Sample records for sustainable energy system

  1. Nuclear technologies in a sustainable energy system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Bauer; A. Mc Donald

    1983-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear and thermonuclear reactors. Topics considered include energy strategies and nuclear power, self-sustaining systems of reactors, sustainable minireactors, small reactors, fast breeders and fusion-fission hybrids, the tokamak as a candidate for a D-T fusion reactor, the fusion breeder, hydrogen production through fusion, hydrogen production by means of electrolysis, the dense plasma focus, and radioactive waste

  2. A sustainable legume biomass energy farming system

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, J.; Rubel, A.; Stencel, J. [Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States); Collins, M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Before environmentally sensitive areas are converted to biomass energy production, the production, the potential for sustainability of such systems must be assessed. The focus has been on woody or grass crops because of their high potential yields; however, yield sustainability is dependent on the application of fertilizer and lining materials, which in turn contribute to large costs. Growing legumes or mixtures of legumes with grasses could lower or alleviate the need for nitrate fertilizers. The incorporation of legumes into energy cropping systems could: (1) add soil organic matter; (2) introduce biologically fixed N; (3) improve soil structure and texture; (4) reduce soil erosion; (5) reduce production costs; and (6) decrease nitrate run-off in surface waters. Through the {open_quotes}rotation effect{close_quotes}, legumes cause increases in yield of subsequent non-legume crops beyond that accounted for by biologically-fixed N alone. In this paper, we describe a biomass energy system combining legume and grass biomass energy with fertilizer production from these same materials. Preliminary agronomic and engineering assessments for this type of biomass system are presented. The technologies needed to integrate nitrate production with legume energy farming and energy production through legume energy conversion are identified.

  3. Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade 

    E-print Network

    Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

    2010-01-01

    SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY SYSTEM IN BELGRADE Biljana Vucicevic Research Assistant Marina Jovanovic Associate Researcher Valentina Turanjanin Associate Researcher Vukman Bakic Senior Research Associate Vinca...

  4. SUSTAINABILITY AND SAFETY EVALUATION OF ENERGY SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NAIM H. AFGAN; MARIA G. CARVALHO

    In the assessment of long term behavior of the complex system we have to introduce notion of sustainability as the measure for the quality of the system. It is defined as the quality which is measuring the ability of our society to secure and not compromise the ability of future generation to have quality of the life at least the

  5. Sustainable resilience of hydrogen energy system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naim Afgan; Ayfer Veziroglu

    Resilience is the capacity of complex system to be recovered after a sudden change of the indicator. Energy resilience is the ability of energy system to provide and maintain an acceptable level of service in the face of various challenges to normal operation. Loss of resilience can cause loss of valuable energy system services, and may even lead to rapid

  6. Plant Wide Energy Management and Reporting Systems Provide Sustainable Results

    E-print Network

    Robinson, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Plant Wide Energy Management and Reporting Systems Provide Sustainable Results James E. Robinson, P.E., P.Eng. CEM, CEP Principal Project Engineer DES Canada, Corporation St. Albert, Alberta Canada ABSTRACT Powerhouse operators can...

  7. Sustainable systems for the storage and conversion of energy are dependent on interconnected

    E-print Network

    Reisslein, Martin

    SEMTE abstract Sustainable systems for the storage and conversion of energy are dependent framework, the development of new sustainable energy technologies for applications including high systems, and sustainable energy portfolios has resulted in over 20 archival journal and conference

  8. Anaerobic fermentative system based scheme for green energy sustainable houses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen-Yeon Chu; Shang-Yuan Chen; Chyi-How Lay; Jou-Hsien Wu; Ming-jen Cheng; Chiu-Yue Lin

    2011-01-01

    The green energy sustainable house based on bio-hydrogen and bio-methane energy technologies proposed in this study employs dark fermentation technology to complete a scheme for green energy sustainable house that includes energy production, storage, distribution control, load applications, recycling, waste treatment, and reuse. In order to resolve the problem of wastewater discharge from hydrogen production in green energy sustainable houses,

  9. Integrative graduate program in sustainable electric energy systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Efraín O'Neill-Carrillo; Agustín A. Irizarry-Rivera; Cristina Pomales-García; Emilio Contreras

    2009-01-01

    The College of Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez (UPRM) created a novel electric energy Masters Program with APEC University (UNAPEC) in Santo Domingo structured using the sustainability philosophy. Initially a traditional graduate power systems program was proposed to fill this need. After mentoring and supervising many Dominican graduate students at UPRM, and using information obtained from meetings and

  10. The role of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in future sustainable energy systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henrik Lund; Georges Salgi

    2009-01-01

    Future sustainable energy systems call for the introduction of integrated storage technologies. One of these technologies is compressed air energy storage (CAES). In Denmark at present, wind power meets 20% and combined heat and power production (CHP) meets 50% of the electricity demand. Based on these figures, the paper assesses the value of integrating CAES into future sustainable energy systems

  11. Hydrogen futures: toward a sustainable energy system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seth Dunn

    2002-01-01

    Fueled by concerns about urban air pollution, energy security, and climate change, the notion of a “hydrogen economy” is moving beyond the realm of scientists and engineers and into the lexicon of political and business leaders. Interest in hydrogen, the simplest and most abundant element in the universe, is also rising due to technical advances in fuel cells — the

  12. SOLARCAP: Super Capacitor Buffering of Solar Energy for Self-Sustainable Field Systems

    E-print Network

    Shen, Kai

    SOLARCAP: Super Capacitor Buffering of Solar Energy for Self-Sustainable Field Systems Amal Fahad of the conventional battery-based energy storage, this paper argues that the super capacitor buffering of solar energy approach to self-sustainable field systems through the use of the super-capacitor-based solar energy

  13. Plant Wide Energy Management and Reporting Systems Provide Sustainable Results 

    E-print Network

    Robinson, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    familiar with the EMRS, they can use this tool for even greater savings by identifying and correcting operating problems for sustainable results. In this case study, the system has identified the potential for an additional $3million savings annually....

  14. A System of Systems (SoS) Approach to Sustainable Energy Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Kaveh; Hadian, Saeed

    2015-04-01

    The general policy of mandating fossil fuel replacement with "green" energies may not be as effective and environmental-friendly as perceived, due to the secondary impacts of renewable energies on different natural resources. An integrated systems analysis framework is essential to developing sustainable energy supply systems with minimal unintended impacts on valuable natural resources such as water, climate, and ecosystem. This presentation discusses how a system of systems (SoS) framework can be developed to quantitatively evaluate the desirability of different energy supply alternatives with respect to different sustainability criteria under uncertainty. Relative Aggregate Footprint (RAF) scores of a range of renewable and nonrenewable energy alternatives are determined using their performance values under four sustainability criteria, namely carbon footprint, water footprint, land footprint, and cost of energy production. Our results suggest that despite their lower emissions, some renewable energy sources are less promising than non-renewable energy sources from a SoS perspective that considers the trade-offs between carbon footprint of energies and their effects on water, ecosystem, and economic resources. A new framework based on the Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) is also proposed for analyzing the overall sustainability of different energy mixes for different risk of return levels with respect to the trade-offs involved. It is discussed how the proposed finance-based sustainability evaluation method can help policy makers maximize the energy portfolio's expected sustainability for a given amount of portfolio risk, or equivalently minimize risk for a given level of expected sustainability level, by revising the energy mix.

  15. An energy systems view of sustainability: emergy analysis of the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) is used to provide a context for understanding and interpreting sustainability. We propose that ?what is sustainable? for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system. Further...

  16. Towards sustainable and renewable systems for electrochemical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Renewable energy sources and electric automotive transportation are popular topics in our belated energy-conscious society, placing electrochemical energy management as one of the major technological developments for this new century. Besides efficiency, any new storage technologies will have to provide advantages in terms of cost and environmental footprint and thus rely on sustainable materials that can be processed at low temperature. To meet such challenges future devices will require inspiration from living organisms and rely on either bio-inspired or biomimetic approaches. PMID:18683264

  17. Innovative systems for sustainable nuclear energy generation and waste management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseaux, Jm; David, S.

    2006-05-01

    The limited amount of fossil resources, the impact of green-house gas emissions on the world climate, the rising demand of primary energy projected to 2050, lead to a potentially critical situation for the world energy supply. The need for alternative (to fossil energies) massive energy production is evaluated to 10 Gtoe. The potential of Nuclear Energy generation at the level of 5 Gtoe is examined. Such a sustainable production can only be met by a breeder reactor fleet for which a deployment scenario is described with the associated constraints. Waste management is discussed in connection with different nuclear energy development scenarios according to the point in time when breeder reactors are started. At the world level, it appears that the optimal handling of today's wastes rests on an early decision to develop tomorrow's breeder reactors.

  18. Transportation and energy: Strategies for a sustainable transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, D.; Shaheen, S.A. [eds.] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

    1995-12-31

    Widespread concern about energy efficiency, societal impacts and environmental quality has sparked a global interest in the reevaluation of their transportation systems. This book examines how transportation energy choices made by citizens, policy makers and planners will affect national goals of mobility, accessibility, environmental quality, quality of life, economic growth, and energy security. Chapters cover: mobility, growth and system change, including land use and transportation alternatives; energy and vehicle alternatives, including ``superefficient`` cars, alternative fuels and energy and emissions reduction policy; social cost analysis of alternative fuels; market-based demand management policies in Southern California; fuel and vehicle taxation as market incentives for higher fuel economy and the effect of taxation policies on vehicle characteristics in the US and other developed countries; and industry perspectives on technology, economics and government-industry cooperation. Based on presentations made by transportation system planners and policy-makers at the 1993 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy.

  19. An energy systems view of sustainability: emergy evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Daniel E; Garmestani, Ahjond S

    2012-03-01

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) provides a framework for understanding and interpreting sustainability. EST implies that "what is sustainable" for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system and within the system of concern. The pulsing paradigm explains the ubiquitous cycles of change that apparently govern ecosystems, rather than succession to a steady state that is then sustainable. Therefore, to make robust decisions among environmental policies and alternatives, decision-makers need to know where their system resides in the cycles of change that govern it. This theory was examined by performing an emergy evaluation of the sustainability of a regional system, the San Luis Basin (SLB), CO. By 1980, the SLB contained a climax stage agricultural system with well-developed crop and livestock production along with food and animal waste processing. The SLB is also a hinterland in that it exports raw materials and primary products (exploitation stage) to more developed areas. Emergy indices calculated for the SLB from 1995 to 2005 revealed changes in the relative sustainability of the system over this time. The sustainability of the region as indicated by the renewable emergy used as a percent of total use declined 4%, whereas, the renewable carrying capacity declined 6% over this time. The Emergy Sustainability Index (ESI) showed the largest decline (27%) in the sustainability of the region. The total emergy used by the SLB, a measure of system well-being, was fairly stable (CV = 0.05). In 1997, using renewable emergy alone, the SLB could support 50.7% of its population at the current standard of living, while under similar conditions the U.S. could support only 4.8% of its population. In contrast to other indices of sustainability, a new index, the Emergy Sustainable Use Index (ESUI), which considers the benefits gained by the larger system compared to the potential for local environmental damage, increased 34% over the period. PMID:22115513

  20. Smart Cities Initiative: how to foster a quick transition towards local sustainable energy systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leonardo Meeus; Erik Delarue; Isabel Azevedo; Jean-Michel Glachant; Vitor Leal; Eduardo de Oliveira Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    The European Commission has recently launched the Smart Cities Initiative to demonstrate and disseminate how to foster a quick transition towards local sustainable energy systems. Within this initiative, the three main challenges faced by pioneering cities, are to reduce or modify the demand for energy services, to improve the uptake of energy efficient technologies and to improve the uptake of

  1. Sustainable Development as a challenge for transforming the energy system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Armin Grunwald; Jürgen Kopfmüller

    Instruction to readers: this is a preliminary and incomplete paper, without having passed a language check and with only few references, more an area of construction than a well-formulated paper. Please use it only for preparing the Deutschlandsberg summer school 2007 and don't circulate it. Abstract The energy system (supply, transport and usage) is of highest importance in the context

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Energy Storage Systems for Buildings

    E-print Network

    into Sustainable Energy Storage Systems for Buildings Jiries Al-Shomali, Jake Davis, Jianxing Niu University;1 An Investigation into Sustainable Energy Storage Systems for Buildings by Jiries Al-Shomali, Jake Davis; the flywheel is both reliable and efficient; the superconducting magnetic energy system is 97% efficient

  3. Designing resilient, sustainable systems.

    PubMed

    Fiksel, Joseph

    2003-12-01

    Pursuit of sustainable development requires a systems approach to the design of industrial product and service systems. Although many business enterprises have adopted sustainability goals, the actual development of sustainable systems remains challenging because of the broad range of economic, environmental and social factors that need to be considered across the system life cycle. Traditional systems engineering practices try to anticipate and resist disruptions but may be vulnerable to unforeseen factors. An alternative is to design systems with inherent "resilience" bytaking advantage of fundamental properties such as diversity, efficiency, adaptability, and cohesion. Previous work on sustainable design has focused largely upon ecological efficiency improvements. For example, companies have found that reducing material and energy intensity and converting wastes into valuable secondary products creates value for shareholders as well as for society at large. To encourage broader systems thinking, a design protocol is presented that involves the following steps: identifying system function and boundaries, establishing requirements, selecting appropriate technologies, developing a system design, evaluating anticipated performance, and devising a practical means for system deployment. The approach encourages explicit consideration of resilience in both engineered systems and the larger systems in which they are embedded. PMID:14700317

  4. Sustainable aquaculture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.E.

    1994-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine and assess the technical feasibility of the integration of plant and/or animal aquaculture systems into a sustainable agriculture. Although most researchers tend to avoid a precise definition of sustainable aquaculture, the implication that one gets from `reading between the lines` is that a sustainable agro-ecosystem is one which recycles materials at maximum energy efficiency. The `unspoken` standard against which comparisons of sustainability are often made is that of a mature natural ecosystem at a steady state. Cost comparisons of alternative systems will be used whenever possible, however, in many cases, conventional cost/benefit analysis will be of limited value in such an analysis. For aquaculture, such an analysis can best be conducted by analyzing the possibilities of integrating nutrients, water, and energy flow from aquaculture systems both to and from, conventional agricultural systems. The various aquaculture options are then qualitatively compared as their potential, limitations, environmental soundness, productivity, socio-economic viability and the availability of supporting technology. It is important to realize that the usefulness or applicability of any sustainable or integrated aquaculture practice is highly site specific.

  5. The nuclear power satellite (NPS) - Key to a sustainable global energy economy and solar system civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, J. A., Jr.; Buden, D.

    The potential role of nuclear power satellite (NPS) in developing a sustainable global energy economy for earth and in the spread of human civilization across the solar system is discussed. The technical steps needed to develop, operate, and maintain NSP facilities are described. An initial application of NPS is examined which involves linking its energy output via energy beaming to hydrogen energy parks on earth.

  6. Underwater manipulator's kinematic analysis for sustainable and energy efficient water hydraulics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Siti Nor Habibah; Yusof, Ahmad Anas; Tuan, Tee Boon; Saadun, Mohd Noor Asril; Ibrahim, Mohd Qadafie; Nik, Wan Mohd Norsani Wan

    2015-05-01

    In promoting energy saving and sustainability, this paper presents research development of water hydraulics manipulator test rig for underwater application. Kinematic analysis of the manipulator has been studied in order to identify the workspace of the fabricated manipulator. The workspace is important as it will define the working area suitable to be developed on the test rig, in order to study the effectiveness of using water hydraulics system for underwater manipulation application. Underwater manipulator that has the ability to utilize the surrounding sea water itself as the power and energy carrier should have better advantages over sustainability and performance.

  7. Introduction to Sustainable Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of MIT's innovative OpenCourseWare Project, which provides materials from MIT classes to the public on the web, this site outlines the content of a Sustainable Energy seminar at MIT. The site provides lecture notes and assignments and solutions. The topics covered include energy transfer and conversion, sustainability issues, renewable energy, thermodynamics and more.

  8. AHP study on energy indicators system for sustainable development of Henan province

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Ran

    2011-01-01

    m Abstract -Analytic Hierarchy Process is an approach to decision making that involves structuring multiple choice criteria into a hierarchy, assessing the relative importance of these criteria, comparing alternatives for each criterion, and determining an overall ranking of the alternatives. This paper applies AHP for evaluating the energy indicators system for sustainable development. A case applied for Henan province is

  9. Renewable Energy: Energy Security and Sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Turner

    2002-01-01

    Renewable energy offers the possibility of providing a complete, sustainable energy infrastructure without anthropogenic emission of CO2. Large-scale implementation of renewable technologies would eliminate the need to develop and implement sequestration systems, by reducing the use of, and ultimately eliminating fossil based energy production. Renewable energy also offers energy security because indigenous resources are sufficient. The major renewable energy systems

  10. Travel instructions for visiting the Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems at the Australian National University in Canberra

    E-print Network

    Travel instructions for visiting the Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems at the Australian National University in Canberra The Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems is located in the east wing. From the airport, drive along Parkes Way and Constitution Avenue to the city, and then along London

  11. Measuring Energy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of measurement, energy sustainability is defined as ensuring that future generations have energy resources that enable them to achieve a level of well-being at least as good as that of the current generation. It is recognized that there are valid, more comprehensive understandings of sustainability and that energy sustainability as defined here is only meaningful when placed in a broader context. Still, measuring energy sustainability is important to society because the rates of consumption of some fossil resources are now substantial in relation to measures of ultimate resources, and because conflicts between fossil energy use and environmental sustainability are intensifying. Starting from the definition, an equation for energy sustainability is derived that reconciles renewable fl ows and nonrenewable stocks, includes the transformation of energy into energy services, incorporates technological change and, at least notionally, allows for changes in the relationship between energy services and societal well-being. Energy sustainability must be measured retrospectively as well as prospectively, and methods for doing each are discussed. Connections to the sustainability of other resources are also critical. The framework presented is merely a starting point; much remains to be done to make it operational.

  12. Energy Master Plans for Sustainable, High Performance HVAC and Associated Systems for Hot and Humid Climates 

    E-print Network

    Maisey, G. E.; Milestone, B.

    2004-01-01

    -term energy and maintenance or improve comfort and productivity. Table 1. A Typical New 100,0002ft Office Block STANDARD HVAC SYSTEM CURRENT"GREEN " HVAC SYSTEM SUSTAINABLE, HIGH PERF. HVAC SYSTEM Installation Cost $2.3M $2.3M $3.2M 50 Year Energy... Costs $13M $10M $2M 50 Year Operation and Maintenance Costs $9M $8M $3M 50 Year Installation and Modification Costs $17M $15M $8M 50 Year Total Costs $39M $33M $13M Figure 1. REDUCING THE 50 YEAR HVAC OPERATING & ENERGY COSTS BY 75%. From How...

  13. The Sustainable Energy Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2010-02-01

    The dependence on oil and fossil fuels for over 80% of our energy and the continued emission of carbon dioxide threatening stable climate are captured in a single term: sustainability. Although we generally agree that sustainability is valuable, there is less agreement on how much sustainability is necessary or desirable. In this talk, three criteria describing increasingly strict features of sustainability will be presented and applied to evaluate the alternatives to oil and carbon dioxide emission, such as tapping unused energy flows in sunlight and wind, producing electricity without carbon emissions from clean coal and high efficiency nuclear power plants, and replacing oil with biofuels or electricity. Implementing these more sustainable alternatives requires new materials of increasing complexity and functionality that control the transformation of energy between light, electrons and chemical bonds at the nanoscale. Challenges and opportunities for developing the complex materials and controlling the chemical changes that enable greater sustainability will be presented. )

  14. Sustainable Energy Management Programs

    E-print Network

    Hanner, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sustainable Energy Management Programs Steve Hanner Allen ISD/TEMA . ESL-KT-14-11-45 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Starting an Energy Management Program • Recognize need, Elicit District Commitment...

  15. Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

    2009-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

  16. Towards Design of Sustainable Energy Systems in Developing Countries: Centralized and Localized Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursun, Berrin

    Energy use in developing countries is projected to equal and exceed the demand in developed countries in the next five years. Growing concern about environmental problems, depletion and price fluctuation of fossil fuels pushes the efforts for meeting energy demand in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way. Hence, it is essential to design energy systems consisting of centralized and localized options that generate the optimum energy mix to meet this increasing energy demand in a sustainable manner. In this study, we try to answer the question, "How can the energy demand in Rampura village be met sustainably?" via two centralized clean coal (CCC) technology and three localized energy technology options analyzed. We perform the analysis of these energy technologies through joint use of donor-side analysis technique emergy analysis (EA) and user-side analysis technique life cycle assessment (LCA). Sustainability of such an energy combination depends on its reliance on renewable inputs rather than nonrenewable or purchased inputs. CCC technologies are unsustainable energy systems dependent on purchased external inputs almost 100%. However, increased efficiency and significantly lower environmental impacts of CCC technologies can lead to more environmentally benign utilization of coal as an energy source. CCC technologies supply electricity at a lower price compared to the localized energy options investigated. Localized energy options analyzed include multi-crystalline solar PV, floating drum biogas digester and downdraft biomass gasifier. Solar PV has the lowest water and land use, however, solar electricity has the highest price with a high global warming potential (GWP). Contrary to general opinion, solar electricity is highly non-renewable. Although solar energy is a 100% renewable natural resource, materials utilized in the production of solar panels are mostly non-renewable purchased inputs causing the low renewability of solar electricity. Best sustainability results are obtained for full capacity operation in anaerobic digestion and for single fuel mode (SFM) operation in biomass gasification. For both of the processes, cost of electricity reduces 2-3 times if they are operated properly. However, there is not enough ipomea to run the biomass gasifier in SFM in Rampura, hence optimum operation scheme is ideal dual fuel mode (DFM) operation for the biomass gasifier analyzed. Emergy analysis of Rampura village and its subsystems reveal that sustainability is not achieved both at the village and in the subsystems levels since they are highly dependent on non-renewable material and energy inputs. To improve the overall sustainability in Rampura, dependency on purchased inputs fodder, fertilizer and diesel, non-renewable cooking fuel wood should be reduced. In satisfying energy demand in Rampura, biogas cooking and 70% biogas cooking scenarios perform better than electricity options in all of the objectives considered. Other than minimum land and water use objectives, electricity-RM and electricity-GM scenarios overlap and do not have a significant difference in terms of performance. Based on these results, the best option to meet the energy demand in Rampura would be to meet all the cooking energy with direct use of biogas. However, 70% biogas cooking scenario may be a more practical option since it both satisfies energy demand in an environmentally benign manner and satisfies the cultural needs of Rampura people. When 30% of cooking is performed by utilizing improved biomass cook stoves in the traditional way, the biogas potential becomes enough to meet all the remaining energy demand (70% of cooking, lighting and irrigation) in Rampura, hence energy security and reliability are ensured. Furthermore, utilizing biogas for cooking enables more agricultural residues to be available as fodder and eases the pressure on environment due to excessive woody biomass harvesting. Additionally, CH4 emissions from cow dung are avoided via production of biogas while the sanitation improves in the area. The GHG emissi

  17. Sustainable Bioenergy Systems: Experiences from Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kes McCormick

    Many aspects of present energy systems and the direction towards future energy systems are incompatible with sustainable development. Sustainable bioenergy systems contribute to combating climate change and improving energy security. Expanding bioenergy decreases carbon dioxide emissions if replacing fossil fuels, establishing energy crops, or integrating with carbon capture and storage, and increases the resilience of energy systems because of the

  18. SUSTAINABLE OCEAN SYSTEMS During the twenty-first century, issues concerned with environmental and energy sustainability

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    national research initiatives in ocean observing systems and algal-based biofuels. Cornell has several research and teaching universities in the United States, Cornell has played and will continue to play and internationally. At this CCSF Topical Lunch Meeting, we will discuss new opportunities in ocean research

  19. Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate

    E-print Network

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital levels. Food & Dining By 2020, increase sustainable food purchases by campus foodservice providers

  20. Water, energy, land use, transportation and socioeconomic nexus: A blue print for more sustainable urban systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth A. Minne; John C. Crittenden; Arka Pandit; Hyunju Jeong; Jean-Ann James; Zhongming Lu; Ming Xu; Steve French; Muthukumar Subrahmanyam; Douglas Noonan; Lin-Han Chiang Hsieh; Marilyn Brown; Joy Wang; Reginald Desroches; Bert Bras; Jeff Yen; Miroslav Begovic; Insu Kim; Ke Li; Preethi Rao

    2011-01-01

    Preparation for global movement to urban regions requires a holistic study of infrastructure interactions. The impact of water and energy on one another has been studied to show how they are dependent upon one another. Other infrastructure interactions also are vital to designing more sustainable cities. The primary infrastructures are: water, energy, land use, and transportation. Creating more sustainable cities

  1. Sensitivity analysis of synergistic collaborative scenarios towards sustainable nuclear energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fesenko, G.; Kuznetsov, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria); Poplavskaya, E. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents results of the study on the role of collaboration among countries towards sustainable global nuclear energy systems. The study explores various market shares for nuclear fuel cycle services, possible scale of collaboration among countries and assesses benefits and issues relevant for collaboration between suppliers and users of nuclear fuel cycle services. The approach used in the study is based on a heterogeneous world model with grouping of the non-personified nuclear energy countries according to different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The methodology applied in the analysis allocates a fraction of future global nuclear energy generation to each of such country-groups as a function of time. The sensitivity studies performed show the impacts of the group shares on the scope of collaboration among countries and on the resulting possible reactor mix and nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure versus time. The study quantitatively demonstrates that the synergistic approach to nuclear fuel cycle has a significant potential for offering a win-win collaborative strategy to both, technology holders and technology users on their joint way to future sustainable nuclear energy systems. The study also highlights possible issues on such a collaborative way. (authors)

  2. Exploring the sustainability of industrial production and energy generation with a model system

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance and complexity of sustainability has been well recognized and a formal study of sustainability based on system theory approaches is imperative as many of the relationships between the various components of the system could be non-linear, intertwined, and non-intuit...

  3. Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-04-30

    More than a dozen energy experts convened in Houston, Texas, on February 13, 2009, for the first in a series of four regionally-based energy summits being held by the Council on Competitiveness. The Southern Energy Summit was hosted by Marathon Oil Corporation, and participants explored the public policy, business and technological challenges to increasing the diversity and sustainability of U.S. energy supplies. There was strong consensus that no single form of energy can satisfy the projected doubling, if not tripling, of demand by the year 2050 while also meeting pressing environmental challenges, including climate change. Innovative technology such as carbon capture and storage, new mitigation techniques and alternative forms of energy must all be brought to bear. However, unlike breakthroughs in information technology, advancing broad-based energy innovation requires an enormous scale that must be factored into any equation that represents an energy solution. Further, the time frame for developing alternative forms of energy is much longer than many believe and is not understood by the general public, whose support for sustainability is critical. Some panelists estimated that it will take more than 50 years to achieve the vision of an energy system that is locally tailored and has tremendous diversity in generation. A long-term commitment to energy sustainability may also require some game-changing strategies that calm volatile energy markets and avoid political cycles. Taking a page from U.S. economic history, one panelist suggested the creation of an independent Federal Energy Reserve Board not unlike the Federal Reserve. The board would be independent and influence national decisions on energy supply, technology, infrastructure and the nation's carbon footprint to better calm the volatile energy market. Public-private efforts are critical. Energy sustainability will require partnerships with the federal government, such as the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories, that can provide real-world improvements in both the short- and long-term. Indeed, the roles of government and the private sector in energy sustainability were brought into sharper focus by the pending American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, also known as the economic stimulus bill. There was cautious optimism that the bill was moving the nation in the right direction by way of focusing on greater energy efficiency, alternative forms of energy and improved infrastructure. Nevertheless, there was concern over Congress picking energy winners and losers. Instead, Congress should challenge industry to produce solutions that will create a clear path forward to energy sustainability that the American people can support.

  4. Sustainable Systems Analysis of Production and Transportation Scenarios for Conventional and Bio-based Energy Commodities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, E. M.; Golden, J. S.; Nowacek, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    International commerce places unique pressures on the sustainability of water resources and marine environments. System impacts include noise, emissions, and chemical and biological pollutants like introduction of invasive species into key ecosystems. At the same time, maritime trade also enables the sustainability ambition of intragenerational equity in the economy through the global circulation of commodities and manufactured goods, including agricultural, energy and mining resources (UN Trade and Development Board 2013). This paper presents a framework to guide the analysis of the multiple dimensions of the sustainable commerce-ocean nexus. As a demonstration case, we explore the social, economic and environmental aspects of the nexus framework using scenarios for the production and transportation of conventional and bio-based energy commodities. Using coupled LCA and GIS methodologies, we are able to orient the findings spatially for additional insight. Previous work on the sustainable use of marine resources has focused on distinct aspects of the maritime environment. The framework presented here, integrates the anthropogenic use, governance and impacts on the marine and coastal environments with the natural components of the system. A similar framework has been highly effective in progressing the study of land-change science (Turner et al 2007), however modification is required for the unique context of the marine environment. This framework will enable better research integration and planning for sustainability objectives including mitigation and adaptation to climate change, sea level rise, reduced dependence on fossil fuels, protection of critical marine habitat and species, and better management of the ocean as an emerging resource base for the production and transport of commodities and energy across the globe. The framework can also be adapted for vulnerability analysis, resilience studies and to evaluate the trends in production, consumption and commerce. To demonstrate the usefulness of the framework, we construct several scenarios as case studies to explore the emerging trends of larger ship deployment and the changing portfolio of energy resources including the increased consumption of bio-based energy. The maritime transportation industry remains heavily reliant on fossil fuels to power transport, while energy, mineral and grain remain the largest bulk commodities shipped. Emerging markets for such commodities, as well as new production methods and locations are considered. We overlay these trends and shifts with ecological areas of concern and biological migration routes. The diversity of governance regimes is also considered to produce a clearer picture of the emerging hot-spots for further study and for the synergies and tradeoffs that must be considered to achieve a sustainable ocean system. References Turner BL, Lambin EF, Reenberg A (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci, (104):20666-20671. UN Trade and Development Board (2013) Recent developments and trends in international maritime transport affecting trade of developing countries, TD/B/C.1/30.

  5. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 1.0: Networked Monitoring and Control of Small Interconnected Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janet.twomey@wichita.edu

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY This report presents accomplishments, results, and future work for one task of five in the Wichita State University Sustainable Energy Solutions Project: To develop a scale model laboratory distribution system for research into questions that arise from networked control and monitoring of low-wind energy systems connected to the AC distribution system. The lab models developed under this task are located in the Electric Power Quality Lab in the Engineering Research Building on the Wichita State University campus. The lab system consists of four parts: 1. A doubly-fed induction generator 2. A wind turbine emulator 3. A solar photovoltaic emulator, with battery energy storage 4. Distribution transformers, lines, and other components, and wireless and wired communications and control These lab elements will be interconnected and will function together to form a complete testbed for distributed resource monitoring and control strategies and smart grid applications testing. Development of the lab system will continue beyond this project.

  6. Harnessing the sun: Developing capacity to sustain local solar energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olarewaju, Olufemi

    2011-12-01

    Use of solar photovoltaic (PV) and other renewable sources to meet rising electricity demand by a growing world population has gained traction in many countries in recent years. In rural Sub-Saharan Africa, where 86 percent of the populace has no access to electricity, solar energy systems represent partial solutions to demand, especially in support of rural development initiatives to supply potable water, health care services and education. Unfortunately, development of human and organizational capacity to maintain solar technology has not kept pace with the rate of installation, causing many to fall into disrepair and disuse. This has stimulated interest in capacity development processes required to make solar systems sustainable. To cast light on the practical meanings and challenges of capacity development for solar energy, this study compares the experiences of two rural projects, one in Lagos State (Nigeria) that disregarded the importance of capacity development, and the other in Texas (United States) that, in contrast, made such development the centerpiece of its operations. Based largely on interviews with 60 key actors, findings underscore the crucial importance of sustained investment in capacity development to assurance of durable power supply from renewable sources.

  7. High fidelity nuclear energy system optimization towards an environmentally benign, sustainable, and secure energy source.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Ames, David E., II (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2010-10-01

    A new high-fidelity integrated system method and analysis approach was developed and implemented for consistent and comprehensive evaluations of advanced fuel cycles leading to minimized Transuranic (TRU) inventories. The method has been implemented in a developed code system integrating capabilities of Monte Carlo N - Particle Extended (MCNPX) for high-fidelity fuel cycle component simulations. In this report, a Nuclear Energy System (NES) configuration was developed to take advantage of used fuel recycling and transmutation capabilities in waste management scenarios leading to minimized TRU waste inventories, long-term activities, and radiotoxicities. The reactor systems and fuel cycle components that make up the NES were selected for their ability to perform in tandem to produce clean, safe, and dependable energy in an environmentally conscious manner. The diversity in performance and spectral characteristics were used to enhance TRU waste elimination while efficiently utilizing uranium resources and providing an abundant energy source. A computational modeling approach was developed for integrating the individual models of the NES. A general approach was utilized allowing for the Integrated System Model (ISM) to be modified in order to provide simulation for other systems with similar attributes. By utilizing this approach, the ISM is capable of performing system evaluations under many different design parameter options. Additionally, the predictive capabilities of the ISM and its computational time efficiency allow for system sensitivity/uncertainty analysis and the implementation of optimization techniques.

  8. Meeting of The New York State Sustainability Education Working Group Syracuse Center of Excellence In Environmental and Energy Systems

    E-print Network

    Linsley, Braddock K.

    Meeting of The New York State Sustainability Education Working Group Syracuse Center of Excellence In Environmental and Energy Systems 727 East Washington Street Syracuse, New York April 1, 2012 RECOMMENDED ACTION STEPS The Goal: Every graduate of a New York college or university will be literate about how to live

  9. Technique of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for sustainable building energy systems performance calculations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kotek Petr; Jordán Filip; Kabele Karel; JLM Hensen

    2007-01-01

    Sustainable buildings design process is typical for modeling and simulation usage. The main reason is because there is generally no experience with such buildings and there is lot of new approaches and technical solutions to be used. Computer simulation could be supporting tool in engineering design process and can bring the good way for reducing energy consumption together with optimalization

  10. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

  11. Parametric systems modeling for sustainable energy and resource flows in buildings and their urban environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philipp Geyer; Martin Buchholz

    This paper proposes Parametric Systems Modeling (PSM) as a tool for building and city planning. The method outlined is based on Systems Modeling Language (SysML). It supplements geometry-based Computer-aided Design (CAD) with a non-geometric, design-oriented modeling approach that considers multidisciplinary information and parametric interdependencies. Its application is intended for the exploration of innovative sustainable design solutions at the system level.

  12. Renewable Energy: Energy Security and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, John

    2002-03-01

    Renewable energy offers the possibility of providing a complete, sustainable energy infrastructure without anthropogenic emission of CO2. Large-scale implementation of renewable technologies would eliminate the need to develop and implement sequestration systems, by reducing the use of, and ultimately eliminating fossil based energy production. Renewable energy also offers energy security because indigenous resources are sufficient. The major renewable energy systems include phovoltaics (solar cells), solar thermal (electric and thermal), wind, biomass (plants and trees), hydroelectric, ocean, and geothermal. Given the intermittent nature of solar energy, only those energy systems that are coupled to an energy storage technology will be viable. Among the energy storage technologies are hydrogen, batteries, flywheels, superconductivity, ultracapacitors, pumped hydro, molten salts (for thermal storage), and compressed gas. One of the most versatile energy storage systems and the best energy carrier for transportation is hydrogen. This talk will review some of the basic renewable energy systems, present possible pathways for the implementation of hydrogen into the energy infrastructure and offer research areas that need to be addressed to increase the viability of these renewable energy technologies.

  13. Scientific American: Energy & Sustainability

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Energy and the broader ideas surrounding "sustainability" are hot topics today, and Scientific American has created this website to provide access to high-quality information about these subjects. The website begins with a list of "Latest Stories", and there is also a "Most Popular" listing so that users can gauge what other folks are interested in. Users shouldn't miss the "Multimedia" area, which offers up features like "How Much Is Left? The Limits of Earth's Resources", which is quite amazing. After a dramatic introduction, the piece allows visitors to watch an interactive timeline and view video clips which provide some insight into this situation. There are other features here, including "The Music of Language" and "When the Sea Saved Humanity". The site also features links to selected articles from the magazine and a listing of materials by topic.

  14. Analyses of Energy, Exergy and Sustainable Development of Vapor Compression Refrigeration System Using Hydrocarbon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. U. Ahamed; R Saidur; H. H. Masjuki; M. A. Sattar

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbons being natural fluid have drawn much attention to the scientists and researchers for the application as a sustainable material for the vapor compression refrigeration system. This paper presents a comparison of the energetic and exergetic performances of a domestic refrigerator using pure butane and iso-butane as refrigerants. The thermodynamic performances such as exergy destruction or losses, exergy efficiency, and

  15. Ph.D. Positions in "ICT for Sustainable Energy Management"

    E-print Network

    Teschner, Matthias

    informatics, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, or related fields Interest in energy management Ph.D. Positions in "ICT for Sustainable Energy Management" Key words: distributed information systems, smart grids, renewable energy, energy efficiency, energy storage, power systems, green computing

  16. Energy access and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Alstone, Peter; Gershenson, Dimitry

    2015-03-01

    With 1.4 billion people lacking electricity to light their homes and provide other basic services, or to conduct business, and all of humanity (and particularly the poor) are in need of a decarbonized energy system can close the energy access gap and protect the global climate system. With particular focus on addressing the energy needs of the underserved, we present an analytical framework informed by historical trends and contemporary technological, social, and institutional conditions that clarifies the heterogeneous continuum of centralized on-grid electricity, autonomous mini- or community grids, and distributed, individual energy services. We find that the current day is a unique moment of innovation in decentralized energy networks based on super-efficient end-use technology and low-cost photovoltaics, supported by rapidly spreading information technology, particularly mobile phones. Collectively these disruptive technology systems could rapidly increase energy access, contributing to meeting the Millennium Development Goals for quality of life, while simultaneously driving action towards low-carbon, Earth-sustaining, energy systems.

  17. Energy Conversion Chain Analysis of Sustainable Energy Systems: A Transportation Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert L. Evans

    2008-01-01

    In general terms there are only three primary energy sources: fossil fuels, renewable energy, and nuclear fission. For fueling road transportation, there has been much speculation about the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, which would usher in the “hydrogen economy.” A parallel situation would use a simple battery to store electricity directly in order to power vehicles. The

  18. Two Sustainable Energy System Analysis Models. A comparison of methodologies and results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henrik Lund; Maria da Graça Carvalho

    This paper presents a comparative study of two energy system analysis models both designed with the purpose of analysing electricity systems with a substantial share of fluctuating renewable energy. The one model (EnergyPLAN) has been designed for national and regional analyses. It has been used in the design of strategies for integration of wind power and other fluctuating renewable energy

  19. MultiComponent Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System for sustainable growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaki Saito

    2002-01-01

    Environmental harmonization of nuclear energy technology is considered as an absolutely necessary condition in its future successful development for peaceful use. Establishment of Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System, that simultaneously meets four requirements — energy production, fuel production, burning of radionuclides and safety, strongly relies on the neutron excess generation. Implementation of external non-fission based neutron sources into fission energy system

  20. Three-level Active Neutral-Point-Clamped Zero-Current-Transition Converter for Sustainable Energy Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Li; Jinjun Liu; Dushan Boroyevich; Paolo Mattavelli; Yaosuo Xue

    2011-01-01

    The widespread use of renewable energy resources brings forth a requirement for high-power, high-efficiency, high-control-bandwidth grid-tied converters. This paper proposes a three-level active neutral-point-clamped zero-current-transition (3L-ANPC ZCT) converter for the sustainable energy power conversion systems. The proposed multilevel soft-switching topology can effectively increase efficiency and switching frequency of the systems by almost eliminating turn-OFF losses and greatly reducing turn-ON losses

  1. Sustainable agriculture, renewable energy and rural development: An analysis of bio-energy systems used by small farms in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aiming Zhou

    2006-01-01

    Renewable energy needs to be incorporated into the larger picture of sustainable agriculture and rural development if it is to serve the needs of the 3.25 billion human beings whose livelihoods and based on rural economies and ecologies. For rural communities, increasing agriculture production is key to raising income generation and improving social well-being, but this linkage depends also upon

  2. High-Fidelity Nuclear Energy System Optimization towards an Environmentally Benign, Sustainable, and Secure Energy Source 

    E-print Network

    Ames, David E.

    2011-10-21

    TRU (neutron consumption/fission) for VHTR and HEST Concept I?... 117 58 Neutron Flux Spectrum in the Fuel Particle for HEST Concept I and II?.. 119 59 DeqTRU (neutron consumption/fission) for HEST Concept II?????? 120 60 VHTR EOC Mass as a Function... CPU Central Processing Unit D Deuterium DOE U.S. Department of Energy DU Depleted Uranium EFPD Effective Full Power Days ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data Files ? Basic EOC End of Cycle FP Fission Products GCC Gulf Cooperation Council GDP...

  3. Optimizing root system architecture in biofuel crops for sustainable energy production and soil carbon sequestration

    PubMed Central

    To, Jennifer PC; Zhu, Jinming; Benfey, Philip N

    2010-01-01

    Root system architecture (RSA) describes the dynamic spatial configuration of different types and ages of roots in a plant, which allows adaptation to different environments. Modifications in RSA enhance agronomic traits in crops and have been implicated in soil organic carbon content. Together, these fundamental properties of RSA contribute to the net carbon balance and overall sustainability of biofuels. In this article, we will review recent data supporting carbon sequestration by biofuel crops, highlight current progress in studying RSA, and discuss future opportunities for optimizing RSA for biofuel production and soil carbon sequestration. PMID:21173868

  4. A version of this paper will be presented at the Fifth Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems in Dubrovnik, Croatia, September

    E-print Network

    Hughes, Larry

    to address energy security and greenhouse gas emissions Larry Hughes Abstract Energy securityA version of this paper will be presented at the Fifth Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems in Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 2009. ERG/200905 Energy

  5. Smart Shelter: A Sustainable Power System Design Using Micro-Energy Harvesting Techniques 

    E-print Network

    Hilton, Benjamin D

    2013-09-25

    forth. For macro power generation purposes, large solar panels have made photovoltaic harvesting a well characterized technology. Approximately 1 mW of average power can be harvested from a 100-mm of photovoltaic cell [13]. Typical efficiency... or panel (consists of an array of solar cells), energy storage and the load system. The solar energy from the environment is collected by the solar collector, converted to electrical energy and is then made available to the load. The energy bank which...

  6. A Systems Approach to Corporate Sustainability in Energy Management of Industrial Units

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodora C. Kouloura; P. D. Panagiotakopoulos; A. S. Safigianni

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a ldquoproof of conceptrdquo system methodology for the energy management of industrial units examining them as socio-technical systems. The cybernetic viable system model (VSM) of Beer is used to consider an industrial unit as a viable organization and through this consideration to diagnose the technical and managerial gaps identifying the Best Interventions Plan according to principles of

  7. Nordic network for Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    ; Hanne K. Petersen · REEEP South East & Asia Pacific Secretariat; Amy Kean · The Natural Edge Project · Project's main objectives ­ To improve the capability of energy using communities in isolated areas sustainable energy projects happening' in isolated areas of the Nordic region. #12;Partners, organisation (1

  8. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    ScienceCinema

    Francesco Danuso

    2010-01-08

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jørgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  9. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Danuso

    2008-06-18

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jørgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  10. Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine) [University of Udine

    2008-06-18

    A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

  11. Development and Analysis of New Integrated Energy Systems for Sustainable Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Farrukh

    Excessive consumption of fossil fuels in the residential sector and their associated negative environmental impacts bring a significant challenge to engineers within research and industrial communities throughout the world to develop more environmentally benign methods of meeting energy needs of residential sector in particular. This thesis addresses potential solutions for the issue of fossils fuel consumption in residential buildings. Three novel renewable energy based multigeneration systems are proposed for different types of residential buildings, and a comprehensive assessment of energetic and exergetic performances is given on the basis of total occupancy, energy load, and climate conditions. System 1 is a multigeneration system based on two renewable energy sources. It uses biomass and solar resources. The outputs of System 1 are electricity, space heating, cooling, and hot water. The energy and exergy efficiencies of System 1 are 91.0% and 34.9%, respectively. The results of the optimisation analysis show that the net present cost of System 1 is 2,700,496 and that the levelised cost of electricity is 0.117/kWh. System 2 is a multigeneration system, integrating three renewable energy based subsystems; wind turbine, concentrated solar collector, and Organic Rankine Cycle supplied by a ground source heat exchanger. The outputs of the System 2 are electricity, hot water, heating and cooling. The optimisation analysis shows that net present cost is 35,502 and levelised cost of electricity is 0.186/kWh. The energy and exergy efficiencies of System 2 are found to be 34.6% and 16.2%, respectively. System 3 is a multigeneration system, comprising two renewable energy subsystems-- geothermal and solar to supply power, cooling, heating, and hot water. The optimisation analysis shows that the net present cost of System 3 is 598,474, and levelised cost of electricity of 0.111/kWh. The energy and exergy efficiencies of System 3 are 20.2% and 19.2%, respectively, with outputs of electricity, hot water, cooling and space heating. A performance assessment for identical conditions indicates that System 3 offers the best performance, with the minimum net present cost of 26,001 and levelised cost of electricity of 0.136/kWh.

  12. EUE (energy use efficiency) of cropping systems for a sustainable agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Alluvione; Barbara Moretti; Dario Sacco; Carlo Grignani

    2011-01-01

    Energy efficiency of agriculture needs improvement to reduce the dependency on non-renewable energy sources. We estimated the energy flows of a wheat–maize–soybean–maize rotation of three different cropping systems: (i) low-input integrated farming (LI), (ii) integrated farming following European Regulations (IFS), and (iii) conventional farming (CONV). Balancing N fertilization with actual crop requirements and adopting minimum tillage proved the most efficient

  13. PETER GLASER LECTURE: SPACE AND A SUSTAINABLE 21 ST CENTURY ENERGY SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Ongaro; Leopold Summerer

    Independent of the current high oil and gas prices, that might eventually fall again, with world population increasing toward 9 billion, and living standards of large parts of the world increasing accordingly energy demand will increase rapidly, straining the entire supply chain from exploration to refining. In addition, environmental problems associated with our current fossil fuel based energy system gain

  14. Flywheel energy storage—An upswing technology for energy sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haichang Liu; Jihai Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage (FES) can have energy fed in the rotational mass of a flywheel, store it as kinetic energy, and release out upon demand. It is a significant and attractive manner for energy futures ‘sustainable’. The key factors of FES technology, such as flywheel material, geometry, length and its support system were described, which directly influence the amount of

  15. STRATEGIC FOCUS: Sustainable Systems

    E-print Network

    presented their design of a sustainable playground and playground equipment for Thailand at an Earth Day. The house, located in Buffalo, N.Y., was featured in an article in the Journal of Architecture Education. I

  16. Center for Sustainability Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems (HyRES) Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Lee, Dongwon

    in Pennsylvania. This station is operated through Penn State's Hybrid and Hydrogen Vehicle Research Laboratory is used to balance energy use, and surplus power used to make hydrogen for a fuel cell vehicle. Power System Features In case of multiple system failure - 25kW fuel cell (vehicle) - External hydrogen fuel

  17. Sustainable futures using nuclear energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Romney B. Duffey

    2005-01-01

    We present the role of nuclear energy in a sustainable future. This addresses the social, economic and environmental concerns of us all. Nuclear energy today avoids the emission of nearly two billion tonnes of greenhouse gases (GHGs) each year, thanks to over 400 reactors operating worldwide.Nevertheless, there is no real recognition of real incentives for large-scale non-emitters like nuclear energy

  18. Sustained high-frequency energy harvesting through a strongly nonlinear electromechanical system under single and repeated impulsive excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, Kevin; Joo, Han Kyul; McFarland, D. Michael; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.; Bergman, Lawrence; Quinn, D. Dane; Vakakis, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    This work investigates a vibration-based energy harvesting system composed of two oscillators coupled with essential (nonlinearizable) stiffness nonlinearity and subject to impulsive loading of the mechanical component. The oscillators in the system consist of one grounded, weakly damped linear oscillator mass (primary system), which is coupled to a second light-weight, weakly damped oscillating mass attachment (the harvesting element) through a piezoelastic cable. Due to geometric/kinematic mechanical effects the piezoelastic cable generates a nonlinearizable cubic stiffness nonlinearity, whereas electromechanical coupling simply sees a resistive load. Under single and repeated impulsive inputs the transient damped dynamics of this system exhibit transient resonance captures (TRCs) causing high-frequency 'bursts' or instabilities in the response of the harvesting element. In turn, these high-frequency dynamic instabilities result in strong and sustained energy transfers from the directly excited primary system to the lightweight harvester, which, through the piezoelastic element, are harvested by the electrical component of the system or, in the present case, dissipated across a resistive element in the circuit. The primary goal of this work is to demonstrate the efficacy of employing this type of high-frequency dynamic instability to achieve enhanced nonlinear vibration energy harvesting under impulsive excitations.

  19. Solving the Meteorological Challenges of Creating a Sustainable Energy System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, M.

    2010-12-01

    Global energy demand is projected to double from 13 TW at the start of this century to 28 TW by the middle of the century. This translates into obtaining 1000 MW (1 GW, the amount produced by an average nuclear or coal power plant) of new energy every single day for the next 40 years. The U.S. Department of Energy has conducted three feasibility studies in the last two years identifying the costs, challenges, impacts, and benefits of generating large portions of the nation’s electricity from wind and solar energy, in the new two decades. The 20% Wind by 2030 report found that the nation could meet one-fifth of its electricity demand from wind energy by 2030. The second report, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, considered similar costs, challenges, and benefits, but considered 20% wind energy in the Eastern Interconnect only, with a target date of 2024. The third report, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, considered the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PVs) and, concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group, with a target date of 2017. All three studies concluded that it is technically feasible to obtain these high penetration levels of renewable energy, but that increases in the balancing area cooperation or coordination, increased utilization of transmission and building of transmission in some cases, and improved weather forecasts are needed. Current energy systems were designed for dispatchable fuels, such as coal, natural gas and nuclear energy. Fitting weather-driven renewable energy into today's energy system is like fitting a square peg into a round hole. If society chooses to meet a significant portion of new energy demand from weather-driven renewable energy, such as wind and solar energy, a number of obstacles must be overcome. Some of these obstacles are meteorological and climatological issues that are amenable to scientific research. For variable renewable energy sources to reach high penetration levels, electric system operators and utilities need better atmo¬spheric observations, models, and forecasts. Current numerical weather prediction models have not been optimized to help the nation use renewable energy. Improved meteorological observations (e.g., wind turbine hub-height wind speeds, surface direct and diffuse solar radiation), as well as observations through a deeper layer of the atmosphere for assimilation into NWP models, are needed. Particularly urgent is the need for improved forecasts of ramp events. Longer-term predictions of renewable resources, on the seasonal to decadal scale, are also needed. Improved understanding of the variability and co-variability of wind and solar energy, as well as their correlations with large-scale climate drivers, would assist decision-makers in long-term planning. This talk with discuss the feasibility and benefits of developing enhanced weather forecasts and climate information specific to the needs of a growing renewable energy infrastructure.

  20. Measure it, See it, Manage it: Using Real Time Data to Benchmark,Optimize, and Sustain System Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Taranto, Thomas; McKane, Aimee; Amon, Ricardo; Maulhardt, Michael

    2007-07-02

    Even after years of training and awareness building at thestate and national level, industrial cross-cutting systems (motor-driven,steam, process heating) continue to offer significant opportunities forenergy savings. The US Department of Energy estimates these remainingsavings at more than 7 percent of all industrial energy use. This paperpresents a different approach to promoting industrial system energyefficiency -- providing plant personnel with ready access to data uponwhich to base energy management decisions.In 2005, a Del Monte Foodsfruit processing plant in Modesto, California worked with LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)to specify and purchase permanentinstrumentation for monitoring their compressed air system. This work,completed as part of a demonstration project under a State TechnologiesAdvancement Collaborative (STAC) grant, was designed to demonstrate theeffectiveness of enterprise energy management (EEM), which is predicatedon the assumption that the energy efficiency of existing, cross-cuttingindustrial systems (motor-driven, steam) can be improved by providingmanagement and operating personnel with real-time data on energy use. Theinitial STAC grant provided for the installation and some initialanalyses, but did not address the larger issue of integrating these newdata into an ongoing energy management program for the compressed airsystem.The California Energy Commission (CEC) decided to support furtheranalysis to identify potential for air system optimization. Through theCEC's Energy in Agriculture Program, a compressed air system audit wasperformed by Tom Taranto to: Measure and document the system's baselineand CASE Index of present operation; Establish methods to sustain anongoing CASE Index measure of performance; Use AIRMaster+ to analyzesupply side performance as compared to the CASE Index; Identify demandside opportunities for efficiency and performance improvement; Assesssupply / demand balance and energy reduction opportunities; Evaluate thepresent air compressor control strategy and potential improvement, andCollect data to benchmark parameters for compressed air systems atsimilar facilities.This paper addresses the benefits and limitations ofboth continuous and targeted measurement in benchmarking, optimizing, andsustaining an efficient compressed air system. Included are methods usedin applying both of these measurements to a complex industrial system.Further, this paper will describe the results of these additionalanalyses and the plant response to them.

  1. Ecological and genetic systems underlying sustainable horticulture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in the 21st century will face unprecedented challenges due to rising energy costs, global climate change, and increasingly scarce production resources. It will become imperative for producers to adopt sustainable systems that rely on natural system processes and use inputs as efficientl...

  2. Sustainable Energy Crop Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofuels currently supply a small portion of the world’s energy needs but this is increasing due to mandates intended to reduce use of fossil fuels and the associated environmental impacts. However, the potentials of plant based feedstocks to substitute for fossil fuels and mitigate environmental im...

  3. A version of this paper will be presented at the Fifth Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems in Dubrovnik, Croatia, September

    E-print Network

    Hughes, Larry

    approach Niki Sheth and Larry Hughes Abstract Energy security, unlike climate change, the other majorA version of this paper will be presented at the Fifth Dubrovnik Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water, and Environment Systems in Dubrovnik, Croatia, September 2009. ERG/200906

  4. National resource accounting for a sustainable energy system in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, J.W. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The conflict resulting in Operation Desert Storm re-enforces the fact that nations of the Persian Gulf are in no position to provide a steady, long-term supply of oil. It is imperative that the US take account of itself and seek ways and means to lessen its dependence on oil and other non-renewable sources of energy, whether foreign or domestic. A national energy policy that focuses on energy efficiency through taxes, conservation, investment in new technologies and alternate fuels can provide a broad base to established an autonomous and sustainableenergyy system, freer of outside influence. This paper contains the following major sections in discussing the topic: History; Present Situation; Probable Solutions; Projections for the Future; Conclusions.

  5. Report of the Alternative Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    Maoz, Shahar

    Report of the Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative 2009 Prof. David Cahen Scientific Director #12;Alternative and Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI) Weizmann Institute of Science 1 thousands of strains of algae, analyzing their Alternative and Sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI

  6. Report of the Alternative Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    Maoz, Shahar

    Report of the Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative 2010 Prof. David Cahen Scientific Director #12;Alternative and sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI) Weizmann Institute of Science Designer Cellulosomes 28 SSC2010: Solar Student Conference 2010 30 #12;Alternative and sustainable Energy

  7. Use of Biomass as a Transitional Strategy to a Sustainable and Clean Energy System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kaygusuz; S. Kele?

    2008-01-01

    Attempts to establish regenerative energy sources are still being rejected. Only since the oil crises, have regenerative energy sources been included in energy policy discussions. Compared with conventional sources of energy, used a much longer period of time, there appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge on regenerative sources of energy. It is another aspect that present-day supply of

  8. Sustainable roofs with real energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper addresses the general concept of sustainability and relates it to the building owner`s selection of a low-slope roof. It offers a list of performance features of sustainable roofs. Experiences and data relevant to these features for four unique roofs are then presented which include: self-drying systems, low total equivalent warming foam insulation, roof coatings and green roofs. The paper concludes with a list of sustainable roofing features worth considering for a low-slope roof investment. Building owners and community developers are showing more interest in investing in sustainability. The potential exists to design, construct, and maintain roofs that last twice as long and reduce the building space heating and cooling energy loads resulting from the roof by 50% (based on the current predominant design of a 10-year life and a single layer of 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of insulation). The opportunity to provide better low-slope roofs and sell more roof maintenance service is escalating. The general trend of outsourcing services could lead to roofing companies` owning the roofs they install while the traditional building owner owns the rest of the building. Such a situation would have a very desirable potential to internalize the costs of poor roof maintenance practices and high roof waste disposal costs, and to offer a profit for installing roofs that are more sustainable. 14 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability

    E-print Network

    Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability L. H. Tsoukalas Purdue University Nuclear;National Research Council of Greece, May 8, 2008 Outline · The Problem · Nuclear Energy Trends · Energy Economics · Life Cycle Analysis · Nuclear Sustainability · Nuclear Energy in Greece? #12;National Research

  10. Global drivers, sustainable manufacturing and systems ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Siemieniuch, C E; Sinclair, M A; Henshaw, M J deC

    2015-11-01

    This paper briefly explores the expected impact of the 'Global Drivers' (such as population demographics, food security; energy security; community security and safety), and the role of sustainability engineering in mitigating the potential effects of these Global Drivers. The message of the paper is that sustainability requires a significant input from Ergonomics/Human Factors, but the profession needs some expansion in its thinking in order to make this contribution. Creating a future sustainable world in which people experience an acceptable way of life will not happen without a large input from manufacturing industry into all the Global Drivers, both in delivering products that meet sustainability criteria (such as durability, reliability, minimised material requirement and low energy consumption), and in developing sustainable processes to deliver products for sustainability (such as minimum waste, minimum emissions and low energy consumption). Appropriate changes are already being implemented in manufacturing industry, including new business models, new jobs and new skills. Considerable high-level planning around the world is in progress and is bringing about these changes; for example, there is the US 'Advanced Manufacturing National Program' (AMNP)', the German 'Industrie 4.0' plan, the French plan 'la nouvelle France industrielle' and the UK Foresight publications on the 'Future of Manufacturing'. All of these activities recognise the central part that humans will continue to play in the new manufacturing paradigms; however, they do not discuss many of the issues that systems ergonomics professionals acknowledge. This paper discusses a number of these issues, highlighting the need for some new thinking and knowledge capture by systems ergonomics professionals. Among these are ethical issues, job content and skills issues. Towards the end, there is a summary of knowledge extensions considered necessary in order that systems ergonomists can be fully effective in this new environment, together with suggestions for the means to acquire and disseminate the knowledge extensions. PMID:26154210

  11. Solving the Meteorological Challenges of Creating a Sustainable Energy System (Invited)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Marquis

    2010-01-01

    Global energy demand is projected to double from 13 TW at the start of this century to 28 TW by the middle of the century. This translates into obtaining 1000 MW (1 GW, the amount produced by an average nuclear or coal power plant) of new energy every single day for the next 40 years. The U.S. Department of Energy

  12. Wind\\/hydrogen hybrid systems: Opportunity for Ireland’s wind resource to provide consistent sustainable energy supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Carton; A. G. Olabi

    2010-01-01

    Ireland with its resource of wind has the potential to use this natural resource and sustain the country’s power needs for the future. However, one of the biggest drawbacks to renewable energy generation, particularly wind-generated electricity is that it is an intermittent and a variable source of power. Even at the “best” sites wind varies dramatically from hour to hour

  13. Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Uthoff, Jay; Jensen, Jon; Bailey, Andrew

    2013-09-25

    Renewable energy, energy conservation, and other sustainability initiatives have long been a central focus of Luther College. The DOE funded Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative project has helped accelerate the College’s progress toward carbon neutrality. DOE funds, in conjunction with institutional matching funds, were used to fund energy conservation projects, a renewable energy project, and an energy and waste education program aimed at all campus constituents. The energy and waste education program provides Luther students with ideas about sustainability and conservation guidelines that they carry with them into their future communities.

  14. Understanding the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition

    PubMed Central

    Steg, Linda; Perlaviciute, Goda; van der Werff, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change threatens the health, economic prospects, and basic food and water sources of people. A wide range of changes in household energy behavior is needed to realize a sustainable energy transition. We propose a general framework to understand and encourage sustainable energy behaviors, comprising four key issues. First, we need to identify which behaviors need to be changed. A sustainable energy transition involves changes in a wide range of energy behaviors, including the adoption of sustainable energy sources and energy-efficient technology, investments in energy efficiency measures in buildings, and changes in direct and indirect energy use behavior. Second, we need to understand which factors underlie these different types of sustainable energy behaviors. We discuss three main factors that influence sustainable energy behaviors: knowledge, motivations, and contextual factors. Third, we need to test the effects of interventions aimed to promote sustainable energy behaviors. Interventions can be aimed at changing the actual costs and benefits of behavior, or at changing people’s perceptions and evaluations of different costs and benefits of behavioral options. Fourth, it is important to understand which factors affect the acceptability of energy policies and energy systems changes. We discuss important findings from psychological studies on these four topics, and propose a research agenda to further explore these topics. We emphasize the need of an integrated approach in studying the human dimensions of a sustainable energy transition that increases our understanding of which general factors affect a wide range of energy behaviors as well as the acceptability of different energy policies and energy system changes. PMID:26136705

  15. Energy foundations for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Sather, N.F.

    1992-01-01

    Worldwide, more than three-quarters of our energy needs are obtained from nonrenewable reserves of coal, oil, gas, and uranium. The unavoidable outcome of our present path is the depletion of all non-renewable energy resources. Further exacerbating the energy picture is the mounting cost of mitigating the adverse environmental and health impacts of energy use. Problems ranging from acid rain and radioactive waste storage to the potential for widespread environmental disaster that could result from the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have made it that the earth's capacity to absorb the waste products of energy use without serious consequences is being severely strained. Potential supply shortages and mounting costs for the energy component of our industrial enterprise will increasingly undermine our ability to sustain global economic development. Strong positive actions that shore up the energy foundations of our economy arc called for. The purpose of this presentation is to focus attention on two such proactive steps which, though insufficient to the task by themselves, are nevertheless crucial to any effective plan for heading off the recessionary tendencies of our growing energy supply and cost dilemma. The first of these essential steps is to develop a much better arrangement than we currently have for including all costs for the adverse health and environmental impacts of industrial production in the price paid by consumers for fuels, electricity, and manufactured goods. The second essential action is to expand our R D effort to develop new manufacturing processes and new materials and products that meet our needs for power, fuels and consumer goods at lower cost, greater efficiency, and with reduced environmental cost.

  16. Energy foundations for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Sather, N.F.

    1992-09-01

    Worldwide, more than three-quarters of our energy needs are obtained from nonrenewable reserves of coal, oil, gas, and uranium. The unavoidable outcome of our present path is the depletion of all non-renewable energy resources. Further exacerbating the energy picture is the mounting cost of mitigating the adverse environmental and health impacts of energy use. Problems ranging from acid rain and radioactive waste storage to the potential for widespread environmental disaster that could result from the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have made it that the earth`s capacity to absorb the waste products of energy use without serious consequences is being severely strained. Potential supply shortages and mounting costs for the energy component of our industrial enterprise will increasingly undermine our ability to sustain global economic development. Strong positive actions that shore up the energy foundations of our economy arc called for. The purpose of this presentation is to focus attention on two such proactive steps which, though insufficient to the task by themselves, are nevertheless crucial to any effective plan for heading off the recessionary tendencies of our growing energy supply and cost dilemma. The first of these essential steps is to develop a much better arrangement than we currently have for including all costs for the adverse health and environmental impacts of industrial production in the price paid by consumers for fuels, electricity, and manufactured goods. The second essential action is to expand our R&D effort to develop new manufacturing processes and new materials and products that meet our needs for power, fuels and consumer goods at lower cost, greater efficiency, and with reduced environmental cost.

  17. Steps towards the development of a certification system for sustainable bio-energy trade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Lewandowski

    2006-01-01

    It is expected that international biomass trade will significantly increase in the coming years because of the possibly lower costs of imported biomass, the better supply security through diversification and the support by energy and climate policies of various countries. Concerns about potential negative effects of large-scale biomass production and export, like deforestation or the competition between food and biomass

  18. Sustainability of Biomass Energy Sources - Measurement and Regional Comparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEFAN KOENIG; JUERGEN SACHAU

    2008-01-01

    Within this paper the authors are aiming to provide planning authorities, investment groups as well as policy authorities with a new method for geographical planning of renewable biomass energy systems. The key element of this work is based on the differentiation of biomass resources in consideration of their sustainability. Due to measure this sustainable character, different indicators have to be

  19. A sustained-arc ignition system for internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1977-01-01

    A sustained-arc ignition system was developed for internal combustion engines. It produces a very-long-duration ignition pulse with an energy in the order of 100 millijoules. The ignition pulse waveform can be controlled to predetermined actual ignition requirements. The design of the sustained-arc ignition system is presented in the report.

  20. Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity

    E-print Network

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 on Energy & Water Sustainability in 2007 successfully brought together policy-makers, researchers, energy of energy and water sustainability, considering the important linkages between these two resources

  1. structure. Integrating sustainable energy sys-tems into the infrastructure would allow rapid

    E-print Network

    Deutch, John

    needed for hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles, we will assume a vehicle fuel economy of 60 miles per kg adoption of electrolysis-based hydrogen pro- duction, whenever these future transportation systems become viable. Since the 1930s, the recognized vision of the hydrogen economy has been to allow the storage

  2. Energy for Me: Sustaining My Community with Renewable Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this problem-based learning unit, learners explore the possibilities of sustainable energy, and engage in a project to provide electricity for their city using alternative energy sources. Instructions to access NASA data are provided along with additional resources and activities. This module was developed to be used in the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) courses for middle and high school teachers and is also available to teachers to adapt for general classroom use.

  3. Sustainable energy development: Energy policy guidelines for developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Ghamarian, A.; Ebbin, S. (Inst. of International Education, Washington, DC (United States). Energy Training Program)

    1992-01-01

    In their push for economic development, developing countries will confront escalating demands for energy, the depletion of natural resources and the degradation of the environment. How does a nation meet its growing needs for energy without damaging or destroying the environmental support system This paper examines four factors that are essential for sustainable energy development: encouraging private investment, promoting energy conservation, mitigating the adverse environmental impacts of energy use, and instituting systematic programs of human resource management (HRM) as the linchpin of all these factors.

  4. Fuel cycle strategies for the sustainable development of nuclear energy: The role of accelerator driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatores, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    The paper summarizes fuel cycle strategies which can call for the development of accelerator driven systems (ADS) and shows how an ADS-based transmutation strategy can be envisaged in a regional context. Finally, a path towards the demonstration of the ADS concept will be proposed, which accounts for the need of developing a consistent strategy of dedicated fuel development and validation with long-term irradiation programs.

  5. Economics, ecology, sustainable agricultural systems and development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clem Tisdell

    1985-01-01

    The importance of ecologically sustainable economic systems and sustainable development, including sustainable agricultural development, has been recognised internationally in the last two decades and is reflected in policy initiatives in South Africa and elsewhere. However, complex issues and tradeoffs are involved in choosing between alternative productive systems. Ecologists, economists and other resource scientists need to cooperate to specify the options

  6. Sustainability by combining nuclear, fossil, and renewable energy sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles W. Forsberg

    2008-01-01

    The energy industries face two sustainability challenges: the need to avoid climate change and the need to replace traditional crude oil as the basis of our transport system. Radical changes in our energy system will be required to meet these challenges. These challenges may require tight coupling of different energy sources (nuclear, fossil, and renewable) to produce liquid fuels for

  7. [Extending study on energy indices for sustainable development].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongfang; Lan, Shengfang; Peng, Shaolin

    2003-05-01

    Based on the deficiency analysis of current international energy sustainable index (ESI), the new sustainable development index (SDI) was put forward to realize the integration of energy analysis, economic analysis and matter analysis. Taking three dike-pond models in Pearl Delta, which is the famous ecological engineering model of China, the case study was carried out. The results showed that the new index can evaluate the system's sustainable development ability more roundly, and showed the station of energy flow, money flow and matter flow at the same time. So it can provide some pieces of constructive optimizing advice from different sides at the same time. PMID:12916222

  8. Modeling and Analysis of Sustainable Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfons H. Salden

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical, physical and logical framework is presented that allows a de- velopment and deployment of a sustainable system, i.e. a model or formal system, that behaves like a natural system comprising ecology, economy and society. Such a sustainable system encodes then the observables and evolution of the natural system. Through a categorification and a multi-scale analys is of this

  9. MMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr Support of Sustainable Energy Research by the

    E-print Network

    Abstract Achieving sustainable production of energy is one of the grand challenges of the 21st centuryMMMaaattteeerrriiiaaalllsss SSSeeemmmiiinnnaaarrr Support of Sustainable Energy Research by the National Science Foundation Gregory Rorrer Energy for Sustainability Program National Science Foundation

  10. The dual sustainability of wind energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan B. Welch; Anand Venkateswaran

    2009-01-01

    Academics, practitioners, and policy makers continue to debate the benefits and costs of alternative sources of energy. Environmental and economic concerns have yet to be fully reconciled. One view is that decisions that incorporate both society's concern with the environment and investors’ desire for shareholder value maximization are more likely to be truly sustainable. We coin the term dual sustainability

  11. Co-Designing Sustainable Communities: The Identification and Incorporation of Social Performance Metrics in Native American Sustainable Housing and Renewable Energy System Design

    E-print Network

    Shelby, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    engineering education and call for students to practice sustainable development.engineering student participants about how using the co-design methodology with PPN allowed the students to further development

  12. Progress on linking gender and sustainable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.

    2000-04-05

    The field of gender and energy has been identified as critical in global sustainable energy development and is increasingly important to decision makers. The theme of women and energy was of significance at the 1998 World Renewable Energy Congress in Florence, Italy. This paper traces further developments in this field by summarizing selected programmatic initiatives, meetings, and publications over the past 18 months.

  13. Energy Sustainability and the Green Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of campus energy sustainability, explaining that both demand- and supply-side strategies are required. Suggests that on the demand side, an aggressive campus energy conservation program can reduce campus energy consumption by 30 percent or more. Asserts that addressing the supply side of the energy equation means shifting…

  14. Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications

    E-print Network

    , the Institute provides leadership in brokering discussions on energy and sustainability issues among panels ..................................................19 Reduce Waste/End of Life Recycling.................................20 Demand Side Improvements..................................................22 Case Study: Solar/Photovoltaics ......................................24 Materials Reduction

  15. A systems framework for characterizing farm sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Hansen; J. W. Jones

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for quantifying and diagnosing constraints to sustainability of farming systems. For a dynamic, stochastic, purposeful system, sustainability is defined as its ability to continue into the future. It can be expressed as the probability of continuation within specified threshold boundaries through a specified future period. Long-term, stochastic simulation of a system model serves as a

  16. Considerations in PromotingConsiderations in Promoting Markets for Sustainable EnergyMarkets for Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    of technology - Links to other important business issues (productivity, environment) #12;21 May 2003 Risø EnergyConsiderations in PromotingConsiderations in Promoting Markets for Sustainable EnergyMarkets for Sustainable Energy Technologies in DevelopingTechnologies in Developing CountriesCountries #12;21 May 2003

  17. Measure it, See it, Manage it: Using Real Time Data to Benchmark,Optimize, and Sustain System Energy Efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Taranto; Aimee McKane; Ricardo Amon; Michael Maulhardt

    2007-01-01

    Even after years of training and awareness building at thestate and national level, industrial cross-cutting systems (motor-driven,steam, process heating) continue to offer significant opportunities forenergy savings. The US Department of Energy estimates these remainingsavings at more than 7 percent of all industrial energy use. This paperpresents a different approach to promoting industrial system energyefficiency -- providing plant personnel with ready

  18. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  19. MSU Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability

    E-print Network

    MSU Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability Mamie Parker President of MA Parker Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability in collaboration with the College of Agriculture to the public. Tuesday, March 19 4:30 p.m. The Game Changer: Facing Fears and Negotiating a Career in Natural

  20. Toward Knowledge Systems for Sustainability Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaks, D. P.; Jahn, M.

    2011-12-01

    Managing ecosystems for the outcomes of agricultural productivity and resilience will require fundamentally different knowledge management systems. In the industrial paradigm of the 20th century, land was considered an open, unconstrained system managed for maximum yield. While dramatic increases in yield occurred in some crops and locations, unintended but often foreseeable consequences emerged. While productivity remains a key objective, we must develop analytic systems that can identify better management options for the full range of monetized and non-monetized inputs, outputs and outcomes that are captured in the following framing question: How much valued service (e.g. food, materials, energy) can we draw from a landscape while maintaining adequate levels of other valued or necessary services (e.g. biodiversity, water, climate regulation, cultural services) including the long-term productivity of the land? This question is placed within our contemporary framing of valued services, but structured to illuminate the shifts required to achieve long-term sufficiency and planetary resilience. This framing also highlights the need for fundamentally new knowledge systems including information management infrastructures, which effectively support decision-making on landscapes. The purpose of this initiative by authors from diverse fields across government and academic science is to call attention to the need for a vision and investment in sustainability science for landscape management. Substantially enhanced capabilities are needed to compare and integrate information from diverse sources, collected over time that link choices made to meet our needs from landscapes to both short and long term consequences. To further the goal of an information infrastructure for sustainability science, three distinct but interlocking domains are best distinguished: 1) a domain of data, information and knowledge assets; 2) a domain that houses relevant models and tools in a curated space; and 3) a domain that includes decision support tools and systems tailored toward frame particular trade-offs, which may focus on inputs or outputs and may range in scale from local to global. An information infrastructure for sustainability science is best built be built and maintained as a modular, open source, open standard, open access, open content platform. We have defined the scope of this challenge, managing choices within agroecosystems, recognizing that any decision on a landscape involves multidimensional tradeoffs. An effort to address this challenge will need a cohesive, coherent and targeted approach toward an integrated knowledge management infrastructure for sustainability science applied to land management is essential to move more rapidly toward sustainable, productive, and resilient landscapes.

  1. The Sustainable Energy Utility (SEU) Model for Energy Service Delivery

    E-print Network

    Delaware, University of

    Rickerson Rickerson Energy Strategies, LLC Climate change, energy price spikes, and concerns about energy to finance, market, and deliver sustainable energy services to energy end-users. This study outlines to achieve deep energy efficiency savings and a high penetration of customer-sited renew- able energy. An SEU

  2. Advanced Decentralized Water/Energy Network Design for Sustainable Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to provide a water infrastructure that is more sustainable into and beyond the 21st century, drinking water distribution systems and wastewater collection systems must account for our diminishing water supply, increasing demands, climate change, energy cost and availabil...

  3. Sustainable Energy Policy University Facilities (UF)

    E-print Network

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Sustainable Energy Policy University Facilities (UF) POLICY 10 Effective Date: August 11, 2008 Last Modified Date: Approved by: Administrative Council I. Introduction Clemson University is committed to doing. Conservation Goals It is the goal of Clemson University to reduce energy consumption per gross square foot

  4. Approaches to Sustainable Energy Consumption Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damjan Krajnc; Rebeka Lukman; Peter Glavic

    Unsustainable consumption mostly refers to energy resources and materials’ utilization, fostered by human activity. Therefore,\\u000a energy consumption represents a major challenge when approaching sustainable development issues. Despite many environmental\\u000a strategies relying on improvements in energy and material efficiency, the World’s energy demand is likely to increase in line\\u000a with its population. In addition, cultural patterns of human activities are closely

  5. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector

    E-print Network

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01

    demand. International Journal of Global Energy Issues, 24 (3/4). Long, W. 2007 (in Chinese). On scientific point of view of building energy efficiency. Building Science. Vol(23) 2. Beijing. Lu, X. et al., 2006. Sustaining Economic Growth.... Energy Policy 28(10). pp.671-687. State statistical bureau (SSB) 2006. China Statistical Yearbook 2006. Beijing. The World Bank 2001. China : Opportunities to improve Energy efficiency in Buildings. Washington. THUBERC 2007. Annual...

  6. Sustainability, Systems Thinking and Professional Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Martin

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the impact of the new sustainability agenda on the occupational and professional needs of those who have taken educational and training programmes in the environmental field either at undergraduate or postgraduate level or through relevant professional institutions’ continuing professional development programmes. It also describes a one-day workshop for the professionals on sustainable development, based on systems thinking

  7. Track 2: Sustainable Energy I. Renewable Energy: Wind and Wave

    E-print Network

    1 Track 2: Sustainable Energy I. Renewable Energy: Wind and Wave II. Renewable Energy: Solar III. Biomass: Waste to Fuel IV. Biomass Energy Recovery Optimization 1. Renewable Energy Wind & Wave: Speakers, operates in shallow water, has no visual impact, and does not threaten wildlife.!!!! Wave Energy Proving

  8. Recent Advances in AI for Computational Sustainability AI and Sustainability Department, IEEE Intelligent Systems

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Douglas H.

    Recent Advances in AI for Computational Sustainability AI and Sustainability., "Computing and AI for a Sustainable Future," IEEE Intelligent Systems, vol. 27, no. 4, July/Aug 2012. Though research at the intersection of AI

  9. Sustainable bioreactor systems for producing hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaborsky, O.R.; Radway, J.C.; Yoza, B.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Molecular Biology; Tredici, M.R. [Univ. of Florence (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiogiche

    1998-08-01

    The overall goal of Hawaii`s BioHydrogen Program is to generate hydrogen from water using solar energy and microalgae under sustainable conditions. Specific bioprocess engineering objectives include the design, construction, testing and validation of a sustainable photobioreactor system. Specific objectives relating to biology include investigating and optimizing key physiological parameters of cyanobacteria of the genus Arthrospira (Spirulina), the organism selected for initial process development. Another objective is to disseminate the Mitsui-Miami cyanobacteria cultures, now part of the Hawaii Culture Collection (HCC), to other research groups. The approach is to use a single organisms for producing hydrogen gas from water. Key stages are the growth of the biomass, the dark induction of hydrogenase, and the subsequent generation of hydrogen in the light. The biomass production stage involves producing dense cultures of filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacteria and optimizing biomass productivity in innovative tubular photobioreactors. The hydrogen generation stages entail inducing the enzymes and metabolic pathways that enable both dark and light-driven hydrogen production. The focus of Year 1 has been on the construction and operation of the outdoor photobioreactor for the production of high-density mass cultures of Arthrospira. The strains in the Mitsui-Miami collection have been organized and distributed to other researchers who are beginning to report interesting results. The project is part of the International Energy Agency`s biohydrogen program.

  10. Energy Solutions for Sustainable Development

    E-print Network

    energy technologies such as clean coal technologies · Providing renewable energy for the transport sector Session 2 - Scenarios and Policy Options 32 Session 3 ­ Clean Coal Technologies 55 Session 4 ­ Bioenergy

  11. CREST: Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology, a 501(c)(3) organization in Washington, DC, announces Solstice, a file server with state-of-the-art information on renewable energy, energy efficiency, the environment, and sustainable community development.

  12. Sustainable desalination using solar energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Veera Gnaneswar Gude; Nagamany Nirmalakhandan

    2010-01-01

    Global potable water demand is expected to grow, particularly in areas where freshwater supplies are limited. Production and supply of potable water requires significant amounts of energy, which is currently being derived from nonrenewable fossil fuels. Since energy production from fossil fuels also requires water, current practice of potable water supply powered by fossil fuel derived energy is not a

  13. Sustainable Energy - Without the hot air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan MacIsaac

    2009-01-01

    Reader John Roeder writes about a website associated with David MacKay's book Sustainable Energy-Without the hot air. The book is a freely downloadable PDF (or purchasable) book describing an analysis detailing a low-carbon renewable energy transformation route for a large, modern first world industrial country (the United Kingdom). Written for the layman, the work uses vernacular language, e.g., energy consumption

  14. Magnetic Materials in sustainable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutfleisch, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    A new energy paradigm, consisting of greater reliance on renewable energy sources and increased concern for energy efficiency in the total energy lifecycle, has accelerated research in energy-related technologies. Due to their ubiquity, magnetic materials play an important role in improving the efficiency and performance of devices in electric power generation, conversion and transportation. Magnetic materials are essential components of energy applications (i.e. motors, generators, transformers, actuators, etc.) and improvements in magnetic materials will have significant impact in this area, on par with many ``hot'' energy materials efforts. The talk focuses on the state-of-the-art hard and soft magnets and magnetocaloric materials with an emphasis on their optimization for energy applications. Specifically, the impact of hard magnets on electric motor and transportation technologies, of soft magnetic materials on electricity generation and conversion technologies, and of magnetocaloric materials for refrigeration technologies, will be discussed. The synthesis, characterization, and property evaluation of the materials, with an emphasis on structure-property relationships, will be examined in the context of their respective markets as well as their potential impact on energy efficiency. Finally, considering future bottle-necks in raw materials and in the supply chain, options for recycling of rare-earth metals will be analyzed.ootnotetextO. Gutfleisch, J.P. Liu, M. Willard, E. Bruck, C. Chen, S.G. Shankar, Magnetic Materials and Devices for the 21st Century: Stronger, Lighter, and More Energy Efficient (review), Adv. Mat. 23 (2011) 821-842.

  15. SEMS: System for Environmental Monitoring and Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this project was to establish a computational and data management system, SEMS, building on our existing system and MTPE-related research. We proposed that the new system would help support Washington University's efforts in environmental sustainability through use in: (a) Problem-based environmental curriculum for freshmen and sophomores funded by the Hewlett Foundation that integrates scientific, cultural, and policy perspectives to understand the dynamics of wetland degradation, deforestation, and desertification and that will develop policies for sustainable environments and economies; (b) Higher-level undergraduate and graduate courses focused on monitoring the environment and developing policies that will lead to sustainable environmental and economic conditions; and (c) Interdisciplinary research focused on the dynamics of the Missouri River system and development of policies that lead to sustainable environmental and economic floodplain conditions.

  16. Wind Power for a Clean and Sustainable Energy Future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kaygusuz

    2009-01-01

    Wind energy is the fastest-growing electricity-generating technology. The wind energy targets set during the last decade have all been surpassed. Climate change is a major challenge to sustainable development worldwide and is increasingly recognized by forward-looking political and business leaders. One of the tasks we are facing is a profound transformation of our energy system over the next few decades

  17. Sustainable energy for tomorrow's world

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Flavin

    1996-01-01

    The world energy economy is poised for a sweeping shift away from imported oil and environmentally damaging coal during the next few decades, despite the belief by most energy planners that the future will probably see a continuation of past trends. Pushed by the need to stabilize the earth's climate, and pulled by the investment opportunities that beckon, the world's

  18. Sustainable, Reliable Mission-Systems Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Graham; Orr, James K.; Watson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    A mission-systems architecture, based on a highly modular infrastructure utilizing open-standards hardware and software interfaces as the enabling technology is essential for affordable md sustainable space exploration programs. This mission-systems architecture requires (8) robust communication between heterogeneous systems, (b) high reliability, (c) minimal mission-to-mission reconfiguration, (d) affordable development, system integration, end verification of systems, and (e) minimal sustaining engineering. This paper proposes such an architecture. Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program and Earthbound complex engineered systems are applied to define the model. Technology projections reaching out 5 years are made to refine model details.

  19. Sustainable, Reliable Mission-Systems Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Graham; Orr, James K.; Watson, Steve

    2007-01-01

    A mission-systems architecture, based on a highly modular infrastructure utilizing: open-standards hardware and software interfaces as the enabling technology is essential for affordable and sustainable space exploration programs. This mission-systems architecture requires (a) robust communication between heterogeneous system, (b) high reliability, (c) minimal mission-to-mission reconfiguration, (d) affordable development, system integration, and verification of systems, and (e) minimal sustaining engineering. This paper proposes such an architecture. Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program and Earthbound complex engineered system are applied to define the model. Technology projections reaching out 5 years are mde to refine model details.

  20. Guidelines for Energy-Efficient Sustainable Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklas, Michael; Bailey, Gary; Rosemain, Pascale; Olin, Samuel

    These guidelines present optional strategies to be considered in designing schools to be more energy efficient and sustainable. The guidelines are organized by the following design and construction process: site selection; selection of A & E design team; programming and goal setting; schematic design; design development; construction documents;…

  1. BIOMASS POWER FOR ENERGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maria Gavrilescu

    The paper discusses some aspects concerning the utilization of biomass as a bioenergy resource worldwide and in Romania, since biomass is considered a sustainable, potentially environmentally sound and a replenishable resource. The biomass categories for bioenergy are analyzed, considering the factors which influence its availability. Biomass energy potential and current use in different regions as well as in Europe is

  2. Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems 1 (2011) 3545 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Mishra, Prabhat

    2011-01-01

    Direct Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/suscom EnergySustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems 1 (2011) 35­45 Contents lists available at Science 21 October 2010 Accepted 23 October 2010 Keywords: Embedded systems Real-time systems Energy

  3. Solar hydrogen energy: The European–Maghreb connection. A new way of excellence for a sustainable energy development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdel-Nasser Cherigui; Bouziane Mahmah; Farid Harouadi; Maïouf Belhamel; Samira Chader; Abdelhamid M'Raoui; Claude Etievant

    2009-01-01

    The global sustainability is a key word of the future energy system for human beings. It should be friendly to our earth. Hydrogen energy is a critical resource to sustainable energy development. Over the coming decades, rapid economic growth will necessitate expanded and diversified energy supplies. This study is proposed to illustrate the attention to the opportunities and possibilities of

  4. Sustainable Energy-Without the Hot Air

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. C. Mackay; David Hafemeister

    2010-01-01

    We have an addiction to fossil fuels, and it's not sustainable. The devel-oped world gets 80% of its energy from fossil fuels; Britain, 90%. And this is unsustainable for three reasons. First, easily-accessible fossil fuels will at some point run out, so we'll eventually have to get our energy from someplace else. Second, burning fossil fuels is having a measurable

  5. A Sustainable U.S. Energy Plan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Herschel Specter

    2009-01-01

    This report gives guidance on what could be done to overcome the political stalemate that has long blocked the creation of\\u000a a sustainable energy plan, leaving the United States vulnerable to oil imports while emitting large amounts of greenhouse\\u000a gases. An overall energy policy is suggested for use by political leaders, along with specific goals on climate change and\\u000a national

  6. Broadband communication enables sustainable energy services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Dennis; Haley M. Jones

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Australia’s electricity supply ,infrastructure requires ,investments ,exceeding ,$100b over ,the next 25 years to maintain ,quality of service ,to domestic ,users. Being careful to distinguish energy service needs from electricity delivery, the case is made for distributed energy services which,offer improved,sustainability outcomes,to the,traditional monolithic generation model. A key ,enabling ,technology ,for commercial ,success ,of the ,proposed ,paradigm ,is a

  7. Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Research

    E-print Network

    Handy, Susan L.

    Vehicle Modeling Program 1998-2002 FCV Technology Hydrogen Pathways 2003-2006 FCVs & H2 Fuel Pathway STEPS Orientation Seminar November 21, 2014 H2 #12;Addressing Transportation Energy Challenges Reduced Vehicle Miles) Vehicle Technology · Advanced conventional vehicles (ICE) · Plug-in hybrid electric · Battery electric

  8. China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through EnergyEfficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Sinton, Jonathan; Zhou,Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Huang, Joe; Price, Lynn; McKane, Aimee T.

    2006-03-20

    China is fueling its phenomenal economic growth with huge quantities of coal. The environmental consequences reach far beyond its borders--China is second only to the United States in greenhouse gas emissions. Expanding its supply of other energy sources, like nuclear power and imported oil, raises trade and security issues. Soaring electricity demand necessitates the construction of 40-70 GW of new capacity per year, creating sustained financing challenges. While daunting, the challenge of meeting China's energy needs presents a wealth of opportunities, particularly in meeting demand through improved energy efficiency and other clean energy technologies. The China Energy Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is committed to understanding these opportunities, and to exploring their implications for policy and business. We work collaboratively with energy researchers, suppliers, regulators, and consumers in China and elsewhere to: better understand the dynamics of energy use in China. Our Research Focus Encompasses Three Major Areas: Buildings, Industry, and Cross-Cutting Activities. Buildings--working to promote energy-efficient buildings and energy-efficient equipment used in buildings. Current work includes promoting the design and use of minimum energy efficiency standards and energy labeling for appliances, and assisting in the development and implementation of building codes for energy-efficient residential and commercial/public buildings. Past work has included a China Residential Energy Consumption Survey and a study of the health impacts of rural household energy use. Industry--understanding China's industrial sector, responsible for the majority of energy consumption in China. Current work includes benchmarking China's major energy-consuming industries to world best practice, examining energy efficiency trends in China's steel and cement industries, implementing voluntary energy efficiency agreements in various industries, and developing a multi-year program for standards and for optimizing the industrial motor systems in China. Past work has included a comprehensive study of China's oil refining sector. Cross-Cutting--analysis and research focused on multisector, policy, and long-term development issues. Current cross-cutting policy and analysis research includes work on government procurement programs; energy service companies; a national energy policy assessment including the National Energy Strategy released by the government in early 2005; energy efficiency policy; an analysis of past trends in energy consumption in China as well as of future scenarios; and our China Energy Databook accompanied by chapter summaries and analysis of recent trends.

  9. Energy technology progress for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.; Drennen, T.E.

    1997-03-01

    Energy security is a fundamental part of a country`s national security. Access to affordable, environmentally sustainable energy is a stabilizing force and is in the world community`s best interest. The current global energy situation however is not sustainable and has many complicating factors. The primary goal for government energy policy should be to provide stability and predictability to the market. This paper differentiates between short-term and long-term issues and argues that although the options for addressing the short-term issues are limited, there is an opportunity to alter the course of long-term energy stability and predictability through research and technology development. While reliance on foreign oil in the short term can be consistent with short-term energy security goals, there are sufficient long-term issues associated with fossil fuel use, in particular, as to require a long-term role for the federal government in funding research. The longer term issues fall into three categories. First, oil resources are finite and there is increasing world dependence on a limited number of suppliers. Second, the world demographics are changing dramatically and the emerging industrialized nations will have greater supply needs. Third, increasing attention to the environmental impacts of energy production and use will limit supply options. In addition to this global view, some of the changes occurring in the US domestic energy picture have implications that will encourage energy efficiency and new technology development. The paper concludes that technological innovation has provided a great benefit in the past and can continue to do so in the future if it is both channels toward a sustainable energy future and if it is committed to, and invested in, as a deliberate long-term policy option.

  10. ESC: Energy Synchronized Communication in Sustainable Sensor Networks

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Abstract--With advances in energy harvesting techniques, it is now feasible to build sustainable sensorESC: Energy Synchronized Communication in Sustainable Sensor Networks Yu Gu, Ting Zhu and Tian He of sustainable sensor networks is to effectively utilize a continuous stream of ambient energy. Instead

  11. Designing Engineering Systems for Sustainability Peter Sandborn and Jessica Myers

    E-print Network

    Sandborn, Peter

    , manufacturing and policy. Business or Corporate Sustainability ­ the increase in productivity and/or reduction6 Designing Engineering Systems for Sustainability Peter Sandborn and Jessica Myers CALCE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Abstract Sustainability means keeping

  12. Engineering biological systems toward a sustainable bioeconomy.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Mateus Schreiner Garcez

    2015-06-01

    The nature of our major global risks calls for sustainable innovations to decouple economic growth from greenhouse gases emission. The development of sustainable technologies has been negatively impacted by several factors including sugar production costs, production scale, economic crises, hydraulic fracking development and the market inability to capture externality costs. However, advances in engineering of biological systems allow bridging the gap between exponential growth of knowledge about biology and the creation of sustainable value chains for a broad range of economic sectors. Additionally, industrial symbiosis of different biobased technologies can increase competitiveness and sustainability, leading to the development of eco-industrial parks. Reliable policies for carbon pricing and revenue reinvestments in disruptive technologies and in the deployment of eco-industrial parks could boost the welfare while addressing our major global risks toward the transition from a fossil to a biobased economy. PMID:25845304

  13. Low-cost sustainable wall construction system

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1998-07-01

    Houses with no wall cavities, such as those made of adobe, stone, brick, or block, have poor thermal properties but are rarely insulated because of the cost and difficulty of providing wall insulation. A simple, low-cost technique using loose-fill indigenous materials has been demonstrated for the construction of highly insulated walls or the retrofit of existing walls in such buildings. Locally available pumice, in sandbags stacked along the exterior wall of an adobe house in New Mexico, added a thermal resistance (R) of 16 F{sm{underscore}bullet}ft{sup 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}h/Btu (2.8 m{sup 2}{sm{underscore}bullet}K/W). The total cost of the sandbag insulation wall retrofit was $3.76 per square foot ($40.50/m{sup 2}). Computer simulations of the adobe house using DOE 2.1E show savings of $275 per year, corresponding to 50% reduction in heating energy consumption. The savings-to-investment ratio ranges from 1.1 to 3.2, so the cost of conserved energy is lower than the price of propane, natural gas and electric heat, making the system cost-effective. Prototype stand-alone walls were also constructed using fly ash and sawdust blown into continuous polypropylene tubing, which was folded between corner posts as it was filled to form the shape of the wall. Other materials could also be used. The inexpensive technique solves the problem of insulating solid-wall hours and constructing new houses without specialized equipment and skills, thereby saving energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and improving comfort for people in many countries. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has filed patent applications on this technology, which is part of a DOE initiative on sustainable building envelope materials and systems.

  14. Biomass Plantation Inergy Systems and Sustainable DevelD~ment

    E-print Network

    .m Biomass Plantation Inergy Systems and Sustainable DevelD~ment ERIC D. LARSON AND ROBERT H- -ducing regions (Table 9.1). A. Renewables-Imensive Global Energy'Scenario (RlGES) h G S .. h-.T e Rl E en.:ets lor com- 550 Renewable electrolytic H2: ,~~' mercial (monetized) biomass 500 \\vould be primarily

  15. Sustainable multipurpose tree production systems for Nepal

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.Y.; Kilpatrick, K.J.

    1988-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing methods for producing reforestation plating stock, fuel, and fodder in a sustainable manner in Nepal. This project, in cooperation with the Ministry of Forest and Soil Conservation of Nepal, is sponsored by the US Agency for International Development (AID). Several production systems are being evaluated for the Mid-Hills Region of Nepal. To provide sustainable biomass production and ecological management of the fragile Mid-Hills Region, the production systems must simultaneously satisfy the physiological requirements of the plants, the symbiotic requirements of the plant and the microorganisms in its rhizosphere, the physicochemical requirements of nutrient and water cycling, and the climatic and topographic constraints.

  16. SUSTAINABLE BIOFUEL SYSTEMS FOR UNDEVELOPED REGIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated our findings based on the level of integration of sustainable methods, feasibility of implementation within the target community, and the quantity of energy produced in relation to community needs. Particular emphasis was placed on development of a production meth...

  17. Energy for sustainable development in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Oladiran, M.T. [Univ. of Botswana, Gaborone (Botswana). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Energy is required both for industrial development and sustenance of technology. Petroleum oil is the main source of energy for several applications including power production and transportation because of its cheapness and availability. However, since the unprecedented hike in the price of oil in the 70`s, the supply of cheap oil could no longer be guaranteed. Increases in the cost of oil affected the developing countries, especially the non-oil producing ones. Consequently, this paper presents a critical survey of energy options that have benign effects on the environment and which can guarantee sustainable development in the developing countries. The fiction of renewable energy resources is of particular interest, and is thus, given prominence in this investigation. The importance of research, documentation and development in applied energy is highlighted.

  18. Sustainable Supply of Energy from Biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolins, J.; Gravitis, J.

    2010-01-01

    The study concerns sustainable supply of primary energy from biomass and considers the interrelation between the amount of energy captured in biomass by photosynthesis and the total land area under perennial species grown for the purpose. The authors analyse available experimental data statistically relevant to natural growths comprising a large number of individual trees of grey alder (Alnus incana), a well-known fast-growing species broadly spread in Latvia and for centuries being used as firewood. By graphical approximation of the growth-rate data available for growths up to 50 years of age the optimum age for harvesting dependent on the age at which the maximum growth-rate of biomass is reached is shown to be 18 years confirming traditional popular knowledge. With account for long-term sustainable supply of energy under condition of 18-year rotation, the average yield of energy from highest quality sites of the total land area permanently occupied by alder is calculated to be ca. 85 GJ/ha and the required land equivalent - slightly less than 12 ha per TJ of primary energy from photosynthesis.

  19. Pathways to a more sustainable production of energy: sustainable hydrogen—a research objective for Shell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Gosselink

    2002-01-01

    Towards a sustainable energy supply is a clear direction for exploratory research in Shell. Examples of energy carriers, which should be delivered to the envisaged sustainable energy markets, are bio-fuels, produced from biomass residues, and hydrogen (or electricity), produced from renewable sources. In contrast to the readily available ancient sunlight stored in fossil fuels, the harvesting of incident sunlight will

  20. Ecology in Sustainable Agriculture Practices and Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Francis; P. Porter

    2011-01-01

    Sustainable and productive agroecosystems must be developed that will meet today's needs for food and other products, as well as preserving the vital natural resource base that will allow future generations to meet their needs. To increase production efficiency, to improve farming strategies based on local resources, and to design systems that are resilient in the face of changing climate

  1. Designing Systems for Environmental Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Smith will describe his U.S. EPA research which involves elements of design, from systems as diverse as biofuel supply chains to recycling systems and chemical processes. Design uses models that rate performance as part of a synthesis approach, where steps of analysis and sy...

  2. Using a participatory approach to develop a sustainability framework for carbon capture and storage systems in The Netherlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Ramírez; Monique Maria Hoogwijk; Chris Hendriks

    2008-01-01

    Sustainability considerations guide political decisions concerning energy supply options. In this article a start has been made for the development of a sustainability framework for carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems in the Netherlands. Using a participatory approach (which includes an exploratory workshop, two interactive meetings, an international survey and in-depth interviews), nine sustainability criteria for CCS based energy systems

  3. Sustainability estimation of energy system options that use gas and renewable resources for domestic hot water production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marina Jovanovic; Valentina Turanjanin; Vukman Bakic; Milada Pezo; Biljana Vucicevic

    2011-01-01

    Two possible substitutions for fossil fuel used in heat production are biomass and solar energy. This paper presents an evaluation of various energy sources for hot water production in a heating plant. The heating plant was situated in one of the largest municipalities in the city of Belgrade, Serbia. It produces and delivers domestic hot water and energy for heating

  4. Systems integration for global sustainability

    E-print Network

    2015-01-01

    and affect other human and natural systems—a trade-off thatproduction and trade (81). The human-nature nexus frameworkhumans. Recent advances consider a variety of ecosystem services simultaneously in order to evaluate trade-

  5. An Emergy Systems View of Sustainability: Emergy Evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) was used to provide a context for understanding and interpreting sustainability. We propose that ?what is sustainable? for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system. Furtherm...

  6. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Finnveden, Göran, E-mail: goran.finnveden@abe.kth.se; Åkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  7. Functional materials for sustainable energy technologies: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V L; Edwards, P P

    2010-01-01

    The critical topic of energy and the environment has rarely had such a high profile, nor have the associated materials challenges been more exciting. The subject of functional materials for sustainable energy technologies is demanding and recognized as a top priority in providing many of the key underpinning technological solutions for a sustainable energy future. Energy generation, consumption, storage, and supply security will continue to be major drivers for this subject. There exists, in particular, an urgent need for new functional materials for next-generation energy conversion and storage systems. Many limitations on the performances and costs of these systems are mainly due to the materials' intrinsic performance. We highlight four areas of activity where functional materials are already a significant element of world-wide research efforts. These four areas are transparent conducting oxides, solar energy materials for converting solar radiation into electricity and chemical fuels, materials for thermoelectric energy conversion, and hydrogen storage materials. We outline recent advances in the development of these classes of energy materials, major factors limiting their intrinsic functional performance, and potential ways to overcome these limitations. PMID:19943280

  8. FISHER INFORMATION AS A METRIC FOR SUSTAINABLE SYSTEM REGIMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. We propose Fisher Information as a metric for the sustainability of dynamic regimes in complex systems. The quantity now known ...

  9. Sustainable decision making: the role of decision support systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marion A. Hersh

    1999-01-01

    Sustainable decision making stands for decision making which contributes to the transition to a sustainable society. It raises a number of challenging problems for which existing decision support systems (DSS) may not be equipped. The role of DSS in sustainable decision making is considered. The different models of decision making and their appropriateness in sustainable decision making are discussed. Examples

  10. Institutionalized knowledge conflict in assessing the possible contributions of H 2 to a sustainable energy system for the Netherlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthijs Hisschemöller; Ries Bode

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a stakeholder dialogue project on the possible contribution of hydrogen to the Dutch energy transition. Dialogue methodology aims at articulating and exploring competing perspectives, including views that are in the margin of the energy policy subsystem. Three dialogue groups explored trajectories labeled Hydrogen for Transport, Hydrogen for the Built Environment and Hydrogen in the existing natural

  11. SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY: KENYA'S ENERGY PAST AND FUTURE, NOVEMBER 2006 SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY: KENYA'S ENERGY PAST AND FUTURE, NOVEMBER 2006 1 SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY KENYA'S ENERGY PAST AND FUTURE BY ROB BAILIS, CHARLES KIRUBI AND ARNE JACOBSON SEARCHING exceeds that of fossil fuels [7], but the starting point 25 years ago was miniscule. Kenya has benefited

  12. Introduction to Lean: Sustainable Quality Systems Design

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hall, Arlie

    This website provides an abstract of the following book- access may be gained via a free login. This book presents the notion that sustainable quality systems theory is a function of five integrated prerequisite leadership skills.: 1. Dr. Walter A. Shewhart's theory of sustainable quality articulated in his three-step inquiry learning process; probability science is vital in each step. 2. Dr. W. Edwards Deming's systems theory and his Plan-Do-Study-Act Cycle for accumulating infinitesimal units of knowledge. 3. Kiichiro Toyoda's concepts of Just In Time are essential prerequisites. 4. Dr. Kaoru Ishikawa's Quality Control Circle curriculum provides an education development plan for shop floor teams. 5. Dr. W. Edwards Deming's System of Profound Knowledge Theory.

  13. The Contribution of Renewable Energies to a Sustainable Energy Economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Müller-Steinhagen; J. Nitsch

    2005-01-01

    ince the beginning of industrialization, energy consumption has increased considerably more rapidly than the world population. In addition to the limited resources, exhaust gases resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels have adverse effects on the world climate and the health of its population. Sustainable and socially acceptable develop- ment is, therefore, only possible if more rational and technologically advanced

  14. Engaging Reluctant Americans into Energy Efficiency and Sustainability 

    E-print Network

    Shelton, S.

    2013-01-01

    Gain a sustainable advantage CATEE December 18, 2012 But I don’t want to! Engaging reluctant Americans (almost all of them) into energy efficiency and sustainability ESL-KT-13-12-58 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Gain a sustainable advantage ESL-KT-13-12-58 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Gain a sustainable advantage ESL-KT-13-12-58 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency...

  15. Analyzing Sustainability of Community-based Energy Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. Khan; A. B. Chhetri; M. R. Islam

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary society has become dependent on energy sources for its continued development and very existence. At the same time, it is becoming increasingly clear that energy development and management techniques are unsustainable given current practices. This paper evaluates the sustainability status of community-based energy technologies. Sustainability assessments usually focus on the immediate impacts of technology. This paper introduces a new

  16. Sustainable energy development (May 2011) with some game-changers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noam Lior

    This paper presents the opening talk that briefly surveys the present (May 2011) situation in sustainable energy development. Recent estimates and forecasts of the oil, gas, coal resources and their reserve\\/production ratio, nuclear and renewable energy potential, and energy uses are surveyed. A brief discussion of the status, sustainability (economic, environmental and social impact), and prospects of fossil, nuclear and

  17. Hydrogeological Factors for Sustainable Urban Water Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHIAS EISWIRTH

    \\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a Urban transport systems and the provision of water have been identified as the factors most critical in determining the future\\u000a of cities in this new century. The effectiveness of conventional technical urban water concepts has reached a limit, and the\\u000a sustainability of such practice is in question. There are a number of different types of key urban water indicators

  18. Key Factors in Planning a Sustainable Energy Future Including Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedstrom, Lars; Saxe, Maria; Folkesson, Anders; Wallmark, Cecilia; Haraldsson, Kristina; Bryngelsson, Marten; Alvfors, Per

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a number of future energy visions, especially those basing the energy systems on hydrogen, are discussed. Some often missing comparisons between alternatives, from a sustainability perspective, are identified and then performed for energy storage, energy transportation, and energy use in vehicles. It is shown that it is important…

  19. What makes closed ecological systems sustainable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitelson, I.; Degermendzhy, A.; Rodicheva, E.

    A closed ecosystem has some properties that an open systems lacks. Let us consider the ones that increase the sustainability of an ecosystem. The common feature of biological and physicochemical life support systems is that basically they are both catalytic. There are two fundamental properties distinguishing biological systems: 1) they are auto-catalytic: their catalysts - enzymes of protein nature - are continuously reproduced when the system functions; 2) the program of every process performed by enzymes and the program of their reproduction are inherent in the biological system itself - in the totality of genomes of the species involved in the functioning of the ecosystem. Actually, one cell with the genome capable of the phenotypic realization is enough for the self- restoration of the function performed by the cells of this species in the ecosystem. The multi-cellular organisms with stem cells are constantly ready to repair themselves by intensifying the continuous process of regeneration. We (Gitelson) have made a quantitative investigation of this process by studying the regeneration and reparation of erythrocytes in mammals. The continuous microalgal culture of Chlorella vulgaris was taken to investigate quantitatively the similar functional process of self-restoration in unicellular algae (Rodicheva). Based on the data obtained, we proposed a mathematical model of the restoration process in the cell population that has suffered an acute radiation damage. Besides these general biological mechanisms responsible for their sustainability, closed systems also possess specific features enhancing their stability. They are as follows: 1. Nutrients cannot leave the system. 2. The metabolic pathways of the material cycling are closed. 3. The rates of interlink metabolism are in conformity with each other due to their mutual limitation. We present the data obtained in the Bios-3 experiments that prove the efficiency of this mechanism as a factor of the sustainability. The factors that reduce the sustainability of a CES are as follows: the range of ambient physicochemical parameters compatible with life is rather narrow and it takes rather a long time for the system to restore itself if damage is done to its relatively long-lived species, such as higher plants. A specific property of a small CES is that humans inhabiting it must perform a deterministic control. Our experiments in Bios-3 proved that this control is quite feasible and that it effectively increases the stability of the system. Thus, we can predict that humanity may perform the function of control in the Earth's biosphere in the course of its transformation into the noosphere. * "This work was made possible in part by Award No. REC-002 of the U.S. Civilian Research &Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Union (CRDF) and RF Ministry of Education."

  20. Energy-efficient control of a smart grid with sustainable homes based on distributing risk

    E-print Network

    Ono, Masahiro, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed control system for a smart grid with sustainable homes. A central challenge is how to enhance energy efficiency in the presence of uncertainty. A major source of uncertainty ...

  1. NASA Johnson Space Center's Energy and Sustainability Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts that NASA is making to assure a sustainable environment and energy savings at the Johnson Space Center. Sustainability is defined as development that meets the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The new technologies that are required for sustainable closed loop life support for space exploration have uses on the ground to reduce energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and water use. Some of these uses are reviewed.

  2. Sustainable energy in china: the closing window of opportunity

    SciTech Connect

    Fei Feng; Roland Priddle; Leiping Wang; Noureddine Berrah

    2007-03-15

    China's remarkable economic growth has been supported by a generally adequate and relatively low-cost supply of energy, creating the world's largest coal industry, its second-largest oil market, and an eclectic power business that is adding capacity at an unprecedented rate. If energy requirements continue to double every decade, China will not be able to meet the energy demands of the present without seriously compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own energy needs. This title uses historical data from 1980 and alternative scenarios through 2020 to assess China's future energy requirements and the resources to meet them. It calls for a high-level commitment to develop and implement an integrated, coordinated, and comprehensive energy policy. The authors recommend eight building blocks to reduce energy consumption growth well below the targeted rate of economic growth, to use national resources on an economically and environmentally sound basis, and to establish a robust energy system that can better ensure the security of a diverse supply of competitively priced energy forms. Sustainability calls for persistence of effort, greater reliance on advanced energy technologies, and better standards enforcement. Achieving these goals will require policy initiatives that restrict demand and create a 'resources-conscious society', reconcile energy needs with environmental imperatives, rationalize pricing, and tackle supply security. While the challenges are daunting, China has a unique opportunity to position itself as a world leader in the application of cutting-edge energy developments to create a sustainable energy sector effectively supporting a flourishing economy and society.

  3. Reporting Systems for Sustainability: What Are They Measuring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    The dominance of the neoliberal discourse in the sustainability debate has tended to privilege the economy over environment and social dimensions with implications for what is measured by sustainability monitoring systems. Moreover, systems to measure sustainability, including those influenced by neoliberal discourse, lack robust definitions and…

  4. SUSTAINABILITY APPRAISAL OF TAIPEI MUNICIPAL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ching-Pin Tung; Yun-Ju Chen; Szu-Wei Chen; Tzu-Ming Liu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a simulation model to evaluate sustainability of water supply systems for Taipei municipal and neighbor areas. The definition of sustainability is addressed first, which indicates that sustainable development requires keeping cumulative impacts not exceeding environmental carrying capacity. The carrying capacity of a water supply system is the quantity of potential water supply

  5. Education in Sustainable Energy by European Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanescu, Corina; Stefureac, Crina

    2010-05-01

    Our schools have been involved in several European projects having with the primary objective of educating the young generation to find ways for saving energy and for using the renewable energy. Small changes in our behaviour can lead to significant energy savings and a major reduction in emissions. In our presentation we will refer to three of them: - The Comenius 1 project "Energy in the Consumers' Hands" tried to improve the quality of education for democratic citizenship in all participant schools by creating a model of curricula concerning the integrative teaching of democratic citizenship using the topic approaches based on key concept - energy as important element of the community welfare. The students studied on the following topics: • Sources of energy • The clean use of fossil based resources; • The rational use of energyEnergy and the environment - The project "Solar Schools Forum" (SSF) focuses on environmental education in schools, in particular addressing the topics of Renewable Energy (RE) and Energy Efficiency (EE). The youth need to become more aware of energy-related problems, and how they can change their own lifestyles to limit environmental damage caused by the daily use of energy. As the decision-makers of tomorrow we need to empower them to make the right choices. The SSF is aimed at improving knowledge about RE and EE among children and young people, using a fun approach and aimed at generating greater enthusiasm for clean energy. The youth will also be encouraged to help raise awareness and so act as multipliers in their own communities, starting with their families and friends. As a result of this project we involved in developing and implementing an optional course for high school students within the Solar Schools Forum project. The optional course entitled "Sustainable energy and the environment" had a great deal of success, proof of this success being the fact that it is still taught even today, three years after its completion. Students also show a great deal of interest towards this course. More information are available on www.school4energy.net/ , www.ises.org/schools/ - The newest is the project "Intelligent Use of Energy in School", starting in this school year. This European project is part of Intelligent Energy program, aims to promote a more efficient way of using energy in every day life among secondary schools students and teachers. IUSES will show secondary school students the basic principles of energy efficiency and give a comprehensive guide to saving energy in their everyday lives. IUSES is currently developing a behaviour-oriented educational kit including: handbooks, multimedia animations and experiment tool-kit. The educational kit will be freely available for downloading on this web site. The project will also include the launch of the European Energy Saving Award in 14 different countries which will reward schools and students that improve their energy efficiency. More information is available on www.iuses.eu or www.iuses.ro

  6. Assessment of nuclear energy sustainability index using fuzzy logic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ayah E. Abouelnaga; Abdelmohsen Metwally; Naguib Aly; Mohammad Nagy; Saeed Agamy

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy is increasingly perceived as an attractive mature energy generation technology that can deliver an answer to the worldwide increasing energy demand while respecting environmental concerns as well as contributing to a reduced dependence on fossil fuel. Advancing nuclear energy deployment demands an assessment of nuclear energy with respect to all sustainability dimensions.In this paper, the nuclear energy, whose

  7. Key Assets for a Sustainable Low Carbon Energy Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, concerns of energy security and climate change gave rise to energy policies focused on energy conservation and diversified low-carbon energy sources. Provided lessons of Fukushima accident are evidently accounted for, nuclear energy will probably be confirmed in most of today's nuclear countries as a low carbon energy source needed to limit imports of oil and gas and to meet fast growing energy needs. Future challenges of nuclear energy are then in three directions: i) enhancing safety performance so as to preclude any long term impact of severe accident outside the site of the plant, even in case of hypothetical external events, ii) full use of Uranium and minimization long lived radioactive waste burden for sustainability, and iii) extension to non-electricity energy products for maximizing the share of low carbon energy source in transportation fuels, industrial process heat and district heating. Advanced LWRs (Gen-III) are today's best available technologies and can somewhat advance nuclear energy in these three directions. However, breakthroughs in sustainability call for fast neutron reactors and closed fuel cycles, and non-electric applications prompt a revival of interest in high temperature reactors for exceeding cogeneration performances achievable with LWRs. Both types of Gen-IV nuclear systems by nature call for technology breakthroughs to surpass LWRs capabilities. Current resumption in France of research on sodium cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs) definitely aims at significant progress in safety and economic competitiveness compared to earlier reactors of this type in order to progress towards a new generation of commercially viable sodium cooled fast reactor. Along with advancing a new generation of sodium cooled fast reactor, research and development on alternative fast reactor types such as gas or lead-alloy cooled systems (GFR & LFR) is strategic to overcome technical difficulties and/or political opposition specific to sodium. In conclusion, research and technology breakthroughs in nuclear power are needed for shaping a sustainable low carbon future. International cooperation is key for sharing costs of research and development of the required novel technologies and cost of first experimental reactors needed to demonstrate enabling technologies. At the same time technology breakthroughs are developed, pre-normative research is required to support codification work and harmonized regulations that will ultimately apply to safety and security features of resulting innovative reactor types and fuel cycles.

  8. Energy for a sustainable future. Summary report and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-04-15

    This year, in September, world leaders will meet at the United Nations to assess progress on the Millennium Development Goals and to chart a course of action for the period leading up to the agreed MDG deadline of 2015. Later in the year, government delegations will gather in Mexico to continue the process of working towards a comprehensive, robust and ambitious climate change agreement. Energy lies at the heart of both of these efforts. The decisions we take today on how we produce, consume and distribute energy will profoundly influence our ability to eradicate poverty and respond effectively to climate change. Addressing these challenges is beyond the reach of governments alone. It will take the active engagement of all sectors of society: the private sector; local communities and civil society; international organizations and the world of academia and research. To that end, in 2009 a high-level Advisory Group on Energy and Climate Change was established, chaired by Kandeh Yumkella, Director-General of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). Comprising representatives from business, the United Nations system and research institutions, its mandate was to provide recommendations on energy issues in the context of climate change and sustainable development. The Group also examined the role the United Nations system could play in achieving internationally-agreed climate goals. The Advisory Group has identified two priorities - improving energy access and strengthening energy efficiency - as key areas for enhanced effort and international cooperation. Expanding access to affordable, clean energy is critical for realizing the MDGs and enabling sustainable development across much of the globe. Improving energy efficiency is paramount if we are to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It can also support market competitiveness and green innovation. (LN)

  9. Improving Energy Efficiency for Energy Harvesting Embedded Systems*

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Qinru

    ABSTRACT While the energy harvesting system (EHS) supplies green energy to the embedded system, it also Environmental energy harvesting is a promising technique for sustainable operation of embedded system (eImproving Energy Efficiency for Energy Harvesting Embedded Systems* Yang Ge, Yukan Zhang and Qinru

  10. Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

  11. Designing sustainable work systems: the need for a systems approach.

    PubMed

    Zink, Klaus J

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing discussion concerning sustainability. While this discussion was at first mainly focused on a society level--and sometimes regarding especially environmental problems, one can now see that this topic is of increasing relevance for companies worldwide and even the social dimension of this three pillar approach is gaining more and more importance. This leads to some questions: Is sustainability already a part of human factors thinking or do we have to further develop our discipline? How can we define sustainable work systems? What are the topics we have to consider? Do we need a new systems ergonomics perspective regarding whole value creation chains and a life-cycle perspective concerning products (and work systems)? How can we deal with potential contradictions about social, ecological, and economic goals? PMID:23608710

  12. A Navigation System with Ultrasonic Beams for Reliable Connection of Sustainable Transports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taizo Miyachi; Jens J. Balvig; Wataru Kisada; Kazuki Hayakawa; Takeshi Suzuki

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable transport such as walking and public transport can save energy and make a variant city that makes healthy profits and reduces the medical expenses. Smart and kind navigation for visitors improves the usefulness of the sustainable transport and enables a pleasant mobility. In this paper we propose a navigation system with ultrasonic beams that keeps guiding pedestrians to a

  13. Natural Treatment Systems as Sustainable Ecotechnologies for the Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Qaisar; Pervez, Arshid; Zeb, Bibi Saima; Zaffar, Habiba; Yaqoob, Hajra; Waseem, Muhammad; Zahidullah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of natural treatment systems is the re-establishment of disturbed ecosystems and their sustainability for benefits to human and nature. The working of natural treatment systems on ecological principles and their sustainability in terms of low cost, low energy consumption, and low mechanical technology is highly desirable. The current review presents pros and cons of the natural treatment systems, their performance, and recent developments to use them in the treatment of various types of wastewaters. Fast population growth and economic pressure in some developing countries compel the implementation of principles of natural treatment to protect natural environment. The employment of these principles for waste treatment not only helps in environmental cleanup but also conserves biological communities. The systems particularly suit developing countries of the world. We reviewed information on constructed wetlands, vermicomposting, role of mangroves, land treatment systems, soil-aquifer treatment, and finally aquatic systems for waste treatment. Economic cost and energy requirements to operate various kinds of natural treatment systems were also reviewed. PMID:23878819

  14. The Sustainable Hydrogen Economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2005-01-01

    Identifying and building a sustainable energy system is perhaps one of the most critical issues that today's society must address. Replacing our current energy carrier mix with a sustainable fuel is one of the key pieces in that system. Hydrogen as an energy carrier, primarily derived from water, can address issues of sustainability, environmental emissions and energy security. The hydrogen

  15. Sustainable Development and Energy Geotechnology Potential Roles for Geotechnical Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    FragaszyProgram Dire, Dr. R. J. [National Science Foundation; Santamarina, Carlos [Georgia Institute of Technology; Espinoza, N. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jang, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jung, J.W. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The world is facing unprecedented challenges related to energy resources, global climate change, material use, and waste generation. Failure to address these challenges will inhibit the growth of the developing world and will negatively impact the standard of living and security of future generations in all nations. The solutions to these challenges will require multidisciplinary research across the social and physical sciences and engineering. Although perhaps not always recognized, geotechnical engineering expertise is critical to the solution of many energy and sustainability-related problems. Hence, geotechnical engineers and academicians have opportunity and responsibility to contribute to the solution of these worldwide problems. Research will need to be extended to non-standard issues such as thermal properties of soils; sediment and rock response to extreme conditions and at very long time scales; coupled hydro-chemo-thermo-bio-mechanical processes; positive feedback systems; the development of discontinuities; biological modification of soil properties; spatial variability; and emergent phenomena. Clearly, the challenges facing geotechnical engineering in the future will require a much broader knowledge base than our traditional educational programs provide. The geotechnical engineering curricula, from undergraduate education through continuing professional education, must address the changing needs of a profession that will increasingly be engaged in alternative/renewable energy production; energy efficiency; sustainable design, enhanced and more efficient use of natural resources, waste management, and underground utilization.

  16. Indoor Air Quality in Sustainable, Energy Efficient Buildings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew K. Persily; Steven J. Emmerich

    2011-01-01

    Building designers, contractors, owners and managers have long been challenged with providing quality indoor environments at a reasonable energy cost. Current efforts to improve building energy efficiency, including goals of sustainability and net-zero energy use, are bringing more focus on how to simultaneously achieve energy efficiency and good indoor air quality (IAQ). While energy efficiency and IAQ are sometimes viewed

  17. Indoor air quality in sustainable, energy efficient buildings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew K. Persily; Steven J. Emmerich

    2012-01-01

    Building designers, contractors, owners, and managers have long been challenged with providing quality indoor environments at a reasonable energy cost. Current efforts to improve building energy efficiency, including goals of sustainability and net-zero energy use, are bringing more focus on how to simultaneously achieve energy efficiency and good indoor air quality (IAQ). While energy efficiency and IAQ are sometimes viewed

  18. Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

    2009-08-01

    There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. Teaching Energy as Part of Education for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Maarten; McKeon, Frankie; Charnley, Fiona; Fleming, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how energy issues and education for sustainable development (ESD) are part of the agenda for two current European projects, CoDeS and SUSTAIN. The latter is mainly concerned with the development of inquiry-based primary and lower secondary science education while the former is a network that aims to learn more about…

  20. Energy Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Office of Educational Partnerships,

    Posters are provided for several different energy conversion systems. Students are provided with cards that give the name and a description of each of the components in an energy system. They match these with the figures on the diagram. Since the groups look at different systems, they also describe their results to the class to share their knowledge.

  1. Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    ?ahin, Sümer, E-mail: ssahin@atilim.edit.tr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, ATILIM University, 06836 ?ncek, Gölba??, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-09-30

    Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, {sup 233}U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO{sub 2}/RG?PuO{sub 2}) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 96 % ThO{sub 2}; 6 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 94 % ThO{sub 2}; 10 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 90 % ThO{sub 2}; 20 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 80 % ThO{sub 2}; 30 % RG?PuO{sub 2} + 70 % ThO{sub 2}, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ? 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ? 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG?PuO{sub 2} fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MW{sub th} has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ?160 kg {sup 233}U per year in addition to fission energy production in situ, multiplying the fusion energy by a factor of ?1.3.

  2. Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?ahin, Sümer

    2014-09-01

    Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, 233U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO2/RG-PuO2) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG-PuO2 + 96 % ThO2; 6 % RG-PuO2 + 94 % ThO2; 10 % RG-PuO2 + 90 % ThO2; 20 % RG-PuO2 + 80 % ThO2; 30 % RG-PuO2 + 70 % ThO2, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ˜ 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ˜ 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG-PuO2 fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MWth has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ˜160 kg 233U per year in addition to fission energy production in situ, multiplying the fusion energy by a factor of ˜1.3.

  3. Sustainable Energy without the hot air

    E-print Network

    MacKay, David J.C.

    .withouthotair.com #12;3 So far, this book's question has been `how can we live without fossil fuels?' Because Britain currently gets 90% of its energy from fossil fuels, it's no surprise that getting off fossil fuels requires than fossil fuel power systems ­ I am worried that we won't actually get off fossil fuels when we need

  4. Sustainable Energy - Without the Hot Air

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-06-27

    In his book, MacKay explores our population’s addiction to fossil fuels and the problems faced with sustainability. Two issues faced with fossil fuels are they will eventually run out and they are harming our environment during use. McKay does not give one simple solution to the problem, but contrast various advanced technologies and how they may be applied to improve our environment and sustainability. More information may be found at http://www.withouthotair.com/.

  5. Perceptions of core elements for sustainability management systems (SMS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Javier Esquer-Peralta; Luis Velazquez; Nora Munguia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The concepts of sustainable development (SD) and management systems (MS) are finding increasing acceptance in a variety of fields, including academy, politics, and non-governmental organizations. These concepts are also being used by the general population. This paper aims to describe the perception of different experts by discussing the usefulness of sustainability management systems (SMS) as holistic systems that

  6. Placing Ecosystem Sustainability Within the Context of Dynamic Earth Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the concept of ecosystem sustainability and the practice of sustainable land management both have long-term foci, it is necessary to view these from the perspective of dynamic rather than static systems. In addition to the typical static system approach for assessing ecos...

  7. Development of a system of indicators for sustainable port management.

    PubMed

    Peris-Mora, E; Diez Orejas, J M; Subirats, A; Ibáñez, S; Alvarez, P

    2005-12-01

    The 1998 project ECOPORT, "Towards A Sustainable Transport Network", developed by the Valencia Port Authority (VPA), established the bases for implementing an Environmental Management System (EMS) in industrial harbours. The use of data and information shall always be required to develop an efficient EMS. The objective of the present research (INDAPORT) study is to propose a system of sustainable environmental management indicators to be used by any port authorities. All activities performed within a port area are analysed for any potential environmental impacts and risks. An environmental analysis of port activities has been carried out with the objective of designing the indicators system. Twenty-one corresponding activities have been identified for large industrial ports. Subsequently, the same methodology developed to date will be later applied to other Spanish and European ports. The study has been developed by using an original system and a methodology, which simultaneously use stage diagrams and systemic models (material and energy flow charts). Multi-criteria analysis techniques were used to evaluate potential impacts (identification of factors and evaluation of impacts). PMID:16095626

  8. BIOFUELS: THE KEY TO INDIA'S SUSTAINABLE ENERGY NEEDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linoj Kumar; M P Ram Mohan

    A country of billion population and having seen a sustained and rapid economic expansion in the last decade India's energy demand will see a quantum 40 percent growth in the next ten years. India, like many other developing countries, is a net importer of energy. More than 25 percent of primary energy needs are being met through imports mainly in

  9. Request for Proposals Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research (WISER)

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    of national interest related to energy and sustainability. Proposals based on new and innovative areas of interdisciplinary research of national interest, or 2) areas that enhance ongoing WISER research activities including clean coal technology, renewable energy and energy storage, smart grid, water

  10. The Challenge of Creating Australia's Sustainable Energy Future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin Harding; Parsons Brinckerhoff

    In light of the historic challenge Australia faces in meeting both its energy needs and carbon emissions targets over the coming decades, a new approach to the forecasting of energy demand and supply has been developed. The approach is subsequently applied to map out a sustainable future for Australia's energy sector out to the year 2050. Australia's carbon emissions are

  11. Conducting Sustainable Energy Projects in Secondary Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toolin, Regina; Watson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how sixth through twelfth grade science teachers can engage their students in the design and implementation of sustainable energy projects as part of a unit of study on energy. The project challenges students to engage in an energy project that gives them the opportunity to make a difference in their local community and the…

  12. An Operational Excellence Approach to Sustainable Energy Management

    E-print Network

    McMullan, A.

    interest wanes when energy prices are lower. With today’s high energy prices and growing interest in reducing CO 2 emissions, energy management must become a core business activity and be implemented in a sustainable fashion as an embedded work process...

  13. Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Bradshaw; T. Hamacher; U. Fischer

    2011-01-01

    An acceptable criterion for strong sustainability in the consumption of natural resources is an effective, or virtual, limitlessness of supply, which can be defined, albeit arbitrarily, as corresponding to a few million years. The fuels for nuclear fusion—lithium and deuterium—satisfy this condition because of the abundance of lithium in seawater and of deuterium in all forms of water. The possible

  14. Sustainable Energy Scheme Mentor Job description

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Jim

    the UK Student Recruitment and Outreach Team / School of Engineering Sciences with the development and Outreach Team Job title: Engineering Scheme Mentor Responsible to: UK Student Recruitment and Outreach Team with the development and delivery of in-school workshops on the sustainability theme. · To be a positive student role

  15. Environmental management systems and sustainable development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. McDonach; P. P. Yaneske

    2002-01-01

    The idea of sustainable development was first brought to widespread attention as a global issue; however, it is increasingly being applied at more local levels down to that of individual companies. This raises the potential danger that sustainable development will come to be predominantly identified with the preservation of the organisation involved. A likely outcome is that management decision-making will

  16. CONSTRUCTING A GENERAL SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability attracts enormous interest in the minds of the public and the scientific and engineering community because it holds the promise of a long-tem solution to environmental problems. Sustainability, however, is mathematically loosely defined. There is no widely accepted...

  17. CONSTRUCTING A GENERAL SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability atracts enormous interest in the minds of the public and the scientific and engineering community because it holds the promise of a long-term solution to environmental problems. Sustainability, however, is mathematically loosely defined. There is no widely accepted...

  18. Developing a sustainability framework for the assessment of bioenergy systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucia Elghali; Roland Clift; Philip Sinclair; Calliope Panoutsou; Ausilio Bauen

    2007-01-01

    The potential for biomass to contribute to energy supply in a low-carbon economy is well recognised. However, for the sector to contribute fully to sustainable development in the UK, specific exploitation routes must meet the three sets of criteria usually recognised as representing the tests for sustainability: economic viability in the market and fiscal framework within which the supply chain

  19. The role of women in sustainable energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cecelski, E.

    2000-07-13

    This paper explores the question of how sustainable energy development--specifically, decentralized renewable energy technologies--can complement and benefit from the goal of increasing women's role in development. It is based on a paper that was originally presented at the World Renewable Energy Congress-V held in Florence, Italy, in September 1998, as a contribution to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's program on gender and energy.

  20. Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation

    E-print Network

    Diamond, Richard

    1 Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Siderius ABSTRACT We argue that a primary focus on energy efficiency may not be sufficient to slow (and in order to achieve a sustainable energy balance. Along the way, we may find it possible to shift

  1. Physics of Sustainable Energy --California State Policy

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning Codes & Standards Demand Side Management Integration Workforce Solar Roofs 1% Renewables 13% Cap and Trade 20% Energy 29% Transportation 33% Energy Efficiency 15 "Loading Order" of Energy Resources: Energy efficiency Demand response Distributed generation Renewable

  2. Investigating the potential for a self-sustaining slow pyrolysis system under varying operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Kyle; Mašek, Ond?ej

    2014-06-01

    This work aimed to investigate the impact of highest treatment temperature (HTT), heating rate, carrier gas flow rate and feedstock on the composition and energy content of pyrolysis gas to assess whether a self-sustained system could be achieved through the combustion of the gas fraction alone, leaving other co-products available for alternative high-value uses. Calculations based on gas composition showed that the pyrolysis process could be sustained by the energy contained within the pyrolysis gases alone. The lower energy limit (6% biomass higher heating value (HHV)) was surpassed by pyrolysis at ?450°C while only a HTT of 650°C consistently met the upper energy limit (15% biomass HHV). These findings fill an important gap in literature related to the energy balance of the pyrolysis systems for biochar production, and show that, at least from an energy balance perspective; self-sustained slow pyrolysis for co-production of biochar and liquid products is feasible. PMID:24747394

  3. Water and Energy Sustainability: A Balance of Government Action and Industry Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Grunewald

    2009-12-31

    By completing the tasks and subtasks of the project, the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) through its state regulatory agency members and oil and gas industry partners, will bring attention to water quality and quantity issues and make progress toward water and energy sustainability though enhanced water protection and conservation thus enhancing the viability of the domestic fossil fuel industry. The project contains 4 major independent Tasks. Task 1 - Work Plan: Water-Energy Sustainability: A Symposium on Resource Viability. Task 2 - Work Plan: A Regional Assessment of Water and Energy Sustainability. Task 3 - Work Plan: Risk Based Data Management System-Water Water and Energy Module. Task 4 - Work Plan: Identification and Assessment of States Regulatory Programs Regarding Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems. Each task has a specific scope (details given).

  4. A multi-source multi-product internal reforming fuel cell energy system as a stepping stone in the transition towards a more sustainable energy and transport sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Hemmes; L. M. Kamp; A. B. H. Vernay; G. de Werk

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the innovative concept of flexible poly-generation of hydrogen, power and heat using an internal reforming fuel cell. Flow sheet calculations show that total efficiency of the system in terms of hydrogen and power production can be increased significantly up to 90%. Furthermore by the coproduction of hydrogen, operation at double power density becomes feasible. The concept does

  5. Fostering sustained energy behavior change and increasing energy literacy in a student housing energy challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Robert Stephen

    We designed the Kukui Cup challenge to foster energy conservation and increase energy literacy. Based on a review of the literature, the challenge combined a variety of elements into an overall game experience, including: real-time energy feedback, goals, commitments, competition, and prizes. We designed a software system called Makahiki to provide the online portion of the Kukui Cup challenge. Energy use was monitored by smart meters installed on each floor of the Hale Aloha residence halls on the University of Hawai'i at Manoa campus. In October 2011, we ran the UH Kukui Cup challenge for the over 1000 residents of the Hale Aloha towers. To evaluate the Kukui Cup challenge, I conducted three experiments: challenge participation, energy literacy, and energy use. Many residents participated in the challenge, as measured by points earned and actions completed through the challenge website. I measured the energy literacy of a random sample of Hale Aloha residents using an online energy literacy questionnaire administered before and after the challenge. I found that challenge participants' energy knowledge increased significantly compared to non-challenge participants. Positive self-reported energy behaviors increased after the challenge for both challenge participants and non-participants, leading to the possibility of passive participation by the non-challenge participants. I found that energy use varied substantially between and within lounges over time. Variations in energy use over time complicated the selection of a baseline of energy use to compare the levels during and after the challenge. The best team reduced its energy use during the challenge by 16%. However, team energy conservation did not appear to correlate to participation in the challenge, and there was no evidence of sustained energy conservation after the challenge. The problems inherent in assessing energy conservation using a baseline call into question this common practice. My research has generated several contributions, including: a demonstration of increased energy literacy as a result of the challenge, the discovery of fundamental problems with the use of baselines for assessing energy competitions, the creation of two open source software systems, and the creation of an energy literacy assessment instrument.

  6. Urban sustainable energy development: A case study of the city of Philadelphia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyriou, Iraklis

    This study explores the role of cities in sustainable energy development through a governance-informed analysis. Despite the leading position of municipalities in energy sustainability, cities have been mostly conceptualized as sites where energy development is shaped by external policy scales, i.e. the national level. A growing body of research, however, critiques this analytical perspective, and seeks to better understand the type of factors and dynamics that influence energy sustainability within a multi-level policy context for urban energy. Given that particular circumstances are applicable across cities, a context-specific analysis can provide insight regarding how sustainable energy development takes place in urban areas. In applying such an analytical perspective on urban energy sustainability, this study undertakes a qualitative case study analysis for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, by looking at four key local policy initiatives relevant to building energy efficiency and solar electricity development at the municipal government and city-wide level. The evaluation of the initiatives suggests that renewable electricity use has increased substantially in the city over the last years but the installed capacity of local renewable electricity systems, including solar photovoltaics, is low. On the other hand, although the city has made little progress in meeting its building energy efficiency targets, more comprehensive action is taken in this area. The study finds that the above outcomes have been shaped mainly by four factors. The first is the city government's incremental policy approach aiming to develop a facilitative context for local action. The second is the role that a diverse set of stakeholders have in local sustainable energy development. The third is the constraints that systemic policy barriers create for solar power development. The fourth is the ways through which the relevant multi-level policy environment structures the city's possibilities on sustainable energy. In this context, the study identifies four areas of policy recommendation that could enhance Philadelphia's prospects for energy sustainability: integrated municipal energy planning; stable financing for market development; enhanced actor interactions; and multi-level policymaking that facilitates local action. These policy directions could be of interest to a broader body of metropolitan cities regarding their efforts in sustainable energy development.

  7. Can large-scale advanced-adiabatic compressed air energy storage be justified economically in an age of sustainable energy?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William F. Pickard; Nicholas J. Hansing; Amy Q. Shen

    2009-01-01

    This article explores whether large-scale compressed air energy storage can be justified technically and economically in an era of sustainable energy. In particular, we present an integrated energy and exergy analysis of an idealized case of an advanced-adiabatic compressed air energy storage system and estimate its cycle efficiency. Based on our results, advanced-adiabatic compressed air energy storage (AA-CAES) seems to

  8. Sustainable energy development in Austria until 2020: Insights from applying the integrated model "e3.at"

    PubMed

    Stocker, Andrea; Großmann, Anett; Madlener, Reinhard; Wolter, Marc Ingo

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on the Austrian research project "Renewable energy in Austria: Modeling possible development trends until 2020". The project investigated possible economic and ecological effects of a substantially increased use of renewable energy sources in Austria. Together with stakeholders and experts, three different scenarios were defined, specifying possible development trends for renewable energy in Austria. The scenarios were simulated for the period 2006-2020, using the integrated environment-energy-economy model "e3.at". The modeling results indicate that increasing the share of renewable energy sources in total energy use is an important but insufficient step towards achieving a sustainable energy system in Austria. A substantial increase in energy efficiency and a reduction of residential energy consumption also form important cornerstones of a sustainable energy policy. PMID:21976785

  9. Sustainable energy development in Austria until 2020: Insights from applying the integrated model “e3.at”

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, Andrea; Großmann, Anett; Madlener, Reinhard; Wolter, Marc Ingo

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the Austrian research project “Renewable energy in Austria: Modeling possible development trends until 2020”. The project investigated possible economic and ecological effects of a substantially increased use of renewable energy sources in Austria. Together with stakeholders and experts, three different scenarios were defined, specifying possible development trends for renewable energy in Austria. The scenarios were simulated for the period 2006–2020, using the integrated environment–energy–economy model “e3.at”. The modeling results indicate that increasing the share of renewable energy sources in total energy use is an important but insufficient step towards achieving a sustainable energy system in Austria. A substantial increase in energy efficiency and a reduction of residential energy consumption also form important cornerstones of a sustainable energy policy. PMID:21976785

  10. SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY: ECOLOGICAL AND OTHER ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), namely development that "meets the needs and asperations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of t...

  11. SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY: ECOLOGICAL AND OTHER ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), namely development that "meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those...

  12. SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY: ECOLOGICAL AND OTHER ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), namely development that "meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of t...

  13. Operationalizing Sustainable Development Suncor Energy Inc: A critical case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Andrew

    The concept of Sustainable Development is often understood as a framework within which organizations are able to move forward in a successful and beneficial manner. However, it is also seen as an ambiguous notion with little substance beyond a hopeful dialogue. If we are to base organizational action upon the concepts of Sustainable Development, it is vital that we comprehend the implications of how the concept is understood at a behavioral level. Industry leaders, competitors, shareholders, and stakeholders recognize Suncor Energy Inc as a leading organization within the Oil and Gas energy field. In particular it has a reputation for proactive thinking and action within the areas of environmental and social responsibility. Through attempting to integrate the ideas of Sustainable Development at a foundational level into the strategic plan, the management of Suncor Energy Inc has committed the organization to be a sustainable energy company. To achieve this vision the organization faces the challenge of converting strategic goals into operational behaviors, a process critical for a successful future. This research focuses on understanding the issues found with this conversion process. Through exploring a critical case, this research illuminates the reality of a best-case scenario. The findings thus have implications for both Suncor Energy Inc and more importantly all other organizations attempting to move in a Sustainable Development direction.

  14. Understanding and Advancing Campus Sustainability Using a Systems Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Stephen M.; Stuart, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: University campuses behave as complex systems, and sustainability in higher education is best seen as an emergent quality that arises from interactions both within an institution and between the institution and the environmental and social contexts in which it operates. A framework for strategically prioritizing campus sustainability work…

  15. Actualizing sustainability: environmental policy for resilience in ecological systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Society benefits from ecological systems in many ways. These benefits are often referred to as ecosystem services (MA 2005). Because these services matter to humans, they are critical to sustainability. Sustainability has many definitions, but for this chapter, we link our defi...

  16. Welfare and Generational Equity in Sustainable Unfunded Pension Systems

    E-print Network

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Welfare and Generational Equity in Sustainable Unfunded Pension Systems Alan J. Auerbach Economics several actual and hypothetical sustainable PAYGO pension structures, including: (1) versions of the US viability of Pay-As-You-Go (PAYGO) pension programs in many countries. These programs promise a level

  17. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector 

    E-print Network

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates the potentials of energy-saving and mitigation of green-house gas (GHG) emission offered by implementation of building energy efficiency policies in China. An overview of existing literature regarding long-term energy...

  18. Nuclear energy and sustainability: Understanding ITER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karine Fiore

    2006-01-01

    Deregulation and new environmental requirements combined with the growing scarcity of fossil resources and the increasing world energy demand lead to a renewal of the debate on tomorrow's energies. Specifically, nuclear energy, which has undeniable assets, faces new constraints. On the one hand, nuclear energy is very competitive and harmless to greenhouse effect. From this point, it seems to be

  19. Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems 2 (2012) 7180 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-print Network

    Mishra, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems 2 (2012) 71­80 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Sustainable Computing: Informatics and Systems journal homepage: www area, per- formance and energy requirements. Dynamic cache reconfiguration is very effective to reduce

  20. Sustainable energy development and water supply security in Kamojang Geothermal Field: The Energy-Water Nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofyan, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Fujimitsu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Kamojang Geothermal Field (KGF) is a typical vapor dominated hydrothermal system in West Java, Indonesia. This geothermal field is the oldest exploited geothermal field in Indonesia. From 1983 to 2005, more than 160 million tons of steam have been exploited from the KGF and more than 30 million tons of water were injected into the reservoir system. The injected water come from condensed water, local river and ground water. Sustainable production in the geothermal energy development is the ability of the production system applied to sustain the stable production level over long times and to manage the mass balance between production, injection and natural recharge in the geothermal reservoir during exploitation. Mass balance in the reservoir system can be monitored by using time lapse gravity monitoring. Mass variation of hydrodynamic in the reservoir of KGF from 1999 to 2005 is about ?3.34 Mt/year while is about ?3.78 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Another period between 2009 and 2010, mass variation decreased about ?8.24 Mt. According to the history of production and injection, natural recharge to the KGF's reservoir is estimated at about 2.77 Mt/year from 1999 to 2005 and 2.75 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Between 2009 and 2010, KGF has a bigger mass deficiency rate throughout 200 MWe maintain production. Large amount of fresh water is needed for sustainable geothermal energy production, while the domestic water supply need is also increased. Natural recharge, about 50% of injected water, cooling system, drilling and other production activities in KGF spend large amounts of fresh water. Water consumption for local people around KGF is about 1.46 MT/year. The water volume around KGF of total runoff is the range between dry season 0.07 MT/month and rainy season 4.4 MT/month. The water demands for sustainable geothermal production of KGF and for local people's consumption will increase in the future. Integrated planning between the energy and water sectors in KGF therefore will be essential to meet rising demands for both resources. Keywords: Gravity monitoring, Sustainable energy development, Water supplyThe first author acknowledges this research activity was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25.03068.

  1. Sustainable Water Use System of Artesian Water in Alluvial Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, K.; Tsujimura, M.; Tase, N.

    2013-12-01

    The traditional water use system, developed with the intelligence of the local residents, usually takes advantage of local natural resources and is considered as a sustainable system, because of its energy saving(only forces of nature). For this reason, such kind of water use system is also recommended in some strategic policies for the purpose of a symbiosis between nature and human society. Therefore, it is important to clarify the relationship between human activities and water use systems. This study aims to clarify the mechanism of traditional water use processes in alluvial fan, and in addition, to investigate the important factors which help forming a sustainable water use system from the aspects of natural conditions and human activities. The study area, an alluvial fan region named Adogawa, is located in Shiga Prefecture, Japan and is in the west of Biwa Lake which is the largest lake in Japan. In this alluvial region where the land use is mainly occupied by settlements and paddy fields, a groundwater flowing well system is called "kabata" according to local tradition. During field survey, we took samples of groundwater, river water and lake water as well as measured the potential head of groundwater. The results showed that the upper boundary of flowing water was approximately 88m amsl, which is basically the same as the results reported by Kishi and Kanno (1966). In study area, a rapid increase of water pumping for domestic water use and melting snow during last 50 years, even if the irrigation area has decreased about 30% since 1970, and this fact may cause a decrease in recharge rate to groundwater. However, the groundwater level didn't decline based on the observed results, which is probably contributed by some water conservancy projects on Biwa Lake which maintained the water level of the lake. All the water samples are characterized by Ca-HCO3 type and similar stable isotopic value of ?D and ?18O. Groundwater level in irrigation season is higher than that in non-irrigation season, which indicates that groundwater level is apparently influenced by surface water. Some communities and NPOs working in this area maintain the "kabata" and canal for environment conservation. There are many rules for the local residents when using the water resources. For example, the use of detergents is prohibited for "kabata" users. The residents living upstream also should think of other groundwater users downstream. For this reason, it can be considered that the "kabata" water use method contributed to a symbiosis between ecosystem and human activity The study area case showed that the traditional water use system is useful for forming a sustainable groundwater flowing well use system.

  2. Sustainable data centers powered by renewable energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Levente J. Klein; Sergio Bermudez; Hans-Dieter Wehle; Stephan Barabasi; Hendrik F. Hamann

    2012-01-01

    The energy consumption of data centers (DCs) has dramatically increased in recent years, primarily due to the massive computing demands driven by communications, banking, online retail, and entertainment services. In today's data centers, the cooling and infrastructure operations require almost the same energy as the IT operations. The large energy consumption in data centers prompted government agencies, industries, professional organizations,

  3. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems

    E-print Network

    Isaacs, Rufus

    quality/human nutrition. The successful candidate will establish innovative research and outreach programsASSISTANT PROFESSOR Sustainable Vegetable Production and Nutrition Systems The Department will develop a nationally and internationally recognized program in vegetable crop nutrition and soil fertility

  4. The Triple Value Model: A Systems Approach to Sustainable Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unintended environmental impacts of economic development threaten the continued availability of ecosystem services that are critical to human well being. An integrated systems approach is needed to characterize sustainability problems and evaluate potential solutions. The T...

  5. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH RESEARCH (SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major technical efforts under the management of NRMRL's Sustainable Technology Division's Systems Analysis Branch (SAB) are organized under research programs. Listed below are the SAB research programs and brief descriptions of their function. Simulation & Design -- This pro...

  6. An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Margaret Miller

    2014-01-01

    The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

  7. Article Title Page Understanding and advancing campus sustainability using a systems framework

    E-print Network

    Vermont, University of

    Clean Energy Fund, and developed strategies to promote efficiency and renewable energy productionArticle Title Page Understanding and advancing campus sustainability using a systems framework/Institution: University of Vermont Town/City: Burlington State (US only): VT Country: USA Author 2 Name: Ralph Stuart

  8. NASA's Space Launch System: Affordability for Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd A.; Creech, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is charged with delivering a new capability for human exploration beyond Earth orbit in an austere economic climate. But the SLS value is clear and codified in United States (U.S.) budget law. The SLS Program knows that affordability is the key to sustainability and will provide an overview of initiatives designed to fit within the funding guidelines by using existing engine assets and hardware now in testing to meet a first launch by 2017 within the projected budget. It also has a long-range plan to keep the budget flat, yet evolve the 70-tonne (t) initial lift capability to 130-t lift capability after the first two flights. To achieve the evolved configuration, advanced technologies must offer appropriate return on investment to be selected through the competitive process. For context, the SLS will be larger than the Saturn V that took 12 men on 6 trips for a total of 11 days on the lunar surface some 40 years ago. Astronauts train for long-duration voyages on platforms such as the International Space Station, but have not had transportation to go beyond Earth orbit in modern times, until now. To arrive at the launch vehicle concept, the SLS Program conducted internal engineering and business studies that have been externally validated by industry and reviewed by independent assessment panels. In parallel with SLS concept studies, NASA is now refining its mission manifest, guided by U.S. space policy and the Global Exploration Roadmap, which reflects the mutual goals of a dozen member nations. This mission planning will converge with a flexible heavy-lift rocket that can carry international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they need for extended trips to asteroids and Mars. In addition, the SLS capability will accommodate very large science instruments and other payloads, using a series of modular fairings and adapters to configure the rocket for the mission. The SLS affordability plan includes streamlining interfaces, applying risk-based insight into contracted work, centralizing systems engineering and integration, and nurturing a learning culture where the question Why? is often asked and the answer "Because we've always done it that way" is rarely heard. The SLS Program will deliver affordable space transportation solutions for the Orion Multi-Purpose Cargo Vehicle s first autonomous certification flight in 2017, followed by a crewed flight in 2021. As this briefing will show, the SLS will offer a global infrastructure asset for robotic and human scouts of all nations.

  9. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  10. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  11. Reduced Emissions and Lower Costs: Combining Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency into a Sustainable Energy Portfolio Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Combining renewable energy and energy efficiency in Sustainable Energy Portfolio Standards has emerged as a key state and national policy option to achieve greater levels of sustainable energy resources with maximum economic efficiency and equity. One advantage of the SEPS relative to a renewable portfolio standard or a stand-along energy efficiency resource standard is enhanced flexibility and broader options for meeting targets.

  12. SIMULATED EXPERIMENTS WITH COMPLEX SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of sustainability is associated with the statement from the World Commission on Environment and Development: "Development that meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future." But the construction of practi...

  13. SYSTEMS METRICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of sustainability is often associated with the statement from the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: "... development that meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future ...". Hence, sus...

  14. Sustainable Development, Systems Thinking and Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the impact of the sustainable development (SD) agenda on the occupational and professional needs of those who have undergone educational and training programmes in the environmental field either at the undergraduate or the postgraduate level or through relevant professional institutions' continuing professional development…

  15. Renewable rural electrification: Sustainability assessment of mini-hybrid off-grid technological systems in the African context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Colin Brent; David E. Rogers

    2009-01-01

    The investigation summarised in this paper applied a sustainability assessment methodology on a renewable energy technological system in a rural village project that was commissioned by the South African Department of Minerals and Energy. The project comprised of wind, solar and lead-acid battery energy storage technologies that were implemented as a mini-hybrid off-grid electrification system for the village. The sustainability

  16. Renewable rural electrification: Sustainability assessment of mini-hybrid off-grid technological systems in the African context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Colin Brent; David E. Rogers

    2010-01-01

    The investigation summarised in this paper applied a sustainability assessment methodology on a renewable energy technological system in a rural village project that was commissioned by the South African Department of Minerals and Energy. The project comprised of wind, solar and lead-acid battery energy storage technologies that were implemented as a mini-hybrid off-grid electrification system for the village. The sustainability

  17. Renewable energy and sustainable communities: Alaska's wind generator experience†

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, R. Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1984, the Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development (DCED) issued the State's first inventory/economic assessment of wind generators, documenting installed wind generator capacity and the economics of replacing diesel-fuel-generated electricity. Alaska's wind generation capacity had grown from hundreds of installed kilowatts to over 15.3 megawatts (MW) by January 2012. Method This article reviews data and conclusions presented in “Alaska's Wind Energy Systems; Inventory and Economic Assessment” (1). (Alaska Department of Commerce and Economic Development, S. Konkel, 1984). It provides a foundation and baseline for understanding the development of this renewable energy source. Results Today's technologies have evolved at an astonishing pace; a typical generator in an Alaska wind farm now is likely rated at 1.5-MW capacity, compared to the single-kilowatt (kW) machines present in 1984. Installed capacity has mushroomed, illustrated by Unalakleet's 600-kW wind farm dwarfing the original three 10-kW machines included in the 1984 inventory. Kodiak Electric had three 1.5-MW turbines installed at Pillar Mountain in 2009, with three additional turbines of 4.5-MW capacity installed in 2012. Utilities now actively plan for wind generation and compete for state funding. Discussion State of Alaska energy policy provides the context for energy project decision-making. Substantial renewable energy fund (REF) awards – $202,000,000 to date for 227 REF projects in the first 5 cycles of funding – along with numerous energy conservation programs – are now in place. Increasing investment in wind is driven by multiple factors. Stakeholders have interests both in public policy and meeting private investment objectives. Wind generator investors should consider project economics and potential impacts of energy decisions on human health. Specifically this article considers:changing environmental conditions in remote Alaska villages,impacts associated with climate change on human health,progress in better understanding wind energy potential through resource assessments and new tools for detailed feasibility and project planning,need for comprehensive monitoring and data analysis, andstate funding requirements and opportunity costs. Conclusion The energy policy choices ahead for Alaska will have important implications for Arctic population health, especially for those villages whose relatively small size and remote locations make energy a key component of subsistence lifestyles and community sustainability. Wind generation can contribute to meeting renewable energy goals and is a particularly important resource for rural and remote Alaskan communities currently dependent on diesel fuel for generating electricity and heat. PMID:23971014

  18. Scientific challenges in sustainable energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan

    2006-04-01

    We describe and evaluate the technical, political, and economic challenges involved with widespread adoption of renewable energy technologies. First, we estimate fossil fuel resources and reserves and, together with the current and projected global primary power production rates, estimate the remaining years of oil, gas, and coal. We then compare the conventional price of fossil energy with that from renewable energy technologies (wind, solar thermal, solar electric, biomass, hydroelectric, and geothermal) to evaluate the potential for a transition to renewable energy in the next 20-50 years. Secondly, we evaluate - per the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - the greenhouse constraint on carbon-based power consumption as an unpriced externality to fossil-fuel use, considering global population growth, increased global gross domestic product, and increased energy efficiency per unit GDP. This constraint is projected to drive the demand for carbon-free power well beyond that produced by conventional supply/demand pricing tradeoffs, to levels far greater than current renewable energy demand. Thirdly, we evaluate the level and timescale of R&D investment needed to produce the required quantity of carbon-free power by the 2050 timeframe. Fourth, we evaluate the energy potential of various renewable energy resources to ascertain which resources are adequately available globally to support the projected demand. Fifth, we evaluate the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free power required. Finally, we discuss the effects of a change in primary power technology on the energy supply infrastructure and discuss the impact of such a change on the modes of energy consumption by the energy consumer and additional demands on the chemical sciences to support such a transition in energy supply.

  19. Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future.

    PubMed

    Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-08-16

    Access to clean, affordable and reliable energy has been a cornerstone of the world's increasing prosperity and economic growth since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Our use of energy in the twenty-first century must also be sustainable. Solar and water-based energy generation, and engineering of microbes to produce biofuels are a few examples of the alternatives. This Perspective puts these opportunities into a larger context by relating them to a number of aspects in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. It also provides a snapshot of the current energy landscape and discusses several research and development opportunities and pathways that could lead to a prosperous, sustainable and secure energy future for the world. PMID:22895334

  20. Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nathan

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will describe and evaluate the challenges, both technical, political, and economic, involved with widespread adoption of renewable energy technologies. First, we estimate the available fossil fuel resources and reserves based on data from the World Energy Assessment and World Energy Council. In conjunction with the current and projected global primary power production rates, we then estimate the remaining years of supply of oil, gas, and coal for use in primary power production. We then compare the price per unit of energy of these sources to those of renewable energy technologies (wind, solar thermal, solar electric, biomass, hydroelectric, and geothermal) to evaluate the degree to which supply/demand forces stimulate a transition to renewable energy technologies in the next 20-50 years. Secondly, we evaluate the greenhouse gas buildup limitations on carbon-based power consumption as an unpriced externality to fossil-fuel consumption, considering global population growth, increased global gross domestic product, and increased energy efficiency per unit of globally averaged GDP, as produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A greenhouse gas constraint on total carbon emissions, in conjunction with global population growth, is projected to drive the demand for carbon-free power well beyond that produced by conventional supply/demand pricing tradeoffs, at potentially daunting levels relative to current renewable energy demand levels. Thirdly, we evaluate the level and timescale of R&D investment that is needed to produce the required quantity of carbon-free power by the 2050 timeframe, to support the expected global energy demand for carbon-free power. Fourth, we evaluate the energy potential of various renewable energy resources to ascertain which resources are adequately available globally to support the projected global carbon-free energy demand requirements. Fifth, we evaluate the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free power on the needed scale by the 2050 timeframe. Finally, we discuss the effects of a change in primary power technology on the energy supply infrastructure and discuss the impact of such a change on the modes of energy consumption by the energy consumer and additional demands on the chemical sciences to support such a transition in energy supply.

  1. Operationalizing sustainability in urban coastal systems: a system dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Bithas, Kostas; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2013-12-15

    We propose a system dynamics approach for Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) in urban coastal systems. A systematic analysis based on theoretical considerations, policy analysis and experts' knowledge is followed in order to define the concept of ESD. The principles underlying ESD feed the development of a System Dynamics Model (SDM) that connects the pollutant loads produced by urban systems' socioeconomic activities with the ecological condition of the coastal ecosystem that it is delineated in operational terms through key biological elements defined by the EU Water Framework Directive. The receiving waters of the Athens Metropolitan area, which bears the elements of typical high population density Mediterranean coastal city but which currently has also new dynamics induced by the ongoing financial crisis, are used as an experimental system for testing a system dynamics approach to apply the concept of ESD. Systems' thinking is employed to represent the complex relationships among the components of the system. Interconnections and dependencies that determine the potentials for achieving ESD are revealed. The proposed system dynamics analysis can facilitate decision makers to define paths of development that comply with the principles of ESD. PMID:24200010

  2. Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campus Boyd and Dethier

    E-print Network

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    ;2 Introduction The importance of energy is rarely far from the American psyche. Gasoline runs our cars, oil heats our homes, and electricity runs the appliances that define modern life. However, the reckless use image, especially as other schools add sustainability programs and staff (Carlson 2009). Any

  3. Agile sustainable communities: On-site renewable energy generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Woodrow W. Clark II; Larry Eisenberg

    2008-01-01

    Smart and sustainable campuses demand three components. First, there is the need to have a Strategic Master Plan (SMP) for all infrastructures that include energy, transportation, water, waste and telecommunications along with the traditional dimensions of research, curricula, outreach and assessments. Secondarily, there is the array of issues pertaining to the sitting of buildings and overall facility master planning which

  4. Plasma and Technology Programme National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    1 Plasma and Technology Programme National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy Technical University METHODS OF OZONE GENERATION BY MICRO-PLASMA CONCEPT Authors A. Fateev, A. Chiper, W. Chen and E. Stamate-1-6365 project devoted to plasma-assisted DeNOx. Ozone is as a key agent in plasma NOx reduction because

  5. Sustainable development of hydropower and biomass energy in Turkey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Kaygusuz

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with policies to meet the increasing energy demand for electricity and domestic heating in Turkey. Air pollutant emissions due to power generation and their harmful effects on the environment are also presented. We also argue in favor of small scale dams for sustainable development. Turkey has a total gross hydropower potential of 433 GW, but only 125

  6. Experience for Sustainable Development of Rural Energy in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Wallace; H. Wu; Z. Y. Wang

    É Abstract: China has made great progress in the past 20 years in lifting rural populations out of poverty and in providing modern services such as access to electricity to remote rural villages and households. Still more than 20 million rural farmers and herdsmen in more than 20,000 villages remain unelectrified. Increasingly, the concept of sustainable rural energy and economic

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Preparation and Characterization of Nanomaterials for Sustainable Energy Production Chang-jun Liu and characterization of new and novel functional nanomaterials with well- controlled sizes, shapes, porosities, crystal economy. The development of various nanomaterials for the generation of more efficient and low-cost solar

  8. The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    E-print Network

    The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pleased" Guest Speakers: Natalie Griffith ­ ORNL Ecosystem Science Natalie is a terrestrial biogeochemist ­ ORNL Bioenergy Resource & Engineering Systems Matt has expertise in accounting for non-market amenities

  9. Sustainable energy development strategies for Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prida Wibulswas

    During the last decade, the average annual energy demand increased by about 4.3%. Fossil fuels represented 81.4% of the total energy supply in 2001. Indigenous natural gas accounted for 33.7% of the supply. Biomass resources including fuel wood, paddy husk and bagasse whose utilization generates a very small amount of net greenhouse-gas emission account for about 16.6% of the total

  10. Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort 

    E-print Network

    Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

    2009-01-01

    . Currently, the main disadvantage of alternative energy sources is their high first costs. Wind turbines and photovoltaic (solar) panels, two of the more common distributed generation renewable energy methods for schools and similar facilities, cost... electricity for an entire elementary school might approach the size of a football field. Wind turbines are more location dependent. They perform better in locations with higher average wind speeds and fewer ground obstructions, such as trees. Wind...

  11. Sustainable deforestation evaluation model and system dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huirong; Lim, C W; Chen, Liqun; Zhou, Xinnian; Zhou, Chengjun; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The current study used the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to construct a sustainable deforestation development evaluation system and evaluation model, which has refined a diversified system to evaluate the theory of sustainable deforestation development. Leveraging the visual image of the system dynamics causal and power flow diagram, we illustrated here that sustainable forestry development is a complex system that encompasses the interaction and dynamic development of ecology, economy, and society and has reflected the time dynamic effect of sustainable forestry development from the three combined effects. We compared experimental programs to prove the direct and indirect impacts of the ecological, economic, and social effects of the corresponding deforest techniques and fully reflected the importance of developing scientific and rational ecological harvesting and transportation technologies. Experimental and theoretical results illustrated that light cableway skidding is an ecoskidding method that is beneficial for the sustainable development of resources, the environment, the economy, and society and forecasted the broad potential applications of light cableway skidding in timber production technology. Furthermore, we discussed the sustainable development countermeasures of forest ecosystems from the aspects of causality, interaction, and harmony. PMID:25254225

  12. Sustainable Deforestation Evaluation Model and System Dynamics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huirong; Lim, C. W.; Chen, Liqun; Zhou, Xinnian; Zhou, Chengjun; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The current study used the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to construct a sustainable deforestation development evaluation system and evaluation model, which has refined a diversified system to evaluate the theory of sustainable deforestation development. Leveraging the visual image of the system dynamics causal and power flow diagram, we illustrated here that sustainable forestry development is a complex system that encompasses the interaction and dynamic development of ecology, economy, and society and has reflected the time dynamic effect of sustainable forestry development from the three combined effects. We compared experimental programs to prove the direct and indirect impacts of the ecological, economic, and social effects of the corresponding deforest techniques and fully reflected the importance of developing scientific and rational ecological harvesting and transportation technologies. Experimental and theoretical results illustrated that light cableway skidding is an ecoskidding method that is beneficial for the sustainable development of resources, the environment, the economy, and society and forecasted the broad potential applications of light cableway skidding in timber production technology. Furthermore, we discussed the sustainable development countermeasures of forest ecosystems from the aspects of causality, interaction, and harmony. PMID:25254225

  13. An Operational Excellence Approach to Sustainable Energy Management 

    E-print Network

    McMullan, A.

    2009-01-01

    in benefits from previously implemented efforts occurs as illustrated in Figure 1. Base Case Performance Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Short term Programs W/ Short Term Improvements Long Term Solutions Sustainable Performance #0;? #0;? Lo #0;? E Energy Use... future projects. The first step in the program is an Energy OpX Assessment, which uses benchmarking and gap analysis to develop a high level master plan. The gap analysis quantifies current performance and the potential for improvement...

  14. The energy situation and its sustainable development strategy in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Na Zhang; Noam Lior; Hongguang Jin

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes China’s energy situation and sustainable development strategy as they were by 2009. The energy consumption in 2009 is reported to be 3.1 billion tons standard coal equivalent, 1\\/7 of the world total, 6.3% higher than in the year 2008, and its share of world CO2 emissions increased rapidly to 20.3% in 2006. These trends are most

  15. Stoked nondynamos: sustaining field in magnetically non-closed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byington, B. M.; Brummell, N. H.; Stone, J. M.; Gough, D. O.

    2014-08-01

    Much effort has gone into identifying and classifying systems that might be capable of dynamo action, i.e. capable of generating and sustaining magnetic field indefinitely against dissipative effects in a conducting fluid. However, it is difficult, if not almost technically impossible, to derive a method of determining in both an absolutely conclusive and a pragmatic manner whether a system is a dynamo or not in the nonlinear regime. This problem has generally been examined only for closed systems, despite the fact that most realistic situations of interest are not strictly closed. Here we examine the even more complex problem of whether a known nondynamo closed system can be distinguished pragmatically from a true dynamo when a small input of magnetic field to the system is allowed. We call such systems ‘stoked nondynamos’ owing to the ‘stoking’ or augmentation of the magnetic field in the system. It may seem obvious that magnetic energy can be sustained in such systems since there is an external source, but crucial questions remain regarding what level is maintained and whether such nondynamo systems can be distinguished from a true dynamo. In this paper, we perform 3D nonlinear numerical simulations with time-dependent ABC forcing possessing known dynamo properties. We find that magnetic field can indeed be maintained at a significant stationary level when stoking a system that is a nondynamo when not stoked. The maintained state results generally from an eventual rough balance of the rates of input and decay of magnetic field. We find that the relevance of this state is dictated by a parameter ? representing the correlation of the resultant field with the stoking forcing function. The interesting regime is where ? is small but non-zero, as this represents a middle ground between a state where the stoking has no effect on the pre-existing nondynamo properties and a state where the effect of stoking is easily detectable. We find that in this regime, (a) the saturated state is somewhat unexpectedly enhanced by a bias resulting from the random fluctuating statistics of the decay process, and (b) the state is indistinguishable from a true dynamo except via ? itself. Such results make the pragmatic identification of dynamos in real situations even more difficult than had previously been thought.

  16. Renewable energy and sustainable developments in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elham Mahmoud; Hoseen el Nather

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the economics of using photovoltaic (PV) technology for developing remote areas. “East Owienat” in Upper Egypt is the chosen region: there, the feasibility of using PV systems for the pumping of ground water in comparison with using diesel units, taking into consideration the different parameters affecting the costs and the present value of both systems, is considered.

  17. Sustainable tourism systems: The example of sustainable rural tourism in Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lars Aronsson

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to provide an overview of what is required of a sustainable tourism system with its two main aspects, demand and supply, and the meeting?places between them. The term tourism refers to leisure travel away from home. As regards the demand side, the paper gives an overview of the motives for and restrictions on travel;

  18. Sustainable water and energy in Gaza Strip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lubna K. Hamdan; Maryam Zarei; Russell R. Chianelli; Elizabeth Gardner

    2008-01-01

    Shortage of fresh water is a common problem in different areas of the world including the Middle East. Desalination of seawater and brackish water is the cheapest way to obtain fresh water in many regions. This research focuses on the situation in Gaza Strip where there is a severe shortage in the energy and water supply. The depletion of fresh

  19. Sustainable Water and Energy in Gaza Strip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Hamdan; M. Zarei; R. Chianelli; E. Gardner

    2007-01-01

    Shortage of fresh water is a common problem in different areas of the world including the Middle East. Desalination of seawater and brackish water is the cheapest way to obtain fresh water in many regions. This research focuses on the situation in Gaza Strip where there is a severe shortage in the energy and water supply. The depletion of fresh

  20. Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural Characterization of Nanomaterials

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural a binding-approximation [4], and the unit cell sketched #12;Nanomaterials for sustainable energy, holography Abstract Zeolites are aluminosilicates widely applied as support for catalysts in the chemical

  1. AFFORDABLE, SUSTAINABLE SOLAR ENERGY HEATER FOR THE DEVELOPING WORLD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research project question is: ?What is an optimum, low-cost, and sustainable system for basic home water heating in underdeveloped areas of the planet?? In the United States, the availability of hot water is taken for granted. A knob is turned and hot water appea...

  2. Integrated energy strategy for the sustainable development of China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linwei Ma; Pei Liu; Feng Fu; Zheng Li; Weidou Ni

    2011-01-01

    We propose in this paper an integrated energy strategy based on a systems approach to address the energy challenges and energy dilemma in China. First, we give a review of existing approaches to energy planning and strategic management, followed by a discussion on the major relationships among energy, economical, environmental and societal systems. Next, we present a conceptual system model

  3. Building Better Buildings: Sustainable Building Activities in California Higher Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowell, Arnold; Eichel, Amanda; Alevantis, Leon; Lovegreen, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the activities and recommendations of California's sustainable building task force, discusses sustainable building activities in California's higher education systems, and highlights key issues that California is grappling with in its implementation of sustainable building practices. (EV)

  4. Emergy as embodied energy based assessment for local sustainability of a constructed wetland in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, J. B.; Chen, G. Q.

    2009-02-01

    Ecological treatment engineering has been widely accepted as an artificially designed work to deal with the deteriorating ecological environment with low energy and resource consumption. To measure the energy and resource consumption and environmental support contained in the constructed wetland as a kind of ecological treatment engineering, emergy as embodied solar energy based assessment is performed and relative emergy-based indices including emergy yield ratio (EYR), emergy load ratio (ELR), emergy sustainability index (ESI), net economic benefit index (Np), and renewable percentage index (Pr), are also modified to evaluate the local sustainability of the constructed wetland in this paper. A case study on Longdao River constructed wetland compared with those of some earlier conventional treatment systems indicate that more local renewable resources and less ecological cost are involved, thus promoting the economic benefit due to less energy and resource consumption and simultaneously lowering the environmental stress of the treatment system on the local areas.

  5. How sustainable is Japan's foreign aid policy? An analysis of Japan's official development assistance and funding for energy sector projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hideka

    Japan has adopted a sustainable development strategy since the late 1980s in the effort to address social and environmental damages caused by past Japan-funded projects in partner nations. Even after about a decade and a half of the policy implementation, however, there are few reports which critically examine effects of the adoption of the idea of sustainable development. This dissertation evaluates Japan's foreign aid policy to determine the extent to which new revisions of aid policy have improved the environmental sustainability of the policy. This dissertation reviews the mainstream idea of sustainable development (also known as the sustainable development paradigm in this dissertation) to reveal the nature of the idea of sustainable development that Japan's foreign aid policy depends on. A literature review of two development discourses---modernization theory and ecological modernization theory---and three types of critiques against the sustainable development paradigm---focused on adverse impacts of modern science, globalization, and environmental overuse---reveals core logics of and problems with the sustainable development paradigm. Japan's foreign aid policy impacts on energy sector development in recipient countries is examined by means of a quantitative analysis and a qualitative analysis. Specifically, it examines the effect of Japan's ODA program over fifteen years that proposed to facilitate sustainable development in developing countries. Special emphasis is given to investigation of ODA disbursements in the energy sector and detailed case studies of several individual energy projects are performed. The dissertation discovers that the sustainable development paradigm guiding Japan's ODA has little capacity to accomplish its goals to bring about social and ecological improvement in developing countries. This dissertation finds three fundamental weaknesses in Japanese ODA policy on energy sector development as well as the sustainable development paradigm; first, the heavy reliance on modern science leads to a failure to use local knowledge and practices which can be more sustainable to sustainability; second, the acceptance of the international capitalist system as the basis for project implementation results in little or no long-term sustainability commitment; and third, the compatibility of economic growth with environmental sustainability, which appears unlikely in the context of global economic inequality. As an alternative, this dissertation suggests several policies for promoting energy systems for rural sustainable development in the Global South.

  6. Energy and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Suding, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    There is a marked difference between the perception of the sustainable development problem in the industrialized countries and that prevailing in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (LA&C). Whereas the industrialized countries seem concerned about the sustainability of their development in view of global climate change, developing countries in LA&C are looking for a sustainable development course that will lead them out of poverty and away from the destruction of the local environment. The industrialized countries perspective is apparent in the titles of the papers being presented at the IAEE Conference under the topic: Harmonizing Energy Policy, Environment, and Sustainable Economic Growth. A great number of titles and sessions focus on the apparent antagonism between economic growth and the environment. By environment one seems to primarily mean emissions into the air, especially greenhouse gas emissions. Probably the majority of the energy community of the industrial countries regards Latin America, on the one hand, as a holder of a large CO{sub 2} sink in danger of extinction and, on the other hand, as a potential new large contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Andrew-Category 4· Category 4 Hurricane - Winds 131-155 mph. Wall failures in homes and complete roofHurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known

  8. Sustainability, Complexity and Learning: Insights from Complex Systems Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinosa, A.; Porter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to explore core contributions from two different approaches to complexity management in organisations aiming to improve their sustainability,: the Viable Systems Model (VSM), and the Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). It is proposed to perform this by summarising the main insights each approach offers to…

  9. Workshop 1 (synthesis): systems for sustainable urban water services.

    PubMed

    Speers, A; Brattberg, G; Oatridge, J

    2005-01-01

    The systems approach is absolutely essential to secure sustainability in urban water services. The financing dimension is critical; fragmented institutions are a great barrier, hindering a systems approach; recycling of water and nutrients is vital for food production and livelihood improvements; effective knowledge transfer about innovative approaches to sanitation is essential to share success stories and failures. PMID:16007925

  10. Environmental impacts and sustainability of egg production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a systemic assessment toward social sustainability of egg production, we have reviewed current knowledge about the environmental impacts of egg production systems and identified topics requiring further research. Currently, we know that 1) high-rise cage houses generally have poorer air q...

  11. Sustaining the Earth's watersheds, agricultural research data system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS water resources program has developed a web-based data system, STEWARDS: Sustaining the Earth’s Watersheds, Agricultural Research Data System to support research that encompasses a broad range of topics such as water quality, hydrology, conservation, land use, and soils. The data syst...

  12. Management Information System – A Tool for Corporate Sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Caldelli; Marisa Luisa Parmigiani

    2004-01-01

    This paper represents the attempt to define a methodology that can evaluate the degree to which companies' information systems correspond to needs determined by the objectives of sustainability the firm imposes on itself. The result is the creation of a general model which define the correct approach to evaluating information systems – a model which should be adapted to the

  13. Hydropower as a renewable and sustainable energy resource meeting global energy challenges in a reasonable way

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary W. Frey; Deborah M. Linke

    2002-01-01

    Central and State Governments in many countries have enacted laws and regulations to promote renewable energy and to encourage sustainable technologies. In doing so, they had to define what they meant by “renewable” and “sustainable”, and they had to decide which particular technologies or organizations would be eligible for subsidies and tax concessions, and which others would be excluded. Not

  14. Interlocal collaboration on energy efficiency, sustainability and climate change issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ssu-Hsien

    Interlocal energy collaboration builds upon network structures among local policy actors dealing with energy, climate change and sustainability issues. Collaboration efforts overcome institutional collective action (ICA) dilemmas, and cope with the problems spanning jurisdictional boundaries, externalities, and free-rider problems. Interlocal energy collaboration emerges as the agreements in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction, pollution control, land use, purchasing, retrofits, transportation, and so forth. Cities work collaboratively through contractual mechanisms (i.e. formal/informal agreements) and collective mechanisms (i.e. regional partnerships or membership organizations) on a variety of energy issues. What factors facilitate interlocal energy collaboration? To what extent is collaboration through interlocal contractual mechanisms different from collective mechanisms? This dissertation tries to answer these questions by examining: city goal priority on energy related issues as well as other ICA explanatory factors. Research data are drawn mainly from the 2010 national survey "Implementation of energy efficiency and sustainability program" supported by National Science Foundation and the IBM Endowment for the Business of Government. The research results show that city emphasis on common pool resource, scale economies and externality issues significantly affect individual selection of tools for energy collaboration. When expected transaction costs are extremely high or low, the contractual mechanism of informal agreement is more likely to be selected to preserve most local autonomy and flexibility; otherwise, written and formal tools for collaboration are preferred to impose constraints on individual behavior and reduce the risks of defection.

  15. Indicators to support environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Allen [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Indicators are needed to assess environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators will help in the quantification of benefits and costs of bioenergy options and resource uses. We identify 19 measurable indicators for soil quality, water quality and quantity, greenhouse gases, biodiversity, air quality, and productivity, building on existing knowledge and on national and international programs that are seeking ways to assess sustainable bioenergy. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major environmental effects of diverse feedstocks, management practices, and post-production processes. The importance of each indicator is identified. Future research relating to this indicator suite is discussed, including field testing, target establishment, and application to particular bioenergy systems. Coupled with such efforts, we envision that this indicator suite can serve as a basis for the practical evaluation of environmental sustainability in a variety of bioenergy systems.

  16. Nanoenhanced hydrogel system with sustained release capabilities.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Sonali; Hines, Kanesha; Mills, David K

    2015-07-01

    An alginate/halloysite nanotube (HNT) nanocomposite was developed with sustained release of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) at picogram low levels. BMP-2, 4, and 6 and osteoblasts were chosen as our model "growth factor" and "cell type" as the interaction of BMPs with osteoblasts is well known and thoroughly investigated. Alginate hydrogels with HNTs doped with BMP-2, 4, or 6 only or BMP-4 and 6 in combination. Osteoblasts were seeded within the hydrogels and studied for changes in cell proliferation, phenotypic expression, and mineralization over a 28-day experimental period. Osteoblast behavior was enhanced in BMP doped hydrogel/HNTs nanocomposites as compared with control groups. Release profiles showed that BMP-2 was released in a sustained fashion over a 7-day period and at picogram levels. Mineralization, as showed by Von Kossa staining, and protein synthesis peaked at 28 days, for all three growth factor combinations. BMP-4 provided a marked stimulus for osteoblast functionality base and was comparable to BMP-6 in terms of osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. BMP-4 and 6, in combination, showed a marked enhancement in osteoblast differentiation and functionality; however, the response seemed to be delayed when compared with BMP-4 and 6 release. Hydrogel surfaces had a complex surface topography and greater structural integrity with increased halloysite addition. The data suggest that these nanocomposites may provide a mechanism to enhance repair and regeneration in damaged or diseased tissues, reducing the need for more invasive treatment modalities. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103: 2416-2426, 2015. PMID:25424733

  17. for a Sustainable Energy Future Sossina M. Haile

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    and their characteristics · Is there a Role for Nano-materials? ­ In solid acid fuel cells ­ In solid oxide fuel cells Future Anode Cathode Fuel Cell Operation: O= Electrolyte H2 O2 O= Overall: H2 + ½ O2 H2O ½ O2 + 2e- O=H2 + O= H2O + 2e- Electrolyte e- #12;A Sustainable Energy Future Fuel Cell Performance H2 + ½ O2 H2

  18. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case

    E-print Network

    Energy Input Heat Loss (10) Heat Loss (5) Hydrogen Dispensed10 Tri-Generation Baseline CHP DC/AC Conversion and Auxiliaries (7) 35 Fuel Cell 32 35 DC/AC Conversion, Hydrogen Compression, and Auxiliaries (8 the grid and heat from a furnace or boiler ­ More efficient; Heat from the facility is used for space

  19. Assessment of Renewable Energy Technology and a Case of Sustainable Energy in Mobile Telecommunication Sector

    PubMed Central

    Okundamiya, Michael S.; Emagbetere, Joy O.; Ogujor, Emmanuel A.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of the mobile telecommunication sectors of many emerging countries creates a number of problems such as network congestion and poor service delivery for network operators. This results primarily from the lack of a reliable and cost-effective power solution within such regions. This study presents a comprehensive review of the underlying principles of the renewable energy technology (RET) with the objective of ensuring a reliable and cost-effective energy solution for a sustainable development in the emerging world. The grid-connected hybrid renewable energy system incorporating a power conversion and battery storage unit has been proposed based on the availability, dynamism, and technoeconomic viability of energy resources within the region. The proposed system's performance validation applied a simulation model developed in MATLAB, using a practical load data for different locations with varying climatic conditions in Nigeria. Results indicate that, apart from being environmentally friendly, the increase in the overall energy throughput of about 4?kWh/$ of the proposed system would not only improve the quality of mobile services, by making the operations of GSM base stations more reliable and cost effective, but also better the living standards of the host communities. PMID:24578673

  20. Design of a grid-independent energy efficient building: Sustainable Energy Research Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Soysal; H. Soysal; J. Spears; D. Posson; K. O'Hearn; B. Charles; B. Harwick

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes architectural and engineering design features of the “Sustainable Energy Research Facility (SERF)” to be constructed on Frostburg State University campus located in Western Maryland, USA. SERF will be an off-grid, energy efficient, residential size building supplied by clean renewable energy sources. When completed, SERF will be used by the FSU Renewable Energy Center to offer research, education,

  1. Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative Prioritize.A 100-Day Energy Action Plan

    E-print Network

    Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative Prioritize.A 100-Day Energy Action Plan recognizes that energy will be a defining challenge for the new Administration--for economic competitiveness, national security and long-term environmental sus- tainability. Energy price and supply volatility impact

  2. A developing country perspective on implementing sustainable energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ul Haq, Z.; James, J.A. [Princeton Economic Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States); Kamal, S. [International Consortium for Energy Development, Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Bangladesh is a developing country faced with many challenges such as high population growth rate, low literacy levels, and poverty. One of its most difficult tasks is providing the infrastructure necessary to sustain a growing population with a finite resource base. There is a need to develop a long term energy strategy that relies on sustainable resources while reducing environmental harm. Solar energy has the potential to meet these requirements and presents a highly attractive energy source for Bangladesh. Bangladesh is fortunate enough to have a significant amount of solar irradiance. A number of projects have been started in Bangladesh to exploit renewable energy resources. This paper will highlight the current status of these projects. Major interest and activity is directed towards development of photovoltaic and wind resources. The market for renewable technologies is vast in Bangladesh where a significant portion of the population is off-grid and in need of energy. Although this is not an affluent market technology costs have come down sufficiently such that it is becoming accessible to rural populations with credit schemes. While developing sustainable energy is a worthwhile goal and much encouraged by donor agencies, Bangladesh`s perspective on attempting to develop this sector suggests that it is not an easy road to follow, due to numerous internal and external barriers. A discussion of the barriers to the commercialization of renewables will be included in this paper. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on these issues and to stimulate discussions on how to overcome the barriers and encourage the dissemination of renewables in developing countries.

  3. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations

    E-print Network

    of Plant · Compressed Hydrogen Gas Storage · Design · Electrical Equipment · Equipment Safety · Fire Safety Storage · 6.4.1 Ventilation Air · 6.4.3 Hydrogen Piping · 7.1.1 General · 7.2.2 When Natural Ventilation Permitted · 7.3 Exhaust Systems Compressed Hydrogen Gas Storage International Building Code (International

  4. Reduced emissions and lower costs: combining renewable energy and energy efficiency into a sustainable energy portfolio standard

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Marilyn A.; York, Dan; Kushler, Martin

    2007-05-15

    Combining renewable energy and energy efficiency in Sustainable Energy Portfolio Standard (SEPS) has emerged as a key state and national policy option to achieve greater levels of sustainable energy resources with maximum economic efficiency and equity. One advantage of the SEPS relative to a renewable portfolio standard or a stand-alone energy efficiency resource standard is enhanced flexibility and broader options for meeting targets. (author)

  5. The role of energy sector in sustainable development in Iran

    E-print Network

    Golabi, Zanyar

    2011-01-01

    Generally speaking, both supply and use of energy in Iran are unsustainable. The unsustainable energy supply and use coupled with an unreliable and unsecure energy system have striking and lasing impacts on economic, social ...

  6. Placing ecosystem sustainability within the context of dynamic earth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidle, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    Because the concept of ecosystem sustainability and the practice of sustainable land management both have long-term foci, it is necessary to view these from the perspective of dynamic rather than static systems. In addition to the typical static system approach for assessing ecosystem sustainability, three additional perspectives are presented. These are resilient systems, systems where tipping points occur, and systems subject to episodic geophysical resetting. Ecosystem resilience accommodates both natural and anthropogenic stressors and should be considered to properly frame many ecosystem assessments. A more complex problem emerges when stressors push systems to tipping points, causing a regime shift. Both chronic anthropogenic activities (e.g., over-grazing, forest conversion, poor irrigation practices) and natural changes (e.g., climate anomalies, geochemical weathering, tectonic uplift, vegetative succession) can exhaust ecosystem resilience leading to a rapid change in state. Anthropogenic perturbations can also lower the initiation threshold and increase the magnitude and frequency of certain natural disasters, increasing the likelihood of ecosystem change. Furthermore, when major episodic geophysical events (e.g., large earthquakes, tsunami, and floods; widespread volcanic activity and landslides) exceed thresholds of ecosystem resilience they may reset the attributes of entire systems or landscapes. Large disasters can initiate a cascade of linked events, as in the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, where tsunami, fires, landslides, artificial fillslope collapses, radioactive releases, and associated health effects occurred. Understanding the potential for natural change (both chronic and episodic) in ecosystems is essential not only to the environmental aspect of sustainability but also to economic and social aspects. Examples are presented for: (1) ecosystems vulnerable to tipping points (Yunnan, China) and (2) ecosystems reset by earthquakes and tsunami (Papua New Guinea and eastern Japan). While these geophysical perturbations and shifts in ecosystems are individually recognized, they are not fully embraced by contemporary sustainability thinking or decision management.

  7. Generating sustainable towns from Chinese villages: a system modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Levine, Richard S; Hughes, Michael T; Ryan Mather, Casey; Yanarella, Ernest J

    2008-04-01

    The great majority of China's developing towns will be extensions of already existing villages. With the prospect of hundreds of millions of Chinese farmers projected to leave their villages to become industrial workers in new and expanded towns within the next few years, new challenges will be faced. As expansion and modernization progress, this development moves from the traditional village model that operates not far from resource sustainability to increasingly unsustainable patterns of commerce, urban development, and modern life. With such an unprecedented mass migration and transformation, how can Chinese culture survive? What is to become of the existing million plus agricultural villages? How can these massively unsustainable new industrial towns survive? In the European Commission sponsored research program SUCCESS, researchers worked from the scale of the Chinese village to find viable answers to these questions. To address these issues, the Center for Sustainable Cities, one of the SUCCESS teams, studied the metabolism of several small villages. In these studies, system dynamics models of a village's metabolism were created and then modified so that inherently unsustainable means were eliminated from the model (fossil fuels, harmful agricultural chemicals, etc.) and replaced by sustainability-oriented means. Small Chinese farming villages are unlikely to survive in anything like their present form or scale, not least because they are too small to provide the range of life opportunities to which the young generation of educated Chinese aspires. As a response to this realization as well as to the many other threats to the Chinese village and its rural way of life, it was proposed that one viable path into the future would be to enlarge the villages to become full service towns with sufficient diversity of opportunity to be able to attract and keep many of the best and brightest young people who are now migrating to the larger cities. Starting with the village in its sustainability-oriented model form, the village model would be enlarged both quantitatively and qualitatively through many trial iterations. A research program is described whereby an operational definition of the sustainable city is developed as a means of creating these enlarged models through citizen participation assisted by outside experts using software under development called the Sustainability Engine to guide the process and provide feedback as to the consequences of various proposals that are brought to the table. As this process is continued, the village would be incrementally enlarged and made more diverse and more complex through a variety of scenarios until it would emerge as a modern, sustainable town or city. In this way, through a participatory, balance-seeking civil society process involving villagers and scientists in what the Center for Sustainable Cities calls the Sustainable City Game, the villages can become the DNA for generating future sustainable Chinese towns and cities. As an extension of this discussion, a new urban model, the Sustainable City-as-a-Hill, is presented that responds to both the qualities of the traditional Chinese village as well as to the modern demands of industrial and post-industrial economies and, in particular, to the need for sustainable urban patterns. In addition a new concept, the Sustainable Area Budget (SAB) is introduced which definitively creates the boundary condition for both modeling the sustainable city and presenting the quest for the sustainable city-region as a coherent, scientific design process. PMID:17854975

  8. Preparation and characterization of nanomaterials for sustainable energy production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-jun; Burghaus, Uwe; Besenbacher, Flemming; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-10-26

    The use of nanotechnology to develop a suite of sustainable energy production schemes is one of the most important scientific challenges of the 21st century. The challenge is to design, to synthesize, and to characterize new functional nanomaterials with controllable sizes, shapes, and/or structures. To summarize the progress of the research and development made in this important field, the Fuel Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) organized a symposium on "Nanotechnology for Sustainable Energy and Fuels" during the 240th ACS National Meeting in Boston, MA on August 22-26, 2010, with the ACS Catalysis Division as the cosponsor. This symposium was a global gathering of leading scientists at the intersection of energy and nanotechnology. The topics discussed at the symposium included nanotechnology, not only for traditional fossil fuel production but also for novel processes for renewable energy applications. This article aims to highlight some of the most exciting advances presented at the symposium, including the preparation and characterization of nanomaterials for clean fuel production, CO(2) capture, solar cells and solar fuels, energy conversion and storage materials, hydrogen storage materials, and fuel cells. Finally, possible future developments in this important and timely area are discussed. PMID:20973572

  9. Creating a Standards Framework for Sustainable Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne Perry; Li Aixian; Li Tienan; Robert Williams

    Industrial motor-driven systems consume more than 70% of global manufacturing electricity annu- ally and offer one of the largest opportunities for energy savings. Program experiences in the US, the United Kingdom, and China have demonstrated that energy savings opportunities are typically 20% or more for these systems across all industrial sectors. Despite the potential benefits, energy savings from motor-driven systems

  10. Defining elements of sustainable work systems--a system-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Klaus; Zink, Klaus J

    2012-01-01

    Based on a system-theoretic discussion of sustainability, this paper aims to develop a conceptual model of a sustainable work system which is consistent with the definition of ergonomics by the IEA in 2000 (but also with earlier definitions) as well as with the triple bottom line understanding of sustainable development - comprising the management of human, social, ecological and economic capital in a balanced manner. PMID:22317318

  11. A micro sustained release system for epidermal growth factor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne B. Murray; Larry Brown; Robert S. Langer; Michael Klagsburn

    1983-01-01

    Summary A technique for ensuring the controlled release of microgram and smaller amounts of biologically active epidermal growth factor (EGF) from polymeric delivery systems is described. We show that albumin in milligram quantities can facilitate the sustained release of picogram amounts of EGF for at least 3 wk. The EGF-containing polymer matrix can be placed directly into cell culture and

  12. SUSTAIN:Urban Modeling Systems Integrating Optimization and Economics

    EPA Science Inventory

    The System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis INtegration (SUSTAIN) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support practitioners in developing cost-effective management plans for municipal storm water programs and evaluating and selecting Best Manag...

  13. Carbon Footprint and Sustainability of Agricultural Production Systems in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. P. Maheswarappa; V. Srinivasan; R. Lal

    2011-01-01

    The agriculture sector, which accounts for about 52% of the total workforce despite a steady decline of its share in the gross domestic product (GDP), is still the largest economic sector that plays a significant role in the overall socio-economic development of India. Sustainability of agricultural production systems depends on their carbon (C) footprint and the C output-input ratio. Thus,

  14. Total quality management for sustainable development : Process based system models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raine Isaksson

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – To highlight possible synergies between total quality management (TQM) and sustainable development (SD). Design\\/methodology\\/approach – These synergies are viewed based on a management system framework consisting of values, methodologies and tools. Based on common values the methodology of process management is identified as a good base for describing organisational synergies of TQM and SD. Also, process management for

  15. A sustainable development OCR system in CADAL application

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HUANG Chen; ZHAO Ji-hai; HU Xiao

    2005-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the main ideas of a sustainable development OCR system based on open architecture techniques and then describes the construction of an optical character recognition (OCR) center built on computer clusters, for the purpose of dynamically improving the recognition precision of the digitized texts of a million volumes of books produced by the China-US Million Books Digital

  16. Enhancing energy security in Malayia: the challenges towards sustainable environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahid, E. J. M.; Siang, C. Ch; Peng, L. Y.

    2013-06-01

    Energy is known as one of the essential ingredients for economic development and security of energy supply is crucial in ensuring continuous economic development of a country. Malaysia's proven domestic oil reserves are estimated to last for another 25 years, while that of gas for another 39 years as of 2011. Despite the depleting indigenous energy resources, the primary energy demand has continued to grow robustly, at an annual rate of 6.3 percent per year from 1990 to 2010, while the primary energy import has grown 7.2% per year and the primary energy export has grown at a slower rate of 1.9% per year. This worrying trend is further compounded by the faster rate of primary oil import averaging 10.5% per year while the primary energy export has shrink at a rate of 1.4% per year. This paper has identified two main concerns namely overdependence on fossil fuel and increasing energy import dependency in creating a precarious position towards energy self-sufficiency. The study will analyse the energy security of the country and explore possible options and challenges in enhancing the energy supply security toward sustainable environment.

  17. The NERSC Sustained System Performance (SSP) Metric

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, William; Shalf, John; Strohmaier, Erich

    2005-09-18

    Most plans and reports recently discuss only one of four distinct purposes benchmarks are used. The obvious purpose is selection of a system from among its competitors, something that is the main focus of this paper. This purpose is well discussed in many workshops and reports. The second use of benchmarks is validating the selected system actually works the way expected once it arrives. This purpose may be more important than the first reason. The second purpose is particularly key when systems are specified and selected based on performance projections rather than actual runs on the actual hardware. The third use of benchmarks, seldom mentioned, is to assure the system performs as expected throughout its lifetime1, (e.g. after upgrades, changes, and regular use.) Finally, benchmarks are used to guide system designs, something covered in detail in a companion paper from Berkeley's Institute for Performance Studies (BIPS).

  18. Sustainable EnergiesSustainable Energies & Their Environmental Impacts& Their Environmental Impacts

    E-print Network

    Budker, Dmitry

    dominant Rapid increase of Hydroelectricity & Nuclear Power Data from Statistical Review of World Energy-6- empty-or-0-4-full/ #12;Energy Consumption Energy consumption in 2009 About 3% Hydroelectricity Low Information Administration) #12;Energy in Future From 1965 to 2100 (prediction) Hydroelectricity dominant

  19. (Energy conservation in buildings and community systems)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1990-01-01

    The International Energy Agency, Energy Conservation in Building and Community Systems, with cooperation from the Solar Research and Development and the Commission of the European Communities has been developing plans for new areas of investigation that affect various energy, environmental, economic, and technical trends on buildings of the next 40 years. Creating a sustainable society must be accomplished in the

  20. Sustainable Transportation: Accelerating Widespread Adoption of Energy Efficient Vehicles & Fuels (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    While energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously slash oil consumption and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, a truly sustainable solution will require more than just putting drivers behind the wheels of new fuel-efficient cars. As the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) accelerates widespread adoption of high-performance, low-emission, energy-efficient passenger and freight vehicles, as well as alternative fuels and related infrastructure. Researchers collaborate closely with industry, government, and research partners, using a whole-systems approach to design better batteries, drivetrains, and engines, as well as thermal management, energy storage, power electronic, climate control, alternative fuel, combustion, and emission systems. NREL's sustainable transportation research, development, and deployment (RD&D) efforts are not limited to vehicles, roads, and fueling stations. The lab also explores ways to save energy and reduce GHGs by integrating transportation technology advancements with renewable energy generation, power grids and building systems, urban planning and policy, and fleet operations.

  1. MSU Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability

    E-print Network

    on physiological ecology; her laboratory uses tools ranging from biochemical tracers and energetic measurements is building an entirely new global ocean observation system centered on measuring marine animal movements

  2. Sustained currents in coupled diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, Hernán; Sanders, David P.

    2014-08-01

    Coupling two diffusive systems may give rise to a nonequilibrium stationary state (NESS) with a non-trivial persistent, circulating current. We study a simple example that is exactly soluble, consisting of random walkers with different biases towards a reflecting boundary, modelling, for example, Brownian particles with different charge states in an electric field. We obtain analytical expressions for the concentrations and currents in the NESS for this model, and exhibit the main features of the system by numerical simulation.

  3. Energy Research at the UW Crea ng sustainable energy sources

    E-print Network

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha

    environmental- impact materials and natural processes Energy harves ng: powering small devices from design: designing proteins for use in fuel cells and hydrogen produc on Solar: energy from the sun Tidal/hydrokine cs: energy from dal currents Wind: energy from the mo on of the wind Storage Storing and transpor ng

  4. Sustainable agricultural development using a farming systems approach in Zambia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mesfin Bezuneh; Glenn C. W. Ames; Carl C. Mabbs-Zeno

    1995-01-01

    Zambia implemented the Farming Systems Research and Extension approach to development of agricultural technologies during the last decade. The results seem to indicate that the inter-related objectives of increasing productivity, income and short-term food security of small-scale farmers have been addressed, but the achievements may have come at the expense of long-term sustainability in agricultural development. The system relied too

  5. Thermally-sustained structure in convectively unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with a thermal noise term is studied under conditions when the system is convectively unstable. Under these conditions, the noise is selectively and spatially amplified giving rise to a noise-sustained structure. Analytical results, applicable to a wide range of physical systems, are derived for the variance, and the coefficients and thermal noise term are determined for Taylor-Couette flow with an axial through-flow. Comparison is made to recent experiments.

  6. Data Acquisition System(DAS) Sustaining Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents general information describing the Data Acquisition System contract, a summary of objectives, tasks performed and completed. The hardware deliverables which are comprised of: 1) Two ground DAS units; 2) Two flight DAS units; 3) Logistic spares; and 4) Shipping containers are described. Also included are the data requirements and scope of the contract.

  7. Identifying Constraints to Potato System Sustainability: Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato yield in the Northeast U.S. has remained constant for over 50 years, despite increased inputs of pesticides, nutrients, and water. We established Status Quo, Soil Conserving, Soil Improving, and Disease Suppressive cropping systems under both irrigated and rainfed management to identify and q...

  8. AUV Docking System for Sustainable Science Missions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tarun Kanti Podder; Mark Sibenac; James Bellingham

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a technological development of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) docking system motivated by science requirements. Twenty-seven case studies were drafted after having elaborate discussions with twelve senior marine scientists from a wide range of oceanographic fields including physical oceanography, ocean chemistry, midwater ecology, biological oceanography, molecular biology, marine microbiology, geology, evolutionary biology, and benthic ecology.

  9. A SUSTAINABLE URBAN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM: THE \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonas Rabinovitch; John P. Hoehn

    1995-01-01

    This analysis examines an innovative approach to transportation policy in Curitiba, Brazil. Curitiba is a city of 1.6 million residents that has grown fourfold in the last 30 years. Unlike many cities, quality of life and transportation has not been a casualty of growth. Curitiba's transportation system actively helps residents obtain the benefits of growth, including access to jobs, homes,

  10. Leadership & Sustainability: System Thinkers in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    As agencies have pushed for greater performance and public accountability over the past two decades, some incremental improvements have been seen. All too often experience reveals that these improvements are temporary. This book provides a comprehensive examination of what leaders at all levels of the educational system can do to pave the way for…

  11. Nanoscale triboelectric-effect-enabled energy conversion for sustainably powering portable electronics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2012-12-12

    Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based on triboelectric effect has been proven to be simple, cost-effective, and robust. However, its output is still insufficient for sustainably driving electronic devices/systems. Here, we demonstrated a rationally designed arch-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) by utilizing the contact electrification between a polymer thin film and a metal thin foil. The working mechanism of the TENG was studied by finite element simulation. The output voltage, current density, and energy volume density reached 230 V, 15.5 ?A/cm(2), and 128 mW/cm(3), respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated. The TENG was systematically studied and demonstrated as a sustainable power source that can not only drive instantaneous operation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but also charge a lithium ion battery as a regulated power module for powering a wireless sensor system and a commercial cell phone, which is the first demonstration of the nanogenerator for driving personal mobile electronics, opening the chapter of impacting general people's life by nanogenerators. PMID:23130843

  12. Toward Standards for Dynamics in Electric Energy Systems

    E-print Network

    Toward Standards for Dynamics in Electric Energy Systems Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;Toward Standards for Dynamics In Electric Energy Systems The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy

  13. David Cahen, Canada-Weizmann 10/'09 Modern Life with Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    's Top Challenges* E N E R G Y resource sustainability WATER ( energy) (rest of) ENVIRONMENT ( energy Power Sources by Type TW Gas Hydro Other for 2005 0 1 2 3 4 5 Oil Coal Nuclear Bio mass ENERGY: J, WsecDavid Cahen, Canada-Weizmann 10/'09 Modern Life with Sustainable Energy Presents an Unprecedented

  14. To appear in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 1 Sustainable Convergence of Electricity and Transport Sectors in the

    E-print Network

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    To appear in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 1 Sustainable Convergence of Electricity~nizaresa , Michael W. Fowlerb , Somayeh Moazenic , Ali Elkamelb , Steven Wonga aPower and Energy Systems Group of Mathematics, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 Abstract

  15. A review of parenteral sustained-release naltrexone systems

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, J.L.; Kincl, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ideal naltrexone sustained-release delivery system should be easy to inject or implant, not cause adverse tissue reaction, release the drug at a relatively constant rate for at least 30 days, and biodegrade within a short time afterwards. Mechanisms which can be used for sustaining drug release include reducing solubility and surface area, coating, encapsulation and microencapsulation, complexation, binding and hydrophilic gelation. Drug release from such systems is controlled by diffusion through a barrier/film, diffusion from a monolithic device, erosion of the surface, hydrolysis, ion exchange, biodegradation, or a combination of these. Injectable systems would seem to be ultimately preferred because of the ease of administration and handling, while the implantable devices may find first use in man since they are easily removable, should that be necessary. Maintaining particulate-free products and sterilization methods are two problems with all parenteral dosage forms. Production must be particularly well controlled and validated.

  16. Energy efficiency, human behavior, and economic growth: Challenges to cutting energy demand to sustainable levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santarius, Tilman

    2015-03-01

    Increasing energy efficiency in households, transportation, industries, and services is an important strategy to reduce energy service demand to levels that allow the steep reduction of greenhouse gases, and a full fledged switch of energy systems to a renewable basis. Yet, technological efficiency improvements may generate so-called rebound effects, which may `eat up' parts of the technical savings potential. This article provides a comprehensive review of existing research on these effects, raises critiques, and points out open questions. It introduces micro-economic rebound effect and suggests extending consumer-side analysis to incorporate potential `psychological rebound effects.' It then discusses meso-economic rebound effects, i.e. producer-side and market-level rebounds, which so far have achieved little attention in the literature. Finally, the article critically reviews evidence for macro-economic rebound effects as energy efficiency-induced economic growth impacts. For all three categories, the article summarizes assessments of their potential quantitative scope, while pointing out remaining methodological weaknesses and open questions. As a rough "rule of thumb", in the long term and on gross average, only half the technical savings potential of across-the-board efficiency improvements may actually be achieved in the real world. Policies that aim at cutting energy service demand to sustainable levels are well advised to take due note of detrimental behavioral and economic growth impacts, and should foster policies and measures that can contain them.

  17. Western China energy development and west to east energy transfer: Application of the Western China Sustainable Energy Development Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wenying Chen; Hualin Li; Zongxin Wu

    2010-01-01

    China is striving for coordinated regional economic development and to solve the energy shortage in eastern China through a western China development plan with one focus being energy development and west to east energy transfer. This paper describes Western China Sustainable Energy Development Model (WSED) to evaluate various energy development scenarios for western China. The model includes a Western China

  18. System interactions of stormwater management using Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems and Green Infrastructure

    E-print Network

    Hoang, L.; Fenner, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores system interactions of stormwater management solutions using Sustainable Urban Drainage System (SuDS) and Green Infrastructure (GI) within the wider urban landscape. A series of interdependencies between urban components...

  19. Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Ris NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy

    E-print Network

    Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Risø NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy edited by MoRteN JastRup #12;Energy for the future #12;Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Translated from 'Energi til fremtiden ­ med Risø fra

  20. Optimal energy options under Clean Development Mechanism: Renewable energy projects for sustainable development and carbon emission reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asmerom M. Gilau

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation addresses two distinct objectives; designing cost-effective renewable energy powered projects including seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO), aquaculture, and ice-making plant, and analyzing the cost-effectiveness of these projects in achieving low abatement costs and promoting sustainable developments under the Clean Development Mechanism. The results of SWRO analysis show that a wind powered system is the least expensive and a PV

  1. Operationalizing the social-ecological systems framework to assess sustainability.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Heather M; Basurto, Xavier; Nenadovic, Mateja; Sievanen, Leila; Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Cota-Nieto, Juan José; Erisman, Brad E; Finkbeiner, Elena; Hinojosa-Arango, Gustavo; Moreno-Báez, Marcia; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Reddy, Sheila M W; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Alexandra; Siegel, Katherine; Ulibarria-Valenzuela, José Juan; Weaver, Amy Hudson; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio

    2015-05-12

    Environmental governance is more effective when the scales of ecological processes are well matched with the human institutions charged with managing human-environment interactions. The social-ecological systems (SESs) framework provides guidance on how to assess the social and ecological dimensions that contribute to sustainable resource use and management, but rarely if ever has been operationalized for multiple localities in a spatially explicit, quantitative manner. Here, we use the case of small-scale fisheries in Baja California Sur, Mexico, to identify distinct SES regions and test key aspects of coupled SESs theory. Regions that exhibit greater potential for social-ecological sustainability in one dimension do not necessarily exhibit it in others, highlighting the importance of integrative, coupled system analyses when implementing spatial planning and other ecosystem-based strategies. PMID:25918372

  2. Operationalizing the social-ecological systems framework to assess sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Heather M.; Basurto, Xavier; Nenadovic, Mateja; Sievanen, Leila; Cavanaugh, Kyle C.; Cota-Nieto, Juan José; Erisman, Brad E.; Finkbeiner, Elena; Hinojosa-Arango, Gustavo; Moreno-Báez, Marcia; Nagavarapu, Sriniketh; Reddy, Sheila M. W.; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Alexandra; Siegel, Katherine; Ulibarria-Valenzuela, José Juan; Weaver, Amy Hudson; Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio

    2015-01-01

    Environmental governance is more effective when the scales of ecological processes are well matched with the human institutions charged with managing human–environment interactions. The social-ecological systems (SESs) framework provides guidance on how to assess the social and ecological dimensions that contribute to sustainable resource use and management, but rarely if ever has been operationalized for multiple localities in a spatially explicit, quantitative manner. Here, we use the case of small-scale fisheries in Baja California Sur, Mexico, to identify distinct SES regions and test key aspects of coupled SESs theory. Regions that exhibit greater potential for social-ecological sustainability in one dimension do not necessarily exhibit it in others, highlighting the importance of integrative, coupled system analyses when implementing spatial planning and other ecosystem-based strategies. PMID:25918372

  3. Vibration energy harvester with sustainable power based on a single-crystal piezoelectric cantilever array.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Ham, Yong-Hyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Kwon, Jong-Kee; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We designed and fabricated a bimorph cantilever array for sustainable power with an integrated Cu proof mass to obtain additional power and current. We fabricated a cantilever system using single-crystal piezoelectric material and compared the calculations for single and arrayed cantilevers to those obtained experimentally. The vibration energy harvester had resonant frequencies of 60.4 and 63.2 Hz for short and open circuits, respectively. The damping ratio and quality factor of the cantilever device were 0.012 and 41.66, respectively. The resonant frequency at maximum average power was 60.8 Hz. The current and highest average power of the harvester array were found to be 0.728 mA and 1.61 mW, respectively. The sustainable maximum power was obtained after slightly shifting the short-circuit frequency. In order to improve the current and power using an array of cantilevers, we also performed energy conversion experiments. PMID:22962737

  4. SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AND URBAN FORM IN CHINA: THE RELEVANCE OF COMMUNITY ENERGY MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    SUSTAINABLE ENERGY AND URBAN FORM IN CHINA: THE RELEVANCE OF COMMUNITY ENERGY MANAGEMENT by Bryn 2010 from two alternative scenarios of urban growth throughout China. The scenarios evaluated. The results of this modelling exercise suggest that China can achieve urban residential and transportation

  5. Going beyond energy accounting for sustainability: Energy, fund elements and the economic process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kozo Mayumi; Hiroki Tanikawa

    The main purpose of this paper is to examine to what extent the widely used energy accounting schemes are useful for dealing with sustainability issues in view of Georgescu-Roegen’s production process and its implications for the evolutionary aspects of the economic process. The first part critically examines the concept of “net energy” in relation to material elements produced and consumed

  6. Challenges of assessing the sustainability of (agro)pastoral systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Ayantunde; J. de Leeuw; M. D. Turner; M. Said

    2011-01-01

    Pastoralism is not only a livestock-based livelihood strategy but also a way of life with socio-cultural norms and values, and indigenous knowledge revolving around livestock. Pastoral systems in Africa are facing demographic, economic, socio-political and climatic pressures which are driving many pastoralists into non-livestock based livelihood strategies. The changing contexts in which pastoralists operate raise the issue of the sustainability

  7. Energy for sustainable development: Key issues and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    2007-07-01

    Energy generation and use are strongly linked to all elements of sustainable development such as economic, social, and environmental. The history of human development rests on the availability and use of energy, the transformation from the early use of fire and animal power that improved lives, to the present world with use of electricity and clean fuels for a multitude of purposes. Energy is the neglected issue of the development debate. The lack of access to reliable and clean energy supplies is a major barrier to improving human well-being around the globe. There are an estimated 1.6 billion people living in the rural areas of developing countries who lack access to electricity, and so dependence on fossil fuels. Combustion of fossil fuels produces large amounts of CO{sub 2}, an important greenhouse gas. In response to increasing concern about the effect of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global climate, international action has been agreed to reduce these emissions. On the other hand, renewable energy is the great, barely tapped solution to the two great challenges of the coming century such as poverty and global warming. Not only can renewable energy provide a clean, flexible power source for homes, schools and hospitals, at the micro-to-medium scale it has huge potential to create meaningful and useful jobs.

  8. Assessing sustainable land-use practices using geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Amelie Y.

    Many prominent scientists have claimed that we need to develop environmentally sustainable practices otherwise societies may collapse. The use of Geographic Information Systems allows detailed studies that can cross disciplinary boundaries and lead to quantifiable statements as to the change of land use practices that took place in the past and those that may occur in the future. This dissertation focuses on two research topics. One that attempts to quantify the environmental consequences of parking lots located in the Midwest, USA. The other research topic focuses on the land area needed to support ethanol in the United States. In Tippecanoe County, Indiana, it was determined that parking lots occupied approximately 6.6% of the urban areas, that the area devoted to parking lots exceeded the area devoted to urban parks by a factor of 3, and that these parking lots contributed to increased runoff of pollutants. The parking lots of Tippecanoe County were estimated to be responsible for 46.5 thousand pounds of oil and grease released annually in runoff, as well as an increase of 240.6 thousand pounds of suspended solids, and 65.7 pounds of lead released when compared to pre-development conditions. A method that scales up the county wide study was also developed to determine the areal footprint of parking lots with the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin. It was estimated that these four states allocate approximately 1260 square km of their land to parking lots and that this accounts for 4.97% of urban land use and over 43 million parking spaces, whereas the number of individuals in age of driving (adults over 18 years old) amounted to just over 25 million. Within the four states studied, states where urban sprawl was considered more prevalent were also states that had a higher proportion of their urban land devoted to parking lots. The second dissertation topic focused on using GIS to locate suitable sites for corn or cellulosic based ethanol production facilities. Since a valuable byproduct of corn ethanol production is Distiller's Grain Solubles (DGS), siting of ethanol plants was considered with regard to both corn production by county within the conterminous United States and head of cattle available to use this output as feed. We found that many counties outside the Midwest could sustain smaller sized ethanol plants, especially when considering that most large production facilities need to redistribute their DGS in dried form sometimes as far as California which has negative impacts on the Net Energy Value of corn based ethanol. The future of ethanol expansion however lies with cellulosic feedstock which is bulkier and thus more costly to transport than corn. Our results indicate that cellulosic ethanol plants should be smaller in capacity, especially when compared to corn ethanol plants where 100 million gallons a year (mgy) plants are more the norm. Only 7 out of 3109 counties in the conterminous United States contain enough wood, switchgrass or crop residue feedstock to sustain plants that produce greater than 40 mgy of biofuel, meaning that larger plants would need to import feedstock from considerable distances and thus incur greater feedstock transport costs. The last section explored co-location options for siting lignocellulosic ethanol plant production facilities.

  9. Impact assessment for a sustainable energy future—Reflections and practical experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean Hugé; Tom Waas; Gilbert Eggermont; Aviel Verbruggen

    2011-01-01

    As energy issues are at the top of the policy agenda worldwide, policy-makers increasingly need better decision-supporting processes to assist them in fostering a sustainable energy future. This paper reflects on the interpretation of sustainable development, and links these reflections with the theory and practice of impact assessment applied on energy issues. An analysis of existing impact assessment approaches with

  10. A Technical and Distributed Management Basis for an Environmentally Clean and Sustainable Energy Supply

    E-print Network

    Wedde, Horst F.

    1 A Technical and Distributed Management Basis for an Environmentally Clean and Sustainable Energy-wide trend towards renewable and ecologically clean forms of energy. We report about ongoing work in the R for a thorough provision with sustainable and clean electric energy. 1. Introduction Rising market prices

  11. Is Sustainability Achievable? Exploring the Limits of Sustainability with Model Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful implementation of sustainability ideas in ecosystem management requires a basic understanding of the often nonlinear and non-intuitive relationships amongst different dimensions of sustainability, particularly the systemwide implications of human actions. This basic un...

  12. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Drive by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under of a PHEV School Bus Robb Barnitt and Jeff Gonder National Renewable Energy Laboratory ABSTRACT Plug

  13. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance. Torcellini IESNA, LEED AP Ph.D., PE ABSTRACT The Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy

  14. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 ASHRAE Associate ASHRAE Member ASHRAE ABSTRACT The construction of the National Renewable Energy

  15. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance.E., ASHRAE IALD, IESNA, LEED AP ABSTRACT Low energy or high-performance buildings form a vital component

  16. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;1 WREF 2012: THE PAST AND FUTURE COST OF WIND ENERGY ABSTRACT

  17. Cloudy Computing: Leveraging Weather Forecasts in Energy Harvesting Sensor Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Navin Sharma; Jeremy Gummeson; David Irwin; Prashant J. Shenoy

    2010-01-01

    To sustain perpetual operation, systems that harvest environmental energy must carefully regulate their usage to satisfy their demand. Regulating energy usage is challenging if a system's demands are not elastic and its hardware components are not energy-proportional, since it cannot precisely scale its usage to match its supply. Instead, the system must choose when to satisfy its energy demands based

  18. Alfalfa -- a sustainable crop for biomass energy production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) has the potential to be a significant contributor to America's renewable energy future. In an alfalfa biomass energy production system, alfalfa forage would be separated into stem and leave fractions. The stems would be processed to produce energy, and the leaves would be s...

  19. Indicators for assessing socioeconomic sustainability of bioenergy systems: A short list of practical measures.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Maggie R [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Indicators are needed to assess both socioeconomic and environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators can help to identify and quantify the sustainability attributes of bioenergy options. We identify 16 socioeconomic indicators that fall into the categories of social well-being, energy security, trade, profitability, resource conservation, and social acceptability. The suite of indicators is predicated on the existence of basic institutional frameworks to provide governance, legal, regulatory and enforcement services. Indicators were selected to be practical, sensitive to stresses, unambiguous, anticipatory, predictive, calibrated with known variability, and sufficient when considered collectively. The utility of each indicator, methods for its measurement, and applications appropriate for the context of particular bioenergy systems are described along with future research needs. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major socioeconomic effects of the full supply chain for bioenergy, including feedstock production and logistics, conversion to biofuels, biofuel logistics and biofuel end uses. Ten of those 16 indicators are proposed to be the minimum list of practical measures of socioeconomic aspects of bioenergy sustainability. Coupled with locally-prioritized environmental indicators, we propose that these socioeconomic indicators can provide a basis to quantify and evaluate sustainability of bioenergy systems across many regions in which they will be deployed.

  20. Three Views of Systems Theories and Their Implications for Sustainability Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Terry; Cordoba, Jose

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, there is an emerging interest in sustainability and sustainability education. A popular and promising approach is the use of systems thinking. However, the systems approach to sustainability has neither been clearly defined nor has its practical application followed any systematic rigor, resulting in confounded and underspecified…

  1. Energy in the Developing World Physics of Sustainable Energy

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Pakistan India South Africa Egypt Bolivia Indonesia El Salvador Philippines Sri Bolivia Indonesia El Salvador Philippines Sri Lanka China Thailand Lebanon TurkeyBrazil Russian Federation developing country, the population (and their energy use) can be highly diverse. Wealthy Indians (and Chinese

  2. Charles Nielsen; Jan Larsen; Kristian Morgen, DONG Energy, Kraftsvaerksvej 53, 7000 Fredericia, Denmark Security of supply, sustainability and the market are controlling parameters for developing the energy

    E-print Network

    Bioethanol Charles Nielsen; Jan Larsen; Kristian Morgen, DONG Energy, Kraftsvaerksvej 53, 7000 for developing the energy system. Bioethanol is part of the solution to the question about security of supply and the demand for a sustainable development, and all over Europe 1st generation bioethanol plants are being

  3. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 2.0: Wind Turbine Reliability and Maintainability Enhancement through System-wide Structure Health Monitoring and Modifications to Rotating Components

    SciTech Connect

    Janet M Twomey, PhD

    2010-04-30

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY An evaluation of nondestructive structural health monitoring methods was completed with over 132 documents, 37 specifically about wind turbines, summarized into a technology matrix. This matrix lists the technology, what can be monitored with this technology, and gives a short summary of the key aspects of the technology and its application. Passive and active acoustic emission equipment from Physical Acoustics Corp. and Acellent Technologies have been evaluated and selected for use in experimental state loading and fatigue tests of composite wind turbine blade materials. Acoustic Emission (AE) and Active Ultrasonic Testing (AUT), were applied to composite coupons with both simulated and actual damage. The results found that, while composites are more complicated in nature, compared to metallic structures, an artificial neural network analysis could still be used to determine damage. For the AE system, the failure mode could be determined (i.e. fiber breakage, delamination, etc.). The Acellent system has been evaluated to work well with composite materials. A test-rig for reliability testing of the rotating components was constructed. The research on the types of bearings used in the wind turbines indicated that in most of the designs, the main bearings utilized to support the shaft are cylindrical roller bearings. The accelerated degradation testing of a population of bearings was performed. Vibration and acoustic emission data was collected and analyzed in order to identify a representative degradation signal for each bearing to identify the initiation of the degradation process in the bearings. Afterwards, the RMS of the vibration signal from degradation initiation up to the end of the useful life of the bearing was selected to predict the remaining useful life of the bearing. This step included fitting Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models to the degradation signals and approximating the probability distribution function (PDF) of remaining useful life based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulation of the ARMA models. This step was performed for different percentages of the degradation signal of each bearing. The accuracy of the proposed approach then was assessed by comparing the actual life of the bearing and the estimated life of the bearing from the developed models. The results were impressive and indicated that the accuracy of the models improved as more data was utilized in developing the ARMA models (we get closer to the end of the life of the bearing).

  4. Biomass energy: Sustainable solution for greenhouse gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrul Islam, A. K. M.; Ahiduzzaman, M.

    2012-06-01

    Biomass is part of the carbon cycle. Carbon dioxide is produced after combustion of biomass. Over a relatively short timescale, carbon dioxide is renewed from atmosphere during next generation of new growth of green vegetation. Contribution of renewable energy including hydropower, solar, biomass and biofuel in total primary energy consumption in world is about 19%. Traditional biomass alone contributes about 13% of total primary energy consumption in the world. The number of traditional biomass energy users expected to rise from 2.5 billion in 2004 to 2.6 billion in 2015 and to 2.7 billion in 2030 for cooking in developing countries. Residential biomass demand in developing countries is projected to rise from 771 Mtoe in 2004 to 818 Mtoe in 2030. The main sources of biomass are wood residues, bagasse, rice husk, agro-residues, animal manure, municipal and industrial waste etc. Dedicated energy crops such as short-rotation coppice, grasses, sugar crops, starch crops and oil crops are gaining importance and market share as source of biomass energy. Global trade in biomass feedstocks and processed bioenergy carriers are growing rapidly. There are some drawbacks of biomass energy utilization compared to fossil fuels viz: heterogeneous and uneven composition, lower calorific value and quality deterioration due to uncontrolled biodegradation. Loose biomass also is not viable for transportation. Pelletization, briquetting, liquefaction and gasification of biomass energy are some options to solve these problems. Wood fuel production is very much steady and little bit increase in trend, however, the forest land is decreasing, means the deforestation is progressive. There is a big challenge for sustainability of biomass resource and environment. Biomass energy can be used to reduce greenhouse emissions. Woody biomass such as briquette and pellet from un-organized biomass waste and residues could be used for alternative to wood fuel, as a result, forest will be saved and sustainable carbon sink will be developed. Clean energy production from biomass (such as ethanol, biodiesel, producer gas, bio-methane) could be viable option to reduce fossil fuel consumption. Electricity generation from biomass is increasing throughout the world. Co-firing of biomass with coal and biomass combustion in power plant and CHP would be a viable option for clean energy development. Biomass can produce less emission in the range of 14% to 90% compared to emission from fossil for electricity generation. Therefore, biomass could play a vital role for generation of clean energy by reducing fossil energy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The main barriers to expansion of power generation from biomass are cost, low conversion efficiency and availability of feedstock. Internationalization of external cost in power generation and effective policies to improve energy security and carbon dioxide reduction is important to boost up the bio-power. In the long run, bio-power will depend on technological development and on competition for feedstock with food production and arable land use.

  5. Barriers and opportunities in realising sustainable energy concepts—an analysis of two Swiss case studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Pohl; Priska Gisler

    2003-01-01

    What assists and what hinders sustainable energy use in being put into effect? Two case studies of sustainable energy concepts—the Zurich Solarstrombörse, where electricity can be purchased that is produced by solar panels, and the Swiss CO2-law, a consensus oriented implementation of the Kyoto-protocol—were analysed in order to investigate this question. In both case studies the unfolding of the sustainable

  6. 2009 AFHVS presidential address: the steering question: challenges to achieving food system sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilbert W. Gillespie Jr

    2010-01-01

    In this address I examine the challenges of achieving food system sustainability. Starting from the position that most people\\u000a want a food system that is “sustainable” and that we have a great reservoir of unapplied technical knowledge applicable to\\u000a increasing sustainability, I argue that the big issue is collective decision-making to accomplish the goal of sustainability.\\u000a Using the metaphor of

  7. Earth's Systems as Models of Ethical Behavior: The Basis for an Ethic of Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    The enormous advances in scientific understanding of the earth in the last 400 years led to a remarkable flourishing of humanity, but it also resulted in the disruption of critical systems on which we depend. Around the world, soil is lost faster than it forms; groundwater is withdrawn faster than it recharges; biodiversity and biocapacity are crashing; fossil fuels are 87% of our primary energy sources despite their many problems, including steadily rising emissions of CO2. Since 1600, science has honed an ethic of objectivity that insists that facts and values - scientific work and its real world outcomes - remain separate. As a result, our economy and society applaud as loudly when our graduates land jobs that further damage earth systems as when they seek to preserve them. Geoethics aims at the idea that balancing human action with the capacity of planetary systems is the primary "good." Without healthy systems, we cannot thrive. Period. Ethical systems developed to mediate human relations are inadequate to find this balance: they implicitly acknowledge a rationality that places the highest value on short-term growth and efficiency, not on living sustainably in the long run. The best paragon of sustainability is the co-evolution of life and other systems on our planet over 3.5 billion years. This presentation explores the contributions of Gregory Bateson and other scientists to understanding systems in cybernetic terms. Bateson suggested that "What we believe ourselves to be should be compatible with what we believe of the world around us." In other words, the path to a sustainable geoethics begins by re-internalizing lessons that humans alone in the biotic community seem to have forgotten. What are the "rules" by which systems sustain themselves? What do self-sustaining systems "value?" How can we help ourselves and our students learn them? I suggest that paying attention to the process of learning itself is an effective first step, and describe the use of a learning cycle model based on system cybernetics. The model provides a structure in which we and our students can reflect on our connections with the world and the limitations on what we can learn about it. I also show how to use campus and other landscapes to clarify the gap between human ethics and a sustainable geoethics.

  8. Modeling of zinc energy storage system for integration with renewable energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emad Manla; Adel Nasiri; Michael Hughes

    2009-01-01

    Utility scale energy storage devices have been considered for integration with renewable energy systems to improve their sustainability and dispatch. In this paper, we analyze and model an advanced zinc energy storage device (ZESS), for grid level applications. This energy storage system has high energy and power density, high efficiency and long life. A series of tests have been conducted

  9. Microalgae as sustainable renewable energy feedstock for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Medipally, Srikanth Reddy; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Shariff, M

    2015-01-01

    The world energy crisis and increased greenhouse gas emissions have driven the search for alternative and environmentally friendly renewable energy sources. According to life cycle analysis, microalgae biofuel is identified as one of the major renewable energy sources for sustainable development, with potential to replace the fossil-based fuels. Microalgae biofuel was devoid of the major drawbacks associated with oil crops and lignocelluloses-based biofuels. Algae-based biofuels are technically and economically viable and cost competitive, require no additional lands, require minimal water use, and mitigate atmospheric CO2. However, commercial production of microalgae biodiesel is still not feasible due to the low biomass concentration and costly downstream processes. The viability of microalgae biodiesel production can be achieved by designing advanced photobioreactors, developing low cost technologies for biomass harvesting, drying, and oil extraction. Commercial production can also be accomplished by improving the genetic engineering strategies to control environmental stress conditions and by engineering metabolic pathways for high lipid production. In addition, new emerging technologies such as algal-bacterial interactions for enhancement of microalgae growth and lipid production are also explored. This review focuses mainly on the problems encountered in the commercial production of microalgae biofuels and the possible techniques to overcome these difficulties. PMID:25874216

  10. Microalgae as Sustainable Renewable Energy Feedstock for Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Yusoff, Fatimah Md.; Shariff, M.

    2015-01-01

    The world energy crisis and increased greenhouse gas emissions have driven the search for alternative and environmentally friendly renewable energy sources. According to life cycle analysis, microalgae biofuel is identified as one of the major renewable energy sources for sustainable development, with potential to replace the fossil-based fuels. Microalgae biofuel was devoid of the major drawbacks associated with oil crops and lignocelluloses-based biofuels. Algae-based biofuels are technically and economically viable and cost competitive, require no additional lands, require minimal water use, and mitigate atmospheric CO2. However, commercial production of microalgae biodiesel is still not feasible due to the low biomass concentration and costly downstream processes. The viability of microalgae biodiesel production can be achieved by designing advanced photobioreactors, developing low cost technologies for biomass harvesting, drying, and oil extraction. Commercial production can also be accomplished by improving the genetic engineering strategies to control environmental stress conditions and by engineering metabolic pathways for high lipid production. In addition, new emerging technologies such as algal-bacterial interactions for enhancement of microalgae growth and lipid production are also explored. This review focuses mainly on the problems encountered in the commercial production of microalgae biofuels and the possible techniques to overcome these difficulties. PMID:25874216

  11. Sustainable Uses of FGD Gypsum in Agricultural Systems: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Watts, Dexter B; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil and water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural producing regions within the last two decades has attributed to this interest. Currently, published data on the long-term sustainability of FGD gypsum use in agricultural systems is limited. This has led to organization of the American Society of Agronomy's Community "By-product Gypsum Uses in Agriculture" and a special collection of nine technical research articles on various issues related to FGD gypsum uses in agricultural systems. A brief review of FGD gypsum, rationale for the special collection, overviews of articles, knowledge gaps, and future research directions are presented in this introductory paper. The nine articles are focused in three general areas: (i) mercury and other trace element impacts, (ii) water quality impacts, and (iii) agronomic responses and soil physical changes. While this is not an exhaustive review of the topic, results indicate that FGD gypsum use in sustainable agricultural production systems is promising. The environmental impacts of FGD gypsum are mostly positive, with only a few negative results observed, even when applied at rates representing cumulative 80-year applications. Thus, FGD gypsum, if properly managed, seems to represent an important potential input into agricultural systems. PMID:25602557

  12. TASK 40: Sustainable International Bio Energy Trade: securing supply Overview of the task

    E-print Network

    Page 1 TASK 40: Sustainable International Bio Energy Trade: securing supply and demand Overview of the task The objective of Task 40 is to investigate what is needed to create a "commodity market" for bio's, the task will contribute to the development of sustainable bio-energy markets on short and on long term

  13. Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural Characterization of Nanomaterials

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural;Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural Characterization *contact e-mail: martial.duchamp@gmail.com Abstract Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a

  14. Making accessible information on regional sustainable energy development within the North Sea Region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Möller

    Abstract Regional economies,are the source and the target of climate change mitigation. Sharing information may facilitate to develop regional economies,with sustainable energy. Many initiatives in European regions and a variety of players exist. Regional authorities need the means to engage themselves in networks on sustainable energy, and share their own regional experiences and knowledge, their good examples and tools. To

  15. Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural Characterization of Nanomaterials

    E-print Network

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Nanomaterials for sustainable energy and protection of the environment Advanced Microstructural). The increased pressure results also in a narrower pore size as #12;Nanomaterials for sustainable energy.caballero@icmse.csic.es Keywords: silicon porous coating, oblique angle deposition (OAD), closed porosity Abstract In last years

  16. Energy-Harvesting Battery Charger for Self-Sustaining Portable Microelectronic Applications

    E-print Network

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    Energy-Harvesting Battery Charger for Self- Sustaining Portable Microelectronic Applications By in the battery is limited, resulting in short lifespan. It is necessary to prolong battery life, and thus device, this energy is utilized to charge an integrated battery, resulting in a self-sustaining battery charger

  17. A Practical Solution to Used Nuclear Fuel Treatment to Enable Sustained Nuclear Energy and Recovery of Vital Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emory D Collins; Guillermo D DelCul; James E Rushton; Kent Alan Williams

    2010-01-01

    A systems analysis, based on previous in-depth studies, was made to develop an advanced used fuel recycling approach in which over 90% of the fuel components and cladding material are recovered and reused. This can minimize the waste requiring disposition to a geologic repository while enabling sustained nuclear energy and recovery of vital materials. The analysis assumed that: (1) continuing

  18. A comprehensive life cycle analysis of cofiring algae in a coal power plant as a solution for achieving sustainable energy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Murat Kucukvar; Omer Tatari

    2011-01-01

    Algae cofiring scenarios in a 360 MW coal power plant were studied utilizing an ecologically based hybrid life cycle assessment methodology. The impacts on the ecological system were calculated in terms of cumulative mass, energy, industrial exergy, and ecological exergy. The environmental performance metrics, including efficiency, loading, and renewability ratios were also quantified to assess the sustainability of cofiring scenarios from

  19. Title: Sustainable Communities Based on a New Clean Energy Source -Marine & Hydrokinetic Power: Roosevelt Island and Beyond

    E-print Network

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Title: Sustainable Communities Based on a New Clean Energy Source - Marine & Hydrokinetic Power: Roosevelt Island and Beyond Host: Todd Cowen May 30, 2012 Abstract: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who electric system that will not only meet a large faction of base load electric needs but also allow electric

  20. Future energy system in environment, economy, and energy problems (2) various nuclear energy system evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Ujita, Hiroshi [The Institute of Applied Energy, Tokyo, 158-0083 (Japan); Tashimo, Masanori [Energy Think Tank, Co, .Ltd., Tokyo, 162-0067 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Role and potentials of nuclear energy system in the energy options are discussed from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming by using the energy module structure of GRAPE model. They change and are affected dramatically by different sets of energy characteristics, nuclear behavior and energy policy even under the moderate set of presumptions. Introduction of thousands of reactors in the end of the century seems inevitable for better life and cleaner earth, but it will not come without efforts and cost. The analysis suggests the need of long term planning and R and D efforts under the wisdom. (authors)

  1. 10.391J / 1.818J / 2.65J / 3.564J / 11.371J / 22.811J / ESD.166J Sustainable Energy, Spring 2003

    E-print Network

    Tester, Jefferson W.

    Assessment of current and potential energy systems, covering extraction, conversion and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Examination of energy ...

  2. Biodelignification of lignocellulose substrates: An intrinsic and sustainable pretreatment strategy for clean energy production.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Anuj K; Gonçalves, Bruna C M; Strap, Janice L; da Silva, Silvio S

    2013-10-24

    Abstract Lignocellulosic biomass (LB) is a promising sugar feedstock for biofuels and other high-value chemical commodities. The recalcitrance of LB, however, impedes carbohydrate accessibility and its conversion into commercially significant products. Two important factors for the overall economization of biofuel production is LB pretreatment to liberate fermentable sugars followed by conversion into ethanol. Sustainable biofuel production must overcome issues such as minimizing water and energy usage, reducing chemical usage and process intensification. Amongst available pretreatment methods, microorganism-mediated pretreatments are the safest, green, and sustainable. Native biodelignifying agents such as Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Pycnoporous cinnabarinus, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Cyathus stercoreus can remove lignin, making the remaining substrates amenable for saccharification. The development of a robust, integrated bioprocessing (IBP) approach for economic ethanol production would incorporate all essential steps including pretreatment, cellulase production, enzyme hydrolysis and fermentation of the released sugars into ethanol. IBP represents an inexpensive, environmentally friendly, low energy and low capital approach for second-generation ethanol production. This paper reviews the advancements in microbial-assisted pretreatment for the delignification of lignocellulosic substrates, system metabolic engineering for biorefineries and highlights the possibilities of process integration for sustainable and economic ethanol production. PMID:24156399

  3. A Romanian energy system model and a nuclear reduction strategy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan-Ioan Gota; Henrik Lund; Liviu Miclea

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the Romanian energy system with the purpose of providing a tool for the analysis of future sustainable energy strategies. The model represents the total national energy system and is detailed to the level of hourly demand and production in order to be able to analyse the consequences of adding fluctuating renewable energy sources to

  4. A renewable perspective for sustainable energy development in Turkey: The case of small hydropower plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Havva Balat

    2007-01-01

    Renewable energy resources provide a large share of the total energy consumption of many developing countries. Turkey's renewable sources are the second largest source for energy production after coal. About two-thirds of the renewable energy produced is obtained from biomass, while the rest is mainly from hydroelectric energy. Hydropower is today the most important kind of renewable and sustainable energy.

  5. Sustainable Energy Production from Jatropha Bio-Diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amit Kumar; Krishna, Vijai

    2012-10-01

    The demand for petroleum has risen rapidly due to increasing industrialization and modernization of the world. This economic development has led to a huge demand for energy, where the major part of that energy is derived from fossil sources such as petroleum, coal and natural gas. Continued use of petroleum sourced fuels is now widely recognized as unsustainable because of depleting supplies. There is a growing interest in using Jatropha curcas L. oil as the feedstock for biodiesel production because it is non-edible and thus does not compromise the edible oils, which are mainly used for food consumption. Further, J. curcas L. seed has a high content of free fatty acids that is converted in to biodiesel by trans esterification with alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. The biodiesel produced has similar properties to that of petroleum-based diesel. Biodiesel fuel has better properties than petro diesel fuel; it is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. Biodiesel has the potential to economically, socially, and environmentally benefit communities as well as countries, and to contribute toward their sustainable development.

  6. Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

    SciTech Connect

    Zalbowitz, M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

  7. Towards sustainability of health information systems: how can we define, measure and achieve it?

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Hullin, Carola M; Chen, Rong; Schuler, Thilo; Gränz, Jana; Knaup, Petra; Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2007-01-01

    Health information systems (HIS) in their current form are rarely sustainable. In order to sustain our health information systems and with it our health systems, we need to focus on defining and maintaining sustainable Health Information System building blocks or components. These components need to be easily updatable when clinical knowledge (or anything else) changes, easily adaptable when business requirements or processes change, and easily exchangeable when technology advances. One major prerequisite for this is that we need to be able to define and measure sustainability, so that it can become one of the major business drivers in HIS development. Therefore, this paper analyses general definitions and indicators for sustainability, and analyses their applicability to HIS. We find that general 'Emergy analysis' is one possibility to measure sustainability for HIS. Based on this, we investigate major enablers and inhibitors to sustainability in a highlevel framework consisting of four pillars: clinical, technical, socio-technical, and political/business. PMID:17911901

  8. Center for Coal-Derived Low Energy Materials for Sustainable Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, Robert; Robl, Tom; Rathbone, Robert

    2012-06-30

    The overarching goal of this project was to create a sustained center to support the continued development of new products and industries that manufacture construction materials from coal combustion by-products or CCB’s (e.g., cements, grouts, wallboard, masonry block, fillers, roofing materials, etc). Specific objectives includes the development of a research kiln and associated system and the formulation and production of high performance low-energy, low-CO2 emitting calcium sulfoaluminate (CAS) cement that utilize coal combustion byproducts as raw materials.

  9. A decision-support system for sustainable urban metabolism in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Ainhoa, E-mail: ainhoag@yahoo.com [Trinity Centre for Biodiversity Research, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Donnelly, Alison, E-mail: donnelac@tcd.ie [Centre for the Environment, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Jones, Mike, E-mail: mike.jones@tcd.ie [Discipline of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Chrysoulakis, Nektarios, E-mail: zedd2@iacm.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics (Greece); Lopes, Myriam, E-mail: myr@ua.pt [Departamento de Ambiente e Ordenamento and CESAM, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2013-01-15

    Urban metabolism components define the energy and material exchanges within a city and, therefore, can provide valuable information on the environmental quality of urban areas. Assessing the potential impact of urban planning alternatives on urban metabolism components (such as energy, water, carbon and pollutants fluxes) can provide a quantitative estimation of their sustainability performance. Urban metabolism impact assessment can, therefore, contribute to the identification of sustainable urban structures with regards, for example, to building types, materials and layout, as well as to location and capacity of transportation and infrastructural developments. In this way, it enables the formulation of planning and policy recommendations to promote efficient use of resources and enhance environmental quality in urban areas. The European FP7 project BRIDGE (sustainaBle uRban plannIng Decision support accountinG for urban mEtabolism) has developed a decision-support system (DSS) that systematically integrates urban metabolism components into impact assessment processes with the aim of accurately quantifying the potential effects of proposed planning interventions. The DSS enables integration of multiple spatial and non-spatial datasets (e.g. physical flows of energy and material with variables of social and economic change) in a systematic manner to obtain spatially defined assessment results and to thus inform planners and decision-makers. This multi-criteria approach also enables incorporation of stakeholders' perceptions in order to prioritise decisive assessment criteria. This paper describes the methodological framework used to develop the DSS and critically examines the results of its practical application in five European cities. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Urban metabolism in sustainability assessment of planning alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer European FP7 project applied to 5 real life case studies across Europe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decision support system enables incorporating scientific knowledge into planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scale, data availability and stakeholder representativeness limit its application.

  10. Carbon Footprint and Sustainability of Agricultural Production Systems in Punjab, India, and Ohio, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anjali Dubey; Rattan Lal

    2009-01-01

    Sustainability of agricultural systems depends on their carbon (C) footprint, and the Coutput:Cinput ratio. Thus, this study was conducted with the objectives to: (i) assess the agricultural C emissions in relation to predominant farming systems in Punjab, India, and Ohio, USA; (ii) evaluate C-use efficiency of production systems; and (iii) determine the relative sustainability of agronomic production systems as determined

  11. Evaluating Wetlands Sustainability Using a Hierarchical Systems Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L. E.; Kolm, K. E.

    2002-12-01

    A hierarchical systems analysis approach, using Geographical Information Systems (GIS)software, is used to integrate and assess the different types of data necessary to characterize the surface and ground-water system as it pertains to the wetlands environment within the landscape context. This hierarchical approach was applied to the Cucumber Gulch wetlands complex, located near Breckenridge, Colorado. The Cucumber Gulch watershed is currently being studied for proposed expansion and development of the existing Breckenridge ski area. The delineated wetland complex is a jurisdictional wetland and is protected under section 404 of the Clean Water Act. The proposed development has the potential to impact the wetlands complex. The various data integrated through the hierarchical systems analysis include climate, topography, geomorphology, geology, vegetation, hydrology, and anthropogenic influences to the natural system. A three-dimensional solid computer model of the surface and sub-surface geology was constructed. Through analysis and integration of these various layers, the surface and ground-water hydrological framework and flow models were developed and calibrated. Throughout the process the ground-water modeling performed to assess the sustainability of the wetland was reconciled with the hydrological framework developed from the "soft" data layers, and with the hydrologic system conceptual model developed from the hierarchical systems analysis. This hierarchical systems approach to modeling provided the Town of Breckenridge with means of assessing the validity of the computer models and potential impact to the wetland complex. Computer modeling was continually refined in response to this process.

  12. Effect of yogic education system and modern education system on sustained attention

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, R; Nagendra, H R; Bhatt, Ramachandra

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim: Sustained attention is a vital function mediated by the right frontoparietal cortex. The Six Letter Cancellation Task (SLCT) measures sustained attention. Development of sustained attention in a yoga-based education system compared to a modern one is the theme of the present study. Aim: To compare the effectiveness of the Modern Education System (MES) and the Gurukula Education System (GES) in developing sustained attention. Materials and Methods: Forty nine boys (11-13 years) were selected from two residential schools, one MES and the other GES, providing similar ambiance and daily routines. The boys were matched for age and socioeconomic status. The GES educational program is based around integrated yoga modules while the MES provides a conventional modern education program. Sustained attention was assessed using the SLCT at the start and end of an academic year. Results: Within groups, the pre-post test differences were significant for both groups. However, the between groups result showed improvement in the GES group compared to the MES group at a P < 0.001 significance level. Conclusions: The study suggests that both MES and GES improve sustained attention in school boys, but GES is more effective. PMID:21234214

  13. GREEN KIT: A MODULAR, VARIABLE APPLICATION SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINABLE COOLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Definition of technical challenge to sustainability One of the challenges to sustainability is to build shelters that provide human comfort (people) using limited resources (prosperity) and minimum environment impact (planet). Current practices in building ...

  14. A Three Dimensional System Approach for Environmentally Sustainable Manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Yuan, Chris; Zhai, Qiang; Dornfield, David

    2012-01-01

    on an emerging nano-manufacturing technology, atomic layerbottom-up nano-scale manufacturing technology, derived fromTechnology improvement for ALD sustainable manufacturing The sustainability performance of ALD nano-

  15. Optimal energy options under Clean Development Mechanism: Renewable energy projects for sustainable development and carbon emission reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilau, Asmerom M.

    This dissertation addresses two distinct objectives; designing cost-effective renewable energy powered projects including seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO), aquaculture, and ice-making plant, and analyzing the cost-effectiveness of these projects in achieving low abatement costs and promoting sustainable developments under the Clean Development Mechanism. The results of SWRO analysis show that a wind powered system is the least expensive and a PV powered system the most expensive, with finished water costs of about 0.50 /m3 and 1.00 /m3, respectively. By international standards, these costs are competitive. The results of renewable energy powered commercial tilapia production indicate that a wind-diesel system has high potential for intensive tilapia production as well as carbon dioxide emission reductions. The study also investigates aeration failures in renewable energy powered tilapia production systems. With respect to the ice-making plant, unlike previous studies which consider nighttime operation only, we have found that a nighttime PV powered ice-making system is more expensive (1/kWh) than daytime ice-making system (0.70/kWh). Our optimal energy options analysis at project scale which includes SWRO, ice-making plant and household energy consumption for about 100 households shows that compared to diesel only energy option, PV-D, W-D, and PV-W-D hybrids are very cost-effective energy options. Moreover, energy options with high levels of renewable energy including 100% renewables have the lowest net present cost and they are already cost-effective without CDM. On the other hand, while the removal of about 87% carbon dioxide emissions could be achieved at negative cost, initial investment could increase by a factor of 40, which is one of the primary barriers hindering wider renewable energy applications in developing countries. Thus in order to increase developing countries' participation in the carbon market, CDM policy should shift from a purely market oriented approach to investigating how to facilitate renewable energy projects through barrier removal. Thus, we recommend that further research should focus on how to efficiently remove renewable energy implementation barriers as a means to improve developing countries participation in meaningful emission reduction while at the same time meeting the needs of sustainable economic development.

  16. Evaluation of thermal energy storage and recovery for an electrical energy mediator system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Bailey; A. W. Davidson; G. R. Smith; J. S. Cotton

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage both electrical and thermal is a rapidly emerging field of interest toward the development of more sustainable energy systems. The inherent inefficiencies associate with electrical storage can be partially overcome when thermal storage that collects and storage the waste thermal energy for alternative uses is integrated. Consequently, thermal energy storage systems are an enabling technology that will allow

  17. Sustainability in CALL Learning Environments: A Systemic Functional Grammar Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to define a sustainable resource in Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL). In order for a CALL resource to be sustainable it must work within existing educational curricula. This feature is a necessary prerequisite of sustainability because, despite the potential for educational change that digitalization has offered since…

  18. Assessing the Sustainability of Buildings From Energy Certificate to Sustainability Report 

    E-print Network

    Lutzkendorf, T.

    2008-01-01

    of international and European standardisation in ISO TC 59 SC 14, ISO SC TC 59 SC 17 as well as CEN TC 350. The aim is to assess the sustainability of buildings by including ecological, economic and social aspects in all their dimensions and ? in addition...

  19. Naltrexone: a review of existing sustained drug delivery systems and emerging nano-based systems.

    PubMed

    Goonoo, Nowsheen; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Ujoodha, Reetesh; Jhugroo, Anil; Hulse, Gary K; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2014-06-10

    Narcotic antagonists such as naltrexone (NTX) have shown some efficiency in the treatment of both opiate addiction and alcohol dependence. A few review articles have focused on clinical findings and pharmacogenetics of NTX, advantages and limitations of sustained release systems as well as pharmacological studies of NTX depot formulations for the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependency. To date, three NTX implant systems have been developed and tested in humans. In this review, we summarize the latest clinical data on commercially available injectable and implantable NTX-sustained release systems and discuss their safety and tolerability aspects. Emphasis is also laid on recent developments in the area of nanodrug delivery such as NTX-loaded micelles and nanogels as well as related research avenues. Due to their ability to increase the therapeutic index and to improve the selectivity of drugs (targeted delivery), nanodrug delivery systems are considered as promising sustainable drug carriers for NTX in addressing opiate and alcohol dependence. PMID:24704710

  20. Ammonia recycling enables sustainable operation of bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ka Yu; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Ammonium (NH4(+)) migration across a cation exchange membrane is commonly observed during the operation of bioelectrochemical systems (BES). This often leads to anolyte acidification (pH <5.5) and complete inactivation of biofilm electroactivity. Without using conventional pH controls (dosage of alkali or pH buffers), the present study revealed that anodic biofilm activity (current) could be sustained if recycling of ammonia (NH3) was implemented. A simple gas-exchange apparatus was designed to enable continuous recycling of NH3 (released from the catholyte at pH >10) from the cathodic headspace to the acidified anolyte. Results indicated that current (110 mA or 688 Am(-3) net anodic chamber volume) was sustained as long as the NH3 recycling path was enabled, facilitating continuous anolyte neutralization with the recycled NH3. Since the microbial current enabled NH4(+) migration against a strong concentration gradient (~10-fold), a novel way of ammonia recovery from wastewaters could be envisaged. PMID:23774293

  1. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www space, the NWTC supports hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines

  2. Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    in the context of the local watershed, and enhance economic, social and environmental sustainability while User calculation. Watershed: In the context of this policy, a watershed is the area of land that drains

  3. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    of the authors. #12;ii List of Acronyms AEP Annual energy production AEP net Net annual energy production AOENREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 2011

  4. Piezoelectric transducer based devices for development of a sustainable machining system - A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ravinder Singh Joshi; Harpreet Singh

    2011-01-01

    Sustainability in production is to develop a system that reduces usage of resources for converting raw material into useful product; Moreover, it could produce waste that can be directly used by another production system. Intentionally inducing vibration to make machining system sustainable started from the work of Kumabe. Based on the direction of modulation with respect to workpiece motion three

  5. A real-time service-oriented framework to support sustainable cyber-physical systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwei-Jay Lin; Mark Panahi

    2010-01-01

    Sustainability is an important issue with a growing interest. Two ICT technologies provide useful support for the sustainability of industrial systems: service-oriented architecture (SOA) and cyber-physical systems (CPS). SOA has been adopted in a variety of industrial systems due to its integration flexibility and process composability. CPS is a new technology to bring computational intelligence to physical devices and to

  6. Virtual laboratory for simulation and modeling systems in engineering degree: A sustainable approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yolanda Bolea; Antoni Grau

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we discuss about the use of computer simulations for sustainable systems. Specifically, we propose laboratory practices for Automatic Control subjects where the plants are sustainable systems. The interest is the simulation of this kind of systems to forecast their behavior in order to control and actuate over them. In this paper, the use of a didactic material

  7. Towards sustainable nuclear energy: Putting nuclear physics to work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. J. Koning; D. Rochman

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new method to propagate the uncertainties of fundamental nuclear physics models and parameters to the design and performance parameters of future, clean nuclear energy systems. Using Monte Carlo simulation, it is for the first time possible to couple these two fields at the extremes of nuclear science without any loss of information in between. With the

  8. Ensuring the Sustainability of Russian Federation National Nuclear Material Accounting System

    SciTech Connect

    Pitel, V; Kasumova, L; Kushnaryov, M; Babcock, R

    2006-06-07

    The Federal Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Information System (FIS) is the national information source on nuclear material accounting of the Russian Federation (RF). RF regulations mandated the creation of a national nuclear material accounting system to be managed by Federal Agency For Atomic Energy (Rosatom), and for the past decade, the FIS has been developed for all organizations required to report to Rosatom. The system represents a successful integration of U.S. financial support and consulting with Russian vision and technical expertise, creating a viable national nuclear material accounting system. This paper discusses crucial elements to ensure Sustainability of the FIS. A long-term plan for operation and maintenance of the information system is critical to a sustainable national accounting system. Plans undertaken throughout the FIS Project lifecycle have supported the necessary elements to ensure success. Through the next two years, long-term planning will be reevaluated and the successful elements and new initiatives will become part of an overall Operations Management Program. FIS resource needs will be managed through prioritization and ranking for each Program element, including: system operation; revising and implementing supporting regulations; establishing monitoring and control mechanisms to ensure validity of the data reported; maintaining and improving communication channels; and establishing regular FIS training. The results of a survey on improving FIS reporting, expected in June 2006, will be used in the prioritization and ranking process. Developing the Program and planning for long-term sustainability of the FIS will ensure a viable national nuclear material accounting system for the future.

  9. Seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining systemic cultural competence.

    PubMed

    Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E; Andres-Hyman, Raquel; Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Davidson, Larry

    2013-03-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities are disturbing facets of the American healthcare system that document the reality of unequal treatment. Research consistently shows that patients of color experience poorer quality of care and health outcomes contributing to increased risks and accelerated mortality rates relative to their white counterparts. While initially conceptualized as an approach for increasing the responsiveness of children's behavioral health care, cultural competence has been adopted as a key strategy for eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities across the healthcare system. However, cultural competence research and practices largely focus on improving provider competencies, while agency and system level approaches for meeting the service needs of diverse populations are given less attention. In this article we offer seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining organizational and systemic cultural competence. These strategies are to: (1) Provide executive level support and accountability, (2) Foster patient, community and stakeholder participation and partnerships, (3) Conduct organizational cultural competence assessments, (4) Develop incremental and realistic cultural competence action plans, (5) Ensure linguistic competence, (6) Diversify, develop, and retain a culturally competent workforce, and (7) Develop an agency or system strategy for managing staff and patient grievances. For each strategy we offer several recommendations for implementation. PMID:22581030

  10. WWS 402: Energy for Sustainable Development Professor Denise Mauzerall

    E-print Network

    Mauzerall, Denise

    ........................................................................................... 3.1 Coal Gasification Technology......................................................... 3.2 Comparison of Coal Gasification and Boiler Technologies........................ 3.3 Gasification, HEALTH, AND ENVIRONMENT Towards a Sustainable Coal-based Development Strategy for China William Ulysses

  11. Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Silver, Pam [Harvard University

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Pam Silver of Harvard University gives a presentation on "Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  12. Controlled Release System for Localized and Sustained Drug Delivery Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Lidia Betsabe

    Current controlled release formulations has many drawbacks such as excess of initial burst release, low drug efficiency, non-degradability of the system and low reproducibility. The present project aims to offer an alternative by developing a technique to prepare uniform, biodegradable particles ( ˜19 mum ) that can sustainably release a drug for a specific period of time. Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide that has many characteristics to be used for biomedical applications. In the last two decades, there have been a considerable number of studies affirming that chitosan could be used for pharmaceutical applications. However, chitosan suffers from inherent weaknesses such as low mechanical stability and dissolution of the system in acidic media. In the present study, chitosan microparticles were prepared by emulsification process. The model drug chosen was acetylsalicylic acid as it is a small and challenging molecule. The maximum loading capacity obtained for the microparticles was approximately 96%. The parameters for the preparation of uniform particles with a narrow size distribution were identified in a triangular phase diagram. Moreover, chitosan particles were successfully coated with thin layers of poly lactic-coglycolic acid (PLGA) and poly lactic acid (PLA). The performance of different layerswas tested for in vitro drug release and degradation studies. Additionally, the degradability of the system was evaluated by measuring the weight loss of the system when exposed to enzyme and without enzyme. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) were used to characterize the controlled release system. Additionally, the in vitro drug release was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The results obtained from this project showed that it is possible to prepare biodegradable microparticles with a uniform size distribution and high drug loading efficiency. However, this could only be achieved with a hybrid system consisting of chitosan matrix interior and then exterior coating of PLGA or PLA. A two layer coating of PLGA 50:50 was shown to be optimal with sustainable controlled drug release for almost 5 days and with 91% of degradation (weight loss) in 8 weeks.

  13. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    Energy security and environmental sustainability are major concerns to many in the U.S. Energy from biomass has been proposed as a strategy to help meet future energy needs; however, widespread cultivation for biofuels could have significant impacts on food security and the environment. One solution to minimizing the impacts of biofuel cultivation is to limit production to abandoned croplands where competition from food crops and environmental degradation will be minimized. Here I estimate the spatial distribution of historical U.S. cropland areas from 1850 to 2000 and subsequently calculate abandoned cropland areas for the year 2000. From this data I estimate the potential biomass energy that could be obtained from abandoned croplands. I also estimate the potential for biomass energy to contribute to a renewable energy system consisting of wind and solar power by meeting seasonal energy storage needs that are a result of the intermittent nature of renewable energy sources. Lastly, I use the historical cropland areas result to estimate the ability of U.S. croplands to supply food to local populations at the county level.

  15. R E S U M E Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development of Indonesia and Germany

    E-print Network

    Peinke, Joachim

    R E S U M E Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development of Indonesia and Germany (RESDIG is organizing a two-day seminar on renewable energies and a two-day field-trip to some renewable energy projects of Oldenburg ­ UO and Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember ­ ITS on Post Graduate Program in Renewable Energy

  16. Topology of Sustainable Management of Dynamical Systems with Desirable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzig, Jobst; Kittel, Tim

    2015-04-01

    To keep the Earth System in a desirable region of its state space, such as the recently suggested 'tolerable environment and development window', 'planetary boundaries', or 'safe (and just) operating space', in addition to the identification of the quantitative internal dynamics and the available options for influencing it (management), there is an urgent need to understand the systems' state space structure with regard to questions such as (i) which of its parts can be reached from which others with or without leaving the desirable region, (ii) which parts are in a variety of senses 'safe' to stay in when management options break away, and which qualitative decision problems may occur as a consequence of this structure. To complement existing approaches from optimal control focusing on quantitative optimization and being much applied in both engineering and integrated assessment, we develop a mathematical theory of the qualitative topology that partitions the state space of a dynamical system with management options and desirable states including terminology suggestions for the various resulting parts. Our detailed formal classification of the possible states and management options with respect to the possibility of avoiding or leaving the undesired region indicates that before performing some form of quantitative optimization, the sustainable management of the Earth System may require decisions of a more discrete type, e.g. choosing between ultimate safety and permanent desirability, or between permanent safety and increasing future options.

  17. Design considerations for solar energy harvesting wireless embedded systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vijay Raghunathan; Aman Kansal; Jason Hsu; Jonathan Friedman; Mani B. Srivastava

    2005-01-01

    Sustainable operation of battery powered wireless embed- ded systems (such as sensor nodes) is a key challenge, and considerable research effort has been devoted to energy optimization of such systems. Environmental energy harvesting, in particular solar based, has emerged as a viable technique to supplement battery supplies. However, designing an efficient solar harvesting system to realize the potential benefits of

  18. Designing a Real-time Strategy Game about Sustainable Energy Use

    E-print Network

    Doucet, Lars Andreas

    2011-08-08

    This thesis documents the development of a video game about sustainable energy use that unites fun with learning. Many other educational games do not properly translate knowledge, facts, and lessons into the language of games: mechanics, rules...

  19. A sustainability analysis of geothermal energy development on the island of Dominica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Kiyana Marie-Jose

    Dominica is heavily dependent on fossil fuels to meet its electricity generation needs. Dominica's volcanic origin and current volcanic activity allow the island to be an ideal place for the production of geothermal energy. Once geothermal exploration and development has begun in Dominica, it is uncertain whether the efforts will produce an environmentally, economically and socially feasible exploitation of the resource. Using content analysis and cost benefit analysis, this study examined the impacts of geothermal energy development based on the triple bottom line of sustainability for the Wotten Waven community, as well as the island as a whole. The results indicate that this project will have an overall positive impact on the triple bottom line of sustainability for Dominica. Therefore, geothermal energy may provide substantial net benefits to economic and sustainable development of the island. Assessing the sustainability of geothermal development is important as Dominica begins to produce geothermal energy.

  20. Minimum Energy Requirements for Sustained Microbial Activity in Anoxic Sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christoper S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Currently understood mechanisms of biochemical energy conservation dictate that, in order to be biologically useful, energy must be available to organisms in "quanta" equal to, at minimum one-third to one-fifth of the energy required to synthesize ATP in vivo. The existence of this biological energy quantum means that a significant fraction of the chemical amp on Earth cannot be used to drive biological productivity, and places a fundamental thermodynamic constraint on the origins, evolution, and distribution of life. We examined the energy requirements of intact microbial assemblages in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA, using dissolved hydrogen concentrations as a non-invasive probe. In this system, the thermodynamics of metabolic processes occurring inside microbial cells is reflected quantitatively by H2 concentrations measured outside those cells. We find that methanogenic archaea are supported by energy yields as small as 10 kJ per mol, about half the quantity calculated from studies of microorganisms in culture. This finding implies that a significantly broader range of geologic and chemical niches might be exploited by microorganisms than would otherwise be expected.

  1. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    Growing Population Increasing Demand for Energy, Clean Water, Food Climate Change Increasing TemperatureNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/TP-6A20-62566 O C TO B E R 2014

  2. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

    E-print Network

    balancing area CAES compressed air energy storage CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAISO CaliforniaNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

  3. Energy storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.D.

    1980-01-08

    An energy storage system particularly adapted for mobile x-ray units which uses electrical energy from an ordinary 110 volt wall outlet, stores it as mechanical energy, and then converts part of the mechanical energy back to electrical energy in a short period of time. The mechanical energy is stored in flywheels which are also parts of a generator which converts mechanical to electrical energy as required.

  4. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Honeywell Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report Period Covered 55418 Fax: (612) 951-7438 #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report modular system designs, · Develop a supervisory control system having on-line optimization, · Develop

  5. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Modular Integrated Energy Systems Prepared for: Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008­December 2004 Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report Period: · Develop a set of "reference" CAD-based IES modular system designs, · Develop a supervisory control system

  6. Sustainable energy planning with efficient office buildings and cogeneration plants in Frankfurt am Main.

    PubMed

    Friedel, Wendelin; Neumann, Werner

    2004-06-01

    Sustainable development of a city not only is determined through the amount of protected areas, but it is also an important task to integrate sustainable development in urban energy planning. In the last 10 years, many new areas for offices and residential buildings have been developed in Frankfurt am Main. In this context, the municipality has taken over a new role as organizer for the integrated energy planning. This article gives an overview of the achievements. PMID:15253915

  7. 10.391J / 1.818J / 2.65J / 11.371J / 22.811J / ESD.166J Sustainable Energy, January IAP 2007 - Spring 2007

    E-print Network

    Drake, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. ...

  8. An injectable liquid crystal system for sustained delivery of entecavir.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jong-Lae; Ki, Min-Hyo; Joo, Min Kyung; An, Sung-Won; Hwang, Kyu-Mok; Park, Eun-Seok

    2015-07-25

    Liquid crystal (LC) technology has attracted much interest for new injectable sustained-release (SR) formulations. In this study, an injectable liquid crystal-forming system (LCFS) including entecavir was prepared for the treatment of hepatitis B. In particular, an anchoring effect was introduced because LCFSs are relatively hydrophobic while entecavir is a slightly charged drug. The physicochemical properties of LCFSs were investigated by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), polarized optical microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), showing typical characteristics of the liquid crystalline phase, which was classified as the hexagonal phase. A pharmacokinetic study in rats showed sustained release of entecavir for 3-5 days with a basic LCFS formulation composed of sorbitan monooleate (SMO), phosphatidyl choline (PC), and tocopherol acetate (TA) as the main LC components. 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid (DPPA), an anionic phospholipid, was added to increase the anchoring effect between the cationic entecavir and the anionic DPPA, which resulted in a 1.5-times increase in half-life in rats. In addition, anchoring was strengthened by optimizing the pH to 2.5-4.5, increasing the half-life in the rat and dog. Also, due to the increasing terminal half-life from rat to dog resulting from species differences, LCFS produced one week delivery of entecavir in rat and two weeks delivery in dog. Therefore, LCFS injection using the anchoring effect for entecavir can potentially be used to deliver the drug over more than 2 weeks or even 1 month for the treatment of hepatitis B. PMID:26004002

  9. Developing an Indicator System for Monitoring, Analyzing, and Assessing Airport Sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Janic

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with developing an indicator system for monitoring, analyzing, and assessing sustainability of airports. The sustainability implies simultaneous increasing of the overall socialeconomic benefits and increasing at a slower rate, stagnating, and\\/or diminishing of the negative impacts of these airports during the specified medium- to long-term period of time. The indicator system consists of the indicators and their

  10. IAC-05-D3.3.03 SUSTAINABILITY IN SYSTEM ARCHITECTURES

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    IAC-05-D3.3.03 SUSTAINABILITY IN SYSTEM ARCHITECTURES THROUGH RECONFIGURABILITY: A CASE STUDY performance. Sustainable system architectures however need to be affordable, ensure delivery of value for achieving these desirable characteristics. Currently, there is no formal methodology for studying

  11. Challenging Students' Perceptions of Sustainability Using an Earth Systems Science Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ian F.; Zeegers, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether an Earth Systems-based course focused on raising postgraduate students' awareness of sustainability, from a systems-thinking perspective, would produce graduates with commitment to drive the sustainability agenda forward with a broad perspective. It investigated students' pre and post-course perceptions of…

  12. Qualitative system analysis as a means for sustainable governance of emerging technologies: the case of nanotechnology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arnim Wiek; Daniel J. Lang; Michael Siegrist

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable governance of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology is a demanding societal challenge due to the “technological throughput” of today's and tomorrow's social life. A prerequisite for sustainable governance is an integrated understanding of the factors, interdependencies and developmental potentials of the technological system under investigation. This paper presents a transdisciplinary qualitative system analysis on nanotechnology in Switzerland, integrating perspectives

  13. Creating a Pathway to Sustainability IIT Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Renewable Energy Solar Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells and Batteries Energy Efficiency, Conversion, Conservation Recycling Solutions Indoor Air Quality Power Programs ......................................................................14 House of the Future

  14. Creating a Pathway to Sustainability IIT Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Renewable Energy Solar Fuel Cells and Batteries Hydrogen Storage Energy Efficiency, Conversion, Conservation Recycling Solutions Indoor Air Quality Power and Education Programs ......................................................................15 House

  15. Energy Policy 29 (2001) 55}65 Sustainable energy and urban form in China: the relevance of

    E-print Network

    2001-01-01

    Energy Policy 29 (2001) 55}65 Sustainable energy and urban form in China: the relevance of urban growth throughout China. The model focuses on how energy demand, residential energy technology development. Results from this exercise suggest that China can achieve urban residential and transportation

  16. An aggregated weighting system for evaluating sustainable urban regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lesley Hemphill; Stanley McGreal; Jim Berry

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with developing an effective means of weighting the key attributes of sustainable urban regeneration in accordance with their relative importance. The theme is initially explored from a literature review, highlighting the potential compatibility of urban regeneration and sustainability concepts, whilst illustrating the changes occurring in urban policy aimed at encapsulating the economic, environmental and social dimensions

  17. Alternative Farming Systems Information Center: Sustainable Agriculture Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site contains the following categories of information related to sustainable agriculture: Bibliographies of articles and research publications, searchable sites and databases, educational resources for elementary, high school, and college instructors, and lists of people and institutions that are involved in researching or promoting sustainable agriculture.

  18. ELEMENTS OF A MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The subject of Sustainability has recently attracted enormous interest in the minds of both the public and the scientific and engineering community. The reason for this interest is the fact that the concept of Sustainability holds the promise of a solution to society's long-term ...

  19. Structured Comprehension For Systems Thinking, Learning And Leadership Towards Sustainability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Waldron; Sophie Byggeth; Henrik Ny; Göran Broman; Karl-Henrik Robèrt

    The Blekinge Institute of Technology (BTH) Karlskrona, Sweden, will begin a new Master's programme focusing on sustainable development in September 2004. The programme is intended to contribute to a growing international network of sustainability practitioners, including early and mid-career professionals, resource managers, executives and political decision-makers. As with many programmes of this type, this one will require coverage of numerous

  20. Hybrid community energy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Karvelas, D. E.; Energy Systems

    2000-01-01

    The availability of efficient, economical, and reliable energy supplies can help attract industry and commercial businesses to a municipality or a region. Efficient use of energy can also improve the air quality and reduce pollution. Therefore, municipalities should explore and encourage the development and implementation of efficient energy systems. Integrated hybrid energy systems can be designed to meet the total energy requirements of large and small communities. These systems can yield significant energy and cost savings when compared with independent systems serving individual units or when compared with the conventional practice of buying power from a utility and producing thermal energy on-site. To maximize energy and cost savings, the design engineer should look beyond the conventional when designing such systems.

  1. Measuring Sustainability within the Veterans Administration Mental Health System Redesign Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ford, James H.; Krahn, Dean; Wise, Meg; Oliver, Karen Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine how attributes affecting sustainability differ across VHA organizational components and by staff characteristics. Subjects Surveys of 870 change team members and 50 staff interviews within the VA’s Mental Health System Redesign initiative. Methods A one-way ANOVA with a Tukey post-hoc test examined differences in sustainability by VISN, job classification, and tenure from staff survey data of the Sustainability Index. Qualitative interviews used an iterative process to identify “a priori” and “in vivo” themes. A simple stepwise linear regression explored predictors of sustainability. Results Sustainability differed across VISN and staff tenure. Job classification differences existed for: 1) Benefits and Credibility of the change and 2) staff involvement and attitudes toward change. Sustainability barriers were: staff and institutional resistance, and non-supportive leadership. Facilitators were: commitment to veterans, strong leadership, and use of QI Tools. Sustainability predictors were outcomes tracking, regular reporting, and use of PDSA cycles. Conclusions Creating homogeneous implementation and sustainability processes across a national health system is difficult. Despite the VA’s best evidence-based implementation efforts, there was significant variance. Locally tailored interventions might better support sustainability than “one-size-fits all” approaches. Further research is needed to understand how participation in a QI collaborative affects sustainability. PMID:21971024

  2. The feasibility of sustainable biomass energy production in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.; Maclean, W.D.; Asad, M. [Pinnacle Technology, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    In January 1994, the Department of Energy announced that 12 projects were chosen to study the feasibility of integrated production-conversion technologies for energy from biomass systems. The team represented by the authors was chosen for one project reflecting the Midwest region of the United States. The project site was Holton, Kansas (30 miles north of Topeka), a rural community which generates its own peaking power. This report is a summary of the technical and economic feasibility of producing three to five MW of baseload power using dedicated biomass feedstocks as the fuel supply and a fast pyrolysis system as the conversion process. Big bluestem/indiangrass and switchgrass had the best energy feasibility for the system. The conversion facility was sized for 100 bone dry tons of feedstock per day and was estimated to cost just over $4.5 million. The environmental, market and socio-economic impacts of the dedicated feedstocks and conversion study were examined. Based on all the data, the economic analysis predicted the facility would break-even at approximately $0.07 per kWh using a very aggressive best-case scenario. Since much of the Midwest has low baseload electricity prices ($0.02-0.03), biomass power based on a dedicated feedstock supply system does not appear to be an attractive option at the current time. There may be specific instances where biomass power will be an option-especially for peaking power or from waste feedstocks that are free, or have a tipping fee.

  3. Offshore wind energy systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Musgrove

    1978-01-01

    Wind energy systems deployed in the shallow but windy waters of the southern North Sea have the potential to provide more than 20% of UK electricity needs. With existing experience of windmills, and of aircraft and offshore structures, such wind energy systems could be developed within a relatively short timescale. A preliminary assessment of the economics of offshore wind energy

  4. Ris Energy Report 8 The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future

    E-print Network

    Risø Energy Report 8 The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future Risø-R-1695(EN) September 2009 Edited by Hans Larsen and Leif Sønderberg Petersen #12;Risø Energy Report 8 Edited by Hans Larsen and Leif Sønderberg Petersen, Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy Technical University

  5. State Energy Data System

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) source for comprehensive state energy statistics. Included are estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Production and consumption estimates begin with the year 1960 while price and expenditure estimates begin with 1970. The multidimensional completeness of SEDS allows users to make comparisons across states, energy sources, sectors, and over time.

  6. Investigating the need of nuclear power plants for sustainable energy in Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mazandarani; T. M. I. Mahlia; W. T. Chong; M. Moghavvemi

    2011-01-01

    Over the decades, the consumption of all types of energy such as electricity increased rapidly in Iran. Therefore, the government decided to redevelop its nuclear program to meet the rising electricity demand and decrease consumption of fossil fuels. In this paper, the effect of this policy in four major aspects of energy sustainability in the country, including energy price, environmental

  7. The current status and possible sustainable paths to energy “generation” and Use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noam Lior

    2010-01-01

    The energy predicament that the world faces, composed of rising energy and overall resources consumption alongside with associated rise in negative environmental, economical and social impacts, is described with recent data. A brief discussion of the status, sustainability (economic, environmental and social impact), and challenges and prospects of fossil, nuclear (including nuclear water desalination) and renewable energy use, and of

  8. The Potential for Launching a Postgraduate Course on Sustainable Energy in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taleb, Hanan M.

    2014-01-01

    The pressures of a growing global population, compounded by environmental degradation, escalating energy use and the depletion of natural energy resources, have led to sustainable energy (SE) holding a prominent position on the international agenda. In spite of the widespread recognition of the important role of SE education in securing a…

  9. Management Strategies for Sustainability Education, Planning, Design, Energy Conservation in California Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petratos, Panagiotis; Damaskou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the effects of campus sustainability planning to annual campus energy inflows and outflows in California higher education. The paper also offers a preliminary statistical analysis for the evaluation of impact factors on energy outflows and a link between energy outflows and building…

  10. Sustainable Buildings, Energy Efficiency, and Williams College A Look at the North and South Academic Buildings

    E-print Network

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Sustainable Buildings, Energy Efficiency, and Williams College A Look at the North and South of the steps that the school is now taking to become more energy efficient and environmentally friendly, and operate them so as to use energy efficiently #12;throughout their lives

  11. Pyramidal energy collector system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Orillion

    1981-01-01

    A radiation energy collector system in which an energy absorber is positioned within a pyramidal enclosure of which approximately one-half of the side area is radiation energy transmissive, and the other side and base area having a reflective inner surface, whereby radiation energy passing through the transmissive side area in part directly impinges on the absorber, and in part is

  12. Modular Integrated Energy Systems

    E-print Network

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Modular Integrated Energy Systems Prepared for: Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008­April 2005 Honeywell #12;Modular Integrated Energy Systems Task 6 Field Monitoring Interim Report Period chiller. The key goals of the project are: · Develop a set of "reference" CAD-based IES modular system

  13. Thermochemical energy storage systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. W. Schmidt; P. A. Lowe

    1976-01-01

    A thermochemical energy storage system is based on a reversible chemical reaction which consumes heat when proceeding in one direction and releases heat when proceeding in the opposite direction. The paper presents an overview of chemical reactions which can be used in a thermochemical energy storage (CES) system. Selection criteria for candidate CES systems are presented. Emphasis is on thermal

  14. SMR Handbook: Hybrid Energy Systems Involving SMRs

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2014-09-01

    Large-scale nuclear reactors are traditionally operated for a singular purpose: steady-state production of dispatchable baseload electricity that is distributed broadly on the electric grid. While this implementation is key to a sustainable, reliable energy grid, SMRs offer new opportunities for increased use of clean nuclear energy for both electric and thermal applications in more locations – while still accommodating the desire to support renewable production sources. This chapter considers a scenario in which renewable generation would be tightly coupled with the nuclear generation source – behind the grid – to meet the grid demand as an integrated energy system while simultaneously producing other commodities with the available thermal energy.

  15. Challenges and opportunities for implementing sustainable energy strategies in coastal communities of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etcheverry, Jose R.

    This dissertation explores the potential of renewable energy and efficiency strategies to solve the energy challenges faced by the people living in the biosphere reserve of El Vizcaino, which is located in the North Pacific region of the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. This research setting provides a practical analytical milieu to understand better the multiple problems faced by practitioners and agencies trying to implement sustainable energy solutions in Mexico. The thesis starts with a literature review (chapter two) that examines accumulated international experience regarding the development of renewable energy projects as a prelude to identifying the most salient implementation barriers impeding this type of initiatives. Two particularly salient findings from the literature review include the importance of considering gender issues in energy analysis and the value of using participatory research methods. These findings informed fieldwork design and the analytical framework of the dissertation. Chapter three surveys electricity generation as well as residential and commercial electricity use in nine coastal communities located in El Vizcaino. Chapter three summarizes the fieldwork methodology used, which relies on a mix of qualitative and quantitative research methods that aim at enabling a gender-disaggregated analysis to describe more accurately local energy uses, needs, and barriers. Chapter four describes the current plans of the state government, which are focused in expanding one of the state's diesel-powered electricity grids to El Vizcaino. The Chapter also examines the potential for replacing diesel generators with a combination of renewable energy systems and efficiency measures in the coastal communities sampled. Chapter five analyzes strategies to enable the implementation of sustainable energy approaches in El Vizcaino. Chapter five highlights several international examples that could be useful to inform organizational changes at the federal and state level aimed at fostering renewable energy and efficiency initiatives that enhance energy security, protect the environment, and also increase economic opportunities in El Vizcaino and elsewhere in Mexico. Chapter six concludes the thesis by providing: a summary of all key findings, a broad analysis of the implications of the research, and an overview of future lines of inquiry.

  16. Sense and sustainability revisited: the limits of total factor productivity measures of sustainable agricultural systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek Byerlee; Rinku Murgai

    2001-01-01

    Many economists have advocated and applied total social factor productivity (TSFP) (i.e., total factor productivity estimated with both market and non-market inputs and externalities, and with all factors valued at social prices) as a single all-embracing measure of agricultural sustainability. This paper reviews the conceptual and practical issues in measuring TSFP and shows that no one measure alone will be

  17. Towards a Sustainable Energy Balance: Progressive Efficiency and the Return of Energy Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Rick; Harris, Jeff; Diamond, Rick; Iyer, Maithili; Payne, Christopher; Blumstein, Carl; Siderius, Hans-Paul

    2007-08-13

    We argue that a primary focus on energy efficiency may not be sufficient to slow (and ultimately reverse) the growth in total energy consumption and carbon emissions. Instead, policy makers need to return to an earlier emphasis on"conservation," with energy efficiency seen as a means rather than an end in itself. We briefly review the concept of"intensive" versus"extensive" variables (i.e., energy efficiency versus energy consumption), and why attention to both consumption and efficiency is essential for effective policy in a carbon- and oil-constrained world with increasingly brittle energy markets. To start, energy indicators and policy evaluation metrics need to reflect energy consumption as well as efficiency. We introduce the concept of"progressive efficiency," with the expected or required level of efficiency varying as a function of house size, appliance capacity, or more generally, the scale of energy services. We propose introducing progressive efficiency criteria first in consumer information programs (including appliance labeling categories) and then in voluntary rating and recognition programs such as ENERGY STAR. As acceptance grows, the concept could be extended to utility rebates, tax incentives, and ultimately to mandatory codes and standards. For these and other programs, incorporating criteria for consumption as well as efficiency offers a path for energy experts, policy-makers, and the public to begin building consensus on energy policies that recognize the limits of resources and global carrying-capacity. Ultimately, it is both necessary and, we believe, possible to manage energy consumption, not just efficiency in order to achieve a sustainable energy balance. Along the way, we may find it possible to shift expectations away from perpetual growth and toward satisfaction with sufficiency.

  18. Subtask 5.3 - Water and Energy Sustainability and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Folkedahl; Christopher Martin; David Dunham

    2010-09-30

    The overall goal of this Energy & Environmental Research Center project was to evaluate water capture technologies in a carbon capture and sequestration system and perform a complete systems analysis of the process to determine potential water minimization opportunities within the entire system. To achieve that goal, a pilot-scale liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) was fabricated and tested in conjunction with a coal-fired combustion test furnace outfitted with CO{sub 2} mitigation technologies, including the options of oxy-fired operation and postcombustion CO{sub 2} capture using an amine scrubber. The process gas stream for these tests was a coal-derived flue gas that had undergone conventional pollutant control (particulates, SO{sub 2}) and CO{sub 2} capture with an amine-based scrubber. The water balance data from the pilot-scale tests show that the packed-bed absorber design was very effective at capturing moisture down to levels that approach equilibrium conditions.

  19. Copyright 2013 by the Authors Proceedings of the International Symposium on Sustainable Systems & Technologies

    E-print Network

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    sustainable solution for simultaneous advancement on the energy consumption and durability issues a comprehensive life-cycle energy model based on energy consumption in three primary phases of the devices to assess the local energy utilization on the devices. A thorough analysis of the benefits of reduction

  20. Understanding energy technology developments from an innovation system perspective

    E-print Network

    .borup@risoe.dk Abstract With the increased market-orientation and privatisation of the energy area, the perspective for discussing the framework conditions for transition to sustainable energy technologies and strengthsUnderstanding energy technology developments from an innovation system perspective Mads Borup1

  1. Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in using and interpreting EC flux measurements. We compare EC observations from two towers established over sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in Hawai'i, USA under similar cultivation, temperature, sunlight, and precipitation, but drastically different wind conditions due to orographic effects. At a daily scale, we find that energy closure for both towers occurs on days when the entire 24 hours has sufficient turbulence. At our windier site, this turbulence condition occurs over 60% of the time, which contributes to substantially better daily energy closure (~98%) than at the calmer site (~75%). At our windy site, we then invert the daily energy closure for continuously windy days to calculate canopy energy storage. At full canopy, peak daily canopy energy storage fluxes (200-400 Wm-2) are approximately an order of magnitude larger than soil heat flux (20-40 Wm-2). As a fraction of net radiation, canopy energy storage appears to vary seasonally and shows substantially greater variability than soil heat flux. The results illustrate the importance of sustained turbulence for accurate, direct measurement of land-atmosphere fluxes. As increasing number of EC towers are established in complex terrain, these results indicate the need for preliminary wind studies to optimize tower placement where orography enhances, rather than suppresses, turbulence.

  2. SUSTAINABILITY: ECOLOGICAL, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, TECHNOLOGICAL, AND SYSTEMS ASPECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is generally associated with a definition by the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: "? development that ?meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future' ?" However, a mathematical theo...

  3. Sustainability evaluation of different systems for sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) farming based on emergy theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guodong; Dong, Shuanglin; Tian, Xiangli; Gao, Qinfeng; Wang, Fang

    2015-06-01

    Emergy analysis is effective for analyzing ecological economic systems. However, the accuracy of the approach is affected by the diversity of economic level, meteorological and hydrological parameters in different regions. The present study evaluated the economic benefits, environmental impact, and sustainability of indoor, semi-intensive and extensive farming systems of sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus) in the same region. The results showed that A. japonicus indoor farming system was high in input and output (yield) whereas pond extensive farming system was low in input and output. The output/input ratio of indoor farming system was lower than that of pond extensive farming system, and the output/input ratio of semi-intensive farming system fell in between them. The environmental loading ratio of A. japonicus extensive farming system was lower than that of indoor farming system. In addition, the emergy yield and emergy exchange ratios, and emergy sustainability and emergy indexes for sustainable development were higher in extensive farming system than those in indoor farming system. These results indicated that the current extensive farming system exerted fewer negative influences on the environment, made more efficient use of available resources, and met more sustainable development requirements than the indoor farming system. A. japonicus farming systems showed more emergy benefits than fish farming systems. The pond farming systems of A. japonicus exploited more free local environmental resources for production, caused less potential pressure on the local environment, and achieved higher sustainability than indoor farming system.

  4. TRIPZOOM: A System to Motivate Sustainable Urban Mobility Paul Holleis, Marko Luther,

    E-print Network

    TRIPZOOM: A System to Motivate Sustainable Urban Mobility Paul Holleis, Marko Luther, Gregor Broll such as increasing pollution or travel costs. We describe a framework that enhances mobility data from existing urban real world tests in several cities. Keywords - sustainable traffic; urban mobility; personal mobile

  5. Model based approach to Study the Impact of Biofuels on the Sustainability of an Ecological System

    EPA Science Inventory

    The importance and complexity of sustainability has been well recognized and a formal study of sustainability based on system theory approaches is imperative as many of the relationships between various components of the ecosystem could be nonlinear, intertwined and non intuitive...

  6. M.S. in Health and Human Development Sustainable Food Systems Emphasis

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    on sustainable food production, food preparation and processing, distribution, nutrition, community food securityM.S. in Health and Human Development Sustainable Food Systems Emphasis Information for Prospective degree with an option in food, family, and community health sciences with two programs of study: 1

  7. Evaluating Sustainability, Environmental Assessment and Toxic Emissions during Manufacturing Process of RFID Based Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajeev Kumar Kanth; Pasi Liljeberg; Hannu Tenhunen; Qiansu Wan; Yasar Amin; Botao Shao; Qiang Chen; Lirong Zheng; Harish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The present state of the art research in the direction of embedded systems demonstrate that analysis of life-cycle, sustainability and environmental assessment have not been a core focus for researchers. To maximize a researcher's contribution in formulating environmentally friendly products, devising green manufacturing processes and services, there is a strong need to enhance life-cycle awareness and sustainability understandings among embedded

  8. Sustainability Data and Analytics in Cloud-Based M2M Systems

    E-print Network

    Dustdar, Schahram

    for sustainability governance. Based on that we present techniques for supporting M2M data and process integration. We present a cloud-based data analytics system for sustainability governance that includes a Platform. Dustdar e-mail: dustdar@dsg.tuwien.ac.at N. Bessis and C. Dobre (eds.), Big Data and Internet of Things

  9. Michael Gonzalez Michael is currently Chief of the Systems Analysis Branch in the Sustainable Technology

    E-print Network

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Michael Gonzalez Michael is currently Chief of the Systems Analysis Branch in the Sustainable Assessment, Industry Ecology and Sustainable Chemistry. Michael has also served as the Senior Advisor, Michael's research interests have focused on the design of green chemical synthesis routes. More recently

  10. Assessing Sustainability in Real Urban Systems: The Greater Cincinnati Metropolitan Area in Ohio

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research article is to present a practical and general methodology for a sustainability assessment in real urban systems. The method is based on the computation and interpretation of Fisher Information (FI) as a sustainability metric using time series for 29 soci...

  11. Sustainability - what are the odds? Envisioning the future of our environment, economy and society

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability ? the word is everywhere these days. Cities, transportation systems, energy producers, agriculture, fisheries, businesses, even mines (!), are making claims or making plans for sustainability. Several formal definitions of sustainability have been offered; here is ...

  12. Sustained Subconjunctival Protein Delivery Using a Thermosetting Gel Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: An effective treatment modality for posterior eye diseases would provide prolonged delivery of therapeutic agents, including macromolecules, to eye tissues using a safe and minimally invasive method. The goal of this study was to assess the ability of a thermosetting gel to deliver a fluorescently labeled protein, Alexa 647 ovalbumin, to the choroid and retina of rats following a single subconjunctival injection of the gel. Additional experiments were performed to compare in vitro to in vivo ovalbumin release rates from the gel. Methods: The ovalbumin content of the eye tissues was monitored by spectrophotometric assays of tissue extracts of Alexa 647 ovalbumin from dissected sclera, choroid, and retina at time points ranging from 2 h to 14 days. At the same time points, fluorescence microscopy images of tissue samples were also obtained. Measurement of intact ovalbumin was verified by LDS-PAGE analysis of the tissue extract solutions. In vitro release of Alexa 488 ovalbumin into 37°C PBS solutions from ovalbumin-loaded gel pellets was also monitored over time by spectrophotometric assay. In vivo ovalbumin release rates were determined by measurement of residual ovalbumin extracted from gel pellets removed from rat eyes at various time intervals. Results: Our results indicate that ovalbumin concentrations can be maintained at measurable levels in the sclera, choroid, and retina of rats for up to 14 days using the thermosetting gel delivery system. The concentration of ovalbumin exhibited a gradient that decreased from sclera to choroid and to retina. The in vitro release rate profiles were similar to the in vivo release profiles. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the thermosetting gel system may be a feasible method for safe and convenient sustained delivery of proteins to choroidal and retinal tissue in the posterior segments of the eye. PMID:20148655

  13. A system approach for reducing the environmental impact of manufacturing and sustainability improvement of nano-scale manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yingchun

    This dissertation develops an effective and economical system approach to reduce the environmental impact of manufacturing. The system approach is developed by using a process-based holistic method for upstream analysis and source reduction of the environmental impact of manufacturing. The system approach developed consists of three components of a manufacturing system: technology, energy and material, and is useful for sustainable manufacturing as it establishes a clear link between manufacturing system components and its overall sustainability performance, and provides a framework for environmental impact reductions. In this dissertation, the system approach developed is applied for environmental impact reduction of a semiconductor nano-scale manufacturing system, with three case scenarios analyzed in depth on manufacturing process improvement, clean energy supply, and toxic chemical material selection. The analysis on manufacturing process improvement is conducted on Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 dielectric gate on semiconductor microelectronics devices. Sustainability performance and scale-up impact of the ALD technology in terms of environmental emissions, energy consumption, nano-waste generation and manufacturing productivity are systematically investigated and the ways to improve the sustainability of the ALD technology are successfully developed. The clean energy supply is studied using solar photovoltaic, wind, and fuel cells systems for electricity generation. Environmental savings from each clean energy supply over grid power are quantitatively analyzed, and costs for greenhouse gas reductions on each clean energy supply are comparatively studied. For toxic chemical material selection, an innovative schematic method is developed as a visual decision tool for characterizing and benchmarking the human health impact of toxic chemicals, with a case study conducted on six chemicals commonly used as solvents in semiconductor manufacturing. Reliability of the schematic method is validated by comparing its benchmark results on 104 chemicals with that from the conventional Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. This dissertation concludes with discussions on environmental impact assessment of nanotechnologies and sustainability management of nano-particles. As nano-manufacturing is emerging for wide industrial applications, improvement and expansion of the system approach would be valuable for use in the environmental management of nano-manufacturing and in the risk control of nano-particles in the interests of public health and the environment.

  14. Wind driven energy system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Currah; G. W. Harper

    1980-01-01

    A system for conversion of wind power to electrical energy is described. The system provides for use during a wide range of wind velocities by use of the following: an external deflection system consisting of baffles and peripheral turbulence creating walls designed to increase the wind velocity and to divert the wind stream to the aperture of the system; a

  15. Psychological factors influencing sustainable energy technology acceptance: A review-based comprehensive framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. A. Huijts; E. J. E. Molin; L. Steg

    Environmental and societal problems related to energy use have spurred the development of sustainable energy technologies, such as wind mills, carbon capture and storage, and hydrogen vehicles. Public acceptance of these technologies is crucial for their successful introduction into society. Although various studies have investigated technology acceptance, most technology acceptance studies focused on a limited set of factors that can

  16. UCSF Sustainability Action Plan UCSF Energy Targets and Strategies August 18, 2011 Page 1

    E-print Network

    Yamamoto, Keith

    of the effect of climate on relative energy consumption. UCSF falls within climate zone 3C, one of the least Sustainability Action Plan: Appendix V: UCSF Energy Targets and Strategies Issue Date: August 18, 2011 #12;UCSF consumption on an annual basis. In lieu of the initial 30% improvement goal, we are therefore recommending

  17. Energy efficient buildings as a tool for ensuring sustainability in the building industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mohammed; A. Mustapha; N. Mu'azu

    2011-01-01

    The sustainability of our sources of energy has been in the front burner of recent because of the climate change debate - that emissions from fossil fuel based industries are mainly responsible for the greenhouse effect, which has resulted in a change in the global weather pattern. Consequently, various industries including the building industry have adopted energy efficiency measures as

  18. World Renewable Energy Congress 2011 Sweden Sustainable Transport (ST) 8-11 May 2011, Linkping, Sweden

    E-print Network

    World Renewable Energy Congress 2011 ­ Sweden Sustainable Transport (ST) 8-11 May 2011, Linköping-mail: larry.anderson@ucdenver.edu Abstract: Many countries are using and considering the increased use in an attempt to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to improve the energy security of the country. Biodiesel

  19. Methane production through anaerobic digestion of various energy crops grown in sustainable crop rotations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Amon; Barbara Amon; Vitaliy Kryvoruchko; Andrea Machmüller; Katharina Hopfner-Sixt; Vitomir Bodiroza; Regina Hrbek; Jürgen Friedel; Erich Pötsch; Helmut Wagentristl; Matthias Schreiner; Werner Zollitsch

    2007-01-01

    Biogas production is of major importance for the sustainable use of agrarian biomass as renewable energy source. Economic biogas production depends on high biogas yields. The project aimed at optimising anaerobic digestion of energy crops. The following aspects were investigated: suitability of different crop species and varieties, optimum time of harvesting, specific methane yield and methane yield per hectare. The

  20. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Session I: Energy Goals and Features of the RSF

    E-print Network

    and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Session I: Energy Goals and Features, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL's Research Support Facility: An Operations for standard office space occupant density and data center loads · Normalized up to 35.1 kBtu/ft2/yr for better

  1. Annual cycle energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minturn, R. E.

    The annual cycle energy system (ACES) program which incorporates in a practical system the outstanding energy conservation potential that exists when the unidirectional heat pump and the interseasonal storage of energy are combined to provide heating, cooling, and domestic hot water to buildings is described. Information on the system, its applicability to different geographic areas, and the methodology for designing and building systems are enumerated. It is shown that the system is rugged, reliable, and appreciably more conservative of purchased energy than all practical alternatives. An ACES residential design methodology was also developed. It is concluded that the system is constant in efficiency and capacity during winter operation, independent of extremes in weather, contributes to the reduction of peak demand and increases in daily and seasonal load factors.

  2. A Real-Time Recording Model of Key Indicators for Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions of Sustainable Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weiwei; Yang, Huanjia; Chew, David; Hou, Yanhong; Li, Qiming

    2014-01-01

    Buildings' sustainability is one of the crucial parts for achieving urban sustainability. Applied to buildings, life-cycle assessment encompasses the analysis and assessment of the environmental effects of building materials, components and assemblies throughout the entire life of the building construction, use and demolition. Estimate of carbon emissions is essential and crucial for an accurate and reasonable life-cycle assessment. Addressing the need for more research into integrating analysis of real-time and automatic recording of key indicators for a more accurate calculation and comparison, this paper aims to design a real-time recording model of these crucial indicators concerning the calculation and estimation of energy use and carbon emissions of buildings based on a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based system. The architecture of the RFID-based carbon emission recording/tracking system, which contains four functional layers including data record layer, data collection/update layer, data aggregation layer and data sharing/backup layer, is presented. Each of these layers is formed by RFID or network devices and sub-systems that operate at a specific level. In the end, a proof-of-concept system is developed to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture and demonstrate the feasibility of the design. This study would provide the technical solution for real-time recording system of building carbon emissions and thus is of great significance and importance to improve urban sustainability. PMID:24831109

  3. ABSTRACT -When it comes to looking at energy efficiency and the concept of sustainability in computing, the focus has

    E-print Network

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    ABSTRACT - When it comes to looking at energy efficiency and the concept of sustainability processing fundamentals to the profile of data center energy use. This paper will consider sustainability that energy consumed globally by mobile devices is increasingly a large fraction that must be improved

  4. A Review on Sustainability Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Far, Amin Hosseinian; Pimenidis, Elias; Jahankhani, Hamid; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    The apprehensions around the climate change and energy crisis have led to the emergence of the need for sustainability analysis. The subject of sustainability is now of wider inclusivity as it can be applied to almost any field of study. There are different approaches to model sustainability; however the systems approach is the focus of consideration in this paper. The proposed model for sustainability incorporates the use of neural networks to develop a complex adaptive system. The complexity of the system is simplified using influence diagrams or knowledge management techniques.

  5. SUSTAINABILITY, RESOURCE SUBSTITUTION IN ENERGY INPUTS AND LEARNING

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -02 Abstract: We assess the impact of the existence of a costly energy substitute (like wind, solar) for a non. In Brazil, Ethanol became the main substitute for petrol (85% of cars are flex-fuel in Brazil resources (in the sense of non-depletable energy which also includes hydro power, wind energy, solar energy

  6. SUSTAINABLE GENERATION AND UTILIZATION OF ENERGY THE CASE OF ICELAND.

    E-print Network

    Valfells, Ágúst

    ­hydro and geothermal energy. It has been estimated that the total potential energy of all precipitation Director, National Power Company #12;Figure I. Hydro Energy Derived from Precipitation in Iceland. Precipitation 285 TWh/a Stored energy in glaciers 7600 TWh Ground- water ?? Twh 33 22 43 Glacier flow

  7. Sustainable and Energy Efficient Urban and Built Infrastructure Development: Opportunities

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    use in buildings matter · Efficiency offers the best means to substantial reduction in energy use energy efficient buildings exist · 50-70% energy use reduction in buildings is feasible with existing Efficiency in Buildings Project Four year project motivated by increasing global energy crisis Must transform

  8. Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Simon Christopher

    Widespread access to renewable electricity is seen as a viable method to mitigate carbon emissions, although problematic are the issues associated with the integration of the generation systems within current power system configurations. Wind power plants are the primary large-scale renewable generation technology applied globally, but display considerable short-term supply variability that is difficult to predict. Power systems are currently not designed to operate under these conditions, and results in the need to increase operating reserve in order to guarantee stability. Often, operating conventional generation as reserve is both technically and economically inefficient, which can overshadow positive benefits associated with renewable energy exploitation. The purpose of this thesis is to introduce and assess an alternative method of enhancing power system operations through the control of electric loads. In particular, this thesis focuses on managing highly-distributed sustainable demand-side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles, and electrolyzers, as dispatchable short-term energy balancing resources. The main contribution of the thesis is an optimal control strategy capable of simultaneously balancing grid- and demand-side objectives. The viability of the load control strategy is assessed through model-based simulations that explicitly track end-use functionality of responsive devices within a power systems analysis typically implemented to observe the effects of integrated wind energy systems. Results indicate that there is great potential for the proposed method to displace the need for increased reserve capacity in systems considering a high penetration of wind energy, thereby allowing conventional generation to operate more efficiently and avoid the need for possible capacity expansions.

  9. Automotive energy management system

    SciTech Connect

    Shiber, S.

    1980-09-23

    A hydromechanical/hydrostatic automotive energy management system is described that is comprised of two hydraulic units, the system adapted to provide: an efficient, continuously variable optimal transmission ratio, an intermittent optimal engine operation in city traffic and regenerative braking, thereby, the system is able to reduce a car's fuel consumption by as much as one half while improving drivability.

  10. Social and economic sustainability of urban systems: comparative analysis of metropolitan statistical areas in Ohio, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article presents a general and versatile methodology for assessing sustainability with Fisher Information as a function of dynamic changes in urban systems. Using robust statistical methods, six Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in Ohio were evaluated to comparatively as...

  11. The dramatic dehospitalization of health services is a prerequisite for a sustainable and effective health system.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Using the general precepts of integration, Lean thinking, and patient centredness, this article highlights the potential for dramatic dehospitalization of health services as a prerequisite for a sustainable and effective health system. PMID:25671873

  12. Sustainability Institute

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Sustainability Institute is a nonprofit organization that provides information, analysis, and practical demonstrations that help promote the development of sustainable systems locally, regionally, and globally. Users can read about recent projects and services that the Sustainability Institute has been involved in .

  13. Solar energy systems cost

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Five major areas of work currently being pursued in the United States in solar energy which will have a significant impact on the world's energy situation in the future are addressed. The five significant areas discussed include a technical description of several solar technologies, current and projected cost of the selected solar systems, and cost methodologies which are under development. In addition, sensitivity considerations which are unique to solar energy systems and end user applications are included. A total of six solar technologies - biomass, photovoltaics, wind, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), solar thermal, and industrial process heat (IPH) have been included in a brief technical description to present the variety of systems and their techncial status. System schematics have been included of systems which have been constructed, are currently in the detail design and test stage of development, or are of a conceptual nature.

  14. MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS/SUSTAINABLE CIVIL ENGINEERING POSITIONS -The Department of Civil Engineering at the University of New Hampshire invites

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    MATERIALS AND SYSTEMS/SUSTAINABLE CIVIL ENGINEERING POSITIONS - The Department of Civil Engineering level. The two positions, one in civil engineering Materials and one in Systems/Sustainable Engineering of resilient, adaptable and sustainable civil infrastructure. More information can be found at http://www.unh.edu/civil-engineering

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report The Sustainability of the UBC Food System Project: A Sustainable Business Plan for

    E-print Network

    of the UBC Food System Project: A Sustainable Business Plan for Agora David Coney, Sandra Jacob, Yee Wah Lee Project Group 7 (2004) General Tasks & Scenario 1: A Sustainable Business Plan for Agora. April 2004 David of Agora's Business Model 12 Integration of Agora with FAS Curriculum 15 Lessons from Other Student

  16. Application of systems engineering methodologies to transitions to sustainable technologies: An architecture framework supporting management of portfolios of sustainable technology transition projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kim Davis; Thomas Mazzuchi; Shahram Sarkani

    2011-01-01

    Transition Management (TM) is a concept which has gained popularity as a means to affect large-scale shifts to more sustainable technologies. The transition management approach is a cyclical process built upon a multilevel perspective of technology transitions. There is also a growing body of research on systems engineering for sustainability, but the field remains focused in areas such as indicators

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability Assessment of Flour Served at UBC's Food System

    E-print Network

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainability Assessment of a project/report". #12;1 Sustainability Assessment Of Flour Served at UBC's Food System Group 30 Angela To........................................................................................... 6 Methodology

  18. Igniting system for mercury lamps protects transistorized sustaining supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guisinger, J. E.

    1964-01-01

    A current from a sustaining power supply flows through the mercury vapor lamp and, as there are no resistors in series with this supply, the power is efficiently used. This high voltage igniting device protects the transistorized high current, low voltage power supply.

  19. SUSTAINABILITY: ECOLOGICAL, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, TECHNOLOGICAL, AND SYSTEMS PERSPECTIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is generally associated with a definition by the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: "Development that meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future". However, a mathematical theory e...

  20. ON SYSTEMS METRICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of sustainability is widely associated with the statement from the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: ?? development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs?? Hence, sustai...