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Sample records for suspension array analysis

  1. Suspension array technology: new tools for gene and protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, J P; Mandy, F F

    2001-11-01

    Flow cytometry has long been a key tool in the analysis of lymphocytes and other cells, owing to its ability to make quantitative, homogeneous, multiparameter measurements of particles. New developments in illumination sources, digital signal processing and microsphere chemistry are driving the development of flow cytometry in new areas of biomedical research. In particular. the maturation of approaches to perform highly parallel analyses using suspension arrays of microspheres with different morphospectral features is making flow cytometry an important tool in protein and genetic analysis. In this paper, we review the development of suspension array technology (SAT), current applications in protein and genomic analysis, and the prospects for this platform in a variety of large scale screening applications. PMID:11838973

  2. Multiplexed Microsphere Suspension Array-Based Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Andrew; Salvador, Alexandra; Carter, J Mark

    2015-01-01

    ELISA is an extremely powerful tool to detect analytes because of its sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and ease of use. Here we describe sandwich immunoassays performed in suspension on spectrally unique microspheres developed by Luminex. Luminex assays offer the benefit of multiplex analysis of large numbers of analytes in a single reaction. Because the microspheres are spectrally unique, many microspheres, each attached to various antibodies, can be added to a single sample. Luminex instruments can distinguish each microsphere and detect the intensity of a reporter signal for each microsphere. Results are reported in Median Fluorescent Intensities for each analyte. Luminex assays can be used to detect up to 500 analytes in a high-throughput format. Luminex refers to this technology as xMAP(®). Here we describe a routine protocol for a Luminex immunoassay. Other Luminex assays would have to be optimized for specific conditions according to their use. PMID:26160569

  3. Multiplex suspension array for human anti-carbohydrate antibody profiling.

    PubMed

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Chinarev, Alexander; Spengler, Marianne; Korchagina, Elena; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Bovin, Nicolai; Rieben, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Glycan-binding antibodies form a significant subpopulation of both natural and acquired antibodies and play an important role in various immune processes. They are for example involved in innate immune responses, cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurological disorders. In the present study, a microsphere-based flow-cytometric immunoassay (suspension array) was applied for multiplexed detection of glycan-binding antibodies in human serum. Several approaches for immobilization of glycoconjugates onto commercially available fluorescent microspheres were compared, and as the result, the design based on coupling of end-biotinylated glycopolymers has been selected. This method requires only minute amounts of glycans, similar to a printed glycan microarray. The resulting glyco-microspheres were used for detection of IgM and IgG antibodies directed against ABO blood group antigens. The possibility of multiplexing this assay was demonstrated with mixtures of microspheres modified with six different ABO related glycans. Multiplexed detection of anti-glycan IgM and IgG correlated well with singleplex assays (Pearson's correlation coefficient r = 0.95-0.99 for sera of different blood groups). The suspension array in singleplex format for A/B trisaccharide, H(di) and Le(x) microspheres corresponded well to the standard ELISA (r > 0.94). Therefore, the described method is promising for rapid, sensitive, and reproducible detection of anti-glycan antibodies in a multiplexed format. PMID:21107457

  4. Suspension Array Analysis of 16S rRNA from Fe- and SO42-Reducing Bacteria in Uranium-Contaminated Sediments Undergoing Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Jarrell, Ann E.; Roden, Eric R.; Golova, Julia; Chernov, Boris; Schipma, Matthew J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Long, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    A 16S rRNA-targeted tunable bead array was developed and used in a retrospective analysis of metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in contaminated subsurface sediments undergoing in situ U(VI) bioremediation. Total RNA was extracted from subsurface sediments and interrogated directly, without a PCR step. Bead array validation studies with total RNA derived from 24 isolates indicated that the behavior and response of the 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes could not be predicted based on the primary nucleic acid sequence. Likewise, signal intensity (absolute or normalized) could not be used to assess the abundance of one organism (or rRNA) relative to the abundance of another organism (or rRNA). Nevertheless, the microbial community structure and dynamics through time and space and as measured by the rRNA-targeted bead array were consistent with previous data acquired at the site, where indigenous sulfate- and iron-reducing bacteria and near neighbors of Desulfotomaculum were the organisms that were most responsive to a change in injected acetate concentrations. Bead array data were best interpreted by analyzing the relative changes in the probe responses for spatially and temporally related samples and by considering only the response of one probe to itself in relation to a background (reference) environmental sample. By limiting the interpretation of the data in this manner and placing it in the context of supporting geochemical and microbiological analyses, we concluded that ecologically relevant and meaningful information can be derived from direct microarray analysis of rRNA in uncharacterized environmental samples, even with the current analytical uncertainty surrounding the behavior of individual probes on tunable bead arrays. PMID:16820459

  5. Simultaneous and rapid detection of multiple pesticide and veterinary drug residues by suspension array technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Gao, Zhixian; Ma, Hongwei; Su, Pu; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ou, Guorong

    2013-03-15

    Suspension array technology is proposed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of seven kinds of pesticide and veterinary drug residues, namely, atrazine, chloramphenicol, carbaryl, clenbuterol, 17-β-estradiol, imidacloprid, and tylosin. The assay is simple and can be accomplished within 2h without repeated pumping and washing steps unlike conventional suspension arrays. The hapten-protein conjugate-coated beads bind to their complementary biotinylated antibodies using a competitive immunoassay format. The coefficients of determination R(2) for six targets were greater than 0.992, whereas that for atrazine was 0.961, which indicate good logistic correlations. The dynamic ranges for the seven targets in the 7-plex assay ranged from 2 log units to 4 log units(1.60×10(0)-1.64×10(3), 5.12×10(-2)-1.60×10(2), 1.00×10(0)-3.13×10(3), 4.00×10(-1)-4.10×10(2), 4.00×10(-1)-4.10×10(2), 5.12×10(-2)-1.60×10(2), and 2.00×10(0)-4.00×10(2)ngmL(-1)). The minimum detection concentrations of chloramphenicol, carbaryl, clenbuterol and 17-β-estradiol in the suspension array (0.05, 1.00, 0.40 and 0.40 ng mL(-1)) were lower than the corresponding limits of detection (0.25, 6.60, 24.23 and 13.96 ng mL(-1)) of using an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Environmental scanning electron microscope was employed to characterize the bead surface, which directly confirmed the reactions on the beads. The suspension array is more flexible and feasible than ELISA for the fast quantitative analysis of pesticide and veterinary drug residues. PMID:23084755

  6. Simultaneous Detection of Fenitrothion and Chlorpyrifos-Methyl with a Photonic Suspension Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Mu, Zhongde; Shangguan, Fengqi; Liu, Ran; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong

    2013-01-01

    A technique was developed for simultaneous detection of fenitrothion (FNT) and chlorpyrifos-methyl (CLT) using a photonic suspension array based on silica colloidal crystal beads (SCCBs). The SCCBs were encoded with the characteristic reflection peak originating from the stop-band of colloidal crystal. This approach avoids the bleaching, fading or potential interference seen when encoding by fluorescence. SCCBs with a nanopatterned surface had increased biomolecule binding capacity and improved stability. Under optimal conditions, the proposed suspension array allowed simultaneous detection of the selected pesticides in the ranges of 0.25 to 1024 ng/mL and 0.40 to 735.37 ng/mL, with the limits of detection (LODs) of 0.25 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively. The suspension array was specific and had no significant cross-reactivity with other chemicals. The mean recoveries in tests in which samples were spiked with target standards were 82.35% to 109.90% with a standard deviation within 9.93% for CLT and 81.64% to 108.10% with a standard deviation within 8.82% for FNT. The proposed method shows a potentially powerful capability for fast quantitative analysis of pesticide residues. PMID:23805266

  7. Simultaneous detection of five antibiotics in milk by high-throughput suspension array technology.

    PubMed

    Su, Pu; Liu, Nan; Zhu, Maoxiang; Ning, Baoan; Liu, Ming; Yang, Zhihua; Pan, Xiujie; Gao, Zhixian

    2011-08-15

    A new suspension array technology is proposed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of five antibiotics-tylosin, tetracycline, gentamicin, streptomycin, and chloramphenicol in milk. A novel treatment of milk samples for suspension array with diethyl ether was performed which greatly reduced the interference of the disturbing components in milk on the reaction results with no significant effect on detection sensitivity. Compared with using biotin labeled monoclonal antibody, using of secondary antibody-biotin make the detection sensitivity further improved. The minimum detectable concentration in samples of tylosin, tetracycline, gentamicin, streptomycin, and chloramphenicol were 0.3, 1.5, 4, 20, and 25 ng/ml, respectively, and the working ranges of samples were 6-400, 7-300, 8-200, 90-3000 and 70-8000 ng/ml, respectively. The mean recovery was 89.38-113.73% with a standard deviation within 16.62%. The suspension assay technology is powerful for the fast quantitative analysis of multi-antibiotics residue in milk. PMID:21726753

  8. Rapid and multiplex microRNA detection on graphically encoded silica suspension array.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Shen, Ye; Zheng, Kexiao; Li, Jiong

    2014-11-15

    MicroRNA (miRNA), an 18-24-nucleotide noncoding RNA molecule, has become an ideal class of biomarker candidates for clinical diagnosis of cancers. By now, a number of detection methods for miRNAs have been developed on planar arrays and suspension arrays. In this work, we describe a hybridization-triggered fluorescence strategy for label-free and multiplex miRNA detection on graphically encoded silica suspension array. The total RNA is directly applied for analysis with an 8-mer Universal Tag which can be selectively captured by the capture probe via base-stacking effects. Benefiting from base-stacking effects, this novel method exhibits superb discrimination ability toward the 5' and 3' end single-nucleotide alteration. Mature miRNAs can be distinguished from their corresponding pre-miRNAs easily. Moreover, the estimated detection limit of 5 amol is comparable to some of the most sensitive methods. All these mentioned characteristics offer exciting possibilities for discovery and clinical applications. PMID:24892784

  9. Suspension, Race, and Disability: Analysis of Statewide Practices and Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krezmien, Michael P.; Leone, Peter E.; Achilles, Georgianna M.

    2006-01-01

    This analysis of statewide suspension data from 1995 to 2003 in Maryland investigated disproportionate suspensions of minority students and students with disabilities. We found substantial increases in over-all rates of suspensions from 1995 to 2003, as well as disproportionate rates of suspensions for African American students, American Indian…

  10. A decoupled control approach for magnetic suspension systems using electromagnets mounted in a planar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1993-01-01

    A decoupled control approach for a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) is presented. The control approach is developed for an LGMSS which provides five degree-of-freedom control of a cylindrical suspended element that contains a core composed of permanent magnet material. The suspended element is levitated above five electromagnets mounted in a planar array. Numerical results are obtained by using the parameters of the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) which is a small scale laboratory model LGMSS.

  11. Highly specific DNA detection employing ligation on suspension bead array readout.

    PubMed

    Mezger, Anja; Kühnemund, Malte; Nilsson, Mats; Herthnek, David

    2015-09-25

    We show for the first time that monomerized rolling circle amplification (RCA) products can be directly detected with the Luminex suspension bead array readout without the need of PCR amplification. Furthermore, using monomerized RCA products to guide ligation of the detection oligonucleotide (DO) to barcode sequences on the magnetic Luminex beads, combined with efficient washing and increased measurement temperature, yields a higher signal to noise ratio. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate detection of pathogenic DNA sequences with high reproducibility, sensitivity and a dynamic range over four orders of magnitude. Using padlock probes in combination with bead suspension arrays opens up the possibility for highly multiplexed DNA targeting and readout. PMID:25681158

  12. Development of a bead-based suspension array for the detection of pathogens in acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ru; Zhang, Wei; Hua, Zhi-Dan; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Meng-Qing; Huang, Wen-Sen; Huang, Li-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Neng-Luan; Lin, Ming; Xie, Bao-Song; Shen, Xiao-Na; Xie, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yi; Huang, Meng; Wu, Yan-An; Hu, Xin-Lan

    2016-08-01

    We developed a high-throughput bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of 20 respiratory tract pathogens in clinical specimens. Pathogen-specific genes were amplified and hybridized to probes coupled to carboxyl-encoded microspheres. Fluorescence intensities generated via the binding of phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin with biotin-labeled targets were measured by the Luminex 100 bead-based suspension array system. The bead-based suspension array detected bacteria in a significantly higher number of samples compared to the conventional culture. There was no significant difference in the detection rate of atypical pathogensatypical pathogens or viruses between the bead-based suspension array and real-time PCR. This technology can play a significant role in screening patients with pneumonia. PMID:27190247

  13. Bead-based suspension array for simultaneous differential detection of five major swine viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ru; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Gao, Xiao-Bo; Xue, Cun-Yi; Song, Chang-Xu; Li, Yan; Cao, Yong-Chang

    2015-01-01

    A novel multiplex detection array based on Luminex xMAP technology was developed and validated for simultaneous detection of five major viruses causing swine reproductive diseases. By combining one-step asymmetric multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with xMAP bead-based hybridization and flow cytometry analysis, the resulting multiplex assay was capable of detecting single and mixed infections of PRRSV, PCV-2, PRV, CSFV, and PPV in a single reaction. The assay accurately detected and differentiated 23 viral strains used in this study. The low detection limit was determined as 2.2-22 copies/μL (corresponding to 0.5-6.8 fg/μL DNA template) on plasmid constructs containing viral fragments. The intra-assay and inter-assay variances (CV%) were low that ranged from 2.5 to 5.4 % and 4.1 to 7.6 %, respectively. The assay was applied to test field samples and detected single and mixed viral infections. The detection rate was higher than that of uniplex conventional PCR and RT-PCR methods. The detection of PRRSV by the bead-based multiplex assay was comparable with a commercially available real time RT-PCR kit. The test procedure on purified DNA or RNA samples could be completed within 2 h. In conclusion, the bead-based suspension array presented here proved to be a high-throughput practical tool that provided highly specific and sensitive identification of single and multiple infections of five major viruses in pigs and boar semen. PMID:25557628

  14. Comparison of Two Suspension Arrays for Simultaneous Detection of Five Biothreat Bacterial in Powder Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Haiyan; Liu, Hengchuan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic “write powder” samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples. PMID:22690123

  15. Comparison of two suspension arrays for simultaneous detection of five biothreat bacterial in powder samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Haiyan; Liu, Hengchuan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic "write powder" samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples. PMID:22690123

  16. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Yelton, William G.; Siegal, Michael P.

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  17. Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Stefano

    2000-06-01

    Special suspension systems are used in gravitational wave detectors to reduce the transmission of seismic vibrations to test masses by many orders of magnitude. In ground-based interferometric antennas, this allows to detect gravitational signals even below a few tens of Hz, where seismic vibrations are very strong. The state of the art on this topic is presented. .

  18. Open-loop characteristics of magnetic suspension systems using electromagnets mounted in a planar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1992-01-01

    The open-loop characteristics of a Large-Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) were studied and numerical results are presented. The LGMSS considered provides five-degree-of-freedom control. The suspended element is a cylinder that contains a core composed of permanent magnet material. The magnetic actuators are air core electromagnets mounted in a planar array. Configurations utilizing five, six, seven, and eight electromagnets were investigated and all configurations were found to be controllable from coil currents and observable from suspended element positions. Results indicate that increasing the number of coils has an insignificant effect on mode shapes and frequencies.

  19. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  20. Rapid oligonucleotide suspension array-based multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinyin; Kang, Lin; Hu, Rui; Gao, Shan; Xin, Wenwen; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Jinglin

    2013-10-01

    A gene-specific microsphere suspension array coupled with 15-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to screen bacterial samples rapidly for 10 strains of bacteria: Shigella spp. (S. flexneri, S. dysenteriae, and S. sonnei), Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholerae (serology O1 and O139), Legionella pneumophila, and Clostridium botulinum (types A, B, and E). Fifteen sets of highly validated primers were chosen to amplify target genes simultaneously. Corresponding oligonucleotide probes directly conjugated with microsphere sets were used to specifically identify PCR amplicons. Sensitivity tests revealed that the array coupled with single PCR was able to detect purified genomic DNA at concentrations as low as 10 copies/μL, while the multiplex detection limit was 10-10⁴ copies/μL. The assay was validated using water samples artificially spiked with S. aureus and S. dysenteriae, as well as water specimens from swimming pools previously identified to contain S. aureus. PMID:23947819

  1. Species-specific identification of seven vegetable oils based on suspension bead array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wu, Yajun; Han, Jianxun; Wang, Bin; Ge, Yiqiang; Chen, Ying

    2012-03-01

    Species adulteration of vegetable oils has become a main form of adulteration in vegetable oils, severely violating consumer rights and causing disorder in the market. A reliable method of species authentication of vegetable oils is desirable. This paper reports a novel method for identification of seven species of vegetable oils based on suspension bead array. One pair of universal primers and seven species-specific probes were designed targeting rbcl gene of the chloroplast. Each probe was coupled to a unique color-coded microsphere. Biotinylated PCR amplicons of seven oils were hybridized to the complementary probes on microsphere sets. Bound amplicons were detected fluorometrically using a reporter dye, streptavidin-R-phycoeryt hrin (SA-PE). A sample could be analyzed less than 1 h after PCR amplification. With the exception of olive probe, all probes showed no cross-reactivity with other species. Absolute detection limit of the seven probes ranged from 0.01 ng/μL to 0.0001 ng/μL. Detection limit in DNA mixture was from 10% to 5%. Detection of vegetable oils validated the effectiveness of the method. The suspension bead array as a rapid, sensitive, and high-throughput technology has potential to identify more species of vegetable oils with increased species of probes. PMID:22324365

  2. Application of suspension array for simultaneous detection of four different mycotoxins in corn and peanut.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Ning, Baoan; Peng, Yuan; Bai, Jialei; Liu, Ming; Fan, Xianjun; Sun, Zhiyong; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Caihong; Gao, Zhixian

    2013-03-15

    Mycotoxins are highly toxic contaminants in foodstuffs and feedstuffs. The study presents a novel suspension array technology for quantifying four mycotoxins, namely, aflatoxin B1, deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin, and zearalenone, in corn and peanut. Using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride, the complete antigens of the mycotoxins became attached to the microspheres with viable activity. The optimal concentrations of each antibody and biotin-rabbit anti-goat IgG were obtained through chessboard titration. The four mycotoxins were detected simultaneously and quantitatively in corn and peanut using indirect competitive immunoassay. Multi-channel standard curves with appropriate logistic correlation (R(2)>0.9819) were respectively plotted. The broad working ranges with three to four orders of magnitude were calculated, and limits of detection at the pg level were found to be better than those obtained using high-performance liquid chromatography. The recovery rates in the actual samples generally ranged from 80.16% to 117.65%, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation lower than 15%, which indicated high accuracy and repeatability. A suspension array method for the simultaneous detection of the four mycotoxins within 4h was successfully developed using minimal samples; the method was proven to have high throughput, flexibility, accuracy and reproducibility. The approach could detect multiple contaminants in actual samples. PMID:23017676

  3. Towards a peptide-based suspension array for the detection of pestivirus antibodies in swine.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Fimme J; Jelsma, Tinka; Fijten, Helmi; Achterberg, René P; Loeffen, Willie L A

    2016-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a highly contagious and lethal disease in swine. Serological tests for the diagnosis of CSF need not only to detect antibodies against CSFV, but also need to differentiate these from antibodies against other pestiviruses. To investigate the possibilities of specific peptide-based serology, various synthetic peptides that represent a well-described linear epitope of the CSFV E2 protein (TAVSPTTLR) were used to test the viability of a peptide-based suspension array for the detection of antibodies against pestiviruses in swine. The results show that N-terminally biotinylated peptides can bind to avidin conjugated beads, and function in detection of the corresponding monoclonal antibody WH303. There are indications that the length of the spacer between epitope and biotin affect the efficiency of the peptide-antibody interaction. A protocol was established that enables probing for antibodies in porcine sera, where neutravidin-blocking of serum and the use of empty control beads for normalization was crucial. With a set of porcine sera with antibodies against various pestiviruses, the proof of concept of a peptide-based suspension array for specific detection of antibodies against pestiviruses in porcine sera was demonstrated. PMID:27166561

  4. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  5. Implementation of a decoupled controller for a magnetic suspension system using electromagnets mounted in a planar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, D. E.; Groom, N. J.

    1994-01-01

    An implementation of a decoupled, single-input/single-output control approach for a large angle magnetic suspension test fixture is described. Numerical and experimental results are presented. The experimental system is a laboratory model large gap magnetic suspension system which provides five degree-of-freedom control of a cylindrical suspended element. The suspended element contains a core composed of permanent magnet material and is levitated above five electromagnets mounted in a planar array.

  6. Comparison of printed glycan array, suspension array and ELISA in the detection of human anti-glycan antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Jacob, Francis; Goldstein, Darlene R; Huflejt, Margaret E; Chinarev, Alexander; Caduff, Rosemarie; Fink, Daniel; Hacker, Neville; Bovin, Nicolai V; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2011-12-01

    Anti-glycan antibodies represent a vast and yet insufficiently investigated subpopulation of naturally occurring and adaptive antibodies in humans. Recently, a variety of glycan-based microarrays emerged, allowing high-throughput profiling of a large repertoire of antibodies. As there are no direct approaches for comparison and evaluation of multi-glycan assays we compared three glycan-based immunoassays, namely printed glycan array (PGA), fluorescent microsphere-based suspension array (SA) and ELISA for their efficacy and selectivity in profiling anti-glycan antibodies in a cohort of 48 patients with and without ovarian cancer. The ABO blood group glycan antigens were selected as well recognized ligands for sensitivity and specificity assessments. As another ligand we selected P(1), a member of the P blood group system recently identified by PGA as a potential ovarian cancer biomarker. All three glyco-immunoassays reflected the known ABO blood groups with high performance. In contrast, anti-P(1) antibody binding profiles displayed much lower concordance. Whilst anti-P(1) antibody levels between benign controls and ovarian cancer patients were significantly discriminated using PGA (p=0.004), we got only similar results using SA (p=0.03) but not for ELISA. Our findings demonstrate that whilst assays were largely positively correlated, each presents unique characteristic features and should be validated by an independent patient cohort rather than another array technique. The variety between methods presumably reflects the differences in glycan presentation and the antigen/antibody ratio, assay conditions and detection technique. This indicates that the glycan-antibody interaction of interest has to guide the assay selection. PMID:21948103

  7. Rapid, Multiplexed Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Isolates Using Suspension Array Technology

    PubMed Central

    Carter, John M.; Lin, Andrew; Clotilde, Laurie; Lesho, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular methods have emerged as the most reliable techniques to detect and characterize pathogenic Escherichia coli. These molecular techniques include conventional single analyte and multiplex PCR, PCR followed by microarray detection, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole genome sequencing. The choice of methods used depends upon the specific needs of the particular study. One versatile method involves detecting serogroup-specific markers by hybridization or binding to encoded microbeads in a suspension array. This molecular serotyping method has been developed and adopted for investigating E. coli outbreaks. The major advantages of this technique are the ability to simultaneously serotype E. coli and detect the presence of virulence and pathogenicity markers. Here, we describe the development of a family of multiplex molecular serotyping methods for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, compare their performance to traditional serotyping methods, and discuss the cost-benefit balance of these methods in the context of various food safety objectives. PMID:27242670

  8. Rapid, Multiplexed Characterization of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Isolates Using Suspension Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Carter, John M; Lin, Andrew; Clotilde, Laurie; Lesho, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular methods have emerged as the most reliable techniques to detect and characterize pathogenic Escherichia coli. These molecular techniques include conventional single analyte and multiplex PCR, PCR followed by microarray detection, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and whole genome sequencing. The choice of methods used depends upon the specific needs of the particular study. One versatile method involves detecting serogroup-specific markers by hybridization or binding to encoded microbeads in a suspension array. This molecular serotyping method has been developed and adopted for investigating E. coli outbreaks. The major advantages of this technique are the ability to simultaneously serotype E. coli and detect the presence of virulence and pathogenicity markers. Here, we describe the development of a family of multiplex molecular serotyping methods for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, compare their performance to traditional serotyping methods, and discuss the cost-benefit balance of these methods in the context of various food safety objectives. PMID:27242670

  9. Microsphere Suspension Array Assays for Detection and Differentiation of Hendra and Nipah Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Foord, Adam J.; White, John R.; Colling, Axel; Heine, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    Microsphere suspension array systems enable the simultaneous fluorescent identification of multiple separate nucleotide targets in a single reaction. We have utilized commercially available oligo-tagged microspheres (Luminex MagPlex-TAG) to construct and evaluate multiplexed assays for the detection and differentiation of Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV). Both these agents are bat-borne zoonotic paramyxoviruses of increasing concern for veterinary and human health. Assays were developed targeting multiple sites within the nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P) encoding genes. The relative specificities and sensitivities of the assays were determined using reference isolates of each virus type, samples from experimentally infected horses, and archival veterinary diagnostic submissions. Results were assessed in direct comparison with an established qPCR. The microsphere array assays achieved unequivocal differentiation of HeV and NiV and the sensitivity of HeV detection was comparable to qPCR, indicating high analytical and diagnostic specificity and sensitivity. PMID:23509705

  10. Microsphere suspension array assays for detection and differentiation of Hendra and Nipah viruses.

    PubMed

    Foord, Adam J; White, John R; Colling, Axel; Heine, Hans G

    2013-01-01

    Microsphere suspension array systems enable the simultaneous fluorescent identification of multiple separate nucleotide targets in a single reaction. We have utilized commercially available oligo-tagged microspheres (Luminex MagPlex-TAG) to construct and evaluate multiplexed assays for the detection and differentiation of Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV). Both these agents are bat-borne zoonotic paramyxoviruses of increasing concern for veterinary and human health. Assays were developed targeting multiple sites within the nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P) encoding genes. The relative specificities and sensitivities of the assays were determined using reference isolates of each virus type, samples from experimentally infected horses, and archival veterinary diagnostic submissions. Results were assessed in direct comparison with an established qPCR. The microsphere array assays achieved unequivocal differentiation of HeV and NiV and the sensitivity of HeV detection was comparable to qPCR, indicating high analytical and diagnostic specificity and sensitivity. PMID:23509705

  11. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories. PMID:27023645

  12. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  13. High sensitive immunoassay for multiplex mycotoxin detection with photonic crystal microsphere suspension array.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guozhe; Xu, Kun; Sun, Yue; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Tiesong; Li, Jianlin

    2013-03-01

    A novel, sensitive, and high throughput competitive immunoassay for multiplex mycotoxins was established by immobilizing the artificial antigens (Ags) of mycotoxins on the surfaces of three kinds of silica photonic crystal microsphere (SPCM) suspension arrays. The SPCMs were encoded by their reflectance peak positions. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), and citrinin (CIT) spiked in the cereals were extracted, and the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled antibodies (Abs) of these mycotoxins were added into the centrifuge tube which contained the SPCMs of the modified artificial antigens (Ags). The fluorescence signal was collected by an array fluorescent scanner. The limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 0.5, 1, and 0.8 pg/mL for AFB1, FB1, and CIT, respectively. The new method provided a wide linear detection range from 0.001 to 10, 0.001 to 10, and 0.001 to 1 ng/mL for AFB1, FB1, and CIT, respectively. The mean recovery rates are in range of 74.7 ± 4.0% to 127.9 ± 4.4% for the three mycotoxins in corn, peanuts, and wheat. The developed method for mycotoxins was used to assay the AFB1, FB1, and CIT level in 10 naturally contaminated cereal samples, and the results of detection were in agreement with that of a classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. This method saves a large amount of reagents (10 μL volume) and detection time (<3 h) for multiplex mycotoxin assay. PMID:23350906

  14. CST Suspension Analysis for Slurry Pumps of Tank 40

    SciTech Connect

    LEE, SIY.

    2004-04-01

    Tank 40 simulation models with four submersible slurry pumps available for the CST suspension operations have been developed to provide operational guidance of slurry pumps for an efficient sludge removal. A series of the modeling calculations have been performed for key operational parameters such as pump operation mode, number of operating pumps, and to provide a recommendation for CST suspension and mixing operations in Tank 40. Reference design and operating conditions shown in Table 1 were used to perform the modeling analysis of the tank CST mixing. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary or rotating. Solid obstructions including the pump housing, the 14 inches riser, and 6.75-ft tank support column were included in the simulation models. Free surface motion of the tank liquid was neglected for high tank liquid level using the literature information. Steady-state and transient analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENTTM. All analyses we re based on three-dimensional results. A suspension capability was evaluated assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of CST suspension and mixing. For a minimum suspension velocity of 1.1 ft/sec for the largest CST size of 700 microns, the results indicated that at least two existing slurry mixers running at 3800 gpm flowrate per nozzle could keep CST solids suspended from the tank with a 200 in liquid level. In this case, the exception is for the fluid region with less than 20 wt contents of CST material. This is based on the conservative assumption that the largest CST size of 700 micron diameter remains unchanged neglecting a friable effect during the entire period of pump operations. The length of time that the CST material is exposed to the liquid stream lower than minimum suspension velocity is also important in affecting the ability of the liquid stream to suspend CST particle, and this effect is quantified in the present analysis by using the literature

  15. Extraction and Analysis of C60, C70 and PCBM in Aqueous Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this work is to develop sampling and analytical methodologies for extracting and quantifying fullerenes in aqueous colloidal suspensions. Sampling and analysis of colloidal suspensions pose some unique challenges not encountered when working with true solutions. For...

  16. Development of a Multiplexed Bead-Based Suspension Array for the Detection and Discrimination of Pospiviroid Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    van Brunschot, Sharon L.; Bergervoet, Jan H. W.; Pagendam, Daniel E.; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Geering, Andrew D. W.; Drenth, André; van der Vlugt, René A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and reliable diagnostic tools for the routine indexing and certification of clean propagating material are essential for the management of pospiviroid diseases in horticultural crops. This study describes the development of a true multiplexed diagnostic method for the detection and identification of all nine currently recognized pospiviroid species in one assay using Luminex bead-based suspension array technology. In addition, a new data-driven, statistical method is presented for establishing thresholds for positivity for individual assays within multiplexed arrays. When applied to the multiplexed array data generated in this study, the new method was shown to have better control of false positives and false negative results than two other commonly used approaches for setting thresholds. The 11-plex Luminex MagPlex-TAG pospiviroid array described here has a unique hierarchical assay design, incorporating a near-universal assay in addition to nine species-specific assays, and a co-amplified plant internal control assay for quality assurance purposes. All assays of the multiplexed array were shown to be 100% specific, sensitive and reproducible. The multiplexed array described herein is robust, easy to use, displays unambiguous results and has strong potential for use in routine pospiviroid indexing to improve disease management strategies. PMID:24404188

  17. F-Canyon Suspension and Deactivation Safety Analysis Reports

    SciTech Connect

    LOW, JM

    2004-04-30

    This paper describes Savannah River Site's compliance with the Department of Energy (DOE) direction to suspend current operations, transition to accommodate revised facility missions, and initiate operations to deactivate F-Canyon using a suspension and deactivation safety basis. This paper integrates multiple Workshop theme topics - Lessons Learned from the Safety Analysis Process, Improvements in Documenting Hazard and Accident Analysis, and Closure Issues - Decontamination and Decommissioning. The paper describes the process used to develop safety documentation to support suspension and deactivation activities for F-Canyon. Embodied are descriptive efforts that include development of intermediate and final ''end states'' (e.g., transitional operations), preparation of safety bases documents to support transition, performance of suspension and deactivation activities (e.g. solvent washing, tank/sump flushing, and laboratory waste processing), and downgrade of Safety Class and Safety Significant equipment. The reduction and/or removal of hazards in the facility result in significant risk (frequency times consequence) reduction to the public, site workers, and the environment. Risk reduction then allows the downgrade of safety class and safety significant systems (e.g., ventilation system) and elimination of associated surveillances. The downgrade of safety systems results in significant cost savings.

  18. Analysis of cyclic combustion of the coal-water suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijo-Kleczkowska, Agnieszka

    2011-04-01

    Combustion technology of the coal-water suspension creates a number of new possibilities to organize the combustion process fulfilling contemporary requirements, e.g. in the environment protection. Therefore the in-depth analysis is necessary to examine the technical application of coal as a fuel in the form of suspension. The research undertakes the complex investigations of the continuous coal-water suspension as well as cyclic combustion. The cyclic nature of fuel combustion results from the movement of the loose material in the flow contour of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB): combustion chamber, cyclone and downcomer. The experimental results proved that the cyclic change of oxygen concentration around fuel, led to the vital change of both combustion mechanisms and combustion kinetics. The mathematical model of the process of fuel combustion has been presented. Its original concept is based on the allowance for cyclic changes of concentrations of oxygen around the fuel. It enables the prognosis for change of the surface and the centre temperatures as well as mass loss of the fuel during combustion in air, in the fluidized bed and during the cyclic combustion.

  19. CAPweb: a bioinformatics CGH array Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Liva, Stéphane; Hupé, Philippe; Neuvial, Pierre; Brito, Isabel; Viara, Eric; La Rosa, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel

    2006-07-01

    Assessing variations in DNA copy number is crucial for understanding constitutional or somatic diseases, particularly cancers. The recently developed array-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) technology allows this to be investigated at the genomic level. We report the availability of a web tool for analysing array-CGH data. CAPweb (CGH array Analysis Platform on the Web) is intended as a user-friendly tool enabling biologists to completely analyse CGH arrays from the raw data to the visualization and biological interpretation. The user typically performs the following bioinformatics steps of a CGH array project within CAPweb: the secure upload of the results of CGH array image analysis and of the array annotation (genomic position of the probes); first level analysis of each array, including automatic normalization of the data (for correcting experimental biases), breakpoint detection and status assignment (gain, loss or normal); validation or deletion of the analysis based on a summary report and quality criteria; visualization and biological analysis of the genomic profiles and results through a user-friendly interface. CAPweb is accessible at http://bioinfo.curie.fr/CAPweb. PMID:16845053

  20. Efficient analysis for infinite microstrip dipole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. M.; Lo, Y. T.

    1983-11-01

    A moment method analysis of infinite microstrip dipole arrays which uses an efficient technique to evaluate the generalized impedance matrix is described. A particularly simple formulation is obtained through the use of the periodic Green function. Results for the reflection coefficient magnitude against scan angle are given for a typical array.

  1. Stability considerations for magnetic suspension systems using electromagnets mounted in a planar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1991-01-01

    Mathematical models of a 5, 6, 7, and 8 coil large gap magnetic suspension system (MSDS) are presented. Some of the topics covered include: force and torque equations, reduction of state-space form, natural modes, origins of modes, effect of rotation in azimuth (yaw), future work, and n-coil ring conclusions.

  2. Viscosity of dilute suspensions of rigid bead arrays at low shear: accounting for the variation in hydrodynamic stress over the bead surfaces.

    PubMed

    Allison, Stuart A; Pei, Hongxia

    2009-06-11

    In this work, we examine the viscosity of a dilute suspension of irregularly shaped particles at low shear. A particle is modeled as a rigid array of nonoverlapping beads of variable size and geometry. Starting from a boundary element formalism, approximate account is taken of the variation in hydrodynamic stress over the surface of the individual beads. For a touching dimer of two identical beads, the predicted viscosity is lower than the exact value by 5.2%. The methodology is then applied to several other model systems including tetramers of variable conformation and linear strings of touching beads. An analysis is also carried out of the viscosity and translational diffusion of several dilute amino acids and diglycine in water. It is concluded that continuum hydrodynamic modeling with stick boundary conditions is unable to account for the experimental viscosity and diffusion data simultaneously. A model intermediate between "stick" and "slip" could possibly reconcile theory and experiment. PMID:19453112

  3. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  4. An Analysis of the Mt. Meron Seismic Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Ryall, F

    2008-01-10

    We have performed a quick analysis of the Mt. Meron seismic array to monitor regional seismic events in the Middle East. The Meron array is the only current array in the Levant and Arabian Peninsula and, as such, might be useful in contributing to event location, identification, and other analysis. Here, we provide a brief description of the array and a review of the travel time and array analysis done to assess its performance.

  5. Performance Analysis of ICA in Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Wang, Xiang; Huang, Zhitao; Wang, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    As the best-known scheme in the field of Blind Source Separation (BSS), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been intensively used in various domains, including biomedical and acoustics applications, cooperative or non-cooperative communication, etc. While sensor arrays are involved in most of the applications, the influence on the performance of ICA of practical factors therein has not been sufficiently investigated yet. In this manuscript, the issue is researched by taking the typical antenna array as an illustrative example. Factors taken into consideration include the environment noise level, the properties of the array and that of the radiators. We analyze the analytic relationship between the noise variance, the source variance, the condition number of the mixing matrix and the optimal signal to interference-plus-noise ratio, as well as the relationship between the singularity of the mixing matrix and practical factors concerned. The situations where the mixing process turns (nearly) singular have been paid special attention to, since such circumstances are critical in applications. Results and conclusions obtained should be instructive when applying ICA algorithms on mixtures from sensor arrays. Moreover, an effective countermeasure against the cases of singular mixtures has been proposed, on the basis of previous analysis. Experiments validating the theoretical conclusions as well as the effectiveness of the proposed scheme have been included. PMID:27164100

  6. Modal Analysis Using Co-Prime Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakrooh, Pooria; Scharf, Louis L.; Pezeshki, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Let a measurement consist of a linear combination of damped complex exponential modes, plus noise. The problem is to estimate the parameters of these modes, as in line spectrum estimation, vibration analysis, speech processing, system identification, and direction of arrival estimation. Our results differ from standard results of modal analysis to the extent that we consider sparse and co-prime samplings in space, or equivalently sparse and co-prime samplings in time. Our main result is a characterization of the orthogonal subspace. This is the subspace that is orthogonal to the signal subspace spanned by the columns of the generalized Vandermonde matrix of modes in sparse or co-prime arrays. This characterization is derived in a form that allows us to adapt modern methods of linear prediction and approximate least squares, such as iterative quadratic maximum likelihood (IQML), for estimating mode parameters. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modal estimation methods, and to compare the fidelity of modal estimation with sparse and co-prime arrays, versus SNR. Our calculations of Cram\\'{e}r-Rao bounds allow us to analyze the loss in performance sustained by sparse and co-prime arrays that are compressions of uniform linear arrays.

  7. Performance Analysis of ICA in Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin; Wang, Xiang; Huang, Zhitao; Wang, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    As the best-known scheme in the field of Blind Source Separation (BSS), Independent Component Analysis (ICA) has been intensively used in various domains, including biomedical and acoustics applications, cooperative or non-cooperative communication, etc. While sensor arrays are involved in most of the applications, the influence on the performance of ICA of practical factors therein has not been sufficiently investigated yet. In this manuscript, the issue is researched by taking the typical antenna array as an illustrative example. Factors taken into consideration include the environment noise level, the properties of the array and that of the radiators. We analyze the analytic relationship between the noise variance, the source variance, the condition number of the mixing matrix and the optimal signal to interference-plus-noise ratio, as well as the relationship between the singularity of the mixing matrix and practical factors concerned. The situations where the mixing process turns (nearly) singular have been paid special attention to, since such circumstances are critical in applications. Results and conclusions obtained should be instructive when applying ICA algorithms on mixtures from sensor arrays. Moreover, an effective countermeasure against the cases of singular mixtures has been proposed, on the basis of previous analysis. Experiments validating the theoretical conclusions as well as the effectiveness of the proposed scheme have been included. PMID:27164100

  8. Rethinking Suspensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Frank H.; Collins, Betty J.

    2010-01-01

    The overrepresentation of the Black and Hispanic subgroups in suspension data is a national problem and a troubling issue for schools and school systems across the United States. In Maryland, an analysis of student suspensions by school districts for the 2006-2007 school year revealed disproportionality issues. In 23 of the 24 jurisdictions,…

  9. Optical position measurement for a large gap magnetic suspension system: Design and performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Clemmons, James I., Jr.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Duncan, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    An optical measurement system (OMS) has been designed and tested for a large gap magnetic suspension system (LGMSS). The LGMSS will be used to study control laws for magnetic suspension systems for vibration isolation and pointing applications. The LGMSS features six degrees of freedom and consists of a planar array of electromagnets that levitate and position a cylindrical element containing a permanent magnet core. The OMS provides information on the location and orientation of the element to the LGMSS control system to stabilize suspension. The hardware design of this optical sensing system and the tracking algorithms are presented. The results of analyses and experiments are presented that define the accuracy limits of the optical sensing system and that quantify the errors in position estimation.

  10. Frequency analysis of a semi-active suspension with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronic, Florin; Mihai, Ioan; Suciu, Cornel; Beniuga, Marius

    2015-02-01

    Suspension systems for motor vehicles are constantly evolving in order to ensure vehicle stability and traffic safety under all driving conditions. The present work aims to highlight the influence factors in the case of a quarter car model for semi-active suspensions. The functions that must be met by such suspension systems are first presented. Mathematical models for passive systems are first illustrated and then customized for the semi-active case. A simulation diagram was conceived for Matlab Simulink. The obtained simulation results allow conducting a frequency analysis of the passive and semi-active cases of the quarter car model. Various charts for Passive Suspension Transmissibility and for the Effect of Damping on Vertical Acceleration Response were obtained for both passive and semi-active situations. Analysis of obtained results allowed evaluating of the suspension systems behavior and their frequency dependence. Significant differences were found between the behaviors of passive and semi-active suspensions. It was found that semi-active suspensions ensure damping in accordance to the chosen control method, and are much more efficient than passive ones.

  11. Parametric analysis of ATM solar array.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, B. K.; Adkisson, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The paper discusses the methods used for the calculation of ATM solar array performance characteristics and provides the parametric analysis of solar panels used in SKYLAB. To predict the solar array performance under conditions other than test conditions, a mathematical model has been developed. Four computer programs have been used to convert the solar simulator test data to the parametric curves. The first performs module summations, the second determines average solar cell characteristics which will cause a mathematical model to generate a curve matching the test data, the third is a polynomial fit program which determines the polynomial equations for the solar cell characteristics versus temperature, and the fourth program uses the polynomial coefficients generated by the polynomial curve fit program to generate the parametric data.

  12. Polystyrene Core-Silica Shell Particles with Defined Nanoarchitectures as a Versatile Platform for Suspension Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Dominik; Gawlitza, Kornelia; Rurack, Knut

    2016-04-19

    The need for rapid and high-throughput screening in analytical laboratories has led to significant growth in interest in suspension array technologies (SATs), especially with regard to cytometric assays targeting a low to medium number of analytes. Such SAT or bead-based assays rely on spherical objects that constitute the analytical platform. Usually, functionalized polymer or silica (SiO2) microbeads are used which each have distinct advantages and drawbacks. In this paper, we present a straightforward synthetic route to highly monodisperse SiO2-coated polystyrene core-shell (CS) beads for SAT with controllable architectures from smooth to raspberry- and multilayer-like shells by varying the molecular weight of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), which was used as the stabilizer of the cores. The combination of both organic polymer core and a structurally controlled inorganic SiO2 shell in one hybrid particle holds great promises for flexible next-generation design of the spherical platform. The particles were characterized by electron microscopy (SEM, T-SEM, and TEM), thermogravimetry, flow cytometry, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption, offering comprehensive information on the composition, size, structure, and surface area. All particles show ideal cytometric detection patterns and facile handling due to the hybrid structure. The beads are endowed with straightforward modification possibilities through the defined SiO2 shells. We successfully implemented the particles in fluorometric SAT model assays, illustrating the benefits of tailored surface area which is readily available for small-molecule anchoring. Very promising assay performance was shown for DNA hybridization assays with quantification limits down to 8 fmol. PMID:27018430

  13. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  14. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  15. Development of a suspension array assay in multiplex for simultaneous measurement of serum levels of four eosinophil granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Makiya, Michelle A.; Herrick, Jesica A.; Khoury, Paneez; Prussin, Calman P.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Klion, Amy D.

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations of major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) have been associated with eosinophilic disease severity. Whereas a variety of techniques have been used to measure individual eosinophil granule protein concentration, none of these methods efficiently measures MBP, ECP, EDN and EPO simultaneously. A multiplex suspension array system was developed to simultaneously measure the concentration of MBP, ECP, EDN and EPO in serum. The assay showed excellent inter- and intra-assay reliability, and serum levels of MBP, ECP and EDN from eosinophilic subjects analyzed by ELISA and multiplex were highly correlated (r = 0.8579; P < 0.0001, r = 0.6356; P = 0.0006 and r = 0.8600; P < 0.0001, respectively, Spearman rank correlation). Moreover, the multiplex assay required 500-fold less serum than a single ELISA to achieve comparable sensitivity. Absolute eosinophil count and eosinophil surface expression of the activation marker, CD69, were significantly correlated with concentrations of MBP, EDN and EPO, but not ECP, in serum from eosinophilic subjects. Furthermore, subjects with eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorder and normal peripheral absolute eosinophil counts (< 0.5 × 109/L) had significantly increased concentrations of MBP (P < 0.0001), ECP (P < 0.0001), EDN (P = 0.0001) and EPO (P < 0.0001) compared to normal donors. In summary, the eosinophil granule protein multiplex assay provides a rapid and reliable way to measure eosinophil granule protein levels and should prove useful in assessing patterns of degranulation in patients with eosinophilic disorders. PMID:24914990

  16. No Evidence for Xenotropic Murine Leukemia-Related Virus Infection in Sweden Using Internally Controlled Multiepitope Suspension Array Serology

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Fredrik; Sjösten, Anna; Sheikholvaezin, Ali; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Elfaitouri, Amal; Hessel, Sanna; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Pipkorn, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Many syndromes have a large number of differential diagnoses, a situation which calls for multiplex diagnostic systems. Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), also named chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), is a common disease of unknown etiology. A mouse retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia-related virus (XMRV), was found in ME/CFS patients and blood donors, but this was not corroborated. However, the paucity of serological investigations on XMRV in humans prompted us to develop a serological assay which cover many aspects of XMRV antigenicity. It is a novel suspension array method, using a multiplex IgG assay with nine recombinant proteins from the env and gag genes of XMRV and 38 peptides based on known epitopes of vertebrate gammaretroviruses. IgG antibodies were sought in 520 blood donors and 85 ME/CFS patients and in positive- and negative-control sera from animals. We found no differences in seroreactivity between blood donors and ME/CFS patients for any of the antigens. This did not support an association between ME/CFS and XMRV infection. The multiplex serological system had several advantages: (i) biotinylated protein G allowed us to run both human and animal sera, which is essential because of a lack of XMRV-positive humans; (ii) a novel quality control was a pan-peptide positive-control rabbit serum; and (iii) synthetic XMRV Gag peptides with degenerate positions covering most of the variation of murine leukemia-like viruses did not give higher background than nondegenerate analogs. The principle may be used for creation of variant tolerant peptide serologies. Thus, our system allows rational large-scale serological assays with built-in quality control. PMID:22787191

  17. Metabolomics driven analysis of Erythrina lysistemon cell suspension culture in response to methyl jasmonate elicitation.

    PubMed

    Farag, Mohamed A; Mekky, Hattem; El-Masry, Sawsan

    2016-09-01

    An MS-based metabolomic approach was used to profile the secondary metabolite of the ornamental plant Erythrina lysistemon via ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to photodiode array detection and high resolution q-TOF mass spectrometry (UPLC-PDA-MS). Cultures maintained the capacity to produce E. lysistemon flavonoid subclasses with pterocarpans amounting for the most abundant ones suggesting that it could provide a resource of such flavonoid subclass. In contrast, alkaloids, major constituents of Erythrina genus, were detected at trace levels in suspension cultures. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), phytohormone, was further supplied to culture with the aim of increasing secondary metabolites production and with metabolite profiles subjected to multivariate data analysis to evaluate its effect. Results revealed that triterpene i.e. oleanolic acid and fatty acid i.e. hydroxy-octadecadienoic acid were elicited in response to methyl jasmonate, whereas pterocarpans i.e., isoneorautenol showed a decline in response to elicitation suggesting for the induction of terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and concurrent with a down regulation of pterocarpans. In conclusion, a total of 53 secondary metabolites including 3 flavones, 12 isoflavones, 4 isoflavanones, 4 alkaloids, 11 pterocarpans, and 5 phenolic acids were identified. PMID:27504198

  18. Bio-Rad’s Bio-Plex® suspension array system, xMAP technology overview

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Brett

    2012-01-01

    The Bio-Plex® system utilizes xMAP technology to permit the multiplexing of up to 100 different analytes. Multiplex analysis gives researchers the ability to look at analytes simultaneously providing more information from less sample volume in less time than traditional immunoassay methods. Similar to ELISA, xMAP utilizes an antibody sandwich for detection but differs from ELISA in capture substrate and detection method. Rather than a flat surface, Bio-Plex®assays make use of differentially detectable bead sets as a substrate capturing analytes in solution and employs fluorescent methods for detection. These bead sets identify the analytes and detection antibodies are used to measure the quantity of analyte. The use of differentially detectable beads enables the simultaneous identification and quantification of many analytes in the same sample. PMID:22852821

  19. Computational Methods for the Analysis of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Raj; Lockwood, William W.; Lam, Wan L.

    2006-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) is a technique for assaying the copy number status of cancer genomes. The widespread use of this technology has lead to a rapid accumulation of high throughput data, which in turn has prompted the development of computational strategies for the analysis of array CGH data. Here we explain the principles behind array image processing, data visualization and genomic profile analysis, review currently available software packages, and raise considerations for future software development. PMID:17992253

  20. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins induced by salicylic acid in suspension-cultured ginseng cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaman; Fu, Junfan; Zhou, Rujun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, optimized 2-DE sample preparation methodologies were established for suspension-cultured ginseng cells. Three commonly used protein extraction methods (Trichloroacetic acid-acetone, urea/thiourea and phenol extraction method) were evaluated for proteomic analysis of suspension cultures of ginseng. A comparative analysis of suspension-cultured ginseng cells proteome induced by salicylic acid (SA) was reported. The results demonstrated that phenol extraction method was the best method based on protein extraction efficiency and the good quality of 2-DE patterns for suspension-cultured ginseng cells. Fifteen differentially expressed proteins induced by salicylic acid in suspension-cultured ginseng cells were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. These identified proteins were involved in defense and stress response, energy metabolism, signal transduction/transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism, and photosynthesis. Chaperonin 60, related to defense responses, was more abundant in suspension-cultured ginseng cells after application of SA. Vacuolar ATPase subunit B was newly induced in SA treatment. PMID:24600313

  1. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  2. Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Long, KIenwyn J.; Curtis, Henry B.; Gardner, Barbara; Davis, Victoria; Messenger, Scott; Walters, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Modeling solar cell performance for a specific radiation environment to obtain the end-of-life photovoltaic array performance has become both increasingly important and, with the rapid advent of new types of cell technology, more difficult. For large constellations of satellites, a few percent difference in the lifetime prediction can have an enormous economic impact. The tool described here automates the assessment of solar array on-orbit end-of-life performance and assists in the development and design of ground test protocols for different solar cell designs. Once established, these protocols can be used to calculate on-orbit end-of-life performance from ground test results. The Solar Array Verification Analysis Tool (SAVANT) utilizes the radiation environment from the Environment Work Bench (EWB) model developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center s Photovoltaic and Space Environmental Effects Branch in conjunction with Maxwell Technologies. It then modifies and combines this information with the displacement damage model proposed by Summers et al. (ref. 1) of the Naval Research Laboratory to determine solar cell performance during the course of a given mission. The resulting predictions can then be compared with flight data. The Environment WorkBench (ref. 2) uses the NASA AE8 (electron) and AP8 (proton) models of the radiation belts to calculate the trapped radiation flux. These fluxes are integrated over the defined spacecraft orbit for the duration of the mission to obtain the total omnidirectional fluence spectra. Components such as the solar cell coverglass, adhesive, and antireflective coatings can slow and attenuate the particle fluence reaching the solar cell. In SAVANT, a continuous slowing down approximation is used to model this effect.

  3. A comparative analysis of passive twin tube and skyhook MRF dampers for motorcycle front suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Mehdi; Gravatt, John

    2004-07-01

    A comparative analysis between conventional passive twin tube dampers and skyhook-controlled magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) dampers for motorcycle front suspensions is provided, based on single axis testing in a damper test rig and suspension performance testing in road trials. Performance motorcycles, while boasting extremely light suspension components and competition-ready performance, have an inherent weakness in comfort, as the suspension systems are designed primarily for racing purposes. Front suspension acceleration and shock loading transmit directly through the front suspension triple clamp into the rider's arms and shoulders, causing rapid fatigue in shoulder muscles. Magneto-rheological fluid dampers and skyhook control systems offer an alternative to conventional sport motorcycle suspensions - both performance and comfort can be combined in the same package. Prototype MRF dampers designed and manufactured specifically for this application require no more space than conventional twin tube designs while adding only 1.7 pounds total weight to the system. The MRF dampers were designed for high controllability and low power consumption, two vital considerations for a motorcycle application. The tests conducted include the dampers' force-velocity curve testing in a damper test rig and suspension performance based on damper position, velocity, and acceleration measurement. Damper test rig results show the MRF dampers have a far greater range of adjustability than the test vehicle's OEM dampers. Combined with a modified sky-hook control system, the MRF dampers can greatly decrease the acceleration and shock loading transmitted to the rider through the handlebars while contributing performance in manners such as anti-dive under braking. Triple clamp acceleration measurements from a variety of staged road conditions, such as sinusoidal wave inputs, will be compared to subjective test-rider field reports to establish a correlation between rider fatigue and the

  4. Approximate Analysis of Semiconductor Laser Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William K.; Katz, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Simplified equation yields useful information on gains and output patterns. Theoretical method based on approximate waveguide equation enables prediction of lateral modes of gain-guided planar array of parallel semiconductor lasers. Equation for entire array solved directly using piecewise approximation of index of refraction by simple functions without customary approximation based on coupled waveguid modes of individual lasers. Improved results yield better understanding of laser-array modes and help in development of well-behaved high-power semiconductor laser arrays.

  5. Digital controller design: Analysis of the annular suspension pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, B. C.

    1979-01-01

    The Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) is a payload auxiliary pointing device of the Space Shuttle. The ASPS is comprised of two major subassemblies, a vernier and a coarse pointing subsystem. The experiment is attached to a mounting plate/rim combination which is suspended on magnetic bearing/actuators (MBA) strategically located about the rim. Fine pointing is achieved by gimballing the plate/rim within the MBA gaps. Control about the experiment line-of-sight is obtained through the use of a non-contacting rim drive and positioning torquer. All sensors used to close the servo loops on the vernier system are noncontacting elements. Therefore, the experiment is a free-flyer constrained only by the magnetic forces generated by the control loops.

  6. Array Analysis of North Atlantic Microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David; Bean, Chris; Möllhoff, Martin; Donne, Sarah; Lokmer, Ivan; Le Pape, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Oceans generate persistent low frequency background seismic signals known as microseisms through a mechanical coupling with the Earth's crust. Microseism energy originates as regions of low barometric pressure (depressions) over the oceans where it is transmitted to the sea-floor and propagates as elastic energy in the Earths crust. Consequently microseisms carry important meteorological information relating to both the atmosphere and the hydrosphere. The significance of microseisms as climate indicators has previously been investigated in several studies (Essen et al., 1999; Aster et al., 2010) and to estimate ocean wave parameters using onshore seismometer data (Bromirski et al., 1999). Also many modern seismological methods make use of microseism signals, for example "noise tomography" (Shapiro et al., 2005); spectral ratio techniques ; and cross-correlation techniques (Wapenaar et al., 2011; Brenguier et al., 2014). The continental shelf near Ireland is a known generation are for microseisms and an important region for European weather forecasting and climate studies. There has also been seismometers in the region since the 1960s. There is a single station in Valentia observatory in south-west Ireland and a small scale seismic array in Scotland which offer potential climate records for the region. To make use of this information it is first necessary to understand how microseisms recorded in Ireland relate to the local ocean wavefield. The WAVEOBS project was set established with three primary goals; to get a better fundamental understanding of microseism sources; to investigate the use of ocean generated microseisms as real time ocean wave height data; and to investigate their use as a climate proxy. Using spectral analysis and array methods the microseism wavefield in the North-East Atlantic near Ireland is described with reference to the ocean wavefield.

  7. Theoretical and FEM analysis of suspension and propulsion system with HTS hybrid electromagnets in an EMS Maglev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Y. D.; Lee, C. Y.; Jang, J. Y.; Yoon, Y. S.; Ko, T. K.

    2011-11-01

    We have been constructed a proto-type electromagnetic suspension (EMS) based maglev vehicle system. The maglev concept utilizes magnetic forces for noncontact suspension, guidance and propulsion. The suspension system with high temperature superconducting (HTS) hybrid electromagnet (EM) is composed of HTS coils and normal coils, which consume little power to keep large suspension gap. The magnetic forces realize to guide the vehicle, propel the vehicle along the guide-way and assist in braking action. The proto-type EMS-based Maglev model is designed to keep the suspension gap of 20 mm. This paper presents the theoretical analysis of the maglev vehicle based on the EMS model to obtain the designing parameters for levitation and propulsion forces. The magnetic field distributions of the electromagnetic forces with hybrid EM and propulsion stator coils are analyzed based on three dimension (3D) finite element method (FEM) analysis. From the simulation results, appropriately design parameters of the suspension, guidance and propulsion were obtained.

  8. Roll and pitch independently tuned interconnected suspension: modelling and dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangzhong; Zhang, Nong; Roser, Holger M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a roll and pitch independently tuned hydraulically interconnected passive suspension is presented. Due to decoupling of vibration modes and the improved lateral and longitudinal stability, the stiffness of individual suspension spring can be reduced for improving ride comfort and road grip. A generalised 14 degree-of-freedom nonlinear vehicle model with anti-roll bars is established to investigate the vehicle ride and handling dynamic responses. The nonlinear fluidic model of the hydraulically interconnected suspension is developed and integrated with the full vehicle model to investigate the anti-roll and anti-pitch characteristics. Time domain analysis of the vehicle model with the proposed suspension is conducted under different road excitations and steering/braking manoeuvres. The dynamic responses are compared with conventional suspensions to demonstrate the potential of enhanced ride and handling performance. The results illustrate the model-decoupling property of the hydraulically interconnected system. The anti-roll and anti-pitch performance could be tuned independently by the interconnected systems. With the improved anti-roll and anti-pitch characteristics, the bounce stiffness and ride damping can be optimised for better ride comfort and tyre grip.

  9. Use of a Suspension Array for Rapid Identification of the Varieties and Genotypes of the Cryptococcus neoformans Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Mara R.; Fell, Jack W.

    2005-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungal pathogen known to cause severe disease in immunocompromised patients. The disease, cryptococcosis, is mostly acquired by inhalation and can result in a chronic meningoencephalitis, which can be fatal. Here, we describe a molecular method to identify the varieties and genotypic groups within the C. neoformans species complex from culture-based assays. The method employs a novel flow cytometer with a dual laser system that allows the simultaneous detection of different target sequences in a multiplex and high-throughput format. The assay uses a liquid suspension hybridization format with specific oligonucleotide probes that are covalently bound to the surface of fluorescent color-coded microspheres. Biotinylated target amplicons, which hybridized to their complementary probe sequences, are quantified by the addition of the conjugate, streptavidin R-phycoerythrin. In this study we developed and validated eight probes derived from sequence analysis of the intergenic spacer region of the rRNA gene region. The assay proved to be specific and sensitive, allowed discrimination of a 1-bp mismatch with no apparent cross-reactivity, and detected 101 to 103 genome copies. The described protocol, which can be used directly with yeast cells or isolated DNA, can be undertaken in less than 1 h following PCR amplification and permits identification of species in a multiplex format. In addition to a multiplex capability, the assay allows the simultaneous detection of target sequences in a single reaction. The accuracy, speed, flexibility, and sensitivity of this technology are a few of the advantages that will make this assay useful for the diagnosis of human cryptococcal infections and other pathogenic diseases. PMID:16081894

  10. Rapid O serogroup identification of the ten most clinically relevant STECs by Luminex microbead-based suspension array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification and serotyping of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli during foodborne outbreaks can aid in matching clinical, food, and environmental isolates when trying to identify the sources of illness and ultimately food contamination. Herein we describe a Luminex microbead-based suspension ...

  11. Spacecraft Multiple Array Communication System Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Desilva, Kanishka; Sham, Catherine C.

    2010-01-01

    The Communication Systems Simulation Laboratory (CSSL) at the NASA Johnson Space Center is tasked to perform spacecraft and ground network communication system simulations, design validation, and performance verification. The CSSL has developed simulation tools that model spacecraft communication systems and the space and ground environment in which the tools operate. In this paper, a spacecraft communication system with multiple arrays is simulated. Multiple array combined technique is used to increase the radio frequency coverage and data rate performance. The technique is to achieve phase coherence among the phased arrays to combine the signals at the targeting receiver constructively. There are many technical challenges in spacecraft integration with a high transmit power communication system. The array combining technique can improve the communication system data rate and coverage performances without increasing the system transmit power requirements. Example simulation results indicate significant performance improvement can be achieved with phase coherence implementation.

  12. Rapid Screening of Complex Chemical Samples via Capillary Array Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Anex; D. W. Neyer

    1998-11-01

    This report is a summary of the results of a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that developed instrumentation and methods for capillary array analysis. During the course of this project, a new capillary array electrochromatography instrument was developed to perform eight simultaneous separations and provide complementary chromatographic information from each column on a single sample.

  13. Utility of array comparative genomic hybridization in cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rashmi R; Cheung, K-John J; Horsman, Douglas E

    2011-01-01

    Conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), high-resolution oligonucleotide, and BAC array CGH have modernized the field of cytogenetics to enable access to unbalanced genomic aberrations such as whole or partial chromosomal gains and losses. The basic principle of array CGH involves hybridizing differentially labeled proband/test (e.g., tumor) and normal reference DNA on an array of oligonucleotide or BAC clones instead of normal metaphases as in conventional CGH. The sub-megabase resolution tiling BAC arrays are extremely useful for the analysis of acquired aberrations in cancer genomes. Array CGH can be extremely useful to identify the chromosomal makeup of marker and ring chromosomes, to define/delineate the precise location/bands involved in structural aberrations and the accurate localization of translocation breakpoints in both simple and complex karyotypes either alone or in combination with standard karyotype analysis. PMID:21431645

  14. Enzyme array-amperometric detection in carbohydrate analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, M.; Lee, C.S.

    1998-03-05

    The introduction of an enzyme array-electrochemical detection method for carbohydrate analysis is demonstrated by using two complex and one high mannose N-linked oligosaccharides. Instead of measuring the remaining uncleaved oligosaccharides in enzymatic digestion, released monosaccharides are directly quantified by pulsed amperometric detection at a gold electrode. The measured monosaccharide concentrations in combination with the enzyme array analysis provide structural characterization of oligosaccharides. The enzyme array-electrochemical detection method does not require any separation procedure or any prior labeling of oligosaccharides. However, this method is limited by the use of purified oligosaccharide samples and the nature of the enzyme array. The development of more sophisticated enzyme arrays relies upon the introduction of a bank of highly specific (bond, arm, aglycon) exoglycosidases.

  15. Analysis of capacitive coupling within microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P R; Detlefsen, D E

    2006-01-01

    Capacitive coupling within high-density microelectrode arrays can degrade neural recording signal or disperse neural stimulation current. Material deterioration in a chronically implanted neural stimulation/recording system can cause such an undesired effect. We present a simple method with an iterative algorithm to quantify the cross-coupling capacitance, in-situ. PMID:17947024

  16. Simultaneous detection of ochratoxin A and fumonisin B1 in cereal samples using an aptamer-photonic crystal encoded suspension array.

    PubMed

    Yue, Sun; Jie, Xu; Wei, Li; Bin, Cao; Dou Dou, Wang; Yi, Yang; QingXia, Lin; JianLin, Li; TieSong, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    A simple, new aptamer-photonic crystal encoded suspension array was designed to simultaneously quantify and qualify ochratoxin A(OTA) and fumonisin B1(FB1) in cereal samples. The aptamers of OTA and FB1 were immobilized on the surfaces of photonic crystals by chemical bonding. When the target mycotoxins appear in a sample, the fluorescence-labeled complementary DNA of the aptamer dissociates from their double DNA hybrid and results in an obvious decrease in fluorescence intensity of the microsphere. The difference value of fluorescent intensities for each kind of silica photonic crystal microsphere (SPCM) quantitatively conveys the concentration of mycotoxin, and the structure colors or reflectance peak positions of the SPCMs confirm the kind of mycotoxin detected. The reaction conditions including the immobilization method for aptamers, hybridization, and incubation conditions have been optimized. This developed method displayed a wide linear detection range (0.01-1 ng/mL for OTA and 0.001-1 ng/mL for FB1) and a low limit of detection (0.25 pg/mL for OTA and 0.16 pg/mL for FB1). The recovery rates in the spiked cereal samples ranged from 81.80% to 116.38% for OTA and 76.58%-114.79% for FB1. The positive detection results in the naturally contaminated cereal samples were in agreement with those of classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This simple suspension array scheme displays a great application potential for the high throughput screen assay of mycotoxins. PMID:25405701

  17. Non-dimensionalised closed-form parametric analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions using a quarter-car model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Mehdi; Blanchard, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    This article provides a non-dimensionalised closed-form analysis of semi-active vehicle suspensions, using a quarter-car model. The derivation of the closed-form solutions for three indices that can be used for ride comfort, vehicle handling, and stability are presented based on non-dimensionalised suspension parameters. The behaviour of semi-active vehicle suspensions is evaluated using skyhook, groundhook, and hybrid control policies, and compared with passive suspensions. The relationship between vibration isolation, suspension deflection, and road holding is studied, using three performance indices based on the mean square of the sprung mass acceleration, rattle space, and tyre deflection, respectively. The results of the study indicate that the hybrid control policy yields significantly better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement for typical passenger cars. The results also indicate that for typical passenger cars, the hybrid control policy results in a better compromise between comfort, road holding and suspension travel requirements than both the skyhook and groundhook control methods.

  18. Economic analysis of the unified heliostat array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    The array (UHA) is comprised of conventional two-axis heliostats mounted on a terraced south-facing wall of a single structure. The arrangement of heliostats on the array is chosen to eliminate or control the degree of inter-heliostat shading and blocking. The UHA was investigated as to cost and optical performance. Two heliostats, the Veda Industrial Heliostat (VIH) and the Repowering Helistat were investigated in conjunction with the UHA. The UHA is found to be a viable candidate for solar thermal central receiver applications. The UHA-VIH combination was shown to provide very high flux densities and to be suitable for high temperature applications in the 1000 K to 2000 K range. These temperatures were shown to be achieve even with very small (1 MWt) collector fields.

  19. Qualitative analysis of controlled release ciprofloxacin/carbopol 934 mucoadhesive suspension

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Subhashree; Chakraborti, Chandra Kanti; Mishra, Subash Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesive polymeric (carbopol 934) suspension of ciprofloxacin was prepared by ultrasonication and optimized with the aim of developing an oral controlled release gastro-retentive dosage form. The qualitative analysis of the formulation was performed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. FTIR (400 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1 region) and Raman (140 to 2400 cm-1 region) Spectroscopic studies were carried out and the spectra were used for interpretation. XRD data of pure drug, polymer and the formulation were obtained using a powder diffractometer scanned from a Bragg's angle (2θ) of 10° to 70°. The dispersion of the particle was observed using SEM techniques. The particle size distribution and aspect ratio of particles in the polymeric suspension were obtained from SEM image analysis. The results from FTIR and Raman spectroscopic analyses suggested that, in formulation, the carboxylic groups of ciprofloxacin and hydroxyl groups of C934 undergo a chemical interaction leading to esterification and hydrogen bonding. The XRD data suggested that the retention of crystalline nature of ciprofloxacin in the formulation would lead to increase in stability and drug loading; decrease in solubility; and delay in release of the drug from polymeric suspension with better bioavailability and penetration capacity. The SEM image analysis indicated that, in the formulation maximum particles were having aspect ratio from 2 to 4 and standard deviation was very less which provided supporting evidences for homogeneous, uniformly dispersed, stable controlled release ciprofloxacin suspension which would be pharmaceutically acceptable. PMID:22171318

  20. Design and analysis of slotted waveguide antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Phillip N.; Yee, Hung Yuet

    1988-06-01

    The typical design of a waveguide slot array begins with an examination of the requirements connected with the definition of the size of the array, the types of slots, and feed methods; this is followed by analysis to determine the dimensions and positions of each slot, and a prediction of array performance; the final step is fabrication and test of a breadboard model to validate the analytical design. These design and analysis aspects are considered in connection with the types of waveguide slots, slot-array architecture, equivalent circuit models, pattern calculations, and analysis techniques. Attention is also given to the use of available design data, experimental techniques, tests using subarrays, experimental measurements of radiating slots, and near-field and far-field measurements.

  1. Geometric analysis and restitution of digital multispectral scanner data arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. R.; Mikhail, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define causes of geometric defects within digital multispectral scanner (MSS) data arrays, to analyze the resulting geometric errors, and to investigate restitution methods to correct or reduce these errors. Geometric transformation relationships for scanned data, from which collinearity equations may be derived, served as the basis of parametric methods of analysis and restitution of MSS digital data arrays. The linearization of these collinearity equations is presented. Algorithms considered for use in analysis and restitution included the MSS collinearity equations, piecewise polynomials based on linearized collinearity equations, and nonparametric algorithms. A proposed system for geometric analysis and restitution of MSS digital data arrays was used to evaluate these algorithms, utilizing actual MSS data arrays. It was shown that collinearity equations and nonparametric algorithms both yield acceptable results, but nonparametric algorithms possess definite advantages in computational efficiency. Piecewise polynomials were found to yield inferior results.

  2. Gas sensor arrays for olfactory analysis: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    There have been many approaches to the development of gas sensor arrays for use in gas detection instruments and devices. Various techniques have been proposed to handle the signal processing and pattern recognition required to convert the outputs of these arrays into useful information such as the identities and concentrations of particular chemical species. In general, the pattern recognition techniques have not been developed as fully as have the sensor arrays. Materials issues, like sensor aging and drift, power requirements, and packaging are also problems that must be solved before gas sensor arrays can be incorporated into instruments for industrial and consumer markets. This paper describes significant thrusts in the areas of metal-oxide gas sensor array design and construction, related signature analysis and deconvolution, and materials issues. Recommendations are offered for future developments.

  3. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwook P.; Chua, Wei Huan; Seo, Yongsok

    2015-05-01

    A new rheological model was applied to the analysis of the electrorheological behavior of a fluid containing silica nanoparticle-decorated polyaniline nanofibers. A model's predictions were compared with the experimental data, revealing that the proposed model correctly predicted the shear stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively. The shear stress data of the electrorheological fluid showing aligned fibers' structural reformation as a function of the shear rate agreed well with the new model which required fewer parameters than the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. The static yield stress was found to be quadratically dependent on the field strength, in agreement with the predictions of the polarization model. A scaling function was used to model the yield stress behavior of the electrorheological fluid over a range of electric fields, and it correctly predicted the static yield stress behavior both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  4. Performance analysis of a semi-active railway vehicle suspension featuring MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Choi, Seung-Bok; Lee, Gyu-Seop; An, Chae-Hun; You, Won-Hee

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents performance analysis of semi-active railway vehicle suspension system using MR damper. In order to achieve this goal, a mathematical dynamic model of railway vehicle is derived by integrating car body, bogie frame and wheel-set which can be able to represent lateral, yaw and roll motion. Based on this model, the dynamic range of MR damper at the railway secondary suspension system and design parameters of MR damper are calculated. Subsequently, control performances of railway vehicle including car body lateral motion and acceleration of MR damper are evaluated through computer simulations. Then, the MR damper is manufactured to be retrofitted with the real railway vehicle and its characteristics are experimentally measured. Experimental performance of MR damper is assessed using test rig which is composed of a car body and two bogies.

  5. Suspension trapping (STrap) sample preparation method for bottom-up proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Zougman, Alexandre; Selby, Peter J; Banks, Rosamonde E

    2014-05-01

    Despite recent developments in bottom-up proteomics, the need still exists in a fast, uncomplicated, and robust method for comprehensive sample processing especially when applied to low protein amounts. The suspension trapping method combines the advantage of efficient SDS-based protein extraction with rapid detergent removal, reactor-type protein digestion, and peptide cleanup. Proteins are solubilized in SDS. The sample is acidified and introduced into the suspension trapping tip incorporating the depth filter and hydrophobic compartments, filled with the neutral pH methanolic solution. The instantly formed fine protein suspension is trapped in the depth filter stack-this crucial step is aimed at separating the particulate matter in space. SDS and other contaminants are removed in the flow-through, and a protease is introduced. Following the digestion, the peptides are cleaned up using the tip's hydrophobic part. The methodology allows processing of protein loads down to the low microgram/submicrogram levels. The detergent removal takes about 5 min, whereas the tryptic proteolysis of a cellular lysate is complete in as little as 30 min. We have successfully utilized the method for analysis of cellular lysates, enriched membrane preparations, and immunoprecipitates. We expect that due to its robustness and simplicity, the method will become an essential proteomics tool. PMID:24678027

  6. Rapid Analysis, Self-Calibrating Array for Air Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, Abhijit V.; Lara, Liana; Huerta, Ramon; Vergara, Alexander; Muezzinoglua, Mehmet K.

    2012-01-01

    Human space missions have critical needs for monitoring and control for life support systems. These systems have monitoring needs that include feedback for closed loop processes and quality control for environmental factors. Sensors and monitoring technologies assure that the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew habitat fall within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the more distant the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. The lifetime of the calibration, for some analytes, was as long as 24 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will include sensor response time in the analysis. The preliminary array analysis for two analytes shows that the analysis time, of an event, can be dropped from 45 minutes to less than10 minutes and array training time can be cut substantially. We will describe the lifetime testing of an array and show lifetime data on individual sensors. This progress will lead to more rapid identification of analytes, and faster training time of the array.

  7. Studying Mixing in Non-Newtonian Blue Maize Flour Suspensions Using Color Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; García-Lara, Silverio; Ballescá-Estrada, Adriana; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Newtonian fluids occur in many relevant flow and mixing scenarios at the lab and industrial scale. The addition of acid or basic solutions to a non-Newtonian fluid is not an infrequent operation, particularly in Biotechnology applications where the pH of Non-Newtonian culture broths is usually regulated using this strategy. Methodology and Findings We conducted mixing experiments in agitated vessels using Non-Newtonian blue maize flour suspensions. Acid or basic pulses were injected to reveal mixing patterns and flow structures and to follow their time evolution. No foreign pH indicator was used as blue maize flours naturally contain anthocyanins that act as a native, wide spectrum, pH indicator. We describe a novel method to quantitate mixedness and mixing evolution through Dynamic Color Analysis (DCA) in this system. Color readings corresponding to different times and locations within the mixing vessel were taken with a digital camera (or a colorimeter) and translated to the CIELab scale of colors. We use distances in the Lab space, a 3D color space, between a particular mixing state and the final mixing point to characterize segregation/mixing in the system. Conclusion and Relevance Blue maize suspensions represent an adequate and flexible model to study mixing (and fluid mechanics in general) in Non-Newtonian suspensions using acid/base tracer injections. Simple strategies based on the evaluation of color distances in the CIELab space (or other scales such as HSB) can be adapted to characterize mixedness and mixing evolution in experiments using blue maize suspensions. PMID:25401332

  8. Application of Dense Array Analysis to Strong Motion Data Recorded at The SMART-1 Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, C.

    2003-12-01

    This paper is part of a project to design an optimal strong motion dense array in New Zealand. The overall project looks at developing a dense network of strong motion seismometers in order to measure directly the rupture process of major seismogenic sources such as the Alpine Fault and strands of the Marlborough Fault System defining the South Island sector of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary zone. This work shows the application of dense array analysis to a set of seismic data recorded at the SMART-1 array in Taiwan (data kindly provided by the Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica Data Management Center for Strong Motion Seismology - Taiwan). The data have been processed and analysed applying modified MUSIC algorithm with higher computing capabilities giving higher resolution results. The SMART-1 array is an ideal dense array of 37 strong motion instruments set up in the following configuration: 3 concentric circles of radii 200m, 1 km and 2km, and one central station. The studied event called Event 5 was recorded on January 29th 1981 and had a magnitude 6. Event 5 is an ideal case study as its epicentral distance (about 30 km) is comparable to epicentral distances for expected events on the Alpine Fault or on the Hope Fault in New Zealand. Event 5 has been previously widely analysed using strong motion array studies and aftershocks studies but with disagreeing results; this new study hopes to bring new insights in the debate. Using simple fault and velocity models, this latest analysis of Event 5 has given the following rupture properties. It has confirmed one of the hypotheses that the fault ruptured from southeast to northwest. The higher resolution of the computation has improved the location of the hypocentre depth and the location of the propagating rupture front. This allowed resolving changes of velocities in the rupture process and locating asperities in the fault plane. Contrary to the previous array studies, the inferred size of the fault

  9. Performance Analysis of a NASA Integrated Network Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program is planning to integrate its individual networks into a unified network which will function as a single entity to provide services to user missions. This integrated network architecture is expected to provide SCaN customers with the capabilities to seamlessly use any of the available SCaN assets to support their missions to efficiently meet the collective needs of Agency missions. One potential optimal application of these assets, based on this envisioned architecture, is that of arraying across existing networks to significantly enhance data rates and/or link availabilities. As such, this document provides an analysis of the transmit and receive performance of a proposed SCaN inter-network antenna array. From the study, it is determined that a fully integrated internetwork array does not provide any significant advantage over an intra-network array, one in which the assets of an individual network are arrayed for enhanced performance. Therefore, it is the recommendation of this study that NASA proceed with an arraying concept, with a fundamental focus on a network-centric arraying.

  10. Analysis of TOPEX laser retroreflector array characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.

    1993-01-01

    The joint U.S./French TOPEX/POSEIDON mission was successfully launched on August 10, 1992 for the study of ocean height variation using microwave altimetry. Accurate determination of the satellite orbit is paramount to the determination of the above phenomenon. To accomplish this, using laser ranging, the satellite is equipped with a laser retroreflector array (LRA) around the altimeter antennae. The goal of laser ranging is to obtain precision orbits with a radial accuracy of 13 cm to the center of mass of the satellite. This requires the laser range correction to the LRA reference be known at the sub-cm level and is quite a challenge considering the geometry of the LRA. Detailed studies were initiated by the TOPEX project office (Christensen) under the auspices of the CDP/DOSE project (Degnan) at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  11. Analysis and simulation of a magnetic bearing suspension system for a laboratory model annular momentum control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.; Woolley, C. T.; Joshi, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A linear analysis and the results of a nonlinear simulation of a magnetic bearing suspension system which uses permanent magnet flux biasing are presented. The magnetic bearing suspension is part of a 4068 N-m-s (3000 lb-ft-sec) laboratory model annular momentum control device (AMCD). The simulation includes rigid body rim dynamics, linear and nonlinear axial actuators, linear radial actuators, axial and radial rim warp, and power supply and power driver current limits.

  12. International Space Station 2A Array Modal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laible, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Kristin; Grygier, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On December 9th 2009, the International Space Station (ISS) 2A solar array mast experienced prolonged longeron shadowing during a Soyuz undocking. Analytical reconstruction of induced thermal and dynamic structural loads showed an exceedance of the mast buckling limit. Possible structural damage to the solar array mast could have occurred during this event. A Low fidelity video survey of the 2A mast showed no obvious damage of the mast longerons or battens. The decision was made to conduct an on-orbit dynamic test of the 2A array on December 18th, 2009. The test included thruster pluming on the array while photogrammetry data was recorded. The test was similar to other Dedicated Thruster Firings (DTFs) that were performed to measure structural frequency and damping of a solar array. Results of the DTF indicated lower frequency mast modes than model predictions, thus leading to speculation of mast damage. A detailed nonlinear analysis was performed on the 2A array model to assess possible solutions to modal differences. The setup of the parametric nonlinear trade study included the use of a detailed array model and the reduced mass and stiffness matrices of the entire ISS being applied to the array interface. The study revealed that the array attachment structure is nonlinear and thus was the source of error in the model prediction of mast modes. In addition, a detailed study was performed to determine mast mode sensitivity to mast longeron damage. This sensitivity study was performed to assess if the ISS program has sufficient instrumentation for mast damage detection.

  13. Phased array antenna analysis using hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-06-01

    This research in computational electromagnetics developed a new method for predicting the near-field mutual coupling effects in phased array antennas, using the finite element method (FEM) in combination with integral equations. Accurate feed modeling is accomplished by enforcing continuity between the FEM solution and an arbitrary number of wave guide models across a ground plane aperture. A periodic integral equation is imposed above the antenna's physical structure in order to enforce the radiation condition and to confine the analysis to an array unit cell. The electric field is expanded in terms of vector finite elements, and Galerkin's method is used to write the problem as a matrix equation. A general-purpose computer code was developed and validated by comparing its results to published data for several array types. Its versatility was demonstrated with predictions of the scanning properties of arrays of printed dipoles and printed flared notches.

  14. Analysis of an off road 4WD vehicle's suspension system modification - Case study of aftermarket suspension lift and modification of wheel track size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J.; Hazrat, M. A.; Rasul, M. G.

    2016-07-01

    In this research, a four wheel drive (4WD) suspension of a vehicle has been modified by increasing the ride height to investigate stability and cornering potential of the vehicle through load transfer and variation of roll angle. Further investigation has been conducted to observe the characteristics which are deemed desirable for off road application but detrimental to the on road application. The Constant Radius Cornering Test (CRCT) was chosen as a base method for experimental investigation to observe the effect of the suspension modifications. The test was carried out by undertaking a known radius and cambered corner at a constant speed. For this test, the acceleration and gyroscopic data were measured to check and compare the accuracy of the analysis performed by OptimumDynamics model. The tests were conducted by means of negotiating the curve at the speed of 80 km/h and it was gradually achieved to allow a good consensus of the amount of body roll the vehicle experienced. Using a surveyor's wheel, the radius of the corner was estimated as 160 m and using the gyroscopic sensor, the corner camber was measured at 4 degrees. While comparing the experimental results with the simulation results, the experimental constraints led to higher values than those of the analytical results. The total load transfer reduced by 2.9% with the increased track size. It has been observed that the dynamic load transfer component is lesser than the standard suspension with the aftermarket suspension lift and the upgraded anti-roll bar (ARB). With the simulation of the fitment of the other modifications aimed to improve the characteristics of the raised vehicle, the vehicle showed a reduced tendency towards roll angle due to the stiffened anti-roll bar and the maximum increased wheel track demonstrated reduced lateral load transfer and body roll. Even with these modifications however, the decrease in load transfer is minimal in comparison to what was expected.

  15. Off-road motorbike performance analysis using a rear semi-active suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya-Santos, Jorge de J.; Cervantes-Muñoz, Damián.; Ramírez Mendoza, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    The topic of this paper is the analysis of a control system for a semi active rear suspension in an off-road 2-wheel vehicle. Several control methods are studied, as well as the recently proposed Frequency Estimation Based (FEB) algorithm. The test motorcycle dynamics, as well as the passive, semi active, and the algorithm controlled shock absorber models are loaded into BikeSim, a professional two-wheeled vehicle simulation software, and tested in several road conditions. The results show a detailed comparison of the theoretical performance of the different control approaches in a novel environment for semi active dampers.

  16. Modelling and characteristic analysis of tri-axle trucks with hydraulically interconnected suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Han, Xu; Luo, Zhen; Zhang, Nong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a new hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS) system is proposed for the implementation of a resistance control for the pitch and bounce modes of tri-axle heavy trucks. A lumped-mass half-truck model is established using the free-body diagram method. The equations of motion of a mechanical and hydraulic coupled system are developed by incorporating the hydraulic strut forces into the mechanical subsystem as externally applied forces. The transfer matrix method (TMM) is used to evaluate the impedance matrix of the hydraulic subsystem consisting of models of fluid pipes, damper valves, accumulators, and three-way junctions. The TMM is further applied to find the quantitative relationships between the hydraulic strut forces and boundary flow of the mechanical-fluid interactive subsystem. The modal analysis method is employed to perform the vibration analysis between the trucks with the conventional suspension and the proposed HIS. Comparison analysis focuses on free vibration with identified eigenvalues and eigenvectors, isolation vibration capacity, and force vibration in terms of the power spectrum density responses. The obtained results show the effectiveness of the proposed HIS system in reducing the pitch motion of sprung mass and simultaneously maintaining the ride comfort. The pitch stiffness is increased while the bounce stiffness is slightly softened. The peak values of sprung mass and wheel hop motions are greatly reduced, and the vibration decay rate of sprung mass is also significantly increased.

  17. Neural network based analysis for chemical sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1995-04-01

    Compact, portable systems capable of quickly identifying contaminants in the field are of great importance when monitoring the environment. In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks for real-time data analysis of a sensor array. Analyzing the sensor data in parallel may allow for rapid identification of contaminants in the field without requiring highly selective individual sensors. We use a prototype sensor array which consists of nine tin-oxide Taguchi-type sensors, a temperature sensor, and a humidity sensor. We illustrate that by using neural network based analysis of the sensor data, the selectivity of the sensor array may be significantly improved, especially when some (or all) the sensors are not highly selective.

  18. Thermoelastic analysis of solar cell arrays and their material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M. A.; Rowe, W. M.; Yasui, R. K.

    1973-01-01

    A thermoelastic stress analysis procedure is reported for predicting the thermally induced stresses and failures in silicon solar cell arrays. A prerequisite for the analysis is the characterization of the temperature-dependent thermal and mechanical properties of the solar cell materials. Extensive material property testing was carried out in the temperature range -200 to +200 C for the filter glass, P- and N-type silicon, interconnector metals, solder, and several candidate silicone rubber adhesives. The analysis procedure is applied to several solar cell array design configurations. Results of the analysis indicate the optimum design configuration, with respect to compatible materials, effect of the solder coating, and effect of the interconnector geometry. Good agreement was found between results of the analysis and the test program.

  19. Rapid prenatal diagnosis of cytogenetic abnormalities by array CGH analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Array CGH analysis has been shown to be highly accurate for rapid detection of chromosomal aneuploidies and submicroscopic deletions or duplications on fetal DNA samples in a clinical prenatal diagnostic setting. The objective of this study is to present our "post-validation phase" experience with ...

  20. Analysis of solar collector array systems using thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of thermography to analyze large solar collector array systems under dynamic operating conditions is discussed. The research has focused on thermographic techniques and equipment to determine temperature distributions, flow patterns, and air blockages in solar collectors. The results of this extensive study, covering many sites and types of collectors, illustrate the capabilities of infrared analysis as an analysis tool and operation and maintenance procedure when applied to large arrays. Thermographic analysis of most collector systems showed temperature distributions that indicated balanced flow patterns with both the thermographs and the hand-held unit. In three significant cases, blocked or broken collector arrays, which previously had gone undetected, were discovered. Using this analysis, validation studies of large computer codes could examine collector arrays for flow patterns or blockages that could cause disagreement between actual and predicted performance. Initial operation and balancing of large systems could be accomplished without complicated sensor systems not needed for normal operations. Maintenance personnel could quickly check their systems without climbing onto the roof and without complicated sensor systems.

  1. Digital interactive image analysis by array processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabels, B. E.; Jennings, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to draw a parallel between the existing geophysical data processing service industries and the emerging earth resources data support requirements. The relationship of seismic data analysis to ERTS data analysis is natural because in either case data is digitally recorded in the same format, resulting from remotely sensed energy which has been reflected, attenuated, shifted and degraded on its path from the source to the receiver. In the seismic case the energy is acoustic, ranging in frequencies from 10 to 75 cps, for which the lithosphere appears semi-transparent. In earth survey remote sensing through the atmosphere, visible and infrared frequency bands are being used. Yet the hardware and software required to process the magnetically recorded data from the two realms of inquiry are identical and similar, respectively. The resulting data products are similar.

  2. Glycomic analysis: an array of technologies

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Mahal, Lara K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrates encode biological information necessary for cellular function. The structural diversity and complexity of these sugar residues have necessitated the creation of novel methodologies for their study. This review highlights recent technological advancements that are starting to unravel the intricate web of carbohydrate biology. New methods for the analysis of both glycoconjugates and glycan structures are discussed. With the use of these innovative tools, the field of glycobiology is poised to take center-stage in the post-genomic era of modern biology and medicine. PMID:19728746

  3. Thermoelastic analysis of solar cell arrays and their material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M. A.; Rowe, W. M.; Yasui, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    Description of a thermoelastic stress analysis procedure for predicting the thermally induced stresses and failures in silicon solar cell arrays. A prerequisite for the analysis is the characterization of the temperature-dependent thermal and mechanical properties of the solar cell materials. Extensive material property testing was carried out in the temperature range from -200 to +200 C for the filter glass, P- and N-type silicon, interconnector metals, solder, and several candidate silicone rubber adhesives. The analysis procedure is applied to several solar cell array design configurations, which were tested in the Space Molecular Sink. Results of the analysis indicate the optimum design configuration with respect to materials and geometry, effect of the solder coating, and effect of the interconnector geometry.

  4. Analysis of Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Nested Annular Tank Array

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; James D. Cleaver

    2009-06-01

    Two series of experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory during the 1980s using highly enriched (93%) uranyl nitrate solution in annular tanks. [1, 2] Tanks were of typical sizes found in nuclear production plants. Experiments looked at tanks of varying radii in a co-located set of nested tanks, a 1 by 2 array, and a 1 by 3 array. The co-located set of tanks had been analyzed previously [3] as a benchmark for inclusion within the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. [4] The current study represents the benchmark analysis of the 1 by 3 array of a series of nested annular tanks. Of the seventeen configurations performed in this set of experiments, twelve were evaluated and nine were judged as acceptable benchmarks.

  5. Analysis of Camera Arrays Applicable to the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiachen; Xu, Ru; Lv, Zhihan; Song, Houbing

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things is built based on various sensors and networks. Sensors for stereo capture are essential for acquiring information and have been applied in different fields. In this paper, we focus on the camera modeling and analysis, which is very important for stereo display and helps with viewing. We model two kinds of cameras, a parallel and a converged one, and analyze the difference between them in vertical and horizontal parallax. Even though different kinds of camera arrays are used in various applications and analyzed in the research work, there are few discussions on the comparison of them. Therefore, we make a detailed analysis about their performance over different shooting distances. From our analysis, we find that the threshold of shooting distance for converged cameras is 7 m. In addition, we design a camera array in our work that can be used as a parallel camera array, as well as a converged camera array and take some images and videos with it to identify the threshold. PMID:27011189

  6. Analysis of Camera Arrays Applicable to the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiachen; Xu, Ru; Lv, Zhihan; Song, Houbing

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things is built based on various sensors and networks. Sensors for stereo capture are essential for acquiring information and have been applied in different fields. In this paper, we focus on the camera modeling and analysis, which is very important for stereo display and helps with viewing. We model two kinds of cameras, a parallel and a converged one, and analyze the difference between them in vertical and horizontal parallax. Even though different kinds of camera arrays are used in various applications and analyzed in the research work, there are few discussions on the comparison of them. Therefore, we make a detailed analysis about their performance over different shooting distances. From our analysis, we find that the threshold of shooting distance for converged cameras is 7 m. In addition, we design a camera array in our work that can be used as a parallel camera array, as well as a converged camera array and take some images and videos with it to identify the threshold. PMID:27011189

  7. Stray light analysis of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birge, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    The stray light analysis performance of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES), which is to be flown on NASA's Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite, was evaluated using the APART/PADE code, and the results are reported. The analysis, together with Brassboard measurements, confirm that the data to be collected by CLAES should not be significantly degraded by stray light resulting from scattering within the system. It is also verified that diffraction effects are successfully controlled by the cascaded stop configuration.

  8. [Determination of Azospirillum Brasilense Cells With Bacteriophages via Electrooptical Analysis of Microbial Suspensions].

    PubMed

    Gulii, O I; Karavayeva, O A; Pavlii, S A; Sokolov, O I; Bunin, V D; Ignatov, O V

    2015-01-01

    The dependence-of changes in the electrooptical properties of Azospirillum brasilense cell suspension Sp7 during interaction with bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7 on the number and time of interactions was studied. Incubation of cells with bacteriophage significantly changed the electrooptical signal within one minute. The selective effect of bacteriophage ΦAb on 18 strains of bacteria of the genus Azospirillum was studied: A. amazonense Ami4, A. brasilense Sp7, Cd, Sp107, Sp245, Jm6B2, Brl4, KR77, S17, S27, SR55, SR75, A. halopraeferans Au4, A. irakense KBC1, K A3, A. lipoferum Sp59b, SR65 and RG20a. We determined the limit of reliable determination of microbial cells infected with bacteriophage: - 10(4) cells/mL. The presence of foreign cell cultures of E. coli B-878 and E. coli XL-1 did not complicate the detection of A brasilense Sp7 cells with the use of bacteriophage ΦAb-Sp7. The results demonstrated that bacteriophage (ΦAb-Sp7 can be used for the detection of Azospirillum microbial cells via t electrooptical analysis of cell suspensions. PMID:26204775

  9. Cryo-FIB-nanotomography for quantitative analysis of particle structures in cement suspensions.

    PubMed

    Holzer, L; Gasser, P H; Kaech, A; Wegmann, M; Zingg, A; Wepf, R; Muench, B

    2007-09-01

    Cryo-FIB-nanotomography is a novel high-resolution 3D-microscopy technique, which opens new possibilities for the quantitative microstructural analysis of complex suspensions. In this paper, we describe the microstructural changes associated with dissolution and precipitation processes occurring in a fresh cement paste, which has high alumina and sulphate contents. During the first 6 min, precipitation of ettringite leads to a general decrease of the particle size distribution. In the unhydrated cement paste almost no particles smaller than 500 nm are present, whereas after 6 min this size class already represents 9 vol%. The precipitation of ettringite also leads to a significant increase of the particle number density from 0.294*10(9)/mm(3) at t(0min) to 20.55*10(9)/mm(3) at t(6min). Correspondingly the surface area increases from 0.75 m(2)/g at t(0min) to 2.13 m(2)/g at t(6min). The small ettringite particles tend to form agglomerates, which strongly influence the rheological properties. The particular strength of cryo-FIB-nt is the potential to quantify particle structures in suspension and thereby also to describe higher-order topological features such as the particle-particle interfaces, which is important for the study of agglomeration processes. PMID:17760616

  10. Analysis of systolic and systolic-type arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Jover, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Synchronous, multiprocessor systems interconnected by fixed links are studied. These special-purpose systems, called systolic-type arrays, perform specific algorithms at a higher throughput rate than the sequential architecture of van Neumann. The main contributions of this thesis are the analysis of systolic-type arrays, and the design of one such complex system. In the analysis problem the topology of the network, the function performed by each processor (including timing information), and the input data streams are given. I/O algorithm performed by the array, and the iteration interval (i.e., the time between two consecutive input samples) are to be determined. Solution to the analysis problem turns out to be based on the simple, at least in retrospect, observation that analysis is the reverse of synthesis (design). In design, the start is with a mathematical algorithm and a representation of it as a signal flow graph (SFG) in which the computations (function evaluations) are presented by delay-free (instantaneous) blocks and the index shifts in the sequences processed by the algorithm are all lumped into so-called z/sup -1/ blocks. In the analysis problem, start is also with a physical implementation described by its computational blocks, their associated processing times, and their interconnections. Also presented is parallel architecture for the measurement update step of the Kalman filter, which estimates a vector parameter.

  11. Erratum to: Automated Sample Preparation Method for Suspension Arrays using Renewable Surface Separations with Multiplexed Flow Cytometry Fluorescence Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Jarrell, Ann E.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2003-04-10

    In this paper we describe a new method of automated sample preparation for multiplexed biological analysis systems that use flow cytometry fluorescence detection. In this approach, color-encoded microspheres derivatized to capture particular biomolecules are temporarily trapped in a renewable surface separation column to enable perfusion with sample and reagents prior to delivery to the detector. This method provides for separation of the biomolecules of interest from other sample matrix components as well as from labeling solutions.

  12. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Field Distribution of Magnetic Micro-barcodes for Suspension Assay Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Vo Thanh; Anandakumar, S.; Kim, CheolGi; Jeong, Jong-Ruyl

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we have investigated real-time decoding feasibility of magnetic micro-barcodes in a microfluidic channel by using numerical analysis of magnetic field distribution of the micro-barcodes. The vector potential model based on a molecular current has been used to obtain magnetic stray field distribution of ferromagnetic bars which consisting of the micro-barcodes. It reveals that the stray field distribution of the micro-barcodes strongly depends on the geometries of the ferromagnetic bar. Interestingly enough, we have found that one can avoide the miniaturization process of a magnetic sensor device needed to increase the sensitivity by optimizing the geometries of micro-barcodes. We also estimate a magnetic sensor response depending on flying height and lateral misalignment of the micro-barcodes over the sensor position and found that control of the flying height is crucial factor to enhance the detection sensitivity and reproducibility of a magnetic sensor signal in the suspension assay technology.

  13. Digital control analysis and design of a field-sensed magnetic suspension system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jen-Hsing; Chiou, Juing-Shian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic suspension systems are mechatronic systems and crucial in several engineering applications, such as the levitation of high-speed trains, frictionless bearings, and wind tunnels. Magnetic suspension systems are nonlinear and unstable systems; therefore, they are suitable educational benchmarks for testing various modeling and control methods. This paper presents the digital modeling and control of magnetic suspension systems. First, the magnetic suspension system is stabilized using a digital proportional-derivative controller. Subsequently, the digital model is identified using recursive algorithms. Finally, a digital mixed linear quadratic regulator (LQR)/H∞ control is adopted to stabilize the magnetic suspension system robustly. Simulation examples and a real-world example are provided to demonstrate the practicality of the study results. In this study, a digital magnetic suspension system model was developed and reviewed. In addition, equivalent state and output feedback controls for magnetic suspension systems were developed. Using this method, the controller design for magnetic suspension systems was simplified, which is the novel contribution of this study. In addition, this paper proposes a complete digital controller design procedure for magnetic suspension systems. PMID:25781508

  14. Digital Control Analysis and Design of a Field-Sensed Magnetic Suspension System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jen-Hsing; Chiou, Juing-Shian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic suspension systems are mechatronic systems and crucial in several engineering applications, such as the levitation of high-speed trains, frictionless bearings, and wind tunnels. Magnetic suspension systems are nonlinear and unstable systems; therefore, they are suitable educational benchmarks for testing various modeling and control methods. This paper presents the digital modeling and control of magnetic suspension systems. First, the magnetic suspension system is stabilized using a digital proportional-derivative controller. Subsequently, the digital model is identified using recursive algorithms. Finally, a digital mixed linear quadratic regulator (LQR)/H∞ control is adopted to stabilize the magnetic suspension system robustly. Simulation examples and a real-world example are provided to demonstrate the practicality of the study results. In this study, a digital magnetic suspension system model was developed and reviewed. In addition, equivalent state and output feedback controls for magnetic suspension systems were developed. Using this method, the controller design for magnetic suspension systems was simplified, which is the novel contribution of this study. In addition, this paper proposes a complete digital controller design procedure for magnetic suspension systems. PMID:25781508

  15. Applications of nylon membrane arrays to gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Cox, J M

    2001-04-01

    Gene expression analyses by hybridization of probes derived from mRNA to cDNA targets arrayed on a nylon membranes have been performed with increasing frequency and success over the last decade. While the initial costs of generating arrays are moderately high, they are now available commercially as complete packages which include the membranes and associated image analysis software for acquisition and processing of the data. Arrays can be used to generate information concerning the expression of mRNA from cells treated with various agents or from different tissues, e.g. comparing diseased with normal controls. To date, many groups, including immunologists, have used this technology to examine gene expression within their area of biological interest. The main characteristic of these systems is the large amount of data generated, since the expression of many thousands of genes are measured in parallel. The main practical issues are sensitivity of detection, reproducibility, comparability with other systems (e.g. Northern blots) and processing of data. Some of the significant applications of nylon array technology to date are reviewed in this chapter, and with these issues in mind, we include a discussion of our own experiences in this area. PMID:11251218

  16. Array-Pattern-Match Compiler for Opportunistic Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A computer program has been written to facilitate real-time sifting of scientific data as they are acquired to find data patterns deemed to warrant further analysis. The patterns in question are of a type denoted array patterns, which are specified by nested parenthetical expressions. [One example of an array pattern is ((>3) 0 (not=1)): this pattern matches a vector of at least three elements, the first of which exceeds 3, the second of which is 0, and the third of which does not equal 1.] This program accepts a high-level description of a static array pattern and compiles a highly optimal and compact other program to determine whether any given instance of any data array matches that pattern. The compiler implemented by this program is independent of the target language, so that as new languages are used to write code that processes scientific data, they can easily be adapted to this compiler. This program runs on a variety of different computing platforms. It must be run in conjunction with any one of a number of Lisp compilers that are available commercially or as shareware.

  17. Analysis of finite multifrequency slotted waveguide antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, L. I.; Rud', S. V.; Ryzhikov, A. V.

    1988-02-01

    A model of a finite multifrequency slotted waveguide antenna array based on multimode waveguides is developed on the basis of an integral-equation method. Numerical-analysis results are presented which make it possible to assess the mutual distortions introduced in the radiation characteristics in each of the operating subbands. It is noted that these distortions can be minimized by a proper mutual arrangement of the slots as well as by an appropriate type of waveguide excitation.

  18. Guidelines for Optimisation of a Multiplex Oligonucleotide Ligation-PCR for Characterisation of Microbial Pathogens in a Microsphere Suspension Array

    PubMed Central

    Wuyts, Véronique; Roosens, Nancy H. C.; Marchal, Kathleen; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.

    2015-01-01

    With multiplex oligonucleotide ligation-PCR (MOL-PCR) different molecular markers can be simultaneously analysed in a single assay and high levels of multiplexing can be achieved in high-throughput format. As such, MOL-PCR is a convenient solution for microbial detection and identification assays where many markers should be analysed, including for routine further characterisation of an identified microbial pathogenic isolate. For an assay aimed at routine use, optimisation in terms of differentiation between positive and negative results and of cost and effort is indispensable. As MOL-PCR includes a multiplex ligation step, followed by a singleplex PCR and analysis with microspheres on a Luminex device, several parameters are accessible for optimisation. Although MOL-PCR performance may be influenced by the markers used in the assay and the targeted bacterial species, evaluation of the method of DNA isolation, the probe concentration, the amount of microspheres, and the concentration of reporter dye is advisable in the development of any MOL-PCR assay. Therefore, we here describe our observations made during the optimisation of a 20-plex MOL-PCR assay for subtyping of Salmonella Typhimurium with the aim to provide a possible workflow as guidance for the development and optimisation of a MOL-PCR assay for the characterisation of other microbial pathogens. PMID:25705689

  19. Analysis of Semi-Active and Passive Suspensions System for Off-Road Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenLahcene, Zohir; Faris, Waleed F.; Khan, M. D. Raisuddin

    2009-03-01

    The speed of off-road vehicles over rough terrain is generally determined by the ride quality not by the engine power. For this reason, researches are currently being undertaking to improve the ride dynamics of these vehicles using an advanced suspension system. This study intends to provide a preliminary evaluation of whether semi-active suspensions are beneficial to improving ride and handling in off-road vehicles. One of the greatest challenges in designing off-road vehicle suspension system is maintaining a good balance between vehicle ride and handling. Three configurations of these vehicles; 2-axle, 3-xle and 4-axles have been studied and their performances are compared. The application of several control policies of semi-active suspension system, namely skyhook; ground-hook and hybrid controls have been analyzed and compared with passive systems. The results show that the hybrid control policy yields better comfort than a passive suspension, without reducing the road-holding quality or increasing the suspension displacement. The hybrid control policy is also shown to be a better compromise between comfort, road-holding and suspension displacement than the skyhook and ground-hook control policies. Results show an improvement in ride comfort and vehicle handling using 4-axle over 3-axle and 2-axle when emphasis is placed on the response of the vehicle body acceleration, suspension and tyre deflection.

  20. Spectral Cytometry Has Unique Properties Allowing Multicolor Analysis of Cell Suspensions Isolated from Solid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmutz, Sandrine; Valente, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry, initially developed to analyze surface protein expression in hematopoietic cells, has increased in analytical complexity and is now widely used to identify cells from different tissues and organisms. As a consequence, data analysis became increasingly difficult due the need of large multi-parametric compensation matrices and to the eventual auto-fluorescence frequently found in cell suspensions obtained from solid organs. In contrast with conventional flow cytometry that detects the emission peak of fluorochromes, spectral flow cytometry distinguishes the shapes of emission spectra along a large range of continuous wave lengths. The data is analyzed with an algorithm that replaces compensation matrices and treats auto-fluorescence as an independent parameter. Thus, spectral flow cytometry should be capable to discriminate fluorochromes with similar emission peaks and provide multi-parametric analysis without compensation requirements. Here we show that spectral flow cytometry achieves a 21-parametric (19 fluorescent probes) characterization and deals with auto-fluorescent cells, providing high resolution of specifically fluorescence-labeled populations. Our results showed that spectral flow cytometry has advantages in the analysis of cell populations of tissues difficult to characterize in conventional flow cytometry, such as heart and intestine. Spectral flow cytometry thus combines the multi-parametric analytical capacity of the highest performing conventional flow cytometry without the requirement for compensation and enabling auto-fluorescence management. PMID:27500930

  1. TIME-FREQUENCY Analysis of a Suspension Bridge Based on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    XU, L.; GUO, J. J.; JIANG, J. J.

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the results obtained from full-scale measurements of Humen bridge, which is the second longest suspension bridge in China. A real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS) has been developed and installed on the Humen bridge for on-line monitoring of bridge deck movements. The field wind-induced vibration data were measured by this monitoring system. Three system identification techniques are then adopted in the modal analysis of the wind-induced vibration response: the time-frequency Wigner distribution (WD) technique, the frequency-domain fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique and the time-domain auto-regressive moving average vector (ARMAV) technique. The WD technique can recognize close modal coupling and non-stationary response. The FFT technique can on site verify the quality of the measurements, but its frequency resolution is low and damping estimates are unreliable. The ARMAV method allows for gaining high-frequency resolution. However, it is strictly related to the stationary hypothesis. It is a general conclusion that we can improve the quality of the analysis and get more precise characteristics of the signal by these three methods. In addition, the WD combined with ARMAV seems to be the best case in quantitative analysis of fast-changing vibration signals.

  2. Phase velocity approach for Suspension P-S Logging data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Lin, Chih-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Due to the short receiver interval, results of Suspension P-S Logging are sensitive to the picking of first arrivals, which is currently carried out by manual picking in the time domain. However, manual picking can be ambiguous and depends heavily on the data quality and analysts' experiences. Furthermore, no information regarding the effective frequency is obtained from first arrival times. A data reduction method based on phase velocity analysis of borehole acoustic waves is proposed herein. The aim is to provide an automatic procedure for more objective velocity analysis. The procedure utilizes the two-channel dispersion curve analysis, but becomes semi-empirical because an additional assumption is made to simplify the calculation and avoid the phase un-wrapping problem associated with the lack of low-frequency information. Some field data were used to evaluate the empirical parameter for calculating the shear wave velocity. Results show that the velocity difference between the proposed method and the conventional method based on manually-picked first arrivals is mostly within 15%. The proposed method can be automated and provide the effective frequency of the obtained shear wave velocity.

  3. Suspension Geometry Measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, M. J.; Yu, C. C.; Chang, H.; Tsung, T. T.; Lin, H. M.

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the instrumentation and analysis of the Vehicle suspension's electrical signals. It will measure the Vehicle suspensions' Vertical Displacement, Track Change, Camber Angle, Caster Angle Steer Angle and convert physical quantity into electrical signals in a various vehicle load change. With using electrical signals for computer control, the electrical controlled vehicle has brought great convenience, great safety and thoughtful kindness vehicle system in our daily life. It will measure the Vehicle suspensions' Vertical Displacement, Track Change, Camber Angle, Caster Angle Steer Angle and convert physical quantity into electrical signals in a various vehicle load change. The function of a suspension system in an automobile is to improve ride comfort and stability. Advances in electronic control technology, applied to the automobile, can improve those functions. The results show that the photocell can convert the electrical signals of suspension for peripheral communications link between the vehicle driving and the electronic control unit (ECU) employed for processing.

  4. Analysis of the static magnetic field-dependent optical transmission of Ni nanorod colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Florian; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic field-dependent optical transmission of dilute Ni nanorod aqueous suspensions was investigated. A series of four samples of nanorods were synthesized using the AAO template method and processed to stable colloids. The distributions of their length and diameter were characterized by analysis of TEM images and revealed average diameters of ˜25 nm and different lengths in the range of 60 nm-1100 nm. The collinear magnetic and optical anisotropy was studied by static field-dependent transmission measurements of linearly polarized light parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction. The experimental results were modelled assuming the field-dependent orientation distribution function of a superparamagnetic ensemble for the uniaxial ferromagnetic nanorods in liquid dispersion and extinction cross sections for longitudinal and transversal optical polarization derived from different approaches, including the electrostatic approximation and the separation of variables method, both applied to spheroidal particles, as well as finite element method simulations of spheroids and capped cylindrical particles. The extinction cross sections were compared to reveal the differences associated with the approximations of homogeneous polarization and/or particle shape. The consequences of these approximations for the quantitative analysis of magnetic field-dependent optical transmission measurements were investigated and a reliable protocol derived. Furthermore, the changes in optical cross sections induced by electromagnetic interaction between two nanorods in parallel end-to-end and side-by-side configuration as a function of their separation were studied.

  5. Bioimpedance analysis for the characterization of breast cancer cells in suspension.

    PubMed

    Guofeng Qiao; Wei Wang; Wei Duan; Fan Zheng; Sinclair, A J; Chatwin, C R

    2012-08-01

    The bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) technique is potentially a useful tool to differentiate malignancy based on the variation of electrical properties presented by different tissues and cells. The different tissues and cells present variant electrical resistance and reactance when excited at different frequencies. The main purpose of this area of research is to use impedance measurements over a low-frequency bandwidth ranging from 1 kHz to 3 MHz to 1) differentiate the pathological stages of cancer cells under laboratory conditions and 2) permit the extraction of electrical parameters related to cellular information for further analysis. This provides evidence to form the basis of bioimpedance measurement at the cellular level and aids the potential future development of rapid diagnostics from biopsy materials. Three cell lines, representing normal breast epithelia and different pathological stages of breast cancer, have been measured using a standard impedance analyzer driving a four-electrode chamber filled with different cell suspensions. We identify the specific BIS profile for each cell type and determine whether these can be differentiated. In addition, the electrical parameters, e.g., the intracellular conductivity, membrane capacitance/capacity, characteristic frequency, are extracted by the use of equivalent circuit models and physical models to provide details of the cell electric signatures for further analysis of cancer cell pathology. PMID:22692870

  6. Genetic heterogeneity in rhabdomyosarcoma revealed by SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Mayrhofer, Markus; Nilsson, Jenny; Hofvander, Jakob; Jonson, Tord; Mandahl, Nils; Øra, Ingrid; Gisselsson, David; Mertens, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents. Alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) histologies predominate, but rare cases are classified as spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS). For treatment stratification, RMS is further subclassified as fusion-positive (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative (FN-RMS), depending on whether a gene fusion involving PAX3 or PAX7 is present or not. We investigated 19 cases of pediatric RMS using high resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. FP-ARMS displayed, on average, more structural rearrangements than ERMS; the single FN-ARMS had a genomic profile similar to ERMS. Apart from previously known amplification (e.g., MYCN, CDK4, and MIR17HG) and deletion (e.g., NF1, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B) targets, amplification of ERBB2 and homozygous loss of ASCC3 or ODZ3 were seen. Combining SNP array with cytogenetic data revealed that most cases were polyploid, with at least one case having started as a near-haploid tumor. Further bioinformatic analysis of the SNP array data disclosed genetic heterogeneity, in the form of subclonal chromosomal imbalances, in five tumors. The outcome was worse for patients with FP-ARMS than ERMS or FN-ARMS (6/8 vs. 1/9 dead of disease), and the only children with ERMS showing intratumor diversity or with MYOD1 mutation-positive SRMS also died of disease. High resolution SNP array can be useful in evaluating genomic imbalances in pediatric RMS. PMID:26482321

  7. DNA array analysis in a Microsoft Windows environment.

    PubMed

    Conway, T; Kraus, B; Tucker, D L; Smalley, D J; Dorman, A F; McKibben, L

    2002-01-01

    Microsoft Windows-based computers have evolved to the point that they provide sufficient computational and visualization power for robust analysis of DNA array data. In fact, smaller laboratories might prefer to carry out some or all of their analyses and visualization in a Windows environment, rather than alternative platforms such as UNIX. We have developed a series of manually executed macros written in Visual Basic for Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, that allows for rapid and comprehensive gene expression data analysis. The first macro assigns gene names to spots on the DNA array and normalizes individual hybridizations by expressing the signal intensity for each gene as a percentage of the sum of all gene intensities. The second macro streamlines statistical consideration of the confidence in individual gene measurements for sets of experimental replicates by calculating probability values with the Student's t test. The third macro introduces a threshold value, calculates expression ratios between experimental conditions, and calculates the standard deviation of the mean of the log ratio values. Selected columns of data are copied by a fourth macro to create a processed data set suitable for entry into a Microsoft Access database. An Access database structure is described that allows simple queries across multiple experiments and export of data into third-party data visualization software packages. These analysis tools can be used in their present form by others working with commercial E. coli membrane arrays, or they may be adapted for use with other systems. The Excel spreadsheets with embedded Visual Basic macros and detailed instructions for their use are available at http://www.ou.edu/microarray. PMID:11808684

  8. Experimental Study of Membrane Fouling during Crossflow Microfiltration of Yeast and Bacteria Suspensions: Towards an Analysis at the Microscopic Level

    PubMed Central

    Ben Hassan, Ines; Ennouri, Monia; Lafforgue, Christine; Schmitz, Philippe; Ayadi, Abdelmoneim

    2013-01-01

    Microfiltration of model cell suspensions combining macroscopic and microscopic approaches was studied in order to better understand microbial membrane fouling mechanisms. The respective impact of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and Escherichia coli bacteria on crossflow microfiltration performances was investigated using a multichannel ceramic 0.2 µm membrane. Pure yeast suspensions (5 µm ovoid cells) and mixtures of yeast and bacteria (1 to 2.5 µm rod shape cells) were considered in order to analyse the effect of interaction between these two microorganisms on fouling reversibility. The resistances varied significantly with the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms. Membrane fouling with pure yeast suspension was mainly reversible. For yeast and bacteria mixed suspensions (6 g L−1 yeast concentration) the increase in bacteria from 0.15 to 0.30 g L−1 increased the percentage of normalized reversible resistance. At 10 g L−1 yeast concentration, the addition of bacteria tends to increase the percentage of normalized irreversible resistance. For the objective of performing local analysis of fouling, an original filtration chamber allowing direct in situ observation of the cake by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was designed, developed and validated. This device will be used in future studies to characterize cake structure at the microscopic scale. PMID:24958619

  9. Thermal Sensor Arrays for The Combinatorial Analysis of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, Patrick James

    2011-12-01

    Membrane-based thermal sensor arrays were developed for the high-throughput analysis of the thermophysical properties of thin films. The continuous growth of integrated circuits and microelectromechanical systems, as well as the development of functional materials and the optimization of materials properties, have produced the need for instruments capable of fast materials screening and analysis at reduced length scales. Two instruments were developed based on a similar architecture, one to measure thermal transport properties and the other to perform calorimetry measurements. Both have the capability to accelerate the pace of materials development and understanding using combinatorial measurement methods. The shared architecture of the instruments consists of a silicon-based micromachined array of thermal sensors. Each sensor consists of a SiN X membrane and a W heating element that also serves as a temperature gauge. The array design allows the simultaneous creation of a library of thin film samples by various deposition techniques while systematically varying a parameter of interest across the device. The membrane-based sensors have little thermal mass making them extremely sensitive to changes in thermal energy. The nano-thermal transport array has an array of sensors optimized for sensitivity to heat loss. The heat loss is determined from the temperature response of the sensor to an applied current. An analytical model is used with a linear regression analysis to fit the thermal properties of the samples to the temperature response. The assumptions of the analytical model are validated with a finite element model. Measured thermal properties include specific heat, thermal effusivity, thermal conductivity, and emissivity. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the thermal transport properties of sputter deposited Cu multilayers with a total film thickness from 15 to 470 nm. The experimental results compare well to a theory based on electronic thermal

  10. Performance Analysis of a Semiactive Suspension System with Particle Swarm Optimization and Fuzzy Logic Control

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Abroon Jamal; de Silva, Clarence W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a quarter model of an automobile having passive and semiactive suspension systems to develop a scheme for an optimal suspension controller. Semi-active suspension is preferred over passive and active suspensions with regard to optimum performance within the constraints of weight and operational cost. A fuzzy logic controller is incorporated into the semi-active suspension system. It is able to handle nonlinearities through the use of heuristic rules. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to determine the optimal gain parameters for the fuzzy logic controller, while maintaining within the normalized ranges of the controller inputs and output. The performance of resulting optimized system is compared with different systems that use various control algorithms, including a conventional passive system, choice options of feedback signals, and damping coefficient limits. Also, the optimized semi-active suspension system is evaluated for its performance in relation to variation in payload. Furthermore, the systems are compared with respect to the attributes of road handling and ride comfort. In all the simulation studies it is found that the optimized fuzzy logic controller surpasses the other types of control. PMID:24574868

  11. Time response analysis in suspension system design of a high-speed car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagwiwoko, Cosmas Pandit

    2009-12-01

    A land speed record vehicle is designed to run on a flat surface like salt lake where the wheels are normally made from solid metal with a special suspension system. The suspension is designed to provide a stable platform to keep the wheel treads on tract, to insulate the car and the driver from the surface irregularities and to take part of good handling properties. The surface condition of the lake beds is basically flat without undulations but with inconsistent surface textures and ridges. Spring with nonlinear rate is used with the reason that the resistance builds up roughly proportional to the aerodynamic download for keeping the height more nearly constant. The objective of the work is to produce an efficient method for assisting the design of suspension system. At the initial step, the stiffness and the damping constants are determined based on RMS optimization by following the optimization strategy i.e. to minimize the absolute acceleration respect to the relative displacement of the suspension. Power bond graph technique is then used to model the nonlinearity of the components i.e. spring and dashpot of the suspension system. This technique also enables to incorporate the interactions of dynamic response of the vehicle's body with aerodynamic flow as a result of the base excitation of the ground to the wheels. The simulation is conducted on the platform of Simulink-MATLAB and the interactions amongst the components within the system are observed in time domain to evaluate the effectiveness of the suspension.

  12. Time response analysis in suspension system design of a high-speed car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagwiwoko, Cosmas Pandit

    2010-03-01

    A land speed record vehicle is designed to run on a flat surface like salt lake where the wheels are normally made from solid metal with a special suspension system. The suspension is designed to provide a stable platform to keep the wheel treads on tract, to insulate the car and the driver from the surface irregularities and to take part of good handling properties. The surface condition of the lake beds is basically flat without undulations but with inconsistent surface textures and ridges. Spring with nonlinear rate is used with the reason that the resistance builds up roughly proportional to the aerodynamic download for keeping the height more nearly constant. The objective of the work is to produce an efficient method for assisting the design of suspension system. At the initial step, the stiffness and the damping constants are determined based on RMS optimization by following the optimization strategy i.e. to minimize the absolute acceleration respect to the relative displacement of the suspension. Power bond graph technique is then used to model the nonlinearity of the components i.e. spring and dashpot of the suspension system. This technique also enables to incorporate the interactions of dynamic response of the vehicle's body with aerodynamic flow as a result of the base excitation of the ground to the wheels. The simulation is conducted on the platform of Simulink-MATLAB and the interactions amongst the components within the system are observed in time domain to evaluate the effectiveness of the suspension.

  13. Analysis of semi-active vehicle suspension system using airspring and MR damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfay, A. H.; Goel, V. K.

    2015-12-01

    With the new advancements in vibration control strategies and controllable actuator manufacturing, semi-active actuators and dampers are finding their way as an essential part of vibration isolators, particularly in vehicle suspension systems. This is attributed to the fact that in a semi-active system, the damping coefficients can be adjusted to improve ride comfort and road handling performances. The currently available semi-active damper technology uses MR fluid to control the damping characteristics of the suspension system. In addition to MR dampers, combining air springs in a semi-active suspension system leads to better handling and ride performance in vehicles. Furthermore, the use of air spring in semi-active suspension system helps to ease design of variable spring stiffness. This easy design opportunity leads to independent control of stiffness and ride height of the vehicle. This paper deals with the design and modelling of variable stiffness air spring for semi-active suspension system, modelling of semi-active suspension systems with variable stiffness and MR damper, and study their

  14. Performance analysis of a semiactive suspension system with particle swarm optimization and fuzzy logic control.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Abroon Jamal; de Silva, Clarence W; Khan, Afzal; Khan, Muhammad Tahir

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a quarter model of an automobile having passive and semiactive suspension systems to develop a scheme for an optimal suspension controller. Semi-active suspension is preferred over passive and active suspensions with regard to optimum performance within the constraints of weight and operational cost. A fuzzy logic controller is incorporated into the semi-active suspension system. It is able to handle nonlinearities through the use of heuristic rules. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to determine the optimal gain parameters for the fuzzy logic controller, while maintaining within the normalized ranges of the controller inputs and output. The performance of resulting optimized system is compared with different systems that use various control algorithms, including a conventional passive system, choice options of feedback signals, and damping coefficient limits. Also, the optimized semi-active suspension system is evaluated for its performance in relation to variation in payload. Furthermore, the systems are compared with respect to the attributes of road handling and ride comfort. In all the simulation studies it is found that the optimized fuzzy logic controller surpasses the other types of control. PMID:24574868

  15. Cluster Computing For Real Time Seismic Array Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Giudicepietro, F.

    A seismic array is an instrument composed by a dense distribution of seismic sen- sors that allow to measure the directional properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) radiated by a seismic source. Over the last years arrays have been widely used in different fields of seismological researches. In particular they are applied in the investigation of seismic sources on volcanoes where they can be suc- cessfully used for studying the volcanic microtremor and long period events which are critical for getting information on the volcanic systems evolution. For this reason arrays could be usefully employed for the volcanoes monitoring, however the huge amount of data produced by this type of instruments and the processing techniques which are quite time consuming limited their potentiality for this application. In order to favor a direct application of arrays techniques to continuous volcano monitoring we designed and built a small PC cluster able to near real time computing the kinematics properties of the wavefield (slowness or wavenumber vector) produced by local seis- mic source. The cluster is composed of 8 Intel Pentium-III bi-processors PC working at 550 MHz, and has 4 Gigabytes of RAM memory. It runs under Linux operating system. The developed analysis software package is based on the Multiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm and is written in Fortran. The message-passing part is based upon the LAM programming environment package, an open-source imple- mentation of the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The developed software system includes modules devote to receiving date by internet and graphical applications for the continuous displaying of the processing results. The system has been tested with a data set collected during a seismic experiment conducted on Etna in 1999 when two dense seismic arrays have been deployed on the northeast and the southeast flanks of this volcano. A real time continuous acquisition system has been simulated by

  16. Test plane uniformity analysis for the MSFC solar simulator lamp array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary analysis was made on the solar simulator lamp array. It is an array of 405 tungsten halogen lamps with Fresnel lenses to achieve the required spectral distribution and collimation. A computer program was developed to analyze lamp array performance at the test plane. Measurements were made on individual lamp lens combinations to obtain data for the computer analysis. The analysis indicated that the performance of the lamp array was about as expected, except for a need to position the test plane within 2.7 m of the lamp array to achieve the desired 7 percent uniformity of illumination tolerance.

  17. Dielectric permittivity of suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, M. Ya.

    2007-08-15

    A strict macroscopic analysis of the limiting long-wavelength permittivity of a model suspension is presented in which the suspension is considered as a finely dispersed system consisting of isotropic dielectric balls with piecewise-continuous radial permittivity profile. The analysis is performed within the framework of the notion of compact groups of inhomogeneities and the procedure of field averaging over volumes significantly exceeding the scale of these groups. The indicated value is described by the Lorentz-Lorenz formula. The effective polarizability of balls in the suspension is reconstructed from their parameters and the parameters of the medium by means of integration. The result is valid for any concentration of the balls at which the suspension remains macroscopically homogeneous and isotropic with respect to the field and for an arbitrary difference between the ball and medium permittivities.

  18. Design and analysis of annular antenna arrays with different reflectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Joines, W T

    2004-09-01

    The design and performance of annular antenna arrays with reflectors is presented. Arrays with three shapes of reflectors are analysed and simulated. These include the corner reflector, the circular reflector and the elliptical reflector. Power-density distributions within the annular arrays with and without reflectors are obtained by using the FDTD method. Also, the image theory method is used to verify the FDTD results in one case. By comparing the power-density distribution pattern of all four of the array designs (three with different reflectors, one without reflector), it is readily seen in each case that the array with reflectors yields better power-efficiency than the array without reflectors and the elliptical reflector yields the best performance. Comparisons of each array are made using 4, 6 and 8 antennae in the annular array. By using the optimized results of the elliptical reflector, the requirement for the input-power level to each antenna is greatly reduced. PMID:15370818

  19. Assessment of formulation robustness for nano-crystalline suspensions using failure mode analysis or derisking approach.

    PubMed

    Nakach, Mostafa; Authelin, Jean-René; Voignier, Cecile; Tadros, Tharwat; Galet, Laurence; Chamayou, Alain

    2016-06-15

    The small particle size of nano-crystalline suspensions can be responsible for their physical instability during drug product preparation (downstream processing), storage and administration. For that purpose, the commercial formulation needs to be sufficiently robust to various triggering conditions, such as ionic strength, shear rate, wetting/dispersing agent desorption by dilution, temperature and pH variation. In our previous work we described a systematic approach to select the suitable wetting/dispersant agent for the stabilization of nano-crystalline suspension. In this paper, we described the assessment of the formulation robustness (stabilized using a mixture of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and) by measuring the rate of perikinetic (diffusion-controlled) and orthokinetic (shear-induced) aggregation as a function of ionic strength, temperature, pH and dilution. The results showed that, using the SDS/PVP system, the critical coagulation concentration is about five times higher than that observed in the literature for suspension colloidaly stable at high concentration. The nano-suspension was also found to be very stable at ambient temperature and at different pH conditions. Desorption test confirmed the high affinity between API and wetting/dispersing agent. However, the suspension undergoes aggregation at high temperature due to the desorption of the wetting/dispersing agent and disaggregation of SDS micelles. Furthermore, aggregation occurs at very high shear rate (orhokinetic aggregation) by overcoming the energy barrier responsible for colloidal stability of the system. PMID:27102992

  20. Analysis of Wide-Band Signals Using Wavelet Array Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisii, V.; Saccorotti, G.

    2005-12-01

    Wavelets transforms allow for precise time-frequency localization in the analysis of non-stationary signals. In wavelet analysis the trade-off between frequency bandwidth and time duration, also known as Heisenberg inequality, is by-passed using a fully scalable modulated window which solves the signal-cutting problem of Windowed Fourier Transform. We propose a new seismic array data processing procedure capable of displaying the localized spatial coherence of the signal in both the time- and frequency-domain, in turn deriving the propagation parameters of the most coherent signals crossing the array. The procedure consists in: a) Wavelet coherence analysis for each station pair of the instruments array, aimed at retrieving the frequency- and time-localisation of coherent signals. To this purpose, we use the normalised wavelet cross- power spectrum, smoothed along the time and scale domains. We calculate different coherence spectra adopting smoothing windows of increasing lengths; a final, robust estimate of the time-frequency localisation of spatially-coherent signals is eventually retrieved from the stack of the individual coherence distribution. This step allows for a quick and reliable signal discrimination: wave groups propagating across the network will manifest as high-coherence patches spanning the corresponding time-scale region. b) Once the signals have been localised in the time and frequency domain,their propagation parameters are estimated using a modified MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Characterization) algorithm. We select the MUSIC approach as it demonstrated superior performances in the case of low SNR signals, more plane waves contemporaneously impinging at the array and closely separated sources. The narrow-band Coherent Signal Subspace technique is applied to the complex Continuous Wavelet Transform of multichannel data for improving the singularity of the estimated cross-covariance matrix and the accuracy of the estimated signal eigenvectors. Using

  1. Genopal™: A Novel Hollow Fibre Array for Focused Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Okuzaki, Daisuke; Fukushima, Tatsunobu; Tougan, Takahiro; Ishii, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Shigeto; Yoshizaki, Kazuyuki; Akita, Takashi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Expression profiling of target genes in patient blood is a powerful tool for RNA diagnosis. Here, we describe Genopal™, a novel platform ideal for efficient focused microarray analysis. Genopal™, which consists of gel-filled fibres, is advantageous for high-quality mass production via large-scale slicing of the Genopal™ block. We prepared two arrays, infectant and autoimmunity, that provided highly reliable data in terms of repetitive scanning of the same and/or distinct microarrays. Moreover, we demonstrated that Genopal™ had sensitivity sufficient to yield signals in short hybridization times (0.5 h). Application of the autoimmunity array to blood samples allowed us to identify an expression pattern specific to Takayasu arteritis based on the Spearman rank correlation by comparing the reference profile with those of several autoimmune diseases and healthy volunteers (HVs). The comparison of these data with those obtained by other methods revealed that they exhibited similar expression profiles of many target genes. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Genopal™ is an advantageous platform for focused microarrays with regard to its low cost, rapid results and reliable quality. PMID:21059707

  2. SAVANT: Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chock, Ricaurte

    2000-01-01

    The photovoltaics (PV) industry is now being held to strict specifications, such as end-oflife power requirements, that force them to overengineer their products to avoid contractual penalties. Such overengineering has been the only reliable way to meet such specifications. Unfortunately, it also results in a more costly process than is probably necessary. In our conversations with the PV industry, the issue of cost has been raised again and again. Consequently, the Photovoltaics and Space Environment Effects branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has been developing a software tool to address this problem. SAVANT, Glenn's tool for solar array verification and analysis is in the technology demonstration phase. Ongoing work has proven that more efficient and less costly PV designs should be possible by using SAVANT to predict the on-orbit life-cycle performance. The ultimate goal of the SAVANT project is to provide a user-friendly computer tool to predict PV on-orbit life-cycle performance. This should greatly simplify the tasks of scaling and designing the PV power component of any given flight or mission. By being able to predict how a particular PV article will perform, designers will be able to balance mission power requirements (both beginning-of-life and end-of-life) with survivability concerns such as power degradation due to radiation and/or contamination. Recent comparisons with actual flight data from the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) mission validate this approach.

  3. Finite element analysis simulations for ultrasonic array NDE inspections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Jeff; Tweedie, Andrew; Harvey, Gerald; O'Leary, Richard; Mulholland, Anthony; Tant, Katherine; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Advances in manufacturing techniques and materials have led to an increase in the demand for reliable and robust inspection techniques to maintain safety critical features. The application of modelling methods to develop and evaluate inspections is becoming an essential tool for the NDE community. Current analytical methods are inadequate for simulation of arbitrary components and heterogeneous materials, such as anisotropic welds or composite structures. Finite element analysis software (FEA), such as PZFlex, can provide the ability to simulate the inspection of these arrangements, providing the ability to economically prototype and evaluate improved NDE methods. FEA is often seen as computationally expensive for ultrasound problems however, advances in computing power have made it a more viable tool. This paper aims to illustrate the capability of appropriate FEA to produce accurate simulations of ultrasonic array inspections - minimizing the requirement for expensive test-piece fabrication. Validation is afforded via corroboration of the FE derived and experimentally generated data sets for a test-block comprising 1D and 2D defects. The modelling approach is extended to consider the more troublesome aspects of heterogeneous materials where defect dimensions can be of the same length scale as the grain structure. The model is used to facilitate the implementation of new ultrasonic array inspection methods for such materials. This is exemplified by considering the simulation of ultrasonic NDE in a weld structure in order to assess new approaches to imaging such structures.

  4. Joint analysis of BICEP2/keck array and Planck Data.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Aghanim, N; Ahmed, Z; Aikin, R W; Alexander, K D; Arnaud, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barkats, D; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Benton, S J; Bernard, J-P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bischoff, C A; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Brevik, J A; Bucher, M; Buder, I; Bullock, E; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Buza, V; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J-F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chary, R-R; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Connors, J; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J-M; Désert, F-X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dowell, C D; Duband, L; Ducout, A; Dunkley, J; Dupac, X; Dvorkin, C; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Filippini, J P; Finelli, F; Fliescher, S; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; Golwala, S R; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Halpern, M; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Hasselfield, M; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hilton, G C; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Hristov, V V; Huffenberger, K M; Hui, H; Hurier, G; Irwin, K D; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Karakci, A; Karkare, K S; Kaufman, J P; Keating, B G; Kefeli, S; Keihänen, E; Kernasovskiy, S A; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kovac, J M; Krachmalnicoff, N; Kunz, M; Kuo, C L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J-M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leitch, E M; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lewis, A; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Lueker, M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Mason, P; Matarrese, S; Megerian, K G; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M-A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Moss, A; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nguyen, H T; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Brient, R; Ogburn, R W; Orlando, A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Pryke, C; Puget, J-L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Richter, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Schwarz, R; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Sheehy, C D; Spencer, L D; Staniszewski, Z K; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A-S; Sygnet, J-F; Tauber, J A; Teply, G P; Terenzi, L; Thompson, K L; Toffolatti, L; Tolan, J E; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Turner, A D; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Vieregg, A G; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, R; Weber, A C; Wehus, I K; White, M; White, S D M; Willmert, J; Wong, C L; Yoon, K W; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-03-13

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400  deg^{2} patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5°. The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2  μK deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150  GHz to a lensed-ΛCDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r_{0.05}<0.12 at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0σ significance. PMID:25815919

  5. Joint Analysis of BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BICEP2/Keck and Planck Collaborations; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barkats, D.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Benton, S. J.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Brevik, J. A.; Bucher, M.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Buza, V.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Connors, J.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; De Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Dvorkin, C.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Filippini, J. P.; Finelli, F.; Fliescher, S.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; Golwala, S. R.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hasselfield, M.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hui, H.; Hurier, G.; Irwin, K. D.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Keihänen, E.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kovac, J. M.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kuo, C. L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leitch, E. M.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Lueker, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Mason, P.; Matarrese, S.; Megerian, K. G.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Pryke, C.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Richter, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schwarz, R.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Sheehy, C. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Teply, G. P.; Terenzi, L.; Thompson, K. L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tolan, J. E.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Turner, A. D.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Vieregg, A. G.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Weber, A. C.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Willmert, J.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.; Bicep2/Keck; Planck Collaborations

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of data from BICEP2/Keck Array and Planck. BICEP2 and Keck Array have observed the same approximately 400 deg2 patch of sky centered on RA 0 h, Dec. -57.5 ° . The combined maps reach a depth of 57 nK deg in Stokes Q and U in a band centered at 150 GHz. Planck has observed the full sky in polarization at seven frequencies from 30 to 353 GHz, but much less deeply in any given region (1.2 μ K deg in Q and U at 143 GHz). We detect 150 ×353 cross-correlation in B modes at high significance. We fit the single- and cross-frequency power spectra at frequencies ≥150 GHz to a lensed-Λ CDM model that includes dust and a possible contribution from inflationary gravitational waves (as parametrized by the tensor-to-scalar ratio r), using a prior on the frequency spectral behavior of polarized dust emission from previous Planck analysis of other regions of the sky. We find strong evidence for dust and no statistically significant evidence for tensor modes. We probe various model variations and extensions, including adding a synchrotron component in combination with lower frequency data, and find that these make little difference to the r constraint. Finally, we present an alternative analysis which is similar to a map-based cleaning of the dust contribution, and show that this gives similar constraints. The final result is expressed as a likelihood curve for r, and yields an upper limit r0.05<0.12 at 95% confidence. Marginalizing over dust and r, lensing B modes are detected at 7.0 σ significance.

  6. Rate equations analysis of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays under steady state conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.; Kapon, E.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.

    1984-01-01

    Rate equations analysis of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays has been carried out. It was found that for given (laser) current densities, the photon density distribution in the array elements is that particular one which maximizes the total photon density. The results of this analysis were then combined with the waveguide properties of the laser array waveguide, yielding a basic model of phase-locked diode laser arrays. This model explains the effects of the variation of the current combination through the array elements on its mode structure that were observed recently.

  7. Supermode analysis of phase-locked arrays of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapon, E.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The optical characteristics of phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays are formulated in terms of the array supermodes, which are the eigenmodes of the composite-array waveguide, by using coupled-mode theory. These supermodes are employed to calculate the near fields, the far fields, and the difference in the longitudinal-mode oscillation wavelengths of the array. It is shown that the broadening in the far-field beam divergence, as well as the broadening of each of the longitudinal modes that were observed in phase-locked arrays, may arise from the excitation of an increasing number of supermodes at increasing pumping levels.

  8. The Murchison Widefield Array 21 cm Power Spectrum Analysis Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Trott, C. M.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Pindor, B.; Sullivan, I. S.; Pober, J. C.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, HS; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Thyagarajan, N.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple independent data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Comparing the outputs of imaging and power spectrum stages highlights differences in calibration, foreground subtraction, and power spectrum calculation. The power spectra found using these different methods span a space defined by the various tradeoffs between speed, accuracy, and systematic control. Lessons learned from comparing the pipelines range from the algorithmic to the prosaically mundane; all demonstrate the many pitfalls of neglecting reproducibility. We briefly discuss the way these different methods attempt to handle the question of evaluating a significant detection in the presence of foregrounds.

  9. Geometric Nonlinear Analysis of Self-Anchored Cable-Stayed Suspension Bridges

    PubMed Central

    Hui-Li, Wang; Yan-Bin, Tan; Si-Feng, Qin; Zhe, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Geometric nonlinearity of self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridges is studied in this paper. The repercussion of shrinkage and creep of concrete, rise-to-span ratio, and girder camber on the system is discussed. A self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridge with a main span of 800 m is analyzed with linear theory, second-order theory, and nonlinear theory, respectively. In the condition of various rise-to-span ratios and girder cambers, the moments and displacements of both the girder and the pylon under live load are acquired. Based on the results it is derived that the second-order theory can be adopted to analyze a self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridge with a main span of 800 m, and the error is less than 6%. The shrinkage and creep of concrete impose a conspicuous impact on the structure. And it outmatches suspension bridges for system stiffness. As the rise-to-span ratio increases, the axial forces of the main cable and the girder decline. The system stiffness rises with the girder camber being employed. PMID:24282388

  10. Geometric nonlinear analysis of self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridges.

    PubMed

    Hui-Li, Wang; Yan-Bin, Tan; Si-Feng, Qin; Zhe, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Geometric nonlinearity of self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridges is studied in this paper. The repercussion of shrinkage and creep of concrete, rise-to-span ratio, and girder camber on the system is discussed. A self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridge with a main span of 800 m is analyzed with linear theory, second-order theory, and nonlinear theory, respectively. In the condition of various rise-to-span ratios and girder cambers, the moments and displacements of both the girder and the pylon under live load are acquired. Based on the results it is derived that the second-order theory can be adopted to analyze a self-anchored cable-stayed suspension bridge with a main span of 800 m, and the error is less than 6%. The shrinkage and creep of concrete impose a conspicuous impact on the structure. And it outmatches suspension bridges for system stiffness. As the rise-to-span ratio increases, the axial forces of the main cable and the girder decline. The system stiffness rises with the girder camber being employed. PMID:24282388

  11. High-throughput analysis and protein engineering using microcapillary arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bob; Lim, Sungwon; Kannan, Arvind; Alford, Spencer C; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel; Dimov, Ivan K; Baer, Thomas M; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a multipurpose technology platform, termed μSCALE (microcapillary single-cell analysis and laser extraction), that enables massively parallel, quantitative biochemical and biophysical measurements on millions of protein variants expressed from yeast or bacteria. μSCALE spatially segregates single cells within a microcapillary array, enabling repeated imaging, cell growth and protein expression. We performed high-throughput analysis of cells and their protein products using a range of fluorescent assays, including binding-affinity measurements and dynamic enzymatic assays. A precise laser-based extraction method allows rapid recovery of live clones and their genetic material from microcapillaries for further study. With μSCALE, we discovered a new antibody against a clinical cancer target, evolved a fluorescent protein biosensor and engineered an enzyme to reduce its sensitivity to its inhibitor. These protein analysis and engineering applications each have unique assay requirements and different host organisms, highlighting the flexibility and technical capabilities of the μSCALE platform. PMID:26641932

  12. Water desorption of cassava starch granules: A study based on thermogravimetric analysis of aqueous suspensions and humid powders.

    PubMed

    Ayala Valencia, Germán; Djabourov, Madeleine; do Amaral Sobral, Paulo José

    2016-08-20

    This work reports on water desorption from cassava starch in relation with the structure and conditioning of granules in suspensions or after equilibration in desiccators. The experimental work is performed by thermogravimetric analysis with isothermal and non-isothermal protocols and interpreted to derive the activation energies and desorption frequencies according to the humidity range with no adjustable parameter. The analysis points out the different types of water interacting with the starch granules and relates the drying coefficients to their microscopic structure. The work helps clarifying contradictory and partial results from the literature. PMID:27178961

  13. Seismic Background Noise Analysis of BRTR (PS-43) Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezgi Bakir, Mahmure; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Umut Semin, Korhan

    2015-04-01

    The seismic background noise variation of BRTR array, composed of two sub arrays located in Ankara and in Ankara-Keskin, has been investigated by calculating Power Spectral Density and Probability Density Functions for seasonal and diurnal noise variations between 2005 and 2011. PSDs were computed within the frequency range of 100 s - 10 Hz. The results show us a little change in noise conditions in terms of time and location. Especially, noise level changes were observed at 3-5 Hz in diurnal variations at Keskin array and there is a 5-7 dB difference in day and night time in cultural noise band (1-10 Hz). On the other hand, noise levels of medium period array is high in 1-2 Hz frequency rather than short period array. High noise levels were observed in daily working times when we compare it to night-time in cultural noise band. The seasonal background noise variation at both sites also shows very similar properties to each other. Since these stations are borehole instruments and away from the coasts, we saw a small change in noise levels caused by microseism. Comparison between Keskin short period array and Ankara medium period array show us Keskin array is quiter than Ankara array.

  14. GEO Satellite Solar Array Abnormality's Analysis and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junyan; Yang, Yujie; Zhu, Weibo; Liu, Jingyong; Xu, Hui

    Solar array, converting sunlight into electricity, is one of the most important components in satellite energy subsystem. It is significant for in-orbit satellite safety that solar array and its subsidiaries work normally. An abnormal phenomenon that the output current of one solar array suddenly decreased happened in a GEO satellite. Combined with the structure of the solar array system and the trends of relevant parameters during the abnormality, the paper analyzed the possible reasons, and detected the root cause, and finally provided an emergency treatment for this kind of abnormality.

  15. Peptide Arrays for Kinome Analysis of Livestock Species

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Joanna; Van Wyk, Brenden; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Arsenault, Ryan; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip John; Napper, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism for both the transfer of intracellular information and the initiation of cellular responses. Within human medicine, considerable emphasis is placed on understanding and controlling the enzymes (kinases) that are responsible for catalyzing these modifications. This is evident in the prominent use of kinase inhibitors as drugs as well as the trend to understand complex biology and identify biomarkers via characterizations of global kinase (kinome) activity. Despite the demonstrated value of focusing on kinome activity, the application of this perspective to livestock has been restricted by the absence of appropriate research tools. In this review, we discuss the development of software platforms that facilitate the development and application of species-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis of livestock. Examples of the application of kinomic approaches to a number of priority species (cattle, pigs, and chickens) in a number of biological contexts (infections, biomarker discovery, and food quality) are presented as are emerging trends for kinome analysis of livestock. PMID:26664912

  16. Peptide Arrays for Kinome Analysis of Livestock Species.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Joanna; Van Wyk, Brenden; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Arsenault, Ryan; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip John; Napper, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism for both the transfer of intracellular information and the initiation of cellular responses. Within human medicine, considerable emphasis is placed on understanding and controlling the enzymes (kinases) that are responsible for catalyzing these modifications. This is evident in the prominent use of kinase inhibitors as drugs as well as the trend to understand complex biology and identify biomarkers via characterizations of global kinase (kinome) activity. Despite the demonstrated value of focusing on kinome activity, the application of this perspective to livestock has been restricted by the absence of appropriate research tools. In this review, we discuss the development of software platforms that facilitate the development and application of species-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis of livestock. Examples of the application of kinomic approaches to a number of priority species (cattle, pigs, and chickens) in a number of biological contexts (infections, biomarker discovery, and food quality) are presented as are emerging trends for kinome analysis of livestock. PMID:26664912

  17. Preparation of Single-cell Suspensions for Cytofluorimetric Analysis from Different Mouse Skin Regions.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Achille; Cigni, Clara; Zanoni, Ivan; Granucci, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a barrier organ that interacts with the external environment. Being continuously exposed to potential microbial invasion, the dermis and epidermis home a variety of immune cells in both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Tools to obtain skin cell release for cytofluorimetric analyses are, therefore, very useful in order to study the complex network of immune cells residing in the skin and their response to microbial stimuli. Here, we describe an efficient methodology for the digestion of mouse skin to rapidly and efficiently obtain single-cell suspensions. This protocol allows maintenance of maximum cell viability without compromising surface antigen expression. We also describe how to take and digest skin samples from different anatomical locations, such as the ear, trunk, tail, and footpad. The obtained suspensions are then stained and analyzed by flow cytometry to discriminate between different leukocyte populations. PMID:27166881

  18. Terrestrial central station array life-cycle analysis support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Plant elements evaluated included designs for module, panel and array structures, as well as balance-of-plant systems. Installation and maintenance procedures and the impact of site environment were also evaluated. In terms of the cost of energy produced, the horizontal array configuration was found to be less expensive than the tandem array at latitudes less than 40 deg. Both of these configurations are less expensive than the rack design. However, the costs of energy for all three configurations are within approximately ?10 percent of each other. For flat plate panels, the seasonally adjusted and tracking array configurations are not economically attractive when compared to the three other designs. Balance-of-plant costs are approximately equal to (goal) module costs. The array structures and foundations are the most expensive items in the balance-of-plant costs.

  19. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  20. Design and analysis of a shock absorber with variable moment of inertia for passive vehicle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tongyi; Liang, Ming; Li, Chuan; Yang, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    A two-terminal mass (TTM) based vibration absorber with variable moment of inertia (VMI) for passive vehicle suspension is proposed. The VMI of the system is achieved by the motion of sliders embedded in a hydraulic driven flywheel. The moment of inertia increases in reaction to strong vertical vehicle oscillations and decreases for weak vertical oscillations. The hydraulic mechanism of the system converts the relative linear motion between the two terminals of the suspension into rotating motion of the flywheel. In the case of stronger vehicle vertical oscillation, the sliders inside the flywheel move away from the center of the flywheel because of the centrifugal force, hence yielding higher moment of inertia. The opposite is true in the case of weaker vehicle oscillation. As such, the moment of inertia adjusts itself adaptively in response to the road conditions. The performance of the proposed TTM-VMI absorber has been analyzed via dynamics modeling and simulation and further examined by experiments. In comparison to its counterpart with constant moment of inertia, the proposed VMI system offers faster response, better road handling and safety, improved ride comfort, and reduced suspension deflection except in the case of sinusoidal excitations.

  1. Analysis of backwashing efficiency in dead-end hollow-fibre ultrafiltration of anaerobic suspensions.

    PubMed

    Vera, Luisa; González, Enrique; Ruigómez, Ignacio; Gómez, Jenniffer; Delgado, Sebastián

    2015-11-01

    A novel dead-end mode operation for filtering anaerobic suspensions was investigated. In this mode, the filtration system automatically adjusted backwashing frequency to a preselected transmembrane pressure set-point. This paper discusses the effectiveness of the backwashing conditions on membrane fouling. Anaerobic suspensions from a conventional wastewater treatment plant digester were used as model suspensions for the trials carried out at lab-scale. Gas sparging aided backwashing significantly enhanced membrane cleaning efficiency. No effect of gas sparging on internal fouling was detected. Also, the cleaning efficiency linearly decreased with permeate flux. Nevertheless, due to a high increase in the reversible fouling, a reasonable net permeate flux (7.2-6.8 L/h m(2)) can be achieved when intermediate fluxes (12-16 L/h m(2)) were imposed and the higher transmembrane pressure set-point value (50 kPa) was applied. Both backwashing duration and flux exhibited similar influence on cake fouling removal for a given volume of permeate produced. PMID:26081780

  2. Design and Analysis of the Warm-To Suspension Links for Jefferson Lab's 11 Gev/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, E.; Brindza, P.; Lassiter, S.; Fowler, M.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes design and analysis performed for the warm-to-cold suspension links of the warm iron yoke superconducting quadrupole magnets, and superconducting dipole magnet. The results of investigation of titanium Ti-6Al-4V and Nitronic 50 stainless steel for the suspension links to support the cold mass, preloads, forces due to cryogenic temperature, and imbalanced magnetic forces from misalignments are presented. Allowable stresses at normal-case scenarios and worst-case scenarios, space constraints, and heat leak considerations are discussed. Principles of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code were used to determine allowable stresses. Optimal angles of the suspension links were obtained by calculation and finite element methods. The stress levels of suspension links at multiple scenarios are presented, discussed, and compared with the allowable stresses.

  3. Reliability analysis of the solar array based on Fault Tree Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianing, Wu; Shaoze, Yan

    2011-07-01

    The solar array is an important device used in the spacecraft, which influences the quality of in-orbit operation of the spacecraft and even the launches. This paper analyzes the reliability of the mechanical system and certifies the most vital subsystem of the solar array. The fault tree analysis (FTA) model is established according to the operating process of the mechanical system based on DFH-3 satellite; the logical expression of the top event is obtained by Boolean algebra and the reliability of the solar array is calculated. The conclusion shows that the hinges are the most vital links between the solar arrays. By analyzing the structure importance(SI) of the hinge's FTA model, some fatal causes, including faults of the seal, insufficient torque of the locking spring, temperature in space, and friction force, can be identified. Damage is the initial stage of the fault, so limiting damage is significant to prevent faults. Furthermore, recommendations for improving reliability associated with damage limitation are discussed, which can be used for the redesigning of the solar array and the reliability growth planning.

  4. Device, array, and methods for disease detection and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Rao, Rupa S.; Lane, Stephen M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2016-06-14

    A device and array coupled to capture molecules are provided. Specifically, the device and array can be used for detecting the presence and concentration of biomarkers in a sample from a subject. The device and array can also allow the use of a method for scoring a sample for, e.g., the purpose of diagnosing a disease. The method can also be advantageous to applications where there is a need to accurately determine the disease stage of a subject for the purpose of making therapeutic decisions.

  5. Surface-induced lamellar orientation of multilayer membrane arrays. Theoretical analysis and a new method with application to purple membrane fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, N A; Rothschild, K J; Luippold, D A; Simon, B A

    1980-01-01

    The orientation of membrane fragments into a lamellar array by a flat surface is analyzed. This analysis includes processes such as centrifugation and drying and physical effects due to membrane fragment steric interactions, finite size, elasticity, and thermal fluctuations. Several model calculations of optimal orientational order in multilayer membrane arrays are presented. The predictions of a smectic A model agree quantitatively with the measured spatial dependence of the fluctuations in layer orientation in a multilamellar arrays. A new technique, based in part on this analysis, for the preparation of well-oriented multilamellar arrays of natural and artificial membranes, isopotential spin-dry centrifugation, is described. The method involves the use of specially designed inserts for the buckets of a standard vacuum ultracentrifuge. The membrane fragments to be oriented are sedimented from solution or suspension onto a substrate of a convenient material which forms a gravitational isopotential surface at high g. Sedimentation is accompanied by removal of the suspending medium at high g to produce oriented films with a selected degree of solvation. In addition, a method is described whereby small solute molecules can be maintained in constant concentration with the membrane fragments during this process. Initial application of the method to the orientation of purple membrane fragments is described. The degree of orientation obtained in this system is evaluated using freeze-fracture and scanning electron microscopy, optical birefringence, linear dichroism, and microscopy. Images FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 15 PMID:7272434

  6. Analysis of variable-thickness, streamlined transducer array windowing concepts for high speed underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Robert M.

    2002-11-01

    Recent research in very high speed underwater vehicles shows they require a much more streamlined vehicle nose than the present rather flat tactical scale vehicle nose. It has been found that the common forward-facing transducer array with a constant thickness array window utilized on current lower speed vehicles is inadequate. Two newer alternate front-end array concepts suitable for lower drag, higher speed vehicles being investigated are (a) a variable thickness, streamlined array window on a flat forward facing array and (b) a streamlined vehicle nose structure consisting of a built-in distributed, conformal array. While these highly streamlined concepts are attractive from the standpoint of reducing vehicle drag at higher speeds, both require reexamination of the effects of high curvature on front-end sonar array performance. In the present paper, both above streamlined array concepts are numerically examined using the sara2d dynamic structural-acoustic Finite Element Analysis (FEA) code. First, the acoustic performance of a hemispherical array window is compared to a common equal aperture flat window in both transmit (outgoing acoustic wave) and receive (incident acoustic wave) modes. Second, a dynamic simulation of acoustic array beam-forming and beam-steering is performed for a conical shaped conformal array to assess the feasibility of the concept.

  7. Faster Array Training and Rapid Analysis for a Sensor Array Intended for an Event Monitor in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, A. V.; Fonollosa, J.; Huerta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental monitoring, in particular, air monitoring, is a critical need for human space flight. Both monitoring and life support systems have needs for closed loop process feedback and quality control for environmental factors. Monitoring protects the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew and different sensors help ensure that the habitat falls within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the farther the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. There is an acknowledged need for an event monitor which samples the air continuously and provides near real-time information on changes in the air. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will incorporate transient sensor responses in the analysis. Preliminary work has already showed more rapid quantification and identification of analytes and the potential for faster training time of the array. We will look at some of the factors that contribute to demonstrating faster training time for the array. Faster training will decrease the integrated sensor exposure to training analytes, which will also help extend sensor lifetime.

  8. Biomedical analysis of rat body hair after hindlimb suspension for 14 days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Masahiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ishioka, Noriaki; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Yamazaki, Takashi; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Niihori, Maki; Nakao, Reiko; Yamada, Shin; Mukai, Chiaki; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2012-04-01

    The levels of 26 minerals in rat body hair were analyzed in control and hindlimb-suspended Wistar Hannover rats (n=5 each). We quantified the levels of 22 minerals in this experiment. However, we were unable to measure the levels of 4 minerals (Be, V, Cd, and Hg) quantitatively because they were below the limit of detection. Of the 22 quantified, the levels of 19 minerals were not significantly different between control and hindlimb-suspended groups. The levels of 3 minerals (Pb, Cr, and Al) tended to be higher in the hindlimb-suspended group than in the control group; however, this difference was not significant. The concentrations of 3 other minerals (I, K, and Mg) were significantly different between the 2 groups. The iodine (I) level was 58.2% higher in the hindlimb-suspended group than in the control group (P<0.05). Potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) levels were 55.2% and 20.4% lower, respectively, in the experimental group (P<0.05 in both cases). These results indicate that a physiological change in mineral metabolism resulting from physical or mental stress, such as hindlimb suspension, is reflected in body hair. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. We believe that hindlimb suspension for 14 days can simulate the effects of an extremely severe environment, such as space flight, because the hindlimb suspension model elicits a rapid physiological change in skeletal muscle, bone, and fluid shift even in the short term. These results also suggest that we can detect various effects on the body by analyzing the human scalp hair shaft.

  9. Nonlinear analysis and performance evaluation of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1978-01-01

    The Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) can provide high accurate fine pointing for a variety of solar-, stellar-, and Earth-viewing scientific instruments during space shuttle orbital missions. In this report, a detailed nonlinear mathematical model is developed for the ASPS/Space Shuttle system. The equations are augmented with nonlinear models of components such as magnetic actuators and gimbal torquers. Control systems and payload attitude state estimators are designed in order to obtain satisfactory pointing performance, and statistical pointing performance is predicted in the presence of measurement noise and disturbances.

  10. [Particle Size and Number Density Online Analysis for Particle Suspension with Polarization-Differentiation Elastic Light Scattering Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-kang; Fang, Hui

    2016-03-01

    The basic principle of polarization-differentiation elastic light scattering spectroscopy based techniques is that under the linear polarized light incidence, the singlely scattered light from the superficial biological tissue and diffusively scattered light from the deep tissue can be separated according to the difference of polarization characteristics. The novel point of the paper is to apply this method to the detection of particle suspension and, to realize the simultaneous measurement of its particle size and number density in its natural status. We design and build a coaxial cage optical system, and measure the backscatter signal at a specified angle from a polystyrene microsphere suspension. By controlling the polarization direction of incident light with a linear polarizer and adjusting the polarization direction of collected light with another linear polarizer, we obtain the parallel polarized elastic light scattering spectrum and cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum. The difference between the two is the differential polarized elastic light scattering spectrum which include only the single scattering information of the particles. We thus compare this spectrum to the Mie scattering calculation and extract the particle size. We then also analyze the cross polarized elastic light scattering spectrum by applying the particle size already extracted. The analysis is based on the approximate expressions taking account of light diffusing, from which we are able to obtain the number density of the particle suspension. We compare our experimental outcomes with the manufacturer-provided values and further analyze the influence of the particle diameter standard deviation on the number density extraction, by which we finally verify the experimental method. The potential applications of the method include the on-line particle quality monitoring for particle manufacture as well as the fat and protein density detection of milk products. PMID:27400522

  11. Array Independent Component Analysis with Application to Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuyeva, Irina A.

    2012-11-01

    There are three ways to learn about an object: from samples taken directly from the site, from simulation studies based on its known scientific properties, or from remote sensing images. All three are carried out to study Earth and Mars. Our goal, however, is to learn about the second largest storm on Jupiter, called the White Oval, whose characteristics are unknown to this day. As Jupiter is a gas giant and hundreds of millions of miles away from Earth, we can only make inferences about the planet from retrieval algorithms and remotely sensed images. Our focus is to find latent variables from the remotely sensed data that best explain its underlying atmospheric structure. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is currently the most commonly employed technique to do so. For a data set with more than two modes, this approach fails to account for all of the variable interactions, especially if the distribution of the variables is not multivariate normal; an assumption that is rarely true of multispectral images. The thesis presents an overview of PCA along with the most commonly employed decompositions in other fields: Independent Component Analysis, Tucker-3 and CANDECOMP/PARAFAC and discusses their limitations in finding unobserved, independent structures in a data cube. We motivate the need for a novel dimension reduction technique that generalizes existing decompositions to find latent, statistically independent variables for one side of a multimodal (number of modes greater than two) data set while accounting for the variable interactions with its other modes. Our method is called Array Independent Component Analysis (AICA). As the main question of any decomposition is how to select a small number of latent variables that best capture the structure in the data, we extend the heuristic developed by Ceulemans and Kiers in [10] to aid in model selection for the AICA framework. The effectiveness of each dimension reduction technique is determined by the degree of

  12. Magnetotelluric array data analysis from north-west Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevatova, M.; Smirnov, M. Yu.; Jones, A. G.; Pedersen, L. B.; Becken, M.; Biolik, M.; Cherevatova, M.; Ebbing, J.; Gradmann, S.; Gurk, M.; Hübert, J.; Jones, A. G.; Junge, A.; Kamm, J.; Korja, T.; Lahti, I.; Löwer, A.; Nittinger, C.; Pedersen, L. B.; Savvaidis, A.; Smirnov, M.

    2015-06-01

    New magnetotelluric (MT) data in north-west Fennoscandia were acquired within the framework of the project "Magnetotellurics in the Scandes" (MaSca). The project focuses on the investigation of the crustal and upper mantle lithospheric structure in the transition zone from stable Precambrian cratonic interior to passive continental margin beneath the Caledonian orogen and the Scandinavian Mountains in western Fennoscandia. An array of 59 synchronous long period and 220 broad-band MT sites was occupied in the summers of 2011 to 2013. We estimated MT transfer functions in the period range from 0.003 to 105 s. The Q-function multi-site multi-frequency analysis and the phase tensor were used to estimate strike and dimensionality of MT data. Dimensionality and strike analyses indicate generally 2-D behaviour of the data with 3-D effects at some sites and period bands. In this paper we present 2-D inversion of the data, 3-D inversion models are shown in the parallel paper. We choose to invert the determinant of the impedance tensor to mitigate 3-D effects in the data on our 2-D models. Seven crustal-scale and four lithospheric-scale 2-D models are presented. The resistive regions are images of the Archaean and Proterozoic basement in the east and thin Caledonian nappes in the west. The middle and lower crust of the Svecofennian province is conductive. The southern end of the Kittilä Greenstone Belt is seen in the models as a strong upper to middle crustal conductor. In the Caledonides, the highly conductive alum shales are observed along the Caledonian Thrust Front. The thickest lithosphere is in the Palaeoproterozioc Svecofennian Domain, not in the Archaean. The thickness of the lithosphere is around 200 km in the north and 300 km in the south-west.

  13. Microfluidic bead suspension hopper.

    PubMed

    Price, Alexander K; MacConnell, Andrew B; Paegel, Brian M

    2014-05-20

    Many high-throughput analytical platforms, from next-generation DNA sequencing to drug discovery, rely on beads as carriers of molecular diversity. Microfluidic systems are ideally suited to handle and analyze such bead libraries with high precision and at minute volume scales; however, the challenge of introducing bead suspensions into devices before they sediment usually confounds microfluidic handling and analysis. We developed a bead suspension hopper that exploits sedimentation to load beads into a microfluidic droplet generator. A suspension hopper continuously delivered synthesis resin beads (17 μm diameter, 112,000 over 2.67 h) functionalized with a photolabile linker and pepstatin A into picoliter-scale droplets of an HIV-1 protease activity assay to model ultraminiaturized compound screening. Likewise, trypsinogen template DNA-coated magnetic beads (2.8 μm diameter, 176,000 over 5.5 h) were loaded into droplets of an in vitro transcription/translation system to model a protein evolution experiment. The suspension hopper should effectively remove any barriers to using suspensions as sample inputs, paving the way for microfluidic automation to replace robotic library distribution. PMID:24761972

  14. Thermal correlation analysis of a long-span suspension bridge static responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linren; Chen, Lan; Xia, Yong; Brownjohn, James M. W.

    2016-04-01

    Harsh service environment degenerates the performance of bridges even leads to catastrophic collapse. Structural temperature has been widely recognized as one of the most negative environmental effects on bridges. The structural responses are deeply affected by the variation and distribution of temperatures on bridges. Therefore, identifying the correlations between them is a significant issue for structural safety assessment. In this study, the relationships between the temperature induced static response and the surrounding weather factors are investigated based on the long-term field measurements of a long-span suspension bridge. The correlations of the meteorological parameters between the bridge filed and the nearby weather station, and the relations of structural static responses to the air temperature, are investigated. The results indicate that relationships of meteorological parameters between nearby weather station and the bridge field can be predicted. The correlation between the static responses and the air temperature and is remarkable with high correlation coefficient. The conclusions are expected to provide reference for the design and evaluation of longspan suspension bridges.

  15. Analysis of reconfigurable line pattern of capillary plasma antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Noor Fadhilah; Dagang, Ahmad Nazri; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2015-04-01

    Simulations by applying Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio have been done towards Hg-Ar (10 Torr and 20 Torr) capillary tubes. These capillary tubes which are 5 mm in diameter are designed as plasma antenna monopole antenna and antenna arrays (four line array, six line array and nine line array). They have been arranged in the two different dimensions, 4mm × 4mm and 8mm × 8mm. Their performance as an antenna have been analyzed and compared. The reconfigurable characteristics of these kinds of plasma antenna such as gain, directivity and return loss are calculated. The results of gain and directivity of 10 Torr of plasma antenna are stronger than 20 Torr in the 4mm × 4mm dimension. Return loss of these kinds of plasma antenna significantly dropped in different operating frequencies of microwave ranges make them suitable to be applied for multiple applications in antennas or telecommunications field. Gas pressure of plasma antenna and array distance between the capillary tubes give a significant effect to the antenna performance in range of 10 GHz and below.

  16. Computational Analysis of Static and Dynamic Behaviour of Magnetic Suspensions and Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J.

    1996-01-01

    Static modelling of magnetic bearings is often carried out using magnetic circuit theory. This theory cannot easily include nonlinear effects such as magnetic saturation or the fringing of flux in air-gaps. Modern computational tools are able to accurately model complex magnetic bearing geometries, provided some care is exercised. In magnetic suspension applications, the magnetic fields are highly three-dimensional and require computational tools for the solution of most problems of interest. The dynamics of a magnetic bearing or magnetic suspension system can be strongly affected by eddy currents. Eddy currents are present whenever a time-varying magnetic flux penetrates a conducting medium. The direction of flow of the eddy current is such as to reduce the rate-of-change of flux. Analytic solutions for eddy currents are available for some simplified geometries, but complex geometries must be solved by computation. It is only in recent years that such computations have been considered truly practical. At NASA Langley Research Center, state-of-the-art finite-element computer codes, 'OPERA', 'TOSCA' and 'ELEKTRA' have recently been installed and applied to the magnetostatic and eddy current problems. This paper reviews results of theoretical analyses which suggest general forms of mathematical models for eddy currents, together with computational results. A simplified circuit-based eddy current model proposed appears to predict the observed trends in the case of large eddy current circuits in conducting non-magnetic material. A much more difficult case is seen to be that of eddy currents in magnetic material, or in non-magnetic material at higher frequencies, due to the lower skin depths. Even here, the dissipative behavior has been shown to yield at least somewhat to linear modelling. Magnetostatic and eddy current computations have been carried out relating to the Annular Suspension and Pointing System, a prototype for a space payload pointing and vibration

  17. Acoustic analysis by spherical microphone array processing of room impulse responses.

    PubMed

    Khaykin, Dima; Rafaely, Boaz

    2012-07-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been recently used for room acoustics analysis, to detect the direction-of-arrival of early room reflections, and compute directional room impulse responses and other spatial room acoustics parameters. Previous works presented methods for room acoustics analysis using spherical arrays that are based on beamforming, e.g., delay-and-sum, regular beamforming, and Dolph-Chebyshev beamforming. Although beamforming methods provide useful directional selectivity, optimal array processing methods can provide enhanced performance. However, these algorithms require an array cross-spectrum matrix with a full rank, while array data based on room impulse responses may not satisfy this condition due to the single frame data. This paper presents a smoothing technique for the cross-spectrum matrix in the frequency domain, designed for spherical microphone arrays, that can solve the problem of low rank when using room impulse response data, therefore facilitating the use of optimal array processing methods. Frequency smoothing is shown to be performed effectively using spherical arrays, due to the decoupling of frequency and angular components in the spherical harmonics domain. Experimental study with data measured in a real auditorium illustrates the performance of optimal array processing methods such as MUSIC and MVDR compared to beamforming. PMID:22779475

  18. Guidelines for genomic array analysis in acquired haematological neoplastic disorders.

    PubMed

    Schoumans, Jacqueline; Suela, Javier; Hastings, Ros; Muehlematter, Dominique; Rack, Katrina; van den Berg, Eva; Berna Beverloo, H; Stevens-Kroef, Marian

    2016-05-01

    Genetic profiling is important for disease evaluation and prediction of prognosis or responsiveness to therapy in neoplasia. Microarray technologies, including array comparative genomic hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphism-detecting arrays, have in recent years been introduced into the diagnostic setting for specific types of haematological malignancies and solid tumours. It can be used as a complementary test or depending on the neoplasia investigated, also as a standalone test. However, comprehensive and readable presentation of frequently identified complex genomic profiles remains challenging. To assist diagnostic laboratories, standardization and minimum criteria for clinical interpretation and reporting of acquired genomic abnormalities detected through arrays in neoplastic disorders are presented. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26774012

  19. Adaptive Injection-locking Oscillator Array for RF Spectrum Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daniel

    2011-04-19

    A highly parallel radio frequency receiver using an array of injection-locking oscillators for on-chip, rapid estimation of signal amplitudes and frequencies is considered. The oscillators are tuned to different natural frequencies, and variable gain amplifiers are used to provide negative feedback to adapt the locking band-width with the input signal to yield a combined measure of input signal amplitude and frequency detuning. To further this effort, an array of 16 two-stage differential ring oscillators and 16 Gilbert-cell mixers is designed for 40-400 MHz operation. The injection-locking oscillator array is assembled on a custom printed-circuit board. Control and calibration is achieved by on-board microcontroller.

  20. High-throughput cell analysis using multiplexed array technologies.

    PubMed

    Beske, Oren E; Goldbard, Simon

    2002-09-15

    The desire for more biologically relevant data from primary screening has resulted in a dramatic increase of cell-based assays in HTS labs. Consequently, new cell-array technologies are being developed to increase the quality and quantity of data emerging from such screens. These technologies take the form of both positional and non-positional formats, each with their own advantages. Notably, screens using these technologies generate databases of high-quality data that can be analyzed in ways currently not possible. The power of cell-based assays combined with new array and analytical technologies will enable the condensation of serial drug discovery processes, thereby decreasing the time and cost of taking a hit compound into clinical trials. Here, we compare array strategies being developed towards the goal of integrating multiplexed cell-based assays into HTS. PMID:12546879

  1. Array2BIO: A Comprehensive Suite of Utilities for the Analysis of Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Chain, P G; Mabery, S; Rasley, A; Garcia, E; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-02-13

    We have developed an integrative and automated toolkit for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray data, named Array2BIO. It identifies groups of coexpressed genes using two complementary approaches--comparative analysis of signal versus control microarrays and clustering analysis of gene expression across different conditions. The identified genes are assigned to functional categories based on the Gene Ontology classification, and a detection of corresponding KEGG protein interaction pathways. Array2BIO reliably handles low-expressor genes and provides a set of statistical methods to quantify the odds of observations, including the Benjamini-Hochberg and Bonferroni multiple testing corrections. Automated interface with the ECR Browser provides evolutionary conservation analysis of identified gene loci while the interconnection with Creme allows high-throughput analysis of human promoter regions and prediction of gene regulatory elements that underlie the observed expression patterns. Array2BIO is publicly available at http://array2bio.dcode.org.

  2. Cantilever arrays for multiplexed mechanical analysis of biomolecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Majumdar, Arunava

    2004-09-01

    Microchips containing arrays of cantilever beams have been used to mechanically detect and quantitatively analyze multiple reactions of DNA hybridization and antigen-antibody binding simultaneously. The reaction-induced deflection of a cantilever beam reflects the interplay between strain energy increase of the beam and the free energy reduction of a reaction, providing an ideal tool for investigating the connection between mechanics and chemistry of biomolecular reactions. Since free energy reduction is common for all reactions, the cantilever array forms a universal platform for label-free detection of various specific biomolecular reactions. A few such reactions and their implications in biology and biotechnology are discussed. PMID:16783934

  3. Recent Developments in the Analysis of Couple Oscillator Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation considers linear arrays of coupled oscillators. Our purpose in coupling oscillators together is to achieve high radiated power through the spatial power combining which results when the oscillators are injection locked to each other. York, et. al. have shown that, left to themselves, the ensemble of injection locked oscillators oscillate at the average of the tuning frequencies of all the oscillators. Coupling these arrays achieves high radiated power through coherent spatial power combining. The coupled oscillators are usually designed to produce constant aperture phase. Oscillators are injection locked to each other or to a master oscillator to produce coherent radiation. Oscillators do not necessarily oscillate at their tuning frequency.

  4. Physical analysis of light-scattering changes in bovine photoreceptor membrane suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Michel-Villaz, M; Brisson, A; Chapron, Y; Saibil, H

    1984-01-01

    We have used electron microscopy and model calculations to analyze the physical basis of light-scattering signals from suspensions of photoreceptor membranes. These signals have previously been used to probe interactions between photoactivated rhodopsin (R*) and the peripheral membrane enzyme, GTP-binding protein (G) (Kühn et al., 1981, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 78:6873-6877). Although there is no unique physical interpretation of these signals, we have shown in this study that they were qualitatively unchanged when the rod outer segment fragments (containing stacked disks) were fragmented by sonication or osmotic shock to produce spherical disk membrane vesicles. An exact treatment of the scattering process for spherical vesicles enabled us to evaluate the effects of changing membrane thickness, refractive index, or vesicle diameter. We present a particular redistribution of mass upon R*-G interaction that fits the experimental data. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:6498278

  5. Simple, Precise and Accurate HPLC Method of Analysis for Nevirapine Suspension from Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Halde, S.; Mungantiwar, A.; Chintamaneni, M.

    2011-01-01

    A selective and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography with UV detector (HPLC-UV) method was developed and validated from human plasma. Nevirapine and internal standard (IS) zidovudine were extracted from human plasma by liquid-liquid extraction process using methyl tert-butyl ether. The samples were analysed using Inertsil ODS 3, 250×4.6 mm, 5 μ column using a mobile phase consists of 50 mM sodium acetate buffer solution (pH-4.00±0.05): acetonitrile (73:27 v/v). The method was validated over a concentration range of 50.00 ng/ml to 3998.96 ng/ml. The method was successfully applied to bioequivalence study of 10 ml single dose nevirapine oral suspension 50 mg/5 ml in healthy male volunteers. PMID:22707826

  6. Panax ginseng Adventitious Root Suspension Culture: Protocol for Biomass Production and Analysis of Ginsenosides by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Paek, Kee Yoeup

    2016-01-01

    Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Korean ginseng) is a popular herbal medicine. It has been used in Chinese and Oriental medicines since thousands of years. Ginseng products are generally used as a tonic and an adaptogen to resist the adverse influence of a wide range of physical, chemical and biological factors, and to restore homeostasis. Ginsenosides or ginseng saponins are the principal active ingredients of ginseng. Since ginseng cultivation process is very slow and needs specific environment for field cultivation, cell and tissue cultures are sought as alternatives for the production of ginseng biomass and bioactive compounds. In this chapter, we focus on methods of induction of adventitious roots from ginseng roots, establishment of adventitious root suspension cultures using bioreactors, procedures for processing of adventitious roots, and analysis of ginsenosides by high pressure liquid chromatography. PMID:27108314

  7. In situ structural analysis of Golgi intracisternal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Engel, Benjamin D; Schaffer, Miroslava; Albert, Sahradha; Asano, Shoh; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    We acquired molecular-resolution structures of the Golgi within its native cellular environment. Vitreous Chlamydomonas cells were thinned by cryo-focused ion beam milling and then visualized by cryo-electron tomography. These tomograms revealed structures within the Golgi cisternae that have not been seen before. Narrow trans-Golgi lumina were spanned by asymmetric membrane-associated protein arrays that had ∼6-nm lateral periodicity. Subtomogram averaging showed that the arrays may determine the narrow central spacing of the trans-Golgi cisternae through zipper-like interactions, thereby forcing cargo to the trans-Golgi periphery. Additionally, we observed dense granular aggregates within cisternae and intracisternal filament bundles associated with trans-Golgi buds. These native in situ structures provide new molecular insights into Golgi architecture and function. PMID:26311849

  8. In situ structural analysis of Golgi intracisternal protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Benjamin D.; Schaffer, Miroslava; Albert, Sahradha; Asano, Shoh; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We acquired molecular-resolution structures of the Golgi within its native cellular environment. Vitreous Chlamydomonas cells were thinned by cryo-focused ion beam milling and then visualized by cryo-electron tomography. These tomograms revealed structures within the Golgi cisternae that have not been seen before. Narrow trans-Golgi lumina were spanned by asymmetric membrane-associated protein arrays that had ∼6-nm lateral periodicity. Subtomogram averaging showed that the arrays may determine the narrow central spacing of the trans-Golgi cisternae through zipper-like interactions, thereby forcing cargo to the trans-Golgi periphery. Additionally, we observed dense granular aggregates within cisternae and intracisternal filament bundles associated with trans-Golgi buds. These native in situ structures provide new molecular insights into Golgi architecture and function. PMID:26311849

  9. Analysis of modified SMI method for adaptive array weight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, R. L.; Moses, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is applied to the problem of receiving a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modification, suggested by Gupta, of the sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. In the modified SMI algorithm, interference suppression is increased by subtracting a fraction F of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the estimated covariance matrix. Given the true covariance matrix and the desired signal direction, the modified algorithm is shown to maximize a well-defined, intuitive output power ratio criterion. Expressions are derived for the expected value and variance of the array weights and output powers as a function of the fraction F and the number of snapshots used in the covariance matrix estimate. These expressions are compared with computer simulation and good agreement is found. A trade-off is found to exist between the desired level of interference suppression and the number of snapshots required in order to achieve that level with some certainty. The removal of noise eigenvectors from the covariance matrix inverse is also discussed with respect to this application. Finally, the type and severity of errors which occur in the covariance matrix estimate are characterized through simulation.

  10. Optoelectronic analysis of multijunction wire array solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Chen, Christopher T.; Emmer, Hal; McMahon, William E.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2013-07-01

    Wire arrays have demonstrated promising photovoltaic performance as single junction solar cells and are well suited to defect mitigation in heteroepitaxy. These attributes can combine in tandem wire array solar cells, potentially leading to high efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate initial growths of GaAs on Si0.9Ge0.1 structures and investigate III-V on Si1-xGex device design with an analytical model and optoelectronic simulations. We consider Si0.1Ge0.9 wires coated with a GaAs0.9P0.1 shell in three different geometries: conformal, hemispherical, and spherical. The analytical model indicates that efficiencies approaching 34% are achievable with high quality materials. Full field electromagnetic simulations serve to elucidate the optical loss mechanisms and demonstrate light guiding into the wire core. Simulated current-voltage curves under solar illumination reveal the impact of a varying GaAs0.9P0.1 minority carrier lifetime. Finally, defective regions at the hetero-interface are shown to have a negligible effect on device performance if highly doped so as to serve as a back surface field. Overall, the growths and the model demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed geometries and can be used to guide tandem wire array solar cell designs.

  11. Exon array data analysis using Affymetrix power tools and R statistical software

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The use of microarray technology to measure gene expression on a genome-wide scale has been well established for more than a decade. Methods to process and analyse the vast quantity of expression data generated by a typical microarray experiment are similarly well-established. The Affymetrix Exon 1.0 ST array is a relatively new type of array, which has the capability to assess expression at the individual exon level. This allows a more comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, and in particular enables the study of alternative splicing, a gene regulation mechanism important in both normal conditions and in diseases. Some aspects of exon array data analysis are shared with those for standard gene expression data but others present new challenges that have required development of novel tools. Here, I will introduce the exon array and present a detailed example tutorial for analysis of data generated using this platform. PMID:21498550

  12. Effect analysis and design on array geometry for coincidence imaging radar based on effective rank theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Guofeng; Wang, Hongqiang; Yang, Zhaocheng; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2016-03-01

    As a complementary imaging technology, coincidence imaging radar (CIR) achieves super-resolution in real aperture staring radar imagery via employing the temporal-spatial independent array detecting (TSIAD) signals. The characters of TSIAD signals are impacted by the array geometry and the imaging performance are influenced by the relative imaging position with respect to antennas array. In this paper, the effect of array geometry on CIR system is investigated in detail based on the judgment criteria of the effective rank theory. In course of analyzing of these influences, useful system design guidance about the array geometry is remarked for the CIR system. With the design guidance, the target images are reconstructed based on the Tikhonov regularization algorithm. Simulation results are presented to validate the whole analysis and the efficiency of the design guidance.

  13. Modeling and analysis of a negative stiffness magnetic suspension vibration isolator with experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Qiang; Xu, Dengfeng; Hu, Chuxiong; Zhang, Ming

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a negative stiffness magnetic suspension vibration isolator (NSMSVI) using magnetic spring and rubber ligaments. The positive stiffness is obtained by repulsive magnetic spring while the negative stiffness is gained by rubber ligaments. In order to study the vibration isolation performance of the NSMSVI, an analytical expression of the vertical stretch force of the rubber ligament is constructed. Experiments are carried out, which demonstrates that the analytical expression is effective. Then an analytical expression of the vertical stiffness of the rubber ligament is deduced by the derivative of the stretch force of the rubber ligament with respect to the displacement of the inner magnetic ring. Furthermore, the parametric study of the magnetic spring and rubber ligament are carried out. As a case study, the size dimensions of the magnetic spring and rubber ligament are determined. Finally, an NSMSVI table was built to verify the vibration isolation performance of the NSMSVI. The transmissibility curves of the NSMSVI are subsequently calculated and tested by instruments. The experimental results reveal that there is a good consistency between the measured transmissibility and the calculated ones, which proves that the proposed NSMSVI is effective and can realize low-frequency vibration isolation. PMID:23020420

  14. Modeling and analysis of a negative stiffness magnetic suspension vibration isolator with experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yu; Li, Qiang; Xu, Dengfeng; Hu, Chuxiong; Zhang, Ming

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a negative stiffness magnetic suspension vibration isolator (NSMSVI) using magnetic spring and rubber ligaments. The positive stiffness is obtained by repulsive magnetic spring while the negative stiffness is gained by rubber ligaments. In order to study the vibration isolation performance of the NSMSVI, an analytical expression of the vertical stretch force of the rubber ligament is constructed. Experiments are carried out, which demonstrates that the analytical expression is effective. Then an analytical expression of the vertical stiffness of the rubber ligament is deduced by the derivative of the stretch force of the rubber ligament with respect to the displacement of the inner magnetic ring. Furthermore, the parametric study of the magnetic spring and rubber ligament are carried out. As a case study, the size dimensions of the magnetic spring and rubber ligament are determined. Finally, an NSMSVI table was built to verify the vibration isolation performance of the NSMSVI. The transmissibility curves of the NSMSVI are subsequently calculated and tested by instruments. The experimental results reveal that there is a good consistency between the measured transmissibility and the calculated ones, which proves that the proposed NSMSVI is effective and can realize low-frequency vibration isolation.

  15. Inverse problem analysis of pluripotent stem cell aggregation dynamics in stirred-suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Mahboubeh Rahmati; Wu, Jincheng; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-08-20

    The cultivation of stem cells as aggregates in scalable bioreactor cultures is an appealing modality for the large-scale manufacturing of stem cell products. Aggregation phenomena are central to such bioprocesses affecting the viability, proliferation and differentiation trajectory of stem cells but a quantitative framework is currently lacking. A population balance equation (PBE) model was used to describe the temporal evolution of the embryonic stem cell (ESC) cluster size distribution by considering collision-induced aggregation and cell proliferation in a stirred-suspension vessel. For ESC cultures at different agitation rates, the aggregation kernel representing the aggregation dynamics was successfully recovered as a solution of the inverse problem. The rate of change of the average aggregate size was greater at the intermediate rate tested suggesting a trade-off between increased collisions and agitation-induced shear. Results from forward simulation with obtained aggregation kernels were in agreement with transient aggregate size data from experiments. We conclude that the framework presented here can complement mechanistic studies offering insights into relevant stem cell clustering processes. More importantly from a process development standpoint, this strategy can be employed in the design and control of bioreactors for the generation of stem cell derivatives for drug screening, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:26036699

  16. Experimental and numerical analysis of clamped joints in front motorbike suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croccolo, D.; de Agostinis, M.; Vincenzi, N.

    2010-06-01

    Clamped joints are shaft-hub connections used, as an instance, in front motorbike suspensions to lock the steering plates with the legs and the legs with the wheel pin, by means of one or two bolts. The preloading force, produced during the tightening process, should be evaluated accurately, since it must lock safely the shaft, without overcoming the yielding point of the hub. Firstly, friction coefficients have been evaluated on “ad-hoc designed” specimens, by applying the Design of Experiment approach: the applied tightening torque has been precisely related to the imposed preloading force. Then, the tensile state of clamps have been evaluated both via FEM and by leveraging some design formulae proposed by the Authors as function of the preloading force and of the clamp geometry. Finally, the results have been compared to those given by some strain gauges applied on the tested clamps: the discrepancies between numerical analyses, the design formulae and the experimental results remains under a threshold of 10%.

  17. Balanced into array: genome-wide array analysis in 54 patients with an apparently balanced de novo chromosome rearrangement and a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feenstra, Ilse; Hanemaaijer, Nicolien; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Yntema, Helger; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Verheij, Joke; Green, Andrew; Hordijk, Roel; Reardon, William; Vries, Bert de; Brunner, Han; Bongers, Ernie; Leeuw, Nicole de; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution genome-wide array analysis enables detailed screening for cryptic and submicroscopic imbalances of microscopically balanced de novo rearrangements in patients with developmental delay and/or congenital abnormalities. In this report, we added the results of genome-wide array analysis in 54 patients to data on 117 patients from seven other studies. A chromosome imbalance was detected in 37% of all patients with two-breakpoint rearrangements. In 49% of these patients, the imbalances were located in one or both breakpoint regions. Imbalances were more frequently (90%) found in complex rearrangements, with the majority (81%) having deletions in the breakpoint regions. The size of our own cohort enabled us to relate the presence of an imbalance to the clinical features of the patients by using a scoring system, the De Vries criteria, that indicates the complexity of the phenotype. The median De Vries score was significantly higher (P=0.002) in those patients with an imbalance (5, range 1–9) than in patients with a normal array result (3, range 0–7). This study provides accurate percentages of cryptic imbalances that can be detected by genome-wide array analysis in simple and complex de novo microscopically balanced chromosome rearrangements and confirms that these imbalances are more likely to occur in patients with a complex phenotype. PMID:21712853

  18. Oligonucleotide arrays vs. metaphase-comparative genomic hybridisation and BAC arrays for single-cell analysis: first applications to preimplantation genetic diagnosis for Robertsonian translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈ 20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  19. Oligonucleotide Arrays vs. Metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation and BAC Arrays for Single-Cell Analysis: First Applications to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Robertsonian Translocation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Laia; del Rey, Javier; Daina, Gemma; García-Aragonés, Manel; Armengol, Lluís; Fernandez-Encinas, Alba; Parriego, Mònica; Boada, Montserrat; Martinez-Passarell, Olga; Martorell, Maria Rosa; Casagran, Oriol; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive chromosome analysis techniques such as metaphase-Comparative Genomic Hybridisation (CGH) and array-CGH are available for single-cell analysis. However, while metaphase-CGH and BAC array-CGH have been widely used for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, oligonucleotide array-CGH has not been used in an extensive way. A comparison between oligonucleotide array-CGH and metaphase-CGH has been performed analysing 15 single fibroblasts from aneuploid cell-lines and 18 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. Afterwards, oligonucleotide array-CGH and BAC array-CGH were also compared analysing 16 single blastomeres from human cleavage-stage embryos. All three comprehensive analysis techniques provided broadly similar cytogenetic profiles; however, non-identical profiles appeared when extensive aneuploidies were present in a cell. Both array techniques provided an optimised analysis procedure and a higher resolution than metaphase-CGH. Moreover, oligonucleotide array-CGH was able to define extra segmental imbalances in 14.7% of the blastomeres and it better determined the specific unbalanced chromosome regions due to a higher resolution of the technique (≈20 kb). Applicability of oligonucleotide array-CGH for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis has been demonstrated in two cases of Robertsonian translocation carriers 45,XY,der(13;14)(q10;q10). Transfer of euploid embryos was performed in both cases and pregnancy was achieved by one of the couples. This is the first time that an oligonucleotide array-CGH approach has been successfully applied to Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for balanced chromosome rearrangement carriers. PMID:25415307

  20. A nongray analysis of radiating-convecting rectangular plate-fin arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, A. M.; Soliman, H. M.

    2008-02-01

    A complete analysis of heat transfer in rectangular fin arrays has been conducted taking into consideration convection and radiation at all surfaces, as well as radiative exchange between the fins and all neighboring surfaces. The analysis assumes diffuse nongray surfaces and uses the spectral optical properties of stainless steel AISI 430. Three different gray models were proposed in order to assess the effect of the gray assumption on the heat-transfer characteristics. Results are presented for the temperature and radiative-flux distributions along the fin, the radiative flux along the base, the contribution of the radiative component to the overall heat transfer, and the effectiveness of the fin array. Significant deviations in some of these results were found between the nongray model and the gray models. In general, convection was found to be the more effective mode of heat transfer in fin arrays and the effectiveness of the array decreases as the contribution of the radiative component increases.

  1. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) arrays for solution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, T.W.; Frye, G.C.; Martin, S.J.; Kottenstette, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Bartholomew, J.W.; Weisenbach, L.; Bohuszewicz, T.V.; Doughty, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) are piezoelectric thickness-shear-mode resonators where the resonant frequency has long been known to vary linearly with the mass of rigid layers on the surface when the device is in contact with air. This reports summarizes the results from a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to use an array of QCMs to measure and identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water solutions. A total of nine polymer-coated QCMs were tested with varying concentrations of twelve VOCs while frequency and damping voltage were measured. Results from these experiments were analyzed using a Sandia-developed pattern recognition technique called visually empirical region of influence (VERI) developed at Sandia. The VERI analyses of data with up to 16% and 50% sensitivity drifts were carried out on an array with six signals obtained from five sensors. The results indicate that better than 98% and 88% correct chemical recognition is maintained for the 16% and 50% drifts, respectively. These results indicate a good degree of robustness for these sensor films.

  2. Tremor patches in Cascadia revealed by seismic array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Vidale, John E.; Sweet, Justin R.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Wech, Aaron G.

    2009-09-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in Cascadia have recently been observed, illuminating the general area that radiates seismic energy in the form of non-volcanic tremor (NVT). However, the picture of the ETS zone remains fuzzy because of difficulties in tremor detection and location. To observe the intimate details of tremor, we deployed a dense 84-element small-aperture seismic array on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, above the tremor migration path. It recorded the main ETS event in May 2008, as well as a weaker tremor episode two months earlier. Using a beamforming technique, we are able to capture and track tremor activity with an unprecedented resolution from southern Puget Sound to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The array technique reveals up to four times more duration of tremor compared to the conventional envelope cross-correlation method. Our findings suggest that NVT is not uniformly distributed on the subduction interface, and unveils several distinct patches that release much of the tremor moment. The patches appear to be devoid of ordinary earthquakes, and may indicate the heterogeneity in fault strength that affects the modes of stress release within the ETS zone.

  3. Correlator data analysis for the array feed compensation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iijima, B.; Fort, D.; Vilnrotter, V.

    1994-01-01

    The real-time array feed compensation system is currently being evaluated at DSS 13. This system recovers signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss due to mechanical antenna deformations by using an array of seven Ka-band (33.7-GHz) horns to collect the defocused signal fields. The received signals are downconverted and digitized, in-phase and quadrature samples are generated, and combining weights are applied before the samples are recombined. It is shown that when optimum combining weights are employed, the SNR of the combined signal approaches the sum of the channel SNR's. The optimum combining weights are estimated directly from the signals in each channel by the Real-Time Block 2 (RTB2) correlator; since it was designed for very-long-baseline interferometer (VLBI) applications, it can process broadband signals as well as tones to extract the required weight estimates. The estimation algorithms for the optimum combining weights are described for tones and broadband sources. Data recorded in correlator output files can also be used off-line to estimate combiner performance by estimating the SNR in each channel, which was done for data taken during a Jupiter track at DSS 13.

  4. Array analysis of regional Pn and Pg wavefields from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, M.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1991-06-01

    Small-aperture high-frequency seismic arrays with dimensions of a few kilometers or less, can improve our ability to seismically monitor compliance with a low-yield Threshold Test Ban Treaty. This work studies the characteristics and effectiveness of array processing of the regional Pn and Pg wavefields generated by underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site. Waveform data from the explosion HARDIN (m{sub b} = 5.5) is recorded at a temporary 12-element, 3-component, 1.5 km-aperture array sited in an area of northern Nevada. The explosions VILLE (m{sub b} = 4.4) and SALUT (m{sub b} = 5.5) are recorded at two arrays sited in the Mojave desert, one a 96-element vertical-component 7 km-aperture array and the other a 155-element vertical-component 4 km-aperture array. Among the mean spectra for the m{sub b} = 5.5 events there are significant differences in low-frequency spectral amplitudes between array sites. The spectra become nearly identical beyond about 6 Hz. Spectral ratios are used to examine seismic source properties and the partitioning of energy between Pn and Pg. Frequency-wavenumber analysis at the 12-element array is used to obtain estimates of signal gain, phase velocity, and source azimuth. This analysis reveals frequency-dependent biases in velocity and azimuth of the coherent Pn and Pg arrivals. Signal correlation, the principal factor governing array performance, is examined in terms of spatial coherence estimates. The coherence is found to vary between the three sites. In all cases the coherence of Pn is greater than that for Pg. 81 refs., 92 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Performance Analysis of a Cost-Effective Electret Condenser Microphone Directional Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Gerhold, Carl H.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Herring, Gregory C.; Bartram, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    Microphone directional array technology continues to be a critical part of the overall instrumentation suite for experimental aeroacoustics. Unfortunately, high sensor cost remains one of the limiting factors in the construction of very high-density arrays (i.e., arrays containing several hundred channels or more) which could be used to implement advanced beamforming algorithms. In an effort to reduce the implementation cost of such arrays, the authors have undertaken a systematic performance analysis of a prototype 35-microphone array populated with commercial electret condenser microphones. An ensemble of microphones coupling commercially available electret cartridges with passive signal conditioning circuitry was fabricated for use with the Langley Large Aperture Directional Array (LADA). A performance analysis consisting of three phases was then performed: (1) characterize the acoustic response of the microphones via laboratory testing and calibration, (2) evaluate the beamforming capability of the electret-based LADA using a series of independently controlled point sources in an anechoic environment, and (3) demonstrate the utility of an electret-based directional array in a real-world application, in this case a cold flow jet operating at high subsonic velocities. The results of the investigation revealed a microphone frequency response suitable for directional array use over a range of 250 Hz - 40 kHz, a successful beamforming evaluation using the electret-populated LADA to measure simple point sources at frequencies up to 20 kHz, and a successful demonstration using the array to measure noise generated by the cold flow jet. This paper presents an overview of the tests conducted along with sample data obtained from those tests.

  6. Tissue matrix arrays for high throughput screening and systems analysis of cell function

    PubMed Central

    Beachley, Vince Z.; Wolf, Matthew T.; Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Manda, Srikanth S.; Jacobs, Heather; Blatchley, Michael; Bader, Joel S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pardoll, Drew; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Cell and protein arrays have demonstrated remarkable utility in the high-throughput evaluation of biological responses; however, they lack the complexity of native tissue and organs. Here, we describe tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) arrays for screening biological outputs and systems analysis. We spotted processed tissue ECM particles as two-dimensional arrays or incorporated them with cells to generate three-dimensional cell-matrix microtissue arrays. We then investigated the response of human stem, cancer, and immune cells to tissue ECM arrays originating from 11 different tissues, and validated the 2D and 3D arrays as representative of the in vivo microenvironment through quantitative analysis of tissue-specific cellular responses, including matrix production, adhesion and proliferation, and morphological changes following culture. The biological outputs correlated with tissue proteomics, and network analysis identified several proteins linked to cell function. Our methodology enables broad screening of ECMs to connect tissue-specific composition with biological activity, providing a new resource for biomaterials research and translation. PMID:26480475

  7. Equivalent circuit-based analysis of CMUT cell dynamics in arrays.

    PubMed

    Oguz, H K; Atalar, Abdullah; Köymen, Hayrettin

    2013-05-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are usually composed of large arrays of closely packed cells. In this work, we use an equivalent circuit model to analyze CMUT arrays with multiple cells. We study the effects of mutual acoustic interactions through the immersion medium caused by the pressure field generated by each cell acting upon the others. To do this, all the cells in the array are coupled through a radiation impedance matrix at their acoustic terminals. An accurate approximation for the mutual radiation impedance is defined between two circular cells, which can be used in large arrays to reduce computational complexity. Hence, a performance analysis of CMUT arrays can be accurately done with a circuit simulator. By using the proposed model, one can very rapidly obtain the linear frequency and nonlinear transient responses of arrays with an arbitrary number of CMUT cells. We performed several finite element method (FEM) simulations for arrays with small numbers of cells and showed that the results are very similar to those obtained by the equivalent circuit model. PMID:23661137

  8. Design, optimization, and analysis of a self-deploying PV tent array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collozza, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    A tent shaped PV array was designed and the design was optimized for maximum specific power. In order to minimize output power variation a tent angle of 60 deg was chosen. Based on the chosen tent angle an array structure was designed. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. To meet these considerations the array was chosen to be self-deployable, form a compact storage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. Through this analysis the component weights were determined. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power for a given PV blanket. This optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environmental conditions. Other factors such as PV blanket types, structural material, and wind velocity (for Mars array), were varied to determine what influence they had on the design point. The performance specifications for the array at both locations and with each type of PV blanket were determined. These specifications were calculated using the Arimid fiber composite as the structural material. The four PV blanket types considered were silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAsCLEFT, and amorphous silicon. The specifications used for each blanket represented either present day or near term technology. For both the Moon and Mars the amorphous silicon arrays produced the highest specific power.

  9. Design, optimization, and analysis of a self-deploying PV tent array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collozza, Anthony J.

    1991-06-01

    A tent shaped PV array was designed and the design was optimized for maximum specific power. In order to minimize output power variation a tent angle of 60 deg was chosen. Based on the chosen tent angle an array structure was designed. The design considerations were minimal deployment time, high reliability, and small stowage volume. To meet these considerations the array was chosen to be self-deployable, form a compact storage configuration, using a passive pressurized gas deployment mechanism. Each structural component of the design was analyzed to determine the size necessary to withstand the various forces to which it would be subjected. Through this analysis the component weights were determined. An optimization was performed to determine the array dimensions and blanket geometry which produce the maximum specific power for a given PV blanket. This optimization was performed for both lunar and Martian environmental conditions. Other factors such as PV blanket types, structural material, and wind velocity (for Mars array), were varied to determine what influence they had on the design point. The performance specifications for the array at both locations and with each type of PV blanket were determined. These specifications were calculated using the Arimid fiber composite as the structural material. The four PV blanket types considered were silicon, GaAs/Ge, GaAsCLEFT, and amorphous silicon. The specifications used for each blanket represented either present day or near term technology. For both the Moon and Mars the amorphous silicon arrays produced the highest specific power.

  10. Array-CGH Analysis Suggests Genetic Heterogeneity in Rhombencephalosynapsis

    PubMed Central

    Démurger, F.; Pasquier, L.; Dubourg, C.; Dupé, V.; Gicquel, I.; Evain, C.; Ratié, L.; Jaillard, S.; Beri, M.; Leheup, B.; Lespinasse, J.; Martin-Coignard, D.; Mercier, S.; Quelin, C.; Loget, P.; Marcorelles, P.; Laquerrière, A.; Bendavid, C.; Odent, S.; David, V.

    2013-01-01

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is an uncommon, but increasingly recognized, cerebellar malformation defined as vermian agenesis with fusion of the hemispheres. The embryologic and genetic mechanisms involved are still unknown, and to date, no animal models are available. In the present study, we used Agilent oligonucleotide arrays in a large series of 57 affected patients to detect candidate genes. Four different unbalanced rearrangements were detected: a 16p11.2 deletion, a 14q12q21.2 deletion, an unbalanced translocation t(2p;10q), and a 16p13.11 microdeletion containing 2 candidate genes. These genes were further investigated by sequencing and in situ hybridization. This first microarray screening of a rhombencephalosynapsis series suggests that there may be heterogeneous genetic causes. PMID:24167461

  11. Nanomolar Trace Metal Analysis of Copper at Gold Microband Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, A.; Dawson, K.; Sassiat, N.; Quinn, A. J.; O'Riordan, A.

    2011-08-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and electrochemical characterization of gold microband electrode arrays designated as a highly sensitive sensor for trace metal detection of copper in drinking water samples. Gold microband electrodes have been routinely fabricated by standard photolithographic methods. Electrochemical characterization were conducted in 0.1 M H2SO4 and found to display characteristic gold oxide formation and reduction peaks. The advantages of gold microband electrodes as trace metal sensors over currently used methods have been investigated by employing under potential deposition anodic stripping voltammetry (UPD-ASV) in Cu2+ nanomolar concentrations. Linear correlations were observed for increasing Cu2+ concentrations from which the concentration of an unknown sample of drinking water was estimated. The results obtained for the estimation of the unknown trace copper concentration in drinking was in good agreement with expected values.

  12. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Flight Performance Data and Computational Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Hoffman, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) was developed jointly by the United States (US) and Russia to provide approximately 6 kW of photovoltaic power to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA was launched to Mir in November 1995 and installed on the Kvant-1 module in May 1996. Since the MCSA photovoltaic panel modules (PPMs) are nearly identical to those of the International Space Station (ISS) photovoltaic arrays, MCSA operation offered an opportunity to gather multi-year performance data on this technology prior to its implementation on ISS. Two specially designed test sequences were executed in June and December 1996 to measure MCSA performance. Each test period encompassed 3 orbital revolutions whereby the current produced by the MCSA channels was measured. The temperature of MCSA PPMs was also measured. To better interpret the MCSA flight data, a dedicated FORTRAN computer code was developed to predict the detailed thermal-electrical performance of the MCSA. Flight data compared very favorably with computational performance predictions. This indicated that the MCSA electrical performance was fully meeting pre-flight expectations. There were no measurable indications of unexpected or precipitous MCSA performance degradation due to contamination or other causes after 7 months of operation on orbit. Power delivered to the Mir bus was lower than desired as a consequence of the retrofitted power distribution cabling. The strong correlation of experimental and computational results further bolsters the confidence level of performance codes used in critical ISS electric power forecasting. In this paper, MCSA flight performance tests are described as well as the computational modeling behind the performance predictions.

  13. Mir Cooperative Solar Array flight performance data and computational analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kerslake, T.W.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1997-12-31

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) was developed jointly by the United States (US) and Russia to provide approximately 6 kW of photovoltaic power to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA was launched to Mir in November 1995 and installed on the Kvant-1 module in May 1996. Since the MCSA photovoltaic panel modules (PPMs) are nearly identical to those of the International Space Station (ISS) photovoltaic arrays, MCSA operation offered an opportunity to gather multi-year performance data on this technology prior to its implementation on ISS. Two specially designed test sequences were executed in June and December 1996 to measure MCSA performance. Each test period encompassed 3 orbital revolutions whereby the current produced by the MCSA channels was measured. The temperature of MCSA PPMs was also measured. To better interpret the MCSA flight data, a dedicated FORTRAN computer code was developed to predict the detailed thermal-electrical performance of the MCSA. Flight data compared very favorably with computational performance predictions. This indicated that the MCSA electrical performance was fully meeting pre-flight expectations. There were no measurable indications of unexpected or precipitous MCSA performance degradation due to contamination or other causes after 7 months of operation on orbit. Power delivered to the Mir bus was lower than desired as a consequence of the retrofitted power distribution cabling. The strong correlation of experimental and computational results further bolsters the confidence level of performance codes used in critical ISS electric power forecasting. In this paper, MCSA flight performance tests are described as well as the computational modeling behind the performance predictions.

  14. A multifunctional microfluidic droplet-array chip for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2013-05-21

    This paper describes a multifunctional semi-closed droplet-array chip coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection for multiple sample pretreatment and analysis. A novel interfacing method for coupling droplet system with ESI-MS was proposed using a sampling probe-two-dimensional (2D) droplet-array strategy. The 2D droplet-array system was composed of an 8 × 8 microwell array chip for droplet storage and a layer of oil covering the droplets served as a "virtual wall" to avoid droplet evaporation or cross-contamination. An L-shaped capillary was adopted as the interface of the droplet array and ESI-MS, using its inlet end as a sampling probe for droplets and its outlet with a tip size of ~20 μm as an electrospray emitter, without the need for any droplet extraction device. The droplet analysis was performed by moving the droplet-array chip to allow the capillary sampling probe to sequentially enter into the droplets through the oil and introduce the sample solution into the capillary emitter for MS detection. The MS analysis time for each droplet sample was 40 s with a sample consumption of ca. 13 nL. A good repeatability of 5.7% (RSD, n = 9) was obtained for 10(-6) M reserpine droplet analysis. The uses of the semi-closed 2D droplet array and off-line interfacing mode provide the system with the substantial flexibility and controllability in droplet indexing, multi-step manipulating, and on-demand sampling for MS analysis. We applied the present system in multi-step pretreatment and identification of small amounts of proteomic samples of myoglobin and cytochrome C, including in-droplet protein reduction, alkylation, digestion, and purification based on solid-phase extraction, matrix modification, sample droplet introduction under flow injection mode, and ESI-MS detection. PMID:23525283

  15. Theory and design of compact hybrid microphone arrays on two-dimensional planes for three-dimensional soundfield analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchi; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Zhang, Wen

    2015-11-01

    Soundfield analysis based on spherical harmonic decomposition has been widely used in various applications; however, a drawback is the three-dimensional geometry of the microphone arrays. In this paper, a method to design two-dimensional planar microphone arrays that are capable of capturing three-dimensional (3D) spatial soundfields is proposed. Through the utilization of both omni-directional and first order microphones, the proposed microphone array is capable of measuring soundfield components that are undetectable to conventional planar omni-directional microphone arrays, thus providing the same functionality as 3D arrays designed for the same purpose. Simulations show that the accuracy of the planar microphone array is comparable to traditional spherical microphone arrays. Due to its compact shape, the proposed microphone array greatly increases the feasibility of 3D soundfield analysis techniques in real-world applications. PMID:26627782

  16. Teleseismic array analysis of upper mantle compressional velocity structure. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walck, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Relative array analysis of upper mantle lateral velocity variations in southern California, analysis techniques for dense data profiles, the P-wave upper mantle structure beneath an active spreading center: the Gulf of California, and the upper mantle under the Cascade ranges: a comparison with the Gulf of California are presented.

  17. Glycerol-treated nuclear suspensions--an efficient preservation method for flow cytometric analysis of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Kolář, Filip; Lučanová, Magdalena; Těšitel, Jakub; Loureiro, João; Suda, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) has been widely used in plant science to determine the amount of nuclear DNA, either in absolute units or in relative terms, as an indicator of ploidy. The requirement for fresh material in some applications, however, limits the value of FCM in field research, including plant biosystematics, ecology and population biology. Dried plant samples have proven to be a suitable alternative in some cases (large-scale ploidy screening) although tissue dehydration is often associated with a decrease in the quality of FCM analysis. The present study tested, using time-scale laboratory and in situ field experiments, the applicability of glycerol-treated nuclear suspension for DNA flow cytometry. We demonstrate that plant nuclei preserved in ice-cold buffer + glycerol solution remain intact for at least a few weeks and provide estimates of nuclear DNA content that are highly comparable and of similar quality to those obtained from fresh tissue. The protocol is compatible with both DAPI and propidium iodide staining, and allows not only the determination of ploidy level but also genome size in absolute units. Despite its higher laboriousness, glycerol-preserved nuclei apparently represent the most reliable way of sample preservation for genome size research. We assume that the protocol will provide a vital alternative to other preservation methods, especially when stringent criteria on the quality of FCM analysis are required. PMID:22362177

  18. Analysis of costs of gallium arsenide and silicon solar arrays for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A parametric analysis was performed to compare the costs of silicon and gallium arsenide arrays for Earth orbital missions. The missions included electric power in low Earth orbit (LEO), electric power in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO), and power for electric propulsion of a LEO to GEO orbit transfer mission. Inputs to the analysis for all missions included launch and purchase costs of the array. For the orbit transfer mission, the launch and purchase costs of the electric propulsion system were added. Radiation flux as a function of altitude and rediation tolerance as a function of cell type were used to determine power degradation for each mission. Curves were generated that show the sensitivity of launch-array cost and total mission cost to a variety of input parameters for each mission. These parameters included mission duration, cover glass thickness, array specific cost, array specific mass, and solar cell efficiency. Solar concentration was considered and the sensitivities of cost to concentration ratio, concentrator costs, and concentrator mass were also evaluated. Results indicate that solar cell development should give a high priority to reducing array costs and that the development of low cost, lightweight, solar concentrators should be pursued.

  19. Ion Trap Array-Based Systems And Methods For Chemical Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Whitten, William B [Oak Ridge, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2005-08-23

    An ion trap-based system for chemical analysis includes an ion trap array. The ion trap array includes a plurality of ion traps arranged in a 2-dimensional array for initially confining ions. Each of the ion traps comprise a central electrode having an aperture, a first and second insulator each having an aperture sandwiching the central electrode, and first and second end cap electrodes each having an aperture sandwiching the first and second insulator. A structure for simultaneously directing a plurality of different species of ions out from the ion traps is provided. A spectrometer including a detector receives and identifies the ions. The trap array can be used with spectrometers including time-of-flight mass spectrometers and ion mobility spectrometers.

  20. A cross-reactive sensor array for the fluorescence qualitative analysis of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Lin, Liping; Rong, Mingcong; Chen, Xi

    2014-11-01

    A cross-reactive sensor array using mercaptopropionic acid modified cadmium telluride (CdTe), glutathione modified CdTe, poly(methacrylic acid) modified silver nanoclusters, bovine serum albumin modified gold nanoclusters, rhodamine derivative and calcein blue as fluorescent indicators has been designed for the detection of seven heavy metal ions (Ag(+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Mn(2+) and Cd(2+)). The discriminatory capacity of the sensor array to different heavy metal ions in different pH solutions has been tested and the results have been analyzed with linear discriminant analysis. Results showed that the sensor array could be used to qualitatively analyze the selected heavy metal ions. The array performance was also evaluated in the identification of known and unknown samples and the preliminary results suggested the promising practicability of the designed sensor assay. PMID:25127598

  1. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  2. Young's modulus and SEM analysis of leg bones exposed to simulated microgravity by hind limb suspension (HLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Niravkumar D.; Mehta, Rahul; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine composition of the leg bone tissue of rats that were exposed to simulated microgravity by Hind-Limb Suspension (HLS) by tail for one week. The leg bones were cross sectioned, cleaned of soft tissues, dried and sputter coated, and then placed horizontally on the stage of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysis. Interaction of a 17.5 keV electron beam, incident from the vertical direction on the sample, generated images using two detectors. X-rays emitted from the sample during electron bombardment were measured with an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) feature of SEM using a liquid-nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 144 eV at 5.9 keV (25Mn Kα x-ray). Kα- x-rays from carbon, oxygen, phosphorus and calcium formed the major peaks in the spectrum. Relative percentages of these elements were determined using a software that could also correct for ZAF factors namely Z(atomic number), A(X-ray absorption) and F(characteristic fluorescence). The x-rays from the control groups and from the experimental (HLS) groups were analyzed on well-defined parts (femur, tibia and knee) of the leg bone. The SEM analysis shows that there are definite changes in the hydroxyl or phosphate group of the main component of the bone structure, hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2], due to hind limb suspension. In a separate experiment, entire leg bones (both from HLS and control rats) were subjected to mechanical stress by mean of a variable force. The stress vs. strain graph was fitted with linear and polynomial function, and the parameters reflecting the mechanical strength of the bone, under increasing stress, were calculated. From the slope of the linear part of the graph the Young's modulus for HLS bones were calculated and found to be 2.49 times smaller than those for control bones.

  3. Young's modulus and SEM analysis of leg bones exposed to simulated microgravity by hind limb suspension (HLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Niravkumar D.; Mehta, Rahul; Ali, Nawab; Soulsby, Michael; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2013-04-19

    The aim of this study was to determine composition of the leg bone tissue of rats that were exposed to simulated microgravity by Hind-Limb Suspension (HLS) by tail for one week. The leg bones were cross sectioned, cleaned of soft tissues, dried and sputter coated, and then placed horizontally on the stage of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for analysis. Interaction of a 17.5 keV electron beam, incident from the vertical direction on the sample, generated images using two detectors. X-rays emitted from the sample during electron bombardment were measured with an Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) feature of SEM using a liquid-nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 144 eV at 5.9 keV ({sub 25}Mn K{sub {alpha}} x-ray). K{sub {alpha}}- x-rays from carbon, oxygen, phosphorus and calcium formed the major peaks in the spectrum. Relative percentages of these elements were determined using a software that could also correct for ZAF factors namely Z(atomic number), A(X-ray absorption) and F(characteristic fluorescence). The x-rays from the control groups and from the experimental (HLS) groups were analyzed on well-defined parts (femur, tibia and knee) of the leg bone. The SEM analysis shows that there are definite changes in the hydroxyl or phosphate group of the main component of the bone structure, hydroxyapatite [Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}], due to hind limb suspension. In a separate experiment, entire leg bones (both from HLS and control rats) were subjected to mechanical stress by mean of a variable force. The stress vs. strain graph was fitted with linear and polynomial function, and the parameters reflecting the mechanical strength of the bone, under increasing stress, were calculated. From the slope of the linear part of the graph the Young's modulus for HLS bones were calculated and found to be 2.49 times smaller than those for control bones.

  4. Two dimensional barcode-inspired automatic analysis for arrayed microfluidic immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Qiao, Lingbo; Ren, Yunke; Wang, Xuwei; Gao, Ming; Tang, Yunfang; Jeff Xi, Jianzhong; Fu, Tzung-May; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-01

    The usability of many high-throughput lab-on-a-chip devices in point-of-care applications is currently limited by the manual data acquisition and analysis process, which are labor intensive and time consuming. Based on our original design in the biochemical reactions, we proposed here a universal approach to perform automatic, fast, and robust analysis for high-throughput array-based microfluidic immunoassays. Inspired by two-dimensional (2D) barcodes, we incorporated asymmetric function patterns into a microfluidic array. These function patterns provide quantitative information on the characteristic dimensions of the microfluidic array, as well as mark its orientation and origin of coordinates. We used a computer program to perform automatic analysis for a high-throughput antigen/antibody interaction experiment in 10 s, which was more than 500 times faster than conventional manual processing. Our method is broadly applicable to many other microchannel-based immunoassays. PMID:24404030

  5. Computational analysis of vertical axis wind turbine arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremseth, J.; Duraisamy, K.

    2016-03-01

    Canonical problems involving single, pairs, and arrays of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are investigated numerically with the objective of understanding the underlying flow structures and their implications on energy production. Experimental studies by Dabiri (J Renew Sustain Energy 3, 2011) suggest that VAWTs demand less stringent spacing requirements than their horizontal axis counterparts and additional benefits may be obtained by optimizing the placement and rotational direction of VAWTs. The flowfield of pairs of co-/counter-rotating VAWTs shows some similarities with pairs of cylinders in terms of wake structure and vortex shedding. When multiple VAWTs are placed in a column, the extent of the wake is seen to spread further downstream, irrespective of the direction of rotation of individual turbines. However, the aerodynamic interference between turbines gives rise to regions of excess momentum between the turbines which lead to significant power augmentations. Studies of VAWTs arranged in multiple columns show that the downstream columns can actually be more efficient than the leading column, a proposition that could lead to radical improvements in wind farm productivity.

  6. Virus inactivation on hard surfaces or in suspension by chemical disinfectants: systematic review and meta-analysis of norovirus surrogates.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, K; Fanaselle, W; Pouillot, R; Van Doren, J M; Dennis, S

    2013-06-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infections are the leading cause of foodborne illness in the United States. Effective disinfection is important for controlling outbreaks caused by this highly infectious virus but can be difficult to achieve because NoV is very resistant to many common disinfection protocols. The inability of human NoV to replicate in tissue culture complicates NoV research, generally necessitating genome copy quantification, the use of surrogate viruses, or the use of other substitutes such as virus-like particles. To date, comprehensive comparisons among NoV surrogates and between surrogates and human NoV are missing, and it is not clear how best to extrapolate information from surrogate data. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of comparisons of NoV surrogates with regard to their susceptibility to disinfection on hard surfaces or in suspension. Restricting our analysis to those studies in which two or more virus surrogates were compared allowed us to improve the signal-to-noise ratio in our analysis, similar to the epidemiological concept of matching. Using meta-analysis methods, our results indicate that hepatitis A virus, murine norovirus 1, and phage MS2 are significantly more resistant to disinfection than is feline calicivirus, but average differences in viral titer reduction appeared to be modest, 1.5 log PFU or less in all cases. None of the studies that compared surrogates and human NoV met our inclusion criteria, precluding a direct comparison between human NoV and NoV surrogates in this study. For all surrogates with sufficient data available to permit subgroup analyses, we detected strong evidence that the type of disinfectant impacted the relative susceptibility of the surrogates. Therefore, extrapolation of results between surrogates or from surrogates to human NoV must consider the type of disinfectant studied. PMID:23726196

  7. AVES: A high performance computer cluster array for the INTEGRAL satellite scientific data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federici, Memmo; Martino, Bruno Luigi; Ubertini, Pietro

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we describe a new computing system array, designed, built and now used at the Space Astrophysics and Planetary Institute (IAPS) in Rome, Italy, for the INTEGRAL Space Observatory scientific data analysis. This new system has become necessary in order to reduce the processing time of the INTEGRAL data accumulated during the more than 9 years of in-orbit operation. In order to fulfill the scientific data analysis requirements with a moderately limited investment the starting approach has been to use a `cluster' array of commercial quad-CPU computers, featuring the extremely large scientific and calibration data archive on line.

  8. Simplified seawater alkalinity analysis: Use of linear array spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wensheng; Byrne, Robert H.

    1998-08-01

    Modified spectrophotometric procedures are presented for the determination of seawater total alkalinity using rapid scan linear array spectrometers. Continuous monitoring of solution pH allows titrations to be terminated at relatively high pH, whereby excess acid terms are very small. Excess acid concentrations are quantified using the sulfonephthalein indicators, bromocresol green and bromocresol purple. The outlined spectrophotometric procedures require no thermal equilibration of samples. Using bromocresol green, solution pH T ([H +] T in moles per kg of solution) is given as: pHT=4.2699+0.002578(35- S)+ log((R(25)-0.00131)/(2.3148-0.1299 R(25))) - log(1-0.001005S) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.00909(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t) is the absorbance ratio ( A616/ A444) at temperature t and salinity S. Using bromocresol purple, the solution pH T is given as pH T=5.8182+0.00129(35- S)+log(( R(25)-0.00381)/(2.8729-0.05104 R(25))) and R(25)= R( t){1+0.01869(25- t)}, where 29⩽S⩽37, 13° C⩽t⩽32° C, and R( t)= A589/ A432. Alkalinity measurements using bromocresol purple had a precision on the order of 0.3 μmol kg -1 and were within 0.3-0.9 μmol kg -1 of the alkalinities of certified seawater reference materials.

  9. Multiplexed gold nanorod array biochip for multi-sample analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-05-15

    Optical transduction of biological bindings based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold nanorods (GNRs) is attractive for label-free biosensing. The aspect ratio (AR) dependence of LSPR band maxima inherently provides an ideal multiplex mechanism. GNRs of selected sizes can be combined to ensure distinct plasmon peaks in absorption spectrum. Monitoring the spectral shift at the dedicated peaks allows for simultaneous detection of the specific analyte. Here, we first transformed the GNR's multiplexed biosensing capability to a robust chip-based format. Specifically, nanorods of AR 2.6 and 4.5 were assembled onto thiol-terminated substrates, followed by functionalization of respective antibodies to construct a GNR multiplex biochip. As a model system, concentrations of human IgG and rabbit IgG were simultaneously measured by correlating red-shifts at distinct resonance peaks caused by specific target binding. The calibration curves exhibited linear relationship between the spectral shift and analyte amount. The sensing performance in multi-analyte mode correlated nicely with those for single analyte detection with minimal cross-reactivity. Moreover, mixed GNRs can be deposited in controllable array pattern on the glass chip to analyze numerous samples at the same time. Each GNRs dot functioned independently as a multiplexed plamonic sensor. Coupled with microplate reader, this GNR nanoarray chip can potentially result in large scale assay of samples concurrently while for each sample, a multi-analyte detection simultaneously if desired. The concept shown in this work is simple and versatile that will definitely be a new paradigm in high-throughput protein biochip development in the era of nano-biosensing. PMID:25127486

  10. Tandem gene arrays in Trypanosoma brucei: Comparative phylogenomic analysis of duplicate sequence variation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P

    2007-01-01

    Background The genome sequence of the protistan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains many tandem gene arrays. Gene duplicates are created through tandem duplication and are expressed through polycistronic transcription, suggesting that the primary purpose of long, tandem arrays is to increase gene dosage in an environment where individual gene promoters are absent. This report presents the first account of the tandem gene arrays in the T. brucei genome, employing several related genome sequences to establish how variation is created and removed. Results A systematic survey of tandem gene arrays showed that substantial sequence variation existed across the genome; variation from different regions of an array often produced inconsistent phylogenetic affinities. Phylogenetic relationships of gene duplicates were consistent with concerted evolution being a widespread homogenising force. However, tandem duplicates were not usually identical; therefore, any homogenising effect was coincident with divergence among duplicates. Allelic gene conversion was detected using various criteria and was apparently able to both remove and introduce sequence variation. Tandem arrays containing structural heterogeneity demonstrated how sequence homogenisation and differentiation can occur within a single locus. Conclusion The use of multiple genome sequences in a comparative analysis of tandem gene arrays identified substantial sequence variation among gene duplicates. The distribution of sequence variation is determined by a dynamic balance of conservative and innovative evolutionary forces. Gene trees from various species showed that intraspecific duplicates evolve in concert, perhaps through frequent gene conversion, although this does not prevent sequence divergence, especially where structural heterogeneity physically separates a duplicate from its neighbours. In describing dynamics of sequence variation that have consequences beyond gene dosage, this survey provides a basis for

  11. Analysis and design of a leaky-wave EMC dipole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potharazu, Pavan K.; Jackson, David R.

    1992-08-01

    An analysis of an electromagnetically coupled (EMC) dipole array is presented, in which a microstrip line is coupled to an infinite periodic linear array of microstrip dipoles, arranged perpendicular to the line. The spectral-domain immitance method is used to obtain the periodic Green's function for the two-layered structure, and the method of moments with a Galerkin testing procedure is then used to enforce the electric field integral equation (EFIE) on the line and the dipole within a unit cell of the structure to obtain the determinantal equation for the unknown leaky-wave propagation constant. One of the interesting features of this analysis is the path of integration in the complex plane used to compute the moment method reactions, which must be partly on the improper sheet for the m = -1 space harmonic when it radiates in the forward direction. Measured radiation patterns for a 10-element EMC dipole array are presented and compared with the corresponding theoretical ones.

  12. A new soft x-ray pulse height analysis array in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu Yi; Yang, J. W.; Song, X. Y.; Liao, M.; Li, X.; Yuan, G. L.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Pan, C. H.

    2009-12-15

    A new soft x-ray pulse height analysis (PHA) array including nine independent subsystems, on basis of a nonconventional software multichannel analysis system and a silicon drift detector (SDD) linear array consisting of nine high performance SDD detectors, has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak. The use of SDD has greatly improved the measurement accuracy and the spatiotemporal resolutions of the soft x-ray PHA system. Since the ratio of peak to background counts obtained from the SDD PHA system is very high, p/b{>=}3000, the soft x-ray spectra measured by the SDD PHA system can approximatively be regarded as electron velocity distribution. The electron velocity distribution can be well derived in the pure ohmic and auxiliary heating discharges. The performance of the new soft x-ray PHA array and the first experimental results with some discussions are presented.

  13. Direct fluorescence analysis of genetic polymorphisms by hybridization with oligonucleotide arrays on glass supports.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Z; Guilfoyle, R A; Thiel, A J; Wang, R; Smith, L M

    1994-01-01

    A simple and rapid method for the analysis of genetic polymorphisms has been developed using allele-specific oligonucleotide arrays bound to glass supports. Allele-specific oligonucleotides are covalently immobilized on glass slides in arrays of 3 mm spots. Genomic DNA is amplified by PCR using one fluorescently tagged primer oligonucleotide and one biotinylated primer oligonucleotide. The two complementary DNA strands are separated, the fluorescently tagged strand is hybridized to the support-bound oligonucleotide array, and the hybridization pattern is detected by fluorescence scanning. Multiple polymorphisms present in the PCR product may be detected in parallel. The effect of spacer length, surface density and hybridization conditions were evaluated, as was the relative efficacy of hybridization with single or double-stranded PCR products. The utility of the method was demonstrated in the parallel analysis of 5 point mutations from exon 4 of the human tyrosinase gene. Images PMID:7816638

  14. Analysis of radiometric signal in sedimentating suspension flow in open channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Petryka, Leszek; Świsulski, Dariusz; Doktor, Marek; Mastej, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    The article discusses issues related to the estimation of the sedimentating solid particles average flow velocity in an open channel using radiometric methods. Due to the composition of the compound, which formed water and diatomite, received data have a very weak signal to noise ratio. In the process analysis the known determining of the solid phase transportation time delay the classical cross-correlation function is the most reliable method. The use of advanced frequency analysis based on mutual spectral density function and wavelet transform of recorded signals allows a reduction of the noise contribution.

  15. Vertical nanowire arrays as a versatile platform for protein detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostgaard, Katrine R.; Frederiksen, Rune S.; Liu, Yi-Chi C.; Berthing, Trine; Madsen, Morten H.; Holm, Johannes; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L.

    2013-10-01

    Protein microarrays are valuable tools for protein assays. Reducing spot sizes from micro- to nano-scale facilitates miniaturization of platforms and consequently decreased material consumption, but faces inherent challenges in the reduction of fluorescent signals and compatibility with complex solutions. Here we show that vertical arrays of nanowires (NWs) can overcome several bottlenecks of using nanoarrays for extraction and analysis of proteins. The high aspect ratio of the NWs results in a large surface area available for protein immobilization and renders passivation of the surface between the NWs unnecessary. Fluorescence detection of proteins allows quantitative measurements and spatial resolution, enabling us to track individual NWs through several analytical steps, thereby allowing multiplexed detection of different proteins immobilized on different regions of the NW array. We use NW arrays for on-chip extraction, detection and functional analysis of proteins on a nano-scale platform that holds great promise for performing protein analysis on minute amounts of material. The demonstration made here on highly ordered arrays of indium arsenide (InAs) NWs is generic and can be extended to many high aspect ratio nanostructures.Protein microarrays are valuable tools for protein assays. Reducing spot sizes from micro- to nano-scale facilitates miniaturization of platforms and consequently decreased material consumption, but faces inherent challenges in the reduction of fluorescent signals and compatibility with complex solutions. Here we show that vertical arrays of nanowires (NWs) can overcome several bottlenecks of using nanoarrays for extraction and analysis of proteins. The high aspect ratio of the NWs results in a large surface area available for protein immobilization and renders passivation of the surface between the NWs unnecessary. Fluorescence detection of proteins allows quantitative measurements and spatial resolution, enabling us to track individual

  16. Tissue matrix arrays for high-throughput screening and systems analysis of cell function.

    PubMed

    Beachley, Vince Z; Wolf, Matthew T; Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Manda, Srikanth S; Jacobs, Heather; Blatchley, Michael R; Bader, Joel S; Pandey, Akhilesh; Pardoll, Drew; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2015-12-01

    Cell and protein arrays have demonstrated remarkable utility in the high-throughput evaluation of biological responses; however, they lack the complexity of native tissue and organs. Here we spotted tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) particles as two-dimensional (2D) arrays or incorporated them with cells to generate three-dimensional (3D) cell-matrix microtissue arrays. We then investigated the responses of human stem, cancer and immune cells to tissue ECM arrays originating from 11 different tissues. We validated the 2D and 3D arrays as representative of the in vivo microenvironment by means of quantitative analysis of tissue-specific cellular responses, including matrix production, adhesion and proliferation, and morphological changes after culture. The biological outputs correlated with tissue proteomics, and network analysis identified several proteins linked to cell function. Our methodology enables broad screening of ECMs to connect tissue-specific composition with biological activity, providing a new resource for biomaterials research and further understanding of regeneration and disease mechanisms. PMID:26480475

  17. Analysis of a parallel-arrayed power regulating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Horton, H. M.; Honnell, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    A power regulation system incorporating n-parallel power supplies employing PWM switching regulators is studied. Analysis of individual unit operation and coupled-system parameter sensitivity is considered from an operations viewpoint. A detailed example is included to illustrate parallel system operation for 18 such units powered by solar-cell banks.

  18. GENE ARRAY ANALYSIS OF THE VENTRAL PROSTATE IN RATS EXPOSED TO EITHER VINCLOZOLIN OR PROCYMIDONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE ARRAY ANALYSIS OF THE VENTRAL PROSTATE IN RATS EXPOSED TO EITHER VINCLOZOLIN OR PROCYMIDONE. MB Rosen, VS Wilson, JE Schmid, and LE Gray Jr. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

    Vinclozolin (Vi) and procymidone (Pr) are antiandrogenic fungicides. While changes in gene expr...

  19. Comprehensive exon array data processing method for quantitative analysis of alternative spliced variants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Hu, Yizhou; Monni, Outi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA generates protein diversity. Dysfunction of splicing machinery and expression of specific transcripts has been linked to cancer progression and drug response. Exon microarray technology enables genome-wide quantification of expression levels of the majority of exons and facilitates the discovery of alternative splicing events. Analysis of exon array data is more challenging than the analysis of gene expression data and there is a need for reliable quantification of exons and alternatively spliced variants. We introduce a novel, computationally efficient methodology, Multiple Exon Array Preprocessing (MEAP), for exon array data pre-processing, analysis and visualization. We compared MEAP with existing pre-processing methods, and validation of six exons and two alternatively spliced variants with qPCR corroborated MEAP expression estimates. Analysis of exon array data from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines revealed several transcripts associated with 11q13 amplification, which is related with decreased survival and metastasis in HNSCC patients. Our results demonstrate that MEAP produces reliable expression values at exon, alternatively spliced variant and gene levels, which allows generating novel experimentally testable predictions. PMID:21745820

  20. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline droplet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaho; Iwai, Yosuke; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Norikazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline (CLC) droplet array by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method successfully reproduced the experimental light path observed in the complicated photonic structure of the CLC droplet array more accurately than the analysis of CLC droplets by geometric optics with Bragg condition, and this method help us understand the polarization of the propagating light waves. The FDTD method holds great promise for the design of various photonic devices composed of curved photonic materials like CLC droplets and microcapsules.

  1. Discrimination of honeys using colorimetric sensor arrays, sensory analysis and gas chromatography techniques.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Haroon Elrasheid; Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Jiyong, Shi; Mariod, Abdalbasit Adam

    2016-09-01

    Aroma profiles of six honey varieties of different botanical origins were investigated using colorimetric sensor array, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis. Fifty-eight aroma compounds were identified, including 2 norisoprenoids, 5 hydrocarbons, 4 terpenes, 6 phenols, 7 ketones, 9 acids, 12 aldehydes and 13 alcohols. Twenty abundant or active compounds were chosen as key compounds to characterize honey aroma. Discrimination of the honeys was subsequently implemented using multivariate analysis, including hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Honeys of the same botanical origin were grouped together in the PCA score plot and HCA dendrogram. SPME-GC/MS and colorimetric sensor array were able to discriminate the honeys effectively with the advantages of being rapid, simple and low-cost. Moreover, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied to indicate the relationship between sensory descriptors and aroma compounds. PMID:27041295

  2. Removing unwanted variation in a differential methylation analysis of Illumina HumanMethylation450 array data

    PubMed Central

    Maksimovic, Jovana; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann A.; Speed, Terence P.; Oshlack, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Due to their relatively low-cost per sample and broad, gene-centric coverage of CpGs across the human genome, Illumina's 450k arrays are widely used in large scale differential methylation studies. However, by their very nature, large studies are particularly susceptible to the effects of unwanted variation. The effects of unwanted variation have been extensively documented in gene expression array studies and numerous methods have been developed to mitigate these effects. However, there has been much less research focused on the appropriate methodology to use for accounting for unwanted variation in methylation array studies. Here we present a novel 2-stage approach using RUV-inverse in a differential methylation analysis of 450k data and show that it outperforms existing methods. PMID:25990733

  3. An analysis of three new infrasound arrays around Kīlauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.; Cooper, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    A network of three new infrasound station arrays was installed around Kīlauea Volcano between July 2012 and September 2012, and a preliminary analysis of open-vent monitoring has been completed by Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Infrasound is an emerging monitoring method in volcanology that detects perturbations in atmospheric pressure at frequencies below 20 Hz, which can result from volcanic events that are not always observed optically or thermally. Each array has the capability to detect various infrasound events as small as 0.05 Pa as measured at the array site. The infrasound monitoring network capabilities are demonstrated through case studies of rockfalls, pit collapses, and rise-fall cycles at Halema'uma'u Crater and Pu'u 'Ōʻō.

  4. Clearance Analysis of Node 3 Aft CBM to the Stowed FGB Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, Donn

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, the ISS Vehicle Configuration Office began considering the relocation of the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) to the aft facing Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) on Node 3 to open a berthing location for visiting vehicles on the Node 1 nadir CBM. In this position, computer-aided design (CAD) models indicated that the aft end of the PMM would be only a few inches from the stowed Functional Cargo Block (FGB) port solar array. To validate the CAD model clearance analysis, in the late summer of 2011 the Image Science and Analysis Group (ISAG) was asked to determine the true geometric relationship between the on-orbit aft facing Node 3 CBM and the FGB port solar array. The desired measurements could be computed easily by photogrammetric analysis if current imagery of the ISS hardware were obtained. Beginning in the fall of 2011, ISAG used the Dynamic Onboard Ubiquitous Graphics (DOUG) program to design a way to acquire imagery of the aft face of Node 3, the aft end-cone of Node 1, the port side of pressurized mating adapter 1 (PMA1), and the port side of the FGB out to the tip of the port solar array using cameras on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). This was complicated by the need to thread the SSRMS under the truss, past Node 3 and the Cupola, and into the space between the aft side of Node 3 and the FGB solar array to acquire more than 100 images from multiple positions. To minimize the number of SSRMS movements, the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) would be attached to the SSRMS. This would make it possible to park the SPDM in one position and acquire multiple images by changing the viewing orientation of the SPDM body cameras using the pan/tilt units on which the cameras are mounted. Using this implementation concept, ISAG identified four SSRMS/SPDM positions from which all of the needed imagery could be acquired. Based on a photogrammetric simulation, it was estimated that the location of the FGB solar array could be

  5. An integrated analysis-synthesis array system for spatial sound fields.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Hua, Yi-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Hao; Hsieh, Yu-Hao

    2015-03-01

    An integrated recording and reproduction array system for spatial audio is presented within a generic framework akin to the analysis-synthesis filterbanks in discrete time signal processing. In the analysis stage, a microphone array "encodes" the sound field by using the plane-wave decomposition. Direction of arrival of plane-wave components that comprise the sound field of interest are estimated by multiple signal classification. Next, the source signals are extracted by using a deconvolution procedure. In the synthesis stage, a loudspeaker array "decodes" the sound field by reconstructing the plane-wave components obtained in the analysis stage. This synthesis stage is carried out by pressure matching in the interior domain of the loudspeaker array. The deconvolution problem is solved by truncated singular value decomposition or convex optimization algorithms. For high-frequency reproduction that suffers from the spatial aliasing problem, vector panning is utilized. Listening tests are undertaken to evaluate the deconvolution method, vector panning, and a hybrid approach that combines both methods to cover frequency ranges below and above the spatial aliasing frequency. Localization and timbral attributes are considered in the subjective evaluation. The results show that the hybrid approach performs the best in overall preference. In addition, there is a trade-off between reproduction performance and the external radiation. PMID:25786949

  6. Efficient Analysis of Systems Biology Markup Language Models of Cellular Populations Using Arrays.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Leandro; Myers, Chris J

    2016-08-19

    The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) has been widely used for modeling biological systems. Although SBML has been successful in representing a wide variety of biochemical models, the core standard lacks the structure for representing large complex regular systems in a standard way, such as whole-cell and cellular population models. These models require a large number of variables to represent certain aspects of these types of models, such as the chromosome in the whole-cell model and the many identical cell models in a cellular population. While SBML core is not designed to handle these types of models efficiently, the proposed SBML arrays package can represent such regular structures more easily. However, in order to take full advantage of the package, analysis needs to be aware of the arrays structure. When expanding the array constructs within a model, some of the advantages of using arrays are lost. This paper describes a more efficient way to simulate arrayed models. To illustrate the proposed method, this paper uses a population of repressilator and genetic toggle switch circuits as examples. Results show that there are memory benefits using this approach with a modest cost in runtime. PMID:26912276

  7. Arrayed lipid bilayer chambers allow single-molecule analysis of membrane transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Rikiya; Soga, Naoki; Fujita, Daishi; Tabata, Kazuhito V.; Yamauchi, Lisa; Hyeon Kim, Soo; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Suga, Hiroaki; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Nano- to micron-size reaction chamber arrays (femtolitre chamber arrays) have facilitated the development of sensitive and quantitative biological assays, such as single-molecule enzymatic assays, digital PCR and digital ELISA. However, the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays is limited to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. Here we report an arrayed lipid bilayer chamber system (ALBiC) that contains sub-million femtolitre chambers, each sealed with a stable 4-μm-diameter lipid bilayer membrane. When reconstituted with a limiting amount of the membrane transporter proteins α-hemolysin or F0F1-ATP synthase, the chambers within the ALBiC exhibit stochastic and quantized transporting activities. This demonstrates that the single-molecule analysis of passive and active membrane transport is achievable with the ALBiC system. This new platform broadens the versatility of femtolitre chamber arrays and paves the way for novel applications aimed at furthering our mechanistic understanding of membrane proteins’ function. PMID:25058452

  8. Numeric-modeling sensitivity analysis of the performance of wind turbine arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Lissaman, P.B.S.; Gyatt, G.W.; Zalay, A.D.

    1982-06-01

    An evaluation of the numerical model created by Lissaman for predicting the performance of wind turbine arrays has been made. Model predictions of the wake parameters have been compared with both full-scale and wind tunnel measurements. Only limited, full-scale data were available, while wind tunnel studies showed difficulties in representing real meteorological conditions. Nevertheless, several modifications and additions have been made to the model using both theoretical and empirical techniques and the new model shows good correlation with experiment. The larger wake growth rate and shorter near wake length predicted by the new model lead to reduced interference effects on downstream turbines and hence greater array efficiencies. The array model has also been re-examined and now incorporates the ability to show the effects of real meteorological conditions such as variations in wind speed and unsteady winds. The resulting computer code has been run to show the sensitivity of array performance to meteorological, machine, and array parameters. Ambient turbulence and windwise spacing are shown to dominate, while hub height ratio is seen to be relatively unimportant. Finally, a detailed analysis of the Goodnoe Hills wind farm in Washington has been made to show how power output can be expected to vary with ambient turbulence, wind speed, and wind direction.

  9. Potential of minicomputer/array-processor system for nonlinear finite-element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohkorb, G. A.; Noor, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of using a minicomputer/array-processor system for the efficient solution of large-scale, nonlinear, finite-element problems is studied. A Prime 750 is used as the host computer, and a software simulator residing on the Prime is employed to assess the performance of the Floating Point Systems AP-120B array processor. Major hardware characteristics of the system such as virtual memory and parallel and pipeline processing are reviewed, and the interplay between various hardware components is examined. Effective use of the minicomputer/array-processor system for nonlinear analysis requires the following: (1) proper selection of the computational procedure and the capability to vectorize the numerical algorithms; (2) reduction of input-output operations; and (3) overlapping host and array-processor operations. A detailed discussion is given of techniques to accomplish each of these tasks. Two benchmark problems with 1715 and 3230 degrees of freedom, respectively, are selected to measure the anticipated gain in speed obtained by using the proposed algorithms on the array processor.

  10. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  11. Phenomic assessment of genetic buffering by kinetic analysis of cell arrays.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, John; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative high-throughput cell array phenotyping (Q-HTCP) is applied to the genomic collection of yeast gene deletion mutants for systematic, comprehensive assessment of the contribution of genes and gene combinations to any phenotype of interest (phenomic analysis). Interacting gene networks influence every phenotype. Genetic buffering refers to how gene interaction networks stabilize or destabilize a phenotype. Like genomics, phenomics varies in its resolution with there being a trade-off allocating a greater number of measurements per sample to enhance quantification of the phenotype vs. increasing the number of different samples by obtaining fewer measurements per sample. The Q-HTCP protocol we describe assesses 50,000-70,000 cultures per experiment by obtaining kinetic growth curves from time series imaging of agar cell arrays. This approach was developed for the yeast gene deletion strains, but it could be applied as well to other microbial mutant arrays grown on solid agar media. The methods we describe are for creation and maintenance of frozen stocks, liquid source array preparation, agar destination plate printing, image scanning, image analysis, curve fitting, and evaluation of gene interaction. PMID:25213246

  12. Zarya Energy Balance Analysis: The Effect of Spacecraft Shadowing on Solar Array Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Kolosov, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    The first element of the International Space Station (ISS). Zarya, was funded by NASA and built by the Russian aerospace company Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center (KhSC). NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and KhSC collaborated in performing analytical predictions of the on-orbit electrical performance of Zarya's solar arrays. GRC assessed the pointing characteristics of and shadow patterns on Zarya's solar arrays to determine the average solar energy incident on the arrays. KHSC used the incident energy results to determine Zarya's electrical power generation capability and orbit-average power balance. The power balance analysis was performed over a range of solar beta angles and vehicle operational conditions. This analysis enabled identification of problems that could impact the power balance for specific flights during ISS assembly and was also used as the primary means of verifying that Zarya complied with electrical power requirements. Analytical results are presented for select stages in the ISS assembly sequence along with a discussion of the impact of shadowing on the electrical performance of Zarya's solar arrays.

  13. Phenomic Assessment of Genetic Buffering by Kinetic Analysis of Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, John; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Quantitative high throughput cell array phenotyping (Q-HTCP) is applied to the genomic collection of yeast gene deletion mutants for systematic, comprehensive assessment of the contribution of genes and gene combinations to any phenotype of interest (phenomic analysis). Interacting gene networks influence every phenotype. Genetic buffering refers to how gene interaction networks stabilize or destabilize a phenotype. Like genomics, phenomics varies in its resolution with there being a tradeoff allocating a greater number of measurements per sample to enhance quantification of the phenotype vs. increasing the number of different samples by obtaining fewer measurement per sample. The Q-HTCP protocol we describe assesses 50,000–70,000 cultures per experiment by obtaining kinetic growth curves from time series imaging of agar cell arrays. This approach was developed for the yeast gene deletion strains, but it could be applied as well to other microbial mutant arrays grown on solid agar media. The methods we describe are for creation and maintenance of frozen stocks, liquid source array preparation, agar destination plate printing, image scanning, image analysis, curve fitting and evaluation of gene interaction. PMID:25213246

  14. Spherical harmonic analysis of the sound radiation from omnidirectional loudspeaker arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqual, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    Omnidirectional sound sources are widely used in room acoustics. These devices are made up of loudspeakers mounted on a spherical or polyhedral cabinet, where the dodecahedral shape prevails. Although such electroacoustic sources have been made readily available to acousticians by many manufacturers, an in-depth investigation of their vibroacoustic behavior has not been provided yet. In order to fulfill this lack, this paper presents a theoretical study of the sound radiation from omnidirectional loudspeaker arrays, which is carried out by using a mathematical model based on the spherical harmonic analysis. Eight different loudspeaker arrangements on the sphere are considered: the well-known five Platonic solid layouts and three extremal system layouts. The latter possess useful properties for spherical loudspeaker arrays used as directivity controlled sound sources, so that these layouts are included here in order to investigate whether or not they could be of interest as omnidirectional sources as well. It is shown through a comparative analysis that the dodecahedral array leads to the lowest error in producing an omnidirectional sound field and to the highest acoustic power, which corroborates the prevalence of such a layout. In addition, if a source with less than 12 loudspeakers is required, it is shown that tetrahedra or hexahedra can be used alternatively, whereas the extremal system layouts are not interesting choices for omnidirectional loudspeaker arrays.

  15. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis of two suspension bridges in Istanbul, Turkey to near- and far-fault ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çavdar, Ö.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the near-fault and far-fault ground motion effects on the probabilistic sensitivity dynamic responses of two suspension bridges in Istanbul. Two different types of suspension bridges are selected to investigate the near-fault (NF) and far-fault (FF) ground motion effects on the bridge sensitivity responses. NF and FF strong ground motion records, which have approximately identical peak ground accelerations, of the Kocaeli (1999) earthquake are selected for the analyses. Displacements and internal forces are determined using the probabilistic sensitivity method (PSM), which is one type of stochastic finite element method. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are validated by comparison with results of the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) method. The displacements and internal forces obtained from the analyses of suspension bridges subjected to each fault effect are compared with each other. It is clearly seen that there is more seismic demand on displacements and internal forces when suspension bridges are subjected to NF and FF ground motion.

  16. Corporal Punishment, School Suspension, and the Civil Rights of Students: An Analysis of Office for Civil Rights School Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glackman, Ted; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Survey data from 116 schools indicate that (1) minority group students, particularly males, are corporally punished more often than their White peers; (2) boys, in general, receive more corporal punishment than girls; and (3) schools that use corporal punishment frequently also have high rates of suspension. (WI)

  17. Beyond Behavior: Multilevel Analysis of the Influence of Sociodemographics and School Characteristics on Students' Risk of Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Klingbeil, David A.; Van Norman, Ethan R.

    2013-01-01

    Minority disproportionality in school discipline outcomes continues to trouble practitioners and scholars. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and indicators of school policy enactment (e.g., retention rates, special education identification) on students' risk of suspension. The sample…

  18. EDITORIAL: Colloidal suspensions Colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, Andrei; Kegel, Willem; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen

    2011-05-01

    Special issue in honour of Henk Lekkerkerker's 65th birthday Professor Henk N W Lekkerkerker is a world-leading authority in the field of experimental and theoretical soft condensed matter. On the occasion of his 65th birthday in the summer of 2011, this special issue celebrates his many contributions to science. Henk Lekkerkerker obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry at the University of Utrecht (1968) and moved to Calgary where he received his PhD in 1971. He moved to Brussels as a NATO fellow at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and was appointed to an assistant professorship (1974), an associate professorship (1977) and a full professorship (1980) in physical chemistry at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. In 1985 he returned to The Netherlands to take up a professorship at the Van 't Hoff Laboratory, where he has been ever since. He has received a series of awards during his career, including the Onsager Medal (1999) of the University of Trondheim, the Bakhuys Roozeboom Gold Medal (2003) of the Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), the ECIS-Rhodia European Colloid and Interface Prize (2003), and the Liquid Matter Prize of the European Physical Society (2008). He was elected a member of KNAW in 1996, was awarded an Academy Chair position in 2005, and has held several visiting lectureships. Henk's work focuses on phase transitions in soft condensed matter, and he has made seminal contributions to both the theoretical and experimental aspects of this field. Here we highlight three major themes running through his work, and a few selected publications. So-called depletion interactions may lead to phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures, and Henk realised that the partitioning of polymer needs to be taken into account to describe the phase behaviour correctly [1]. Colloidal suspensions can be used as model fluids, with the time- and length-scales involved leading to novel opportunities, notably the direct observation of capillary waves at a

  19. Suspensions in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.N.

    1996-12-31

    Suspensions or slurries are widely used in well stimulation and hydraulic fracturing processes to enhance the production of oil and gas from the underground hydrocarbon-bearing formation. The success of these processes depends significantly upon having a thorough understanding of the behavior of suspensions used. Therefore, the characterization of suspensions under realistic conditions, for their rheological and hydraulic properties, is very important. This chapter deals with the state-of-the-art hydraulic fracturing suspension technology. Specifically it deals with various types of suspensions used in well stimulation and fracturing processes, their rheological characterization and hydraulic properties, behavior of suspensions in horizontal wells, review of proppant settling velocity and proppant transport in the fracture, and presently available measurement techniques for suspensions and their merits. Future industry needs for better understanding of the complex behavior of suspensions are also addressed. 74 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  20. An analysis of eight-year operation of GaAs solar array at space station MIR

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M.; Nadorov, V.; Rjevsky, V.

    1994-12-31

    The Russian space station MIR was launched in February 1986. Total power system capacity was to be continuously increased by means of additional arrays of docked scientific and technological modules. The current appearance of the MIR with solar arrays is shown. The effects of thermal stresses are evaluated. The results of a detailed analysis of the performance of the solar arrays over the eight years of operation are presented.

  1. A laboratory study on sediment resuspension within arrays of rigid cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, Rafael O.; Coco, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    We present results from laboratory experiments on flow through submerged arrays of rigid cylinders embedded in a sandy bed. Using rigid, cylindrical elements to mimic vegetation and benthos, we account for only the physical effects resulting from their presence, eliminating biological factors, such as biofilms and root systems. In line with previous findings, rigid arrays modify the flow mean and turbulent velocity statistics. However, even if the flow speed is significantly damped within dense arrays, the amount of sediment that gets lifted into suspension increases as the density of the array increases due to array- and cylinder-scale turbulence. We present a first attempt to provide predictive relationships of suspended sediment concentration using an alternative approach for the Shields parameter with an empirical coefficient to account for turbulence generated by submerged arrays of rigid cylinders. A similar analysis, using a ratio of populated to non-populated Shields parameter, is conducted to predict resuspension as a function of array density.

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis for radiation-induced cell cycle suspension in 92-1 melanoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengling; Bing, Zhitong; Zhang, Yanan; Ao, Bin; Zhang, Sheng; Ye, Caiyong; He, Jinpeng; Ding, Nan; Ye, Wenling; Xiong, Jie; Sun, Jintu; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Zhou, Guangming; Yang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor with high invasive and metastatic properties. Though radiation is the major therapy for melanoma, its radio-resistance has been shown to severely influence the clinical outcome. So it is imperative to enhance the sensitivity of uveal melanoma cells to radiotherapy. Previously, we found that the cell cycle of 92-1 uveal melanoma cells was suspended and remained unchanged for up to 5 days after exposure to 10 Gy of X-rays, which might be relevant to the high radio-sensitivity of 92-1 cells. To further investigate the cell cycle suspension-associated proteins, we employed two analyses with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture technology and two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated for 15 h or 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy of X-rays. We identified a total of 737 proteins at 15 h (Group A) and 530 proteins at 48 h post-irradiation (Group B). The gene ontology biological pathway was used to obtain a systems level view of proteome changes in 92-1cells under cell cycle suspension. We further selected the significantly changed proteins for investigation of their potential contribution to cell cycle suspension, growth arrest and cell senescence. These proteins are involved in the cell cycle, stress response, glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, etc. Our study expected to reveal potential marker proteins associated with cell suspension induced by irradiation, which might contribute to understanding the mechanism beyond the cell cycle suspension. PMID:23447694

  3. Array analysis methods for detection, classification and location of seismic sources: a first evaluation for aftershock analysis using dense temporary post-seismic array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J.; Bernard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, separation, classification and location of distributed non stationary seismic sources in broadband noisy environment is an important problem in seismology, in particular for monitoring the high-level post-seismic activity following large subduction earthquakes, like the off-shore Maule (Mw 8.8, 2010) earthquake in Central Chile. Multiple seismic arrays, and local antenna, distributed over a region allow exploiting frequency selective coherence of the signals that arrive at widely-separated array stations, leading to improved detection, convolution blind source separation, and location of distributed non stationary sources. We present here first results on the investigation of time-frequency adaptive array analysis techniques for detection and location of broadband distributed seismic events recorded by the dense temporary seismic network (International Maule Aftershock Deployment, IMAD) installed for monitoring the high-level seismic activity following the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8). This seismic network is characterized by a large aperture, with variable inter-station distances, corroborated with a high level of distributed near and far field seismic source activity and noise. For this study, we first extract from the post-seismic network a number of seismic arrays distributed over the region covered by this network. A first aspect is devoted to passive distributed seismic sources detection, classification and separation. We investigate a number of narrow and wide band signal analysis methods both in time and time-frequency domains for energy arrival detection and tracking, including time adaptive higher order statistics, e.g. like kurtosis, and multiband band-pass filtering, together with adaptive time-frequency transformation and extraction techniques. We demonstrate that these techniques provide superior resolution and robustness than classical STA/LTA techniques in particular in the case of distributed sources with potential signal

  4. Integrated dynamic analysis simulation of space stations with controllable solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrichs, J. A.; Fee, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    A methodology is formulated and presented for the integrated structural dynamic analysis of space stations with controllable solar arrays and non-controllable appendages. The structural system flexibility characteristics are considered in the dynamic analysis by a synthesis technique whereby free-free space station modal coordinates and cantilever appendage coordinates are inertially coupled. A digital simulation of this analysis method is described and verified by comparison of interaction load solutions with other methods of solution. Motion equations are simulated for both the zero gravity and artificial gravity (spinning) orbital conditions. Closed loop controlling dynamics for both orientation control of the arrays and attitude control of the space station are provided in the simulation by various generic types of controlling systems. The capability of the simulation as a design tool is demonstrated by utilizing typical space station and solar array structural representations and a specific structural perturbing force. Response and interaction load solutions are presented for this structural configuration and indicate the importance of using an integrated type analysis for the predictions of structural interactions.

  5. Breath analysis system for early detection of lung diseases based on multi-sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Yu, Joon-Boo; Shin, Jeong-Suk; Byun, Hyung-Gi; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Expiratory breath contains various VOCs(Volatile Organic Compounds) produced from the human. When a certain disease exists, the exhalation has specific VOCs which may be generated from diseases. Many researchers have been actively working to find different types of biomarkers which are characteristic for particular diseases. Research regarding the identification of specific diseases from exhalation is still in progress. The aim of this research is to implement early detection of lung disease such as lung cancer and COPD(Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), which was nominated on the 6th of domestic death rate in 2010, based on multi-sensor array system. The system has been used to acquire sampled expiratory gases data and PCA(Principle Component Analysis) technique was applied to analyze signals from multi-sensor array. Throughout the experimental trials, a clearly distinguishable difference between lung disease patients and healthy controls was found from the measurement and analysis of their respective expiratory gases.

  6. The Electrophysiological MEMS Device with Micro Channel Array for Cellular Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonomura, Wataru; Kurashima, Toshiaki; Takayama, Yuzo; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Konishi, Satoshi

    This paper describes a new type of MCA (Micro Channel Array) for simultaneous multipoint measurement of cellular network. Presented MCA employing the measurement principles of the patch-clamp technique is designed for advanced neural network analysis which has been studied by co-authors using 64ch MEA (Micro Electrode Arrays) system. First of all, sucking and clamping of cells through channels of developed MCA is expected to improve electrophysiological signal detections. Electrophysiological sensing electrodes integrated around individual channels of MCA by using MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) technologies are electrically isolated for simultaneous multipoint measurement. In this study, we tested the developed MCA using the non-cultured rat's cerebral cortical slice and the hippocampal neurons. We could measure the spontaneous action potential of the slice simultaneously at multiple points and culture the neurons on developed MCA. Herein, we describe the experimental results together with the design and fabrication of the electrophysiological MEMS device with MCA for cellular network analysis.

  7. Recent CSMIP/CALTRANS Downhole Array Data and their Application in Site Specific Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, H. R.; Graizer, V.; Shakal, T.; Hipely, P.

    2002-12-01

    The California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP) operates 13 downhole geotechnical arrays throughout the state of California, 8 of them instrumented with the support and cooperation of California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). More than 60 low amplitude recordings from earthquakes with 2.4arrays. The strongest acceleration of 0.5g was recorded at the La Cienega array in Los Angeles area during the M4.2 earthquake of 9/9/2001. This is a relatively small event with the epicentral distance of 2.7 km and depth of 7.9 km (almost vertical wave incidence). This case presents an opportunity to trace the incident and reflected phases of shear wave recorded at different elevations of the array. The structure of shallow ground layers is evaluated based on those phases and shows good agreement with the downhole profile of US Geological Survey and Caltrans. At the La Cienega site the shear wave velocity increases gradually from 163 m/s at the ground surface to 653 m/s at depth of 250 m. Due to vertical propagation of waves, the one dimensional wave propagation program SHAKE91 can be used to model ground motion in the layers. The earthquake ground motion at depth of 252 m is considered as the input, and the ground motion is computed at the surface, and at depths of 18 m and 100 m using SHAKE91 program. The recorded motion at the depth of 252 m consists of the two main phases: incident wave and reflected wave from the ground surface. The incident wave is used as an input ground motion in order to prevent coupling effect. Output motions are in good agreement with the actual recordings at the ground surface, 18 m and 100 m depths. The earthquake ground motion recorded at geotechnical arrays show that the incident and reflected phases of P- waves overlap in some cases (because of higher P-wave velocity the arrival time of reflected phase cannot be visually identified) and additional analysis is necessary to distinguish the arrival

  8. Stability Analysis of Roughness Array Wake in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Edwards, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Computations are performed to examine the effects of both an isolated and spanwise periodic array of trip elements on a high-speed laminar boundary layer, so as to identify the potential physical mechanisms underlying an earlier transition to turbulence as a result of the trip(s). In the context of a 0.333 scale model of the Hyper-X forebody configuration, the time accurate solution for an array of ramp shaped trips asymptotes to a stationary field at large times, indicating the likely absence of a strong absolute instability in the mildly separated flow due to the trips. A prominent feature of the wake flow behind the trip array corresponds to streamwise streaks that are further amplified in passing through the compression corner. Stability analysis of the streaks using a spatial, 2D eigenvalue approach reveals the potential for a strong convective instability that might explain the earlier onset of turbulence within the array wake. The dominant modes of streak instability are primarily sustained by the spanwise gradients associated with the streaks and lead to integrated logarithmic amplification factors (N factors) approaching 7 over the first ramp of the scaled Hyper-X forebody, and substantially higher over the second ramp. Additional computations are presented to shed further light on the effects of both trip geometry and the presence of a compression corner on the evolution of the streaks.

  9. CMOS focal-plane-array for analysis of enzymatic reaction in system-on-chip spectrophotometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Ha, Chanki; Park, Chan B.; Joo, Youngjoong

    2004-06-01

    A CMOS focal-plane-array is designed for the high-throughput analysis of enzymatic reaction in on-chip spectrophotometer system. One of potential applications of the presented prototype system is to perform enzymatic analysis of biocompounds contained in blood. This function normally requires an expensive diode-array spectrophotometer, but it is possible to perform high throughput analysis with low budget if the spectrophotometer system is scaled down to a chip. The CMOS active pixel sensor array can cover a layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) forming the microfluidic channels and the substrate solution for enzymatic reaction can be injected into the channels by capillary force. Under room light, the underneath CMOS active pixel sensor with 40 x 40 pixels detect the gray levels of the fluid"s color. Inside the image sensor chip (size: 3mm x 3mm), the pixels of the same column share the same sample and hold circuits. The analog signals from 40 columns are multiplexed into one input feeding an on-chip 8 bits dual-slope analog to digital converter. The color change can be displayed on the external monitor by using a data acquisition card and personal computer.

  10. Analysis and comparison of two two-dimensional Halbach permanent magnet arrays for magnetically levitated planar motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Kou, Baoquan; Xing, Feng; Zhang, He

    2014-05-01

    A novel 2-D Halbach permanent magnet array which can be used in magnetically levitated planar motor is proposed in this paper. The air-gap flux density distribution of the novel 2-D Halbach permanent magnet array is solved by the scalar magnetic potential equation. In order to compare with the well-known Halbach magnet array that was used by Jansen et al. [IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl. 44(4), 1108 (2008)], harmonic analysis of the x- and z- component of the air-gap flux density are carried out by Fourier decomposition. Comparison of Bx and Bz between the two 2-D Halbach magnet arrays are made. And it is verified that the performance of the new Halbach magnet array is superior to the existing Halbach magnet arrays, its higher magnetic flux density and lower high-order harmonics will help to improve the performance of the magnetically levitated planar motor.

  11. Analysis of the persistence of enteric markers in sewage polluted water on a solid matrix and in liquid suspension.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Yolanda; Aslan, Asli; Tamrakar, Sushil; Murali, Bharathi; Mitchell, Jade; Rose, Joan B

    2015-06-01

    Addressing the persistence of bacterial indicators using qPCR and their respective DNA targets under various conditions is a critical part of risk assessment for water quality monitoring. The goal of this study was to examine the persistence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) via Escherichia coli uidA, enterococci 23S rDNA and Bacteroides thetataiotaomicron 1,6 alpha mannanase from cells attached to a solid matrix and in suspension. Raw sewage (10% vol/vol) was seeded into autoclaved river water with half of the sample volume in suspension and the other half was filtered onto membranes and stored at 4°, 27° and 37°C for up to 28 days. At various time points, DNA from cells was extracted, markers were quantified, and were fit to linear and non-linear models (first order exponential, biphasic (double) exponential, two-staged, log-logistic, and Gompertz 3-parameter). First order and biphasic exponential models fit 73% of the experimental data. Persistence increased significantly when the cells were stored in an attached state (p < 0.001). Increasing temperature had an inverse effect on persistence for the cells in suspension. Bacterial cells could be stored on a solid matrix at 4°, 27° and 37 °C for up to 27, 18, and 3 days, respectively, with <90% decay. The least stable indicator at 4°, 27° and 37 °C was B. thetataiotaomicron in suspension with T90 = 9.6, 1.8, and 1.1 days, respectively. The most persistent indicator was enterococci, with T90 > 28 days in an attached state at all temperatures. PMID:25835590

  12. Analysis and testing of an integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Jiang, Peng; Pan, Hui; Qian, Li-Jun

    2016-04-01

    An integrated semi-active seat suspension for both longitudinal and vertical vibration control is analyzed and tested in this paper. The seat suspension consists of a switching mechanism transforming both longitudinal and vertical motions into a rotary motion and a real-time damping-controllable system-a rotary magnetorheological (MR) damper working in pure shear mode and its corresponding control system. The switching mechanism employs the parallelogram frames as a motion guide which keeps the seat moving longitudinally and vertically. At the same time, both longitudinal and vertical motions are transformed into a reciprocating rotary motion that is transmitted to the rotary MR damper after an amplification by a gear mechanism. Both the longitudinal and vertical vibrations can be attenuated in real time through controlling the damping force (or torque) of the rotary MR damper. The mathematical model of the seat suspension system is established, simulated, and analyzed. The experimental test based on the test rig in Hefei University of Technology is implemented, and the results of simulation and experimental test are compared and analyzed.

  13. Analysis and design of coupled-oscillator arrays for microwave systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussounda, Renaud

    The concept of synchronized nonlinear coupled oscillators is applied to microwave and antenna engineering for the analysis and design of wireless communication and sensing systems operating at the microwave and/or millimeter (mm)-wave frequencies. The significance of such approach is justified from the potential gain in efficiency, weight, cost and functionality although technical challenges stand in the way. Unlike typical phased array systems, which are currently used to construct such systems, coupled-oscillator systems present additional challenges that mainly arise from maintaining stability and synchronization as the the coupled nonlinear system is operated. Linear systems do not present such stability issues and are consequently faster since they do not rely on any gradual synchronization mechanism in order to function. However, at significantly higher frequencies in the quasi-optical domain, coupled-oscillator systems can make up for the speed difference and present significant efficiency advantages over typical phased array architectures. In addition, coupled nonlinear systems possess inherent analog properties that can be used for a multitude of functions. This dissertation advances the topic of coupled-oscillator arrays by 1) developing an alternative set of techniques for designing the oscillating unit cells called active integrated antennas (AIAs) at microwave or mm-wave frequencies, 2) developing a more accurate description of the dynamics of the array, 3) developing and implementing a new topology for a coupling network that is able to extend stability, 4) implementing a fully non-reciprocally coupled array able to produce large scan angle without loss of stability, 5) proposing an architecture based on a single phase-locked loop (PLL) and containing a self-calibration mechanism, and finally 6) implementing a phase-boosting mechanism using simple circuits to amplify the phase difference between adjacent radiating antennas in order to increase

  14. Nanoparticle tracking analysis of particle size and concentration detection in suspensions of polymer and protein samples: Influence of experimental and data evaluation parameters.

    PubMed

    Gross, Julia; Sayle, Sabrina; Karow, Anne R; Bakowsky, Udo; Garidel, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) is an emerging technique for detecting simultaneously sub-micron particle size distributions and particle concentrations of a sample. This study deals with the performance evaluation for the detection and characterisation of various particles by NTA. Our investigation focusses on the NTA measurement parameter set-ups, as will be shown in this study, are very crucial parameters to correctly analyse and interpret the data. In order to achieve this, we used (i) polystyrene standard particles as well as (ii) protein particles. We show the highly precise and reproducible detection of particle size and concentration in monodisperse polystyrene particle systems, under specified and constant parameter settings. On the other hand, our results exemplify potential risks and errors while setting inadequate parameters with regards to the results and thus interpretation thereof. In particular changes of the parameters, camera level (CL) and detection threshold (DT), led to significant changes in the determined particle concentration. We propose defined and specified "optimal" camera levels for monodisperse particle suspension characterisations in the size range of 20-1000nm. We illustrate that the results of polydisperse polystyrene standard particle solution measurements, highly depend on the used parameter settings, which are rarely published with the data. Changes in these settings led to the "appearance" or "disappearance" of particle populations ("peaks") for polydisperse systems. Thus, a correct evaluation of the particle size populations in the sample becomes very challenging. For the use of NTA in biopharmaceutical analysis, proteinaceous samples were investigated. We analysed protein particle suspensions and compared unstressed and stressed (formation of aggregates) protein samples similar to polystyrene particle analysis. We also studied these samples in two different measuring modes (general capture mode and live monitoring mode

  15. Investigating high-concentration monoclonal antibody powder suspension in nonaqueous suspension vehicles for subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Mayumi; Armstrong, Nick; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2012-12-01

    Developing high-concentration monoclonal antibody (mAb) liquid formulations for subcutaneous (s.c.) administration is challenging because increased viscosity makes injection difficult. To overcome this obstacle, we investigated a nonaqueous powder suspension approach. Three IgG1 mAbs were spray dried and suspended at different concentrations in Miglyol® 840, benzyl benzoate, or ethyl lactate. Suspensions were characterized for viscosity, particle size, and syringeability; physical stability was visually inspected. Suspensions generally outperformed liquid solutions for injectability despite higher viscosity at the same mAb concentrations. Powder formulations and properties had little effect on viscosity or injectability. Ethyl lactate suspensions had lowest viscosity (<20 cP) and lowest syringe injection glide force (<15 N) at mAb concentrations as high as 333 mg/mL (500 mg powder/mL). Inverse gas chromatography analysis indicated that the vehicle was the most important factor impacting suspension performance. Ethyl lactate rendered greater heat of sorption (suggesting strong particle-suspension vehicle interaction may reduce particle-particle self-association, leading to low suspension viscosity and glide force) but lacked the physical suspension stability exhibited by the other vehicles. Specific mixtures of ethyl lactate and Miglyol® 840 improved overall performance in high mAb concentration suspensions. This study demonstrated the viability of high mAb concentration (>300 mg/mL) in suspension formulations for s.c. administration. PMID:23001898

  16. Magnetic Suspension Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin

    1998-01-01

    This Cooperative Agreement, intended to support focused research efforts in the area of magnetic suspension systems, was initiated between NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Old Dominion University (ODU) starting January 1, 1997. The original proposal called for a three-year effort, but funding for the second year proved to be unavailable, leading to termination of the agreement following a 5-month no-cost extension. This report covers work completed during the entire 17-month period of the award. This research built on work that had taken place over recent years involving both NASA LARC and the Principal Investigator (PI). The research was of a rather fundamental nature, although specific applications were kept in mind at all times, such as wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), space payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, magnetic bearings for unconventional applications, magnetically levitated ground transportation and electromagnetic launch systems. Fundamental work was undertaken in areas such as the development of optimized magnetic configurations, analysis and modelling of eddy current effects, control strategies for magnetically levitated wind tunnel models and system calibration procedures. Despite the termination of this Cooperative Agreement, several aspects of the research work are currently continuing with alternative forms of support.

  17. Design and test analysis of a solar array root hinge drive assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xilun; Li, Xin

    2014-09-01

    A root hinge drive assembly is preferred in place of the classical viscous damper in a large solar array system. It has advantages including better deployment control and higher reliability. But the traditional single degree of freedom model should be improved. A multiple degrees of freedom dynamics model is presented for the solar arrays deployment to guide the drive assembly design. The established model includes the functions of the torsion springs, the synchronization mechanism and the lock-up impact. A numerical computation method is proposed to solve the dynamics coupling problem. Then considering the drive torque requirement calculated by the proposed model, a root hinge drive assembly is developed based on the reliability engineering design methods, and dual actuators are used as a redundancy design. Pseudo-efficiency is introduced and the major factors influencing the (pseudo-) efficiency of the gear mechanism designed with high reduction ratio are studied for further test data analysis. A ground prototype deployment test is conducted to verify the capacity of the drive assembly. The test device consists of a large-area solar array system and a root hinge drive assembly. The RHDA development time is about 43 s. The theoretical drive torque is compared with the test values which are obtained according to the current data and the reduction efficiency analysis, and the results show that the presented model and the calibration methods are proper enough.

  18. An approach to simulation of the finite element machine. [array of microcomputers for structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the simulation approach for the finite element machine (FEM), a special-purpose computer for structural analysis calculations under development at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The FEM consists of an array (1000 or more) of general-purpose microcomputers performing structural analysis in an asychronous parallel manner. A simulator of sufficient flexibility to model the behavior of the FEM on many levels has been designed and coded, and verification has begun using the experimental FEM hardware. The structure of the simulator is described, and preliminary simulation results are presented.

  19. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrese, James C.; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach. Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results. Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  20. Nuclear analysis for the intor array of loops ICRF launcher module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.

    1985-07-01

    Nuclear analysis for the array of loops ICRF launcher module design of INTOR is presented. The nuclear radiation environment in the different module components is determined. The fast neutron fluence in the BeO radome is 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ after one full power year leading to significant microcracking. Activation calculations for SF/sub 6/ imply a total activity of 5 x 10/sup 4/ Ci at shutdown. Nuclear heating results in a large breakdown rate in SF/sub 6/. A 1.6 m thick nuclear shield is needed to allow for hands-on maintenance one day after shutdown behind the launcher module. The results imply that significant design changes are required for the array of loops ICRF launcher module to stand the severe INTOR nuclear environment.

  1. Loch Linnhe `94: Current meter array operations and on-site analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.H.; Jones, H.E.

    1995-08-11

    This report documents the operation and on-site data analysis of the LLNL Current Meter Array (CMA) which was fielded at Loch Linnhe `94. The CMA is a large floating array of 10 sensors which measure horizontal current near the water surface. The measurements are used to interpret radar images of the water surface. This experiment was conducted as a part of the Joint UK/US Radar Ocean Imaging (ROI) Program. It was held at Loch Linnhe, Scotland in September 1994. The experiment consisted of measuring natural and ship-generated internal waves (IWs) in Loch Linnhe and imaging them with a land-based, dual frequency, dual-polarization real aperture radar operated by the UK. The goal was to determine the relationship between the amplitude of IWs as measured by instrumentation deployed in the water and the modulation they produce in radar images of the water surface.

  2. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  3. Analysis of neuronal cells of dissociated primary culture on high-density CMOS electrode array.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Eiko; Mita, Takeshi; Hubert, Julien; Bakkum, Douglas; Frey, Urs; Hierlemann, Andreas; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Ikegami, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous development of neuronal cells was recorded around 4-34 days in vitro (DIV) with high-density CMOS array, which enables detailed study of the spatio-temporal activity of neuronal culture. We used the CMOS array to characterize the evolution of the inter-spike interval (ISI) distribution from putative single neurons, and estimate the network structure based on transfer entropy analysis, where each node corresponds to a single neuron. We observed that the ISI distributions gradually obeyed the power law with maturation of the network. The amount of information transferred between neurons increased at the early stage of development, but decreased as the network matured. These results suggest that both ISI and transfer entropy were very useful for characterizing the dynamic development of cultured neural cells over a few weeks. PMID:24109870

  4. Analysis of Mirnov signals from coils mounted in a rectangular array

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, A P; Dunlap, J L; Pare, V K; Burris, R D

    1980-01-01

    Data analysis techniques for determining the structure of MHD instabilities in the ISX-B tokamak from Mirnov signals have been under development. Standard techniques cannot be applied directly in this case since the rectangular shape of the vacuum chamber requires a similar shape for the poloidal array of magnetic pickup coils. Components of the poloidal field perturbation are considered both parallel and perpendicular to the chamber walls and a twofold problem is addressed: (a) determining the relative signal phases as a function of poloidal angle along the array for any particular poloidal structure of plasma perturbation, without boundary effects; and (b) determining distortions of these phase lines due to eddy currents in the chamber. Results from simulation of plasma perturbations and from ISX-B experimental data are discussed.

  5. On the thermoelastic analysis of solar cell arrays and related material properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, M. A.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1976-01-01

    Accurate prediction of failure of solar cell arrays requires accuracy in the computation of thermally induced stresses. This was accomplished by using the finite element technique. Improved procedures for stress calculation were introduced together with failure criteria capable of describing a wide range of ductile and brittle material behavior. The stress distribution and associated failure mechanisms in the N-interconnect junction of two solar cell designs were then studied. In such stress and failure analysis, it is essential to know the thermomechanical properties of the materials involved. Measurements were made of properties of materials suitable for the design of lightweight arrays: microsheet-0211 glass material for the solar cell filter, and Kapton-H, Kapton F, Teflon, Tedlar, and Mica Ply PG-402 for lightweight substrates. The temperature-dependence of the thermal coefficient of expansion for these materials was determined together with other properties such as the elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, and the stress-strain behavior up to failure.

  6. Analytical and numerical approaches of a solar array thermal analysis in a low-earth orbit satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hui Kyung; Han, Cho Young

    2010-12-01

    This paper researches the thermal analysis of a fixed-type solar array in a low-earth orbit satellite through both an analytical method with a simplified thermal model and a numerical method with a detailed thermal model. An analytical solution is derived from the simplified one-dimensional thermal governing equation. Because the current solar array is thermally decoupled from the spacecraft bus, its thermal analysis can be performed independently. The worst hot temperature of the current solar array can be predicted using an analytical solution of a single-lumped mass node. For better solar cell efficiency, a thermal surface finish of the backside of a solar array is required to ensure that the solar array temperature remains as low as possible in orbit. There are four ideal thermal surface types for a thermal surface finish. Based on the analytical solutions of the solar array temperature under the worst hot condition corresponding to each ideal thermal surface type, a solar reflector type gives the lowest temperature. Thus, SG121FD white paint was selected as an actual application of a thermal surface finish. A detailed solar array thermal model included in the system-level satellite thermal model was developed and solved numerically. From the detailed thermal analysis, in-orbit thermal characteristics of the solar array were determined and the thermal safety of the current solar array was verified with satisfying the allowable temperature limits. And the usefulness of the analytical approach to predict the worst hot temperature of the current solar array was also confirmed in comparison with the numerical analysis result of the detailed thermal model.

  7. Development of antibody arrays for monoclonal antibody Higher Order Structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing; Li, Qing; Davies, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Antibody arrays were developed to probe a monoclonal antibody's three-dimensional structure (3-D structure). Peptides with overlapping regions were designed to cover the whole mAb light chain and heavy chain, respectively, and used to generate polyclonal antibodies after the conjugation of the peptides to a carrier protein, KLH. It was shown that good peptide specificity was achieved from the antibodies generated. Using more than 30 different polyclonal antibodies to measure the surface epitope distribution, it was shown that the mAb antibody array can detect epitope exposure as low as 0.1% of defined mAb populations. This ELISA-based analysis of mAb epitope exposure can be considered as a measurement of “conformational impurity” in biologics development, similar to the analysis of other product-related impurities such as different forms of glycosylation, deamidation, and oxidation. This analysis of “conformational impurity” could provide valuable information on the mAb conformational comparability for biosimilar mAbs as well as novel mAbs, especially in the area of protein immunogenicity. Furthermore, stability studies indicated that there are several conformational “hot spots” in many mAbs tested, especially in the hinge region. This antibody array technology can be used for novel mAb Higher Order Structure (HOS) analysis during process and formulation development. Another important area of application is for biosimilar mAb development where the innovator molecule and biosimilar molecule could be compared based on their systemic “fingerprint” from the 30 plus antibodies. PMID:23970865

  8. Using Solid State Disk Array as a Cache for LHC ATLAS Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W.; Hanushevsky, A. B.; Mount, R. P.; Atlas Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    User data analysis in high energy physics presents a challenge to spinning-disk based storage systems. The analysis is data intense, yet reads are small, sparse and cover a large volume of data files. It is also unpredictable due to users' response to storage performance. We describe here a system with an array of Solid State Disk as a non-conventional, standalone file level cache in front of the spinning disk storage to help improve the performance of LHC ATLAS user analysis at SLAC. The system uses several days of data access records to make caching decisions. It can also use information from other sources such as a work-flow management system. We evaluate the performance of the system both in terms of caching and its impact on user analysis jobs. The system currently uses Xrootd technology, but the technique can be applied to any storage system.

  9. Statistical Analysis of the Performance of MDL Enumeration for Multiple-Missed Detection in Array Processing

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fei; Li, Yibo; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-01-01

    An accurate performance analysis on the MDL criterion for source enumeration in array processing is presented in this paper. The enumeration results of MDL can be predicted precisely by the proposed procedure via the statistical analysis of the sample eigenvalues, whose distributive properties are investigated with the consideration of their interactions. A novel approach is also developed for the performance evaluation when the source number is underestimated by a number greater than one, which is denoted as “multiple-missed detection”, and the probability of a specific underestimated source number can be estimated by ratio distribution analysis. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the superiority of the presented method over available results and confirm the ability of the proposed approach to perform multiple-missed detection analysis. PMID:26295232

  10. Data in support of proteomic analysis of pneumococcal pediatric clinical isolates to construct a protein array

    PubMed Central

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Obando, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J.

    2016-01-01

    Surface proteins play key roles in the interaction between cells and their environment, and in pathogenic microorganisms they are the best targets for drug or vaccine discovery and/or development. In addition, surface proteins can be the basis for serodiagnostic tools aiming at developing more affordable techniques for early diagnosis of infection in patients. We carried out a proteomic analysis of a collection of pediatric clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen responsible for more than 1.5 million child deaths worldwide. For that, cultured live bacterial cells were “shaved” with trypsin, and the recovered peptides were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. We selected 95 proteins to be produced as recombinant polypeptides, and printed them on an array. We probed the protein array with a collection of patient sera to define serodiagnostic antigens. The mass spectrometry proteomics data correspond to those published in [1] and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium [2] via the PRIDE partner repository [3] with the dataset identifier PXD001740. The protein array raw data are provided as supplemental material in this article. PMID:26949725

  11. MIR Solar Array Return Experiment: Power Performance Measurements and Molecular Contamination Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, James; Kinard, William; Brinker, David; Scheiman, David; Banks, Bruce; Albyn, Keith; Hornung, Steve; See, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    A solar array segment was recently removed from the Mir core module and returned for ground-based analysis. The segment, which is similar to the ones the Russians have provided for the FGB and Service Modules, was microscopically examined and disassembled by US and Russian science teams. Laboratory analyses have shown the segment to he heavily contaminated by an organic silicone coating, which was converted to an organic silicate film by reactions with atomic oxygen within the. orbital flight environment. The source of the contaminant was a silicone polymer used by the Russians as an adhesive and bonding agent during segment construction. During its life cycle, the array experienced a reduction in power performance from approx. 12%, when it was new and first deployed, to approx. 5%, when it was taken out of service. However, current-voltage measurements of three contaminated cells and three pristine, Russian standard cells have shown that very little degradation in solar array performance was due to the silicate contaminants on the solar cell surfaces. The primary sources of performance degradation is attributed to "thermal hot-spotting" or electrical arcing; orbital debris and micrometeoroid impacts; and possibly to the degradation of the solar cells and interconnects caused by radiation damage from high energy protons and electrons.

  12. Magnetic field analysis of novel spherical actuators with three-dimensional pole arrays.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Liang, Fengqi; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi

    2016-06-01

    Spherical actuator is an electric device that can achieve multiple degree-of-freedom rotary motions in a single joint. Permanent magnet array is a key factor that influences the output performance of electromagnetic spherical actuators. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) pole array is proposed to improve the system flux density and thus the output performance. Analysis of magnetic field distribution is extremely important for spherical actuators with 3D magnet arrays. Thus, the investigation of magnetic field is conducted in analytical, numerical, and experimental ways. The general solution of magnetic scalar potential in 3D space is formulated analytically based on Laplace's equations and spherical harmonics, and then specific solutions of the magnetic scalar potential and magnetic flux density are obtained by using boundary conditions. Numerical computation is utilized to validate the analytical model and to facilitate the observation of the magnetic field variation. A research prototype and a testing platform of magnetic field have been developed for experimental study. The testing platform can move the probe to any position around the spherical actuator and measure the flux density automatically. Experiments are conducted to obtain the flux distribution. Both numerical and experimental results validate the analytical model well. PMID:27370488

  13. Magnetic field analysis of novel spherical actuators with three-dimensional pole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liang; Liang, Fengqi; Jiao, Zongxia; Wang, Tianyi

    2016-06-01

    Spherical actuator is an electric device that can achieve multiple degree-of-freedom rotary motions in a single joint. Permanent magnet array is a key factor that influences the output performance of electromagnetic spherical actuators. In this paper, a novel three-dimensional (3D) pole array is proposed to improve the system flux density and thus the output performance. Analysis of magnetic field distribution is extremely important for spherical actuators with 3D magnet arrays. Thus, the investigation of magnetic field is conducted in analytical, numerical, and experimental ways. The general solution of magnetic scalar potential in 3D space is formulated analytically based on Laplace's equations and spherical harmonics, and then specific solutions of the magnetic scalar potential and magnetic flux density are obtained by using boundary conditions. Numerical computation is utilized to validate the analytical model and to facilitate the observation of the magnetic field variation. A research prototype and a testing platform of magnetic field have been developed for experimental study. The testing platform can move the probe to any position around the spherical actuator and measure the flux density automatically. Experiments are conducted to obtain the flux distribution. Both numerical and experimental results validate the analytical model well.

  14. 22q13.3 Deletion Syndrome: Clinical and Molecular Analysis Using Array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, S.U.; del Gaudio, D.; German, J.R.; Peters, S.U.; Ou, Z.; Bader, P.I.; Berg, J.S.; Blazo, M.; Brown, C.W.; Graham, B.H.; Grebe, T.A.; Lalani, S.; Irons, M.; Sparagana, S.; Williams, M.; Phillips, J.A.; Beaudet, A.L.; Stankiewicz, P.; Patel, A.; Cheung, S.W.; Sahoo, T.

    2011-01-01

    The 22q13.3 deletion syndrome results from loss of terminal segments of varying sizes at 22qter. Few genotype–phenotype correlations have been found but all patients have mental retardation and severe delay, or absence of, expressive speech. We carried out clinical and molecular characterization of 13 patients. Developmental delay and speech abnormalities were common to all and comparable in frequency and severity to previously reported cases. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization showed the deletions to vary from 95 kb to 8.5 Mb. We also carried out high-resolution 244K array comparative genomic hybridization in 10 of 13 patients, that defined the proximal and distal breakpoints of each deletion and helped determine the size, extent, and gene content within the deletion. Two patients had a smaller 95 kb terminal deletion with breakpoints within the SHANK3 gene while three other patients had a similar 5.5 Mb deletion implying the recurrent nature of these deletions. The two largest deletions were found in patients with ring chromosome 22. No correlation could be made with deletion size and phenotype although complete/partial SHANK3 was deleted in all patients. There are very few reports on array comparative genomic hybridization analysis on patients with the 22q13.3 deletion syndrome, and we aim to accurately characterize these patients both clinically and at the molecular level, to pave the way for further genotype–phenotype correlations. PMID:20186804

  15. Data in support of proteomic analysis of pneumococcal pediatric clinical isolates to construct a protein array.

    PubMed

    Olaya-Abril, Alfonso; Obando, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2016-03-01

    Surface proteins play key roles in the interaction between cells and their environment, and in pathogenic microorganisms they are the best targets for drug or vaccine discovery and/or development. In addition, surface proteins can be the basis for serodiagnostic tools aiming at developing more affordable techniques for early diagnosis of infection in patients. We carried out a proteomic analysis of a collection of pediatric clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen responsible for more than 1.5 million child deaths worldwide. For that, cultured live bacterial cells were "shaved" with trypsin, and the recovered peptides were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. We selected 95 proteins to be produced as recombinant polypeptides, and printed them on an array. We probed the protein array with a collection of patient sera to define serodiagnostic antigens. The mass spectrometry proteomics data correspond to those published in [1] and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium [2] via the PRIDE partner repository [3] with the dataset identifier PXD001740. The protein array raw data are provided as supplemental material in this article. PMID:26949725

  16. Solar array design based on shadow analysis for increasing net energy collection in a competition vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio-Gómez, Gilberto; Mejía-Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Suárez-Castañeda, Nicolás; Gil-Herrera, Ana; Barrera-Velásquez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) applications such as in the architectural, automotive, and aerospace industries face design contradictions because they are expected to produce a lot of energy but are constrained by available area, surface shape, incident irradiance, shadows, and other aspects that have a negative influence on the energy produced by the solar panel. Solar competition vehicles are some of these challenging PV applications. The design of such solar arrays needs to consider efficiency evaluation in order to optimize space; it is difficult not to install solar modules in areas impacted by shadows. A design procedure for a solar array configuration based on shadow analysis for competition vehicles is presented. The principle is that shadows in moving objects can be simulated, since the vehicle, the earth and the sun are are moving in semipredictable patterns, thus net energy collection can be forecast. The case study presented is the solar array design of a vehicle that participated in the World Solar Challenge 2013. The obtained results illustrate how the employment of the procedure gives insights on important aspects to consider and also delivers qualitative and quantitative information for decision making. In addition, the experience in competition highlights some issues to be considered, modified, or improved in further vehicle designs.

  17. Detection and Analysis of Low-Frequency Sperm Whale Vocalizations with a Towed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Alexander

    Sperm whale vocalizations recorded during a sea test and calibration experiment in the Gulf of Maine on a single towed, horizontal, densely sampled, low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), coherent hydrophone array system are detected and analyzed for signal energy level and other characteristics. The vocalizing individuals are localized in bearing, range, and depth. An algorithm is developed to achieve automatic detection of vocalizations. This analysis is shown to have potential utility despite restriction to only the low-frequency component of the vocalizations by sampling theory. In addition, transmission loss in the New England continental shelf and slope environment is accounted for with an ocean waveguide-acoustic propagation model. Multiple averaged realizations of this model are used to estimate transmission loss as a function of range and depth for transects between the receiver array and vocalizing whales. Comparison of the vocalizations and background noise levels and the estimated transmission loss suggests the sperm whale detection range after coherent array processing exceeds 60 km in low-to-moderate sea states. Low-frequency source levels of vocalizations are estimated using the received levels and the estimated transmission loss, and applications of both this estimate and the receiver-side statistics are discussed.

  18. Demonstration of Array-Based Analysis for Highly Multiplexed PCR Assays

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Janice M.; Rothberg, Paul G.; Wang, Nancy; Burack, W. Richard

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an approach that allowed rapid development of a robust assay for the detection of chromosomal translocations. The method includes highly multiplexed PCR with analysis of the PCR products performed by array detection. As proof of principle, we applied this approach to the detection of IGH@-BCL2 translocations in DNA prepared from FFPE specimens. This translocation and specimen type were chosen because of the known difficulties associated with PCR-based detection of this lesion and the additional loss of sensitivity associated with FFPE samples. The multiplex PCR with array detection method detected the IGH@-BCL2 translocation in 26 of 36 FFPE follicular lymphoma specimens, whereas the BIOMED-2 assay detected 13 of 36 specimens. This increased sensitivity was the result of both the increased density of BCL2 primers and identification of PCR products by low-density array. The method was specific and allowed mapping of the BCL2 break point in all cases. The method detected the IGH@-BCL2 lesion when the tumor DNA was diluted more than 1:20 in normal DNA but not when it was diluted more than 1:100. This sensitivity allows detection of diagnostically relevant levels of IGH@-BCL2 but will not detect the rare cells with IGH@-BCL2 translocations in healthy individuals. PMID:21497287

  19. Fiber coating with suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Nunes, Janine K.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    The basic features of fiber coating with Newtonian fluids are well characterized at low capillary numbers by the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin analysis. Several extensions have been reported including studies of the influence of polymers, surfactants, and emulsions. Here we present an experimental study of fiber coating with suspensions of micron-sized particles where we perform direct visualization of the coating process using fluorescent particles. The addition of particles to the coating liquid produce several novel effects including (a) accumulation of particles in the neighborhood of the meniscus, which changes the dynamics of the coating process, and (b) crystallization can occur on the fiber, in some cases in the form of a continuous film that is at most a few particles thick, and which depends on capillary number. These results using continuous withdrawal will be contrasted with those reported in the literature for colloidal cystallization produced by evaporative processes.

  20. 8-spot smFRET analysis using two 8-pixel SPAD arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Antonino; Panzeri, Francesco; Sarkosh, Niusha; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo; Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) techniques are now widely used to address outstanding problems in biology and biophysics. In order to study freely diffusing molecules, current approaches consist in exciting a low concentration (<100 pM) sample with a single confocal spot using one or more lasers and detecting the induced single-molecule fluorescence in one or more spectrally- and/or polarization-distinct channels using single-pixel Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs). A large enough number of single-molecule bursts must be accumulated in order to compute FRET efficiencies with sufficient statistics. As a result, the minimum timescale of observable phenomena is set by the minimum acquisition time needed for accurate measurements, typically a few minutes or more, limiting this approach mostly to equilibrium studies. Increasing smFRET analysis throughput would allow studying dynamics with shorter timescales. We recently demonstrated a new multi-spot excitation approach, employing a novel multi-pixel SPAD array, using a simplified dual-view setup in which a single 8-pixel SPAD array was used to collect FRET data from 4 independent spots. In this work we extend our results to 8 spots and use two 8-SPAD arrays to collect donor and acceptor photons and demonstrate the capabilities of this system by studying a series of doubly labeled dsDNA samples with different donor-acceptor distances ranging from low to high FRET efficiencies. Our results show that it is possible to enhance the throughput of smFRET measurements in solution by almost one order of magnitude, opening the way for studies of single-molecule dynamics with fast timescale once larger SPAD arrays become available. PMID:24386541

  1. Array Analysis of T-Waves Generated by Large Tsunamigenic and Non-tsunamigenic Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulli, J. J.; Salzberg, D. H.

    2007-12-01

    Hydroacoustic stations of the International Monitoring System are now operating in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Each station consists of one or two three-element arrays with a bandwidth of 100 Hz and precise signal direction finding capability on the order of 0.25 degrees. These arrays routinely record T-waves generated by sub- sea earthquakes and provide the capability to localize the points of sound generation on the ocean floor. The utility of these arrays for understanding T-wave generation was demonstrated with data from the Great Sumatran Earthquake of December 26, 2004, where T-waves of 15-minutes in time and nearly 1000-km in source extent could be localized along the Sumatran trench. This correlates well with seismic determinations of the fault dynamics and implies the capability to perform real-time estimates of source complexity, which impacts tsunami warning. Since then, we have applied array-processing techniques to the analysis of T-waves from dozens of sub-sea earthquakes in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Here we report on a comparison of results from the larger events in our dataset (magnitudes > 6.5 Mw), some of which have generated recordable or reportable tsunamis. These include: March 28, 2005 Northern Sumatra, Mw 8.6; May 16, 2006 Northern Sumatra, Mw 6.8; March 30, 2007 Kamchatka, Mw 6.5; and August 15, 2007 Coastal Peru, Mw 8.0. T-waves from all of these events can be localized to an extended source area, which is often more than 100-km long, but the relationship of this source area to tsunamigenisis is complicated. This source area may or may not be directly indicative of the fault zone extent, since T-wave generation results from a complex interaction seismic waves with ocean bottom topography. This interaction must be accounted for to relate acoustic source area to seismic faulting. One way to accomplish this is by using smaller events (aftershocks) as Green's functions for the main shock. Array analysis of T

  2. Broadband Array Analysis of the 2005 Episodic Tremor and Slip Event in Northern Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, A.; Creager, K.; McCausland, W.; Frassetto, A.; Qamar, A.; Derosier, S.; Carmichael, J.; Malone, S.; Johnson, D.

    2005-12-01

    The region of Cascadia from the Olympic Mountains through southern Vancouver Island and down-dip of the subduction megathrust has repeatedly experienced episodes of slow slip. This episodic slip, which has been observed to take place over a period of two to several weeks, is accompanied by a seismic tremor signal. Based on the average recurrence interval of 14 months, the next episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event should occur within six weeks of mid-September, 2005. Indeed, it appears to have begun on September 3, as this abstract was being written. In order to record this anticipated event, we deployed an array of 11 three-component seismometers on the northern side of the Olympic Peninsula augmenting Pacific Northwest Seismographic Network stations as well as the first few EarthScope BigFoot stations and Plate Boundary Observatory borehole seismometers. This seismic array was comprised of six short-period and five broadband instruments with spacings of 500 m and 2200 m respectively. In conjunction with this Earthscope seismic deployment, we also installed a dense network of 29 temporary, continuous GPS stations across the entire Olympic Peninsula to integrate seismic and geodetic observations. One of the primary goals of this research is to utilize the broadband instrumentation in the array to investigate the possible correlation of low frequency energy with the rest of the tremor activity. ETS has been carefully investigated at high-frequency (seismic tremor at 2-6 Hz) and very low-frequency (slip occurring over weeks, observed by GPS). An important goal of this experiment is to investigate the possibility that the tremor generates intermediate, low-frequency signals. Preliminary analysis of short-period array recordings of the July, 2004 ETS event suggests that the tremor displays signs of lower-frequency energy (~0.5 Hz) correlated with its higher frequency activity. Our array should enable us to distinguish low- frequency signals originating in the direction

  3. Metal oxide based multisensor array and portable database for field analysis of antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Erica; Bradley, Ryan; Frasco, Thalia; Jayathilaka, Dilhani; Marsh, Amanda; Andreescu, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel chemical sensing array based on metal oxide nanoparticles as a portable and inexpensive paper-based colorimetric method for polyphenol detection and field characterization of antioxidant containing samples. Multiple metal oxide nanoparticles with various polyphenol binding properties were used as active sensing materials to develop the sensor array and establish a database of polyphenol standards that include epigallocatechin gallate, gallic acid, resveratrol, and Trolox among others. Unique charge-transfer complexes are formed between each polyphenol and each metal oxide on the surface of individual sensors in the array, creating distinct optically detectable signals which have been quantified and logged into a reference database for polyphenol identification. The field-portable Pantone/X-Rite© CapSure® color reader was used to create this database and to facilitate rapid colorimetric analysis. The use of multiple metal-oxide sensors allows for cross-validation of results and increases accuracy of analysis. The database has enabled successful identification and quantification of antioxidant constituents within real botanical extractions including green tea. Formation of charge-transfer complexes is also correlated with antioxidant activity exhibiting electron transfer capabilities of each polyphenol. The antioxidant activity of each sample was calculated and validated against the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay showing good comparability. The results indicate that this method can be successfully used for a more comprehensive analysis of antioxidant containing samples as compared to conventional methods. This technology can greatly simplify investigations into plant phenolics and make possible the on-site determination of antioxidant composition and activity in remote locations. PMID:24610993

  4. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Wood, Constance L; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Stromberg, Arnold J

    2004-01-01

    Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease) or absence (Control) of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB) or cerebellum (CER). In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033) determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD) procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER. PMID:15626348

  5. Fermilab Failure Analysis of TeV I (TIE) Array Soldier Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Runge-Marchese, Jude M.; Daehn, Ralph C.; /Fermilab

    1987-09-02

    Failure of TIE array loop assembly solder joints within Stochastic Cooling Tanks during system operation resulted in the loop base plate dropping into the beam region. This caused a non-operational condition to exist within the system. In order to understand the failure mechanism, several loop assemblies were submitted to Midwest Materials and Engineering Consultants for complete metallurgical evaluation and failure analysis. Because of the similarity between the loop assembly material construction and the TIE resistor assemblies, several resistor assemblies were also evaluated.

  6. Hindlimb suspension reduces muscle regeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Truong, Q.; Macius, A.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of juvenile skeletal muscle to a weightless environment reduces growth and satellite cell mitotic activity. However, the effect of a weightless environment on the satellite cell population during muscle repair remains unknown. Muscle injury was induced in rat soleus muscles using the myotoxic snake venom, notexin. Rats were placed into hindlimb-suspended or weightbearing groups for 10 days following injury. Cellular proliferation during regeneration was evaluated using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) regenerated muscle mass, regenerated myofiber diameter, uninjured muscle mass, and uninjured myofiber diameter compared to weightbearing rats. Hindlimb suspension reduced (P < 0.05) BrdU labeling in uninjured soleus muscles compared to weight-bearing muscles. However, hindlimb suspension did not abolish muscle regeneration because myofibers formed in the injured soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended rats, and BrdU labeling was equivalent (P > 0.10) on myofiber segments isolated from the soleus muscles of hindlimb-suspended and weightbearing rats following injury. Thus, hindlimb suspension (weightlessness) does not suppress satellite cell mitotic activity in regenerating muscles before myofiber formation, but reduces growth of the newly formed myofibers.

  7. Analysis of slotted-waveguide antenna array excited by tuning screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Tony Joseph

    1998-10-01

    A radiating array consisting of Longitudinal, centered slots, excited by objects inside the waveguide have several advantages that makes it attractive for the broadcast industry. This dissertation analyses a waveguide with a slot in the center of its broad wall, excited by a tuning screw. The waveguide can be made to radiate at different channels and with different elevation patterns. Parameters of the analysis are post position and penetration and slot position and length. We present a Method of Moments analysis of such a unit element, consisting of screw and slot, and of two unit elements, including their mutual coupling. Also, a fast and accurate analysis of a truncated post is presented. The results are presented in the form of scattering matrices and the data are compared to the widely used finite element code HFSS. The post/slot combination is shown to be equivalent to a shunt element on a transmission line. In comparison with all available commercial software, it is found that our Method of Moments code is fast, accurate and efficient. It requires only normally available hardware and runs in a matter of minutes. The complete radiation pattern of an eight element array is shown.

  8. A Thermal Analysis Approach for the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2003-01-01

    There are numerous challenges associated with placing a spacecraft in orbit around Mars. Often. trades must be made such as the mass of the payload and the amount of fuel that can be carried. One technique employed to more efficiently place a spacecraft in orbit while maximizing payload mass (minimizing fuel use) is aerobraking. The Mars Odyssey Spacecraft made use of aerobraking to gradually reduce its orbit period from a highly elliptical insertion orbit to its final science orbit. Aerobraking introduces its own unique challenges, in particular, predicting the thermal response of the spacecraft and its components during each aerobraking drag pass. This paper describes the methods used to perform aerobraking thermal analysis using finite element thermal models of the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's solar array. To accurately model the complex behavior during aerobraking, the thermal analysis must be tightly coupled to the spatially varying, time dependent aerodynamic heating analysis. Also, to properly represent the temperatures prior to the start of the drag pass. the model must include the orbital solar and planetary heat fluxes. It is critical that the thermal behavior be predicted accurately to maintain the solar array below its structural flight allowable temperature limit. The goal of this paper is to describe a thermal modeling method that was developed for this purpose.

  9. Analysis of LH Launcher Arrays (Like the ITER One) Using the TOPLHA Code

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Vecchi, G.

    2009-11-26

    TOPLHA (Torino Polytechnic Lower Hybrid Antenna) code is an innovative tool for the 3D/1D simulation of Lower Hybrid (LH) antennas, i.e. accounting for realistic 3D waveguides geometry and for accurate 1D plasma models, and without restrictions on waveguide shape, including curvature. This tool provides a detailed performances prediction of any LH launcher, by computing the antenna scattering parameters, the current distribution, electric field maps and power spectra for any user-specified waveguide excitation. In addition, a fully parallelized and multi-cavity version of TOPLHA permits the analysis of large and complex waveguide arrays in a reasonable simulation time. A detailed analysis of the performances of the proposed ITER LH antenna geometry has been carried out, underlining the strong dependence of the antenna input parameters with respect to plasma conditions. A preliminary optimization of the antenna dimensions has also been accomplished. Electric current distribution on conductors, electric field distribution at the interface with plasma, and power spectra have been calculated as well. The analysis shows the strong capabilities of the TOPLHA code as a predictive tool and its usefulness to LH launcher arrays detailed design.

  10. {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis measurements with subcritical arrays of PWR fuel pins

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Blakeman, E.D.; King, W.T.

    1996-08-01

    Experiments with fresh PWR fuel assemblies were performed to assess the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis method for measuring the subcriticality of spent fuel. The measurements at the Babcox and Wilcox Critical Experiments Facility mocked up between 17x17 fuel pins (single assembly) and a full array of 4961 fuel pins (about 17 fuel assemblies) in borated water with a fixed B concentration. For the full array, the B content of the water was varied from 1511 at delayed criticality to 4303 ppM. Measurements were done for various source-detector-fuel pin configurations; they showed high sensitivity of frequency analysis parameters to B content and fissile mass. Parameters such as auto and cross power spectral densities can be calculated directly by a more general model of the Monte Carlo code (MCNP-DSP). Calculation-measurement comparisons are presented. This model permits the validation of neutron and gamma ray transport calculational methods with subcritical measurements using the {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency analysis method.

  11. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors. PMID:25553996

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cultured Suspension Cells of the Halophyte Halogeton glomeratus by iTRAQ Provides Insights into Response Mechanisms to Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juncheng; Yao, Lirong; Li, Baochun; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Ren, Panrong; Yang, Ke; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity severely threatens land use capability and crop yields worldwide. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes will contribute to the development of salt-tolerant crops. In this study, a combination of physiological characteristics and iTRAQ-based proteomic approaches was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the salt response of suspension cell cultures of halophytic Halogeton glomeratus. These cells showed halophytic growth responses comparable to those of the whole plant. In total, 97 up-regulated proteins and 192 down-regulated proteins were identified as common to both 200 and 400 mM NaCl concentration treatments. Such salinity responsive proteins were mainly involved in energy, carbohydrate metabolism, stress defense, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell growth, and cytoskeleton metabolism. Effective regulatory protein expression related to energy, stress defense, and carbohydrate metabolism play important roles in the salt-tolerance of H. glomeratus suspension cell cultures. However, known proteins regulating Na+ efflux from the cytoplasm and its compartmentalization into the vacuole did not change significantly under salinity stress suggesting our existing knowledge concerning Na+ extrusion and compartmentalization in halophytes needs to be evaluated further. Such data are discussed in the context of our current understandings of the mechanisms involved in the salinity response of the halophyte, H. glomeratus. PMID:26904073

  13. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cultured Suspension Cells of the Halophyte Halogeton glomeratus by iTRAQ Provides Insights into Response Mechanisms to Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juncheng; Yao, Lirong; Li, Baochun; Meng, Yaxiong; Ma, Xiaole; Lai, Yong; Si, Erjing; Ren, Panrong; Yang, Ke; Shang, Xunwu; Wang, Huajun

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity severely threatens land use capability and crop yields worldwide. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance in halophytes will contribute to the development of salt-tolerant crops. In this study, a combination of physiological characteristics and iTRAQ-based proteomic approaches was conducted to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the salt response of suspension cell cultures of halophytic Halogeton glomeratus. These cells showed halophytic growth responses comparable to those of the whole plant. In total, 97 up-regulated proteins and 192 down-regulated proteins were identified as common to both 200 and 400 mM NaCl concentration treatments. Such salinity responsive proteins were mainly involved in energy, carbohydrate metabolism, stress defense, protein metabolism, signal transduction, cell growth, and cytoskeleton metabolism. Effective regulatory protein expression related to energy, stress defense, and carbohydrate metabolism play important roles in the salt-tolerance of H. glomeratus suspension cell cultures. However, known proteins regulating Na(+) efflux from the cytoplasm and its compartmentalization into the vacuole did not change significantly under salinity stress suggesting our existing knowledge concerning Na(+) extrusion and compartmentalization in halophytes needs to be evaluated further. Such data are discussed in the context of our current understandings of the mechanisms involved in the salinity response of the halophyte, H. glomeratus. PMID:26904073

  14. Large angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P. (Principal Investigator); Huang, Jen-Kuang (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Good progress is being made in several major areas. These include eddy current modelling and analysis, design optimization methods, wind tunnel Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS), payload pointing and vibration isolation systems, and system identification. In addition, another successful International Symposium has been completed, with the Proceedings being printed at the time of writing. These activities continue current work under this Grant and extend previous work on magnetic suspension systems and devices in the Guidance and Control Branch and will permit the demonstration of several new developments in the field of magnetic suspension technology.

  15. Microstamped Petri Dishes for Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy Analysis of Arrays of Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Adithya; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    While scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a powerful technique for non-invasive analysis of cells, SECM-based assays remain scarce and have been mainly limited so far to single cells, which is mostly due to the absence of suitable platform for experimentation on 3D cellular aggregates or microtissues. Here, we report stamping of a Petri dish with a microwell array for large-scale production of microtissues followed by their in situ analysis using SECM. The platform is realized by hot embossing arrays of microwells (200 μm depth; 400 μm diameter) in commercially available Petri dishes, using a PDMS stamp. Microtissues form spontaneously in the microwells, which is demonstrated here using various cell lines (e.g., HeLa, C2C12, HepG2 and MCF-7). Next, the respiratory activity of live HeLa microtissues is assessed by monitoring the oxygen reduction current in constant height mode and at various distances above the platform surface. Typically, at a 40 μm distance from the microtissue, a 30% decrease in the oxygen reduction current is measured, while above 250 μm, no influence of the presence of the microtissues is detected. After exposure to a model drug (50% ethanol), no such changes in oxygen concentration are found at any height in solution, which reflects that microtissues are not viable anymore. This is furthermore confirmed using conventional live/dead fluorescent stains. This live/dead assay demonstrates the capability of the proposed approach combining SECM and microtissue arrays formed in a stamped Petri dish for conducting cellular assays in a non-invasive way on 3D cellular models. PMID:24690887

  16. Ultrasensitive Label-free Electronic Chip for DNA Analysis Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Ye, Qi; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is a strong need for faster, cheaper, and simpler methods for nucleic acid analysis in today s clinical tests. Nanotechnologies can potentially provide solutions to these requirements by integrating nanomaterials with biofunctionalities. Dramatic improvement in the sensitivity and multiplexing can be achieved through the high-degree miniaturization. Here, we present our study in the development of an ultrasensitive label-free electronic chip for DNA/RNA analysis based on carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays. A reliable nanoelectrode array based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in a SiO2 matrix is fabricated using a bottom-up approach. Characteristic nanoelectrode behavior is observed with a low-density MWNT nanoelectrode array in measuring both the bulk and surface immobilized redox species. The open-end of MWNTs are found to present similar properties as graphite edge-plane electrodes, with a wide potential window, flexible chemical functionalities, and good biocompatibility. A BRCA1 related oligonucleotide probe with 18 bases is covalently functionalized at the open ends of the MWNTs and specifically hybridized with an oligonucleotide target as well as a PCR amplicon. The guanine bases in the target molecules are employed as the signal moieties for the electrochemical measurements. Ru(bpy)3(2+) mediator is used to further amplify the guanine oxidation signal. This technique has been employed for direct electrochemical detection of label-free PCR amplicon through specific hybridization with the BRCAl probe. The detection limit is estimated to be less than approximately 1000 DNA molecules, approaching the limit of the sensitivity by laser-based fluorescence techniques in DNA microarray. This system provides a general electronic platform for rapid molecular diagnostics in applications requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, simple sample preparation, and low- cost operation.

  17. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy. PMID:21041397

  18. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    PubMed

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  19. Research on School Suspension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iselin, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Schools across the nation report increases in the use of punitive disciplinary methods (e.g., suspension). The need for these disciplinary practices to address serious student misconduct is undisputed. What research has questioned is why some students seem to be suspended more often than others, what effects suspension has on students, and whether…

  20. A 48-pixel array of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes for multispot Single Molecule analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rech, Ivan; Maccagnani, Piera; Ghioni, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present an array of 48 Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) specifically designed for multispot Single Molecule Analysis. The detectors have been arranged in a 12×4 square geometry with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of ten in order to minimize the collection of the light from non-conjugated excitation spots. In order to explore the trade-offs between the detectors’ performance and the optical coupling with the experimental setup, SPADs with an active diameter of 25 and of 50µm have been manufactured. The use of a custom technology, specifically designed for the fabrication of the detectors, allowed us to combine a high photon detection efficiency (peak close to 50% at a wavelength of 550nm) with a low dark count rate compatible with true single molecule detection. In order to allow easy integration into the optical setup for parallel single-molecule analysis, the SPAD array has been incorporated in a compact module containing all the electronics needed for a proper operation of the detectors. PMID:24357913

  1. Application Of The Time-Frequency Polarization Analysis Of The Wavefield For Seismic Noise Array Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J. L.; Molina-Palacios, S.; Martinez-Espla, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Microzonation studies using ambient noise measurements constitute an extended and useful procedure for determine the local soil characteristics and its response due to an earthquake. Several methods exist for analyzing the noise measurements, being the most popular the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (H/V) and the array techniques, i.e. the frequency-wavenumber (F-K) transform. Many works exist about this topic and it stills being an ongoing debate about ambient noise composition, whether body or surface waves constitute most of it, showing the importance of identifying the different kinds of waves presents in a seismic record. In this work we utilize a new method of time-frequency polarization analysis, based on the stationary wavelet packet transform, to investigate how the polarization characteristics of the wavefield influence in the application of ambient noise techniques. The signals are divided in different bands, according to their reciprocal ellipticity values and then the H/V method and the F-K array analysis are computed for each band. The qualitative and quantitative comparison between the original curve and the obtained for the analyzed intervals provide information about the signals composition, showing that the major components of the seismic noise present reciprocal ellipticity values lower than 0.5. The efficient application of the studied techniques by using just the main a part of the entire signal, [0 - 0.5], is also evaluated, showing favorable results.

  2. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  3. Flexible polyimide microelectrode array for in vivo recordings and current source density analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C; Renaud, Philippe; Tanila, Heikki; Djupsund, Kaj

    2007-03-15

    This work presents implantable, flexible polymer-based probes with embedded microelectrodes for acute and chronic neural recordings in vivo, as tested on rodents. Acute recordings using this array were done in mice under urethane anesthesia and compared to those made using silicon-based probes manufactured at the Center for Neural Communication Technology, University of Michigan. The two electrode arrays yielded similar results. Recordings with chronically implanted polymer-based electrodes were performed for 60 days post-surgically in awake, behaving rats. The microelectrodes were used to monitor local field potentials and capture laminar differences in function of cortex and hippocampus, and produced response waveforms of undiminished amplitude and signal-to-noise ratios 8 weeks after chronic implantation. The polymer-based electrodes could also be connected to a lesion current to mark specific locations in the tissue. Current source density (CSD) analysis from the recordings depicted a source - sink-composition. Tissue response was assessed 8 weeks after insertion by immunochemical labeling with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) to identify astrocytes, and histological analysis showed minimal tissue reaction to the implanted structures. PMID:17027251

  4. Induction and Analysis of the Alkaloid Mitragynine Content of a Mitragyna speciosa Suspension Culture System upon Elicitation and Precursor Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zuldin, Nor Nahazima; Said, Ikram Md.; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Jin Kiat, Chew; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L−1 2, 4-D (70.83%). Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L−1 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47 ± 0.4667 mL). The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L−1 yeast extract (9.275 ± 0.082 mg L−1) that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3 μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226 ± 1.98 mg L−1). PMID:24065873

  5. Induction and analysis of the alkaloid mitragynine content of a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture system upon elicitation and precursor feeding.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Zuldin, Nor Nahazima; Said, Ikram Md; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Jin Kiat, Chew; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L⁻¹ 2,4-D (70.83%). Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L⁻¹ 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47 ± 0.4667 mL). The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L⁻¹ yeast extract (9.275 ± 0.082 mg L⁻¹) that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3  μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226 ± 1.98 mg L⁻¹). PMID:24065873

  6. Investigation of cortical structures at Etna Volcano through the analysis of array and borehole data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, Luciano; Paratore, Mario; La Rocca, Mario; Ferrari, Ferruccio; Messina, Alfio Alex; Galluzzo, Danilo; Contrafatto, Danilo; Rapisarda, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    A continuous monitoring of seismic activity is a fundamental task to detect the most common signals possibly related with volcanic activity, such as volcano-tectonic earthquakes, long-period events, and volcanic tremor. A reliable prediction of the ray-path propagated back from the recording site to the source is strongly limited by the poor knowledge of the local shallow velocity structure. Usually in volcanic environments the shallowest few hundreds meters of rock are characterized by strongly variable mechanical properties. Therefore the propagation of seismic signals through these shallow layers is strongly affected by lateral heterogeneity, attenuation, scattering, and interaction with the free surface. Driven by these motivations, between May and October 2014 we deployed a seismic array in the area called "Pozzo Pitarrone", where two seismic stations of the local monitoring network are installed, one at surface and one borehole at a depth of about 130 meters. The Pitarrone borehole is located in the middle northeastern flank along one of the main intrusion zones of Etna volcano, the so called NE-rift. With the 3D array we recorded seismic signals coming from the summit craters, and also from the seismogenetic fault called Pernicana Fault, which is located nearby. We used array data to analyse the dispersion characteristics of ambient noise vibrations and we derived one-dimensional (1D) shallow shear-velocity profiles through the inversion of dispersion curves measured by autocorrelation methods (SPAC). We observed a one-dimensional variation of shear-velocity between 430 m/s and 700 m/s to a depth of investigation of about 130 m. An abrupt velocity variation was recorded at a depth of about 60 m, probably corresponding to the transition between two different layers. Our preliminary results suggest a good correlation between the velocity model deducted with the stratigraphic section on Etna. The analysis of the entire data set will improve our knowledge about

  7. Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Barrese, James C; Rao, Naveen; Paroo, Kaivon; Triebwasser, Corey; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Franquemont, Lachlan; Donoghue, John P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) using chronically implanted intracortical microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have the potential to restore lost function to people with disabilities if they work reliably for years. Current sensors fail to provide reliably useful signals over extended periods of time for reasons that are not clear. This study reports a comprehensive retrospective analysis from a large set of implants of a single type of intracortical MEA in a single species, with a common set of measures in order to evaluate failure modes. Approach Since 1996, 78 silicon MEAs were implanted in 27 monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We used two approaches to find reasons for sensor failure. First, we classified the time course leading up to complete recording failure as acute (abrupt) or chronic (progressive). Second, we evaluated the quality of electrode recordings over time based on signal features and electrode impedance. Failure modes were divided into four categories: biological, material, mechanical, and unknown. Main results Recording duration ranged from 0 to 2104 days (5.75 years), with a mean of 387 days and a median of 182 days (n = 78). Sixty-two arrays failed completely with a mean time to failure of 332 days (median = 133 days) while nine array experiments were electively terminated for experimental reasons (mean = 486 days). Seven remained active at the close of this study (mean = 753 days). Most failures (56%) occurred within a year of implantation, with acute mechanical failures the most common class (48%), largely because of connector issues (83%). Among grossly observable biological failures (24%), a progressive meningeal reaction that separated the array from the parenchyma was most prevalent (14.5%). In the absence of acute interruptions, electrode recordings showed a slow progressive decline in spike amplitude, noise amplitude, and number of viable channels that predicts complete signal loss by about eight years. Impedance measurements showed

  8. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomazou, Eleni M; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Lefebvre, Gregory; Andrews, Robert; Ellis, Peter; Jackson, David K; Langford, Cordelia; Francis, Matthew D; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Miretti, Marcos; Coggill, Penny; Ottaviani, Diego; Sheer, Denise; Murrell, Adele; Beck, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP), array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs). Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics. PMID:18513384

  9. An Array of Qualitative Data Analysis Tools: A Call for Data Analysis Triangulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech, Nancy L.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important steps in the qualitative research process is analysis of data. The purpose of this article is to provide elements for understanding multiple types of qualitative data analysis techniques available and the importance of utilizing more than one type of analysis, thus utilizing data analysis triangulation, in order to…

  10. Analysis of MMIC arrays for use in the ACTS Aero Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.; Lee, R.; Rho, E.; Zaman, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The Aero Experiment is designed to demonstrate communication from an aircraft to an Earth terminal via the ACTS. This paper describes the link budget and antenna requirements for a 4.8 kbps full-duplex voice link at Ka-Band frequencies. Three arrays, one transmit array developed by TI and two receive arrays developed by GE and Boeing, were analyzed. The predicted performance characteristics of these arrays are presented and discussed in the paper.

  11. Multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves inferred from high-resolution array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency radio sky shows the locations of electromagnetic radio sources with a characteristic dilution of precision. Here we report a thorough high-resolution analysis of radio waves from low-frequency (˜20-150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day. It is found that the observed dilution of precision results from the array geometry of the radio receivers, a birefringent wave propagation, and the correlated multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves. The influence of the array geometry on the dilution of precision is reduced by taking into account the impulse response of the array. This procedure reveals for the very first time the splitting of one single radio source into two distinct source locations separated by ˜0.2°-1.9° which result from a birefringent wave propagation. The two locations are yet more clearly identified by using the polarity of the modulated wave number vectors of the radio waves. This polarity is also used to quantify the dilution of precision arising from correlated multipath propagation which is discriminated against wave number fluctuations arising from the timing accuracy of the radio receivers. It is found that ˜69% of the wave number variability is of natural origin and ˜31% originates from the timing accuracy of the receivers. The wave number variability from correlated multipath propagation results in a standard deviation ˜2-8% relative to the source location. This compact measurement of correlated multipath propagation is used to characterize the uncertainty of source locations in the radio sky. The identification of correlated multipath propagation strongly suggests the existence of very fast processes acting on time scales <1 ms in the D region ionosphere with physically meaningful effects on low-frequency radio wave propagation. This important result has implications for practical applications in that the observed multipath

  12. Seismic analysis of the 4-meter telescope SST-GATE for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, Jean-Laurent; Huet, Jean-Michel; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Dumas, Delphine; Blake, Simon; Sol, Hélène

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project aims to create a next generation Very High Energy (VHE)γ-ray telescope array, devoted to the observation in a wide band of energy, from a few tens of GeV to more than 100 TeV. Two sites are foreseen to view the whole sky, with the main one in the Southern Hemisphere where about 100 telescopes of three different classes, related to the specific energy region to be investigated, will be installed. Among these, the Small Size class of Telescopes, SSTs, are 4-meter telescopes and are devoted to the highest energy region, from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV. Some of these sites considered for CTA exhibit strong seismic constraints. At the Observatoire de Paris, we have designed a prototype of a Small Size Telescope named SST-GATE, based on the dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical formula, which was never before implemented in the design of a Cherenkov telescope. The integration of this telescope on the site of the Observatoire de Paris is currently in progress. Technical solutions exist in the literature to protect structures from dynamic loads caused by earthquakes without increasing the mass and cost of the structure. This paper presents a state of the art of these techniques by keeping in mind that the operational performance of the telescope should not be compromised. The preliminary seismic analysis of SSTGATE performed by the finite element method is described before.

  13. Computationally efficient analysis of extraordinary optical transmission through infinite and truncated subwavelength hole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Miguel; Boix, Rafael R.; Medina, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    The authors present a computationally efficient technique for the analysis of extraordinary transmission through both infinite and truncated periodic arrays of slots in perfect conductor screens of negligible thickness. An integral equation is obtained for the tangential electric field in the slots both in the infinite case and in the truncated case. The unknown functions are expressed as linear combinations of known basis functions, and the unknown weight coefficients are determined by means of Galerkin's method. The coefficients of Galerkin's matrix are obtained in the spatial domain in terms of double finite integrals containing the Green's functions (which, in the infinite case, is efficiently computed by means of Ewald's method) times cross-correlations between both the basis functions and their divergences. The computation in the spatial domain is an efficient alternative to the direct computation in the spectral domain since this latter approach involves the determination of either slowly convergent double infinite summations (infinite case) or slowly convergent double infinite integrals (truncated case). The results obtained are validated by means of commercial software, and it is found that the integral equation technique presented in this paper is at least two orders of magnitude faster than commercial software for a similar accuracy. It is also shown that the phenomena related to periodicity such as extraordinary transmission and Wood's anomaly start to appear in the truncated case for arrays with more than 100 (10 ×10 ) slots.

  14. High-Throughput Analysis of Molecular Orientation on Surfaces by NEXAFS Imaging of Curved Sample Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Joe E.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy provides detailed information about the orientation and alignment of thin films. NEXAFS is a synchrotron-based technique—the availability of beam-time per user is typically limited to no more than a few weeks per year. The limited availability is currently a true barrier for using NEXAFS in combinatorial studies of molecular alignment. We have recently demonstrated how large area full field NEXAFS imaging allows users to pursue combinatorial studies of surface chemistry. Now we report an extension of this approach which allows the acquisition of orientation information from a single NEXAFS image. An array with 80 elements (samples), containing eight series of different surface modifications, was mounted on a curved substrate allowing the collection of NEXAFS spectra with a range of orientations with respect to the X-ray beam. Images collected from this array show how hyperspectral NEXAFS data collected from curved surfaces can be used for high-throughput molecular orientation analysis. PMID:25046426

  15. A TSVD Analysis of the Impact of Polarization on Microwave Breast Imaging using an Enclosed Array of Miniaturized Patch Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Mays, R. Owen; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging performance is fundamentally dependent on the quality of information contained within the scattering data. We apply a truncated singular-value decomposition (TSVD) method to evaluate the information contained in a simulated scattering scenario wherein a compact, shielded array of miniaturized patch antennas surrounds an anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. In particular, we investigate the impact of different antenna orientations (and thus polarizations), namely two array configurations with uniform antenna orientations and one mixed-orientation array configuration. The latter case is of interest because it may offer greater flexibility in antenna and array design. The results of this analysis indicate that mixed-polarization configurations do not degrade information quality compared to uniform-polarization configurations and in fact may enhance imaging performance, and thus represent viable design options for microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25705136

  16. Array CGH analysis identifies two distinct subgroups of primary angiosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; de Jong, Danielle; Bertoni, Franco; Sciot, Raf; Antonescu, Cristina R; Szuhai, Karoly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies on vascular tumors are rare. Recently, possible involvement of MYC and KDR has been documented in a subset of angiosarcomas of soft tissue. We performed a cytogenetic analysis of primary angiosarcomas of bone (n = 13) and soft tissue (n = 5) using high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Regions of interest were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Antibodies for candidate genes (SKI, MYC, KDR, and MAPK9) were selected and immunohistochemistry was performed. Six angiosarcomas of bone and four angiosarcomas of soft tissue showed chromosomal losses, gains, and high level amplifications. Cluster analysis identified two groups: a group with a complex genetic profile and a group with only few genetic aberrations. Five regions of interest were selected, which were located at chromosome bands 1p36.23, 2q32-34, 5q35, 8q24, and 17q21.32-24.2. Interphase FISH confirmed the high-level amplifications. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high expression of MYC (16/60), MAPK9 (63/69), and SKI (52/62). There were no differences between the two groups with regards to location, immunohistochemical expression nor survival. In summary, we identified two subgroups of angiosarcoma: those with few or no gross aberrations and those which show numerous genetic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains and high level amplifications or complex aberrations. The most common finding was amplification of 2q and 17q in both angiosarcoma of bone and soft tissue, suggesting overlap in tumorigenesis irrespective of their location. We show MYC amplification in primary angiosarcoma indicating this is not entirely specific for radiation-induced angiosarcoma. PMID:25231439

  17. Analysis of the Proteins Secreted from the Oryza meyeriana Suspension-Cultured Cells Induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Dong, Yan; Yu, Chulang; Fang, XianPing; Deng, Zhiping; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Oryza meyeriana, a wild species of rice from China, shows high resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the cause of rice bacterial blight, one of the most serious rice pathogens. To better understand the resistance mechanism, a proteomic study was conducted to identify changes in the proteins secreted in embryo cell suspension cultures in response to Xoo. After two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), 72 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 34 proteins were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. Of the 34 proteins, 10 were up regulated and 24 down regulated. The secreted proteins identified were predicted to be involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, defense, ROS and cell wall modification. 77% of the 34 proteins were predicted to have a signal peptide by Signal P. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that transcript levels of 14 secreted proteins were not well correlated with secreted protein levels. Peroxidase activity was up regulated in both O. meyriana and susceptible rice but was about three times higher in O. meyeriana. This suggests that peroxidases may play an important role in the early response to Xoo in O. meyeriana. These results not only provide a better understanding of the resistance mechanism of O. meyeriana, but have implications for studies of the interactions between other plants and their pathogens. PMID:27196123

  18. Detection analysis of surface hydroxyl active sites and simulation calculation of the surface dissociation constants of aqueous diatomite suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of the diatomite were investigated using nitrogen adsorption/deadsorption isotherms, TG-DSC, FTIR, and XPS, and surface protonation-deprotonation behavior was determined by continuous acid-base potentiometric titration technique. The diatomite sample with porous honeycomb structure has a BET specific surface area of 10.21 m2/g and large numbers of surface hydroxyl functional groups (i.e. tbnd Si-OH, tbnd Fe-OH, and tbnd Al-OH). These surface hydroxyls can be protonated or deprotonated depending on the pH of the suspension. The experimental potentiometric data in two different ionic strength solutions (0.1 and 0.05 mol/L NaCl) were fitted using ProtoFit GUI V2.1 program by applying diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites and minimizing the sum of squares between a dataset derivative function and a model derivative function. The optimized surface parameters (i.e. surface dissociation constants (log K1, log K2) and surface site concentrations (log C)) of the sample were obtained. Based on the optimized surface parameters, the surface species distribution was calculated using Program-free PHREEQC 3.1.2. Thus, this work reveals considerable new information about surface protonation-deprotonation processes and surface adsorptive behaviors of the diatomite, which helps us to effectively use the cheap and cheerful diatomite clay adsorbent.

  19. A pharmacokinetic analysis of posaconazole oral suspension in the serum and alveolar compartment of lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Thakuria, L; Packwood, K; Firouzi, A; Rogers, P; Soresi, S; Habibi-Parker, K; Lyster, H; Zych, B; Garcia-Saez, D; Mohite, P; Patil, N; Sabashnikov, A; Capoccia, M; Chibvuri, M; Lamba, H; Tate, H; Carby, M; Simon, A; Leaver, N; Reed, A

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections cause significant morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Fungal prophylaxis following lung transplantation is not standardised, with transplant centres utilising a variety of regimens. Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal triazole that requires further investigation within the setting of lung transplantation. This prospective, single-centre, observational study explored the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole oral suspension (POS) in the early perioperative period following lung transplantation in 26 patients. Organ recipients were scheduled to receive 400mg POS twice daily for 6 weeks as primary antifungal prophylaxis. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of serum posaconazole levels was performed in accordance with local clinical protocols. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was sampled during routine bronchoscopies. Posaconazole levels were measured both in serum and BALF using mass spectrometry. Posaconazole levels were highly variable within lung transplant recipients during the perioperative period and did not achieve 'steady-state'. Serum posaconazole concentrations positively correlated with levels within the BALF (r=0.5527; P=0.0105). Of the 26 patients, 10 failed to complete the study for multiple reasons and so the trial was terminated early. Unlike study findings in stable recipients, serum posaconazole levels rarely achieved steady-state in the perioperative period; however, they do reflect the concentrations within the airways of newly transplanted lungs. The role of POS as primary prophylaxis in the perioperative period is uncertain, but if used TDM may be helpful for determining attainment of therapeutic levels. PMID:26607341

  20. Analysis of the Proteins Secreted from the Oryza meyeriana Suspension-Cultured Cells Induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xian; Dong, Yan; Yu, Chulang; Fang, XianPing; Deng, Zhiping; Yan, Chengqi; Chen, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Oryza meyeriana, a wild species of rice from China, shows high resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the cause of rice bacterial blight, one of the most serious rice pathogens. To better understand the resistance mechanism, a proteomic study was conducted to identify changes in the proteins secreted in embryo cell suspension cultures in response to Xoo. After two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), 72 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 34 proteins were identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. Of the 34 proteins, 10 were up regulated and 24 down regulated. The secreted proteins identified were predicted to be involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, defense, ROS and cell wall modification. 77% of the 34 proteins were predicted to have a signal peptide by Signal P. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that transcript levels of 14 secreted proteins were not well correlated with secreted protein levels. Peroxidase activity was up regulated in both O. meyriana and susceptible rice but was about three times higher in O. meyeriana. This suggests that peroxidases may play an important role in the early response to Xoo in O. meyeriana. These results not only provide a better understanding of the resistance mechanism of O. meyeriana, but have implications for studies of the interactions between other plants and their pathogens. PMID:27196123

  1. Mean kinetic energy transport and event classification in a model wind turbine array versus an array of porous disks: Energy budget and octant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camp, Elizabeth H.; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-08-01

    An array of model rotating wind turbines is compared experimentally to an array of static porous disks in order to quantify the similarities and differences in the mean kinetic energy transport within the wakes produced in these two cases. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements are done in a wind tunnel bracketing the center turbine in the fourth row of a 4 ×3 array of model turbines. Equivalent sets of rotors and porous disks are created by matching their respective induction factors. The primary difference in the mean velocity components is found in the spanwise mean velocity component, which is as much as 190% different between the rotor and disk case. Horizontal averages of mean kinetic energy transport terms in the region where rotation is most important show percent differences in the range 3%-41%, which decrease to 1%-6% at streamwise coordinates where rotation is less important. Octant analysis is performed on the most significant term related to vertical mean kinetic energy flux u'v' ¯U . The average percent difference between corresponding octants is as much as 68% different in the near wake and as much as 17% different in the far wake. Furthermore, octant analysis elucidates the three-dimensional nature of sweeps and ejections in the near wake of the rotor case. Together, these results imply that a stationary porous disk adequately represents the mean kinetic energy transport of a rotor in the far wake where rotation is less important, while significant discrepancies exist at streamwise locations where rotation is a key phenomenon. This comparison has implications in the use of an actuator disk to model the wind turbine rotor in computational simulations specifically for studies where Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity, or interactions with the atmosphere are of interest.

  2. Compartmentalized microchannel array for high-throughput analysis of single cell polarized growth and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tao; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Szymanski, Craig J.; Liu, Bingwen; Baker, Scott E.; Orr, Galya; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Interrogating polarized growth is technologically challenging due to extensive cellular branching and uncontrollable environmental conditions in conventional assays. Here we present a robust and high-performance microfluidic system that enables observations of polarized growth with enhanced temporal and spatial control over prolonged periods. The system has built-in tunability and versatility to accommodate a variety of scientific applications requiring precisely controlled environments. Using the model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, our microfluidic system enabled direct visualization and analysis of cellular heterogeneity in a clonal fungal cell population, nuclear distribution and dynamics at the subhyphal level, and quantitative dynamics of gene expression with single hyphal compartment resolution in response to carbon source starvation and exchange. Although the microfluidic device is demonstrated on filamentous fungi, the technology is immediately extensible to a wide array of other biosystems that exhibit similar polarized cell growth, with applications ranging from bioenergy production to human health. PMID:26530004

  3. Tandem array of nanoelectronic readers embedded coplanar to a fluidic nanochannel for correlated single biopolymer analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lesser-Rojas, Leonardo; Sriram, K. K.; Liao, Kuo-Tang; Lai, Shui-Chin; Kuo, Pai-Chia; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a two-step electron-beam lithography process to fabricate a tandem array of three pairs of tip-like gold nanoelectronic detectors with electrode gap size as small as 9 nm, embedded in a coplanar fashion to 60 nm deep, 100 nm wide, and up to 150 μm long nanochannels coupled to a world-micro-nanofluidic interface for easy sample introduction. Experimental tests with a sealed device using DNA-protein complexes demonstrate the coplanarity of the nanoelectrodes to the nanochannel surface. Further, this device could improve transverse current detection by correlated time-of-flight measurements of translocating samples, and serve as an autocalibrated velocimeter and nanoscale tandem Coulter counters for single molecule analysis of heterogeneous samples. PMID:24753731

  4. Compartmentalized microchannel array for high-throughput analysis of single cell polarized growth and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Tao; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Szymanski, Craig J.; Liu, Bingwen; Baker, Scott E.; Orr, Galya; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2015-11-04

    Here, interrogating polarized growth is technologically challenging due to extensive cellular branching and uncontrollable environmental conditions in conventional assays. Here we present a robust and high-performance microfluidic system that enables observations of polarized growth with enhanced temporal and spatial control over prolonged periods. The system has built-in tunability and versatility to accommodate a variety of science applications requiring precisely controlled environments. Using the model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, this microfluidic system enabled direct visualization and analysis of cellular heterogeneity in a clonal fungal cell population, nuclear distribution and dynamics at the subhyphal level, and quantitative dynamics of gene expression with single hyphal compartment resolution in response to carbon source starvation and exchange experiments. Although the microfluidic device is demonstrated on filamentous fungi, our technology is immediately extensible to a wide array of other biosystems that exhibit similar polarized cell growth with applications ranging from bioenergy production to human health.

  5. Improved Statistical Analysis for Array CGH-Based DNA Copy Number Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongmei; Zhu, Zhong-Zheng; Yu, Yue; Lin, Simon; Hou, Lifang

    2011-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) allows measuring DNA copy number at the whole genome scale. In cancer studies, one may be interested in identifying DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) associated with certain clinicopathological characteristics such as cancer metastasis. We proposed to define test regions based on copy number pattern profiles across multiple samples, using either smoothed log2-ratio or discrete data of copy number gain/loss calls. Association test performed on the refined test regions instead of the probes has improved power due to reduced number of tests. We also compared three types of measurement of copy number levels, normalized log2-ratio, smoothed log2-ratio, and copy number gain or loss calls in statistical hypothesis testing. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the proposed method were demonstrated using both simulation studies and real data analysis of a liver cancer study. PMID:22084565

  6. Numerical analysis of the beam quality and spectrum of wavelength-beam-combined laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuan; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Ke, Wei-Wei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is presented to simulation the performance of the wavelength-beam-combined laser diode arrays (LDA) system. The eigen mode expansion method is used to describe the two-dimensional optical amplification and the strength of field feedback of external cavity. To describe the mode competition in laser diodes, the gain saturation effect is considered. The two-dimension distributions of the carrier concentration, recombination rates, and optical gain are calculated for solving the laser dynamic equation. The Fresnel integration, grating equation and mode overlap integration are used to obtain the feedback coefficient of extent cavity diffraction. Quantum noise is considered to evaluate the spectral linewidth of semiconductor laser. Based on the numerical model, the impact of the mutual optical feedback on the beam quality and spectrum of the LDA is present and analysis.

  7. Compartmentalized microchannel array for high-throughput analysis of single cell polarized growth and dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geng, Tao; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Szymanski, Craig J.; Liu, Bingwen; Baker, Scott E.; Orr, Galya; Evans, James E.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2015-11-04

    Here, interrogating polarized growth is technologically challenging due to extensive cellular branching and uncontrollable environmental conditions in conventional assays. Here we present a robust and high-performance microfluidic system that enables observations of polarized growth with enhanced temporal and spatial control over prolonged periods. The system has built-in tunability and versatility to accommodate a variety of science applications requiring precisely controlled environments. Using the model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, this microfluidic system enabled direct visualization and analysis of cellular heterogeneity in a clonal fungal cell population, nuclear distribution and dynamics at the subhyphal level, and quantitative dynamics of gene expression withmore » single hyphal compartment resolution in response to carbon source starvation and exchange experiments. Although the microfluidic device is demonstrated on filamentous fungi, our technology is immediately extensible to a wide array of other biosystems that exhibit similar polarized cell growth with applications ranging from bioenergy production to human health.« less

  8. Analysis of the multi-spectral inhomogeneous metasurfaces consisting of different arrays of components.

    PubMed

    Danaeifar, Mohammad; Granpayeh, Nosrat

    2015-12-01

    The analytical method to study the multi-spectral inhomogeneous metasurfaces with various components is presented. Because of symmetrical distribution of different components, we can find the effective polarizability of the inhomogeneous metasurfaces. This polarizability provides equivalent conductivity of each metasurface with two and three different nanodisk arrays. Full-wave simulations confirm the analysis of inhomogeneous metasurfaces. In a metasurface, symmetrical distribution of components with a unique periodicity is limited to three types in a hexagonal combination. Then we extend the proposed approach to partly symmetric inhomogeneous metasurfaces in subwavelength scale for four different nanodisks. Also, monolayer and multi-layer absorbers consisting of inhomogeneous metasurfaces with graphene nanodisks are designed as the examples of wideband applications of this method in infrared regime. PMID:26625077

  9. Ordered Arrays of Native Chromatin Molecules for High-Resolution Imaging and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Aline; Tian, Harvey C.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2012-01-01

    Individual chromatin molecules contain valuable genetic and epigenetic information. To date, there have not been reliable techniques available for the controlled stretching and manipulation of individual chromatin fragments for high-resolution imaging and analysis of these molecules. We report the controlled stretching of single chromatin fragments extracted from two different cancerous cell types (M091 and HeLa) characterized through fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our method combines soft-lithography with molecular stretching to form ordered arrays of more than 250,000 individual chromatin fragments immobilized into a beads-on-a-string structure on a solid transparent support. Using fluorescence microscopy and AFM, we verified the presence of histone proteins after the stretching and transfer process. PMID:22816516

  10. RPPanalyzer toolbox: an improved R package for analysis of reverse phase protein array data.

    PubMed

    von der Heyde, Silvia; Sonntag, Johanna; Kaschek, Daniel; Bender, Christian; Bues, Johannes; Wachter, Astrid; Timmer, Jens; Korf, Ulrike; Beißbarth, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of large-scale proteomic data sets requires specialized software tools, tailored toward the requirements of individual approaches. Here we introduce an extension of an open-source software solution for analyzing reverse phase protein array (RPPA) data. The R package RPPanalyzer was designed for data preprocessing followed by basic statistical analyses and proteomic data visualization. In this update, we merged relevant data preprocessing steps into a single user-friendly function and included a new method for background noise correction as well as new methods for noise estimation and averaging of replicates to transform data in such a way that they can be used as input for a new time course plotting function. We demonstrate the robustness of our enhanced RPPanalyzer platform by analyzing longitudinal RPPA data of MET receptor signaling upon stimulation with different hepatocyte growth factor concentrations. PMID:25209047

  11. Modeling and stability analysis for the upper atmosphere research satellite auxiliary array switch component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfgang, R.; Natarajan, T.; Day, J.

    1987-01-01

    A feedback control system, called an auxiliary array switch, was designed to connect or disconnect auxiliary solar panel segments from a spacecraft electrical bus to meet fluctuating demand for power. A simulation of the control system was used to carry out a number of design and analysis tasks that could not economically be performed with a breadboard of the hardware. These tasks included: (1) the diagnosis of a stability problem, (2) identification of parameters to which the performance of the control system was particularly sensitive, (3) verification that the response of the control system to anticipated fluctuations in the electrical load of the spacecraft was satisfactory, and (4) specification of limitations on the frequency and amplitude of the load fluctuations.

  12. Thermal Analysis and Correlation of the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's Solar Array During Aerobraking Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; George, Benjamin E.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft made use of multipass aerobraking to gradually reduce its orbit period from a highly elliptical insertion orbit to its final science orbit. Aerobraking operations provided an opportunity to apply advanced thermal analysis techniques to predict the temperature of the spacecraft's solar array for each drag pass. Odyssey telemetry data was used to correlate the thermal model. The thermal analysis was tightly coupled to the flight mechanics, aerodynamics, and atmospheric modeling efforts being performed during operations. Specifically, the thermal analysis predictions required a calculation of the spacecraft's velocity relative to the atmosphere, a prediction of the atmospheric density, and a prediction of the heat transfer coefficients due to aerodynamic heating. Temperature correlations were performed by comparing predicted temperatures of the thermocouples to the actual thermocouple readings from the spacecraft. Time histories of the spacecraft relative velocity, atmospheric density, and heat transfer coefficients, calculated using flight accelerometer and quaternion data, were used to calculate the aerodynamic heating. During aerobraking operations, the correlations were used to continually update the thermal model, thus increasing confidence in the predictions. This paper describes the thermal analysis that was performed and presents the correlations to the flight data.

  13. In-shoe plantar pressure measurement and analysis system based on fabric pressure sensing array.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lin; Hua, Tao; Wang, Yangyong; Qiao Li, Qiao; Feng, David Dagan; Tao, Xiaoming

    2010-05-01

    Spatial and temporal plantar pressure distributions are important and useful measures in footwear evaluation, athletic training, clinical gait analysis, and pathology foot diagnosis. However, present plantar pressure measurement and analysis systems are more or less uncomfortable to wear and expensive. This paper presents an in-shoe plantar pressure measurement and analysis system based on a textile fabric sensor array, which is soft, light, and has a high-pressure sensitivity and a long service life. The sensors are connected with a soft polymeric board through conductive yarns and integrated into an insole. A stable data acquisition system interfaces with the insole, wirelessly transmits the acquired data to remote receiver through Bluetooth path. Three configuration modes are incorporated to gain connection with desktop, laptop, or smart phone, which can be configured to comfortably work in research laboratories, clinics, sport ground, and other outdoor environments. A real-time display and analysis software is presented to calculate parameters such as mean pressure, peak pressure, center of pressure (COP), and shift speed of COP. Experimental results show that this system has stable performance in both static and dynamic measurements. PMID:20071266

  14. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    Retropubic suspension is surgery to help control stress incontinence . This is urine leakage that happens when you ... This procedure is done to treat stress incontinence . Before discussing ... medicines, or other options. If you tried these and are ...

  15. Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007374.htm Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension To use the sharing features on ... may be because other problems are causing your urinary incontinence. Over time, some or all of the leakage ...

  16. Rod Climbing of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Wang, Xiaorong

    We wish to report an unexpected effect observed for particle suspensions sucked to pass through a vertical pipe. Above a critical concentration, the suspension on the outside of the pipe may climb along the outside wall of the pipe and then display a surprising rod-climbing effect. Our study shows that the phenomenon is influenced mainly by the suspension composition, the pipe dimension and the suction speed. The effects of the pipe materials of different kinds are negligible. Increasing the suction force and the concentration increases the climbing height. Increasing the pipe diameter and wall thickness reduces the climbing effect. This behavior may be relevant to that the suspensions of the type described are all displaying markedly shear-thickening.

  17. The strong ground motion in Mexico City: array and borehole data analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roullé, A.; Chávez-García, F. J.

    2003-04-01

    Site response at Mexico City has been intensively studied for the last 15 years, since the disastrous 1985 earthquakes. After those events, more than 100 accelerographs were installed, and their data have been extremely useful in quantifying amplification and in the subsequent upgrading of the building code. However, detailed analysis of the wavefield has been hampered by the lack of absolute time in the records and the large spacing between stations in terms of dominant wavelengths. In 2001, thanks to the support of CONACYT, Mexico, a new dense accelerographic network was installed in the lake bed zone of Mexico City. The entire network, including an existing network of 3 surface and 2 borehole stations operated by CENAPRED, consists in 12 surface and 4 borehole stations (at 30, 102 and 50 meters). Each station has a 18 bits recorder and a GPS receiver so that the complete network is a 3D array with absolute time. The main objective of this array is to provide data that can help us to better understand the wavefield that propagates in Mexico City during large earthquakes. Last year, a small event of magnitude 6.0 was partially recorded by 6 of the 12 surface stations and all the borehole stations. We analysed the surface data using different array processing techniques such as f-k methods and MUSIC algorithm and the borehole ones using a cross-correlation method. For periods inferior to the site resonance period, the soft clay layer with very low propagation velocities (less than 500 m/s) and a possible multipathing rule the wavefield pattern. For the large period range, the dominant surface wave comes from the epicentral direction and propagates with a quicker velocity (more than 1500 m/s) that corresponds to the velocity of deep layers. The analysis of borehole data shows the presence of different quick wavetrains in the short period range that could correspond to the first harmonic modes of Rayleigh waves. To complete this study, four others events recorded in

  18. Non-homogeneous flow profiles in sheared bacterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devranjan; Cheng, Xiang

    Bacterial suspensions under shear exhibit interesting rheological behaviors including the remarkable ``superfluidic'' state with vanishing viscosity at low shear rates. Theoretical studies have shown that such ``superfluidic'' state is linked with non-homogeneous shear flows, which are induced by coupling between nematic order of active fluids and hydrodynamics of shear flows. However, although bulk rheology of bacterial suspensions has been experimentally studied, shear profiles within bacterial suspensions have not been explored so far. Here, we experimentally investigate the flow behaviors of E. coli suspensions under planar oscillatory shear. Using confocal microscopy and PIV, we measure velocity profiles across gap between two shear plates. We find that with increasing shear rates, high-concentration bacterial suspensions exhibit an array of non-homogeneous flow behaviors like yield-stress flows and shear banding. We show that these non-homogeneous flows are due to collective motion of bacterial suspensions. The phase diagram of sheared bacterial suspensions is systematically mapped as functions of shear rates an bacterial concentrations. Our experiments provide new insights into rheology of bacterial suspensions and shed light on shear induced dynamics of active fluids. Chemical Engineering and Material Science department.

  19. Hypergeometric analysis of tiling-array and sequence data: detection and interpretation of peaks.

    PubMed

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Hoogeboezem, Remco; Delwel, Ruud; Reinders, Marcel Jt

    2013-01-01

    Probing protein-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is gaining popularity as it sheds light on molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes. Currently, tiling-arrays and next-generation sequencing technology can be used to measure these interactions. Both methods generate a signal over the genome in which contiguous regions of peaks on the genome represent the presence of an interacting molecule. Many methods do exist to identify functional regions of interest (ROIs) on the genome. However the detection of ROIs are often not an end-point in research questions and it therefore requires data dragging between tools to relate the ROIs to information present in databases, such as gene-ontology, pathway information, or enrichment of certain genomic content. We introduce hypergeometric analysis of tiling-array and sequence data (HATSEQ), a powerful tool that accurately identifies functional ROIs on the genome where a genomic signal significantly deviates from the general genome-wide behavior. HATSEQ also includes a number of built-in post-analyses with which biological meaning can be attached to the detected ROIs in terms of gene pathways and de-novo motif analysis, and provides different visualizations and statistical summaries for the detected ROIs. In addition, HATSEQ has an intuitive graphic user interface that lowers the barrier for researchers to analyze their data without the need of scripting languages. We compared the results of HATSEQ against two other popular chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) methods and observed overlap in the detected ROIs but HATSEQ is more specific in delineating the peak boundaries. We also discuss the versatility of HATSEQ by using a Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) ChIP-Seq data-set, and show that the detected ROIs are highly specific for the expected STAT1 binding motif. HATSEQ is freely available at: http://hema13.erasmusmc.nl/index.php/HATSEQ. PMID:24187504

  20. Hypergeometric analysis of tiling-array and sequence data: detection and interpretation of peaks

    PubMed Central

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Hoogeboezem, Remco; Delwel, Ruud; Reinders, Marcel JT

    2013-01-01

    Probing protein-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is gaining popularity as it sheds light on molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes. Currently, tiling-arrays and next-generation sequencing technology can be used to measure these interactions. Both methods generate a signal over the genome in which contiguous regions of peaks on the genome represent the presence of an interacting molecule. Many methods do exist to identify functional regions of interest (ROIs) on the genome. However the detection of ROIs are often not an end-point in research questions and it therefore requires data dragging between tools to relate the ROIs to information present in databases, such as gene-ontology, pathway information, or enrichment of certain genomic content. We introduce hypergeometric analysis of tiling-array and sequence data (HATSEQ), a powerful tool that accurately identifies functional ROIs on the genome where a genomic signal significantly deviates from the general genome-wide behavior. HATSEQ also includes a number of built-in post-analyses with which biological meaning can be attached to the detected ROIs in terms of gene pathways and de-novo motif analysis, and provides different visualizations and statistical summaries for the detected ROIs. In addition, HATSEQ has an intuitive graphic user interface that lowers the barrier for researchers to analyze their data without the need of scripting languages. We compared the results of HATSEQ against two other popular chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) methods and observed overlap in the detected ROIs but HATSEQ is more specific in delineating the peak boundaries. We also discuss the versatility of HATSEQ by using a Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) ChIP-Seq data-set, and show that the detected ROIs are highly specific for the expected STAT1 binding motif. HATSEQ is freely available at: http://hema13.erasmusmc.nl/index.php/HATSEQ. PMID:24187504

  1. Sugar uptake analysis of suspension Arabidopsis, tobacco, and rice cells in various media using an FT-IR/ATR method.

    PubMed

    Suehara, Ken-ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic behavior of the sugar uptake phenomena of a suspension of Arabidopsis cells was investigated by mid-infrared spectroscopy using Fourier transform infrared spectrometers and attenuated total reflection techniques. The kinetic behavior of the cell growth was also studied and the growth and the sugar uptake behaviors were discussed for three typical plant cells (Arabidopsis, TBY-2, and rice cells). The cell growth rate and the lag period were influenced by not only the types of the plant cells, but also the sugar species used as the carbon source. The characteristics of the sugar uptake behavior were clarified based on the difference in the three types of plant cells. The cell growth and the sugar uptake progressed at approximately the same time in the TBY-2 cells. In the rice cells, the sugar uptake rate was relatively lower than that of the others. On the other hand, the sugar uptake of the Arabidopsis cells started before the cell growth. Furthermore, glucose as the carbon source of the Arabidopsis cell cultivation seems to significantly influence the sugar metabolism. Glucose had a significant influence on the sugar metabolism of the other sugar under the conditions for the mixture of glucose and the other sugar. The characteristics of the sugar uptake phenomena based on the cell growth stage was typical for each plant cell except for some sugars, such as galactose and trehalose, and the behavior of the total sugar uptake had not changed. These results suggested that the cell growth and the sugar uptake in the plant cell cultivation processes may be controlled by the combined supply of the sugar species as the carbon source. The detailed data for plant cell cultivation using each sugar obtained in this study would be useful for bioscience research and for cultivation process control using various sugars, for example, purified or sugar mixtures formed from biomass materials. PMID:22395819

  2. Membrane filtration of food suspensions.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, A N; Peterkin, P I; Dudas, I

    1979-01-01

    Factors affecting the membrane filtration of food suspensions were studied for 58 foods and 13 membrane filters. Lot number within a brand, pore size (0.45 or 0.8 micrometer), and time elapsed before filtration had little effect on filterability. Brand of membrane filter, flow direction, pressure differential, age (microbiological quality) of the food, duration of the blending process, temperature, and concentration of food in the suspension had significant and often predictable effects. Preparation of suspensions by Stomacher (relative to rotary blender) addition of surfactant (particularly at elevated temperature) and prior incubation with proteases sometimes had dramatic effects of filterability. In contrast to popular opinion, foods can be membrane filtered in quantities pertinent to the maximums used in conventional plating procedures. Removal of growth inhibitors and food debris is possible by using membrane filters. Lowering of the limits of detection of microorganisms by concentration on membrane filters can be considered feasible for many foods. The data are particularly relevant to the use of hydrophobic grid-membrane filters (which are capable of enumerating up to 9 X 10(4) organisms per filter) in instrumented methods of food microbiological analysis. Images PMID:760637

  3. Arrayed water-in-oil droplet bilayers for membrane transport analysis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, R; Soga, N; Hara, M; Noji, H

    2016-08-01

    The water-in-oil droplet bilayer is a simple and useful lipid bilayer system for membrane transport analysis. The droplet interface bilayer is readily formed by the contact of two water-in-oil droplets enwrapped by a phospholipid monolayer. However, the size of individual droplets with femtoliter volumes in a high-throughput manner is difficult to control, resulting in low sensitivity and throughput of membrane transport analysis. To overcome this drawback, in this study, we developed a novel micro-device in which a large number of droplet interface bilayers (>500) are formed at a time by using femtoliter-sized droplet arrays immobilized on a hydrophobic/hydrophilic substrate. The droplet volume was controllable from 3.5 to 350 fL by changing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic pattern on the device, allowing high-throughput analysis of membrane transport mechanisms including membrane permeability to solutes (e.g., ions or small molecules) with or without the aid of transport proteins. Thus, this novel platform broadens the versatility of water-in-oil droplet bilayers and will pave the way for novel analytical and pharmacological applications such as drug screening. PMID:27080052

  4. Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Challa, Samyuktha; Chen, Kevin; Peck, Austin; Fahad, Hossain M.; Ota, Hiroki; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Kiriya, Daisuke; et al

    2016-01-27

    We report that wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual’s state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information13, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other noninvasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state14–18. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanicallymore » flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Lastly, our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plasticbased sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing.« less

  5. Analysis of Reverse Phase Protein Array Data: From Experimental Design towards Targeted Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Astrid; Bernhardt, Stephan; Beissbarth, Tim; Korf, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Mastering the systematic analysis of tumor tissues on a large scale has long been a technical challenge for proteomics. In 2001, reverse phase protein arrays (RPPA) were added to the repertoire of existing immunoassays, which, for the first time, allowed a profiling of minute amounts of tumor lysates even after microdissection. A characteristic feature of RPPA is its outstanding sample capacity permitting the analysis of thousands of samples in parallel as a routine task. Until today, the RPPA approach has matured to a robust and highly sensitive high-throughput platform, which is ideally suited for biomarker discovery. Concomitant with technical advancements, new bioinformatic tools were developed for data normalization and data analysis as outlined in detail in this review. Furthermore, biomarker signatures obtained by different RPPA screens were compared with another or with that obtained by other proteomic formats, if possible. Options for overcoming the downside of RPPA, which is the need to steadily validate new antibody batches, will be discussed. Finally, a debate on using RPPA to advance personalized medicine will conclude this article. PMID:27600238

  6. Cell type analysis of functional fetal dopamine cell suspension transplants in the striatum and substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Ivar; Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Cooper, Oliver; Viñuela, Angel; Ferrari, Daniela; Björklund, Lars; Dagher, Alain; Isacson, Ole

    2005-07-01

    We report the first post-mortem analysis of two patients with Parkinson's disease who received fetal midbrain transplants as a cell suspension in the striatum, and in one case also in the substantia nigra. These patients had a favourable clinical evolution and positive 18F-fluorodopa PET scans and did not develop motor complications. The surviving transplanted dopamine neurons were positively identified with phenotypic markers of normal control human substantia nigra (n = 3), such as tyrosine hydroxylase, G-protein-coupled inward rectifying current potassium channel type 2 (Girk2) and calbindin. The grafts restored the cell type that provides specific dopaminergic innervation to the most affected striatal regions in the parkinsonian brain. Such transplants were able to densely reinnervate the host putamen with new dopamine fibres. The patients received only 6 months of standard immune suppression, yet by post-mortem analysis 3-4 years after surgery the transplants appeared only mildly immunogenic to the host brain, by analysis of microglial CD45 and CD68 markers. This study demonstrates that, using these methods, dopamine neuronal replacement cell therapy can be beneficial for patients with advanced disease, and that changing technical approaches could have a favourable impact on efficacy and adverse events following neural transplantation. PMID:15872020

  7. Surface-wave analysis and its application to determining crustal and mantle structure beneath regional arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ge

    We develop several new techniques to better retrieve Earth's structure by analyzing seismic surface waves. These techniques are applied in regional studies to understand a variety of tectonic structures and geodynamic processes in Earth's crust and upper mantle. We create an automated method to retrieve surface-wave phase velocities using dense seismic arrays. The method is based on the notion of using cross-correlation to measure phase variations between nearby stations. Frequency-dependent apparent phase velocities are inverted from the phase-variation measurements via the Eikonal equation. The multi-pathing interference is corrected using amplitude measurements via the Helmholtz equation. The coherence between nearby-station waveforms, together with other data-selection criteria, helps to automate the entire process. We build up the Automated Surface-Wave Measuring System (ASWMS) that retrieves structural phase velocity directly from raw seismic waveforms for individual earthquakes without human intervention. This system is applied on the broad-band seismic data recorded by the USArray from 2006-2014, and obtain Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps at the periods of 20-100~s. In total around half million seismograms from 850 events are processed, generating about 4 million cross-correlation measurements. The maps correlate well with several published studies, including ambient-noise results at high frequency. At all frequencies, a significant contrast in Rayleigh-wave phase velocity between the tectonically active western US and the stable eastern US can be observed, with the phase-velocity variations in the western US being 1-2 times greater. The Love wave phase-velocity maps are also calculated. We find that overtone interference may produce systematic bias for the Love-wave phase-velocity measurements. We apply surface-wave analysis on the data collected by a temporary broad-band seismic array near the D'Entrecasteaux Island (DI), Papua New Guinea. The array

  8. Analysis of copper nanoparticles toxicity based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Lei, Chunyang; Shen, Qinpeng; Li, Lijun; Wang, Ming; Guo, Manli; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-12-01

    The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array. According to the responses of the biosensing strains, it is found that CuNPs induce not only oxidative stress in E. coli, but also protein damage, DNA damage, and cell membrane damage, and ultimately cause cell growth inhibition. Through enzyme detoxification analysis, the toxicological effects of CuNPs are traced to H2O2 generation from CuNPs. Rapid copper release from CuNPs and Cu(i) production are observed. The oxidation of the released Cu(i) has a close relation to H2O2 production, as tris-(hydroxypropyltriazolylmethyl) amine, the specific Cu(i) chelator, can largely protect the cells from the toxicity of CuNPs. In addition, the TEM study shows that CuNPs can be adsorbed and incepted fast by the cells. Comparatively, copper microparticles are relatively stable in the system and practically non-toxic, which indicates the importance of toxic estimation of materials at the nanoscale. In addition, the Cu(ii) ion can induce protein damage, membrane damage, and slight DNA damage only at a relatively high concentration. The current study reveals the preliminary mechanism of toxicity of CuNPs, and suggests that the stress-responsive bacterial biosensor array can be used as a simple and promising tool for rapid screening in vitro toxicity of nanoparticles and studying the primary mechanism of the toxicity.The rapid development in nanoparticle production and application during the past decade requires an easy, rapid, and predictive screening method for nanoparticles toxicity assay. In this study, the toxicological effects and the source of toxicity of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) are investigated based on a stress

  9. DNA array analysis of gene expression in response to UV irradiation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Quillardet, Philippe; Rouffaud, Marie-Ange; Bouige, Philippe

    2003-10-01

    The capacity of DNA macroarrays that contain all 4290 predicted open reading frames of the E. coli K12 genome was evaluated by measuring changes in gene expression in response to irradiation by ultraviolet light (UV). UV and other DNA damaging agents are known to trigger the induction of the SOS response. This is a coordinated increase in the level of expression of a set of approximately 30 unlinked genes, the SOS genes, negatively regulated by the LexA repressor. The analysis was performed on a set of isogenic strains with mutations that affect expression of genes of the SOS system: (i) the lexA+ strain, in which the SOS system can be induced after DNA damage, (ii) lexAind- mutants in which the SOS system cannot be induced, and (iii) lexAdef mutants in which the SOS system is induced constitutively. We found that a large set of genes appeared to be either upregulated or downregulated following UV irradiation. Among the genes which appeared to be upregulated in a LexA-dependent manner, we correctly identified 9 out of 27 SOS genes printed on the arrays and one gene containing a LexA binding site. One gene, dnaN, encoding the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, was identified as an upregulated gene in a LexA-independent manner. Our results were compared to those of similar studies previously published. Although the SOS response as a whole could not be illustrated by using DNA arrays, the data suggest that regulation of some SOS genes might be more complex than previously thought. PMID:14527657

  10. Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) Analysis in Patients with Anophthalmia, Microphthalmia and Coloboma

    PubMed Central

    Raca, Gordana; Jackson, Craig A.; Kucinskas, Laimutis; Warman, Berta; Shieh, Joseph T. C.; Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya M.; Schimmenti, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of our study was to determine whether genomic copy number abnormalities (deletions and duplications) affecting genes involved in eye development contribute to the etiology of anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma. Methods The affected individuals were tested for deletions and duplications in genomic DNA using 2 million probe (HD2) comparative genomic hybridization arrays (aCGH) from Roche-NimbleGen. Results Array analysis of 32 patients detected one case with a deletion encompassing the Renal-coloboma syndrome associated gene PAX2. Non-polymorphic copy number changes were also observed at several candidate chromosomal regions, including 6p12.3, 8q23.1q23.2, 13q31.3, 15q11.2q13.1, 16p13.13 and 20q13.13. Conclusions This study identified the first patient with the typical phenotype of the Renal-coloboma syndrome caused by a submicroscopic deletion of the coding region of the PAX2 gene. The finding suggests that PAX2 deletion testing should be performed in addition to gene sequencing as a part of molecular evaluation for the Renal-coloboma syndrome. aCGH testing of 32 affected individual showed that genomic deletions and duplications are not a common cause of non-syndromic anophthalmia, microphthalmia and/or coloboma, but undoubtedly contribute to the etiology of these eye anomalies. aCGH testing therefore represents an important and valuable addition to candidate gene sequencing in research and diagnostics of ocular birth defects. PMID:21285886

  11. Clustering binary fingerprint vectors with missing values for DNA array data analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Andres; Borneman, James; Jiang, Tao

    2004-01-01

    Oligonucleotide fingerprinting is a powerful DNA array-based method to characterize cDNA and ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) libraries and has many applications including gene expression profiling and DNA clone classification. We are especially interested in the latter application. A key step in the method is the cluster analysis of fingerprint data obtained from DNA array hybridization experiments. Most of the existing approaches to clustering use (normalized) real intensity values and thus do not treat positive and negative hybridization signals equally (positive signals are much more emphasized). In this paper, we consider a discrete approach. Fingerprint data are first normalized and binarized using control DNA clones. Because there may exist unresolved (or missing) values in this binarization process, we formulate the clustering of (binary) oligonucleotide fingerprints as a combinatorial optimization problem that attempts to identify clusters and resolve the missing values in the fingerprints simultaneously. We study the computational complexity of this clustering problem and a natural parameterized version and present an efficient greedy algorithm based on MINIMUM CLIQUE PARTITION on graphs. The algorithm takes advantage of some unique properties of the graphs considered here, which allow us to efficiently find the maximum cliques as well as some special maximal cliques. Our preliminary experimental results on simulated and real data demonstrate that the algorithm runs faster and performs better than some popular hierarchical and graph-based clustering methods. The results on real data from DNA clone classification also suggest that this discrete approach is more accurate than clustering methods based on real intensity values in terms of separating clones that have different characteristics with respect to the given oligonucleotide probes. PMID:15700408

  12. Clustering binary fingerprint vectors with missing values for DNA array data analysis.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Andres; Borneman, James; Jiang, Tao

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotide fingerprinting is a powerful DNA array based method to characterize cDNA and ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) libraries and has many applications including gene expression profiling and DNA clone classification. We are especially interested in the latter application. A key step in the method is the cluster analysis of fingerprint data obtained from DNA array hybridization experiments. Most of the existing approaches to clustering use (normalized) real intensity values and thus do not treat positive and negative hybridization signals equally (positive signals are much more emphasized). In this paper, we consider a discrete approach. Fingerprint data are first normalized and binarized using control DNA clones. Because there may exist unresolved (or missing) values in this binarization process, we formulate the clustering of (binary) oligonucleotide fingerprints as a combinatorial optimization problem that attempts to identify clusters and resolve the missing values in the fingerprints simultaneously. We study the computational complexity of this clustering problem and a natural parameterized version, and present an efficient greedy algorithm based on MINIMUM CLIQUE PARTITION on graphs. The algorithm takes advantage of some unique properties of the graphs considered here, which allow us to efficiently find the maximum cliques as well as some special maximal cliques. Our experimental results on simulated and real data demonstrate that the algorithm runs faster and performs better than some popular hierarchical and graph-based clustering methods. The results on real data from DNA clone classification also suggest that this discrete approach is more accurate than clustering methods based on real intensity values, in terms of separating clones that have different characteristics with respect to the given oligonucleotide probes. PMID:16452777

  13. Analysis of jet-airfoil interaction noise sources by using a microphone array technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Vincent; Davy, Renaud

    2016-03-01

    The paper is concerned with the characterization of jet noise sources and jet-airfoil interaction sources by using microphone array data. The measurements were carried-out in the anechoic open test section wind tunnel of Onera, Cepra19. The microphone array technique relies on the convected, Lighthill's and Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings' acoustic analogy equation. The cross-spectrum of the source term of the analogy equation is sought. It is defined as the optimal solution to a minimal error equation using the measured microphone cross-spectra as reference. This inverse problem is ill-posed yet. A penalty term based on a localization operator is therefore added to improve the recovery of jet noise sources. The analysis of isolated jet noise data in subsonic regime shows the contribution of the conventional mixing noise source in the low frequency range, as expected, and of uniformly distributed, uncorrelated noise sources in the jet flow at higher frequencies. In underexpanded supersonic regime, a shock-associated noise source is clearly identified, too. An additional source is detected in the vicinity of the nozzle exit both in supersonic and subsonic regimes. In the presence of the airfoil, the distribution of the noise sources is deeply modified. In particular, a strong noise source is localized on the flap. For high Strouhal numbers, higher than about 2 (based on the jet mixing velocity and diameter), a significant contribution from the shear-layer near the flap is observed, too. Indications of acoustic reflections on the airfoil are also discerned.

  14. Modelling and Analysis of Electrical Potentials Recorded in Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs).

    PubMed

    Ness, Torbjørn V; Chintaluri, Chaitanya; Potworowski, Jan; Łęski, Szymon; Głąbska, Helena; Wójcik, Daniel K; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2015-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs), substrate-integrated planar arrays of up to thousands of closely spaced metal electrode contacts, have long been used to record neuronal activity in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the analysis of the MEA potentials has generally been mainly qualitative. Here we use a biophysical forward-modelling formalism based on the finite element method (FEM) to establish quantitatively accurate links between neural activity in the slice and potentials recorded in the MEA set-up. Then we develop a simpler approach based on the method of images (MoI) from electrostatics, which allows for computation of MEA potentials by simple formulas similar to what is used for homogeneous volume conductors. As we find MoI to give accurate results in most situations of practical interest, including anisotropic slices covered with highly conductive saline and MEA-electrode contacts of sizable physical extensions, a Python software package (ViMEAPy) has been developed to facilitate forward-modelling of MEA potentials generated by biophysically detailed multicompartmental neurons. We apply our scheme to investigate the influence of the MEA set-up on single-neuron spikes as well as on potentials generated by a cortical network comprising more than 3000 model neurons. The generated MEA potentials are substantially affected by both the saline bath covering the brain slice and a (putative) inadvertent saline layer at the interface between the MEA chip and the brain slice. We further explore methods for estimation of current-source density (CSD) from MEA potentials, and find the results to be much less sensitive to the experimental set-up. PMID:25822810

  15. Finite Element Analysis Of Thermal Transients In Multi-Stripe Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippincott, Wendy L.; Clement, Anne E.

    1989-05-01

    The NASTRAN finite element code was used to simulate the temperature transients in the active area of laser diode arrays caused by driving the array with a pulsed waveform. A ten-stripe multi-quantum-well (MQW) structure was used. The thermal impedance of the array was also determined and compared to experimental values obtained by monitoring the threshold dependance of the device during pulsed and cw operation. The single-stripe diode was also modeled for comparison purposes.

  16. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL – A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  17. Analysis of Conical Wire Array Z-Pinch Stability with a Center Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Presura, R.; Wright, S.; Plechaty, C.; Neff, S.; Wanex, L.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2009-01-21

    Adding a center wire on the axis of a conical wire array produces conditions suitable for studying shear flow stabilization of the Z-pinch. The conical wire array produces and axial plasma flow while the center wire introduces a radial variation of the axial velocity. Experiments of this array configuration were preformed on the 1 MA Zebra Z-pinch generator and showed stabilization of the kink instability when a center wire was present. Comparison with equivalent cylindrical wire arrays indicates that the shear flow stabilization plays a role in the stabilization of the kink instability.

  18. ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN FISH EXPOSED TO NATURAL PHARMACEUTICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS USING GENE ARRAYS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denslow, N.D., P. Larkin, T.L. Sabo-Attwood, J. Kocerha, K.J. Kroll, M.J. Hemmer and L.C. Folmar. 2004. Analysis of Changes in Gene Expression Patterns in Fish Exposed to Natural, Pharmaceutical and Environmental Estrogens Using Gene Arrays (Abstract). Mar. Environ. Res. 58(2-5):...

  19. Theoretical Analysis of Amounts of Musical Noise and Speech Distortion in Structure-Generalized Parametric Blind Spatial Subtraction Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Ryoichi; Saruwatari, Hiroshi; Shikano, Kiyohiro

    We propose a structure-generalized blind spatial subtraction array (BSSA), and the theoretical analysis of the amounts of musical noise and speech distortion. The structure of BSSA should be selected according to the application, i.e., a channelwise BSSA is recommended for listening but a conventional BSSA is suitable for speech recognition.

  20. Student and school factors associated with school suspension: A multilevel analysis of students in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States

    PubMed Central

    Sheryl, A. Hemphill; Stephanie, M. Plenty; Herrenkohl, Todd I.; Toumbourou, John W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    One of the common issues schools face is how best to handle challenging student behaviors such as violent behavior, antisocial behavior, bullying, school rule violations, and interrupting other students’ learning. School suspension may be used to remove students engaging in challenging behaviors from the school for a period of time. However, the act of suspending students from school may worsen rather than improve their behavior. Research shows that suspensions predict a range of student outcomes, including crime, delinquency, and drug use. It is therefore crucial to understand the factors associated with the use of school suspension, particularly in sites with different policy approaches to problem behaviors. This paper draws on data from state-representative samples of 3,129 Grade 7 and 9 students in Washington State, United States and Victoria, Australia sampled in 2002. Multilevel modeling examined student and school level factors associated with student-reported school suspension. Results showed that both student (being male, previous student antisocial and violent behavior, rebelliousness, academic failure) and school (socioeconomic status of the school, aggregate measures of low school commitment) level factors were associated with school suspension and that the factors related to suspension were similar in the two states. The implications of the findings for effective school behavior management policy are that, rather than focusing only on the student, both student and school level factors need to be addressed to reduce the rates of school suspension. PMID:24860205

  1. Student and school factors associated with school suspension: A multilevel analysis of students in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States.

    PubMed

    Sheryl, A Hemphill; Stephanie, M Plenty; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Toumbourou, John W; Catalano, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    One of the common issues schools face is how best to handle challenging student behaviors such as violent behavior, antisocial behavior, bullying, school rule violations, and interrupting other students' learning. School suspension may be used to remove students engaging in challenging behaviors from the school for a period of time. However, the act of suspending students from school may worsen rather than improve their behavior. Research shows that suspensions predict a range of student outcomes, including crime, delinquency, and drug use. It is therefore crucial to understand the factors associated with the use of school suspension, particularly in sites with different policy approaches to problem behaviors. This paper draws on data from state-representative samples of 3,129 Grade 7 and 9 students in Washington State, United States and Victoria, Australia sampled in 2002. Multilevel modeling examined student and school level factors associated with student-reported school suspension. Results showed that both student (being male, previous student antisocial and violent behavior, rebelliousness, academic failure) and school (socioeconomic status of the school, aggregate measures of low school commitment) level factors were associated with school suspension and that the factors related to suspension were similar in the two states. The implications of the findings for effective school behavior management policy are that, rather than focusing only on the student, both student and school level factors need to be addressed to reduce the rates of school suspension. PMID:24860205

  2. Exome sequencing and array-based comparative genomic hybridisation analysis of preferential 6-methylmercaptopurine producers.

    PubMed

    Chua, E W; Cree, S; Barclay, M L; Doudney, K; Lehnert, K; Aitchison, A; Kennedy, M A

    2015-10-01

    Preferential conversion of azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine into methylated metabolites is a major cause of thiopurine resistance. To seek potentially Mendelian causes of thiopurine hypermethylation, we recruited 12 individuals who exhibited extreme therapeutic resistance while taking azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine and performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and copy-number variant analysis by array-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH). Exome-wide variant filtering highlighted four genes potentially associated with thiopurine metabolism (ENOSF1 and NFS1), transport (SLC17A4) or therapeutic action (RCC2). However, variants of each gene were found only in two or three patients, and it is unclear whether these genes could influence thiopurine hypermethylation. Analysis by aCGH did not identify any unusual or pathogenic copy-number variants. This suggests that if causative mutations for the hypermethylation phenotype exist they may be heterogeneous, occurring in several different genes, or they may lie within regulatory regions not captured by WES. Alternatively, hypermethylation may arise from the involvement of multiple genes with small effects. To test this hypothesis would require recruitment of large patient samples and application of genome-wide association studies. PMID:25752523

  3. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 8: Project analysis and integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, P.; Henry, P.

    1986-01-01

    Project Analysis and Integration (PA&I) performed planning and integration activities to support management of the various Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project R&D activities. Technical and economic goals were established by PA&I for each R&D task within the project to coordinate the thrust toward the National Photovoltaic Program goals. A sophisticated computer modeling capability was developed to assess technical progress toward meeting the economic goals. These models included a manufacturing facility simulation, a photovoltaic power station simulation and a decision aid model incorporating uncertainty. This family of analysis tools was used to track the progress of the technology and to explore the effects of alternative technical paths. Numerous studies conducted by PA&I signaled the achievement of milestones or were the foundation of major FSA project and national program decisions. The most important PA&I activities during the project history are summarized. The PA&I planning function is discussed and how it relates to project direction and important analytical models developed by PA&I for its analytical and assessment activities are reviewed.

  4. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Domenico F.; Abuin, David S.; Tauber, Gabriel A.; Pham, Andrew T.; Pearson, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  5. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Abuin, David S; Tauber, Gabriel A; Pham, Andrew T; Pearson, Chad G

    2015-01-01

    Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  6. Supercritical fluid chromatography with photodiode array detection for pesticide analysis in papaya and avocado samples.

    PubMed

    Pano-Farias, Norma S; Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; Gonzalez, Jorge; Jurado, José M; Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    To improve the analysis of pesticides in complex food matrices with economic importance, alternative chromatographic techniques, such as supercritical fluid chromatography, can be used. Supercritical fluid chromatography has barely been applied for pesticide analysis in food matrices. In this paper, an analytical method using supercritical fluid chromatography coupled to a photodiode array detection has been established for the first time for the quantification of pesticides in papaya and avocado. The extraction of methyl parathion, atrazine, ametryn, carbofuran, and carbaryl was performed through the quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe methodology. The method was validated using papaya and avocado samples. For papaya, the correlation coefficient values were higher than 0.99; limits of detection and quantification ranged from 130-380 and 220-640 μg/kg, respectively; recovery values ranged from 72.8-94.6%; precision was lower than 3%. For avocado, limit of detection values were ˂450 μg/kg; precision was lower than 11%; recoveries ranged from 50.0-94.2%. Method feasibility was tested for lime, banana, mango, and melon samples. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method is applicable to methyl parathion, atrazine, ametryn, and carbaryl, toxics pesticides used worldwide. The methodology presented in this work could be applicable to other fruits. PMID:25641906

  7. Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy: Observations, Data Analysis, and Results for Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Ho, Paul T. P.; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Koch, Patrick M.; Liao, Yu-Wei; Lin, Kai-Yang; Liu, Guo-Chin; Molnar, Sandor M.; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Altamirano, Pablo; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Ming-Tang; Chiueh, Tzihong; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Jiang, Homin; Kesteven, Michael; Kubo, Derek Y.; Lancaster, Katy; Li, Chao-Te; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Raffin, Philippe; Wei, Tashun; Wilson, Warwick

    2009-04-01

    We present observations, analysis, and results for the first-year operation of Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA), an interferometric experiment designed to study cosmology via the measurement of cosmic microwave background (CMB). AMiBA is the first CMB interferometer operating at 3 mm to have reported successful results, currently with seven close-packed antennas of 60 cm diameter giving a synthesized resolution of around 6'. During 2007, AMiBA detected the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (SZEs) of six galaxy clusters at redshift 0.091 <= z <= 0.322. An observing strategy with on-off-source switching is used to minimize the effects from electronic offset and ground pickup. Planets were used to test the observational capability of AMiBA and to calibrate the conversion from correlator time-lag data to visibilities. The detailed formalism for data analysis is given. We summarize our early tests including observations of planets and quasars, and present images, visibility profiles, the estimated central coordinates, sizes, and SZE amplitudes of the galaxy clusters. Scientific implications are summarized. We also discuss possible systematic effects in the results.

  8. Reproducibility of quantitative RT-PCR array in miRNA expression profiling and comparison with microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongxin; Gelfond, Jonathan AL; McManus, Linda M; Shireman, Paula K

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical functions in various biological processes. MiRNA profiling is an important tool for the identification of differentially expressed miRNAs in normal cellular and disease processes. A technical challenge remains for high-throughput miRNA expression analysis as the number of miRNAs continues to increase with in silico prediction and experimental verification. Our study critically evaluated the performance of a novel miRNA expression profiling approach, quantitative RT-PCR array (qPCR-array), compared to miRNA detection with oligonucleotide microchip (microarray). Results High reproducibility with qPCR-array was demonstrated by comparing replicate results from the same RNA sample. Pre-amplification of the miRNA cDNA improved sensitivity of the qPCR-array and increased the number of detectable miRNAs. Furthermore, the relative expression levels of miRNAs were maintained after pre-amplification. When the performance of qPCR-array and microarrays were compared using different aliquots of the same RNA, a low correlation between the two methods (r = -0.443) indicated considerable variability between the two assay platforms. Higher variation between replicates was observed in miRNAs with low expression in both assays. Finally, a higher false positive rate of differential miRNA expression was observed using the microarray compared to the qPCR-array. Conclusion Our studies demonstrated high reproducibility of TaqMan qPCR-array. Comparison between different reverse transcription reactions and qPCR-arrays performed on different days indicated that reverse transcription reactions did not introduce significant variation in the results. The use of cDNA pre-amplification increased the sensitivity of miRNA detection. Although there was variability associated with pre-amplification in low abundance miRNAs, the latter did not involve any systemic bias in the estimation of miRNA expression. Comparison between microarray and qPCR-array

  9. Towards a Joint Analysis of Data from the IceCube Neutrino Telescope, the Pierre Auger Observatory and Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov; Golup, G.; Montaruli, T.; Rameez, M.; Aublin, J.; Caccianiga, L.; Ghia, P. L.; Roulet, E.; Unger, M.; Sagawa, H.; Tinyakov, P.

    A joint point-source analysis to search for correlations between the arrival directions of neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being planned by the IceCube, Pierre Auger and Telescope Array Collaborations. A cross-correlation analysis will be performed using ten years of Auger data, six years of Telescope Array data and a signal-rich set of neutrino candidate events detected at IceCube. Also, a likelihood analysis will be applied to the same sample of neutrinos, stacking their arrival directions, and to UHECRs. Finally, another likelihood analysis will be performed on stacked UHECRs and the IceCube 4-year sample of clean, through-going muons that could be associated with charged-current muon neutrino interactions. An outline of the analyses, their sensitivities and discovery potentials is presented here.

  10. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  11. Sensor placement for the analysis of seismic surface waves: sources of error, design criterion and array design algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranò, Stefano; Fäh, Donat; Lu, Yue M.

    2014-06-01

    Seismic surface waves can be measured by deploying an array of seismometers on the surface of the earth. The goal of such measurement surveys is, usually, to estimate the velocity of propagation and the direction of arrival of the seismic waves. In this paper, we address the issue of sensor placement for the analysis of seismic surface waves from ambient vibration wavefields. First, we explain in detail how the array geometry affects the mean-squared estimation error of parameters of interest, such as the velocity and direction of propagation, both at low and high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Secondly, we propose a cost function suitable for the design of the array geometry with particular focus on the estimation of the wavenumber of both Love and Rayleigh waves. Thirdly, we present and compare several computational approaches to minimize the proposed cost function. Numerical experiments verify the effectiveness of our cost function and resulting array geometry designs, leading to greatly improved estimation performance in comparison to arbitrary array geometries, both at low and high SNR levels.

  12. Analysis and Design of a Reflection-Cancelling Transverse Slot-Pair Array with Grating-Lobe Suppressing Baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takehito; Hirokawa, Jiro; Ando, Makoto

    This paper presents the analysis and design of a reflection-cancelling transverse slot-pair array antenna with baffles by using the Spectrum of Two-Dimensional Solutions (S2DS) method. For the transverse slot array, the slot spacings with more than one free-space wavelength cause the grating-lobes. The baffles suppress the grating-lobes effectively. A one-dimensional slot array is extracted from the 2D array with in-phase excitation by assuming periodicity in the transversal direction. The uniform excitation over the finite array is synthesized iteratively to demonstrate the fast and accurate results by S2DS. A unit design model with the baffles is introduced to determine the initial parameters of the slot-pairs, which greatly accelerate the iterations process. Experiments at 25.3GHz demonstrate the suppression of the grating lobes to the level less than -20.0dB and also the good uniformity of the aperture field distribution.

  13. Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Suspension Bridge Structural Systems: Cable Suspension & Anchorage; Warren Stiffening Truss; Upper & Lower Decks; Assembled System - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Challa, Samyuktha; Chen, Kevin; Peck, Austin; Fahad, Hossain M; Ota, Hiroki; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Kiriya, Daisuke; Lien, Der-Hsien; Brooks, George A; Davis, Ronald W; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-28

    Wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual's state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other non-invasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanically flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plastic-based sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing. This application could not have been realized using either of these technologies alone owing to their respective inherent limitations. The wearable system is used to measure the detailed sweat profile of human subjects engaged in prolonged indoor and outdoor physical activities, and to make a real-time assessment of the physiological state of the subjects. This platform enables a wide range of personalized diagnostic and physiological monitoring applications. PMID:26819044

  15. Field-Programmable Gate Array Computer in Structural Analysis: An Initial Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Brown, Samuel

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an initial assessment of using a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) computational device as a new tool for solving structural mechanics problems. A FPGA is an assemblage of binary gates arranged in logical blocks that are interconnected via software in a manner dependent on the algorithm being implemented and can be reprogrammed thousands of times per second. In effect, this creates a computer specialized for the problem that automatically exploits all the potential for parallel computing intrinsic in an algorithm. This inherent parallelism is the most important feature of the FPGA computational environment. It is therefore important that if a problem offers a choice of different solution algorithms, an algorithm of a higher degree of inherent parallelism should be selected. It is found that in structural analysis, an 'analog computer' style of programming, which solves problems by direct simulation of the terms in the governing differential equations, yields a more favorable solution algorithm than current solution methods. This style of programming is facilitated by a 'drag-and-drop' graphic programming language that is supplied with the particular type of FPGA computer reported in this paper. Simple examples in structural dynamics and statics illustrate the solution approach used. The FPGA system also allows linear scalability in computing capability. As the problem grows, the number of FPGA chips can be increased with no loss of computing efficiency due to data flow or algorithmic latency that occurs when a single problem is distributed among many conventional processors that operate in parallel. This initial assessment finds the FPGA hardware and software to be in their infancy in regard to the user conveniences; however, they have enormous potential for shrinking the elapsed time of structural analysis solutions if programmed with algorithms that exhibit inherent parallelism and linear scalability. This potential warrants further

  16. Fully integrated wearable sensor arrays for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Emaminejad, Sam; Nyein, Hnin Yin Yin; Challa, Samyuktha; Chen, Kevin; Peck, Austin; Fahad, Hossain M.; Ota, Hiroki; Shiraki, Hiroshi; Kiriya, Daisuke; Lien, Der-Hsien; Brooks, George A.; Davis, Ronald W.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Wearable sensor technologies are essential to the realization of personalized medicine through continuously monitoring an individual’s state of health. Sampling human sweat, which is rich in physiological information, could enable non-invasive monitoring. Previously reported sweat-based and other non-invasive biosensors either can only monitor a single analyte at a time or lack on-site signal processing circuitry and sensor calibration mechanisms for accurate analysis of the physiological state. Given the complexity of sweat secretion, simultaneous and multiplexed screening of target biomarkers is critical and requires full system integration to ensure the accuracy of measurements. Here we present a mechanically flexible and fully integrated (that is, no external analysis is needed) sensor array for multiplexed in situ perspiration analysis, which simultaneously and selectively measures sweat metabolites (such as glucose and lactate) and electrolytes (such as sodium and potassium ions), as well as the skin temperature (to calibrate the response of the sensors). Our work bridges the technological gap between signal transduction, conditioning (amplification and filtering), processing and wireless transmission in wearable biosensors by merging plastic-based sensors that interface with the skin with silicon integrated circuits consolidated on a flexible circuit board for complex signal processing. This application could not have been realized using either of these technologies alone owing to their respective inherent limitations. The wearable system is used to measure the detailed sweat profile of human subjects engaged in prolonged indoor and outdoor physical activities, and to make a real-time assessment of the physiological state of the subjects. This platform enables a wide range of personalized diagnostic and physiological monitoring applications.

  17. Halbach arrays in precision motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, D.L.; Williams, M.E.

    1995-02-01

    The Halbach array was developed for use as an optical element in particle accelerators. Following up on a suggestion from Klaus Halbach, the authors have investigated the utility of such arrays as the permanent magnet structure for synchronous machines in cartesian, polar, and cylindrical geometries. Their work has focused on the design of a novel Halbach array linear motor for use in a magnetic suspension stage for photolithography. This paper presents the details of the motor design and its force and power characteristics.

  18. Magnetic Suspension Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, Claude R. (Editor); Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    In order to identify the state of magnetic suspension technology in such areas as rotating systems, pointing of experiments or subsystems, payload isolation, and superconducting materials, a workshop on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, on 2-4 Feb. 1988. The workshop included five technical sessions in which a total of 24 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of pointing, isolation, and measurement, rotating systems, modeling and control, and superconductors. A list of attendees is provided.

  19. Testing small-aperture array analysis on well-located earthquakes, and application to the location of deep tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    La, Rocca M.; Galluzzo, D.; Malone, S.; McCausland, W.; Saccorotti, G.; Del, Pezzo E.

    2008-01-01

    We have here analyzed local and regional earthquakes using array techniques with the double aim of quantifying the errors associated with the estimation of propagation parameters of seismic signals and testing the suitability of a probabilistic location method for the analysis of nonimpulsive signals. We have applied the zero-lag cross-correlation method to earthquakes recorded by three dense arrays in Puget Sound and Vancouver Island to estimate the slowness and back azimuth of direct P waves and S waves. The results are compared with the slowness and back azimuth computed from the source location obtained by the analysis of data recorded by the Pacific Northwest seismic network (PNSN). This comparison has allowed a quantification of the errors associated with the estimation of slowness and back azimuth obtained through the analysis of array data. The statistical analysis gives ??BP = 10?? and ??BS = 8?? as standard deviations for the back azimuth and ??SP = 0.021 sec/km and ??SS = 0.033 sec /km for the slowness results of the P and S phases, respectively. These values are consistent with the theoretical relationship between slowness and back azimuth and their uncertainties. We have tested a probabilistic source location method on the local earthquakes based on the use of the slowness estimated for two or three arrays without taking into account travel-time information. Then we applied the probabilistic method to the deep, nonvolcanic tremor recorded by the arrays during July 2004. The results of the tremor location using the probabilistic method are in good agreement with those obtained by other techniques. The wide depth range, of between 10 and 70 km, and the source migration with time are evident in our results. The method is useful for locating the source of signals characterized by the absence of pickable seismic phases.

  20. Pacific Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, H.; Takeo, A.; Isse, T.; Nishida, K.; Shiobara, H.; Suetsugu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Based on our recent results on broadband ocean bottom seismometry, we propose a next generation large-scale array experiment in the ocean. Recent advances in ocean bottom broadband seismometry (e.g., Suetsugu & Shiobara, 2014, Annual Review EPS), together with advances in the seismic analysis methodology, have now enabled us to resolve the regional 1-D structure of the entire lithosphere/asthenosphere system, including seismic anisotropy (both radial and azimuthal), with deployments of ~10-15 broadband ocean bottom seismometers (BBOBSs) (namely "ocean-bottom broadband dispersion survey"; Takeo et al., 2013, JGR; Kawakatsu et al., 2013, AGU; Takeo, 2014, Ph.D. Thesis; Takeo et al., 2014, JpGU). Having ~15 BBOBSs as an array unit for 2-year deployment, and repeating such deployments in a leap-frog way (an array of arrays) for a decade or so would enable us to cover a large portion of the Pacific basin. Such efforts, not only by giving regional constraints on the 1-D structure, but also by sharing waveform data for global scale waveform tomography, would drastically increase our knowledge of how plate tectonics works on this planet, as well as how it worked for the past 150 million years. International collaborations might be sought.

  1. Micro-mirror array simulation and far-field diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaohui; Liu, Siyuan; Schmidt, Jason D.; Anisimov, Igor

    2014-06-01

    Developing a customized micro-mirror array (MMA) is costly and time consuming. Characterization experiments can be nearly as labor-intensive as fabrication. It is therefore desirable to have a computational simulation as a cost-effective and efficient means to conduct exploratory investigations such that appropriate parameters and optical characteristics can be obtained prior to any physical tests. In this article, we present our simulation of a novel MMA and preliminary diffraction analysis. Using geometric mapping, we created a three-dimensional visualization of the 5 × 5 MMA based on userspecified poses, which provides an interactive virtual view of the MMA geometry. A number of parameters are used to allow customizable simulation of various micro-mirror poses within the hardware limits. In addition, the far-field diffraction is simulated based on the given mirror geometry. This simulation package provides a tool for studying optical properties of MMAs, and it enables computational means to evaluate the performance of MMA as a beam steering element of Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) systems.

  2. Multiple Mass Analysis Using an Ion Trap Array (ITA) Mass Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yu; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses.

  3. Analysis and quantification of laser-dazzling effects on IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueber, N.,; Vincent, D.,; Morin, A.,; Dieterlen, A.,; Raymond, P.,

    2010-04-01

    Today Optronic Countermeasure (OCM) concerns imply an IR Focal-Plane Array (FPA) facing an in-band laser irradiation. In order to evaluate the efficiency of new countermeasure concepts or the robustness of FPAs, it is necessary to quantify the whole interaction effects. Even though some studies in the open literature show the vulnerability of imaging systems to laser dazzling, the diversity of analysis criteria employed does not allow the results of these studies to be correlated. Therefore, we focus our effort on the definition of common sensor figures of merit adapted to laser OCM studies. In this paper, two investigation levels are presented: the first one for analyzing the local nonlinear photocell response and the second one for quantifying the whole dazzling impact on image. The first study gives interesting results on InSb photocell behaviors when irradiated by a picosecond MWIR laser. With an increasing irradiance, four different successive responses appear: from linear, logarithmic, decreasing ones to permanent linear offset response. In the second study, our quantifying tools are described and their successful implementation through the picosecond laser-dazzling characterization of an InSb FPA is assessed.

  4. Design and analysis of low frequency strut-straddling feed arrays for EVLA reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, M.; Ellingson, S. W.

    2011-06-01

    A new feed system is designed for operation below 100 MHz. The only existing system on the EVLA operating below 100 MHz is the "4 m" (74 MHz) system which uses crossed half-wave dipoles located in front of the Cassegrain subreflector as the feed. However, the dipole feeds of this system introduce blockage, and a reduction in system sensitivity (estimated to be ˜6% at 1.4 GHz) is observed at higher frequency bands; hence the dipoles are removed most of the time. An alternative feed concept is therefore proposed in this paper. The proposed system appears to reduce sensitivity degradation at 1.4 GHz by 3% and thus might be permanently mounted. Moreover, the new system has sensitivity comparable to the existing system at frequencies below 100 MHz. The feed for this system consists of dipoles mounted between the adjacent struts of the reflector and is thus referred to as a strut-straddling feed array. This design and the analysis methodology used in this paper should be applicable in meeting the contiguous frequency coverage requirement (50-470 MHz) of the new low frequency system proposed for the EVLA. Also, it may be applied in the modification of other existing large reflector antennas for low frequency operation.

  5. Multiple mass analysis using an ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses. PMID:23797864

  6. 2D optical array probe analysis of precipitating cumulonimbus clouds during EPIC 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.

    2007-05-01

    During the 2001 East Pacific Investigation of Climate (EPIC) experiment, numerous measurements were made of the size distributions of raindrops in convective clouds that were developing over a region of the Mexican inter- tropical convergence zone (ITCZ). These measurements were made with optical array probes (PMS 2D-C and 2D-P) mounted on the National Science Foundation Hercules C-130, operated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. In addition to capturing shadow images of individual drops between 25 μm and 6400 μm, these instruments also record the distance between each drop via a measurement of arrival times in the spectrometers lasers. The separation distance, along with the drop size, provides detailed information about the microstructure of precipitation. The 2D probe measurements have been analyzed as a function of altitude above cloud base, horizontal distance from cloud edges, cloud droplet size distributions (2-50 μm) and vertical wind velocities. The objective of the analysis is to evaluate the spatial distribution of precipitation events with respect to the microphysical and dynamical processes that are related to the development and evolution of rain in tropical convective clouds. In addition, the reflectivity is calculated from the size distributions and evaluated to assess how inhomogeneities in the precipitation might be observed by meteorological radars.

  7. Optical sensitivity non-uniformity analysis and optimization of a tilt optical readout focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianyu; Shang, Haiping; Shi, Haitao; Li, Zhigang; Ou, Yi; Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Qingchuan

    2016-02-01

    An optical readout focal plane array (FPA) usually has a differently tilted reflector/absorber at the initial state due to the micromachining technique. The angular deviation of the reflector/absorber has a strong impact on the optical sensitivity non-uniformity, which is a key factor which affects the imaging uniformity. In this study, a theoretical analysis has been developed, and it is found that the stress matching in SiO2-Aluminum (Al) bilayer leg could make a contribution towards reducing the optical sensitivity non-uniformity. Ion implantation of phosphorus (P) has been utilized to control the stress in SiO2 film. By controlling the implantation energy and dose, the stress and stress stability are modified. The optical readout FPA has been successfully fabricated with the stress-control technique based on P+ implantation. It is demonstrated that the gray response non-uniformity of optical readout FPA has decreased from 25.69% to 10.7%.

  8. Mutation analysis of patients with neurodegenerative disorders using NeuroX array.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Mahdi; Lang, Anthony E; Zinman, Lorne; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Bessi, Valentina; Tedde, Andrea; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Surace, Ezequiel I; Sato, Christine; Moreno, Danielle; Xi, Zhengrui; Hung, Rachel; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Genetic analyses of patients with neurodegenerative disorders have identified multiple genes that need to be investigated for the presence of damaging variants. However, mutation analysis by Sanger sequencing is costly and time consuming. We tested the utility of a recently designed semi-custom genome-wide array (NeuroX; Illumina, Inc) tailored to study neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., mutation screening). We investigated 192 patients with 4 different neurodegenerative disorders for the presence of rare damaging variations in 77 genes implicated in these diseases. Several causative mutations were identified and confirmed by Sanger sequencing, including PSEN1 p.M233T responsible for Alzheimer's disease in a large Italian family, as well as SOD1 p.A4V and p.I113T in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In total, we identified 78 potentially damaging rare variants (frequency <1%), including ABCA7 p.L400V in a family with Alzheimer's disease and LRRK2 p.R1514Q in 6 of 98 patients with Parkinson's disease (6.1%). In conclusion, NeuroX appears to be helpful for rapid and accurate mutation screening, although further development may be still required to improve some current caveats. PMID:25174650

  9. Mutation analysis of patients with Neurodegenerative disorders using NeuroX array

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Mahdi; Lang, Anthony E; Zinman, Lorne; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Surace, Ezequiel I; Sato, Christine; Moreno, Danielle; Xi, Zhengrui; Hung, Rachel; Nalls, Mike A; Singleton, Andrew; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    Genetic analyses of patients with neurodegenerative disorders have identified multiple genes that need to be investigated for the presence of damaging variants. However, mutation analysis by Sanger sequencing is costly and time consuming. We tested the utility of a recently designed semi-custom genome-wide array (NeuroX; Illumina, Inc) tailored to study neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. mutation screening). We investigated 192 patients with four different neurodegenerative disorders for the presence of rare damaging variations in 77 genes implicated in these diseases. Several causative mutations were identified and confirmed by Sanger sequencing including PSEN1 p.M233T responsible for Alzheimer’s disease in a large Italian family, as well as SOD1 p.A4V and p.I113T in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. In total, we identified 78 potentially damaging rare variants (frequency <1%), including ABCA7 p.L400V in a family with Alzheimer’s disease and LRRK2 p.R1514Q in 6 out 98 patients with Parkinson’s Disease (6.1%). In conclusion, NeuroX appears to be helpful for rapid and accurate mutation screening, although further development may be still required to improve some current caveats. PMID:25174650

  10. Power spectrum analysis of ionospheric fluctuations with the Murchison Widefield Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Trott, Cathryn M.; Murphy, Tara; Cairns, Iver H.; Bell, Martin; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Morgan, John; Lenc, Emil; Offringa, A. R.; Feng, L.; Hancock, P. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Emrich, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kasper, J. C.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-07-01

    Low-frequency, wide field-of-view (FOV) radio telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) enable the ionosphere to be sampled at high spatial completeness. We present the results of the first power spectrum analysis of ionospheric fluctuations in MWA data, where we examined the position offsets of radio sources appearing in two data sets. The refractive shifts in the positions of celestial sources are proportional to spatial gradients in the electron column density transverse to the line of sight. These can be used to probe plasma structures and waves in the ionosphere. The regional (10-100 km) scales probed by the MWA, determined by the size of its FOV and the spatial density of radio sources (typically thousands in a single FOV), complement the global (100-1000 km) scales of GPS studies and local (0.01-1 km) scales of radar scattering measurements. Our data exhibit a range of complex structures and waves. Some fluctuations have the characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances, while others take the form of narrow, slowly drifting bands aligned along the Earth's magnetic field.

  11. Uncertainty analysis for trace-moisture standard realized using a magnetic suspension balance/diffusion-tube humidity generator developed at NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hisashi; Kitano, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Chiharu

    2015-12-01

    A method of estimating the uncertainty for a primary trace-moisture standard realized using a magnetic suspension balance/diffusion-tube humidity generator (MSB/DTG) developed at the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) is reported in full detail. The results of uncertainty analysis showed that the relative expanded uncertainties of the trace-moisture standard with a coverage factor of k = 2 are 6.9 % to 0.75 % for the amount-of-substance fractions (mole fractions) of water in nitrogen in the range of 12 nmol mol-1 to 1400 nmol mol-1. NMIJ participated in an international comparison of primary trace-moisture standards, and the results of the comparison demonstrated that the method of estimating uncertainty developed in this study is reasonable. The dominant uncertainty was attributable to the performance of the trace-moisture analyzer used to evaluate the uncertainty. We conclude that the development of a trace-moisture analyzer based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy with higher performance is needed to reduce the uncertainty of trace-moisture standards based on an MSB/DTG.

  12. Direct analysis of gain-guided phase-locked semiconductor laser arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, W. K.; Katz, J.

    1986-01-01

    A method for analyzing arbitrary one-dimensional waveguides is described and applied to find the lateral modes of gain-guided laser arrays directly, without the need for a coupled-mode approximation. Detailed results are given for a four-element array for which experimental results are available, and the effect of varying device parameters on the relative gains of the modes is considered. The results show differences between gain-guided and real-index guided arrays which are not evident in prior analyses.

  13. Impedance approach to the analysis of polarization losses in antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarskij, P. L.

    1992-08-01

    The powers of the basic and parasitic components of the radiated field are expressed through currents at the inputs of the antenna array using Hermitian forms, whose coefficients comprise two matrices of polarization impedance, while their sum matrix forms the matrix of the array radiation resistance. A method for determining the mutual polarization resistances of arbitrary radiators is developed, and calculation formulas applicable to the Hertz dipole are obtained. This approach was used to calculate the polarization-loss coefficient of a hexagonal array of tourniquet radiators.

  14. Application of a floating point systems AP190L array processor to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.

    1982-04-01

    This report discusses the implementation of a finite element program on a Floating Point Systems AP190L array processor attached to a Univac 1182 host computer. The array processor was used to perform all calculations on the global system of linear equations including matrix assembly, matrix factoring and vector solution. A large scratch disk was attached directly to the array processor for storing the factored matrix. The remaining calculations, including data preparation, element matrix formation, stress integration and output display were performed by the host computer.

  15. Tissue MicroArray: a distributed Grid approach for image analysis.

    PubMed

    Viti, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Galizia, Antonella; D'Agostino, Daniele; Clematis, Andrea; Milanesi, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    The Tissue MicroArray (TMA) technique is assuming even more importance. Digital images acquisition becomes fundamental to provide an automatic system for subsequent analysis. The accuracy of the results depends on the image resolution, which has to be very high in order to provide as many details as possible. Lossless formats are more suitable to bring information, but data file size become a critical factor researchers have to deal with. This affects not only storage methods but also computing times and performances. Pathologists and researchers who work with biological tissues, in particular with the TMA technique, need to consider a large number of case studies to formulate and validate their hypotheses. It is clear the importance of image sharing between different institutes worldwide to increase the amount of interesting data to work with. In this context, preserving the security of sensitive data is a fundamental issue. In most of the cases copying patient data in places different from the original database is forbidden by the owner institutes. Storage, computing and security are key problems of TMA methodology. In our system we tackle all these aspects using the EGEE (Enabling Grids for E-sciencE) Grid infrastructure. The Grid platform provides good storage, performance in image processing and safety of sensitive patient information: this architecture offers hundreds of Storage and Computing Elements and enables users to handle images without copying them to physical disks other than where they have been archived by the owner, giving back to end-users only the processed anonymous images. The efficiency of the TMA analysis process is obtained implementing algorithms based on functions provided by the Parallel IMAge processing Genoa Library (PIMA(GE)2 Lib). The acquisition of remotely distributed TMA images is made using specialized I/O functions based on the Grid File Access Library (GFAL) API. In our opinion this approach may represent important contribution

  16. A prototype for the real-time analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Fioretti, Valentina; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; De Rosa, Adriano; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Interlandi, Matteo; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Burkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Contreras, Jose Luis; De Cesare, Giovanni; de los Reyes, Raquel; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Rosen, Simon; Tacchini, Alessandro; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Trifoglio, Massimo; Weinstein, Amanda

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the biggest ground-based very-high-energy (VHE) γ- ray observatory. CTA will achieve a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity from some tens of GeV to beyond 100 TeV with respect to existing telescopes. The CTA observatory will be capable of issuing alerts on variable and transient sources to maximize the scientific return. To capture these phenomena during their evolution and for effective communication to the astrophysical community, speed is crucial. This requires a system with a reliable automated trigger that can issue alerts immediately upon detection of γ-ray flares. This will be accomplished by means of a Real-Time Analysis (RTA) pipeline, a key system of the CTA observatory. The latency and sensitivity requirements of the alarm system impose a challenge because of the anticipated large data rate, between 0.5 and 8 GB/s. As a consequence, substantial efforts toward the optimization of highthroughput computing service are envisioned. For these reasons our working group has started the development of a prototype of the Real-Time Analysis pipeline. The main goals of this prototype are to test: (i) a set of frameworks and design patterns useful for the inter-process communication between software processes running on memory; (ii) the sustainability of the foreseen CTA data rate in terms of data throughput with different hardware (e.g. accelerators) and software configurations, (iii) the reuse of nonreal- time algorithms or how much we need to simplify algorithms to be compliant with CTA requirements, (iv) interface issues between the different CTA systems. In this work we focus on goals (i) and (ii).

  17. Viscosity of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.G.D.; Schepper, I.M. de

    1995-12-31

    Simple expressions are given for the effective Newtonian viscosity as a function of concentration as well as for the effective visco-elastic response as a function of concentration and imposed frequency, of monodisperse neutral colloidal suspensions over the entire fluid range. The basic physical mechanisms underlying these formulae are discussed. The agreement with existing experiments is very good.

  18. Keep solids in suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Gladki, H.Z.

    1997-10-01

    Mixing is an important operation in the CPI. It is not synonymous with agitation. Mixing is a random distribution into and through one another of two or more initially separate phases. Within that broad definition is the important specialty area of liquid-solid dispersion. This paper addresses the dispersion of solids in lower concentrations that don`t affect the rheological properties of the fluid. The just suspended condition represents the lowest grade of complete suspension, but this level of agitation is the most efficient for solids-liquid agitation. Higher mixing speeds waste energy. Undersized mixers need replacing. The top-entering mixer has a long history in the CPI and the environmental area. Many suspension studies were run with this type. These papers result in empirical correlations for just suspension conditions to scale up from laboratory measurement. Variables considered are the agitation speed, liquid and solids physical properties, solids concentration, system geometry and impeller type. Lately, submersible mixers are becoming more popular, but there are no published sizing methods. This article will explain how to define the critical hydraulic conditions in the tank to reach just solids suspension for a submersible agitator of the type described here as FJFA (Free Jet Flow Agitator).

  19. Clustering in Bubble Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenit, Roberto

    2000-11-01

    A monidisperse bubble suspension is studied experimentally for the limit in which the Weber number is small and the Reynolds number is large. For this regime the suspension can be modeled using potential flow theory to describe the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Complete theoretical descriptions have been composed (Spelt and Sangani, 1998) to model the behavior of these suspensions. Bubble clustering is a natural instability that arises from the potential flow considerations, in which bubbles tend to align in horizontal rafts as they move upwards. The appearance of bubble clusters was recently corroborated experimentally by Zenit et al. (2000), who found that although clusters did appear, their strength was not as strong as the predictions. Experiments involving gravity driven shear flows are used to explain the nature of the clustering observed in these type of flows. Balances of the bubble phase pressure (in terms of a calculated diffusion coefficient) and the Maxwell pressure (from the potential flow description) are presented to predict the stability of the bubble suspension. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

  20. Flywheel Magnetic Suspension Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, Alan; Kenny, Andrew; Sifford, Curtiss; Thomas, Erwin; Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Provenza, Andrew; Kascak, Albert; Montague, Gerald; Lei, Shuliang; Kim, Yeonkyu; Sun, Guangyoung; Chon, ChonHee; Tucker, Randy; Preuss, Jason; Li, Ming; Minihan, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of many areas of the flywheel magnetic suspension (MS) R&D being performed at the Texas A&M Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab (TAMU-VCEL). This includes system response prediction, actuator optimization and redundancy, controller realizations and stages, sensor enhancements and backup bearing reliability.

  1. Stability of Metronidazole Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ronald F; Ying, James

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole is an antiprotozoal agent used in the treatment of bacterial and protozoal anaerobic infections. The objectives of this study were to develop concentrated metronidazole suspensions that are inexpensive and easy to prepare and determine the stability of these suspensions after storage in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles at room temperature (23°C) and under refrigeration (5°C). Metronidazole suspensions (50 mg/mL) were prepared from powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup as the vehicles. Samples were collected in triplicate from each container on days 0, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 93. Samples were assayed using a high-performance liquid chromatography method that had been validated as stability indicating. Color, change in physical appearance, and pH were also monitored at each time interval. There was no apparent change in color or physical appearance. The pH values changed by less than 0.20 units over the 93 days. The stability of metronidazole suspensions compounded from United States Pharmacopeia powder using Ora-Blend or simple syrup and packaged in amber polyvinyl chloride bottles was determined to be 93 days when stored at either room temperature or under refrigeration. PMID:26714365

  2. Evaluation of SNP Data from the Malus Infinium Array Identifies Challenges for Genetic Analysis of Complex Genomes of Polyploid Origin

    PubMed Central

    Troggio, Michela; Šurbanovski, Nada; Bianco, Luca; Moretto, Marco; Giongo, Lara; Banchi, Elisa; Viola, Roberto; Fernández, Felicdad Fernández; Costa, Fabrizio; Velasco, Riccardo; Cestaro, Alessandro; Sargent, Daniel James

    2013-01-01

    High throughput arrays for the simultaneous genotyping of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have made the rapid genetic characterisation of plant genomes and the development of saturated linkage maps a realistic prospect for many plant species of agronomic importance. However, the correct calling of SNP genotypes in divergent polyploid genomes using array technology can be problematic due to paralogy, and to divergence in probe sequences causing changes in probe binding efficiencies. An Illumina Infinium II whole-genome genotyping array was recently developed for the cultivated apple and used to develop a molecular linkage map for an apple rootstock progeny (M432), but a large proportion of segregating SNPs were not mapped in the progeny, due to unexpected genotype clustering patterns. To investigate the causes of this unexpected clustering we performed BLAST analysis of all probe sequences against the ‘Golden Delicious’ genome sequence and discovered evidence for paralogous annealing sites and probe sequence divergence for a high proportion of probes contained on the array. Following visual re-evaluation of the genotyping data generated for 8,788 SNPs for the M432 progeny using the array, we manually re-scored genotypes at 818 loci and mapped a further 797 markers to the M432 linkage map. The newly mapped markers included the majority of those that could not be mapped previously, as well as loci that were previously scored as monomorphic, but which segregated due to divergence leading to heterozygosity in probe annealing sites. An evaluation of the 8,788 probes in a diverse collection of Malus germplasm showed that more than half the probes returned genotype clustering patterns that were difficult or impossible to interpret reliably, highlighting implications for the use of the array in genome-wide association studies. PMID:23826289

  3. Graphene- and graphene oxide- based multisensor arrays for selective gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Varezhnikov, Alexey; Sysoev, Victor; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Arrays of nearly identical graphene devices on Si/SiO2 exhibit a substantial device-to-device variation, even in case of a high-quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or mechanically exfoliated graphene. We propose that such device-to-device variation could provide a platform for highly selective multisensor electronic olfactory systems. We fabricated a multielectode array of CVD graphene devices on a Si/SiO2 substrate, and demonstrated that the diversity of these devices is sufficient to reliably discriminate different short-chain alcohols: methanol, ethanol and isopropanol. The diversity of graphene devices on Si/SiO2 could possibly be used to construct multisensor systems trained to recognize other analytes as well. Similar multisensory arrays based on graphene oxide (GO) devices are also capable of discriminating these short-chain alcohols. We will discuss the possibility of chemical modification of GO for further increase the selectivity of GO multisensory arrays.

  4. Analysis of Modified SMI Method for Adaptive Array Weight Control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, Ronald Louis

    1989-01-01

    An adaptive array is used to receive a desired signal in the presence of weak interference signals which need to be suppressed. A modified sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm controls the array weights. The modification leads to increased interference suppression by subtracting a fraction of the noise power from the diagonal elements of the covariance matrix. The modified algorithm maximizes an intuitive power ratio criterion. The expected values and variances of the array weights, output powers, and power ratios as functions of the fraction and the number of snapshots are found and compared to computer simulation and real experimental array performance. Reduced-rank covariance approximations and errors in the estimated covariance are also described.

  5. Design, analysis, and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems. [low cost solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A.; Minning, C.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of optical and electrical verification test coupons is detailed. Testing of these coupons was completed and the results are presented. Additionally, a thermal simulation of roof mounted array conditions was done and the results documented.

  6. Comprehensive analysis of radiative properties of brass and Al arranged in nested cylindrical wire arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, A.; Keim, S. F.; Osborne, Glenn C.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Shrestha, I.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Shlyaptseva, V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Williamson, K. M.; Ouart, Nicholas D.; Safronova, Alla S.; Weller, M. E.

    2010-11-01

    Experimental results of nested cylindrical wire arrays (NCWA) consisting of brass (70% Cu and 30% Zn) wires on one array and Al (5056, 5% Mg) wires on the other array performed on the UNR Zebra generator at 1.0 MA current are compared and analyzed. Specifically, radiative properties of K-shell Al and Mg ions and L-shell Cu and Zn ions are compared as functions of the placements of the brass and Al wires on the inner and outer arrays. A full diagnostic set which included more than ten different beam-lines was implemented. Identical loads were fielded to allow the timing of time-gated pinhole and x-ray spectrometers to be shifted to get a more complete understanding of the evolution of plasma parameters over the x-ray pulse. The importance of the study of NCWAs with different wire materials is discussed.

  7. Numerical analysis of sound propagation for acoustic lens array in different fluid mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Kei; Asada, Akira

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, an acoustic sound focusing method using acoustic lens array is investigated numerically. To understand the sound propagation in the acoustic field in water with a lens material of glycerin, compressible Navier-Stokes equation, the mass conservation, energy equation, state equation in cylindrical coordinate system are solved without applying parabolic approximation. The numerical method is based on the finite difference time domain method. The numerical calculation of the sound propagation is carried out in the near field of the acoustic lens array of variable thickness normal to the acoustic beam. The numerical result shows that the sound pressure level along the beam axis increases due to the influence of the acoustic lens array, which indicates the capability of the acoustic lens array to the sound focusing.

  8. In-School Suspension Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas County Schools, Thomasville, GA.

    The in-school suspension program (ISS) for grades 6-12 in Thomas County, Georgia, is described in this report. The program retains students in school, offers individual help, and provides the opportunity to stay on task. During the suspension period, students are placed in individualized carrels in the suspension center and must complete…

  9. LEO Download Capacity Analysis for a Network of Adaptive Array Ground Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Mary Ann; Barott, William C.; Popovic, Zoya; Rondineau, Sebastien; Langley, John; Romanofsky, Robert; Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix; Steffes, Paul; Mandl, Dan

    2005-01-01

    To lower costs and reduce latency, a network of adaptive array ground stations, distributed across the United States, is considered for the downlink of a polar-orbiting low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite. Assuming the X-band 105 Mbps transmitter of NASA s Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite with a simple line-of-sight propagation model, the average daily download capacity in bits for a network of adaptive array ground stations is compared to that of a single 11 m dish in Poker Flats, Alaska. Each adaptive array ground station is assumed to have multiple steerable antennas, either mechanically steered dishes or phased arrays that are mechanically steered in azimuth and electronically steered in elevation. Phased array technologies that are being developed for this application are the space-fed lens (SFL) and the reflectarray. Optimization of the different boresight directions of the phased arrays within a ground station is shown to significantly increase capacity; for example, this optimization quadruples the capacity for a ground station with eight SFLs. Several networks comprising only two to three ground stations are shown to meet or exceed the capacity of the big dish, Cutting the data rate by half, which saves modem costs and increases the coverage area of each ground station, is shown to increase the average daily capacity of the network for some configurations.

  10. Infrared/millimeter wave mirror array beam combiner design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yi; Sun, Gang; Li, Fan; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Li; Li, Zhuo

    2014-06-20

    The design method of an infrared/millimeter wave mirror array type of beam combiner was investigated. The beam combiner was composed of a support plate, air gap, and mirror array. It had two advantages: one was that the size of the beam combiner could be extended by splicing more mirrors; the other was that the millimeter wave passband could be tuned by adjusting the thickness of the air gap. The millimeter wave and infrared structure was designed by using transmission line theory and optimized by a simplex Nelder-Mead method. In order to analyze the influence of deformation on performance, the mechanical characteristics of the mirrors and support plate were analyzed by the finite element method. The relationship between the millimeter wave transmission characteristics and the air gap was also analyzed by transmission line theory. The scattered field caused by pillars was computed by the multilevel fast multipole method. In addition, the effect of edge diffraction on the near field uniformity was analyzed by the aperture field integration method. In order to validate the mirror array splicing principle and the infrared imaging performance, a prototype of the mirror array was fabricated and tested. Finally, the infrared images reflected by the mirror array were obtained and analyzed. The simulation and experiment results validated the feasibility of the mirror array beam combiner. PMID:24979417

  11. Bivariate segmentation of SNP-array data for allele-specific copy number analysis in tumour samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SNP arrays output two signals that reflect the total genomic copy number (LRR) and the allelic ratio (BAF), which in combination allow the characterisation of allele-specific copy numbers (ASCNs). While methods based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been extended from array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) to jointly handle the two signals, only one method based on change-point detection, ASCAT, performs bivariate segmentation. Results In the present work, we introduce a generic framework for bivariate segmentation of SNP array data for ASCN analysis. For the matter, we discuss the characteristics of the typically applied BAF transformation and how they affect segmentation, introduce concepts of multivariate time series analysis that are of concern in this field and discuss the appropriate formulation of the problem. The framework is implemented in a method named CnaStruct, the bivariate form of the structural change model (SCM), which has been successfully applied to transcriptome mapping and aCGH. Conclusions On a comprehensive synthetic dataset, we show that CnaStruct outperforms the segmentation of existing ASCN analysis methods. Furthermore, CnaStruct can be integrated into the workflows of several ASCN analysis tools in order to improve their performance, specially on tumour samples highly contaminated by normal cells. PMID:23497144

  12. Phenotype MicroArrays for High-Throughput Phenotypic Testing and Assay of Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Barry R.; Gadzinski, Peter; Panomitros, Eugenia

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Escherichia coli is used as a model cellular system to test and validate a new technology called Phenotype MicroArrays (PMs). PM technology is a high-throughput technology for simultaneous testing of a large number of cellular phenotypes. It consists of preconfigured well arrays in which each well tests a different cellular phenotype and an automated instrument that continuously monitors and records the response of the cells in all wells of the arrays. For example, nearly 700 phenotypes of E. coli can be assayed by merely pipetting a cell suspension into seven microplate arrays. PMs can be used to directly assay the effects of genetic changes on cells, especially gene knock-outs. Here, we provide data on phenotypic analysis of six strains and show that we can detect expected phenotypes as well as, in some cases, unexpected phenotypes. PMID:11435407

  13. High-resolution melting curve analysis for genotyping of common SNP in MTHFR gene using fixed-cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Sinthuwiwat, Thivaratana; Poowasanpetch, Phanasit; Wongngamrungroj, Angsana; Promso, Somying; Auewarakul, Chirayu; Mooney, Sean; Tocharoentanaphol, Chintana

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variation in MTHFR might explain the interindividual differences in both therapeutic and toxic responses to the treatment of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis with methotrexate, and can be involved in the sensitivity of developing diseases like cancer and congenital anomalies. We investigated the common sequence variation, C677T, in the MTHFR gene in fixed-cell specimens archived after chromosomal analysis using a novel gene scanning method based on post PCR analysis of high-resolution melting curves (HRM). These fixed specimens were stored after routine chromosomal analysis for 1 year at -20 degrees C in a 3:1 methanol:acetic acid solution. The method revealed a distinct pattern between homozygous and heterozygous alleles. Sensitivity and specificity of the HRM based method were comparable to that obtained by a hybridization probe. While the success rate for genotyping of a common SNP in MTHFR was similar to the hybridization probe approach, the HRM based method was more cost-effective and had a shorter turnaround time. PMID:18725286

  14. Mesohydrodynamics of suspensions of membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian Feng

    Complex fluids are ubiquitous in science and engineering. Biological fluids, immiscible blends, foams, and many types of suspensions are familiar examples of complex fluids. Their internal structure (e.g. suspended particles in suspensions or the interface in immiscible blends) evolves in time on the time scale that is comparable with the time scale of the macroscopic motion. The macroscopic time evolution has to be therefore coupled to the microstructure time evolution. Such coupling then causes the complexity of the flow phenomena. This thesis focuses on suspensions of interfaces or elastic membranes. They include the clean interface between two liquid bulks, liquid interfaces covered with surface active agents, and solid-liquid membranes of red blood cells. The popular point of departure of a theoretical analysis of this type of complex fluids is microhydrodynamics. The formulation can either be made into a basis for direct numerical simulations or it can be carried to a field formulation. In both cases an extensive computer power is needed to solve the governing equation. To pass finally to predictions of flow properties one needs to involve still an additional physics and approximations that allow to transform the solutions (addressing typically trajectories of individual particles or a single particle deformations) into stresses arising in the fluids. The approach that we use in this thesis is mesoscopic. The starting point is a. mesoscopic model of the internal structure and of the physics taking place in the fluid. The physics is then expressed into governing equations of the rheological model by following the thermodynamic (GENERIC) framework. In most cases, the governing equations are just a set of ordinary differential equations that can readily be solved by using a standard software. Predictions of our models are found to be in a good agreement with results of experimental observations and predictions of the models based on microhydrodynamics.

  15. SNP Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genomic Abnormalities Including Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity in Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations). To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA),” has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively. At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD. Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  16. Parallel multispot smFRET analysis using an 8-pixel SPAD array

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, A.; Colyer, R. A.; Kim, D.; Panzeri, F.; Lin, R.; Gulinatti, A.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.; Weiss, S.; Michalet, X.

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is a powerful tool for extracting distance information between two fluorophores (a donor and acceptor dye) on a nanometer scale. This method is commonly used to monitor binding interactions or intra- and intermolecular conformations in biomolecules freely diffusing through a focal volume or immobilized on a surface. The diffusing geometry has the advantage to not interfere with the molecules and to give access to fast time scales. However, separating photon bursts from individual molecules requires low sample concentrations. This results in long acquisition time (several minutes to an hour) to obtain sufficient statistics. It also prevents studying dynamic phenomena happening on time scales larger than the burst duration and smaller than the acquisition time. Parallelization of acquisition overcomes this limit by increasing the acquisition rate using the same low concentrations required for individual molecule burst identification. In this work we present a new two-color smFRET approach using multispot excitation and detection. The donor excitation pattern is composed of 4 spots arranged in a linear pattern. The fluorescent emission of donor and acceptor dyes is then collected and refocused on two separate areas of a custom 8-pixel SPAD array. We report smFRET measurements performed on various DNA samples synthesized with various distances between the donor and acceptor fluorophores. We demonstrate that our approach provides identical FRET efficiency values to a conventional single-spot acquisition approach, but with a reduced acquisition time. Our work thus opens the way to high-throughput smFRET analysis on freely diffusing molecules. PMID:24382989

  17. Upper mantle structure of central and West Antarctica from array analysis of Rayleigh wave phase velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeszel, David S.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Aster, Richard C.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wilson, Terry J.; Winberry, J. Paul

    2016-03-01

    The seismic velocity structure of Antarctica is important, both as a constraint on the tectonic history of the continent and for understanding solid Earth interactions with the ice sheet. We use Rayleigh wave array analysis methods applied to teleseismic data from recent temporary broadband seismograph deployments to image the upper mantle structure of central and West Antarctica. Phase velocity maps are determined using a two-plane wave tomography method and are inverted for shear velocity using a Monte Carlo approach to estimate three-dimensional velocity structure. Results illuminate the structural dichotomy between the East Antarctic Craton and West Antarctica, with West Antarctica showing thinner crust and slower upper mantle velocity. West Antarctica is characterized by a 70-100 km thick lithosphere, underlain by a low-velocity zone to depths of at least 200 km. The slowest anomalies are beneath Ross Island and the Marie Byrd Land dome and are interpreted as upper mantle thermal anomalies possibly due to mantle plumes. The central Transantarctic Mountains are marked by an uppermost mantle slow-velocity anomaly, suggesting that the topography is thermally supported. The presence of thin, higher-velocity lithosphere to depths of about 70 km beneath the West Antarctic Rift System limits estimates of the regionally averaged heat flow to less than 90 mW/m2. The Ellsworth-Whitmore block is underlain by mantle with velocities that are intermediate between those of the West Antarctic Rift System and the East Antarctic Craton. We interpret this province as Precambrian continental lithosphere that has been altered by Phanerozoic tectonic and magmatic activity.

  18. Shotgun proteomic analysis of yeast-elicited California poppy (Eschscholzia californica) suspension cultures producing enhanced levels of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Oldham, John T; Hincapie, Marina; Rejtar, Tomas; Wall, P Kerr; Carlson, John E; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2010-09-01

    The California poppy, Eschscholzia californica, produces benzophenanthridine alkaloids (BPAs), an important class of biologically active compounds. Cell cultures of E. californica were investigated as an alternative and scalable method for producing these valuable compounds; treatment with yeast extract increased production from low levels to 23 mg/g dry weight (DW) of BPAs. A shotgun proteomic analysis of E. californica cell cultures was undertaken to explore changes in metabolism associated with enhanced BPA production. We implemented differential centrifugation and then shotgun proteomics based on nanoliquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) for peptide separation and analysis. A unigene database available for E. californica was translated and utilized for protein identification. Approximately 646 proteins (3% false discovery rate at the protein level) were identified. Differentially abundant proteins observed with elicitation included enzymes involved in (S)-adenosyl methionine (SAM) biosynthesis and BPA biosynthesis. These results demonstrate (1) the identification of proteins from a medicinal plant using shotgun proteomics combined with a well-annotated, translated unigene database and (2) the potential utility of proteomics for exploring changes in metabolism associated with enhanced secondary metabolite production. PMID:20690678

  19. Analysis of 5S rDNA arrays in Arabidopsis thaliana: physical mapping and chromosome-specific polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Cloix, C; Tutois, S; Mathieu, O; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Picard, G; Tourmente, S

    2000-05-01

    A physical map of a pericentromeric region of chromosome 5 containing a 5S rDNA locus and spanning approximately 1000 kb was established using the CIC YAC clones. Three 5S rDNA arrays were resolved in this YAC contig by PFGE analysis and we have mapped different types of sequences between these three blocks. 5S rDNA units from each of these three arrays of chromosome 5, and from chromosomes 3 and 4, were isolated by PCR. A total of 38 new DNA sequences were obtained. Two types of 5S rDNA repeated units exist: the major variant with 0.5-kb repeats and one with short repeats (251 bp) only detected on YAC 11A3 from chromosome 3. Although the 38 sequences displayed noticeable heterogeneity, we were able to group them according to their 5S array origin. The presence of 5S array-specific variants was confirmed with the restriction polymorphism study of all the YACs carrying 5S units. PMID:10810091

  20. A critical analysis of air shower structure functions and size spectrum measurements with the NBU air shower array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhuri, N.; Basak, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 11,000 showers in the size range 10 to the 4 to 10 to the 6 particles so far detected by the NBU air shower array has been analyzed using five different structure functions. A comparison of structure functions in terms: (1) of shower size; and (2) electron density at various core distances has been discussed to indicate the present status of structure functions in air shower analysis.

  1. A transient plasticity study and low cycle fatigue analysis of the Space Station Freedom photovoltaic solar array blanket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Liao, Mei-Hwa; Morris, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom photovoltaic solar array blanket assembly is comprised of several layers of materials having dissimilar elastic, thermal, and mechanical properties. The operating temperature of the solar array, which ranges from -75 to +60 C, along with the material incompatibility of the blanket assembly components combine to cause an elastic-plastic stress in the weld points of the assembly. The weld points are secondary structures in nature, merely serving as electrical junctions for gathering the current. The thermal mechanical loading of the blanket assembly operating in low earth orbit continually changes throughout each 90 min orbit, which raises the possibility of fatigue induced failure. A series of structural analyses were performed in an attempt to predict the fatigue life of the solar cell in the Space Station Freedom photovoltaic array blanket. A nonlinear elastic-plastic MSC/NASTRAN analysis followed by a fatigue calculation indicated a fatigue life of 92,000 to 160,000 cycles for the solar cell weld tabs. Additional analyses predict a permanent buckling phenomenon in the copper interconnect after the first loading cycle. This should reduce or eliminate the pulling of the copper interconnect on the joint where it is welded to the silicon solar cell. It is concluded that the actual fatigue life of the solar array blanket assembly should be significantly higher than the calculated 92,000 cycles, and thus the program requirement of 87,500 cycles (orbits) will be met. Another important conclusion that can be drawn from the overall analysis is that, the strain results obtained from the MSC/NASTRAN nonlinear module are accurate to use for low-cycle fatigue analysis, since both thermal cycle testing of solar cells and analysis have shown higher fatigue life than the minimum program requirement of 87,500 cycles.

  2. A superconducting large-angle magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Torti, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The component technologies were developed required for an advanced control moment gyro (CMG) type of slewing actuator for large payloads. The key component of the CMG is a large-angle magnetic suspension (LAMS). The LAMS combines the functions of the gimbal structure, torque motors, and rotor bearings of a CMG. The LAMS uses a single superconducting source coil and an array of cryoresistive control coils to produce a specific output torque more than an order of magnitude greater than conventional devices. The designed and tested LAMS system is based around an available superconducting solenoid, an array of twelve room-temperature normal control coils, and a multi-input, multi-output control system. The control laws were demonstrated for stabilizing and controlling the LAMS system.

  3. Multiplexed Analysis of Serum Breast and Ovarian Cancer Markers by Means of Suspension Bead-quantum Dot Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhnik, Kristina; Sokolova, Zinaida; Baryshnikova, Maria; Bilan, Regina; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    Multiplexed analysis of cancer markers is crucial for early tumor diagnosis and screening. We have designed lab-on-a-bead microarray for quantitative detection of three breast cancer markers in human serum. Quantum dots were used as bead-bound fluorescent tags for identifying each marker by means of flow cytometry. Antigen-specific beads reliably detected CA 15-3, CEA, and CA 125 in serum samples, providing clear discrimination between the samples with respect to the antigen levels. The novel microarray is advantageous over the routine single-analyte ones due to the simultaneous detection of various markers. Therefore the developed microarray is a promising tool for serum tumor marker profiling.

  4. Rheological behavior of oxide nanopowder suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinar, Simge

    Ceramic nanopowders offer great potential in advanced ceramic materials and many other technologically important applications. Because a material's rheological properties are crucial for most processing routes, control of the rheological behavior has drawn significant attention in the recent past. The control of rheological behavior relies on an understanding of how different parameters affect the suspension viscosities. Even though the suspension stabilization mechanisms are relatively well understood for sub-micron and micron size particle systems, this knowledge cannot be directly transferred to nanopowder suspensions. Nanopowder suspensions exhibit unexpectedly high viscosities that cannot be explained with conventional mechanisms and are still a topic of investigation. This dissertation aims to establish the critical parameters governing the rheological behavior of concentrated oxide nanopowder suspensions, and to elucidate the mechanisms by which these parameters control the rheology of these suspensions. Aqueous alumina nanopowders were chosen as a model system, and the findings were extrapolated to other oxide nanopowder systems such as zirconia, yttria stabilized zirconia, and titania. Processing additives such as fructose, NaCl, HCl, NaOH, and ascorbic acid were used in this study. The effect of solids content and addition of fructose on the viscosity of alumina nanopowder suspensions was investigated by low temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC), rheological, and zeta potential measurements. The analysis of bound water events observed in LT-DSC revealed useful information regarding the rheological behavior of nanopowder suspensions. Because of the significance of interparticle interactions in nanopowder suspensions, the electrostatic stabilization was investigated using indifferent and potential determining ions. Different mechanisms, e.g., the effect of the change in effective volume fraction caused by fructose addition and electrostatic

  5. Comparative efficiency analysis of fiber-array and conventional beam director systems in volume turbulence.

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, Mikhail; Filimonov, Grigory; Ovchinnikov, Vladimir; Polnau, Ernst; Lachinova, Svetlana; Weyrauch, Thomas; Mangano, Joseph

    2016-05-20

    The performance of two prominent laser beam projection system types is analyzed through wave-optics numerical simulations for various atmospheric turbulence conditions, propagation distances, and adaptive optics (AO) mitigation techniques. Comparisons are made between different configurations of both a conventional beam director (BD) using a monolithic-optics-based Cassegrain telescope and a fiber-array BD that uses an array of densely packed fiber collimators. The BD systems considered have equal input power and aperture diameters. The projected laser beam power inside the Airy size disk at the target plane is used as the performance metric. For the fiber-array system, both incoherent and coherent beam combining regimes are considered. We also present preliminary results of side-by-side atmospheric beam projection experiments over a 7-km propagation path using both the AO-enhanced beam projection system with a Cassegrain telescope and the coherent fiber-array BD composed of 21 densely packed fiber collimators. Both wave-optics numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that, for similar system architectures and turbulence conditions, coherent fiber-array systems are more efficient in mitigation of atmospheric turbulence effects and generation of a hit spot of the smallest possible size on a remotely located target. PMID:27411147

  6. Origin of microseisms in equatorial and southern Africa from analysis of broadband arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, G. G.; Wiens, D. A.; Nyblade, A.

    2010-12-01

    Using broadband array noise correlation and frequency-wavenumber analysis, we find evidence for 4 distinct origins of microseisms in the 10-200mHz band: an unusual source of Rayleigh waves at 35-40mHz located in the Bight of Bonny, several abyssal locations with enhanced P-wave production at 100-200mHz, and both coastal and abyssal Rayleigh wave sources that vary in bandwidth. We find no evidence of persistent seismic noise generation on land. Data analyzed were 1Hz vertical component recordings from the Cameroon, Southern Africa, Tanzania, and Ethiopia PASSCAL experiments. The Bonny microseism is characterized by 2 well-defined peaks at 36 & 38mHz and is found to have a location on the continental shelf in the northern portion of the Bight of Bonny. Our preliminary analysis finds that the microseism is well represented as a point source with a frequency-dependent location and horizontal slowness. Additional peaks near 61mHz and 69mHz are associated with increased Rayleigh waves sourced from the Bight of Bonny but are below the frequency range expected for a doubled frequency microseism (70-80mHz). Strong P-wave energy is found to originate from abyssal regions west of Retkjanes Ridge near Greenland, South of the Kerguelen Islands, and in the vicinity of the triple-junction formed by the African, South American & Antarctic plates. We propose that the locations represent optimal sea floor bathymetry for efficient conversion of nonlinearly interfering ocean swell to seismic P waves. Maputo bay and Sofala bay in Mozambique, the Western Cape coast in South Africa, and the North Atlantic are the dominant sources of microseismic Rayleigh waves outside of 35-40mHz. All noise sources identified in our study have a seasonal signature with peak noise generation in the winter months of each location implying their energy is derived from ocean swell of extratropical cyclones.

  7. Seismo-acoustic analysis of the ocean swell sources observed with Romanian infrasound array and seismic stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghica, Daniela; Grecu, Bogdan; Popa, Mihaela

    2015-04-01

    Romanian Plostina infrasound array (IPLOR) is deployed in the central part of the country, in Vrancea region. Presently, IPLOR array configuration includes 6 elements equipped with Chaparral Physics sensors and with aperture of about 2.5 km. For the purpose of assessing the IPLOR performance in observing various types of infrasound sources, over five years of data (since June 2009 to present) were processed. Signal interactive analysis was performed using WinPMCC software. The detection results show that the station response was gradually improved, as the number of array elements increased from three to six, and wind noise reduction conditions were enhanced. A larger number of detected signals and a better array resolution at lower frequency were noticed as well. Microbaroms - the interaction of ocean swell with the atmosphere - represent a relevant type of infrasonic source present in the IPLOR detection plots, for which the signal characterization has been enhanced with the array upgrading process. IPLOR detection capability related to this energetic long-period infrasound waves, which propagate over large distances, shows an alternating behavior, being strongly influenced by the upper atmospheric winds, i.e. seasonally dependent stratospheric winds. The ocean swell can be considered as a seismo-acoustic source, leaving an imprint on both seismic and infrasonic recordings. The interaction with the atmosphere generates infrasound (microbarom), while the interaction with the sea floor emits seismic signal (microseism). Microbaroms have a sinusoidal wave character with a dominant period of 5 s. Due to low damping at this period in stratospheric wave duct, microbaroms are observed over large distance ranges up to a few thousand kilometres. Microseisms occur as an increasing of seismic background noise between 2 and 20 s; in this range, primary and secondary peaks, at 5 and 14 s, are observed. Common broad-band seismic data, recorded with Romanian dense seismic

  8. Photomixing of chlamydomonas rheinhardtii suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Capellazzi Resta, Marina; Abou, Bérengère; Brunet, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas rheinhardtii is a fast swimming unicellular alga able to bias its swimming direction in gradients of light intensity, an ability know as phototaxis. We have investigated experimentally both the swimming behavior of individual cells and the macroscopic response of shallow suspensions of these micro-organisms in response to a localized light source. At low light intensity, algae exhibit positive phototaxis and accumulate beneath the excitation light. In weakly concentrated thin layers, the balance between phototaxis and cell motility results in steady symmetrical patterns compatible with a purely diffusive model using effective diffusion coefficients extracted from the analysis of individual cell trajectories. However, at higher cell density and layer depth, collective effects induce convective flows around the light source. These flows disturb the cell concentration patterns which spread and may then becomes unstable. Using large passive tracer particles, we have characterized the velocity fields associated with this forced bioconvection and their dependence on the cell density and layer depth. By tuning the light distribution, this mechanism of photo-bioconvection allows a fine control over the local fluid flows, and thus the mixing efficiency, in algal suspensions.

  9. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  10. Estimating the deposition of river-borne suspended matter from the joint analysis of suspension concentration and salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavialov, P. O.; Barbanova, E. S.; Pelevin, V. V.; Osadchiev, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    A simple method has been proposed for estimating the deposition and mixing rates of river-borne suspended matter and mapping the deposition intensity in near-estuary sea areas. The method involves the joint analysis of data on the total suspended solids (TSS) concentration and salinity. The relative content of river runoff in seawater is determined from the salinity value. If the suspended matter is subject to deposition, its concentration would be fully determined by the relative content of river water in the seawater and could be calculated based on salinity. However, the factual TSS concentration is usually lower than that estimated from salinity, because of deposition. Hence, the amount of TSS deposited from a specific water parcel can be obtained as the difference between the concentration prescribed by the linear mixing of river and seawater masses and the factual concentration. This scheme has been implemented using high-resolution data collected in field campaigns in the Black Sea near the Mzymta River mouth. The TSS concentration was obtained using ultraviolet fluorescence lidar, and salinity was measured by a pump-through CTD system.

  11. Overexpression and purification of HSV-2 glycoprotein D in suspension CHO cells with serum-free medium and immunogenicity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Xu, Yueyue; Pan, Ying; Li, Suqin; Li, Bingjun; Pan, Mingjie; Zhang, Shumin; Li, Yuexi

    2016-05-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD2) is the most important candidate antigen for herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) vaccine development. Establishment of a stable eukaryotic cell line to overexpress gD2 and an efficient purification process to purify is essential for the development of subunit vaccine against HSV-2. The DNA sequence of the extracellular epitope-rich fragment of gD2 was optimized, chemically synthesized, and cloned into plasmid pMD902. The recombinant plasmid pMD902-gD was stably transfected into CHO-DG44 cells, and cell lines with high levels of expression of gD2 were established. The recombinant gD2 was purified efficiently using an anion exchange column and a Sephadex G-25 desalting column. The yield of the purified gD2 was 57 mg/L of serum-free culture medium, and its purity was determined to be about 95% by HPLC analysis. Finally, the immunogenicity of the purified gD2 was measured and it induced strong and specific humoral immunity and higher level of cellular immune response than gD2 expressed in prokaryotic cells. We established a stable, secretory, and high-yield gD2-expression cell line and an easy and efficient gD2-purification process, which lays the foundation for preparation of large amount of gD2 that is essential for HSV-2 subunit vaccine development. PMID:25906680

  12. The subtle suspension of backlash: A meta-analysis of penalties for women's implicit and explicit dominance behavior.

    PubMed

    Williams, Melissa J; Tiedens, Larissa Z

    2016-02-01

    Previous research suggests that women, more than men, experience negative outcomes when they display dominance. A closer look, however, reveals ambiguity about the specific forms of dominance proscribed for women. Here, we suggest that negative reactions to women's dominance, a counter-stereotypical behavior, may require that the behavior be clearly encoded as counter-stereotypical-which is less likely when the behavior is expressed implicitly. This hypothesis was tested with a meta-analysis of studies on the evaluation of individuals behaving dominantly, including articles not directly investigating gender. Results revealed that dominance indeed hurts women's, relative to men's, likability (although the overall effect is small, d = -0.19, k = 63), as well as more downstream outcomes such as hireability (d = -0.58, k = 20). More important, however, dominance expressed explicitly (e.g., direct demands) affected women's likability (d = -0.28) whereas implicit forms of dominance (e.g., eye contact) did not (d = 0.03). Finally, the effect of dominance on men's and women's perceived competence did not differ (d = 0.02, k = 31), consistent with the idea that it is interpersonal (rather than instrumental) evaluations that obstruct women leaders. Implications for theory, and for the success of male and female leaders, are discussed. PMID:26689089

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Plasma Ablation Using Inverse Wire Array Z-pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Lebedev, S. V.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hall, G. N.; Ning, C.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bott, S. C.

    2009-01-21

    An inverse (exploding) wire array configuration, in which the wires form a cylinder around a current carrying electrode on axis, was used to study the ablation phase of the pinch. This configuration allows the parameters of the plasma from individual wires of the array to be measured as the ablated plasma streams propagate in the outward radial direction. The density distribution and the evolution of the natural mode of modulation of the ablation was measured with interferometry and soft x-ray imaging. Measurements of the voltage across the array, which in this configuration is determined by the private magnetic flux around the individual wires, allows information on the localisation of the current to be obtained.

  14. Array CGH analysis of a cohort of Russian patients with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Kashevarova, Anna A; Nazarenko, Lyudmila P; Skryabin, Nikolay A; Salyukova, Olga A; Chechetkina, Nataliya N; Tolmacheva, Ekaterina N; Sazhenova, Elena A; Magini, Pamela; Graziano, Claudio; Romeo, Giovanni; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lebedev, Igor N

    2014-02-15

    The use of array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) as a diagnostic tool in molecular genetics has facilitated the identification of many new microdeletion/microduplication syndromes (MMSs). Furthermore, this method has allowed for the identification of copy number variations (CNVs) whose pathogenic role has yet to be uncovered. Here, we report on our application of array CGH for the identification of pathogenic CNVs in 79 Russian children with intellectual disability (ID). Twenty-six pathogenic or likely pathogenic changes in copy number were detected in 22 patients (28%): 8 CNVs corresponded to known MMSs, and 17 were not associated with previously described syndromes. In this report, we describe our findings and comment on genes potentially associated with ID that are located within the CNV regions. PMID:24291026

  15. Partially coherent analysis of imaging and interferometric phased arrays: noise, correlations, and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Withington, Stafford; Saklatvala, George; Hobson, Michael P

    2006-06-01

    Phased arrays are of considerable importance for far-infrared, submillimeter-wave, and microwave astronomy; they are also being developed for areas as diverse as optical switching, radar, and radio communications. We present a discretized, modal theory of imaging and interferometric phased arrays. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging, or interferometric, phased array can be determined for a source in any state of spatial coherence and polarization, once the synthesized beam patterns are known. It is not necessary to know anything about the internal construction of the beam-forming networks; indeed, the beam patterns can be taken from experimental data. The synthesized beams can be nonorthogonal and even linearly dependent. Our theory leads to many conceptual insights and opens the way to a range of new design and simulation techniques. PMID:16715152

  16. Modeling and Flight Data Analysis of Spacecraft Dynamics with a Large Solar Array Paddle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Takanori; Maeda, Ken; Hoshino, Hiroki

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24 2006 and has been operated successfully since then. This satellite has the attitude dynamics characterized by three large flexible structures, four large moving components, and stringent attitude/pointing stability requirements. In particular, it has one of the largest solar array paddles. Presented in this paper are flight data analyses and modeling of spacecraft attitude motion induced by the large solar array paddle. On orbit attitude dynamics was first characterized and summarized. These characteristic motions associated with the solar array paddle were identified and assessed. These motions are thermally induced motion, the pitch excitation by the paddle drive, and the role excitation. The thermally induced motion and the pitch excitation by the paddle drive were modeled and simulated to verify the mechanics of the motions. The control law updates implemented to mitigate the attitude vibrations are also reported.

  17. Heteropolar Magnetic Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misovec, Kathleen; Johnson, Bruce; Downer, James; Eisenhaure, David; Hockney, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Compact permanent-magnet/electromagnet actuator has six degrees of freedom. Heteropolar magnetic actuator conceived for use as actively controlled vibration-isolating suspension device. Exerts forces along, and torques about, all three principal coordinate axes to resist all three components of translational vibration and all three components of rotational vibration. Inner cylinder suspended magnetically within outer cylinder. Electro-magnet coils interact with fields of permanent magnets to provide active control of suspending force and torque.

  18. Articulated Suspension Without Springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, Donald B.

    1990-01-01

    Wheels negotiate bumps and holes with minimal tilting of vehicle body. In new suspension, wheel climbs obstacle as high as 1 1/2 times its diameter without excessive tilting of chassis. Provides highly stable ride over rough ground for such vehicles as wheelchairs, military scout cars, and police and fire robots. System of levers distributes weight to wheels. Sized to distribute equal or other desired portions of load among wheels.

  19. Genome-Wide Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Array Analysis Improves Prognostication of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunhong; Miller, Sue; Roulston, Diane; Bixby, Dale; Shao, Lina

    2016-07-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are important for the risk stratification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (ALL). However, approximately 30% of pediatric and 50% of adult patients lack abnormalities with clinical relevance by traditional cytogenetic analysis. We integrated cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism array results from 60 consecutive clinical ALL cases. By cytogenetic and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses, recurring abnormalities with clinical relevance were observed in 33 B-cell ALL (B-ALL), including t(9;22), hyperdiploidy, KMT2A translocation, ETV6-RUNX1, intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21, near haploidy or low hypodiploidy, and t(8;22). Single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis found additional aberrations with prognostic or therapeutic implication in 21 B-ALL and two T-cell ALL, including IKZF1 deletion, intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (one case with a normal karyotype), low hypodiploidy (two cases with a normal karyotype), and one case each with fusion genes ETV6-NTRK3, CRLF2-P2RY8, NUP214-ABL1, and SET-NUP214. IKZF1 deletion was noted in nine B-ALL with t(9;22), one B-ALL with t(4;11), five B-ALL with a normal karyotype, and three B-ALL with nonrecurring karyotypic abnormalities. Combining single-nucleotide polymorphism array with chromosome and fluorescence in situ hybridization assays, the detection rate for clinically significant abnormal results increased from 56% to 75%. Whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis detects cytogenetically undetectable clinically significant aberrations and should be routinely applied at diagnosis of ALL. PMID:27161658

  20. Memristor-based programmable logic array (PLA) and analysis as Memristive networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwan-Hee; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Seok-Man; Cho, Kyoungrok

    2013-05-01

    A Memristor theorized by Chua in 1971 has the potential to dramatically influence the way electronic circuits are designed. It is a two terminal device whose resistance state is based on the history of charge flow brought about as the result of the voltage being applied across its terminals and hence can be thought of as a special case of a reconfigurable resistor. Nanoscale devices using dense and regular fabrics such as Memristor cross-bar is promising new architecture for System-on-Chip (SoC) implementations in terms of not only the integration density that the technology can offer but also both improved performance and reduced power dissipation. Memristor has the capacity to switch between high and low resistance states in a cross-bar circuit configuration. The cross-bars are formed from an array of vertical conductive nano-wires cross a second array of horizontal conductive wires. Memristors are realized at the intersection of the two wires in the array through appropriate processing technology such that any particular wire in the vertical array can be connected to a wire in the horizontal array by switching the resistance of a particular intersection to a low state while other cross-points remain in a high resistance state. However the approach introduces a number of challenges. The lack of voltage gain prevents logic being cascaded and voltage level degradation affects robustness of the operation. Moreover the cross-bars introduce sneak current paths when two or more cross points are connected through the switched Memristor. In this paper, we propose Memristor-based programmable logic array (PLA) architecture and develop an analytical model to analyze the logic level on the memristive networks. The proposed PLA architecture has 12 inputs maximum and can be cascaded for more input variables with R(off)/R(on) ratio in the range from 55 to 160 of Memristors. PMID:23858841

  1. Quantitative charge state analysis of manganese biominerals in aqueous suspension using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, K.; McCubbery, D.; Kneedler, E.; Rothe, J.; Bargar, J.; Meigs, G.; Cox, L.; Nealson, K.; Tonner, B.

    2003-03-01

    We have applied Scanning Transmission Soft X-ray Microscopy (STXM) to investigate the charge state distribution of Mn in two kinds of Mn-biominerals, Mn nodules collected from Lake Michigan sediments and Mn precipitates formed by spores of a marine bacillus SG-1 under transport limited reaction conditions. A data analysis technique was developed, which allows for extraction of spatially resolved 2-d charge state maps of manganese on a submicron level. We find that the charge state of Mn dominates the spectral shape of L-edge spectra of environmentally important single oxidation state Mn minerals and that spectra of mixed oxidation state oxides can be modelled by a combination of appropriate single oxidation state reference spectra. Two-dimensional maps of charge state distributions clearly reveal domains of different oxidation states within single particles of Mn-micronodules. Spots of preferred accumulation of Mn(II) were found, which indicates biogenic precipitation of Mn(II)-species as a first step of nodule formation. The presence of Mn(III) in the studied sediment samples suggests the involvement of one-electron oxidation processes and reaction conditions which inhibit or slow down the disproportionation of Mn(III)-products. Under transport limited conditions, Mn oxidation products formed by spores of the marine bacillus SG-1 can vary from cell to cell. The presence of significant amounts of Mn(III) containing species points to the involvement of one-electron oxidation reactions as in the case of the micro-nodules. Our technique and the results obtained form a new basis for the mechanistic understanding of the formation of Mn biominerals in the environment.

  2. Optical position measurement for a Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Clemmons, James I.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an optical position measurement system which is being built as part of the NASA Langley Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS). The LGMSS is a five degree-of-freedom, large-gap magnetic suspension system which is being built for Langley Research Center as part of the Advanced Controls Test Facility (ACTF). The LGMSS consists of a planar array of electromagnets which levitate and position a cylindrically shaped model containing a permanent magnet core. The optical position measurement system provides information on the location and orientation of the model to the LGMSS control system to stabilize levitation of the model.

  3. Stress in dilute suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passman, Stephen L.

    1989-01-01

    Generally, two types of theory are used to describe the field equations for suspensions. The so-called postulated equations are based on the kinetic theory of mixtures, which logically should give reasonable equations for solutions. The basis for the use of such theory for suspensions is tenuous, though it at least gives a logical path for mathematical arguments. It has the disadvantage that it leads to a system of equations which is underdetermined, in a sense that can be made precise. On the other hand, the so-called averaging theory starts with a determined system, but the very process of averaging renders the resulting system underdetermined. A third type of theory is proposed in which the kinetic theory of gases is used to motivate continuum equations for the suspended particles. This entails an interpretation of the stress in the particles that is different from the usual one. Classical theory is used to describe the motion of the suspending medium. The result is a determined system for a dilute suspension. Extension of the theory to more concentrated systems is discussed.

  4. Analysis and performance evaluation of an all-fiber wide range interrogation system for a Bragg grating sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2009-05-01

    Analysis and performance evaluation of a macro-bend fiber based interrogation system for a Bragg grating sensor array is presented. Due to the characteristic properties of the macro-bend fiber filter such as polarization and temperature dependence and the total noise associated with the ratiometric system, a best fit ratio slope is required to interrogate multiple fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) whose peak wavelengths are spread over a wide wavelength range, rather than the optimal slope for individual FBGs. In this study, we have used an FBG array with 5 FBGs with peak reflected wavelengths lying between 1525 and 1575 nm. The analysis of the system is carried out and a fiber filter with a slope which covers a wavelength range of 1525-1575 nm is selected which ensures a resolution and accuracy for all the FBG sensors in the array as close as possible to that which would be achieved with a filter with an optimal slope for each FBG. Performance evaluation of the system is carried out and the static strain, dynamic strain, and temperature are measured with the developed interrogation system.

  5. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  6. Magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  7. Impact-activated solidification of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Shear-thickening, non-Newtonian fluids have typically been investigated under steady-state conditions. This approach has produced two pictures for suspension response to imposed forcing. In the weak shear-thickening picture, the response is typically attributed to the hydrodynamic interactions giving rise to hydroclusters, small groups of particles interacting through lubrication forces. At the other end of the spectrum, in the discontinuous shear-thickening regime, the response can be seen as a system-wide jamming that is ultimately limited in strength by the system boundaries. While these steady-state pictures have proven extremely useful, some of the most interesting phenomena associated with dense suspensions is transient and local in character. A prototypical example is the extraordinarily large impact resistance of dense suspensions such as cornstarch and water. When poked lightly these materials respond like a fluid, but when punched or kicked they seem to temporarily ``solidify'' and provide enormous resistance to the motion of the impacting object. Using an array of experimental techniques, including high-speed video, embedded force and acceleration sensing, and x-ray imaging, we are able to investigate the dynamic details this process as it unfolds. We find that an impacting object drives the rapid growth of a jammed, solid-like region directly below the impact site. Being coupled to the surrounding fluid by grain-mediated lubrication forces, this creates substantial peripheral flow and ultimately leads to the sudden extraction of the impactor's momentum. With a simple jamming picture to describe the solidification and an added mass model to explain the force on the rod, we are able to predict the forces on the impactor quantitatively. These findings highlight the importance of the non-equilibrium character of dense suspensions near jamming and might serve as a bridge between the weak and discontinuous shear-thickening pictures.

  8. A novel hemizygous SACS mutation identified by whole exome sequencing and SNP array analysis in a Chinese ARSACS patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Li, X B; Zi, X H; Shen, L; Hu, Zh M; Huang, Sh X; Yu, D L; Li, H B; Xia, K; Tang, B S; Zhang, R X

    2016-03-15

    The array of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS) has expanded worldwide after the first description in the Charlevoix-Saguenay region of Québec. Here, we report a Chinese ARSACS patient presenting progressive peripheral neuropathy (CMTNS2=15) with horizontal gaze nystagmus and mild spastic gait. Genetic studies including whole exome sequencing (WES), Sanger sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis revealed a novel hemizygous nonsense mutation (c.11803C>T, p.Gln3935X) of SACS and a 1.33Mb deletion involved in SACS on chromosome 13q12.12 in the patient. Our findings highlight the necessity of SACS mutation screening in the gene panel of inherited peripheral neuropathies, and stress the need of testing copy number variation (CNV) in SACS mutation screening. PMID:26944128

  9. Design, fabrication, and calibration of a cryogenic search-coil array for harmonic analysis of quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.I.; Barale, P.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Nelson, D.H.; O'Neill, J.W.; Schafer, R.V.; Taylor, C.E.

    1987-09-01

    A cryogenic search-coil array has been fabricated at LBL for harmonic error analysis of SSC model quadrupoles. It consists of three triplets of coils; the center-coil triplet is 10 cm long, and the end coil triplets are 70 cm long. Design objectives are a high bucking ratio for the dipole and quadrupole signals and utility at cryogenic operating currents (approx.6 kA) with sufficient sensitivity for use at room-temperature currents (approx.10 A). the design and fabrication are described. Individual coils are mechanically measured to +-5 ..mu..m, and their magnetic areas measured to 0.05%. A computer program has been developed to predict the quadrupole and dipole bucking ratios from the mechanical and magnetic measurements. The calibration procedure and accuracy of the array are specified. Results of measurements of SSC model quadrupoles are presented. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  10. Effect of osmotic pressure to bioimpedance indexes of erythrocyte suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper we studied effects of osmotic modification of red blood cells on bioimpedance parameters of erythrocyte suspension. The Cole parameters: the extracellular (Re) and intracellular (Ri) fluid resistance, the Alpha parameter, the characteristic frequency (Fchar) and the cell membranes capacitance (Cm) of concentrated erythrocyte suspensions were measured by bioimpedance analyser in the frequency range 5 - 500 kHz. Erythrocytes were incubated in hypo-, hyper- and isoosmotic solutions to achieve changes in cell volume. It was found that Re and Alpha increased in the suspensions with low osmolarity and decreased in the hypertonic suspensions. Ri, Fchar and Cm were higher in the hyperosmotic and were lower in the hypoosmotic suspensions. Correlations of all BIS parameters with MCV were obtained, but multiple regression analysis showed that only Alpha parameter was independently related to MCV (β=0.77, p=0.01). Thus Alpha parameter may be related the mean corpuscular volume of cells.

  11. Accuracy and Resolution Analysis of a Direct Resistive Sensor Array to FPGA Interface

    PubMed Central

    Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Sánchez-Durán, José A.; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Resistive sensor arrays are formed by a large number of individual sensors which are distributed in different ways. This paper proposes a direct connection between an FPGA and a resistive array distributed in M rows and N columns, without the need of analog-to-digital converters to obtain resistance values in the sensor and where the conditioning circuit is reduced to the use of a capacitor in each of the columns of the matrix. The circuit allows parallel measurements of the N resistors which form each of the rows of the array, eliminating the resistive crosstalk which is typical of these circuits. This is achieved by an addressing technique which does not require external elements to the FPGA. Although the typical resistive crosstalk between resistors which are measured simultaneously is eliminated, other elements that have an impact on the measurement of discharge times appear in the proposed architecture and, therefore, affect the uncertainty in resistance value measurements; these elements need to be studied. Finally, the performance of different calibration techniques is assessed experimentally on a discrete resistor array, obtaining for a new model of calibration, a maximum relative error of 0.066% in a range of resistor values which correspond to a tactile sensor. PMID:26840321

  12. FINAL REPORT. OPTICALLY-BASED ARRAY SENSORS FOR SELECTIVE IN SITU ANALYSIS OF TANK WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research program is to conduct the fundamental research necessary to develop an array of chemically-selective sensors, based on highly selective molecular recognition agents and highly sensitive fluorescence techniques, that can be coupled to fiber optics fo...

  13. Analysis and Uniform Design of a Single-Layer Slotted Waveguide Array Antenna with Baffles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takehito; Hirokawa, Jiro; Ando, Makoto

    This paper presents the formulation for the evaluation of external coupling in the alternating-phase feed single-layer slotted waveguide array antenna with baffles by using the Spectrum of Two-Dimensional Solutions (S2DS) method. A one-dimensional slot array is extracted from the array by assuming the periodicity in transversal direction and introducing the perfect electric conductors in the external region. The uniform excitation over the finite array is synthesized iteratively to demonstrate the fast and accurate results by S2DS. A unit design model with the baffles is introduced to determine the initial parameters of the slot pair which accelerate the iteration. Experiment at 25.3GHz demonstrates good uniformity of the aperture field distribution as well as the effects of the baffles. The directivity is 32.7dB which corresponds to the aperture efficiency 90.5% and the reflection is below -15.0dB over 1.3GHz.

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of Radiative Properties of Brass and Al Arranged in Nested Cylindrical Wire Arrays*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, M. E.; Ouart, N. D.; Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Shrestha, I.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Keim, S. F.; Stafford, A.; Coverdale, C. A.

    2010-11-01

    Experimental results of nested cylindrical wire arrays (NCWA) consisting of brass (70% Cu and 30% Zn) wires on one array and Al (5056, 5% Mg) wires on the other array performed on the UNR Zebra generator at 1.0 MA current are compared and analyzed. Specifically, radiative properties of K-shell Al and Mg ions and L-shell Cu and Zn ions are compared as functions of the placements of the brass and Al wires on the inner and outer arrays. A full diagnostic set which included more than ten different beam-lines was implemented. Identical loads were fielded to allow the timing of time-gated pinhole and x-ray spectrometers to be shifted to get a more complete understanding of the evolution of plasma parameters over the x-ray pulse. The importance of the study of NCWAs with different wire materials is discussed. *This work was supported by NNSA under DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC52-06NA27588, DE-FC52-06NA27586, and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. OPTICALLY-BASED ARRAY SENSORS FOR SELECTIVE IN SITU ANALYSIS OF TANK WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fundamental research will be directed toward developing an array of chemically selective sensors, based on highly selective molecular recognition agents and fluorescence techniques, coupled to fiber optics, for the safe and cost-effective in situ characterization of high level wa...

  16. Accuracy and Resolution Analysis of a Direct Resistive Sensor Array to FPGA Interface.

    PubMed

    Oballe-Peinado, Óscar; Vidal-Verdú, Fernando; Sánchez-Durán, José A; Castellanos-Ramos, Julián; Hidalgo-López, José A

    2016-01-01

    Resistive sensor arrays are formed by a large number of individual sensors which are distributed in different ways. This paper proposes a direct connection between an FPGA and a resistive array distributed in M rows and N columns, without the need of analog-to-digital converters to obtain resistance values in the sensor and where the conditioning circuit is reduced to the use of a capacitor in each of the columns of the matrix. The circuit allows parallel measurements of the N resistors which form each of the rows of the array, eliminating the resistive crosstalk which is typical of these circuits. This is achieved by an addressing technique which does not require external elements to the FPGA. Although the typical resistive crosstalk between resistors which are measured simultaneously is eliminated, other elements that have an impact on the measurement of discharge times appear in the proposed architecture and, therefore, affect the uncertainty in resistance value measurements; these elements need to be studied. Finally, the performance of different calibration techniques is assessed experimentally on a discrete resistor array, obtaining for a new model of calibration, a maximum relative error of 0.066% in a range of resistor values which correspond to a tactile sensor. PMID:26840321

  17. Multidimensional tensor array analysis of multiphase flow during a hydrodynamic ram event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenfelter, A.; Liu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Flow visualization is necessary to characterize the fluid flow properties during a hydrodynamic ram event. The multiphase flow during a hydrodynamic ram event can make traditional image processing techniques such as contrast feature detection and PIV difficult. By stacking the imagery to form a multidimensional tensor array, feature detection to determine flow field velocities are visualized.

  18. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Images: Data Processing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale ([greater, similar]30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the [approx]1-5 [mu]m mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low ([greater, similar]1 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3-5 [mu]m), and thus consistent with current [gamma]-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs

  19. Analysis of traveling-wave electro-osmotic pumping with double-sided electrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Chun; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Luo, Win-Jet

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a series of numerical simulations was performed to investigate the pumping performance of electro-osmotic micropumps containing electrode arrays patterned on the upper and lower sides of a microchannel. The simulations have been analyzed with a linear electro-osmotic model based upon the Debye-Hückel theory of the double layer. The potential drop across the diffuse layer is assumed to be less than 25 mV (kBT/e), and there is a linear response between the surface charge and the voltage drop across the double layer. The double layer is not resolved but is lumped into effective parameters that are imported from the Debye-Hückel and Stern layers. We examined the effects of the relative positioning of the electrodes in the opposing arrays (i.e., symmetrical or staggered), and the phase lag and the angular frequency of the alternating current (ac) signals applied to the electrodes within the two arrays. A critical height of the microchannel was observed, below which the interactions of the applied electrical potentials on the walls became significant. The optimum pumping effect was obtained when the electrode arrays were symmetrical to one another around the centerline of the channel and were activated by ac potentials with a 0° phase shift. The corresponding angular frequency of the maximum pumping velocity for different phase shifts of the applied ac signals was also determined. Overall, the simulation results presented in this paper provide a useful insight into the optimal design parameters and operating conditions for micropumps containing two arrays of microelectrodes on the microchannel walls.

  20. Intracellular delivery of molecules using microfabricated nanoneedle arrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Seonhee; Choi, Seong-O; Paik, Seung-joon; Choi, Seungkeun; Allen, Mark; Prausnitz, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Many bioactive molecules have intracellular targets, but have difficulty crossing the cell membrane to reach those targets. To address this difficulty, we fabricated arrays of nanoneedles to gently and simultaneously puncture 10(5) cells and thereby provide transient pathways for transport of molecules into the cells. The nanoneedles were microfabricated by etching silicon to create arrays of nanoneedles measuring 12 μm in height, tapering to a sharp tip less than 30 nm wide to facilitate puncture into cells and spaced 10 μm apart in order to have at least one nanoneedle puncture each cell in a confluent monolayer. These nanoneedles were used for intracellular delivery in two ways: puncture loading, in which nanoneedle arrays were pressed into cell monolayers, and centrifuge loading, in which cells in suspension were spun down onto nanoneedle arrays. The effects on intracellular uptake and cell viability were determined as a function of nanoneedle length and sharpness, puncture force and duration, and molecular weight of the molecule delivered. Under optimal conditions, intracellular uptake was seen in approximately 50 % of cells while maintaining high cell viability. Overall, this study provides a comparative analysis of intracellular delivery using nanoneedle arrays by two different loading methods over a range of operating parameters. PMID:26797026

  1. Nanoelectrode array formation by electrolytic nanoparticle impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, T. R.; Holter, J.; Young, N.; Compton, R. G.

    2016-07-01

    We report the fabrication of functional nanoelectrode arrays by the electrolysis of AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) impacting on a glassy carbon electrode from suspension in aqueous solution. The impacted NPs result in Ag NP deposits of similar size to the originating NP, with the coverage of these arrays easily controlled by the time of the deposition step. The NPs constituting the array are deposited randomly across the surface with little aggregation or agglomeration. The fabricated arrays are themselves electrochemically active, mediating the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2.

  2. Nanoelectrode array formation by electrolytic nanoparticle impacts.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, T R; Holter, J; Young, N; Compton, R G

    2016-07-21

    We report the fabrication of functional nanoelectrode arrays by the electrolysis of AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) impacting on a glassy carbon electrode from suspension in aqueous solution. The impacted NPs result in Ag NP deposits of similar size to the originating NP, with the coverage of these arrays easily controlled by the time of the deposition step. The NPs constituting the array are deposited randomly across the surface with little aggregation or agglomeration. The fabricated arrays are themselves electrochemically active, mediating the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, H2O2. PMID:26758943

  3. Distributed array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimiller, R. C.; Belyea, J. E.; Tomlinson, P. G.

    1983-11-01

    Distributed array radar (DAR) is a concept for efficiently accomplishing surveillance and tracking using coherently internetted mini-radars. They form a long baseline, very thinned array and are capable of very accurate location of targets. This paper describes the DAR concept. Factors involving two-way effective gain patterns for deterministic and random DAR arrays are analyzed and discussed. An analysis of factors affecting signal-to-noise ratio is presented and key technical and performance issues are briefly summarized.

  4. A Digital Control Algorithm for Magnetic Suspension Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Thomas C.

    1996-01-01

    An ongoing program exists to investigate and develop magnetic suspension technologies and modelling techniques at NASA Langley Research Center. Presently, there is a laboratory-scale large air-gap suspension system capable of five degree-of-freedom (DOF) control that is operational and a six DOF system that is under development. Those systems levitate a cylindrical element containing a permanent magnet core above a planar array of electromagnets, which are used for levitation and control purposes. In order to evaluate various control approaches with those systems, the Generic Real-Time State-Space Controller (GRTSSC) software package was developed. That control software package allows the user to implement multiple control methods and allows for varied input/output commands. The development of the control algorithm is presented. The desired functionality of the software is discussed, including the ability to inject noise on sensor inputs and/or actuator outputs. Various limitations, common issues, and trade-offs are discussed including data format precision; the drawbacks of using either Direct Memory Access (DMA), interrupts, or program control techniques for data acquisition; and platform dependent concerns related to the portability of the software, such as memory addressing formats. Efforts to minimize overall controller loop-rate and a comparison of achievable controller sample rates are discussed. The implementation of a modular code structure is presented. The format for the controller input data file and the noise information file is presented. Controller input vector information is available for post-processing by mathematical analysis software such as MATLAB1.

  5. Genome-wide linkage analysis of a Parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome pedigree by 500 K SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Seyedmehdi; Sina, Farzad; Banihosseini, Setareh Sadat; Kazemi, Mohammad Hossein; Kalhor, Reza; Shahidi, Gholam-Ali; Fakhrai-Rad, Hossein; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Elahi, Elahe

    2008-06-01

    Robust SNP genotyping technologies and data analysis programs have encouraged researchers in recent years to use SNPs for linkage studies. Platforms used to date have been 10 K chip arrays, but the possible value of interrogating SNPs at higher densities has been considered. Here, we present a genome-wide linkage analysis by means of a 500 K SNP platform. The analysis was done on a large pedigree affected with Parkinsonian-pyramidal syndrome (PPS), and the results showed linkage to chromosome 22. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed a disease-associated homozygous variation (R378G) in FBXO7. FBXO7 codes for a member of the F-box family of proteins, all of which may have a role in the ubiquitin-proteosome protein-degradation pathway. This pathway has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases, and identification of FBXO7 as the causative gene of PPS is expected to shed new light on its role. The performance of the array was assessed and systematic analysis of effects of SNP density reduction was performed with the real experimental data. Our results suggest that linkage in our pedigree may have been missed had we used chips containing less than 100,000 SNPs across the genome. PMID:18513678

  6. Effective Viscosity of Microswimmer Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaï, Salima; Jibuti, Levan; Peyla, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of a quantitative and macroscopic parameter to estimate the global motility of a large population of swimming biological cells is a challenge. Experiments on the rheology of active suspensions have been performed. Effective viscosity of sheared suspensions of live unicellular motile microalgae (Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii) is far greater than for suspensions containing the same volume fraction of dead cells. In addition, suspensions show shear thinning behavior. We relate these macroscopic measurements to the orientation of individual swimming cells under flow and discuss our results in the light of several existing models.

  7. Starch Suspensions with Different Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody; Melville, Audrey; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2014-03-01

    A suspension made of starch particles dispersed in water displays significant non-Newtonian behavior for high enough particulate concentration. This surprising behavior has recently inspired a series of experiments that have shed much light on the possible mechanism behind this phenomenon. In our studies we assess the role of the fluid phase in these suspensions. We find that using fluids other than water can significantly alter the behavior of starch suspensions. Through mechanical tests of various kinds, we assess the interaction between starch particles and different liquids, and how this interaction affects the non-Newtonian behavior of starch suspensions.

  8. Controls of maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. A one-dimensional vehicle with two degrees of freedom, to simulate the German Transrapid Maglev System, is used for suspension control designs. The transient and frequency responses of suspension systems and PSDs of vehicle accelerations are calculated to evaluate different control designs. The results show that active and semi-active control designs indeed improve the response of vehicle and provide an acceptable ride comfort for maglev systems.

  9. Finite Element Analysis and Failure Mode Characterization of Pyramidal Fin Arrays Produced by Masked Cold Gas Dynamic Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Yannick; Dupuis, Philippe; Jodoin, Bertrand; Ghaei, Abbas

    2015-12-01

    This work evaluates the shear strength of pyramidal fin arrays made from various feedstock materials (cylindrical aluminum, spherical nickel, and cylindrical stainless steel 304 powders) deposited on an Al6061-T6 substrate. Higher shear strength was measured for the nickel fin array followed by the stainless steel 304 and the aluminum arrays. Different failure modes were observed by inspecting the fracture surfaces under Scanning Electron Microscope. Deposition between the cold sprayed nickel and stainless fins was detected whereas dimples were noticed on the substrate between the fins when aluminum is used as the feedstock material. A numerical simulation of normal and angled impacts using the high strain rate Preston-Tonks-Wallace model was carried out in order to have a better understanding of the experimental results. The equivalent plastic strain (PEEQ) obtained from the finite element analysis at normal impact correlates with the different shear strengths measured experimentally. Furthermore, even if a higher PEEQ was observed for angled impacts compared to its normal collision counterpart, it is suggested that the particles may not bond because of the rotational restitution momentum caused by the tangential friction generated during angled impacts. This rotational restitution momentum was not detected for particle impacts normal to the substrate surface.

  10. Covariance analysis and phase ambiguity resolution for a linear interferometer antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, James Andrew

    This thesis explores the application of mathematical techniques for estimating the angle of arrival (AOA) using a receiving platform having a linear interferometer antenna array. It addresses the estimation accuracy of interferometer phase measurements of a signal with superposed Gaussian noise from multiple antenna baselines, and provides a method for resolving the modulo two-pi problem inherent to many phase measurement systems. The study extends prior theoretical work (Hanna, C., 1983) by laying a mathematical foundation to complement his geometrical approach, provides a robust method of performance prediction for such a system. Key elements include estimation accuracy of a signal parameter with additive noise; the design of the linear antenna array element spacings and the relationship to Diophantine equations; and the application of the Cramer-Rao lower bound on variance of parameter estimation. It is hoped that the work presented here will serve as a practical guide for research scientists and engineers.

  11. Application of an array processor to the analysis of magnetic data for the Doublet III tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.; Saito, M.T.

    1980-08-01

    Discussed herein is a fast computational technique employing the Floating Point Systems AP-190L array processor to analyze magnetic data for the Doublet III tokamak, a fusion research device. Interpretation of the experimental data requires the repeated solution of a free-boundary nonlinear partial differential equation, which describes the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium of the plasma. For this particular application, we have found that the array processor is only 1.4 and 3.5 times slower than the CDC-7600 and CRAY computers, respectively. The overhead on the host DEC-10 computer was kept to a minimum by chaining the complete Poisson solver and free-boundary algorithm into one single-load module using the vector function chainer (VFC). A simple time-sharing scheme for using the MHD code is also discussed.

  12. Analysis of regional left ventricular wall movement by phased array echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, D G; Brown, D J; Logan-Sinclair, R B

    1978-01-01

    Images from standard two-dimensional echocardiographs do not lend themselves to the study of regional left ventricular wall movement because of poor definition of endocardium. An alternative method, based on a wide-angle phased array sector scanner has, therefore, been devised. Once the appropriate region of the heart has been identified, the scan rate is increased, and an array of 41 M-mode scans is produced, resulting in improved frequency response and endocardial definition. Each scan is digitised separately, and since their spatial orientation is known, the left ventricular image can be reconstituted by computer, and isometric or contour displays produced. Preliminary results, based on 40 patients, are presented showing examples of left ventricular wall movement. Regional abnormalities of amplitude or timing can be displayed with results similar to those of angiography, while disturbances of septal motion or wall thickness can be observed in greater detail than with other methods. Images PMID:737090

  13. Grating lobes analysis based on blazed grating theory for liquid crystal optical-phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2013-09-01

    The grating lobes of the liquid crystal optical-phased array (LCOPA) based on blazed grating theory is studied. Using the Fraunhofer propagation principle, the analytical expressions of the far-field intensity distribution are derived. Subsequently, we can obtain both the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes. The derived analytical functions that provide an insight into single-slit diffraction and multislit interference effect on the grating lobes are discussed. Utilizing the conventional microwave-phased array technique, the intensities of the grating lobes and the main lobe are almost the same. Different from this, the derived analytical functions demonstrate that the intensities of the grating lobes are less than that of the main lobe. The computer simulations and experiments show that the proposed method can correctly estimate the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes for a LCOPA simultaneously.

  14. Scattering and radiation analysis of three-dimensional cavity arrays via a hybrid finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid numerical technique is presented for a characterization of the scattering and radiation properties of three-dimensional cavity arrays recessed in a ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods and invokes Floquet's representation to formulate a system of equations for the fields at the apertures and those inside the cavities. The system is solved via the conjugate gradient method in conjunction with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) thus achieving an O(N) storage requirement. By virtue of the finite element method, the proposed technique is applicable to periodic arrays comprised of cavities having arbitrary shape and filled with inhomogeneous dielectrics. Several numerical results are presented, along with new measured data, which demonstrate the validity, efficiency, and capability of the technique.

  15. Steady-state self-consistent analysis of diode-laser arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, T.

    1987-04-06

    A diode-laser array model, solving the two-dimensional Laplace equation in the passive layer and the carrier diffusion equation in the active layer in a self-consistent manner, is presented. The model is general and does not make use of the usual one-dimensional approximation to the current spreading problem. The beam-propagation method used in solving the wave equation eases the inclusion of any axial variations.

  16. Aberration analysis and calculation in system of Gaussian beam illuminates lenslet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhu; Hui, Mei; Zhou, Ping; Su, Tianquan; Feng, Yun; Zhao, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    Low order aberration was founded when focused Gaussian beam imaging at Kodak KAI -16000 image detector, which is integrated with lenslet array. Effect of focused Gaussian beam and numerical simulation calculation of the aberration were presented in this paper. First, we set up a model of optical imaging system based on previous experiment. Focused Gaussian beam passed through a pinhole and was received by Kodak KAI -16000 image detector whose microlenses of lenslet array were exactly focused on sensor surface. Then, we illustrated the characteristics of focused Gaussian beam and the effect of relative space position relations between waist of Gaussian beam and front spherical surface of microlenses to the aberration. Finally, we analyzed the main element of low order aberration and calculated the spherical aberration caused by lenslet array according to the results of above two steps. Our theoretical calculations shown that , the numerical simulation had a good agreement with the experimental result. Our research results proved that spherical aberration was the main element and made up about 93.44% of the 48 nm error, which was demonstrated in previous experiment. The spherical aberration is inversely proportional to the value of divergence distance between microlens and waist, and directly proportional to the value of the Gaussian beam waist radius.

  17. Nanohole Array-Directed Trapping of Mammalian Mitochondria Enabling Single Organelle Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailabh; Wolken, Gregory G; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Arriaga, Edgar A; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-15

    We present periodic nanohole arrays fabricated in free-standing metal-coated nitride films as a platform for trapping and analyzing single organelles. When a microliter-scale droplet containing mitochondria is dispensed above the nanohole array, the combination of evaporation and capillary flow directs individual mitochondria to the nanoholes. Mammalian mitochondria arrays were rapidly formed on chip using this technique without any surface modification steps, microfluidic interconnects, or external power sources. The trapped mitochondria were depolarized on chip using an ionophore with results showing that the organelle viability and behavior were preserved during the on-chip assembly process. Fluorescence signal related to mitochondrial membrane potential was obtained from single mitochondria trapped in individual nanoholes revealing statistical differences between the behavior of polarized vs depolarized mammalian mitochondria. This technique provides a fast and stable route for droplet-based directed localization of organelles-on-a-chip with minimal limitations and complexity, as well as promotes integration with other optical or electrochemical detection techniques. PMID:26593329

  18. Theoretical and experimental comparative analysis of beamforming methods for loudspeaker arrays under given performance constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivieri, Ferdinando; Fazi, Filippo Maria; Nelson, Philip A.; Shin, Mincheol; Fontana, Simone; Yue, Lang

    2016-07-01

    Methods for beamforming are available that provide the signals used to drive an array of sources for the implementation of systems for the so-called personal audio. In this work, performance of the delay-and-sum (DAS) method and of three widely used methods for optimal beamforming are compared by means of computer simulations and experiments in an anechoic environment using a linear array of sources with given constraints on quality of the reproduced field at the listener's position and limit to input energy to the array. Using the DAS method as a benchmark for performance, the frequency domain responses of the loudspeaker filters can be characterized in three regions. In the first region, at low frequencies, input signals designed with the optimal methods are identical and provide higher directivity performance than that of the DAS. In the second region, performance of the optimal methods are similar to the DAS method. The third region starts above the limit due to spatial aliasing. A method is presented to estimate the boundaries of these regions.

  19. Detecting Seismic Activity with a Covariance Matrix Analysis of Data Recorded on Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously all around the word, with very broadband and high-sensitivity sensors. The aim of our study is to apply statistical array-based approaches to processing of these records. We use the methods mainly brought from the random matrix theory in order to give a statistical description of seismic wavefields recorded at the Earth's surface. We estimate the array covariance matrix and explore the distribution of its eigenvalues that contains information about the coherency of the sources that generated the studied wavefields. With this approach, we can make distinctions between the signals generated by isolated deterministic sources and the "random" ambient noise. We design an algorithm that uses the distribution of the array covariance matrix eigenvalues to detect signals corresponding to coherent seismic events. We investigate the detection capacity of our methods at different scales and in different frequency ranges by applying it to the records of two networks: (1) the seismic monitoring network operating on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano at La Réunion island composed of 21 receivers and with an aperture of ~15 km, and (2) the transportable component of the USArray composed of ~400 receivers with ~70 km inter-station spacing.

  20. Simulation Analysis on Photoelectric Conversion Characteristics of Silicon Nanowire Array Photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Yu, Jin; Fang, Li-Guang; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hui-Qin; Yuan, Ji-Ren; Wu, Shaolong; Cheng, Guo-An

    2015-12-01

    Semiconductor nanowire photoelectrochemical cells have attracted extensive attention in the light-conversion field owing to the low-cost preparation, excellent optical absorption, and short distance of carrier collection. Although there are numbers of experimental investigations to improve the device performance, the understanding of the detailed process of photoelectric conversion needs to be further improved. In this work, a thorough optoelectronic simulation is employed to figure out how the nanowire diameter, doping concentration, and illumination wavelength affect the photoelectric conversion characteristics of the silicon nanowire array photoelectrodes. We find that two balances should be carefully weighted between optical absorption and photogenerated-carrier collection, along with between short-circuit photocurrent density and open-circuit voltage. For the small-diameter nanowire array photoelectrodes, the overall absorption is higher than that of the larger-diameter ones with the most contribution from the nanowires. However, the substrate shows increasing absorption with increasing illumination wavelength. Higher doping density leads to a larger open-circuit voltage; while lower doping density can guarantee a relatively higher short-circuit photocurrent. To obtain high-light-conversion-efficiency photoelectrodes, the doping density should be carefully chosen with considerations of illumination wavelength and surface recombination. Suppressing the surface recombination velocity can effectively enhance the short-circuit photocurrent (open-circuit voltage) for the lightly (heavily) doped nanowire array photoelectrodes. Our systematical results provide a theoretical guidance for the photoelectrochemical devices based on semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26123274