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1

Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site from the Australian National University Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems provides information about photovoltaics and solar thermal energy technology. Links are provided to energy information and research sites.

Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSES); University, Australian N.

2

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY SYSTEM IN BELGRADE Biljana Vucicevic Research Assistant Marina Jovanovic Associate Researcher Valentina Turanjanin Associate Researcher Vukman Bakic Senior Research Associate Vinca...SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY SYSTEM IN BELGRADE Biljana Vucicevic Research Assistant Marina Jovanovic Associate Researcher Valentina Turanjanin Associate Researcher Vukman Bakic Senior Research Associate Vinca...

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01

3

The sustainable system for global nuclear energy utilization  

SciTech Connect

The sustainable system for global nuclear energy utilization has been developed based on the concept of the Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System. As the results, it is clarified that metallic fuel fast reactor cycle with recycling of actinides and five LLFPs is one of the most promising systems for the sustainable nuclear utilization. It is important to develop the related technologies toward its realization. (authors)

Arie, Kazuo; Araki, Yoshio; Sato, Mitsuyoshi; Mori, Kenji [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Kawashima, Masatoshi [Aitel Corporation, 8, Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Nakayama, Yoshiyuki; Ishiguma, Kazuo [The Japan Atomic Power Company, 1-1, Kanda-Mitoshiro-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0053 (Japan); Fuji-ie, Yoichi [Nuclear Salon Fuji-ie, 1-7-6, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

2007-07-01

4

Anaerobic fermentative system based scheme for green energy sustainable houses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The green energy sustainable house based on bio-hydrogen and bio-methane energy technologies proposed in this study employs dark fermentation technology to complete a scheme for green energy sustainable house that includes energy production, storage, distribution control, load applications, recycling, waste treatment, and reuse. In order to resolve the problem of wastewater discharge from hydrogen production in green energy sustainable houses,

Chen-Yeon Chu; Shang-Yuan Chen; Chyi-How Lay; Jou-Hsien Wu; Ming-jen Cheng; Chiu-Yue Lin

2011-01-01

5

Environment, Energy and Sustainability from a Systems Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a framework for teaching and learning about environment, energy and sustainability issues from the perspective of the emerging field of engineering systems. Engineering systems integrates approaches from engineering, management and social sciences to address systems with a high degree of technical and social complexity of importance to human societies. We share approaches to integrating engineering systems research and teaching from the Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Topics include simulation and modeling; risk assessment; technology assessment; coupled human-natural systems; and optimization. We show how we have applied active learning techniques using simple models (e.g. climate and economic system modeling) to help students understand the dynamics of complexity in environmental systems and their interacting human components.

Selin, N. E.; Webster, M. D.; Trancik, J.

2010-12-01

6

Energy Master Plans for Sustainable, High Performance HVAC and Associated Systems for Hot and Humid Climates  

E-print Network

. Energy Master Plans (EMPs) examine the pieces of true sustainable design and then assemble the pieces into whole sustainable, high performance HVAC systems. These are presented to the owner as the target to reach. A detailed, in depth energy master... Buildings Learn by Stuart Brand Figure 2. EMP?S WILL DOUBLE THE SERVICES LIFE CYCLE. From How Buildings Learn by Stuart Brand Energy Master Plans initially focus on four essential design initiatives to create sustainable, high performance...

Maisey, G. E.; Milestone, B.

2004-01-01

7

Nordic network for Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

Nordic network for Sustainable Energy Systems in Isolated Locations (NordSESIL) Gordon A. Mackenzie of the Nordic region to access sustainable energy solutions by creating and stimulating a network of relevant sustainable energy projects happening' in isolated areas of the Nordic region. #12;Partners, organisation (1

8

Measuring Energy Sustainability  

E-print Network

20 Measuring Energy Sustainability David L. Greene Abstract For the purpose of measurement, energy sustainability is defined as ensuring that future generations have energy resources that enable them to achieve that there are valid, more comprehensive understandings of sustainability and that energy sustainability as de- fined

9

Transportation and energy: Strategies for a sustainable transportation system  

SciTech Connect

Widespread concern about energy efficiency, societal impacts and environmental quality has sparked a global interest in the reevaluation of their transportation systems. This book examines how transportation energy choices made by citizens, policy makers and planners will affect national goals of mobility, accessibility, environmental quality, quality of life, economic growth, and energy security. Chapters cover: mobility, growth and system change, including land use and transportation alternatives; energy and vehicle alternatives, including ``superefficient`` cars, alternative fuels and energy and emissions reduction policy; social cost analysis of alternative fuels; market-based demand management policies in Southern California; fuel and vehicle taxation as market incentives for higher fuel economy and the effect of taxation policies on vehicle characteristics in the US and other developed countries; and industry perspectives on technology, economics and government-industry cooperation. Based on presentations made by transportation system planners and policy-makers at the 1993 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy.

Sperling, D.; Shaheen, S.A. [eds.] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1995-12-31

10

SOLARCAP: Super Capacitor Buffering of Solar Energy for Self-Sustainable Field Systems  

E-print Network

buffering, a system that we call SOLARCAP. Using solar panels paired with super-capacitors presents uniqueSOLARCAP: Super Capacitor Buffering of Solar Energy for Self-Sustainable Field Systems Amal Fahad of the conventional battery-based energy storage, this paper argues that the super capacitor buffering of solar energy

Shen, Kai

11

|What is energy sustainability? W e frequently hear that our energy system is not sustainable. This  

E-print Network

they were expected to excel ­ financial performance. Almost everywhere, the costs of nuclear power ended up fuels at the same time. We can increase our use of nuclear power. It has negligible emissions more energy efficient equipment that should repay its extra up-front cost many times over. We leave

12

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS  

E-print Network

and Sustainable Transportation 249 11: Toward a Universal Low-Carbon Fuel Standard 251 Daniel Sperling and SoniaSUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS #12;SUSTAINABLE

California at Davis, University of

13

The nuclear power satellite (NPS) - Key to a sustainable global energy economy and solar system civilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential role of nuclear power satellite (NPS) in developing a sustainable global energy economy for earth and in the spread of human civilization across the solar system is discussed. The technical steps needed to develop, operate, and maintain NSP facilities are described. An initial application of NPS is examined which involves linking its energy output via energy beaming to

J. A. Angelo Jr.; D. Buden

1991-01-01

14

An energy systems view of sustainability: emergy evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado.  

PubMed

Energy Systems Theory (EST) provides a framework for understanding and interpreting sustainability. EST implies that "what is sustainable" for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system and within the system of concern. The pulsing paradigm explains the ubiquitous cycles of change that apparently govern ecosystems, rather than succession to a steady state that is then sustainable. Therefore, to make robust decisions among environmental policies and alternatives, decision-makers need to know where their system resides in the cycles of change that govern it. This theory was examined by performing an emergy evaluation of the sustainability of a regional system, the San Luis Basin (SLB), CO. By 1980, the SLB contained a climax stage agricultural system with well-developed crop and livestock production along with food and animal waste processing. The SLB is also a hinterland in that it exports raw materials and primary products (exploitation stage) to more developed areas. Emergy indices calculated for the SLB from 1995 to 2005 revealed changes in the relative sustainability of the system over this time. The sustainability of the region as indicated by the renewable emergy used as a percent of total use declined 4%, whereas, the renewable carrying capacity declined 6% over this time. The Emergy Sustainability Index (ESI) showed the largest decline (27%) in the sustainability of the region. The total emergy used by the SLB, a measure of system well-being, was fairly stable (CV = 0.05). In 1997, using renewable emergy alone, the SLB could support 50.7% of its population at the current standard of living, while under similar conditions the U.S. could support only 4.8% of its population. In contrast to other indices of sustainability, a new index, the Emergy Sustainable Use Index (ESUI), which considers the benefits gained by the larger system compared to the potential for local environmental damage, increased 34% over the period. PMID:22115513

Campbell, Daniel E; Garmestani, Ahjond S

2012-03-01

15

STRATEGIC FOCUS: Sustainable Systems  

E-print Network

to apply sustain- ability principles to building and design, transportation and other fields, to green1010 STRATEGIC FOCUS: Sustainable Systems Biology doctoral student Tanya Lubansky uses quan and quantitative ecologists. Sustainable Systems in NJIT's Educational Programs Educational offerings

16

Engineering sustainability: thermodynamics, energy systems, and the environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY Thermodynamic concepts have been utilized by practitioners in a variety of disciplines with interests in environmental sustainability, including ecology, economics and engineering. Widespread concern about resource depletion and environmental degradation are common to them all. It has been argued that these consequences of human development are reflected in thermodynamic parameters and methods of analysis; they are said to mirror

Geoffrey P. Hammondn

17

Designing resilient, sustainable systems.  

PubMed

Pursuit of sustainable development requires a systems approach to the design of industrial product and service systems. Although many business enterprises have adopted sustainability goals, the actual development of sustainable systems remains challenging because of the broad range of economic, environmental and social factors that need to be considered across the system life cycle. Traditional systems engineering practices try to anticipate and resist disruptions but may be vulnerable to unforeseen factors. An alternative is to design systems with inherent "resilience" bytaking advantage of fundamental properties such as diversity, efficiency, adaptability, and cohesion. Previous work on sustainable design has focused largely upon ecological efficiency improvements. For example, companies have found that reducing material and energy intensity and converting wastes into valuable secondary products creates value for shareholders as well as for society at large. To encourage broader systems thinking, a design protocol is presented that involves the following steps: identifying system function and boundaries, establishing requirements, selecting appropriate technologies, developing a system design, evaluating anticipated performance, and devising a practical means for system deployment. The approach encourages explicit consideration of resilience in both engineered systems and the larger systems in which they are embedded. PMID:14700317

Fiksel, Joseph

2003-12-01

18

Chapter 2: Sustainable and Unsustainable Developments in the U.S. Energy System  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the United States developed a wealthy society on the basis of cheap and abundant fossil fuel energy. As fossil fuels have become ecologically and economically expensive in the twenty-first century, America has shown mixed progress in transitioning to a more sustainable energy system. From 2000 to 2006, energy and carbon intensity of GDP continued favorable long-term trends of decline. Energy end-use efficiency also continued to improve; for example, per-capita electricity use was 12.76 MWh per person per year in 2000 and again in 2006, despite 16 percent GDP growth over that period. Environmental costs of U.S. energy production and consumption have also been reduced, as illustrated in air quality improvements. However, increased fossil fuel consumption, stagnant efficiency standards, and expanding corn-based ethanol production have moved the energy system in the opposite direction, toward a less sustainable energy system. This chapter reviews energy system developments between 2000 and 2006 and presents policy recommendations to move the United States toward a more sustainable energy system.

Levine, Mark; Levine, Mark D.; Aden, Nathaniel T.

2008-05-01

19

Sustainable Energy Coalition Homepage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Sustainable Energy Coalition brings together business, environmental, and consumer organizations that advocate federal energy policies that will lead to "a cleaner environment, safe reliable energy technologies, and a secure, prosperous future for all Americans."

2008-08-18

20

Environmental Sustainability & Green Energy  

E-print Network

Environmental Sustainability & Green Energy With escalating concerns about global energy shortages of carbon nanotubes for solar energy · ChemicalReactorEngineeringCentre: developing innovative green reactor and ensuring the safety of such structures as nuclear power plants · Researchfor

Denham, Graham

21

Solar Cooling Using Variable Geometry Ejectors Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems  

E-print Network

Solar Cooling Using Variable Geometry Ejectors M. Dennis Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems then produced a moderate vacuum. It was a natural progression for steam based ejectors to be used to draw vapour applications when there was a ready source of low pressure steam and were commonplace in ships and hotels from

22

Renewable Energy: Energy Security and Sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renewable energy offers the possibility of providing a complete, sustainable energy infrastructure without anthropogenic emission of CO2. Large-scale implementation of renewable technologies would eliminate the need to develop and implement sequestration systems, by reducing the use of, and ultimately eliminating fossil based energy production. Renewable energy also offers energy security because indigenous resources are sufficient. The major renewable energy systems

John Turner

2002-01-01

23

G-7 countries on the way to sustainable energy systems?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is a comparative analysis of energy production and CO>SUB align=right>>SMALL>2>\\/SMALL>>\\/SUB> emission flows in the G-7 countries in the years 1960-1999. The comparative analyses are based on the complete decomposition methodology. The authors provide an analysis of dynamic changes of energy and CO>SUB align=right>>SMALL>2>\\/SMALL>>\\/SUB> emission flows in the G7-economies. The comparative analyses reveal that: (1) activity effects of the

Jyrki Luukkanen; Jari Kaivo-oja

2003-01-01

24

Plant Wide Energy Management and Reporting Systems Provide Sustainable Results  

E-print Network

does not include lost elec- tric generation cost offset with hydroelectric power. Theoretical Steam Allocation Boiler Minimum Capacity Maximum Capacity FO1 Case Economic Order of Firing FO2 Case Economic Order of Firing CB#2-Hog 150 250 1 1 PB1... cohesive control and reporting strategy. 4. The application engineering group benefit twice: First, they haves a constraint reporting system, high resolution historian, and an advisory inter- face across multiple subsystems from the power- house...

Robinson, J. E.

2007-01-01

25

Sustainable Biomass Supply Systems  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) aims to displace 30% of the 2004 gasoline use (60 billion gal/yr) with biofuels by 2030 as outlined in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, which will require 700 million tons of biomass to be sustainably delivered to biorefineries annually. Lignocellulosic biomass will make an important contribution towards meeting DOE’s ethanol production goals. For the biofuels industry to be an economically viable enterprise, the feedstock supply system (i.e., moving the biomass from the field to the refinery) cannot contribute more that 30% of the total cost of the biofuel production. The Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis and Kansas State University are developing a set of tools for identifying economical, sustainable feedstocks on a regional basis based on biorefinery siting.

Erin Searcy; Dave Muth; Erin Wilkerson; Shahab Sokansanj; Bryan Jenkins; Peter Titman; Nathan Parker; Quinn Hart; Richard Nelson

2009-04-01

26

Sustainable agriculture, renewable energy and rural development: An analysis of bio-energy systems used by small farms in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renewable energy needs to be incorporated into the larger picture of sustainable agriculture and rural development if it is to serve the needs of the 3.25 billion human beings whose livelihoods and based on rural economies and ecologies. For rural communities, increasing agriculture production is key to raising income generation and improving social well-being, but this linkage depends also upon not harming natural resources. This dissertation provides an overview of recent Chinese agriculture history, discusses the role of energy in contemporary's China's agriculture and rural development, and introduces a new approach---the integrated agricultural bio-energy (IAB) system---to address the challenge of sustainable agriculture and rural development. IAB is an innovative design and offers a renewable energy solution for improving agricultural productivity, realizing efficient resource management, and enhancing social well-being for rural development. In order to understand how the IAB system can help to achieve sustainable agricultural and rural development in China, a comprehensive evaluation methodology is developed from health, ecological, energy and economic (HE3) perspectives. With data from surveys of 200 small farm households, a detailed study of IAB and conventional agricultural energy (CAE) system applications (in China's Liaoning and Yunnan Province) is conducted. The HE3 impacts of IAB systems in China's rural areas (compared to existing CAE systems) are quantified. The dissertation analyzes the full life-cycle costs and benefits of IAB systems, including their contributions to energy savings, CO2 emissions reduction, agricultural waste reduction, increased rural incomes, better rural health, and improved ecosystem sustainability. The analysis relies upon qualitative and quantitative modeling in order to produce a comprehensive assessment of IAB system impacts. Finally, the dissertation discusses the barriers to greater diffusion of the IAB systems currently in China's rural areas. It also provides feasible policy strategies for removing these barriers, thus enabling IAB systems to better serve sustainable rural development objectives in China. Prospects for the transfer of IAB systems to other developing countries are briefly considered.

Zhou, Aiming

27

structure. Integrating sustainable energy sys-tems into the infrastructure would allow rapid  

E-print Network

structure. Integrating sustainable energy sys- tems into the infrastructure would allow rapid of electrical energy, reduce environmental emissions, and provide a transportation fuel. This goal is clearly achievable, but only with a sustained, focused effort. References and Notes 1. For the purpose

Deutch, John

28

Sensitivity analysis of synergistic collaborative scenarios towards sustainable nuclear energy systems  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents results of the study on the role of collaboration among countries towards sustainable global nuclear energy systems. The study explores various market shares for nuclear fuel cycle services, possible scale of collaboration among countries and assesses benefits and issues relevant for collaboration between suppliers and users of nuclear fuel cycle services. The approach used in the study is based on a heterogeneous world model with grouping of the non-personified nuclear energy countries according to different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The methodology applied in the analysis allocates a fraction of future global nuclear energy generation to each of such country-groups as a function of time. The sensitivity studies performed show the impacts of the group shares on the scope of collaboration among countries and on the resulting possible reactor mix and nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure versus time. The study quantitatively demonstrates that the synergistic approach to nuclear fuel cycle has a significant potential for offering a win-win collaborative strategy to both, technology holders and technology users on their joint way to future sustainable nuclear energy systems. The study also highlights possible issues on such a collaborative way. (authors)

Fesenko, G.; Kuznetsov, V. [IAEA, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400, Vienna (Austria); Poplavskaya, E. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

29

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate  

E-print Network

Campus Sustainability Goals Energy & Climate By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 and water consumption and wastewater production; incorporate sustainable design principles into capital levels. Food & Dining By 2020, increase sustainable food purchases by campus foodservice providers

Jacobs, Lucia

30

Leveraging Human-environment Systems in Residential Buildings for Aggregate Energy Efficiency and Sustainability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reducing the energy consumed in the built environment is a key objective in many sustainability initiatives. Existing energy saving methods have consisted of physical interventions to buildings and/or behavioral modifications of occupants. However, such methods may not only suffer from their own disadvantages, e.g. high cost and transient effect, but also lose aggregate energy saving potential due to the oftentimes-associated single-building-focused view and an isolated examination of occupant behaviors. This dissertation attempts to overcome the limitations of traditional energy saving research and practical approaches, and enhance residential building energy efficiency and sustainability by proposing innovative energy strategies from a holistic perspective of the aggregate human-environment systems. This holistic perspective features: (1) viewing buildings as mutual influences in the built environment, (2) leveraging both the individual and contextualized social aspects of occupant behaviors, and (3) incorporating interactions between the built environment and human behaviors. First, I integrate three interlinked components: buildings, residents, and the surrounding neighborhood, and quantify the potential energy savings to be gained from renovating buildings at the inter-building level and leveraging neighborhood-contextualized occupant social networks. Following the confirmation of both the inter-building effect among buildings and occupants' interpersonal influence on energy conservation, I extend the research further by examining the synergy that may exist at the intersection between these "engineered" building networks and "social" peer networks, focusing specifically on the additional energy saving potential that could result from interactions between the two components. Finally, I seek to reach an alignment of the human and building environment subsystems by matching the thermostat preferences of each household with the thermal conditions within their apartment, and develop the Energy Saving Alignment Strategy to be considered in public housing assignment policy. This strategy and the inter-building level energy management strategies developed in my preceding research possess large-scale cost-effectiveness and may engender long-lasting influence compared with existing energy saving approaches. Building from the holistic framework of coupled human-environment systems, the findings of this research will advance knowledge of energy efficiency in the built environment and lead to the development of novel strategies to conserve energy in residential buildings.

Xu, Xiaoqi

31

Sustainable Systems Analysis of Production and Transportation Scenarios for Conventional and Bio-based Energy Commodities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International commerce places unique pressures on the sustainability of water resources and marine environments. System impacts include noise, emissions, and chemical and biological pollutants like introduction of invasive species into key ecosystems. At the same time, maritime trade also enables the sustainability ambition of intragenerational equity in the economy through the global circulation of commodities and manufactured goods, including agricultural, energy and mining resources (UN Trade and Development Board 2013). This paper presents a framework to guide the analysis of the multiple dimensions of the sustainable commerce-ocean nexus. As a demonstration case, we explore the social, economic and environmental aspects of the nexus framework using scenarios for the production and transportation of conventional and bio-based energy commodities. Using coupled LCA and GIS methodologies, we are able to orient the findings spatially for additional insight. Previous work on the sustainable use of marine resources has focused on distinct aspects of the maritime environment. The framework presented here, integrates the anthropogenic use, governance and impacts on the marine and coastal environments with the natural components of the system. A similar framework has been highly effective in progressing the study of land-change science (Turner et al 2007), however modification is required for the unique context of the marine environment. This framework will enable better research integration and planning for sustainability objectives including mitigation and adaptation to climate change, sea level rise, reduced dependence on fossil fuels, protection of critical marine habitat and species, and better management of the ocean as an emerging resource base for the production and transport of commodities and energy across the globe. The framework can also be adapted for vulnerability analysis, resilience studies and to evaluate the trends in production, consumption and commerce. To demonstrate the usefulness of the framework, we construct several scenarios as case studies to explore the emerging trends of larger ship deployment and the changing portfolio of energy resources including the increased consumption of bio-based energy. The maritime transportation industry remains heavily reliant on fossil fuels to power transport, while energy, mineral and grain remain the largest bulk commodities shipped. Emerging markets for such commodities, as well as new production methods and locations are considered. We overlay these trends and shifts with ecological areas of concern and biological migration routes. The diversity of governance regimes is also considered to produce a clearer picture of the emerging hot-spots for further study and for the synergies and tradeoffs that must be considered to achieve a sustainable ocean system. References Turner BL, Lambin EF, Reenberg A (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci, (104):20666-20671. UN Trade and Development Board (2013) Recent developments and trends in international maritime transport affecting trade of developing countries, TD/B/C.1/30.

Doran, E. M.; Golden, J. S.; Nowacek, D. P.

2013-12-01

32

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 1.0: Networked Monitoring and Control of Small Interconnected Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY This report presents accomplishments, results, and future work for one task of five in the Wichita State University Sustainable Energy Solutions Project: To develop a scale model laboratory distribution system for research into questions that arise from networked control and monitoring of low-wind energy systems connected to the AC distribution system. The lab models developed under this task are located in the Electric Power Quality Lab in the Engineering Research Building on the Wichita State University campus. The lab system consists of four parts: 1. A doubly-fed induction generator 2. A wind turbine emulator 3. A solar photovoltaic emulator, with battery energy storage 4. Distribution transformers, lines, and other components, and wireless and wired communications and control These lab elements will be interconnected and will function together to form a complete testbed for distributed resource monitoring and control strategies and smart grid applications testing. Development of the lab system will continue beyond this project.

Janet.twomey@wichita.edu

2010-04-30

33

Energy Solutions for Sustainable Development  

E-print Network

Energy Solutions for Sustainable Development Proceedings Risø International Energy Conference 2007 Larsen Title: Energy Solutions for Sustainable Development Proceedings Risø International Energy energy production technologies such as fuel cells, hydrogen, bio-energy and wind energy · Centralized

34

Diversification and localization of energy systems for sustainable development and energy security  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dominance of a single-energy system inevitably leads to excessive burden on, and eventually weakening, a particular aspect of the environment, and can cause environmental fatigue and failure (permanent damage) or even catastrophe if dominated for too long; thus it inevitably poses the health and environmental risk. This is the case for our currently fossil-fuel-based energy systems. In fact, each

Xianguo Li

2005-01-01

35

Smart and sustainable energy systems for developing countries: An Indian perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

India is a highly diverse country with regard to its electrification status, covering all from well developed cities to rural areas without access to electricity. It has identified renew- able energy sources as the long-term solution for future energy and progressing in the direction of electrifying the unreachable pockets. In this context, paper accumulates the prospects of sustainable energy and

V. S. K. Murthy Balijepalli; S. A. Khaparde

2011-01-01

36

WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY  

E-print Network

WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESEARCH (WISER) Strategic Plan Summary #12;WISER Strategic Plan Summary | 1 WANGER INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY RESEARCH (WISER) STRATEGIC PLAN SUMMARY 1 by developing and supporting undergraduate research in energy and sustainability related areas. � Develop co

Heller, Barbara

37

High fidelity nuclear energy system optimization towards an environmentally benign, sustainable, and secure energy source.  

SciTech Connect

The impact associated with energy generation and utilization is immeasurable due to the immense, widespread, and myriad effects it has on the world and its inhabitants. The polar extremes are demonstrated on the one hand, by the high quality of life enjoyed by individuals with access to abundant reliable energy sources, and on the other hand by the global-scale environmental degradation attributed to the affects of energy production and use. Thus, nations strive to increase their energy generation, but are faced with the challenge of doing so with a minimal impact on the environment and in a manner that is self-reliant. Consequently, a revival of interest in nuclear energy has followed, with much focus placed on technologies for transmuting nuclear spent fuel. The performed research investigates nuclear energy systems that optimize the destruction of nuclear waste. In the context of this effort, nuclear energy system is defined as a configuration of nuclear reactors and corresponding fuel cycle components. The proposed system has unique characteristics that set it apart from other systems. Most notably the dedicated High-Energy External Source Transmuter (HEST), which is envisioned as an advanced incinerator used in combination with thermal reactors. The system is configured for examining environmentally benign fuel cycle options by focusing on minimization or elimination of high level waste inventories. Detailed high-fidelity exact-geometry models were developed for representative reactor configurations. They were used in preliminary calculations with Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtented (MCNPX) and Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code systems. The reactor models have been benchmarked against existing experimental data and design data. Simulink{reg_sign}, an extension of MATLAB{reg_sign}, is envisioned as the interface environment for constructing the nuclear energy system model by linking the individual reactor and fuel component sub-models for overall analysis of the system. It also provides control over key user input parameters and the ability to effectively consolidate vital output results for uncertainty/sensitivity analysis and optimization procedures. The preliminary analysis has shown promising advanced fuel cycle scenarios that include Pressure Water Reactors Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) and dedicated HEST waste incineration facilities. If deployed, these scenarios may substantially reduce nuclear waste inventories approaching environmentally benign nuclear energy system characteristics. Additionally, a spent fuel database of the isotopic compositions for multiple design and control parameters has been created for the VHTR-HEST input fuel streams. Computational approaches, analysis metrics, and benchmark strategies have been established for future detailed studies.

Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rodriguez, Salvador B.; Ames, David E., II (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Rochau, Gary Eugene

2009-09-01

38

Hopi Sustainable Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hopi Tribal Government as part of an initiative to ?Regulate the delivery of energy and energy services to the Hopi Reservation and to create a strategic business plan for tribal provision of appropriate utility, both in a manner that improves the reliability and cost efficiency of such services,? established the Hopi Clean Air Partnership Project (HCAPP) to support the Tribe?s economic development goals, which is sensitive to the needs and ways of the Hopi people. The Department of Energy (DOE) funded, Formation of Hopi Sustainable Energy Program results are included in the Clean Air Partnership Report. One of the Hopi Tribe?s primary strategies to improving the reliability and cost efficiency of energy services on the Reservation and to creating alternative (to coal) economic development opportunities is to form and begin implementation of the Hopi Sustainable Energy Program. The Hopi Tribe through the implementation of this grant identified various economic opportunities available from renewable energy resources. However, in order to take advantage of those opportunities, capacity building of tribal staff is essential in order for the Tribe to develop and manage its renewable energy resources. As Arizona public utilities such as APS?s renewable energy portfolio increases the demand for renewable power will increase. The Hopi Tribe would be in a good position to provide a percentage of the power through wind energy. It is equally important that the Hopi Tribe begin a dialogue with APS and NTUA to purchase the 69Kv transmission on Hopi and begin looking into financing options to purchase the line.

Norman Honie, Jr.; Margie Schaff; Mark Hannifan

2004-08-01

39

City.Net IES: A sustainability-oriented energy decision support system  

E-print Network

A city's energy system processes, as well as the interactions of the energy system with other systems in a city are imperative in creating a comprehensive energy decision support system due to the interdependencies between ...

Adepetu, Adedamola

40

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30

41

Renewable Energy: Energy Security and Sustainability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renewable energy offers the possibility of providing a complete, sustainable energy infrastructure without anthropogenic emission of CO2. Large-scale implementation of renewable technologies would eliminate the need to develop and implement sequestration systems, by reducing the use of, and ultimately eliminating fossil based energy production. Renewable energy also offers energy security because indigenous resources are sufficient. The major renewable energy systems include phovoltaics (solar cells), solar thermal (electric and thermal), wind, biomass (plants and trees), hydroelectric, ocean, and geothermal. Given the intermittent nature of solar energy, only those energy systems that are coupled to an energy storage technology will be viable. Among the energy storage technologies are hydrogen, batteries, flywheels, superconductivity, ultracapacitors, pumped hydro, molten salts (for thermal storage), and compressed gas. One of the most versatile energy storage systems and the best energy carrier for transportation is hydrogen. This talk will review some of the basic renewable energy systems, present possible pathways for the implementation of hydrogen into the energy infrastructure and offer research areas that need to be addressed to increase the viability of these renewable energy technologies.

Turner, John

2002-03-01

42

Campus Sustainability Planetary Health Ecological Design Social and Environmental Enterprise Incuba-tion EcoVillages Sustainable Food Systems Ecoliteracy Solutions Journal Campus Systems Model Energy  

E-print Network

a Contract for Change Ecological Economics Ecological Design Complex Systems Sustainable Business Social Systems School of Ecological Arts & Design Developing a Contract for Change Ecological Economics to transform our university into a powerful catalyst, model, and engine of positive and lasting change

Hayden, Nancy J.

43

Cogeneration supply by bio-energy for a sustainable hotel building management system  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work we presented the development of an energy model based on a mixed system of renewable energy, with primary energy sources as solar and biomass. It is a hybrid and autonomous system with solar PV panels and gasification cogeneration technology. Also it is an environment friendly process aiming the reduction of energy demand, costs and emissions. This energy

João Rafael Galvão; Sérgio Augusto Leitão; Salvador Malheiro Silva; Tiago Manuel Gaio

2011-01-01

44

Energy Conversion Chain Analysis of Sustainable Energy Systems: A Transportation Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In general terms there are only three primary energy sources: fossil fuels, renewable energy, and nuclear fission. For fueling road transportation, there has been much speculation about the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, which would usher in the "hydrogen economy." A parallel situation would use a simple battery to store electricity…

Evans, Robert L.

2008-01-01

45

MultiComponent Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System for sustainable growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental harmonization of nuclear energy technology is considered as an absolutely necessary condition in its future successful development for peaceful use. Establishment of Self-Consistent Nuclear Energy System, that simultaneously meets four requirements — energy production, fuel production, burning of radionuclides and safety, strongly relies on the neutron excess generation. Implementation of external non-fission based neutron sources into fission energy system

Masaki Saito

2002-01-01

46

Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility.  

E-print Network

PROPRIETARY INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May... Improvements ? Cost-savings initiatives ? Increasing environmental awareness ? Increasing throughput by debottlenecking processes ? Increasing government mandates 2May 2013 Energy Costs for a 200kBPD Complex refinery Typically, energy efficiency programs...

Hoyle, A.

2013-01-01

47

Efficient and Sustainable EnergyEfficient and Sustainable Energy NIU Energy Initiative  

E-print Network

to alternative (including nuclear) and renewable energy sources (including solar,energy sources (including solar, until alternative and renewable energy infrastructure is developed and maturedinfrastructureEfficient and Sustainable EnergyEfficient and Sustainable Energy NIU Energy Initiative: Efficient

Kostic, Milivoje M.

48

Is bioethanol a sustainable energy source? An energy-, exergy, and emergy-based thermodynamic system analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biofuels are widely seen as substitutes for fossil fuels to offset the imminent decline of oil production and to mitigate the emergent increase in GHG emissions. This view is, however, based on too simple an analysis, focusing on only one piece in the whole mosaic of the complex biofuel techno-system, and such partial approaches may easily lead to ideological bias

Wenjie Liao; Reinout Heijungs; Gjalt Huppes

2011-01-01

49

Successful systems sustaining change.  

PubMed

Much has been published on the success and particularly the failure of IT projects; still failures are commonplace. This prospective study focused from the outset on assessing risk of failure and addressing critical success factors. The aim was to apply existing methods in a challenging acute care hospital where success demanded rapid achievement of sustainable improvements in clinical and administrative processes. The implementations were part of the English National Programme for IT. The desired outcomes required the integration of accepted tools and techniques to provide a pragmatic approach to systems implementation: Lean, Six Sigma, PRINCE2 and Benefits Management. The outcome and further insights into success and failure of IT projects in healthcare are described. In particular lessons are identified related to the business need for the project and the successful achievement of the required benefits and business change. PMID:17911905

Bullas, Sheila; Bryant, John

2007-01-01

50

The properties of hydrogen as fuel tomorrow in sustainable energy system for a cleaner planet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global energy system transition from fossil fuel to hydrogen utilization is described. Environmental benefits of the combustion of hydrogen are reported. World carbon emissions from fossil fuel are schematized in connection with the opportunities of using hydrogen. The atomic hydrogen\\/carbon ratio and chemical properties of hydrogen are described. Pollutants of the energy system in our planet and hydrogen production

Magdalena Momirlan; T. N. Veziroglu

2005-01-01

51

A key review on exergetic analysis and assessment of renewable energy resources for a sustainable future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy resources and their utilization intimately relate to sustainable development. In attaining sustainable development, increasing the energy efficiencies of processes utilizing sustainable energy resources plays an important role. The utilization of renewable energy offers a wide range of exceptional benefits. There is also a link between exergy and sustainable development. A sustainable energy system may be regarded as a cost-efficient,

Arif Hepbasli

2008-01-01

52

Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed.  SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Jørgensen, 1994) in which systems are modelled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower  management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

Francesco Danuso

2008-06-18

53

Knowledge Integration to Make Decisions About Complex Systems: Sustainability of Energy Production from Agriculture  

SciTech Connect

A major bottleneck for improving the governance of complex systems, rely on our ability to integrate different forms of knowledge into a decision support system (DSS). Preliminary aspects are the classification of different types of knowledge (a priori or general, a posteriori or specific, with uncertainty, numerical, textual, algorithmic, complete/incomplete, etc.), the definition of ontologies for knowledge management and the availability of proper tools like continuous simulation models, event driven models, statistical approaches, computational methods (neural networks, evolutionary optimization, rule based systems etc.) and procedure for textual documentation. Following these views at University of Udine, a computer language (SEMoLa, Simple, Easy Modelling Language) for knowledge integration has been developed. SEMoLa can handle models, data, metadata and textual knowledge; it implements and extends the system dynamics ontology (Forrester, 1968; Joergensen, 1994) in which systems are modeled by the concepts of material, group, state, rate, parameter, internal and external events and driving variables. As an example, a SEMoLa model to improve management and sustainability (economical, energetic, environmental) of the agricultural farms is presented. The model (X-Farm) simulates a farm in which cereal and forage yield, oil seeds, milk, calves and wastes can be sold or reused. X-Farm is composed by integrated modules describing fields (crop and soil), feeds and materials storage, machinery management, manpower management, animal husbandry, economic and energetic balances, seed oil extraction, manure and wastes management, biogas production from animal wastes and biomasses.

Danuso, Francesco (University of Udine) [University of Udine

2008-06-18

54

The Role of the Latvian District Heating System in the Development of Sustainable Energy Supply  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of the study is to determine whether and to what extent it is possible to use excess electricity produced by wind power plants during low demand periods for district heat production by heat pumps. Energy system analysis on an hourly basis is conducted at various capacities of wind power plants. The results show that it is possible to increase the share of renewable energy sources, decrease the use of primary energy sources and CO2 emissions per unit of the produced energy, i.e. heat and electricity, by using the surplus electricity produced by wind power in the heat pumps combined with the heat storage.

Bazbauers, Gatis; Cimdina, Ginta

2011-01-01

55

Sustainable futures using nuclear energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the role of nuclear energy in a sustainable future. This addresses the social, economic and environmental concerns of us all. Nuclear energy today avoids the emission of nearly two billion tonnes of greenhouse gases (GHGs) each year, thanks to over 400 reactors operating worldwide.Nevertheless, there is no real recognition of real incentives for large-scale non-emitters like nuclear energy

Romney B. Duffey

2005-01-01

56

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY Andrew Blakers  

E-print Network

- pumping water uphill during the day and releasing it through turbines at night) and shifting loads from night time to daytime. The worldwide solar energy industry is doubling in size every 20 months energy from fission has severe problems relating to nuclear weapons proliferation and nuclear terrorism

57

Solving the Meteorological Challenges of Creating a Sustainable Energy System (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global energy demand is projected to double from 13 TW at the start of this century to 28 TW by the middle of the century. This translates into obtaining 1000 MW (1 GW, the amount produced by an average nuclear or coal power plant) of new energy every single day for the next 40 years. The U.S. Department of Energy has conducted three feasibility studies in the last two years identifying the costs, challenges, impacts, and benefits of generating large portions of the nation’s electricity from wind and solar energy, in the new two decades. The 20% Wind by 2030 report found that the nation could meet one-fifth of its electricity demand from wind energy by 2030. The second report, the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, considered similar costs, challenges, and benefits, but considered 20% wind energy in the Eastern Interconnect only, with a target date of 2024. The third report, the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, considered the operational impact of up to 35% penetration of wind, photovoltaics (PVs) and, concentrating solar power (CSP) on the power system operated by the WestConnect group, with a target date of 2017. All three studies concluded that it is technically feasible to obtain these high penetration levels of renewable energy, but that increases in the balancing area cooperation or coordination, increased utilization of transmission and building of transmission in some cases, and improved weather forecasts are needed. Current energy systems were designed for dispatchable fuels, such as coal, natural gas and nuclear energy. Fitting weather-driven renewable energy into today's energy system is like fitting a square peg into a round hole. If society chooses to meet a significant portion of new energy demand from weather-driven renewable energy, such as wind and solar energy, a number of obstacles must be overcome. Some of these obstacles are meteorological and climatological issues that are amenable to scientific research. For variable renewable energy sources to reach high penetration levels, electric system operators and utilities need better atmo¬spheric observations, models, and forecasts. Current numerical weather prediction models have not been optimized to help the nation use renewable energy. Improved meteorological observations (e.g., wind turbine hub-height wind speeds, surface direct and diffuse solar radiation), as well as observations through a deeper layer of the atmosphere for assimilation into NWP models, are needed. Particularly urgent is the need for improved forecasts of ramp events. Longer-term predictions of renewable resources, on the seasonal to decadal scale, are also needed. Improved understanding of the variability and co-variability of wind and solar energy, as well as their correlations with large-scale climate drivers, would assist decision-makers in long-term planning. This talk with discuss the feasibility and benefits of developing enhanced weather forecasts and climate information specific to the needs of a growing renewable energy infrastructure.

Marquis, M.

2010-12-01

58

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY  

EPA Science Inventory

While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987) namely development that "meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future," it is import...

59

Sustainable systems for the storage and conversion of energy are dependent on interconnected  

E-print Network

-efficiency water heating and waste heat driven cooling will be presented. With such a research approach as a basis refrigeration, and served as the primary instructor for Thermodynamics at Georgia Tech's international campus in Metz, France, and Energy Systems Design and Analysis at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. His research

Reisslein, Martin

60

Assessing the Sustainability of Buildings From Energy Certificate to Sustainability Report  

E-print Network

) Department of Economics & Business Engineering Sustainable Management of Housing & Real Estate Kaiserstr. 12 76128 Karlsruhe 00 49 72 1/ 6 08 83 40 thomas.luetzkendorf@wiwi.uka.de Assessing the Sustainability of Buildings - From Energy Certificate... to Sustainability Report In its current work on the development, testing and implementation of a national system to describe, evaluate and certify sustainable buildings (DGNB ? Deutsches G?tesiegel Nachhaltiges Bauen), Germany is focussed on the current state...

Lutzkendorf, T.

2008-01-01

61

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan stabilization. A host of complex resource issues complicates the path toward a sustainable transportation system cells or lithium for batteries, and impacts on the broader economy. #12;2 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION

California at Davis, University of

62

ETSF5 -INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE  

E-print Network

ETSF5 - INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FOR A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Energy and Large Research Facilities: The role of large research facilities in the development of sustainable energy systems June 9-10, 2005 Paul Scherrer Institute Switzerland Structural studies of polymer electrolytes for fuel

63

Energy Realpolitik: Towards a Sustainable Energy Strategy  

E-print Network

A long-term strategy based on existing technological, ecological, economical, and geopolitical realities is urgently needed to develop a sustainable energy economy, which should be designed with adaptability to unpredicted changes in any of these aspects. While only a highly diverse energy portfolio and conservation can ultimately guarantee optimum sustainability, based on a comparison of current primary energy generation methods, it is argued that future energy strategy has to rely heavily on expanded coal and nuclear energy sectors. A comparison of relative potentials, merits and risks associated with fossil-fuel, renewable, and nuclear technologies suggests that the balance of technologies should be shifted in favor of new-generation, safe nuclear methods to produce electricity, while clean-coal plants should be assigned to transportation fuel. Novel nuclear technologies exploit fission of uranium and thorium as primary energy sources with fast-spectrum and transmutation (burner) reactors. A closed fuel cy...

Schroeder, W Udo

2008-01-01

64

Ocean vertical sustained observations by a moored underwater energy conserving system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is need to obtain the hydrologic data including ocean current,wave, temperature and so on in South China Sea. A new profiling instrument which doesn't suffer from nature forces or incidents caused by passing ships is under development to recover data from this area. It incorporates a small, instrumented vertically profiling float attached via an electromechanical cable to a winch integral with the main subsurface flotation. On a pre-set schedule, the instrument float carrying sensors is winched up to the surface and defined by an on-board miniature sonar if there is no ship passing by. It can be immediately winched down to a certain depth if the sonar sensor finds something is coming. Because of logistics, the area can only be visited once for a long time and a minimum of 10 times per day. So the system has been designed to conserve a substantial portion of the potential energy and subsequently use this energy to pull the instrument down.

Li, Si-ren; Chen, Yong-hua

2011-10-01

65

Sustainable systems as organisms?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Schrödinger [Schrödinger, E., 1944. What is Life? Cambridge University Press, Cambridge] marvelled at how the organism is able to use metabolic energy to maintain and even increase its organisation, which could not be understood in terms of classical statistical thermodynamics. Ho [Ho, M.W., 1993. The Rainbow and the Worm, The Physics of Organisms, World Scientific, Singapore; Ho, M.W., 1998a. The

Mae-Wan Ho; Robert Ulanowicz

2005-01-01

66

Epidemiology in sustainable systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge of plant disease epidemiology has had increasing impact in the production-based industry of both the developed and developing world. In the last 50 years European agriculture has been associated with a move towards the simplification of systems, as farms have tended to specialize in arable or livestock production, largely determined by their soil or climatic conditions. Although cereal monoculture

Robert J. Cook; David J. Yarhm

67

Energy in Sweden: Leading the way to a sustainable future?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sweden is fortunate to have large amounts of hydropower and bio fuels, but it has still a long way to go in establishing a sustainable energy system. However, considerable progress has been made and the experience acquired has put Sweden in a leading position in the path towards a sustainable energy future. Jan-Olof Dalenbäck, Sweden reports.

Jan-Olof Dalenbäck

2002-01-01

68

Sustainable roofs with real energy savings  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the general concept of sustainability and relates it to the building owner`s selection of a low-slope roof. It offers a list of performance features of sustainable roofs. Experiences and data relevant to these features for four unique roofs are then presented which include: self-drying systems, low total equivalent warming foam insulation, roof coatings and green roofs. The paper concludes with a list of sustainable roofing features worth considering for a low-slope roof investment. Building owners and community developers are showing more interest in investing in sustainability. The potential exists to design, construct, and maintain roofs that last twice as long and reduce the building space heating and cooling energy loads resulting from the roof by 50% (based on the current predominant design of a 10-year life and a single layer of 1 to 2 in. (2.5 to 5.1 cm) of insulation). The opportunity to provide better low-slope roofs and sell more roof maintenance service is escalating. The general trend of outsourcing services could lead to roofing companies` owning the roofs they install while the traditional building owner owns the rest of the building. Such a situation would have a very desirable potential to internalize the costs of poor roof maintenance practices and high roof waste disposal costs, and to offer a profit for installing roofs that are more sustainable. 14 refs., 12 figs.

Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

1996-12-31

69

Creating a Pathway to Sustainability IIT Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research  

E-print Network

#12;Creating a Pathway to Sustainability IIT Wanger Institute for Sustainable Energy Research Table of Contents Energy and Sustainability Educational and Research Activities at IIT Renewable Energy Solar Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells and Batteries Energy Efficiency, Conversion, Conservation

Heller, Barbara

70

A Collaborative Model for a Sustainable Management System for Energy at Small to Medium Industrial Enterprises  

E-print Network

site through integration into their Company?s existing integrated management system. Applying the ANSI/MSE standard as their guide, processes are being carefully mapped to existing management systems used in their ISO 9000, ISO14000 and ISRS... site through integration into their Company?s existing integrated management system. Applying the ANSI/MSE standard as their guide, processes are being carefully mapped to existing management systems used in their ISO 9000, ISO14000 and ISRS...

Imel, M.; Gromacki, M.; Magoon, D.

71

Smart Shelter: A Sustainable Power System Design Using Micro-Energy Harvesting Techniques  

E-print Network

the solar cell operate at MPP (most efficient voltage). The challenge is that MPP varies with solar radiation, ambient temperature and solar cell temperature. Figure 2 depicts an I-V curve in a solar cell. A line intersects the knee of the curves... of the solar, thermal, piezoelectric, and radio-frequency energy harvesting modules. Subsystem 5 consists of the low-power microcontroller and low- power boost converter which provides battery management/energy storage. In order to implement the above...

Hilton, Benjamin D

2013-09-25

72

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

is to develop a robust and sustainable integrated energy system across electrical, thermal, and fuel energy and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. SustainableNRELB I E N N I A L R E P, and strategies, the Sustainable NREL Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2012­2013 reflects the human side

73

Center for Sustainability Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems (HyRES) Laboratory  

E-print Network

station is used for experimental fleet vehicles and buses The MorningStar Home planned at Penn State: MorningStar Home is powered by 100% solar energy and is off-the-grid. Surplus power used to charge.5 KW roof mounted PV array 60 SF Solar Thermal panels HyRES Laboratory Operation Mode: MorningStar Home

Lee, Dongwon

74

Energy foundations for sustainable development  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide, more than three-quarters of our energy needs are obtained from nonrenewable reserves of coal, oil, gas, and uranium. The unavoidable outcome of our present path is the depletion of all non-renewable energy resources. Further exacerbating the energy picture is the mounting cost of mitigating the adverse environmental and health impacts of energy use. Problems ranging from acid rain and radioactive waste storage to the potential for widespread environmental disaster that could result from the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have made it that the earth's capacity to absorb the waste products of energy use without serious consequences is being severely strained. Potential supply shortages and mounting costs for the energy component of our industrial enterprise will increasingly undermine our ability to sustain global economic development. Strong positive actions that shore up the energy foundations of our economy arc called for. The purpose of this presentation is to focus attention on two such proactive steps which, though insufficient to the task by themselves, are nevertheless crucial to any effective plan for heading off the recessionary tendencies of our growing energy supply and cost dilemma. The first of these essential steps is to develop a much better arrangement than we currently have for including all costs for the adverse health and environmental impacts of industrial production in the price paid by consumers for fuels, electricity, and manufactured goods. The second essential action is to expand our R D effort to develop new manufacturing processes and new materials and products that meet our needs for power, fuels and consumer goods at lower cost, greater efficiency, and with reduced environmental cost.

Sather, N.F.

1992-01-01

75

Energy foundations for sustainable development  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide, more than three-quarters of our energy needs are obtained from nonrenewable reserves of coal, oil, gas, and uranium. The unavoidable outcome of our present path is the depletion of all non-renewable energy resources. Further exacerbating the energy picture is the mounting cost of mitigating the adverse environmental and health impacts of energy use. Problems ranging from acid rain and radioactive waste storage to the potential for widespread environmental disaster that could result from the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have made it that the earth`s capacity to absorb the waste products of energy use without serious consequences is being severely strained. Potential supply shortages and mounting costs for the energy component of our industrial enterprise will increasingly undermine our ability to sustain global economic development. Strong positive actions that shore up the energy foundations of our economy arc called for. The purpose of this presentation is to focus attention on two such proactive steps which, though insufficient to the task by themselves, are nevertheless crucial to any effective plan for heading off the recessionary tendencies of our growing energy supply and cost dilemma. The first of these essential steps is to develop a much better arrangement than we currently have for including all costs for the adverse health and environmental impacts of industrial production in the price paid by consumers for fuels, electricity, and manufactured goods. The second essential action is to expand our R&D effort to develop new manufacturing processes and new materials and products that meet our needs for power, fuels and consumer goods at lower cost, greater efficiency, and with reduced environmental cost.

Sather, N.F.

1992-09-01

76

Report of the Alternative Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

. It has become the primary vehicle for accelerating, coordinating and sharing alternative energy researchReport of the Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative 2010 Prof. David Cahen Scientific Director #12;Alternative and sustainable Energy Research Initiative (AERI) Weizmann Institute of Science

Maoz, Shahar

77

Physics of Sustainable Energy Berkeley CA  

E-print Network

of Sustainable Energy Berkeley CA March 5-6, 2011 Concentrating Solar Power ­ Direct Sun StatePhysics of Sustainable Energy Berkeley CA March 5-6, 2011 Integra Dept of Energy Resources), John Moura (FERC), Peter Sauer (UIUC), Humayun Tai

Kammen, Daniel M.

78

Sustainable Energy Education and Training (SEET)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Sustainable Energy Education and Training (SEET) Project is being developed by the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and partners to help build the capacity of energy and environmental technicians to meet the challenges of energy sustainability in the 21st century workplace. The SEET project is providing professional development training for 50 upper level high school and community college technology instructors. Training focuses on the areas of sustainable energy and energy efficiency, delivered through two ten-day intensive annual workshops at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and continued through online networking activities. Om this site, visitors will find information about the workshops, the topics they cover, the program's partner institutions, and sustainable energy education instructional materials, which are available from ATEEC's Sustainable Energy resource clearinghouse for free.

2008-10-30

79

Sustained nuclear energy without weapons or reprocessing using accelerator-driven systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accelerator-driven thermal-spect rum molten-salt nuclear technology can greatly simplify nuclear energy technology by eliminating reprocessing and greatly enhancing once-through burn-up. In effect the accelerator may be employed as a substitute for frequent reprocessing and recycle. The accelerator makes possible reduction in plutonium and minor actinides from current LWRs by a factor of more than ten without reprocessing while converting the

Charles D. Bowman

1999-01-01

80

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Sustainable Energy Storage Systems for Buildings  

E-print Network

promising techniques-- the flywheel system, and the superconducting magnetic energy system. Operation; the flywheel is both reliable and efficient; the superconducting magnetic energy system is 97% efficient impacts, the flywheel energy storage system is recommended for the new SUB. #12;3 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST

81

Normative Dimensions of Sustainable Energy Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawing a link between energy policy and sustainable development, this paper explores the normative dimensions of policy analysis that inform energy sector decision-making, and how these norms fall short of incorporating adequate considerations of sustainability. The discussion focuses on the obligations that our present generation has to conserve for future generations, the decision of which discount rate to use, and

Sanya Carley

2011-01-01

82

Energy for Me: Sustaining My Community with Renewable Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this problem-based learning unit, learners explore the possibilities of sustainable energy, and engage in a project to provide electricity for their city using alternative energy sources. Instructions to access NASA data are provided along with additional resources and activities. This module was developed to be used in the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) courses for middle and high school teachers and is also available to teachers to adapt for general classroom use.

83

Sustainable Rural Energy Development in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Under the Luz Para Todos ('Lights for All') Program, the Government of Brazil (GOB) seeks to provide basic electricity services to all its citizens by 2008. An estimated 2.5 million rural households (over 12 million Brazilians) currently lack electric service, with approximately 80% of them located in rural areas. Since many of these households are too geographically isolated to be connected to the national grid, they will receive distributed energy systems, and the government hopes to maximize the use of local renewable resources to service them. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with the GOB and a variety of local partners to identify and implement sustainable off-grid solutions to meet Brazil's rural energy needs. Focused in the Amazon region, these collaborative activities are, on one hand, using field-based activities to build local technical capacity and design replicable models for rural energy development, while on the other hand helping to develop the institutional structures that will be necessary to sustain distributed renewable energy development on a large-scale in Brazil.

Ghandour, A.

2005-01-01

84

Renewable energy strategies for sustainable development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the perspective of renewable energy (wind, solar, wave and biomass) in the making of strategies for a sustainable development. Such strategies typically involve three major technological changes: energy savings on the demand side, efficiency improvements in the energy production, and replacement of fossil fuels by various sources of renewable energy. Consequently, large-scale renewable energy implementation plans must

Henrik Lund

2007-01-01

85

The United Nations development programme initiative for sustainable energy  

SciTech Connect

Energy is central to current concerns about sustainable human development, affecting economic and social development; economic growth, the local, national, regional, and global environment; the global climate; a host of social concerns, including poverty, population, and health, the balance of payments, and the prospects for peace. Energy is not an end in itself, but rather the means to achieve the goals of sustainable human development. The energy systems of most developing countries are in serious crisis involving insufficient levels of energy services, environmental degradation, inequity, poor technical and financial performance, and capital scarcity. Approximately 2.5 billion people in the developing countries have little access to commercial energy supplies. Yet the global demand for energy continues to grow: total primary energy is projected to grow from 378 exajoules (EJ) per year in 1990 to 571 EJ in 2020, and 832 EJ in 2050. If this increase occurs using conventional approaches and energy sources, already serious local (e.g., indoor and urban air pollution), regional (eg., acidification and land degradation), and global (e.g., climate change) environmental problems will be critically aggravated. There is likely to be inadequate capital available for the needed investments in conventional energy sources. Current approaches to energy are thus not sustainable and will, in fact, make energy a barrier to socio-economic development. What is needed now is a new approach in which energy becomes an instrument for sustainable development. The two major components of a sustainable energy strategy are (1) more efficient energy use, especially at the point of end-use, and (2) increased use of renewable sources of energy. The UNDP Initiative for Sustainable Energy (UNISE) is designed to harness opportunities in these areas to build upon UNDP`s existing energy activities to help move the world toward a more sustainable energy strategy by helping program countries.

Hurry, S.

1997-12-01

86

RISNEWS JUNE 2007 NO Energy, climate and sustainable development in  

E-print Network

of sustainable energy, we conduct research into bioenergy, fuel cells and hydrogen, emerging energy technolRISÃ?NEWSNO 12007PAGE1 RISÃ?NEWS JUNE 2007 NO 1 Energy, climate and sustainable development in the global fight for sustainable development

87

Exploring Approaches Towards a Sustainable Transport System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article undertakes a ‘backcasting’ analysis exploring strategic approaches for overall systems sustainability in personal transport. Starting from a robust definition of sustainability for the personal transport sector, the research examines the impact of combinations of transport technologies and changes in travel behaviour in reducing CO2 emissions towards a sustainable level. In doing this a simple equation model is used.

Stephen Potter

2007-01-01

88

TOWARD A THEORY OF SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

While there is tremendous interest in sustainability, a fundamental theory of sustainability does not exist. We present our efforts at constructing such a theory using Physics, Information Theory, Economics and Ecology. We discuss the state of complex sustainable systems that i...

89

The dual sustainability of wind energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Academics, practitioners, and policy makers continue to debate the benefits and costs of alternative sources of energy. Environmental and economic concerns have yet to be fully reconciled. One view is that decisions that incorporate both society's concern with the environment and investors’ desire for shareholder value maximization are more likely to be truly sustainable. We coin the term dual sustainability

Jonathan B. Welch; Anand Venkateswaran

2009-01-01

90

Ubiquitous computing for sustainable energy (UCSE2010)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing sustainable energy is one of the fundamental challenges for mankind. With energy usage being a part of everyday activities and with the increasingly diversity of energy creation this is an inherently multi-disciplinary problem. Transportation and travel, heating and cooling, manu-facturing and production are major areas in which energy is used and all these domains become more and more linked

Albrecht Schmidt; Adrian Friday; Hans-Werner Gellersen; Friedemann Mattern

2010-01-01

91

Progress on linking gender and sustainable energy  

SciTech Connect

The field of gender and energy has been identified as critical in global sustainable energy development and is increasingly important to decision makers. The theme of women and energy was of significance at the 1998 World Renewable Energy Congress in Florence, Italy. This paper traces further developments in this field by summarizing selected programmatic initiatives, meetings, and publications over the past 18 months.

Farhar, B.

2000-04-05

92

Energy Sustainability and the Green Campus.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the importance of campus energy sustainability, explaining that both demand- and supply-side strategies are required. Suggests that on the demand side, an aggressive campus energy conservation program can reduce campus energy consumption by 30 percent or more. Asserts that addressing the supply side of the energy equation means shifting…

Simpson, Walter

2003-01-01

93

Efficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable Buildings M. Kostic  

E-print Network

proven and the "cutting-edge" comprehensive buildings' "green & sustainable" energy technologies nuclear) and renewable energy sources (including solar, biomass, hydro, wind, and geothermal products with existing technology - thus it could be done for any car and any power plant ­ energy

Kostic, Milivoje M.

94

A systems framework for characterizing farm sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a framework for quantifying and diagnosing constraints to sustainability of farming systems. For a dynamic, stochastic, purposeful system, sustainability is defined as its ability to continue into the future. It can be expressed as the probability of continuation within specified threshold boundaries through a specified future period. Long-term, stochastic simulation of a system model serves as a

J. W. Hansen; J. W. Jones

1996-01-01

95

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/5 ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems: Planning, Operation, and Markets  

E-print Network

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/5 Syllabus ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power geothermal energy in providing space conditioning relative to direct fossil fuel burning, and the prospect of electrifying the transportation industry, will render electricity the dominant energy form in a sustainable

96

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/4 ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems: Planning, Operation, and Markets  

E-print Network

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/4 Syllabus ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power geothermal energy in providing space conditioning relative to direct fossil fuel burning, and the prospect of electrifying the transportation industry, will render electricity the dominant energy form in a sustainable

97

Toward Knowledge Systems for Sustainability Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Managing ecosystems for the outcomes of agricultural productivity and resilience will require fundamentally different knowledge management systems. In the industrial paradigm of the 20th century, land was considered an open, unconstrained system managed for maximum yield. While dramatic increases in yield occurred in some crops and locations, unintended but often foreseeable consequences emerged. While productivity remains a key objective, we must develop analytic systems that can identify better management options for the full range of monetized and non-monetized inputs, outputs and outcomes that are captured in the following framing question: How much valued service (e.g. food, materials, energy) can we draw from a landscape while maintaining adequate levels of other valued or necessary services (e.g. biodiversity, water, climate regulation, cultural services) including the long-term productivity of the land? This question is placed within our contemporary framing of valued services, but structured to illuminate the shifts required to achieve long-term sufficiency and planetary resilience. This framing also highlights the need for fundamentally new knowledge systems including information management infrastructures, which effectively support decision-making on landscapes. The purpose of this initiative by authors from diverse fields across government and academic science is to call attention to the need for a vision and investment in sustainability science for landscape management. Substantially enhanced capabilities are needed to compare and integrate information from diverse sources, collected over time that link choices made to meet our needs from landscapes to both short and long term consequences. To further the goal of an information infrastructure for sustainability science, three distinct but interlocking domains are best distinguished: 1) a domain of data, information and knowledge assets; 2) a domain that houses relevant models and tools in a curated space; and 3) a domain that includes decision support tools and systems tailored toward frame particular trade-offs, which may focus on inputs or outputs and may range in scale from local to global. An information infrastructure for sustainability science is best built be built and maintained as a modular, open source, open standard, open access, open content platform. We have defined the scope of this challenge, managing choices within agroecosystems, recognizing that any decision on a landscape involves multidimensional tradeoffs. An effort to address this challenge will need a cohesive, coherent and targeted approach toward an integrated knowledge management infrastructure for sustainability science applied to land management is essential to move more rapidly toward sustainable, productive, and resilient landscapes.

Zaks, D. P.; Jahn, M.

2011-12-01

98

Discrete event simulation to generate requirements specification for sustainable manufacturing systems design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sustainable manufacturing systems design using processes, methodologies, and technologies that are energy efficient and environmental friendly is desirable and essential for sustainable development of products and services. Efforts must be made to create and maintain such sustainable manufacturing systems. Discrete Event Simulation (DES) in combination with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) system can be utilized to evaluate a manufacturing system

Björn Johansson; Anders Skoogh; Mahesh Mani; Swee Leong

2009-01-01

99

Renewable energy and sustainable development in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Achieving solutions to environmental problems that we face today requires long-term potential actions for sustainable development. In this regard, renewable energy resources appear to be the one of the most efficient and effective solutions. So clean, domestic and renewable energy is commonly accepted as the key for future life for Turkey. Turkey's geographical location has several advantages for extensive use

Kamil Kaygusuz; Abdullah Kaygusuz

2002-01-01

100

Report of the Alternative Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

.......................................................................................................... 17 Novel nuclear-energy fuel and radioactive waste transmutation research towards clean fuels, solar cells, biofuels, and waste-free nuclear power. This report gives someReport of the Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative 2009 Prof. David Cahen Scientific

Maoz, Shahar

101

Sustainable cities: transport, energy, and urban form  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper extends the debate over the ideal of the sustainable city, particularly as it relates to transport, by providing empirical evidence, from five case-study cities in the United Kingdom and one in the Netherlands on the links between urban form and energy consumption in transport. It also links energy use measures to the physical, economic, and social structure of

D Banister; S Watson; C Wood

1997-01-01

102

Introduction to Renewable Energy and Sustainable Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) has provided this course model on renewable and sustainable technology. The course emphasizes energy consumption, efficiency, and conservation. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

Kox, Amy L.

2011-05-03

103

Financing Sustainable EnergyFinancing Sustainable Energy City of Berkeley  

E-print Network

Energy Financing District · Levy of Special Taxes on parcels annexed to Special Tax District Use Pl· Climate Action Plan Transportation and Land Use Building Energy Useu d g e gy Use Waste Reduction similar to CFDFinancing model similar to CFD Additional 20 year Property Tax le on participating

Kammen, Daniel M.

104

Promoting sustainable energy strategies in Russia  

SciTech Connect

Enormous structural changes are taking place in the economy of Russia. It is important that vital sectors of the economy undergo a smooth transition from a centrally-planned paradigm to a more market-oriented structure. Introducing market-oriented-institutional structures and energy planning approaches to Russian utilities can facilitate the transition to the market and allow them to become vehicles for change rather than mere witnesses. As real electricity prices increase relative to other prices, a significant industrial restructuring can be expected, with an accompanying reduction of energy consumption. By developing programs to help industry become more energy-efficiency, the electricity sector can play a central role in Russia`s economic recovery. A robust energy sector will be in a much better position to lead other sectors of the economy toward market-oriented solutions to the present economic crisis. Because of the magnitude of the task of recreating an economy for one of the world`s superpowers, institutional restructuring should take place incrementally. The transition of US utilities from a {open_quotes}build-and-grow{close_quotes} paradigm to one of Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and subsequently to a hybrid of competition and IRP began and is continuing on the state and regional level. Local success stories on the West Coast and New England persuaded other states to adopt these methods. This strategy could also prove to be very effective in regions of Russia that are served by integrated electricity grids, such as the South Russia Power pool (Yuzhenergo) that serves the North Caucasus region. As the Russian energy system currently undergoes change, simultaneously privatizing and restructuring, these issues will be largely decided within the next two years. One of the greatest challenges involves implementing an environmentally sustainable strategy which ensures that energy efficiency and renewable energy are incorporated into the new structure.

Watson, R.K.

1995-12-31

105

Sustainable desalination using solar energy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global potable water demand is expected to grow, particularly in areas where freshwater supplies are limited. Production and supply of potable water requires significant amounts of energy, which is currently being derived from nonrenewable fossil fuels. Since energy production from fossil fuels also requires water, current practice of potable water supply powered by fossil fuel derived energy is not a

Veera Gnaneswar Gude; Nagamany Nirmalakhandan

2010-01-01

106

Sustainable Energy Development in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turkey's demand for energy and electricity is increasing rapidly. Turkey is heavily dependent on expensive imported energy resources that place a big burden on the economy, and air pollution is becoming a great environmental concern in the country. As would be expected, the rapid expansion of energy production and consumption has brought with it a wide range of environmental issues

S. Karagoz; K. Bakirci

2009-01-01

107

A New Approach for Sustainable Energy Systems due to the Excitation of Inner-core Electrons on Zinc Atoms Induced by Surface-ion-recombination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crisis of Nuclear power plants due to the March 11, 2011 Tsunami in Japan suggests an increased need for sustainable science and technology in our society. The authors propose a new physical approach with surface-ion-recombination (SIR) due to the inner-core excitation of zinc atom [Ne]3s23p63d104s2 that brings no magnetic moment. Condensed material indicated the energy dependence of X-ray diffraction intensity, in which exists strong diffuse scattering intensities at 10 eV, 90 eV, 100 eV and 230 eV. These energies are strictly corresponding to zinc of electron systems (3s,3p,3d and these combination). Our approach may have the potential of techniques for future nanotechnology, especially for hydrogen storage systems.

Hamasaki, Mitsugi; Obara, Masumi; Yamaguchi, Mitsuomi; Kuwayama, Masahiro; Obara, Kozo

2011-12-01

108

Sustainable bioreactor systems for producing hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of Hawaii`s BioHydrogen Program is to generate hydrogen from water using solar energy and microalgae under sustainable conditions. Specific bioprocess engineering objectives include the design, construction, testing and validation of a sustainable photobioreactor system. Specific objectives relating to biology include investigating and optimizing key physiological parameters of cyanobacteria of the genus Arthrospira (Spirulina), the organism selected for initial process development. Another objective is to disseminate the Mitsui-Miami cyanobacteria cultures, now part of the Hawaii Culture Collection (HCC), to other research groups. The approach is to use a single organisms for producing hydrogen gas from water. Key stages are the growth of the biomass, the dark induction of hydrogenase, and the subsequent generation of hydrogen in the light. The biomass production stage involves producing dense cultures of filamentous, non-heterocystous cyanobacteria and optimizing biomass productivity in innovative tubular photobioreactors. The hydrogen generation stages entail inducing the enzymes and metabolic pathways that enable both dark and light-driven hydrogen production. The focus of Year 1 has been on the construction and operation of the outdoor photobioreactor for the production of high-density mass cultures of Arthrospira. The strains in the Mitsui-Miami collection have been organized and distributed to other researchers who are beginning to report interesting results. The project is part of the International Energy Agency`s biohydrogen program.

Zaborsky, O.R.; Radway, J.C.; Yoza, B.A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Molecular Biology; Tredici, M.R. [Univ. of Florence (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze e Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiogiche

1998-08-01

109

Magnetic Materials in sustainable energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new energy paradigm, consisting of greater reliance on renewable energy sources and increased concern for energy efficiency in the total energy lifecycle, has accelerated research in energy-related technologies. Due to their ubiquity, magnetic materials play an important role in improving the efficiency and performance of devices in electric power generation, conversion and transportation. Magnetic materials are essential components of energy applications (i.e. motors, generators, transformers, actuators, etc.) and improvements in magnetic materials will have significant impact in this area, on par with many ``hot'' energy materials efforts. The talk focuses on the state-of-the-art hard and soft magnets and magnetocaloric materials with an emphasis on their optimization for energy applications. Specifically, the impact of hard magnets on electric motor and transportation technologies, of soft magnetic materials on electricity generation and conversion technologies, and of magnetocaloric materials for refrigeration technologies, will be discussed. The synthesis, characterization, and property evaluation of the materials, with an emphasis on structure-property relationships, will be examined in the context of their respective markets as well as their potential impact on energy efficiency. Finally, considering future bottle-necks in raw materials and in the supply chain, options for recycling of rare-earth metals will be analyzed.ootnotetextO. Gutfleisch, J.P. Liu, M. Willard, E. Bruck, C. Chen, S.G. Shankar, Magnetic Materials and Devices for the 21st Century: Stronger, Lighter, and More Energy Efficient (review), Adv. Mat. 23 (2011) 821-842.

Gutfleisch, Oliver

2012-02-01

110

Sustainable Energy - Without the hot air  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reader John Roeder writes about a website associated with David MacKay's book Sustainable Energy-Without the hot air. The book is a freely downloadable PDF (or purchasable) book describing an analysis detailing a low-carbon renewable energy transformation route for a large, modern first world industrial country (the United Kingdom). Written for the layman, the work uses vernacular language, e.g., energy consumption

Dan MacIsaac

2009-01-01

111

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY UTILITY DESIGN: OPTIONS  

E-print Network

..................................................................25 3.4.3 Green Energy Fund-responsive Programs that Target All Fuels and All Customer Classes.................32 4.3 A Financing Plan for Self

Delaware, University of

112

Sustainability in cattle production systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cattle production has the potential of being an important component of sustainable agriculture globally. The ability to transform feed not suitable for humans into high-quality food will be of great importance in the long-term for feeding a growing population. Other aspects such as preservation of landscape values and maintenance of rural communities are highly appreciated values, especially in the industrialized

C. J. C. Phillips; J. Tind Sorensen

1993-01-01

113

Energy, environment and sustainable development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globally, buildings are responsible for approximately 40% of the total world annual energy consumption. Most of this energy is for the provision of lighting, heating, cooling, and air conditioning. Increasing awareness of the environmental impact of CO2 and NOx emissions and CFCs triggered a renewed interest in environmentally friendly cooling, and heating technologies. Under the 1997 Montreal Protocol, governments agreed

Abdeen Mustafa Omer

2008-01-01

114

Ris International Energy Conference 2007 Energy Solutions for Sustainable Development  

E-print Network

University of Technology Impacts of high energy prices on long-term energy-economic scenarios for GermanyRisø International Energy Conference 2007 Energy Solutions for Sustainable Development Presentations Session 1 - Future Global Development Options Energy Efficiency. Achieving more with less, Stefan

115

Briggs & Stratton Sustainable Energy Efficiency  

E-print Network

manufacture are Made in the USA of US and global parts ESL-IE-13-05-22 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 3 Engine Power Products Power Products ProductsESL-IE-13-05-22 Proceedings... annual savings ESL-IE-13-05-22 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 Base Year 4% 11% 11% 15% 20% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 FY12 Energy Intensity...

Feustel, R.

2013-01-01

116

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/5 ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems: Planning, Operation, and Markets  

E-print Network

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/5 Syllabus ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power to direct fossil fuel burning, and the prospect of electrifying the transportation industry, will render electricity the dominant energy form in a sustainable environment future. Under this premise, the course

Lin, Xi

117

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/5 ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems: Planning, Operation, and Markets  

E-print Network

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/5 Syllabus ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power space conditioning relative to direct fossil fuel burning, and the prospect of electrifying the transportation industry, will render electricity the dominant energy form in a sustainable environment future

118

Recent Advances in AI for Computational Sustainability AI and Sustainability Department, IEEE Intelligent Systems  

E-print Network

Recent Advances in AI for Computational Sustainability AI and Sustainability., "Computing and AI for a Sustainable Future," IEEE Intelligent Systems, vol. 27, no. 4, July/Aug 2012. Though research at the intersection of AI

Fisher, Douglas H.

119

Sustainable health systems: addressing three key areas.  

PubMed

In the modern context sustainable health systems are being developed using the newest technological and communication technologies. This is proving to be a great success for the growth of Health Informatics and healthcare improvement. However this revolution is not being reached by a lot of the world population. This paper will address the importance of closing the Digital Divide, Empowerment of health consumers and the importance of converging communications. Key areas in the development of a truly sustainable health system. PMID:17911893

Chhanabhai, Prajesh N; Holt, Alec; Benwell, George

2007-01-01

120

Sustainable, Reliable Mission-Systems Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A mission-systems architecture, based on a highly modular infrastructure utilizing open-standards hardware and software interfaces as the enabling technology is essential for affordable md sustainable space exploration programs. This mission-systems architecture requires (8) robust communication between heterogeneous systems, (b) high reliability, (c) minimal mission-to-mission reconfiguration, (d) affordable development, system integration, end verification of systems, and (e) minimal sustaining engineering. This paper proposes such an architecture. Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle program and Earthbound complex engineered systems are applied to define the model. Technology projections reaching out 5 years are made to refine model details.

O'Neil, Graham; Orr, James K.; Watson, Steve

2005-01-01

121

A Systems Framework for Sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current concerns over climate change and global warming has created a new vocabulary and brought about a whole new emphasis\\u000a on a broad set of issues collectively referred to as sustainability. This rather novel concept is now well established within\\u000a the scientific community principally advocating a global and ecological perspective focused on the survivability of Gaia and\\u000a its ability

Ali G. Hessami; Feng Hsu; Hamid Jahankhani

122

Sustainable Energy Scheme Mentor Job description  

E-print Network

and Outreach Team Job title: Engineering Scheme Mentor Responsible to: UK Student Recruitment and Outreach Team during the academic year 2009/10 Overall Purpose of Job: · To support the UK Student Recruitment1 Sustainable Energy Scheme Mentor Job description Department: Student Administration and Registry

Anderson, Jim

123

Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability  

E-print Network

Nuclear Power Trends Energy Economics and Sustainability L. H. Tsoukalas Purdue University Nuclear Nuclear Today · 439 nuclear power reactors (31 countries) · Over 12,000 years of operating experience · Nuclear reactors supply 16% of the world's electricity as base-load power (372,000 MWe of total capacity

124

Guidelines for Energy-Efficient Sustainable Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These guidelines present optional strategies to be considered in designing schools to be more energy efficient and sustainable. The guidelines are organized by the following design and construction process: site selection; selection of A & E design team; programming and goal setting; schematic design; design development; construction documents;…

Nicklas, Michael; Bailey, Gary; Rosemain, Pascale; Olin, Samuel

125

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

and Sustainable Transportation We have explored and compared advanced vehicle and fuel pathways and imaginedSUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 4: POLICY AND SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION Part 4: Policy

California at Davis, University of

126

Sustainability Evaluation of Ground Source Heat Pump System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology is regarded as an effective technology for energy saving in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, which is being boosted greatly in China. The sustainable development of GSHP system requires to quantitatively analyze from the aspects such as economic, social and environmental benefits. In this paper, as the cases of 3 different cooling and

Yuhe Luo; Lixing Ding; Xianrong Zhuo; Lanlan Lin

2010-01-01

127

A Sustainable U.S. Energy Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report gives guidance on what could be done to overcome the political stalemate that has long blocked the creation of\\u000a a sustainable energy plan, leaving the United States vulnerable to oil imports while emitting large amounts of greenhouse\\u000a gases. An overall energy policy is suggested for use by political leaders, along with specific goals on climate change and\\u000a national

Herschel Specter

2009-01-01

128

Sustainable Energy-Without the Hot Air  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have an addiction to fossil fuels, and it's not sustainable. The devel-oped world gets 80% of its energy from fossil fuels; Britain, 90%. And this is unsustainable for three reasons. First, easily-accessible fossil fuels will at some point run out, so we'll eventually have to get our energy from someplace else. Second, burning fossil fuels is having a measurable

David J. C. Mackay; David Hafemeister

2010-01-01

129

China Energy Group - Sustainable Growth Through EnergyEfficiency  

SciTech Connect

China is fueling its phenomenal economic growth with huge quantities of coal. The environmental consequences reach far beyond its borders--China is second only to the United States in greenhouse gas emissions. Expanding its supply of other energy sources, like nuclear power and imported oil, raises trade and security issues. Soaring electricity demand necessitates the construction of 40-70 GW of new capacity per year, creating sustained financing challenges. While daunting, the challenge of meeting China's energy needs presents a wealth of opportunities, particularly in meeting demand through improved energy efficiency and other clean energy technologies. The China Energy Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is committed to understanding these opportunities, and to exploring their implications for policy and business. We work collaboratively with energy researchers, suppliers, regulators, and consumers in China and elsewhere to: better understand the dynamics of energy use in China. Our Research Focus Encompasses Three Major Areas: Buildings, Industry, and Cross-Cutting Activities. Buildings--working to promote energy-efficient buildings and energy-efficient equipment used in buildings. Current work includes promoting the design and use of minimum energy efficiency standards and energy labeling for appliances, and assisting in the development and implementation of building codes for energy-efficient residential and commercial/public buildings. Past work has included a China Residential Energy Consumption Survey and a study of the health impacts of rural household energy use. Industry--understanding China's industrial sector, responsible for the majority of energy consumption in China. Current work includes benchmarking China's major energy-consuming industries to world best practice, examining energy efficiency trends in China's steel and cement industries, implementing voluntary energy efficiency agreements in various industries, and developing a multi-year program for standards and for optimizing the industrial motor systems in China. Past work has included a comprehensive study of China's oil refining sector. Cross-Cutting--analysis and research focused on multisector, policy, and long-term development issues. Current cross-cutting policy and analysis research includes work on government procurement programs; energy service companies; a national energy policy assessment including the National Energy Strategy released by the government in early 2005; energy efficiency policy; an analysis of past trends in energy consumption in China as well as of future scenarios; and our China Energy Databook accompanied by chapter summaries and analysis of recent trends.

Levine, Mark; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Sinton, Jonathan; Zhou,Nan; Aden, Nathaniel; Huang, Joe; Price, Lynn; McKane, Aimee T.

2006-03-20

130

Sustainability Report: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2003 -- 2004  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Sustainability Report for 2003-2004 highlights the Laboratory's comprehensive sustainability activities. These efforts demonstrate NREL's progress toward achieving overall sustainability goals. Sustainability is an inherent centerpiece of the Laboratory's work. NREL's mission--to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and practices and transfer knowledge and innovations to address the nation's energy and environmental goals--is synergistic with sustainability. The Laboratory formalized its sustainability activities in 2000, building on earlier ideas--this report summarizes the status of activities in water use, energy use, new construction, green power, transportation, recycling, environmentally preferable purchasing, greenhouse gas emissions, and environmental management.

Not Available

2004-09-01

131

Modelling Sustainable Development Scenarios of Croatian Power System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main objective of power system sustainable development is to provide the security of electricity supply required to underpin economic growth and increase the quality of living while minimizing adverse environmental impacts. New challenges such as deregulation, liberalization of energy markets, increased competition on energy markets, growing demands on security of supply, price insecurities and demand to cut CO2 emissions, are calling for better understanding of electrical systems modelling. Existing models are not sufficient anymore and planners will need to think differently in order to face these challenges. Such a model, on the basis on performed simulations, should enable planner to distinguish between different options and to analyze sustainability of these options. PLEXOS is an electricity market simulation model, used for modeling electrical system in Croatia since 2005. Within this paper, generation expansion scenarios until 2020 developed for Croatian Energy Strategy and modeled in PLEXOS. Development of sustainable Croatian energy scenario was analyzed in the paper - impacts of CO2 emission price and wind generation. Energy Strategy sets goal for 1200 MW from wind power plants in 2020. In order to fully understand its impacts, intermittent nature of electricity generation from wind power plant was modeled. We conclude that electrical system modelling using everyday growing models has proved to be inevitable for sustainable electrical system planning in complex environment in which power plants operate today.

Paši?ko, Robert; Stani?, Zoran; Debrecin, Nenad

2010-05-01

132

Simulation-based sustainable manufacturing system design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manufacturing simulation and digital engineering tools and procedures have had a positive impact on the manufacturing industry. However, to design a sustainable manufacturing system, a multitude of system dimensions must be jointly optimized. This paper proposes an integrated simulation tool helping to maximize production efficiency and balance environmental constraints already in the system design phase. Lean manufacturing, identification and elimination

Juhani Heilala; Saija Vatanen; Hannele Tonteri; Jari Montonen; Salla Lind; Björn Johansson; Johan Stahre

2008-01-01

133

Energy technology progress for sustainable development  

SciTech Connect

Energy security is a fundamental part of a country`s national security. Access to affordable, environmentally sustainable energy is a stabilizing force and is in the world community`s best interest. The current global energy situation however is not sustainable and has many complicating factors. The primary goal for government energy policy should be to provide stability and predictability to the market. This paper differentiates between short-term and long-term issues and argues that although the options for addressing the short-term issues are limited, there is an opportunity to alter the course of long-term energy stability and predictability through research and technology development. While reliance on foreign oil in the short term can be consistent with short-term energy security goals, there are sufficient long-term issues associated with fossil fuel use, in particular, as to require a long-term role for the federal government in funding research. The longer term issues fall into three categories. First, oil resources are finite and there is increasing world dependence on a limited number of suppliers. Second, the world demographics are changing dramatically and the emerging industrialized nations will have greater supply needs. Third, increasing attention to the environmental impacts of energy production and use will limit supply options. In addition to this global view, some of the changes occurring in the US domestic energy picture have implications that will encourage energy efficiency and new technology development. The paper concludes that technological innovation has provided a great benefit in the past and can continue to do so in the future if it is both channels toward a sustainable energy future and if it is committed to, and invested in, as a deliberate long-term policy option.

Arvizu, D.E.; Drennen, T.E.

1997-03-01

134

Engineering Molecular Transformations for Sustainable Energy Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Future strategies for sustainable energy production will undoubtedly require processes and materials that can efficiently convert renewable resources into fuels. Nature’s enzymes can exquisitely integrate highly active catalytic centers within flexible environments that can adaptively guide reactants to products with very high activities and selectivities. They are limited, however, by their stability and ability to integrate into large scale production processes. The design of more robust heterogeneous catalytic materials that mimic the performance of enzymes, however, has been hindered by our limited understanding of how such transformations proceed. The tremendous advances in ab initio quantum mechanical methods, atomistic simulations, and high performance computing that have occurred over the past two decades, however, provide unprecedented ability to track molecular transformations and how they proceed at specific sites and within particular environments. This information together with the advances in in situ spectroscopic methods that follow such transformations can begin to enable the design of atomic surface ensembles and nanoscale reaction environments. This paper provides the author’s perspective on how theory and simulation can be used to move from current onedimensional design efforts based on catalytic descriptors to the design of two-dimensional surfaces, threedimensional reaction environments, and proton-coupled electron transfer systems that mimic enzymes in the transformation of molecules.

Neurock, Matthew

2010-12-03

135

**NEW UNIVERSITY-WIDE MINOR ** Minor in Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

**NEW UNIVERSITY-WIDE MINOR ** Minor in Sustainable Energy Energy is central to one of the preeminent challenges facing humanity: a sustainable human existence on the planet. The Minor in Sustainable Energy allows a student in any four-year undergraduate School or College

Goldberg, Bennett

136

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sustainability Report FY 2009  

E-print Network

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sustainability Report FY 2009 White Black NREL is a national by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored. Design and planning for these highly energy-efficient buildings enable NREL to model sustainability

137

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan their feedstocks displaces food crops. #12;298 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CONCLUSION: KEY FINDINGS. · Biofuels can make limited but significant contributions to a sustainable transportation energy supply

California at Davis, University of

138

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan presented in this book was drawn from the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways (STEPS) program.S. Environmental Protection Agency Volkswagen #12;312 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

California at Davis, University of

139

SUSTAINABLE BIOFUEL SYSTEMS FOR UNDEVELOPED REGIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

We evaluated our findings based on the level of integration of sustainable methods, feasibility of implementation within the target community, and the quantity of energy produced in relation to community needs. Particular emphasis was placed on development of a production meth...

140

Designing Engineering Systems for Sustainability Peter Sandborn and Jessica Myers  

E-print Network

6 Designing Engineering Systems for Sustainability Peter Sandborn and Jessica Myers CALCE, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland Abstract Sustainability means keeping that satisfy the original requirements. Sustainability also includes manufacturing and fielding revised

Sandborn, Peter

141

Sustainable multipurpose tree production systems for Nepal  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory is developing methods for producing reforestation plating stock, fuel, and fodder in a sustainable manner in Nepal. This project, in cooperation with the Ministry of Forest and Soil Conservation of Nepal, is sponsored by the US Agency for International Development (AID). Several production systems are being evaluated for the Mid-Hills Region of Nepal. To provide sustainable biomass production and ecological management of the fragile Mid-Hills Region, the production systems must simultaneously satisfy the physiological requirements of the plants, the symbiotic requirements of the plant and the microorganisms in its rhizosphere, the physicochemical requirements of nutrient and water cycling, and the climatic and topographic constraints.

Shen, S.Y.; Kilpatrick, K.J.

1988-03-01

142

Designing Systems for Environmental Sustainability  

EPA Science Inventory

Dr. Smith will describe his U.S. EPA research which involves elements of design, from systems as diverse as biofuel supply chains to recycling systems and chemical processes. Design uses models that rate performance as part of a synthesis approach, where steps of analysis and sy...

143

Sustainable Supply of Energy from Biomass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study concerns sustainable supply of primary energy from biomass and considers the interrelation between the amount of energy captured in biomass by photosynthesis and the total land area under perennial species grown for the purpose. The authors analyse available experimental data statistically relevant to natural growths comprising a large number of individual trees of grey alder (Alnus incana), a well-known fast-growing species broadly spread in Latvia and for centuries being used as firewood. By graphical approximation of the growth-rate data available for growths up to 50 years of age the optimum age for harvesting dependent on the age at which the maximum growth-rate of biomass is reached is shown to be 18 years confirming traditional popular knowledge. With account for long-term sustainable supply of energy under condition of 18-year rotation, the average yield of energy from highest quality sites of the total land area permanently occupied by alder is calculated to be ca. 85 GJ/ha and the required land equivalent - slightly less than 12 ha per TJ of primary energy from photosynthesis.

Abolins, J.; Gravitis, J.

2010-01-01

144

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/8 Syllabus Draft  

E-print Network

ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable Power Systems Page 1/8 Syllabus Draft ENG EC/ME/SE 543 Sustainable enthalpy geothermal energy in providing space conditioning relative to direct fossil fuel burning in a sustainable environment future. Under this premise, the course considers key technical and economic

Caramanis, Michael

145

Energy Security: A Key Requirement forSustainable Development  

E-print Network

1 Energy Security: A Key Requirement forSustainable Development Perspective and Action Plan Robert Card Under Secretary US Department of Energy August 30, 2002 Session One: Maintaining Energy Security WSSD Side Event Energy for Sustainable Development IEA/UNEP/Eskom #12;2 Energy Security is a Key

146

Sustainable Rice Production Through Farming Systems Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field experiments were conducted for three years (from 1999 to 2002) at ICAR Research Complex for Goa, Old Goa, Goa, India, to identify a productive and sustainable cropping system with rice. Three major cropping systems common to the coastal region of India (rice–groundnut, rice–cowpea, and rice–vegetables) were compared with rice–fallow and rice–green manure (sunnhemp) systems. The experiment was conducted in

B. L. Manjunath; V. S. Korikanthimath

2009-01-01

147

DARS Authorization Form Certificate in Engineering for Energy Sustainability  

E-print Network

DARS Authorization Form Certificate in Engineering for Energy Sustainability College of Engineering the capstone requirement. 2. Any student wishing to receive sustainability credits for a course and capstone projects must address energy sustainability in some manner and will be reviewed by the certificate

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

148

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (AUSTRALIA) and AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND SOLAR ENERGY SOCIETY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sustainable Energy Industry Association (Australia) was formed in 1999 by Australia's major sustainable energy organisations, who recognised the need for a peak council to support the development of the sustainable energy industry, and to liaise with Government. SEIA's mission is to promote the Australian research, manufacture and application of sustainable energy and to encourage the uptake of renewable energy

Alan Pears; David Abba

149

Pathways to a more sustainable production of energy: sustainable hydrogen—a research objective for Shell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Towards a sustainable energy supply is a clear direction for exploratory research in Shell. Examples of energy carriers, which should be delivered to the envisaged sustainable energy markets, are bio-fuels, produced from biomass residues, and hydrogen (or electricity), produced from renewable sources. In contrast to the readily available ancient sunlight stored in fossil fuels, the harvesting of incident sunlight will

J. W. Gosselink

2002-01-01

150

Role of Fusion Energy in a Sustainable Global Energy Strategy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Fusion can play an important role in sustainable global energy because it has an available and unlimited fuel supply and location not restricted by climate or geography. Further, it emits no greenhouse gases. It has no potential for large energy releases ...

J. Sheffield

2001-01-01

151

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH (SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Systems Analysis Branch (SAB)is organized under the Sustainable Technology Division of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory. The mission of SAB is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective decision making tools for use by the private and public sectors. Such tools...

152

Ecology in Sustainable Agriculture Practices and Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable and productive agroecosystems must be developed that will meet today's needs for food and other products, as well as preserving the vital natural resource base that will allow future generations to meet their needs. To increase production efficiency, to improve farming strategies based on local resources, and to design systems that are resilient in the face of changing climate

C. A. Francis; P. Porter

2011-01-01

153

Montana State University 1 Sustainable Food Systems  

E-print Network

Plant Propagation 3 HORT 337 Vegetable Production 3 HORT 345 Organic Market Gardening 3 HSTA 409 FoodMontana State University 1 Sustainable Food Systems Option Health and Human Development Algebra 3 SFBS 146 - Intro Sust Food/Bioenergy Sys 3 Choose one of the following: 3 SFBS 296 - Practicum

Maxwell, Bruce D.

154

Software Product Line Engineering for Long-lived, Sustainable Systems  

E-print Network

Software Product Line Engineering for Long-lived, Sustainable Systems Robyn Lutz1,2, David Weiss1 system, long-lived system, variability, commonality/variability analysis. 1 Introduction Sustainable and requirements, distinguishes sustainable systems from legacy systems. Accordingly we use the term long-lived

Lutz, Robyn R.

155

Global Energy Scenarios forGlobal Energy Scenarios for Sustainable DevelopmentSustainable Development  

E-print Network

T #12;NakicenovicNakicenovic IIASA & VUT 2003IIASA & VUT 2003 Global Carbon Dioxide EmissionsGlobal Carbon Dioxide Emissions Nakicenovic IPCC 2001 #12;Technical Options for a more Sustainable Future Energy Technologies: · next generation fossil fuel and carbon sequestration technologies · nuclear

156

Recycling of wood waste as sustainable industrial resources—Design of energy saving wood-based board for floor heating systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycled wood has two important functions for sustainable development, as an industrial resource and as a means of longer storage of fixed carbon from carbon dioxide by photosynthesis. Recycled wood-based board, such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), is treated to produce a base material of floor heating system. The concept of functionally graded material (FGM) is introduced for the design

Yoshihiro Obata; Kazutoshi Takeuchi; Naho Soma; Kozo Kanayama

2006-01-01

157

Sustainable decision making: the role of decision support systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable decision making stands for decision making which contributes to the transition to a sustainable society. It raises a number of challenging problems for which existing decision support systems (DSS) may not be equipped. The role of DSS in sustainable decision making is considered. The different models of decision making and their appropriateness in sustainable decision making are discussed. Examples

Marion A. Hersh

1999-01-01

158

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

and comparing fuel/vehicle pathways with respect to a set of sustainability metrics. For more than twenty yearsSUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>. For information on commercial licensing, contact copyright@ucdavis.edu. #12;278 SUSTAINABLE

California at Davis, University of

159

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

that has been done so far comparing the sustainability of different fuel/vehicle pathways along these linesSUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>. For information on commercial licensing, contact copyright@ucdavis.edu. #12;171 SUSTAINABLE

California at Davis, University of

160

Hydrogeological Factors for Sustainable Urban Water Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a Urban transport systems and the provision of water have been identified as the factors most critical in determining the future\\u000a of cities in this new century. The effectiveness of conventional technical urban water concepts has reached a limit, and the\\u000a sustainability of such practice is in question. There are a number of different types of key urban water indicators

MATTHIAS EISWIRTH

161

MIT: Global System for Sustainable Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Global System for Sustainable Development (GSSD) is a project of the Global Accords Consortium for Sustainable Development that is "dedicated to internationalization of knowledge access, provision & sharing for 'reducing the gap between knowledge & policy.'" Housed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), GSSD is "a multi-dimensional knowledge networking system" that combines public and private networks to provide a continually evolving cross-referenced knowledge base for informing decision-making and policy in the domain of "sustainable development." The Using GSSD section of the website provides information on the organizing principles used to develop the database, demonstrates the functionality and architecture of the system and other aspects of the project, such as the multiple mirror sites that are in languages other than English. Reports and working papers from the GSSD are also posted. Visitors can search the holdings of the database using a text search or based on other parameters, such as issue area or industry type, and are invited to submit websites to be considered for inclusion.

162

Renewable energy for sustainable development in Africa: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renewable energy usage in Africa has been reviewed using South Africa, Egypt, Nigeria and Mali as case studies. The various national energy policies of these countries were analysed and areas that require attention to achieve sustainability were highlighted. On the overall, the success of sustainable development in Africa lies in addressing the imminent energy crisis in the continent. Excessive usage

I. M. Bugaje

2006-01-01

163

Renewable Energy Strategies for Sustainable Development Henrik Lund*  

E-print Network

Renewable Energy Strategies for Sustainable Development Henrik Lund* Department of Development of renewable energy (wind, solar, wave and biomass) in the making of strategies for a sustainable development. Such strategies typically involve three major technological changes: energy savings on the demand side, efficiency

Hansen, René Rydhof

164

Renewable energy and sustainable development: a crucial review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Achieving solutions to environmental problems that we face today requires long-term potential actions for sustainable development. In this regard, renewable energy resources appear to be the one of the most efficient and effective solutions. That is why there is an intimate connection between renewable energy and sustainable development. Anticipated patterns of future energy use and consequent environmental impacts (focussing on

Ibrahim Dincer

2000-01-01

165

SUSTAINABLE GENERATION AND UTILIZATION OF ENERGY THE CASE OF ICELAND.  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE GENERATION AND UTILIZATION OF ENERGY THE CASE OF ICELAND. PRODUCTION ET UTILISATION DE Harnessable energy 64 TWh/a Dispersed and not harnessable energy 123 TWh/a Flowing water 187 TWh/a Groundwater, but the most recent estimates for sustainable use of high temperature fields suggest that they could yield 26

Valfells, Ágúst

166

Regional Energy Cooperation for Sustainable Development: Northeast Asian Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to evaluate how the Northeast Asian energy cooperation can contribute to sustainable development of the countries in the region as well as the region as a whole. There are many features of the region pertaining to the energy sector and implications for sustainability thereof. Examples include; rapid economic growth and the energy needs to support it, increasing

Sang-Gon Lee

167

Engaging Reluctant Americans into Energy Efficiency and Sustainability  

E-print Network

Gain a sustainable advantage CATEE December 18, 2012 But I don’t want to! Engaging reluctant Americans (almost all of them) into energy efficiency and sustainability ESL-KT-13-12-58 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San... Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Gain a sustainable advantage ESL-KT-13-12-58 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Gain a sustainable advantage ESL-KT-13-12-58 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency...

Shelton, S.

2013-01-01

168

China's sustainable energy future: Scenarios of energy and carbonemissions (Summary)  

SciTech Connect

China has ambitious goals for economic development, and mustfind ways to power the achievement of those goals that are bothenvironmentally and socially sustainable. Integration into the globaleconomy presents opportunities for technological improvement and accessto energy resources. China also has options for innovative policies andmeasures that could significantly alter the way energy is acquired andused. These opportunities andoptions, along with long-term social,demographic, and economic trends, will shape China s future energysystem, and consequently its contribution to emissions of greenhousegases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). In this study, entitled China sSustainable Energy Future: Scenarios of Energy and Carbon Emissions, theEnergy Research Institute (ERI), an independent analytic organizationunder China's Na tional Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), soughtto explore in detail how China could achieve the goals of the TenthFive-Year Plan and its longer term aims through a sustainable developmentstrategy. China's ability to forge a sustainable energy path has globalconsequences. China's annual emissions of greenhouse gases comprisenearly half of those from developing countries, and 12 percent of globalemissions. Most of China's greenhouse gas emissions are in the form ofCO2, 87 percent of which came from energy use in 2000. In that year,China's carbon emissions from energy use and cement production were 760million metric tons (Mt-C), second only to the 1,500 Mt-C emitted by theUS (CDIAC, 2003). As China's energy consumption continues to increase,greenhouse gas emissions are expected to inevitably increase into thefuture. However, the rate at which energy consumption and emissions willincrease can vary significantly depending on whether sustainabledevelopment is recognized as an important policy goal. If the ChineseGovernment chooses to adopt measures to enhance energy efficiency andimprove the overall structure of energy supply, it is possible thatfuture economic growth may be supported by a relatively lower increase inenergy consumption. Over the past 20 years, energy intensity in China hasbeen reduced partly through technological and structural changes; currentannual emissions may be as much as 600 Mt-C lower than they would havebeen without intensity improvements. China must take into account itsunique circumstances in considering how to achieve a sustainabledevelopment path. This study considers the feasibility of such anachievement, while remaining open to exploring avenues of sustainabledevelopment that may be very different from existing models. Threescenarios were prepared to assist the Chinese Government to explore theissues, options and uncertainties that it confronts in shaping asustainable development path compatible with China's uniquecircumstances. The Promoting Sustainability scenario offers a systematicand complete interpretation of the social and economic goals proposed inthe Tenth Five-Year Plan. The possibility that environmentalsustainability would receive low priority is covered in the OrdinaryEffort scenario. Aggressive pursuit of sustainable development measuresalong with rapid economic expansion is featured in the Green Growthscenario. The scenarios differ in the degree to which a common set ofenergy supply and efficiency policies are implemented. In cons ultationwith technology and policy experts domestically and abroad, ERI developedstrategic scenarios and quantified them using an energy accounting model.The scenarios consider, in unprecedented detail, changes in energy demandstructure and technology, as well as energy supply, from 1998 to 2020.The scenarios in this study are an important step in estimating realistictargets for energy efficiency and energy supply development that are inline with a sustainable development strategy. The scenarios also helpanalyze and explore ways in which China might slow growth in greenhousegas emissions. The key results have important policy implications:Depending on how demand for energy services is met, China could quadrupleits gross domesti

Zhou, Dadi; Levine, Mark; Dai, Yande; Yu, Cong; Guo, Yuan; Sinton, Jonathan E.; Lewis, Joanna I.; Zhu, Yuezhong

2004-03-10

169

ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY OF TROPICAL REEF SYSTEMS: ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN THE EXUMA CAYS, BAHAMAS  

E-print Network

ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY OF TROPICAL REEF SYSTEMS: ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE TOURISM to that which will sustain rather than destroy the environment, the very product marketed and sought. In order to their conservation and eco- nomic growth. Tourism facilities and ser- vices consume large quantities of land, wa- ter

Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

170

Key Factors in Planning a Sustainable Energy Future Including Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, a number of future energy visions, especially those basing the energy systems on hydrogen, are discussed. Some often missing comparisons between alternatives, from a sustainability perspective, are identified and then performed for energy storage, energy transportation, and energy use in vehicles. It is shown that it is important…

Hedstrom, Lars; Saxe, Maria; Folkesson, Anders; Wallmark, Cecilia; Haraldsson, Kristina; Bryngelsson, Marten; Alvfors, Per

2006-01-01

171

Key Factors in Planning a Sustainable Energy Future Including Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, a number of future energy visions, especially those basing the energy systems on hydrogen, are discussed. Some often missing comparisons between alternatives, from a sustainability perspective, are identified and then performed for energy storage, energy transportation, and energy use in vehicles. It is shown that it is important to be aware of the losses implied by production,

Lars Hedström; Maria Saxe; Anders Folkesson; Cecilia Wallmark; Kristina Haraldsson; Mårten Bryngelsson; Per Alvfors

2006-01-01

172

What makes closed ecological systems sustainable?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A closed ecosystem has some properties that an open systems lacks. Let us consider the ones that increase the sustainability of an ecosystem. The common feature of biological and physicochemical life support systems is that basically they are both catalytic. There are two fundamental properties distinguishing biological systems: 1) they are auto-catalytic: their catalysts - enzymes of protein nature - are continuously reproduced when the system functions; 2) the program of every process performed by enzymes and the program of their reproduction are inherent in the biological system itself - in the totality of genomes of the species involved in the functioning of the ecosystem. Actually, one cell with the genome capable of the phenotypic realization is enough for the self- restoration of the function performed by the cells of this species in the ecosystem. The multi-cellular organisms with stem cells are constantly ready to repair themselves by intensifying the continuous process of regeneration. We (Gitelson) have made a quantitative investigation of this process by studying the regeneration and reparation of erythrocytes in mammals. The continuous microalgal culture of Chlorella vulgaris was taken to investigate quantitatively the similar functional process of self-restoration in unicellular algae (Rodicheva). Based on the data obtained, we proposed a mathematical model of the restoration process in the cell population that has suffered an acute radiation damage. Besides these general biological mechanisms responsible for their sustainability, closed systems also possess specific features enhancing their stability. They are as follows: 1. Nutrients cannot leave the system. 2. The metabolic pathways of the material cycling are closed. 3. The rates of interlink metabolism are in conformity with each other due to their mutual limitation. We present the data obtained in the Bios-3 experiments that prove the efficiency of this mechanism as a factor of the sustainability. The factors that reduce the sustainability of a CES are as follows: the range of ambient physicochemical parameters compatible with life is rather narrow and it takes rather a long time for the system to restore itself if damage is done to its relatively long-lived species, such as higher plants. A specific property of a small CES is that humans inhabiting it must perform a deterministic control. Our experiments in Bios-3 proved that this control is quite feasible and that it effectively increases the stability of the system. Thus, we can predict that humanity may perform the function of control in the Earth's biosphere in the course of its transformation into the noosphere. * "This work was made possible in part by Award No. REC-002 of the U.S. Civilian Research &Development Foundation for the Independent States of the Former Union (CRDF) and RF Ministry of Education."

Gitelson, I.; Degermendzhy, A.; Rodicheva, E.

173

Sustainable energy in china: the closing window of opportunity  

SciTech Connect

China's remarkable economic growth has been supported by a generally adequate and relatively low-cost supply of energy, creating the world's largest coal industry, its second-largest oil market, and an eclectic power business that is adding capacity at an unprecedented rate. If energy requirements continue to double every decade, China will not be able to meet the energy demands of the present without seriously compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own energy needs. This title uses historical data from 1980 and alternative scenarios through 2020 to assess China's future energy requirements and the resources to meet them. It calls for a high-level commitment to develop and implement an integrated, coordinated, and comprehensive energy policy. The authors recommend eight building blocks to reduce energy consumption growth well below the targeted rate of economic growth, to use national resources on an economically and environmentally sound basis, and to establish a robust energy system that can better ensure the security of a diverse supply of competitively priced energy forms. Sustainability calls for persistence of effort, greater reliance on advanced energy technologies, and better standards enforcement. Achieving these goals will require policy initiatives that restrict demand and create a 'resources-conscious society', reconcile energy needs with environmental imperatives, rationalize pricing, and tackle supply security. While the challenges are daunting, China has a unique opportunity to position itself as a world leader in the application of cutting-edge energy developments to create a sustainable energy sector effectively supporting a flourishing economy and society.

Fei Feng; Roland Priddle; Leiping Wang; Noureddine Berrah

2007-03-15

174

Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: SUSTAINABLE ENERGY FUTURES SCENARIO DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Scholar position Area: SUSTAINABLE ENERGY FUTURES SCENARIO DESIGN AND APPLICATIONS HEALTH PLAN BENEFITS The Department of ENBRIDGE CENTRE FOR CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY in the Faculty Fellow in SUSTAINABLE ENERGY Job Description: The Enbridge Centre for Corporate Sustainability

de Leon, Alex R.

175

NASA Johnson Space Center's Energy and Sustainability Efforts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts that NASA is making to assure a sustainable environment and energy savings at the Johnson Space Center. Sustainability is defined as development that meets the needs of present generations without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. The new technologies that are required for sustainable closed loop life support for space exploration have uses on the ground to reduce energy, greenhouse gas emissions, and water use. Some of these uses are reviewed.

Ewert, Michael K.

2008-01-01

176

Sustainability and Resilience in Resource Systems: Indicator Frameworks & Policy Directions  

E-print Network

Sustainability and Resilience in Resource Systems: Indicator Frameworks & Policy Directions Tony = market W = wholesale R = retail C = consumers Relevant Resources Habitat 1 2 3 P D M W R C Adapted from A. Charles, Sustainable Fishery Systems, Blackwell Science, Oxford UK (2001). #12;Sustainability in Resource

Charles, Anthony

177

Reporting Systems for Sustainability: What Are They Measuring?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dominance of the neoliberal discourse in the sustainability debate has tended to privilege the economy over environment and social dimensions with implications for what is measured by sustainability monitoring systems. Moreover, systems to measure sustainability, including those influenced by neoliberal discourse, lack robust definitions and…

Davidson, Kathryn M.

2011-01-01

178

Energy-efficient control of a smart grid with sustainable homes based on distributing risk  

E-print Network

The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed control system for a smart grid with sustainable homes. A central challenge is how to enhance energy efficiency in the presence of uncertainty. A major source of uncertainty ...

Ono, Masahiro, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01

179

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>. For information on commercial licensing, contact copyright@ucdavis.edu. #12;97 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CHAPTER 4: COMPARING FUEL ECONOMIES AND COSTS OF ADVANCED VS. CONVENTIONAL

California at Davis, University of

180

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/>. For information on commercial licensing, contact copyright@ucdavis.edu. #12;133 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 1: INDIVIDUAL FUEL/VEHICLE PATHWAYS PART 2 Chapter 6: Comparing Greenhouse

California at Davis, University of

181

for a Sustainable Energy Future Sossina M. Haile  

E-print Network

Importer · 65% of known petroleum reserves in Middle East · 3% of reserves in USA, but 25% of world;Towards a Sustainable Energy Future Environmental Outlook Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2001: 382ppmv #12;Towards a Sustainable Energy Future Observations of Climate Change · Evaporation

182

Sustainable Schools: Making Energy Efficiency a Lifestyle Priority  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Promoting efficient energy use in schools that consequently reduces greenhouse gas emissions is the purpose of a residential Energy Efficiency in Schools (EEIS) program reported on in this paper. Research on this program aligns with one of the "key "overarching" sustainability issues", set out in the "Learning for Sustainability: NSW Environmental…

Purnell, Ken; Sinclair, Mark; Gralton, Anna

2004-01-01

183

Fuel Cells: Thermodynamic Engine to a Sustainable Energy Future Richard T. Carlin  

E-print Network

9.00am Fuel Cells: Thermodynamic Engine to a Sustainable Energy Future Richard T. Carlin Office sustainable, reliable electrical grids and micro-grids. Integration of fuel cell systems with renewable of Naval Research Abstract Fuel cells operating on hydrogen and other appropriate fuels provide many

Levi, Anthony F. J.

184

Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) Vermont Highlight (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Case study on Vermont's innovative strategy for helping low-income families save energy through its Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) program. The DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) granted Vermont to give its weatherization clients access to solar energy systems and one-on-one assistance from energy efficiency coaches to help clients achieve meaningful and long-lasting reductions in their energy bills. Vermont-SERC is administered by the Vermont Office of Economic Opportunity and is carried out by five local weatherization agencies. The purpose of the program is to identify technologies and new approaches-in this case, solar energy and energy efficiency coaches-that can improve weatherization services to low-income clients. The program selects households that have previously received weatherization services. This has several advantages. First, the clients already understand how weatherization works and are willing to strive for additional energy savings. Second, the weatherization agencies are working with clients who have previously had weatherization and therefore have complete energy usage data from utility bills collected during the first energy upgrade installation. This allows the agencies to select the best potential candidates for solar energy. Agencies have existing knowledge of the homes and can pre-screen them for potential structural problems or lack of south-facing exposure.

Not Available

2012-01-01

185

Key Assets for a Sustainable Low Carbon Energy Future  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the beginning of the 21st century, concerns of energy security and climate change gave rise to energy policies focused on energy conservation and diversified low-carbon energy sources. Provided lessons of Fukushima accident are evidently accounted for, nuclear energy will probably be confirmed in most of today's nuclear countries as a low carbon energy source needed to limit imports of oil and gas and to meet fast growing energy needs. Future challenges of nuclear energy are then in three directions: i) enhancing safety performance so as to preclude any long term impact of severe accident outside the site of the plant, even in case of hypothetical external events, ii) full use of Uranium and minimization long lived radioactive waste burden for sustainability, and iii) extension to non-electricity energy products for maximizing the share of low carbon energy source in transportation fuels, industrial process heat and district heating. Advanced LWRs (Gen-III) are today's best available technologies and can somewhat advance nuclear energy in these three directions. However, breakthroughs in sustainability call for fast neutron reactors and closed fuel cycles, and non-electric applications prompt a revival of interest in high temperature reactors for exceeding cogeneration performances achievable with LWRs. Both types of Gen-IV nuclear systems by nature call for technology breakthroughs to surpass LWRs capabilities. Current resumption in France of research on sodium cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs) definitely aims at significant progress in safety and economic competitiveness compared to earlier reactors of this type in order to progress towards a new generation of commercially viable sodium cooled fast reactor. Along with advancing a new generation of sodium cooled fast reactor, research and development on alternative fast reactor types such as gas or lead-alloy cooled systems (GFR & LFR) is strategic to overcome technical difficulties and/or political opposition specific to sodium. In conclusion, research and technology breakthroughs in nuclear power are needed for shaping a sustainable low carbon future. International cooperation is key for sharing costs of research and development of the required novel technologies and cost of first experimental reactors needed to demonstrate enabling technologies. At the same time technology breakthroughs are developed, pre-normative research is required to support codification work and harmonized regulations that will ultimately apply to safety and security features of resulting innovative reactor types and fuel cycles.

Carre, Frank

2011-10-01

186

Developing Sustainable Spacecraft Water Management Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is well recognized that water handling systems used in a spacecraft are prone to failure caused by biofouling and mineral scaling, which can clog mechanical systems and degrade the performance of capillary-based technologies. Long duration spaceflight applications, such as extended stays at a Lunar Outpost or during a Mars transit mission, will increasingly benefit from hardware that is generally more robust and operationally sustainable overtime. This paper presents potential design and testing considerations for improving the reliability of water handling technologies for exploration spacecraft. Our application of interest is to devise a spacecraft wastewater management system wherein fouling can be accommodated by design attributes of the management hardware, rather than implementing some means of preventing its occurrence.

Thomas, Evan A.; Klaus, David M.

2009-01-01

187

Wisconsin Agricultural and Food Systems Network: Dairy Systems Sustainability Metrics  

E-print Network

Wisconsin Agricultural and Food Systems Network: Dairy Systems Sustainability Metrics Request and metrics in the Wisconsin dairy and cheese manufacturing industry. The information generated by this applied research will be used as a baseline to inform decisions primarily in cheese manufacturing industry

Bohnhoff, David

188

Natural treatment systems as sustainable ecotechnologies for the developing countries.  

PubMed

The purpose of natural treatment systems is the re-establishment of disturbed ecosystems and their sustainability for benefits to human and nature. The working of natural treatment systems on ecological principles and their sustainability in terms of low cost, low energy consumption, and low mechanical technology is highly desirable. The current review presents pros and cons of the natural treatment systems, their performance, and recent developments to use them in the treatment of various types of wastewaters. Fast population growth and economic pressure in some developing countries compel the implementation of principles of natural treatment to protect natural environment. The employment of these principles for waste treatment not only helps in environmental cleanup but also conserves biological communities. The systems particularly suit developing countries of the world. We reviewed information on constructed wetlands, vermicomposting, role of mangroves, land treatment systems, soil-aquifer treatment, and finally aquatic systems for waste treatment. Economic cost and energy requirements to operate various kinds of natural treatment systems were also reviewed. PMID:23878819

Mahmood, Qaisar; Pervez, Arshid; Zeb, Bibi Saima; Zaffar, Habiba; Yaqoob, Hajra; Waseem, Muhammad; Zahidullah; Afsheen, Sumera

2013-01-01

189

Natural Treatment Systems as Sustainable Ecotechnologies for the Developing Countries  

PubMed Central

The purpose of natural treatment systems is the re-establishment of disturbed ecosystems and their sustainability for benefits to human and nature. The working of natural treatment systems on ecological principles and their sustainability in terms of low cost, low energy consumption, and low mechanical technology is highly desirable. The current review presents pros and cons of the natural treatment systems, their performance, and recent developments to use them in the treatment of various types of wastewaters. Fast population growth and economic pressure in some developing countries compel the implementation of principles of natural treatment to protect natural environment. The employment of these principles for waste treatment not only helps in environmental cleanup but also conserves biological communities. The systems particularly suit developing countries of the world. We reviewed information on constructed wetlands, vermicomposting, role of mangroves, land treatment systems, soil-aquifer treatment, and finally aquatic systems for waste treatment. Economic cost and energy requirements to operate various kinds of natural treatment systems were also reviewed. PMID:23878819

Mahmood, Qaisar; Pervez, Arshid; Zeb, Bibi Saima; Zaffar, Habiba; Yaqoob, Hajra; Waseem, Muhammad; Zahidullah

2013-01-01

190

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01

191

SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY: KENYA'S ENERGY PAST AND FUTURE, NOVEMBER 2006 SEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY  

E-print Network

, 2]. At the time, the world faced record high energy prices and decision makers were gradually to a low-carbon future. Energy prices were at historic highs and, for many, a shift from con- ventionalSEARCHING FOR SUSTAINABILITY: KENYA'S ENERGY PAST AND FUTURE, NOVEMBER 2006 1 SEARCHING

Kammen, Daniel M.

192

Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.  

SciTech Connect

There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

2009-08-01

193

Environmental Sustainability  

E-print Network

Energy Systems & Climate Change 21 3.2 Communication 24 #12;Prospectus for Environmental SustainabilityEnvironmental Sustainability Distance Learning Masters in Science Graduate Diploma & Certificate #12;Prospectus for Environmental Sustainability: Distance Learning 2013-2014 2 CONTENTS 1.0 FOREWORD 5

194

Environmental Sustainability  

E-print Network

Energy Systems & Climate Change 21 3.2 Communication 24 #12;Prospectus for Environmental SustainabilityEnvironmental Sustainability Distance Learning Masters in Science Graduate Diploma & Certificate #12;Prospectus for Environmental Sustainability: Distance Learning 2014-2015 2 CONTENTS 1.0 FOREWORD 5

195

Addressing Sustainability in Transportation Systems: Definitions, Indicators, and Metrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Addressing the sustainability of transportation systems is an important activity as evidenced by a growing number of initiatives around the world to define and measure sustainability in transportation planning and infrastructure provision. This paper reviews major initiatives in North America, Europe, and Oceania. The purpose is to characterize the emergent thinking on what constitutes transportation sustainability and how to measure

Christy Mihyeon Jeon; Adjo Amekudzi

2005-01-01

196

Sams Energy Academy: Education for sustainable development  

E-print Network

difficult. · Lesson learned: the process of decision making was changed from topdown to bottomup energy system to accommodate both solar and wind · Replace 21 old wind turbines with new and more efficient turbines · Replace fossil fuel for heating with district heating and heat pumps · Replace cars

Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

197

Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, 233U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO2/RG-PuO2) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG-PuO2 + 96 % ThO2; 6 % RG-PuO2 + 94 % ThO2; 10 % RG-PuO2 + 90 % ThO2; 20 % RG-PuO2 + 80 % ThO2; 30 % RG-PuO2 + 70 % ThO2, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ˜ 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ˜ 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG-PuO2 fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MWth has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ˜160 kg 233U per year in addition to fission energy production in situ, multiplying the fusion energy by a factor of ˜1.3.

?ahin, Sümer

2014-09-01

198

A Navigation System with Ultrasonic Beams for Reliable Connection of Sustainable Transports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable transport such as walking and public transport can save energy and make a variant city that makes healthy profits and reduces the medical expenses. Smart and kind navigation for visitors improves the usefulness of the sustainable transport and enables a pleasant mobility. In this paper we propose a navigation system with ultrasonic beams that keeps guiding pedestrians to a

Taizo Miyachi; Jens J. Balvig; Wataru Kisada; Kazuki Hayakawa; Takeshi Suzuki

2010-01-01

199

Sustainable Rural Energy: Traditional Water Wheels in Padang (PWW) Indonesia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Renewable and sustainable energy is increasingly gaining interest in current research circles due to the debates on renewable energy resources. It is essential for scientists and researchers to search for solutions in renewable energy resources, with effective technologies, and low cost in operation and maintenance. Hydro resources can be considered a potential renewable energy resource. The traditional water wheel with simple construction coupled with a basic concept of technology can be utilised as a renewable and sustainable rural energy system. This paper discusses the case of the water wheel as a renewable energy system employed in Padang, Indonesia. The Padang water wheel is constructed from hardwood material with a diameter of 300 cm and width of 40 cm. It is built on a river using water flow to generate the movement of the wheel. The water wheel application in the area showed that it is suitable to be utilised to elevate and distribute water to rice fields located at a higher level than the water level of the river. The water wheel capacity is about 100-120 liters/min. It could continuously irrigate ±5 ha. of the rice fields. One of the advantages of this water wheel type is to function as a green technology concept promising no negative effect on the environment. The traditional water wheel has also a big economic impact on the rural economy, increasing the productivity of the rice fields. The people of Padang live in a water landscape encompassing the water wheel as an ubiquitous part of their lives, hence they relate to it and the technology of fabrication as well as the utilisation, making it an amenable and effective technology, finding relevance in the modern world.

Ibrahim, Gusri Akhyar; Haron, Che Hassan Che; Azhari, Che Husna

2010-06-01

200

Sustainability of rainwater harvesting system in terms of water quality.  

PubMed

Water is considered an everlasting free source that can be acquired naturally. Demand for processed supply water is growing higher due to an increasing population. Sustainable use of water could maintain a balance between its demand and supply. Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is the most traditional and sustainable method, which could be easily used for potable and nonpotable purposes both in residential and commercial buildings. This could reduce the pressure on processed supply water which enhances the green living. This paper ensures the sustainability of this system through assessing several water-quality parameters of collected rainwater with respect to allowable limits. A number of parameters were included in the analysis: pH, fecal coliform, total coliform, total dissolved solids, turbidity, NH3-N, lead, BOD5, and so forth. The study reveals that the overall quality of water is quite satisfactory as per Bangladesh standards. RWH system offers sufficient amount of water and energy savings through lower consumption. Moreover, considering the cost for installation and maintenance expenses, the system is effective and economical. PMID:24701186

Rahman, Sadia; Khan, M T R; Akib, Shatirah; Din, Nazli Bin Che; Biswas, S K; Shirazi, S M

2014-01-01

201

Sustainability of Rainwater Harvesting System in terms of Water Quality  

PubMed Central

Water is considered an everlasting free source that can be acquired naturally. Demand for processed supply water is growing higher due to an increasing population. Sustainable use of water could maintain a balance between its demand and supply. Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is the most traditional and sustainable method, which could be easily used for potable and nonpotable purposes both in residential and commercial buildings. This could reduce the pressure on processed supply water which enhances the green living. This paper ensures the sustainability of this system through assessing several water-quality parameters of collected rainwater with respect to allowable limits. A number of parameters were included in the analysis: pH, fecal coliform, total coliform, total dissolved solids, turbidity, NH3–N, lead, BOD5, and so forth. The study reveals that the overall quality of water is quite satisfactory as per Bangladesh standards. RWH system offers sufficient amount of water and energy savings through lower consumption. Moreover, considering the cost for installation and maintenance expenses, the system is effective and economical. PMID:24701186

Khan, M. T. R.; Akib, Shatirah; Din, Nazli Bin Che; Biswas, S. K.; Shirazi, S. M.

2014-01-01

202

The Sustainable Hydrogen Economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying and building a sustainable energy system is perhaps one of the most critical issues that today's society must address. Replacing our current energy carrier mix with a sustainable fuel is one of the key pieces in that system. Hydrogen as an energy carrier, primarily derived from water, can address issues of sustainability, environmental emissions and energy security. The hydrogen

2005-01-01

203

The silver bullet myth of sustainable energy savings  

SciTech Connect

Especially in the U.S., people like to think that solving problems just requires finding the proper ''silver bullet.'' Such fixes are not sustainable. Any utility company wanting sustainable long-term savings in personal energy demand requires a more thorough commitment that might be referred to as ''head'' (education), ''heart'' (motivation), and ''hands'' (action). (author)

Pasqualetti, Martin J.; Tabbert, Michael K.; Boscamp, Robert L.

2010-10-15

204

Teaching Energy as Part of Education for Sustainability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes how energy issues and education for sustainable development (ESD) are part of the agenda for two current European projects, CoDeS and SUSTAIN. The latter is mainly concerned with the development of inquiry-based primary and lower secondary science education while the former is a network that aims to learn more about…

Tas, Maarten; McKeon, Frankie; Charnley, Fiona; Fleming, Margaret

2014-01-01

205

Sustainable Energy - Without the Hot Air  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In his book, MacKay explores our populationâs addiction to fossil fuels and the problems faced with sustainability. Two issues faced with fossil fuels are they will eventually run out and they are harming our environment during use. McKay does not give one simple solution to the problem, but contrast various advanced technologies and how they may be applied to improve our environment and sustainability. More information may be found at http://www.withouthotair.com/.

Cambridge, University O.

206

Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity  

E-print Network

Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability: Increasing Resource Productivity April 10, 2009 2) Technological solutions to increase energy productivity 3) Energy-water co-benefits of increasing resource productivity 4) Case Studies of combined energy-water conservation projects 5) Private Sector

Keller, Arturo A.

207

Energy and Environmental Consequences of Transportation: Indicators of Sustainability  

SciTech Connect

The rapid motorization of world transportation systems puts growing emphasis on controlling transportation`s direct and indirect impacts on the global environment, in other words, on achieving sustainability in transport. In 1950, the world contained 70 million motor vehicles, of which 70% were in the United States. Today the world`s motor vehicle fleet exceeds 600 million,of which less than one-third are in the U.S. Outside of the U.S., motor vehicle stocks are growing twice as fast (Davis & McFarlin, 1996, tables 1.1 & 1.2). With this explosive growth of motorized transport comes a compelling need to control its concomitant pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and fossil fuel consumption. Large scale indicators of transportation`s performance with respect to sustainability are therefore becoming increasingly important for monitoring trends and evaluating the effectiveness of policies at national and international scales. A recent survey by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (U. S. DOT/BTS, 1 996) of data on transportation`s environmental consequences in the U.S., found that reasonable indicators exist for energy use and for certain of transportation`s environmental impacts. Statistics on air pollutant emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy use are adequate for developing rigorous indicators of at least emissions and energy use. Much less is known about noise generation, water and groundwater pollution, solid waste,land-use and habitat impacts.

Greene, D.L.

1997-07-01

208

Impact of Sustainable Cool Roof Technology on Building Energy Consumption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Highly reflective roofing systems have been analyzed over several decades to evaluate their ability to meet sustainability goals, including reducing building energy consumption and mitigating the urban heat island. Studies have isolated and evaluated the effects of climate, surface reflectivity, and roof insulation on energy savings, thermal load mitigation and also ameliorating the urban heat island. Other sustainable roofing systems, like green-roofs and solar panels have been similarly evaluated. The motivation for the present study is twofold: the first goal is to present a method for simultaneous evaluation and inter-comparison of multiple roofing systems, and the second goal is to quantitatively evaluate the realized heating and cooling energy savings associated with a white roof system compared to the reduction in roof-top heat flux. To address the first research goal a field experiment was conducted at the International Harvester Building located in Portland, OR. Thermal data was collected for a white roof, vegetated roof, and a solar panel shaded vegetated roof, and the heat flux through these roofing systems was compared against a control patch of conventional dark roof membrane. The second research goal was accomplished using a building energy simulation program to determine the impact of roof area and roof insulation on the savings from a white roof, in both Portland and Phoenix. The ratio of cooling energy savings to roof heat flux reduction from replacing a dark roof with a white roof was 1:4 for the month of July, and 1:5 annually in Portland. The COP of the associated chillers ranges from 2.8-4.2, indicating that the ratio of cooling energy savings to heat flux reduction is not accounted for solely by the COP of the chillers. The results of the building simulation indicate that based on energy savings alone, white roofs are not an optimal choice for Portland. The benefits associated with cooling energy savings relative to a black roof are offset by the winter-time penalty, and the net benefit from adopting white roof technology in Portland is small. That said, there are other potential benefits of white roofing such as impact on urban heat islands and roof life that must also be considered.

Vuppuluri, Prem Kiran

209

Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. Sustainable Water Systems  

E-print Network

Sustainable Practices Policy Sections II, III.I. and V.I. ­ Sustainable Water Systems Revenue is Outpatient Revenue + Newborn Revenue + Inpatient Revenue. Domestic Water: Potable and non-potable water provided for domestic indoor (e.g., toilets, urinals, showers, and faucets) and outdoor (e

California at Santa Cruz, University of

210

CONSTRUCTING A GENERAL SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY  

EPA Science Inventory

Sustainability atracts enormous interest in the minds of the public and the scientific and engineering community because it holds the promise of a long-term solution to environmental problems. Sustainability, however, is mathematically loosely defined. There is no widely accepted...

211

CONSTRUCTING A GENERAL SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY  

EPA Science Inventory

Sustainability attracts enormous interest in the minds of the public and the scientific and engineering community because it holds the promise of a long-tem solution to environmental problems. Sustainability, however, is mathematically loosely defined. There is no widely accepted...

212

Ubiquitous Computing for Sustainable Energy (UCSE2010) Ubicomp 2010 Workshop  

E-print Network

- tunities for saving energy. With many renewable energy resources such as solar power and wind power in devices to per- sonal green power plants, a great potential for creating sus- tainable energy arises sustainable be- havior [4]. Driving a car more economically or sharing a ride (e.g. 3 people in one car

213

September 2, 2011 Competence Center for Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

power plants and components Met-ocean stations for evaluation for offshore wind energy purposes #12: EET (Prof. Krauter) Renewable energies (wind power, PV, geothermal) and their integration in existing;September 2, 2011 Competence Center for Sustainable Energy Technologies PV Wind turbine Solid state

Noé, Reinhold

214

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 6 (2002) 433455  

E-print Network

Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 6 (2002) 433­455 www.elsevier.com/locate/rser Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs): a review of an environmentally clean and efficient source of energy A. Boudghene for engineers and scientists. Fuel cells convert chemical energy of a fuel gas directly into electrical work

Gleixner, Stacy

215

First Western Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability  

E-print Network

For degraded waters, treatment & disposal can be the largest component of cost. business impacts of water resource sustainability. Key questions: Is water an important cost factor in your regional differences #12;Water Cost and Availability Cost is important, if broadly defined: "An important

Keller, Arturo A.

216

Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form?  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acceptable criterion for strong sustainability in the consumption of natural resources is an effective, or virtual, limitlessness of supply, which can be defined, albeit arbitrarily, as corresponding to a few million years. The fuels for nuclear fusion—lithium and deuterium—satisfy this condition because of the abundance of lithium in seawater and of deuterium in all forms of water. The possible

A. M. Bradshaw; T. Hamacher; U. Fischer

2011-01-01

217

Request for Proposals in Organic & Sustainability Systems Research, Teaching & Outreach  

E-print Network

involving organics and sustainability in farm and food systems, and managed landscapes including gardens knowledge about organic and sustainable gardening, farming, and landscaping. Encourage and support systems that enhance integrated learning and the knowledge foundation for organic farming, gardening, and landscaping

Pawlowski, Wojtek

218

Developing a sustainability framework for the assessment of bioenergy systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential for biomass to contribute to energy supply in a low-carbon economy is well recognised. However, for the sector to contribute fully to sustainable development in the UK, specific exploitation routes must meet the three sets of criteria usually recognised as representing the tests for sustainability: economic viability in the market and fiscal framework within which the supply chain

Lucia Elghali; Roland Clift; Philip Sinclair; Calliope Panoutsou; Ausilio Bauen

2007-01-01

219

Investigation of sustainable development potential for Ulubey Aquifer System, Turkey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigates sustainable development potential for Ulubey aquifer system which serves as an important water supply for Usak province (Turkey). In recent years, growing population, accelerating industrial activities and decreasing rainfall, as well as contamination of the surface water resources, made groundwater indispensable to meet the freshwater demands of Usak province. Therefore, a sustainable groundwater development plan has to be set up by determining the sustainable yield of the system, which is the aim of this study. To achieve this goal, a mathematical groundwater flow model is constructed in order to test the alternative development scenarios. Results show that the system preserves equilibrium conditions under present stresses. The future effects of possible increases in stresses are also simulated and based on the dynamic responses of the system to changing stresses; sustainable yield and sustainable pumping rate of the aquifer are determined and compared with the safe yield of the system.

Burcu, U.; Hasan, Y.

2014-09-01

220

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY: ECOLOGICAL AND OTHER ASPECTS  

EPA Science Inventory

While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), namely development that "meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those...

221

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY: ECOLOGICAL AND OTHER ASPECTS  

EPA Science Inventory

While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), namely development that "meets the needs and asperations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of t...

222

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS THEORY: ECOLOGICAL AND OTHER ASPECTS  

EPA Science Inventory

While sustainability is generally associated with the definition given by the Brundtland Commission (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987), namely development that "meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of t...

223

Future energy system in environment, economy, and energy problems (2) various nuclear energy system evaluations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Role and potentials of nuclear energy system in the energy options are discussed from the viewpoint of sustainable development with protecting from global warming by using the energy module structure of GRAPE model. They change and are affected dramatically by different sets of energy characteristics, nuclear behavior and energy policy even under the moderate set of presumptions. Introduction of thousands

Kazuaki Matsui; Hiroshi Ujita; Masanori Tashimo

2006-01-01

224

Investigating the potential for a self-sustaining slow pyrolysis system under varying operating conditions.  

PubMed

This work aimed to investigate the impact of highest treatment temperature (HTT), heating rate, carrier gas flow rate and feedstock on the composition and energy content of pyrolysis gas to assess whether a self-sustained system could be achieved through the combustion of the gas fraction alone, leaving other co-products available for alternative high-value uses. Calculations based on gas composition showed that the pyrolysis process could be sustained by the energy contained within the pyrolysis gases alone. The lower energy limit (6% biomass higher heating value (HHV)) was surpassed by pyrolysis at ?450°C while only a HTT of 650°C consistently met the upper energy limit (15% biomass HHV). These findings fill an important gap in literature related to the energy balance of the pyrolysis systems for biochar production, and show that, at least from an energy balance perspective; self-sustained slow pyrolysis for co-production of biochar and liquid products is feasible. PMID:24747394

Crombie, Kyle; Mašek, Ond?ej

2014-06-01

225

Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative Prioritize.A 100-Day Energy Action Plan  

E-print Network

Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative Prioritize.A 100-Day Energy Action Plan, national security and long-term environmental sus- tainability. Energy price and supply volatility impact and opportunity to act now. The Council launched the Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability (ESIS

226

Energy justice and foundations for a sustainable sociology of energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation proposes an approach to energy that transcends the focus on energy as a mere technical economic or engineering problem, is connected to sociological theory as a whole, and takes issues of equality and ecology as theoretical starting points. In doing so, the work presented here puts ecological and environmental sociological theory, and the work of environmental justice scholars, feminist ecologists, and energy scholars, in a context in which they may complement one another to broaden the theoretical basis of the current sociology of energy. This theoretical integration provides an approach to energy focused on energy justice. Understanding energy and society in the terms outlined here makes visible energy injustice, or the interface between social inequalities and ecological depredations accumulating as the social and ecological debts of the modern energy regime. Systems ecology is brought into this framework as a means for understanding unequal exchange, energy injustice more generally, and the requirements for long-term social and ecological reproduction in ecological terms. Energy developments in Ecuador and Cuba are used here as case studies in order to further develop the idea of energy justice and the theory of unequal ecological exchange. The point is to broaden the framework of the contemporary critical sociology of energy, putting energy justice at its heart. This dissertation contains previously published and unpublished co-authored material.

Holleman, Hannah Ann

227

Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector  

E-print Network

This article investigates the potentials of energy-saving and mitigation of green-house gas (GHG) emission offered by implementation of building energy efficiency policies in China. An overview of existing literature regarding long-term energy...

Li, J.

2007-01-01

228

Preliminary Analysis Framework for State Sustainable Transportation system  

E-print Network

Sustainable practices have become the cornerstone of the transportation sector, and widely adopted by many states' transportation agencies. The nerve center of the economic development today circles around resource utilization and energy use...

Naganathan, Hariharan

2013-12-31

229

Environmental Impacts from the Solar Energy Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solar energy technologies offer a clean, renewable, and domestic energy source, and are essential components of a sustainable energy future. Solar energy systems (i.e., photovoltaics, solar thermal) provide significant environmental benefits in comparison to the conventional energy sources. It is known that these systems have some minor negative impacts on the environment during their production and operation. This study presents

H. Gunerhan; A. Hepbasli; U. Giresunlu

2008-01-01

230

Nuclear energy and sustainability: Understanding ITER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Deregulation and new environmental requirements combined with the growing scarcity of fossil resources and the increasing world energy demand lead to a renewal of the debate on tomorrow's energies. Specifically, nuclear energy, which has undeniable assets, faces new constraints. On the one hand, nuclear energy is very competitive and harmless to greenhouse effect. From this point, it seems to be

Karine Fiore

2006-01-01

231

Water and Energy Sustainability: A Balance of Government Action and Industry Innovation  

SciTech Connect

By completing the tasks and subtasks of the project, the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) through its state regulatory agency members and oil and gas industry partners, will bring attention to water quality and quantity issues and make progress toward water and energy sustainability though enhanced water protection and conservation thus enhancing the viability of the domestic fossil fuel industry. The project contains 4 major independent Tasks. Task 1 - Work Plan: Water-Energy Sustainability: A Symposium on Resource Viability. Task 2 - Work Plan: A Regional Assessment of Water and Energy Sustainability. Task 3 - Work Plan: Risk Based Data Management System-Water Water and Energy Module. Task 4 - Work Plan: Identification and Assessment of States Regulatory Programs Regarding Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems. Each task has a specific scope (details given).

Ben Grunewald

2009-12-31

232

Energy Sustainability: It's Easier (and Cheaper) than You Think  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this economy, it's hard to implement any kind of school facility improvement plan with tight budgets and rising energy costs. The following strategies and suggestions are just some of the many ways schools can reach toward sustainability. In creating this presentation, our objective was to point out what you can do to save energy right now with…

Smith, Molly; Peterson, David

2010-01-01

233

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 3 CHAPTER 10: OPTIMIZING THE TRANSPORTATION CLIMATE MITIGATION WEDGE Chapter

California at Davis, University of

234

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS CHAPTER 8: SCENARIOS FOR DEEP REDUCTIONS IN GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS PART 3

California at Davis, University of

235

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 1: INDIVIDUAL FUEL/VEHICLE PATHWAYS PART 2 Chapter 5: Comparing

California at Davis, University of

236

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers  

E-print Network

SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis One TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS PART 3: SCENARIOS FOR A LOW-CARBON TRANSPORTATION FUTURE PART 3 Part 3: Scenarios

California at Davis, University of

237

Office of Sustainability 2013-2014 Energy Ambassador Student Internship*  

E-print Network

Office of Sustainability 2013-2014 Energy Ambassador Student Internship* Organization in a team setting. The internship is open to all majors. To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter explaining why you are a good fit for the energy ambassador internship to Ayrel Clark-Proffitt, outreach

Tipple, Brett

238

On the Way to a Sustainable Energy Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

The establishment of a sustainable energy future is one of the most pressing tasks of mankind. With the exhaustion of fossil resources the energy economy will change from a chemical to an electrical base. This transition is one of physics, not one of politics. However, proven technology and existing engineering experience come in useful. Actions must be taken soon to

U. Bossel

2005-01-01

239

Addressing challenges to sustainable development with innovative energy  

E-print Network

in a competitive electric industry Robert H. Williams Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Princeton. In the industrialized countries, public policies supportive of innovation directed to the needs of the developing worldAddressing challenges to sustainable development with innovative energy technologies

240

General Electric Company Evaluation of Sustainable Energy Options  

E-print Network

General Electric Company Evaluation of Sustainable Energy Options for the Big Island of Hawaii-West Rd, Post 109 Honolulu, HI 96822 Phone: 808-956-8346 e-mail: rochelea@hawaii.edu General Electric by General Electric Company (GE) as an account of work sponsored by the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI

241

Ecolabeling for energy efficiency and sustainability: a meta-evaluation of US programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eco-labeling is a promising market-based approach for improving the environmental performance of products through consumer choice. While eco-labeling itself is not new, eco-labeling to promote energy efficiency or sustainability is a more recent phenomenon. Five such energy-labeling programs in the US are evaluated: Green Seal, Scientific Certification Systems, Energy Guide, Energy Star, and Green-e. Of these, the first four certify

Abhijit Banerjee; Barry D. Solomon

2003-01-01

242

Sustained resonance: a binary system perturbed by gravitational radiation  

E-print Network

Sustained resonance: a binary system perturbed by gravitational radiation C Chiconey, B Mashhoonz with sustained resonance are studied in this paper in connection with relativistic binary pulsars. We employ a theorem of C. Robinson to argue that resonance capture does occur under favorable conditions

Chicone, Carmen

243

Evaluation of an underground railway carriage operating with a sustainable groundwater cooling system  

Microsoft Academic Search

In London and Merseyside in the UK, which are served by deep underground railway networks, rising water tables are proving an increasing problem, leading to a serious deterioration of track, traction supply and signalling systems. Also in these transport systems there is an increasing demand for an energy efficient and environmentally sustainable comfort cooling system. This paper outlines a novel

G. G Maidment; J. F Missenden

2002-01-01

244

Emergy evaluation of the performance and sustainability of three agricultural systems with different scales and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergy analysis was used to analyze three agricultural systems to compare and contrast resource use, productivity, environmental impact, and overall sustainability. Emergy analysis was appropriate for this task because of its ability to transform different types of inputs to a common form (solar energy equivalents) to allow meaningful comparisons across the three systems. The systems analyzed were conventional corn (Zea

Jay F. Martin; Stewart A. W. Diemont; Erick Powell; Michele Stanton; Samuel Levy-Tacher

2006-01-01

245

GSSD: Global System for Sustainable Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A project of the Global Accords Consortium for Sustainable Development (located at MIT), this site offers a collection of over 2,500 abstracted, indexed, and cross-referenced online resources on sustainable development. Users have four options for searching the index: text (keyword and advanced) and three graphical browsers, one indexing all holdings (organized by subject and problems and solutions), the others covering industry related topics and the Alliance for Global Sustainability (AGS), respectively. Initial search returns include title, "slice" (subject), and "ring" (problem area). Item titles link to further information, including an abstract and the resource itself. GSSD also features a modest selection of full-text reports on "scientific developments and/or policy deliberations." The Consortium plans to make the entire knowledge base available in at least nine additional languages in the future.

246

Energy Systems Integration A Convergence of Ideas  

E-print Network

Energy Systems Integration A Convergence of Ideas July 2012 Ben Kroposki, Bobi Garrett, Stuart Macmillan, Brent Rice, and Connie Komomua National Renewable Energy Laboratory Mark O'Malley University of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy

247

Innovative paths for providing green energy for sustainable global economic growth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

According to United Nation, world population may reach 10.1 billion by the year 2100. The fossil fuel based global economy is not sustainable. For sustainable global green energy scenario we must consider free fuel based energy conversion, environmental concerns and conservation of water. Photovoltaics (PV) offers a unique opportunity to solve the 21st century's electricity generation because solar energy is essentially unlimited and PV systems provide electricity without any undesirable impact on the environment. Innovative paths for green energy conversion and storage are proposed in areas of R and D, manufacturing and system integration, energy policy and financing. With existing silicon PV system manufacturing, the implementation of new innovative energy policies and new innovative business model can provide immediately large capacity of electricity generation to developed, emerging and underdeveloped economies.

Singh, Rajendra; Alapatt, G. F.

2012-10-01

248

Carbon Capture and Storage: Sustainability in the UK energy mix yryfasyfrtsayfsaytrsyfysa 1 UK Energy Research Centre  

E-print Network

Carbon Capture and Storage: Sustainability in the UK energy mix yryfasyfrtsayfsaytrsyfysa 1 UK Energy Research Centre CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE: SUSTAI NABI LI TY I N THE UK ENERGY MI X WorkshopSciences, University of Edinburgh Event organised and sponsored by: #12;Carbon Capture and Storage: Sustainability

249

World energy: Building a sustainable future  

SciTech Connect

As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

1992-04-01

250

World energy: Building a sustainable future  

SciTech Connect

As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

1992-04-01

251

SIMULATED EXPERIMENTS WITH COMPLEX SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The concept of sustainability is associated with the statement from the World Commission on Environment and Development: "Development that meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future." But the construction of practi...

252

Solar energy solutions for an environmentally sustainable world  

SciTech Connect

The United Nations Conference of Environment and Development has focused the world's attention on the complex relationship between the environment and economic development. The essence of this relationship, and the emerging theme of UNCED, is the concept of sustainability. Sustainable economic development improves quality of life and raises standards of living by using the Earth's resources in a way that ensures that they are continually renewed, and will continue to support future generations. This is the subject of this report. While energy resources are essential to economic development, the authors current patterns of energy use are not sustainable. Reliance on fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and large-scale hydroelectric projects has contributed to serious environmental problems, including atmospheric pollution, loss of land productivity, loss of biological diversity, ocean and fresh water pollution, and hazardous waste generation. Thus, if they are to achieve sustainability in their patterns of energy consumption, it is imperative that they bring about a rapid and widespread transition to the utilization of environmentally sound energy sources and technologies. Solar energy technologies are environmentally sound, socially beneficial, and economically practical. They have been proven in a wide variety of applications around the world. The barriers to the widespread implementation of solar technologies are no longer technical, but rather social, economic, and political. These barriers can and must be removed.

Not Available

1992-01-01

253

Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort  

E-print Network

fuel, e.g. natural gas, propane, etc., is also saving energy. Savings can be achieved directly - from reducing energy consumption of on-site equipment such as lighting, HVAC, and miscellaneous plug loads. It can also be accomplished indirectly.... The following are examples of items that potentially affect both comfort and energy efficiency: ? Changing filters regularly ? Verify correct belt tension and alignment ? Confirm proper damper operation ? Repair duct leaks ? Calibration of sensors...

Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

254

Scientific challenges in sustainable energy technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe and evaluate the technical, political, and economic challenges involved with widespread adoption of renewable energy technologies. First, we estimate fossil fuel resources and reserves and, together with the current and projected global primary power production rates, estimate the remaining years of oil, gas, and coal. We then compare the conventional price of fossil energy with that from renewable energy technologies (wind, solar thermal, solar electric, biomass, hydroelectric, and geothermal) to evaluate the potential for a transition to renewable energy in the next 20-50 years. Secondly, we evaluate - per the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - the greenhouse constraint on carbon-based power consumption as an unpriced externality to fossil-fuel use, considering global population growth, increased global gross domestic product, and increased energy efficiency per unit GDP. This constraint is projected to drive the demand for carbon-free power well beyond that produced by conventional supply/demand pricing tradeoffs, to levels far greater than current renewable energy demand. Thirdly, we evaluate the level and timescale of R&D investment needed to produce the required quantity of carbon-free power by the 2050 timeframe. Fourth, we evaluate the energy potential of various renewable energy resources to ascertain which resources are adequately available globally to support the projected demand. Fifth, we evaluate the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free power required. Finally, we discuss the effects of a change in primary power technology on the energy supply infrastructure and discuss the impact of such a change on the modes of energy consumption by the energy consumer and additional demands on the chemical sciences to support such a transition in energy supply.

Lewis, Nathan

2006-04-01

255

Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation will describe and evaluate the challenges, both technical, political, and economic, involved with widespread adoption of renewable energy technologies. First, we estimate the available fossil fuel resources and reserves based on data from the World Energy Assessment and World Energy Council. In conjunction with the current and projected global primary power production rates, we then estimate the remaining years of supply of oil, gas, and coal for use in primary power production. We then compare the price per unit of energy of these sources to those of renewable energy technologies (wind, solar thermal, solar electric, biomass, hydroelectric, and geothermal) to evaluate the degree to which supply/demand forces stimulate a transition to renewable energy technologies in the next 20-50 years. Secondly, we evaluate the greenhouse gas buildup limitations on carbon-based power consumption as an unpriced externality to fossil-fuel consumption, considering global population growth, increased global gross domestic product, and increased energy efficiency per unit of globally averaged GDP, as produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). A greenhouse gas constraint on total carbon emissions, in conjunction with global population growth, is projected to drive the demand for carbon-free power well beyond that produced by conventional supply/demand pricing tradeoffs, at potentially daunting levels relative to current renewable energy demand levels. Thirdly, we evaluate the level and timescale of R&D investment that is needed to produce the required quantity of carbon-free power by the 2050 timeframe, to support the expected global energy demand for carbon-free power. Fourth, we evaluate the energy potential of various renewable energy resources to ascertain which resources are adequately available globally to support the projected global carbon-free energy demand requirements. Fifth, we evaluate the challenges to the chemical sciences to enable the cost-effective production of carbon-free power on the needed scale by the 2050 timeframe. Finally, we discuss the effects of a change in primary power technology on the energy supply infrastructure and discuss the impact of such a change on the modes of energy consumption by the energy consumer and additional demands on the chemical sciences to support such a transition in energy supply.

Lewis, Nathan

2006-03-01

256

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH RESEARCH (SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The major technical efforts under the management of NRMRL's Sustainable Technology Division's Systems Analysis Branch (SAB) are organized under research programs. Listed below are the SAB research programs and brief descriptions of their function. Simulation & Design -- This pro...

257

An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats  

E-print Network

The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

Shaw, Margaret Miller

2014-01-01

258

A roadmap towards sustainable self-aware service systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Self-awareness and self-adaptation have become primary concerns in large-scale systems as they have become too complex to be managed by human administrators alone, but rather require a new blend of coordination mechanisms between people and software services. This paper presents a roadmap to effective and efficient system adaptation through coupling self-awareness of global-level goals with sustainability constraints. Sustainability of large-scale

Schahram Dustdar; Christoph Dorn; Fei Li; Luciano Baresi; Giacomo Cabri; Cesare Pautasso; Franco Zambonelli

2010-01-01

259

Opportunities and challenges for a sustainable energy future.  

PubMed

Access to clean, affordable and reliable energy has been a cornerstone of the world's increasing prosperity and economic growth since the beginning of the industrial revolution. Our use of energy in the twenty-first century must also be sustainable. Solar and water-based energy generation, and engineering of microbes to produce biofuels are a few examples of the alternatives. This Perspective puts these opportunities into a larger context by relating them to a number of aspects in the transportation and electricity generation sectors. It also provides a snapshot of the current energy landscape and discusses several research and development opportunities and pathways that could lead to a prosperous, sustainable and secure energy future for the world. PMID:22895334

Chu, Steven; Majumdar, Arun

2012-08-16

260

Reduced Emissions and Lower Costs: Combining Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency into a Sustainable Energy Portfolio Standard  

SciTech Connect

Combining renewable energy and energy efficiency in Sustainable Energy Portfolio Standards has emerged as a key state and national policy option to achieve greater levels of sustainable energy resources with maximum economic efficiency and equity. One advantage of the SEPS relative to a renewable portfolio standard or a stand-along energy efficiency resource standard is enhanced flexibility and broader options for meeting targets.

Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

2007-01-01

261

Research Systems for a Transition Toward Sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Sustainability concerns have occupied a place on the global agenda since at least the Brundtland Commission’s 1987 report\\u000a “Our Common Future” (World Commission on Environment and Development 1987; Clark 1986). The prominence of that place has been rising, however. UN Secretary General Kofi Annan reflected a growing consensus when\\u000a he wrote in his Millennium Report to the General Assembly that

William C. Clark

262

Energy systems transformation.  

PubMed

The contemporary industrial metabolism is not sustainable. Critical problems arise at both the input and the output side of the complex: Although affordable fossil fuels and mineral resources are declining, the waste products of the current production and consumption schemes (especially CO(2) emissions, particulate air pollution, and radioactive residua) cause increasing environmental and social costs. Most challenges are associated with the incumbent energy economy that is unlikely to subsist. However, the crucial question is whether a swift transition to its sustainable alternative, based on renewable sources, can be achieved. The answer requires a deep analysis of the structural conditions responsible for the rigidity of the fossil-nuclear energy system. We argue that the resilience of the fossil-nuclear energy system results mainly from a dynamic lock-in pattern known in operations research as the "Success to the Successful" mode. The present way of generating, distributing, and consuming energy--the largest business on Earth--expands through a combination of factors such as the longevity of pertinent infrastructure, the information technology revolution, the growth of the global population, and even the recent financial crises: Renewable-energy industries evidently suffer more than the conventional-energy industries under recession conditions. Our study tries to elucidate the archetypical traits of the lock-in pattern and to assess the respective importance of the factors involved. In particular, we identify modern corporate law as a crucial system element that thus far has been largely ignored. Our analysis indicates that the rigidity of the existing energy economy would be reduced considerably by the assignment of unlimited liabilities to the shareholders. PMID:23297208

Dangerman, A T C Jérôme; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

2013-02-12

263

International Conference on Sustainable Energy and Environmental Strategies  

E-print Network

Warming and East Asia According to the UN-sponsored Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC planet, which is now feeling the early effects of climate change, nor our public health - it is estimatedInternational Conference on Sustainable Energy and Environmental Strategies: Taiwan and the World

Delaware, University of

264

Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form? A. M. Bradshaw  

E-print Network

Is nuclear fusion a sustainable energy form? A. M. Bradshaw Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics million years. The fuels for nuclear fusion ­ lithium and deuterium ­ satisfy this condition because multipliers foreseen for fusion power plants, in particular beryllium, represent a major supply problem

265

High Economic Growth, Equity and Sustainable Energy Development of India  

Microsoft Academic Search

India has been experiencing sustained high economic growth in the recentyears. However, there exists substantial amount of unacceptable poverty among the people in the country. The expressions of symptoms of such poverty include among others inadequate educational and health attainment of the people and lack of access to basic amenities like modern clean energy, safe water and sanitation which are

Ramprasad Sengupta

2007-01-01

266

Sustainable Energy Revolving Loan Fund LOAN AGREEMENT FORM  

E-print Network

are recorded when the loan is made ($100 used in the example below): 1. The appropriate OSU Business CenterSustainable Energy Revolving Loan Fund LOAN AGREEMENT FORM OREGON STATE BOARD OF HIGHER EDUCATION Inter-Fund Loan Agreement Whereas there is a temporary need for funds in [OSU unit name and fund name

Escher, Christine

267

Plasma and Technology Programme National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

1 Plasma and Technology Programme National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy Technical University METHODS OF OZONE GENERATION BY MICRO-PLASMA CONCEPT Authors A. Fateev, A. Chiper, W. Chen and E. Stamate-1-6365 project devoted to plasma-assisted DeNOx. Ozone is as a key agent in plasma NOx reduction because

268

Nanoparticle gasifier fuel cell for sustainable energy future  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new concept for production of electricity from biomass or coal using molten carbonate fuel cells is proposed. It involves feeding fine coal particles or biomass, for sustainable energy future, with steam into the anode compartment of the fuel cell in which the waste heat from the fuel cell is used to produce synthesis gas which reacts electrochemically. This concept

Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok

2007-01-01

269

Exergy sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched

Rush D. Robinett; David Gerald Wilson; Alfred W. Reed

2006-01-01

270

Machine level energy efficiency analysis in discrete manufacturing for a sustainable energy infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable economic development necessitates a careful design of the energy infrastructure. The energy infrastructure is primarily composed of energy producers on the supply side, the energy consumers on the demand side and the network which connects them. The increasing energy demand, the spiraling cost of capacity addition and the global climate change scenario have put the energy infrastructure under enormous

S. S. Krishnan; N. Balasubramanian; Eswaran Subrahmanian; V. Arun Kumar; G. Ramakrishna; A. Murali Ramakrishnan; A. Krishnamurthy

2009-01-01

271

Sustainable Water and Energy in Gaza Strip  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Shortage of fresh water is a common problem in different areas of the world including the Middle East. Desalination of seawater and brackish water is the cheapest way to obtain fresh water in many regions. This research focuses on the situation in Gaza Strip where there is a severe shortage in the energy and water supply. The depletion of fresh water supplies and lack of wastewater treatments result in environmental problems. A solar powered cogeneration plant producing water and energy is proposed to be a suitable solution for Gaza Strip. Solar energy, using Concentrating Solar thermal Power (CSP) technologies, is used to produce electricity by a steam cycle power plant. Then the steam is directed to a desalination plant where it is used to heat the seawater to obtain freshwater. The main objective of this research is to outline a solution for the water problems in Gaza Strip, which includes a cogeneration (power and water) solar powered plant. The research includes four specific objectives: 1- an environmental and economic comparison between solar and fossil fuel energies; 2- technical details for the cogeneration plant; 3- cost and funding, 4- the benefits.

Hamdan, L.; Zarei, M.; Chianelli, R.; Gardner, E.

2007-12-01

272

Hydropower in Turkey: The Sustainable Energy Future  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last two decades, global electricity production has more than doubled and electricity demand is rising rapidly around the world as economic development spreads to emerging economies. Not only has electricity demand increased significantly, it is the fastest growing end-use of energy. Therefore, technical, economic, and environmental benefits of hydroelectric power make it an important contributor to the future

K. Kaygusuz

2009-01-01

273

|Sustainable energy choices: comparing the options  

E-print Network

with an ethical distaste for resource waste. Nuclear power emits no air pollu- tants or greenhouse gases for addressing these growing service demands, each of which has its attractions. Energy efficiency reduces be converted at modest cost and low environmental impact into electricity and hydrogen ­ the cleanest forms

274

A Robust Strategy for Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

pundits predict the end of oil and indeed the end of the fossil-fuel era.1 With its recent merger) is particularly pessimistic, suggesting that oil is running out and that other fossil fuels make unlikely Street Journal, August 10, 2005, p. A1. 3. See BP's Statistical Review of World Energy (BP, 2005), which

275

Sustainable energy-efficient wireless applications using light  

Microsoft Academic Search

As we step further into the 21st century, the demand for sustainable energy-efficient technology grows higher. The important area of electric lighting, currently dominated by decades-old incandescent and fluorescent sources, is being taken over by white light emitting diodes, which are solid state devices with much greater energy savings. Replacement of current inefficient lighting by these LEDs will result in

Mohsen Kavehrad

2010-01-01

276

Achieving Sustainability of the Energy Sector in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy represents a major sustainable-development challenge for Canada. In the short term, labour shortages and infrastructure bottlenecks are likely to hinder energy developments and need to be addressed. In addition, provincial fiscal management could be improved by adopting prudent allocation and withdrawal rules of revenues from non-renewable resources to and from a long-term fund. Eventually the main challenge will be

Annabelle Mourougane

2008-01-01

277

Sustainable deforestation evaluation model and system dynamics analysis.  

PubMed

The current study used the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to construct a sustainable deforestation development evaluation system and evaluation model, which has refined a diversified system to evaluate the theory of sustainable deforestation development. Leveraging the visual image of the system dynamics causal and power flow diagram, we illustrated here that sustainable forestry development is a complex system that encompasses the interaction and dynamic development of ecology, economy, and society and has reflected the time dynamic effect of sustainable forestry development from the three combined effects. We compared experimental programs to prove the direct and indirect impacts of the ecological, economic, and social effects of the corresponding deforest techniques and fully reflected the importance of developing scientific and rational ecological harvesting and transportation technologies. Experimental and theoretical results illustrated that light cableway skidding is an ecoskidding method that is beneficial for the sustainable development of resources, the environment, the economy, and society and forecasted the broad potential applications of light cableway skidding in timber production technology. Furthermore, we discussed the sustainable development countermeasures of forest ecosystems from the aspects of causality, interaction, and harmony. PMID:25254225

Feng, Huirong; Lim, C W; Chen, Liqun; Zhou, Xinnian; Zhou, Chengjun; Lin, Yi

2014-01-01

278

Sustainable Deforestation Evaluation Model and System Dynamics Analysis  

PubMed Central

The current study used the improved fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to construct a sustainable deforestation development evaluation system and evaluation model, which has refined a diversified system to evaluate the theory of sustainable deforestation development. Leveraging the visual image of the system dynamics causal and power flow diagram, we illustrated here that sustainable forestry development is a complex system that encompasses the interaction and dynamic development of ecology, economy, and society and has reflected the time dynamic effect of sustainable forestry development from the three combined effects. We compared experimental programs to prove the direct and indirect impacts of the ecological, economic, and social effects of the corresponding deforest techniques and fully reflected the importance of developing scientific and rational ecological harvesting and transportation technologies. Experimental and theoretical results illustrated that light cableway skidding is an ecoskidding method that is beneficial for the sustainable development of resources, the environment, the economy, and society and forecasted the broad potential applications of light cableway skidding in timber production technology. Furthermore, we discussed the sustainable development countermeasures of forest ecosystems from the aspects of causality, interaction, and harmony. PMID:25254225

Feng, Huirong; Lim, C. W.; Chen, Liqun; Zhou, Xinnian; Zhou, Chengjun; Lin, Yi

2014-01-01

279

Sustaining Performance Improvements in Energy Intensive Industries  

E-print Network

assumes the overall efficiency of the system is simply a function of the individual units. However, many more factors contribute to overall performance improvement. These external factors contribute greater weight to poor performance than do equipment...

Moore, D. A.

2005-01-01

280

Sustainability evaluation of Sicily's lemon and orange production: an energy, economic and environmental analysis.  

PubMed

The island of Sicily has a long standing tradition in citrus growing. We evaluated the sustainability of orange and lemon orchards, under organic and conventional farming, using an energy, environmental and economic analysis of the whole production cycle by using a life cycle assessment approach. These orchard systems differ only in terms of a few of the inputs used and the duration of the various agricultural operations. The quantity of energy consumption in the production cycle was calculated by multiplying the quantity of inputs used by the energy conversion factors drawn from the literature. The production costs were calculated considering all internal costs, including equipment, materials, wages, and costs of working capital. The performance of the two systems (organic and conventional), was compared over a period of fifty years. The results, based on unit surface area (ha) production, prove the stronger sustainability of the organic over the conventional system, both in terms of energy consumption and environmental impact, especially for lemons. The sustainability of organic systems is mainly due to the use of environmentally friendly crop inputs (fertilizers, not use of synthetic products, etc.). In terms of production costs, the conventional management systems were more expensive, and both systems were heavily influenced by wages. In terms of kg of final product, the organic production system showed better environmental and energy performances. PMID:23850762

Pergola, M; D'Amico, M; Celano, G; Palese, A M; Scuderi, A; Di Vita, G; Pappalardo, G; Inglese, P

2013-10-15

281

Hydropower for sustainable water and energy development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Turkey has a total gross hydropower potential of 433GWh\\/year, but only 125GWh\\/year of the total hydroelectric potential of Turkey can be economically used. By the commissioning of new hydropower plants, which are under construction, 36% of the economically usable potential of the country would be tapped. Turkey presently has considerable renewable energy sources. The most important renewable sources are hydropower,

Ibrahim Yüksel

2010-01-01

282

The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)  

E-print Network

The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pleased of Short-rotation Pine for Bioenergy on Water Quality and Quantity Using a Watershed-scale Experiment ­ ORNL Bioenergy Resource & Engineering Systems Matt has expertise in accounting for non-market amenities

283

Towards a sustainable energy future: realities and opportunities.  

PubMed

My purpose in this paper is threefold. First, I would like to examine why the world needs us to produce more energy. Second, I will look at the range of energy sources available for a sustainable future. A number of myths have grown up around the various energy sources and their relative contribution to addressing the global energy challenge: I will seek to dispel some of those. Third, I want to highlight what I see as an urgent need: for more informed decision making and more action in this complex area. PMID:21464076

Armstrong, Lynda

2011-05-13

284

Towards sustainable food and farming systems in industrialised countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Economic systems at all levels rely for their success on the value of services flowing from the stock of total assets which comprise five types of capital: natural, social, human, physical and financial. Sustainable systems accumulate stocks of these five assets, so increasing the capital base over time. But unsustainable systems deplete or run down capital, spending assets as if

Jules Pretty

2000-01-01

285

Measuring Environmental Sustainability of Intensive Poultry-Rearing System  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Sustainability of human activities is one of the most important concerns of the European Union. Consequently, the need to\\u000a assess the level of sustainability achieved both at local and at government level is increasing. This process involves all\\u000a economic sectors, including agriculture and, in particular, livestock. Until several years ago livestock production systems\\u000a were mainly focused on production efficiency and

Simone Bastianoni; Antonio Boggia; Cesare Castellini; Cinzia Stefano; Valentina Niccolucci; Emanuele Novelli; Luisa Paolotti; Antonio Pizzigallo

286

Sustainable Energy - without the hot air  

E-print Network

.” For example, Richard Branson says that if Virgin Trains’ Voyager fleet switched to 20% biodiesel – incidentally, don’t you feel it’s outrageous to call a train a “green biodie- sel-powered train” when it runs on 80% fossil fuels and just 20% biodiesel? – sorry... .chemlink.com.au/conversions.htm This means that when the price of oil is $100 per barrel, oil energy costs 6c per kWh. If there were a carbon tax of $250 per ton of CO2 on fossil fuels, that tax would increase the price of a barrel of oil by $100. Gallons The gallon would be a fine human...

MacKay, David

2008-12-02

287

Sustainable Energy without the hot air  

E-print Network

of the public to say `no' to wind farms, `no' to nuclear power, `no' to tidal barrages ­ `no' to anything other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 17 Osmotic power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 18 Technology systems; and a ten- or twenty-fold increase in wind power and nuclear power, for example. Given

MacKay, David J.C.

288

ExxonMobil Global Energy Management System  

E-print Network

of our refineries and chemical plants. The system builds on international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies. Launched in 2000, it utilizes a common methodology to identify performance gaps, implement closure plans, sustain...

Roberto, F.

289

Part of the Earth Day 2012 Celebration Energy Center Global Sustainability Initiative (GSI) Purdue Interdisciplinary Center for Ecological Sustainability (PICES) Purdue Energy Club O ce of Sustainability  

E-print Network

icts. Meanwhile, the planet will continue to warm and the impacts of global climate change will followSPONSORS Part of the Earth Day 2012 Celebration Energy Center Global Sustainability Initiative (GSI at which global oil production stagnates and then goes into decline ­ will change the game of oil politics

Ginzel, Matthew

290

Energy and sustainable development in Latin America and the Caribbean  

SciTech Connect

There is a marked difference between the perception of the sustainable development problem in the industrialized countries and that prevailing in the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean (LA&C). Whereas the industrialized countries seem concerned about the sustainability of their development in view of global climate change, developing countries in LA&C are looking for a sustainable development course that will lead them out of poverty and away from the destruction of the local environment. The industrialized countries perspective is apparent in the titles of the papers being presented at the IAEE Conference under the topic: Harmonizing Energy Policy, Environment, and Sustainable Economic Growth. A great number of titles and sessions focus on the apparent antagonism between economic growth and the environment. By environment one seems to primarily mean emissions into the air, especially greenhouse gas emissions. Probably the majority of the energy community of the industrial countries regards Latin America, on the one hand, as a holder of a large CO{sub 2} sink in danger of extinction and, on the other hand, as a potential new large contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

Suding, P.H.

1995-12-31

291

Field survey of a sustainable sanitation system in a residential house  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable sanitation is an approach for more ecological and sustainable water resources management. In this paper, we proposed one of the new integrated waste treatment systems: an “sustainable sanitation system” that includes separation of the black water from water system by a non-flushing toilet (bio-toilet), and a gray water treatment based on a biological and ecological concept. Sustainable sanitation system

Naoko NAKAGAWA; Masahiro OTAKI; Shinji MIURA; Hironobu HAMASUNA; Katsuyoshi ISHIZAKI

2006-01-01

292

Emergy as embodied energy based assessment for local sustainability of a constructed wetland in Beijing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ecological treatment engineering has been widely accepted as an artificially designed work to deal with the deteriorating ecological environment with low energy and resource consumption. To measure the energy and resource consumption and environmental support contained in the constructed wetland as a kind of ecological treatment engineering, emergy as embodied solar energy based assessment is performed and relative emergy-based indices including emergy yield ratio (EYR), emergy load ratio (ELR), emergy sustainability index (ESI), net economic benefit index (Np), and renewable percentage index (Pr), are also modified to evaluate the local sustainability of the constructed wetland in this paper. A case study on Longdao River constructed wetland compared with those of some earlier conventional treatment systems indicate that more local renewable resources and less ecological cost are involved, thus promoting the economic benefit due to less energy and resource consumption and simultaneously lowering the environmental stress of the treatment system on the local areas.

Chen, B.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, J. B.; Chen, G. Q.

2009-02-01

293

Sustainability of energy and carbon capture and storage for Turkey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study, as study herein, is intended to approach a different way to provide sustainability of energy and environment by different aspects for Turkey. This study investigates the potential of renewable energy sources in Turkey for non-emissions of GHG and elaborates on a carbon capture and storage technology by creating a roadmap for Turkey. The main purpose of this study is to make a roadmap about carbon capture and storage (CCS) for Turkey to use as it proceeds. As one of the members of International Panel of Climate Change, which signed Kyoto protocol, it must adapt its acts and regulations. In addition, this study concentrates on the sustainable energy potential of Turkey, although the study investigated only the alternative energy resources suitable for Turkey: solar, wind, geothermal, bio-energy, and hydropower. There are huge numbers of potential renewable energy sources, and given Turkey's total energy demand of 106.3 million tons equivalent petroleum in 2010, only solar potential would be able to eventually supply the total demand, but energy from the wind and hydropower are sufficient to provide partial amounts. This study might help policy makers in their decisions regarding CCS technology. Currently, there are various technical and non-technical economic and social challenges that prevent CCS from become an extensively used commercial technology. This document discusses them and presents goals for each research pathway.

Alpsar, Cengiz

294

Interlocal collaboration on energy efficiency, sustainability and climate change issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interlocal energy collaboration builds upon network structures among local policy actors dealing with energy, climate change and sustainability issues. Collaboration efforts overcome institutional collective action (ICA) dilemmas, and cope with the problems spanning jurisdictional boundaries, externalities, and free-rider problems. Interlocal energy collaboration emerges as the agreements in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction, pollution control, land use, purchasing, retrofits, transportation, and so forth. Cities work collaboratively through contractual mechanisms (i.e. formal/informal agreements) and collective mechanisms (i.e. regional partnerships or membership organizations) on a variety of energy issues. What factors facilitate interlocal energy collaboration? To what extent is collaboration through interlocal contractual mechanisms different from collective mechanisms? This dissertation tries to answer these questions by examining: city goal priority on energy related issues as well as other ICA explanatory factors. Research data are drawn mainly from the 2010 national survey "Implementation of energy efficiency and sustainability program" supported by National Science Foundation and the IBM Endowment for the Business of Government. The research results show that city emphasis on common pool resource, scale economies and externality issues significantly affect individual selection of tools for energy collaboration. When expected transaction costs are extremely high or low, the contractual mechanism of informal agreement is more likely to be selected to preserve most local autonomy and flexibility; otherwise, written and formal tools for collaboration are preferred to impose constraints on individual behavior and reduce the risks of defection.

Chen, Ssu-Hsien

295

System Dynamics Modeling of Community Sustainability in NetLogo  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project is to apply system dynamics modeling to a basic instance of the contemporary issue of sustainability. System dynamics modeling is especially well-suited to the topic of sustainabil- ity; the flows and stocks involved with this sort of modeling are the keys needed to express the relationships between quantities and to ob- serve their interactions. My

Thomas Bettge

2009-01-01

296

What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained  

E-print Network

· Abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane. #12;Storm Surge Flooding-Katrina #12;HurricaneHurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known

Meyers, Steven D.

297

Ecological functions within a Sustainable Urban Drainage System  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTACT Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) are regarded as engineering solutions to urban storm water control and flood risk. Additional benefits from SUDS in the built environment include sediment entrapment and remediation of water quality from urban runoff through the use of retention\\/detention systems. Biodiversity value of SUDS is alluded to but few studies have evaluated conservation potential or monitored

J. I. Jackson; R. Boutle

298

Environmental impacts and sustainability of egg production systems.  

PubMed

As part of a systemic assessment toward social sustainability of egg production, we have reviewed current knowledge about the environmental impacts of egg production systems and identified topics requiring further research. Currently, we know that 1) high-rise cage houses generally have poorer air quality and emit more ammonia than manure belt (MB) cage houses; 2) manure removal frequency in MB houses greatly affects ammonia emissions; 3) emissions from manure storage are largely affected by storage conditions, including ventilation rate, manure moisture content, air temperature, and stacking profile; 4) more baseline data on air emissions from high-rise and MB houses are being collected in the United States to complement earlier measurements; 5) noncage houses generally have poorer air quality (ammonia and dust levels) than cage houses; 6) noncage houses tend to be colder during cold weather due to a lower stocking density than caged houses, leading to greater feed and fuel energy use; 7) hens in noncage houses are less efficient in resource (feed, energy, and land) utilization, leading to a greater carbon footprint; 8) excessive application of hen manure to cropland can lead to nutrient runoff to water bodies; 9) hen manure on open (free) range may be subject to runoff during rainfall, although quantitative data are lacking; 10) mitigation technologies exist to reduce generation and emission of noxious gases and dust; however, work is needed to evaluate their economic feasibility and optimize design; and 11) dietary modification shows promise for mitigating emissions. Further research is needed on 1) indoor air quality, barn emissions, thermal conditions, and energy use in alternative hen housing systems (1-story floor, aviary, and enriched cage systems), along with conventional housing systems under different production conditions; 2) environmental footprint for different US egg production systems through life cycle assessment; 3) practical means to mitigate air emissions from different production systems; 4) process-based models for predicting air emissions and their fate; and 5) the interactions between air quality, housing system, worker health, and animal health and welfare. PMID:21177468

Xin, H; Gates, R S; Green, A R; Mitloehner, F M; Moore, P A; Wathes, C M

2011-01-01

299

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations  

E-print Network

· 502 Required Systems · 510 Hazardous Exhaust Systems NFPA 55, Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids.2.1 Pressure Relief Devices · 10.2.1.1 Venting Requirements NFPA 853, Standard for the Installation Code Council 2009) · 303 Equipment & Appliance Location NFPA 55, Compressed Gases and Cryogenic Fluids

300

David Cahen, 10 / 2009 Modern Life with Sustainable Energy Presents an  

E-print Network

://www.weizmann.ac.il/AERI/presentations.html Living (well) on Sustainable Energy: Dream or Reality? #12;David Cahen, 10 / 2009 David Cahen, 4 ACWIS 7David Cahen, 10 / 2009 Modern Life with Sustainable Energy Presents an Unprecedented Challenge Why's Alternative Sustainable Energy Research Initiative http://www.weizmann.ac.il/AERI/ Presentations are at http

Martin, Jan M.L.

301

The Quest for Sustainable Energy Renewable fuel is at the heart of  

E-print Network

The Quest for Sustainable Energy Renewable fuel is at the heart of Government energy policy be cheaper than other fuels The Quest for Sustainable Energy Renewable fuel is at the heart of Government reduce fuel bills. · So long as forests are sustainably managed, woodfuel provides a renewable source

302

Indicators to support environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems  

SciTech Connect

Indicators are needed to assess environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators will help in the quantification of benefits and costs of bioenergy options and resource uses. We identify 19 measurable indicators for soil quality, water quality and quantity, greenhouse gases, biodiversity, air quality, and productivity, building on existing knowledge and on national and international programs that are seeking ways to assess sustainable bioenergy. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major environmental effects of diverse feedstocks, management practices, and post-production processes. The importance of each indicator is identified. Future research relating to this indicator suite is discussed, including field testing, target establishment, and application to particular bioenergy systems. Coupled with such efforts, we envision that this indicator suite can serve as a basis for the practical evaluation of environmental sustainability in a variety of bioenergy systems.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2011-01-01

303

Events & Topics in Renewable Energy & the Environment Sustainable Land Lab Tour  

E-print Network

is the Sustainable Land Lab? The Sustainable Land Lab is a living laboratory of strategies for creatively reusingEvents & Topics in Renewable Energy & the Environment Sustainable Land Lab Tour What the Sustainable Land Lab in action, have an opportunity to hear from the teams testing strategies, and learn more

Subramanian, Venkat

304

Emergy analysis for the environmental sustainability of an inshore fish farming system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emergy concept was used to evaluate the environmental sustainability of the rearing process of Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) in an inshore fish farming system in Gulf of La Spezia (Italy, Northwestern Mediterranean). Emergy is defined as the available energy of one kind previously used up directly and indirectly to make a product or service. The indices for the

P. Vassallo; S. Bastianoni; I. Beiso; R. Ridolfi; M. Fabiano

2007-01-01

305

Sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obviously, with hundreds, if not thousands of references, this paper can do little justice as a comprehensive review ofthe scientific approaches to sustainability (much less the normative and polemical literature) as a concept useful to ecosystem management. The objective, therefore is a narrower and more focused review of recent literature that deals with the conceptual and scientific issues presented by

Stephen F. McCool; Richard Haynes

306

The interaction of energy, population and sustainable development  

SciTech Connect

The relationships among, energy, population growth, and sustainable economic development will be of critical importance during the next half century. In previous papers, the authors have modeled the interactions among energy, population and economic development. These studies have shown that the increased availability of economic alternatives, improved health conditions, and sustainable energy supplies have a direct interaction with the rate of population growth. Conversely, their studies and others have shown that poverty, poor health conditions, and the lack of economic alternatives contribute to a vicious cycle in which rapid population growth continues, poverty prevails, and health conditions deteriorate further. Reducing population growth to a sustainable steady state value is, in part, a product of the improved health and living conditions brought on by a well-considered industrialization. Improving the availability and reliability of the electric supply is an integral part of that industrialization. Free trade zones surrounding major ports are becoming a major vehicle for development and gateways to the global economy. By providing the needed electricity to power these enterprise zones, US technology could furnish a vital link in development. Many current projects for providing power to preindustrial countries involve the construction of large, centralized projects. The construction of conventional fossil and nuclear plants requires that the developing countries first develop an infrastructure for both the construction and operation of such plants. Both hydro and steam plants require significant capital investment, either by the host country or by outside development agencies, before the first kilowatt-hour is delivered.

Mills, J.I.; Herring, J.S. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-31

307

The role of energy sector in sustainable development in Iran  

E-print Network

Generally speaking, both supply and use of energy in Iran are unsustainable. The unsustainable energy supply and use coupled with an unreliable and unsecure energy system have striking and lasing impacts on economic, social ...

Golabi, Zanyar

2011-01-01

308

Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado.  

PubMed

This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an important method in information theory. Our adaptation of Fisher information provides a means of monitoring the variables of a system to characterize dynamic order, and, therefore, its regimes and regime shifts. This work is part of the SLB Sustainability Metrics Project, which aimed to evaluate movement over time towards or away from regional sustainability. One of the key goals of this project was to use readily available data to assess the sustainability of the system including its environmental, social and economic aspects. For this study, Fisher information was calculated for fifty-three variables which characterize the consumption of food and energy, agricultural production, environmental characteristics, demographic properties and changes in land use for the SLB system from 1980 to 2005. Our analysis revealed that while the system displayed small changes in dynamic order over time with a slight decreasing trend near the end of the period, there is no indication of a regime shift. Therefore, the SLB system is stable with very slight movement away from sustainability in more recent years. PMID:21930337

Eason, Tarsha; Cabezas, Heriberto

2012-02-01

309

Nuclear energy option for energy security and sustainable development in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

India is facing great challenges in its economic development due to the impact on climate change. Energy is the important driver of economy. At present Indian energy sector is dominated by fossil fuel. Due to international pressure for green house gas reduction in atmosphere there is a need of clean energy supply for energy security and sustainable development. The nuclear

Subhash Mallah

2011-01-01

310

Opportunities for GEOGLAM to contribute to Food Systems Sustainability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEO-GLAM) community of practice was formed, there has been much interest in how this community can be leveraged to address a series of challenges that has received recognition from a variety of stakeholder groups across acacemia, government, the private sector and multilateral international organizations. This talk will review the collaborative network that has formed around the on-going and planned activities of GEOGLAM, and how future research and development activities within and around GEOGLAM can contribute to the innovation ecosystem around agricultural monitoring and how monitoring activities can contribute to informing decision processes from stakeholders ranging from farmers to policy-makers and other key stakeholders. These collaborative activities revolve around sharing data, information, knowledge, analytics, improved reflections of risks, and opportunities related to humanity's sustainable provisioning at the land/water/energy nexus. The goal of extending GEOGLAMs collaborative activities is to mobilize aligned assets and commitments to set up more ordered approaches to describing and managing the dynamics of food systems, viewed more holistically as sets of nested geospatially and temporally explicit processes. A special focus will be given to how information assets originating from within GEOGLAM can be used to support a coherent visualization of the world's food systems along with improving representation of the resource bases upon which our survival depends

LeZaks, D.; Jahn, M.

2013-12-01

311

Assessment of renewable energy technology and a case of sustainable energy in mobile telecommunication sector.  

PubMed

The rapid growth of the mobile telecommunication sectors of many emerging countries creates a number of problems such as network congestion and poor service delivery for network operators. This results primarily from the lack of a reliable and cost-effective power solution within such regions. This study presents a comprehensive review of the underlying principles of the renewable energy technology (RET) with the objective of ensuring a reliable and cost-effective energy solution for a sustainable development in the emerging world. The grid-connected hybrid renewable energy system incorporating a power conversion and battery storage unit has been proposed based on the availability, dynamism, and technoeconomic viability of energy resources within the region. The proposed system's performance validation applied a simulation model developed in MATLAB, using a practical load data for different locations with varying climatic conditions in Nigeria. Results indicate that, apart from being environmentally friendly, the increase in the overall energy throughput of about 4 kWh/$ of the proposed system would not only improve the quality of mobile services, by making the operations of GSM base stations more reliable and cost effective, but also better the living standards of the host communities. PMID:24578673

Okundamiya, Michael S; Emagbetere, Joy O; Ogujor, Emmanuel A

2014-01-01

312

Assessment of Renewable Energy Technology and a Case of Sustainable Energy in Mobile Telecommunication Sector  

PubMed Central

The rapid growth of the mobile telecommunication sectors of many emerging countries creates a number of problems such as network congestion and poor service delivery for network operators. This results primarily from the lack of a reliable and cost-effective power solution within such regions. This study presents a comprehensive review of the underlying principles of the renewable energy technology (RET) with the objective of ensuring a reliable and cost-effective energy solution for a sustainable development in the emerging world. The grid-connected hybrid renewable energy system incorporating a power conversion and battery storage unit has been proposed based on the availability, dynamism, and technoeconomic viability of energy resources within the region. The proposed system's performance validation applied a simulation model developed in MATLAB, using a practical load data for different locations with varying climatic conditions in Nigeria. Results indicate that, apart from being environmentally friendly, the increase in the overall energy throughput of about 4?kWh/$ of the proposed system would not only improve the quality of mobile services, by making the operations of GSM base stations more reliable and cost effective, but also better the living standards of the host communities. PMID:24578673

Okundamiya, Michael S.; Emagbetere, Joy O.; Ogujor, Emmanuel A.

2014-01-01

313

A developing country perspective on implementing sustainable energy programs  

SciTech Connect

Bangladesh is a developing country faced with many challenges such as high population growth rate, low literacy levels, and poverty. One of its most difficult tasks is providing the infrastructure necessary to sustain a growing population with a finite resource base. There is a need to develop a long term energy strategy that relies on sustainable resources while reducing environmental harm. Solar energy has the potential to meet these requirements and presents a highly attractive energy source for Bangladesh. Bangladesh is fortunate enough to have a significant amount of solar irradiance. A number of projects have been started in Bangladesh to exploit renewable energy resources. This paper will highlight the current status of these projects. Major interest and activity is directed towards development of photovoltaic and wind resources. The market for renewable technologies is vast in Bangladesh where a significant portion of the population is off-grid and in need of energy. Although this is not an affluent market technology costs have come down sufficiently such that it is becoming accessible to rural populations with credit schemes. While developing sustainable energy is a worthwhile goal and much encouraged by donor agencies, Bangladesh`s perspective on attempting to develop this sector suggests that it is not an easy road to follow, due to numerous internal and external barriers. A discussion of the barriers to the commercialization of renewables will be included in this paper. The objective of this paper is to shed some light on these issues and to stimulate discussions on how to overcome the barriers and encourage the dissemination of renewables in developing countries.

Ul Haq, Z.; James, J.A. [Princeton Economic Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States); Kamal, S. [International Consortium for Energy Development, Boston, MA (United States)

1997-12-31

314

Reduced emissions and lower costs: combining renewable energy and energy efficiency into a sustainable energy portfolio standard  

SciTech Connect

Combining renewable energy and energy efficiency in Sustainable Energy Portfolio Standard (SEPS) has emerged as a key state and national policy option to achieve greater levels of sustainable energy resources with maximum economic efficiency and equity. One advantage of the SEPS relative to a renewable portfolio standard or a stand-alone energy efficiency resource standard is enhanced flexibility and broader options for meeting targets. (author)

Brown, Marilyn A.; York, Dan; Kushler, Martin

2007-05-15

315

Creating a Sustainable American Higher Education System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College presidents need to get a handle on the actual dimension of higher education today. They must locate themselves firmly in the context of a world that is radically different from the one that created the current systems of American colleges and universities. Without a more honest depiction, and absent an ability to accurately define,…

Mellow, Gail O.

2008-01-01

316

Data Acquisition System(DAS) Sustaining Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents general information describing the Data Acquisition System contract, a summary of objectives, tasks performed and completed. The hardware deliverables which are comprised of: 1) Two ground DAS units; 2) Two flight DAS units; 3) Logistic spares; and 4) Shipping containers are described. Also included are the data requirements and scope of the contract.

1998-01-01

317

SUSTAIN:Urban Modeling Systems Integrating Optimization and Economics  

EPA Science Inventory

The System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis INtegration (SUSTAIN) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support practitioners in developing cost-effective management plans for municipal storm water programs and evaluating and selecting Best Manag...

318

MODELLING A SUSTAINABLE URBAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Emmanuel Dufrasnes1  

E-print Network

MODELLING A SUSTAINABLE URBAN MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Emmanuel Dufrasnes1 Catherine Buhé2 Etienne Wurtz1, nibel@cstb.fr Keywords: Project management, urban scale, environmental performance. Summary After to professionals and future residents of an urban renewal neighbourhood in Aix-les-Bains. This methodology, while

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Biomass Plantation Inergy Systems and Sustainable DevelD~ment  

E-print Network

.)Furthermore, mostbiomassenergy Such \\isions of large contributions by biomass ro global today comes from natural forest.m Biomass Plantation Inergy Systems and Sustainable DevelD~ment ERIC D. LARSON AND ROBERT H ranks ir ar the bor- rom of the ladderofPreferred Biomass DEV'ELOPING COUNTRIES energ

320

A micro sustained release system for epidermal growth factor  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary A technique for ensuring the controlled release of microgram and smaller amounts of biologically active epidermal growth factor (EGF) from polymeric delivery systems is described. We show that albumin in milligram quantities can facilitate the sustained release of picogram amounts of EGF for at least 3 wk. The EGF-containing polymer matrix can be placed directly into cell culture and

Joanne B. Murray; Larry Brown; Robert S. Langer; Michael Klagsburn

1983-01-01

321

SUSTAINABLE SOCIAL-ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: AN IMPOSSIBILITY?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given rapid changes in large-scale human and biophysical processes—carbon emissions, population increase and migrations, overharvesting and pollution leading to loss of species—scientists are worried that many of the social-ecological systems existing today may collapse by the end of the 21st century. Is this an exaggerated worry? The thesis I will present is that the negative prognosis will indeed occur in

Elinor Ostrom

2007-01-01

322

Defining elements of sustainable work systems--a system-oriented approach.  

PubMed

Based on a system-theoretic discussion of sustainability, this paper aims to develop a conceptual model of a sustainable work system which is consistent with the definition of ergonomics by the IEA in 2000 (but also with earlier definitions) as well as with the triple bottom line understanding of sustainable development - comprising the management of human, social, ecological and economic capital in a balanced manner. PMID:22317318

Fischer, Klaus; Zink, Klaus J

2012-01-01

323

Nuclear Energy - Hydrogen Production - Fuel Cell: A Road Towards Future China's Sustainable Energy Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable development of Chinese economy in 21. century will mainly rely on self-supply of clean energy with indigenous natural resources. The burden of current coal-dominant energy mix and the environmental stress due to energy consumptions has led nuclear power to be an indispensable choice for further expanding electricity generation capacity in China and for reducing greenhouse effect gases emission. The

Zhiwei Zhou

2006-01-01

324

Alternative Energy Sources for Oil - Rich Countries: (Middle East - Iran) Pathway to Sustainable Energy Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

Energy sustainability and environmental policies play significant roles in energy development and planning in developed and developing countries. The present study is being conducted as part of the Energy, Environment, and Economics Program (E3) at the Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). The main objective of this study is to analyze and present alternative

J. Nouri; H. Arastoopour; S. Al-Hallaj

325

Energy Modeling of a High Performance Building in the U.A.E. for Sustainability Certification  

E-print Network

programs. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) sustainable building program provides a set of criteria for rating sustainable buildings (U.S. Green Building Council 2009). The Estidama rating program, currently in its pilot phase...

Jones, M.; Ledinger, S.

2010-01-01

326

Small water and wastewater systems: pathways to sustainable development?  

PubMed

Globally we are faced with billions of people without access to safe water and adequate sanitation. These are generally located in developing communities. Even in developed communities the current large scale systems for supplying water, collecting wastewater and treating it are not environmentally sustainable, because it is difficult to close the cycle of water and nutrients. This paper discusses the advantages of small scale water and wastewater systems in overcoming the difficulties in providing water and wastewater systems in developing communities and in achieving sustainability in both developed and developing communities. Particular attention is given to technology and technology choice, even though technology alone does not provide the complete answer. Disadvantages of small scale systems and how they may be overcome are discussed. PMID:14753513

Ho, G

2003-01-01

327

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

& Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Solar of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;iii Acknowledgments The authors would like to thank Jennifer De

328

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

& Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National% post consumer waste. #12;iii Acknowledgments This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

329

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

& Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Green of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;iii Acknowledgments This work was funded by the U.S. Department

330

Production–Consumption Systems and the Pursuit of Sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The pursuit of sustainability has many facets. Sectoral approaches attempt to improve the productivity of agriculture or energy\\u000a efficiency while reducing negative impacts of air and water pollutants on the environment. In place-based approaches a suite\\u000a of environmental challenges posed by development are tackled together seeking to reduce underlying drivers, complementarities\\u000a among inputs and inputs, and negotiating trade-offs when win-win

Louis Lebel; Sylvia Lorek

331

Modeling and planning distributed energy systems online  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sustainable energy is a core concern worldwide for the foreseeable future. Technologically, its key trends are distributed and renewable energy resources and smart grid capabilities. At the same time, a global need for sustainable energy is meeting increasingly diverse energy policy and economics. To plan with such complex contexts and systems, a novel distributed energy software tool and its initial implementation is presented: the Energy Systems Evaluator Online (ESEO). Its contributions include: (1) A flexible model framework that can simulate current and expected distributed energy systems; (2) An architecture specifying the modular design needed for distributed energy planning software in general; (3) A working implementation as the first general energy planning tool deployed via the Internet with collaborative capabilities.

Wieler, Susana

332

Technology policy and sustainability: An empirical study of renewable energy development in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the debate over sustainability and development paradigms, energy assumes a unique position by virtue of its direct link with environmental sustainability and its role as an essential vehicle for development. Agenda 21 recognizes that coupling end-use energy efficiency with renewable sources of energy will help meet a large share of the world's energy needs while reducing the environmental impacts

Maithili Iyer

2000-01-01

333

Nanoscale triboelectric-effect-enabled energy conversion for sustainably powering portable electronics.  

PubMed

Harvesting energy from our living environment is an effective approach for sustainable, maintenance-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging based on triboelectric effect has been proven to be simple, cost-effective, and robust. However, its output is still insufficient for sustainably driving electronic devices/systems. Here, we demonstrated a rationally designed arch-shaped triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) by utilizing the contact electrification between a polymer thin film and a metal thin foil. The working mechanism of the TENG was studied by finite element simulation. The output voltage, current density, and energy volume density reached 230 V, 15.5 ?A/cm(2), and 128 mW/cm(3), respectively, and an energy conversion efficiency as high as 10-39% has been demonstrated. The TENG was systematically studied and demonstrated as a sustainable power source that can not only drive instantaneous operation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) but also charge a lithium ion battery as a regulated power module for powering a wireless sensor system and a commercial cell phone, which is the first demonstration of the nanogenerator for driving personal mobile electronics, opening the chapter of impacting general people's life by nanogenerators. PMID:23130843

Wang, Sihong; Lin, Long; Wang, Zhong Lin

2012-12-12

334

The role of nuclear energy in establishing sustainable energy paths  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nuclear energy remains a controversial issue for public policies on energy and the environment because of arguments concerning radioactive waste, reactor accidents, nuclear proliferation and economic competitiveness. The issues of climate change and supply security have provided a new rationale for its reappearance on the international political agenda. Recent national policy directions in some countries show that such a comeback

J. J. C. Bruggink; B. C. C. der van Zwaan

2002-01-01

335

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

Resource Integrated Database EISA ­ Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 EMS ­ EnvironmentalNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Site Sustainability Plan FY 2014 #12

336

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

& Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Using by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden% post consumer waste. #12;iii Acknowledgments This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy

337

Agricultural biodiversity, social-ecological systems and sustainable diets.  

PubMed

The stark observation of the co-existence of undernourishment, nutrient deficiencies and overweight and obesity, the triple burden of malnutrition, is inviting us to reconsider health and nutrition as the primary goal and final endpoint of food systems. Agriculture and the food industry have made remarkable advances in the past decades. However, their development has not entirely fulfilled health and nutritional needs, and moreover, they have generated substantial collateral losses in agricultural biodiversity. Simultaneously, several regions are experiencing unprecedented weather events caused by climate change and habitat depletion, in turn putting at risk global food and nutrition security. This coincidence of food crises with increasing environmental degradation suggests an urgent need for novel analyses and new paradigms. The sustainable diets concept proposes a research and policy agenda that strives towards a sustainable use of human and natural resources for food and nutrition security, highlighting the preeminent role of consumers in defining sustainable options and the importance of biodiversity in nutrition. Food systems act as complex social-ecological systems, involving multiple interactions between human and natural components. Nutritional patterns and environment structure are interconnected in a mutual dynamic of changes. The systemic nature of these interactions calls for multidimensional approaches and integrated assessment and simulation tools to guide change. This paper proposes a review and conceptual modelling framework that articulate the synergies and tradeoffs between dietary diversity, widely recognised as key for healthy diets, and agricultural biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions, crucial resilience factors to climate and global changes. PMID:25068204

Allen, Thomas; Prosperi, Paolo; Cogill, Bruce; Flichman, Guillermo

2014-11-01

338

Energy for sustainable development: Key issues and challenges  

SciTech Connect

Energy generation and use are strongly linked to all elements of sustainable development such as economic, social, and environmental. The history of human development rests on the availability and use of energy, the transformation from the early use of fire and animal power that improved lives, to the present world with use of electricity and clean fuels for a multitude of purposes. Energy is the neglected issue of the development debate. The lack of access to reliable and clean energy supplies is a major barrier to improving human well-being around the globe. There are an estimated 1.6 billion people living in the rural areas of developing countries who lack access to electricity, and so dependence on fossil fuels. Combustion of fossil fuels produces large amounts of CO{sub 2}, an important greenhouse gas. In response to increasing concern about the effect of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on global climate, international action has been agreed to reduce these emissions. On the other hand, renewable energy is the great, barely tapped solution to the two great challenges of the coming century such as poverty and global warming. Not only can renewable energy provide a clean, flexible power source for homes, schools and hospitals, at the micro-to-medium scale it has huge potential to create meaningful and useful jobs.

Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

2007-07-01

339

Assessing sustainable land-use practices using geographic information systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many prominent scientists have claimed that we need to develop environmentally sustainable practices otherwise societies may collapse. The use of Geographic Information Systems allows detailed studies that can cross disciplinary boundaries and lead to quantifiable statements as to the change of land use practices that took place in the past and those that may occur in the future. This dissertation focuses on two research topics. One that attempts to quantify the environmental consequences of parking lots located in the Midwest, USA. The other research topic focuses on the land area needed to support ethanol in the United States. In Tippecanoe County, Indiana, it was determined that parking lots occupied approximately 6.6% of the urban areas, that the area devoted to parking lots exceeded the area devoted to urban parks by a factor of 3, and that these parking lots contributed to increased runoff of pollutants. The parking lots of Tippecanoe County were estimated to be responsible for 46.5 thousand pounds of oil and grease released annually in runoff, as well as an increase of 240.6 thousand pounds of suspended solids, and 65.7 pounds of lead released when compared to pre-development conditions. A method that scales up the county wide study was also developed to determine the areal footprint of parking lots with the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin. It was estimated that these four states allocate approximately 1260 square km of their land to parking lots and that this accounts for 4.97% of urban land use and over 43 million parking spaces, whereas the number of individuals in age of driving (adults over 18 years old) amounted to just over 25 million. Within the four states studied, states where urban sprawl was considered more prevalent were also states that had a higher proportion of their urban land devoted to parking lots. The second dissertation topic focused on using GIS to locate suitable sites for corn or cellulosic based ethanol production facilities. Since a valuable byproduct of corn ethanol production is Distiller's Grain Solubles (DGS), siting of ethanol plants was considered with regard to both corn production by county within the conterminous United States and head of cattle available to use this output as feed. We found that many counties outside the Midwest could sustain smaller sized ethanol plants, especially when considering that most large production facilities need to redistribute their DGS in dried form sometimes as far as California which has negative impacts on the Net Energy Value of corn based ethanol. The future of ethanol expansion however lies with cellulosic feedstock which is bulkier and thus more costly to transport than corn. Our results indicate that cellulosic ethanol plants should be smaller in capacity, especially when compared to corn ethanol plants where 100 million gallons a year (mgy) plants are more the norm. Only 7 out of 3109 counties in the conterminous United States contain enough wood, switchgrass or crop residue feedstock to sustain plants that produce greater than 40 mgy of biofuel, meaning that larger plants would need to import feedstock from considerable distances and thus incur greater feedstock transport costs. The last section explored co-location options for siting lignocellulosic ethanol plant production facilities.

Davis, Amelie Y.

340

Patent fees for a sustainable EU patent system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper puts forward a sustainable fee structure for the EU Patent (COMPAT). The proposal includes pre-grant and post-grant fees and illustrates the differences between Euro-direct applications and PCT applications. The break-even analysis shows that the COMPAT would make the European patent system more attractive with significantly lower relative costs. At the same time, the new schedule provides a financially

Jérôme Danguy; Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie

2011-01-01

341

Energy in the Developing World Physics of Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

Pakistan India South Africa Egypt Bolivia Indonesia El Salvador Philippines Sri Bolivia Indonesia El Salvador Philippines Sri Lanka China Thailand Lebanon TurkeyBrazil Russian Federation to 2025 · All to be provided with housing, energy, water, transporta

Kammen, Daniel M.

342

Linking Energy Efficiency and ISO: Creating a Framework forSustainable Industrial Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Industrial motor-driven systems consume more than 2194billion kWh annually on a global basis and offer one of the largestopportunities for energy savings. In the United States (US), they accountfor more than 50 percent of all manufacturing electricity use. Incountries with less well-developed consumer economies, the proportion ofelectricity consumed by motors is higher-more than 50 percent ofelectricity used in all sectors in China is attributable to motors.Todate, the energy savings potential from motor-driven systems haveremained largely unrealized worldwide. Both markets and policy makerstend to focus on individual system components, which have a typicalimprovement potential of 2-5 percent versus 20-50 percent for completesystems. Several factors contribute to this situation, most notably thecomplexity of the systems themselves. Determining how to optimize asystem requires a high level of technical skill. In addition, once anenergy efficiency project is completed, the energy savings are often notsustained due to changes in personnel and production processes. Althoughtraining and educational programs in the US, UK, and China to promotesystem optimization have proven effective, these resource-intensiveefforts have only reached a small portion of the market.The same factorsthat make it so challenging to achieve and sustain energy efficiency inmotor-driven systems (complexity, frequent changes) apply to theproduction processes that they support. Yet production processestypically operate within a narrow band of acceptable performance. Theseprocesses are frequently incorporated into ISO 9000/14000 quality andenvironmental management systems, which require regular, independentaudits to maintain ISO certification, an attractive value forinternational trade.This paper presents a new approach to achievingindustrial system efficiency (motors and steam) that will encourageplants to incorporate system energy efficiency into their existing ISOmanagement systems. We will describe an Industrial Standards Frameworkprepared for China, also applicable elsewhere, that includes nationalstandards and a System Optimization Library. ISO work instructions arepart of the Library, so that a plant can easily incorporate projects intotheir ISO Quality Environmental Manual. The goal is to provide aplant-based mechanism that helps each company maintain their focus onenergy efficiency commitments, provide visibility for its achievements,and provide verification of results for financial backers (includingcarbon traders) to help stimulate much greater industrial energyefficiency.

McKane, Aimee; Perry, Wayne; Aixian, Li; Tienan, Li; Williams,Robert

2005-04-01

343

Is Sustainability Achievable? Exploring the Limits of Sustainability with Model Systems  

EPA Science Inventory

Successful implementation of sustainability ideas in ecosystem management requires a basic understanding of the often nonlinear and non-intuitive relationships amongst different dimensions of sustainability, particularly the systemwide implications of human actions. This basic un...

344

Sustainability of hydropower as source of renewable and clean energy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydroelectric energy has been in recent times placed as an important future source of renewable and clean energy. The advantage of hydropower as a renewable energy is that it produces negligible amounts of greenhouse gases, it stores large amounts of electricity at low cost and it can be adjusted to meet consumer demand. This noble vision however is becoming more challenging due to rapid urbanization development and increasing human activities surrounding the catchment area. Numerous studies have shown that there are several contributing factors that lead towards the loss of live storage in reservoir, namely geology, ground slopes, climate, drainage density and human activities. Sediment deposition in the reservoir particularly for hydroelectric purposes has several major concerns due to the reduced water storage volume which includes increase in the risk of flooding downstream which directly effects the safety of human population and properties, contributes to economic losses not only in revenue for power generation but also large capital and maintenance cost for reservoir restorations works. In the event of functional loss of capabilities of a hydropower reservoir as a result of sedimentation or siltation could lead to both economical and environmental impact. The objective of this paper is aimed present the importance of hydropower as a source of renewable and clean energy in the national energy mix and the increasing challenges of sustainability.

Luis, J.; Sidek, L. M.; Desa, M. N. M.; Julien, P. Y.

2013-06-01

345

Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is focused on the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. It encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper gives an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables.

K. A. McCarthy; D. L. Williams; R. Reister

2012-05-01

346

A Reference Process to Design Information Systems for Sustainable Design based on LCA, PSS, Social and  

E-print Network

A Reference Process to Design Information Systems for Sustainable Design based on LCA, PSS, Social of Sustainable Design, SD, is to satisfy customer needs while reducing environmental impacts. The main challenge: SOA, Reference Process, Sustainable Design, Information Systems, Information Systems to Support

Boyer, Edmond

347

Sustainable nanocomposites toward electrochemical energy storage and environmental remediation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energy shortage and environmental pollution are the two most concerns right now for the long term sustainable development of human society. New technology developments are the key solutions to these challenges, which strongly rely on the continuous upgrading of advanced material performance. In this dissertation, sustainable nanocomposites with multifunctionalities are designed and fabricated targeting to the applications in high energy/power density capacitor electrodes and efficient heavy metal adsorbent for polluted water purification. Contrary to the helical carbon structure from pure cotton fabrics under microwave heating and radical oxidized ignition of nanoparticles from conventional heating, magnetic carbon tubular nanocomposite fabrics decorated with unifromally dispersed Co-Co3O4 nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a microwave heating process using cotton fabric and inorganic salt as precursors, which have shown better anti-corrosive performance and demonstrated great potential as novel electrochemical pseudocapacitor electrode. Polyaniline nanofibers (PANI-NFs)/graphite oxide (GO) nanocomposites with excellent interfacial interaction and elongated fiber structure were synthesized via a facile interfacial polymerization method. The PANI-NFs/GO hybrid materials showed orders of magnitude enhancement in capacitance and energy density than that of individual GO and PANI-NF components. At the same weight loading of PANI in the composites, fibrous PANI demonstrated higher energy density and long term stability than that of particle-shaped PANI at higher power density. Besides the efforts focusing on the inside of the capacitor including new electrodes, electrolyte materials, and capacitor configuration designs. A significant small external magnetic field (720 Gauss) induced capacitance enhancement is reported for graphene and graphene nanocomposite electrodes. The capacitance of Fe2O3/graphene nanocomposites increases by 154.6% after appling magnetic field. Without any modification of the inside of the electrochemical capacitance cell, the reported magnetic field enhanced capacitance with both improved energy density and power density will have a great impact on the electrochemical energy storage field. A facile thermodecomposition process to synthesize magnetic graphene nanocomposites (MGNCs) is reported. The MGNCs demonstrate an extremely fast Cr(VI) removal from the wastewater with a high removal efficiency and with an almost complete removal of Cr(VI) within 5 min. The large saturation magnetization (96.3 emu/g) of the synthesized nanoparticles allows fast separation of the MGNCs from liquid suspension. By using a permanent magnet, the recycling process of both the MGNC adsorbents and the adsorbed Cr(VI) is more energetically and economically sustainable. The significantly reduced treatment time required to remove the Cr(VI) and the applicability in treating the solutions with low pH make MGNCs promising for the efficient removal of heavy metals from the wastewater. A waste-free process to recycle Fe Fe2O3/ polypropylene (PP) polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) is introduced to synthesize magnetic carbon nanocomposites (MCNCs) and simultaneously produce useful chemical species which can be utilized as a feedstock in petrochemical industry. The magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are found to have an effective catalytic activity on the pyrolysis of PP. The coked solid waste from the conventional process has been utilized as a carbon source to form a protective carbon shell surrounding the magnetic NPs. The magnetic carbon nanocomposites (MCNCs) pyrolyzed from PNCs containing 20.0 wt% NPs demonstrate extremely fast Cr(VI) removal from wastewater with the almost complete removal of Cr(VI) within 10 min. The large saturation magnetization (32.5 emu g-1) of these novel magnetic carbon nanocomposites allows fast recycling of both the adsorbents and the adsorbed Cr(VI) from the liquid suspension in a more energetically and economically sustainable way by simply applying a permanent magnet.

Zhu, Jiahua

348

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 2.0: Wind Turbine Reliability and Maintainability Enhancement through System-wide Structure Health Monitoring and Modifications to Rotating Components  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY An evaluation of nondestructive structural health monitoring methods was completed with over 132 documents, 37 specifically about wind turbines, summarized into a technology matrix. This matrix lists the technology, what can be monitored with this technology, and gives a short summary of the key aspects of the technology and its application. Passive and active acoustic emission equipment from Physical Acoustics Corp. and Acellent Technologies have been evaluated and selected for use in experimental state loading and fatigue tests of composite wind turbine blade materials. Acoustic Emission (AE) and Active Ultrasonic Testing (AUT), were applied to composite coupons with both simulated and actual damage. The results found that, while composites are more complicated in nature, compared to metallic structures, an artificial neural network analysis could still be used to determine damage. For the AE system, the failure mode could be determined (i.e. fiber breakage, delamination, etc.). The Acellent system has been evaluated to work well with composite materials. A test-rig for reliability testing of the rotating components was constructed. The research on the types of bearings used in the wind turbines indicated that in most of the designs, the main bearings utilized to support the shaft are cylindrical roller bearings. The accelerated degradation testing of a population of bearings was performed. Vibration and acoustic emission data was collected and analyzed in order to identify a representative degradation signal for each bearing to identify the initiation of the degradation process in the bearings. Afterwards, the RMS of the vibration signal from degradation initiation up to the end of the useful life of the bearing was selected to predict the remaining useful life of the bearing. This step included fitting Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models to the degradation signals and approximating the probability distribution function (PDF) of remaining useful life based on the results of Monte-Carlo simulation of the ARMA models. This step was performed for different percentages of the degradation signal of each bearing. The accuracy of the proposed approach then was assessed by comparing the actual life of the bearing and the estimated life of the bearing from the developed models. The results were impressive and indicated that the accuracy of the models improved as more data was utilized in developing the ARMA models (we get closer to the end of the life of the bearing).

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30

349

TASK 40: Sustainable International Bio Energy Trade: securing supply Overview of the task  

E-print Network

Page 1 TASK 40: Sustainable International Bio Energy Trade: securing supply and demand Overview of the task The objective of Task 40 is to investigate what is needed to create a "commodity market" for bio-energy's, the task will contribute to the development of sustainable bio-energy markets on short and on long term

350

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for  

E-print Network

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

DeLucia, Evan H.

351

Dwelling adaptation for sustainability:Improving interventions for energy efficiency, comfort and equity in Tasmania.  

E-print Network

??In Tasmania it is common for householders in disadvantaged circumstances to live in uncomfortable and energy inefficient housing, which creates sustainability and affordability challenges. Adapting… (more)

Watson, PL

2013-01-01

352

Applicability and methodology of determining sustainable yield in groundwater systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is currently a need for a review of the definition and methodology of determining sustainable yield. The reasons are: (1) current definitions and concepts are ambiguous and non-physically based so cannot be used for quantitative application, (2) there is a need to eliminate varying interpretations and misinterpretations and provide a sound basis for application, (3) the notion that all groundwater systems either are or can be made to be sustainable is invalid, (4) often there are an excessive number of factors bound up in the definition that are not easily quantifiable, (5) there is often confusion between production facility optimal yield and basin sustainable yield, (6) in many semi-arid and arid environments groundwater systems cannot be sensibly developed using a sustained yield policy particularly where ecological constraints are applied. Derivation of sustainable yield using conservation of mass principles leads to expressions for basin sustainable, partial (non-sustainable) mining and total (non-sustainable) mining yields that can be readily determined using numerical modelling methods and selected on the basis of applied constraints. For some cases there has to be recognition that the groundwater resource is not renewable and its use cannot therefore be sustainable. In these cases, its destiny should be the best equitable use.

Kalf, Frans R. P.; Woolley, Donald R.

2005-03-01

353

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

& Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303, including 10% post consumer waste. #12;iii Acknowledgments This work was funded by the U.S. Department

354

sustainment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Airlines have massive investment in equipment and systems; while there have been well-documented IT successes in the business of selling and operating air travel, the technical side of the industry is considered a slower innovator and offers great scope for efficiency improvement and cost reduction. In terms of value chain systems, airlines can be said to have succeeded in business-to-consumer

Michael MacDonnell; Benjamin T Clegg

355

Modeling of a conceptual self-sustained liquid fuel vaporization – combustion system with radiative output using inert porous media  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present model is based on a combined self-sustained liquid fuel vaporization – combustion system, where the liquid fuel vaporization occurs on a wetted wall plate with energy transferred through the plate from the combustion of vaporized oil. The vaporization energy has been derived through the radiative interaction of the vaporizing plate and an upstream end surface of the porous

Tarun K. Kayal; Mithiles Chakravarty

2007-01-01

356

Perspectives on achieving sustainable energy production and use  

EPA Science Inventory

The traditional definition of sustainability calls for polices and strategies that meet society's present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Achieving operational sustainability requires three critical elements: advances in scien...

357

Indicators for assessing socioeconomic sustainability of bioenergy systems: A short list of practical measures.  

SciTech Connect

Indicators are needed to assess both socioeconomic and environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems. Effective indicators can help to identify and quantify the sustainability attributes of bioenergy options. We identify 16 socioeconomic indicators that fall into the categories of social well-being, energy security, trade, profitability, resource conservation, and social acceptability. The suite of indicators is predicated on the existence of basic institutional frameworks to provide governance, legal, regulatory and enforcement services. Indicators were selected to be practical, sensitive to stresses, unambiguous, anticipatory, predictive, calibrated with known variability, and sufficient when considered collectively. The utility of each indicator, methods for its measurement, and applications appropriate for the context of particular bioenergy systems are described along with future research needs. Together, this suite of indicators is hypothesized to reflect major socioeconomic effects of the full supply chain for bioenergy, including feedstock production and logistics, conversion to biofuels, biofuel logistics and biofuel end uses. Ten of those 16 indicators are proposed to be the minimum list of practical measures of socioeconomic aspects of bioenergy sustainability. Coupled with locally-prioritized environmental indicators, we propose that these socioeconomic indicators can provide a basis to quantify and evaluate sustainability of bioenergy systems across many regions in which they will be deployed.

Davis, Maggie R [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hilliard, Michael R [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2013-01-01

358

Whole systems thinking for sustainable water treatment design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology could provide a low cost alternative to conventional aerated wastewater treatment, however there has been little comparison between MFC and aeration treatment using real wastewater substrate. This study attempts to directly compare the wastewater treatment efficiency and energy consumption and generation among three reactor systems, a traditional aeration process, a simple submerged MFC configuration, and a control reactor acting similar as natural lagoons. Results showed that all three systems were able to remove >90% of COD, but the aeration used shorter time (8 days) then the MFC (10 days) and control reactor (25 days). Compared to aeration, the MFC showed lower removal efficiency in high COD concentration but much higher efficiency when the COD is low. Only the aeration system showed complete nitrification during the operation, reflected by completed ammonia removal and nitrate accumulation. Suspended solid measurements showed that MFC reduced sludge production by 52-82% as compared to aeration, and it also saved 100% of aeration energy. Furthermore, though not designed for high power generation, the MFC reactor showed a 0.3 Wh/g COD/L or 24 Wh/m3 (wastewater treated) net energy gain in electricity generation. These results demonstrate that MFC technology could be integrated into wastewater infrastructure to meet effluent quality and save operational cost. The high cost and life-cycle impact of electrode materials is one major barrier to the large scale application of microbial fuel cells (MFC). We also demonstrate that biomass-derived black carbon (biochar), could be a more cost effective and sustainable alternative to granular activated carbon (GAC) and graphite granule (GG) electrodes. In a comparison study, two biochar materials made from lodgepole pine sawdust pellets (BCp) and lodgepole pine woodchips (BCc), gassified at a highest heat temperature (HHT) of 1000°C under a heating rate of 16°C/min, showed a satisfactory power density of 532 +/- 18 mW/m-2 and 457 +/- 20 mW/m-2 respectively, compared to GAC with 674 +/- 10 mW/m-2 and GG with 566 +/- 5 mW/m-2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area), as an anode material in a two-chamber MFC. BCc and BCp had BET-N2 surface area measurements of 429 cm2 g -1 and 470 cm2 g-1 respectively, lower than industrial GAC with 1248 cm2 g-1 but several orders of magnitude higher that GG with 0.44 cm2 g-1 . BCc and BCp had a lower surface resistance of 3+/-1? mm -1 and 6+/-1 ? mm-1 than 8+/-2? mm -1 for GAC, but higher that GG with 0.4+/-0.5 ? mm -1. We also investigated the life-cycle impact and estimated cost of biochar as an electrode material. Although there is no well-established market price for biochar, conservative estimates place the costs around 51-356 US/tonne, up to ten times cheaper that GAC (500-2500 US/tonne) and GGs (500-800 US$/tonne) with significantly greater life-cycle advantages.

Huggins, Mitchell Tyler

359

Energy Savings with Energy-Efficient HVAC Systems in Commercial Buildings of Hong Kong  

E-print Network

Kong for sustainable development. In this study, the major factors influencing the electricity use of HVAC systems are studied with the building energy simulation program EnergyPlus, which include chiller efficiency, space cooling temperature, variable...

Yang, J.; Chan, K.; Wu, X.

2006-01-01

360

Indicators to support environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems1 Authors: Allen C. McBridea  

E-print Network

1 Indicators to support environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems1 2 Authors: Allen C. Mc: 1-865-576-3989, dalevh@ornl.gov7 8 a Center for Bioenergy Sustainability, Environmental Sciences to assess environmental sustainability of bioenergy systems.11 Effective indicators will help

Jager, Henriette I.

361

New developments in recirculating aquaculture systems in Europe: A perspective on environmental sustainability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dual objective of sustainable aquaculture, i.e., to produce food while sustaining natural resources is achieved only when production systems with a minimum ecological impact are used. Recirculating aquaculture systems (RASs) provide opportunities to reduce water usage and to improve waste management and nutrient recycling. RAS makes intensive fish production compatible with environmental sustainability. This review aims to summarize the

C. I. M. Martins; E. H. Eding; M. C. J. Verdegem; L. T. N. Heinsbroek; O. Schneider; J. P. Blancheton; E. Roque d’Orbcastel; J. A. J. Verreth

2010-01-01

362

Towards a sustainable modular robot system for planetary exploration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis investigates multiple perspectives of developing an unmanned robotic system suited for planetary terrains. In this case, the unmanned system consists of unit-modular robots. This type of robot has potential to be developed and maintained as a sustainable multi-robot system while located far from direct human intervention. Some characteristics that make this possible are: the cooperation, communication and connectivity among the robot modules, flexibility of individual robot modules, capability of self-healing in the case of a failed module and the ability to generate multiple gaits by means of reconfiguration. To demonstrate the effects of high flexibility of an individual robot module, multiple modules of a four-degree-of-freedom unit-modular robot were developed. The robot was equipped with a novel connector mechanism that made self-healing possible. Also, design strategies included the use of series elastic actuators for better robot-terrain interaction. In addition, various locomotion gaits were generated and explored using the robot modules, which is essential for a modular robot system to achieve robustness and thus successfully navigate and function in a planetary environment. To investigate multi-robot task completion, a biomimetic cooperative load transportation algorithm was developed and simulated. Also, a liquid motion-inspired theory was developed consisting of a large number of robot modules. This can be used to traverse obstacles that inevitably occur in maneuvering over rough terrains such as in a planetary exploration. Keywords: Modular robot, cooperative robots, biomimetics, planetary exploration, sustainability.

Hossain, S. G. M.

363

Designing sustainable heavy lift launch vehicle architectures adaptability, lock-in, and system evolution  

E-print Network

Long term human space exploration depends on the development of a sustainable heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV). But what exactly is sustainability in the context of launch systems and how can it addressed in the design ...

Silver, Matthew Robin

2005-01-01

364

Energy Systems Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

PRESTO, a COSMIC program, handles energy system specifications and predicts design efficiency of cogeneration systems. These systems allow a company to use excess energy produced to generate electricity. PRESTO is utilized by the Energy Systems Division of Thermo Electron Corporation in the custom design of cogeneration systems.

1986-01-01

365

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

of sustainable, energy-dense advanced biofuels that are compatible with our existing transportation fuel and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Partnering with Industry to Advance to develop and evaluate commercial processes for the production of biobased products and fuels. In addition

366

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

Natural Marketing Institute's (NMI) Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability (LOHAS) Consumer Trends & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Consumer Attitudes About Renewable Energy: Trends and Regional Differences Natural Marketing Institute

367

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

& Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE% post consumer waste. #12;1 A Large-Eddy Simulation of Wind-Plant Aerodynamics Matthew J. Churchfield1

McCalley, James D.

368

China's energy consumption and sustainable development: Comparative evidence from GDP and genuine savings  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper employs the structural vector autoregressions framework and the generalized impulse response function to study the long-term dynamic relation between China's energy consumption and sustainable economic growth. In addition to the conventional economic indicators (GDP growth rates), genuine savings rates are particularly examined to indicate sustainable economic development. Results show that the high elasticity of energy consumption dramatically undermines

Jing You

2011-01-01

369

STYRIAN AcADEmY FoR SUSTAINABlE ENERGIES INTERNATIoNAl WINTER School 2011  

E-print Network

STYRIAN AcADEmY FoR SUSTAINABlE ENERGIES INTERNATIoNAl WINTER School 2011 "SUSTAINABlE SmART cITIES to structural details. The Winter School "Sustainable Smart Cities" is intended to proceed from the "Large and energy used for infrastructures. In order to introduce sustainable ways of life and in view of the threat

370

Ris Energy Report 4 Supply technologies in the future energy system 10 Supply technologies in the future energy system  

E-print Network

the interaction between wind turbines, other energy sources and consumers in the electricity system. Biomass biomass covers wood, agricultural residues, energy crops, household waste and agro-industrial waste energy [3]. New sustainable biomass technologies such as biorefineries are being developed, especially

371

Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: economy.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper is to present an efficient tool for evaluating the economy part of the sustainability of pig farming systems. The selected tool IDEA was tested on a sample of farms from 15 contrasted systems in Europe. A statistical analysis was carried out to check the capacity of the indicators to illustrate the variability of the population and to analyze which of these indicators contributed the most towards it. The scores obtained for the farms were consistent with the reality of pig production; the variable distribution showed an important variability of the sample. The principal component analysis and cluster analysis separated the sample into five subgroups, in which the six main indicators significantly differed, which underlines the robustness of the tool. The IDEA method was proven to be easily comprehensible, requiring few initial variables and with an efficient benchmarking system; all six indicators contributed to fully describe a varied and contrasted population. PMID:25222654

Ilari-Antoine, E; Bonneau, M; Klauke, T N; Gonzàlez, J; Dourmad, J Y; De Greef, K; Houwers, H W J; Fabrega, E; Zimmer, C; Hviid, M; Van der Oever, B; Edwards, S A

2014-12-01

372

Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future  

SciTech Connect

The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.

Zalbowitz, M. [ed.

1997-02-01

373

Sustainable Energy Production from Jatropha Bio-Diesel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The demand for petroleum has risen rapidly due to increasing industrialization and modernization of the world. This economic development has led to a huge demand for energy, where the major part of that energy is derived from fossil sources such as petroleum, coal and natural gas. Continued use of petroleum sourced fuels is now widely recognized as unsustainable because of depleting supplies. There is a growing interest in using Jatropha curcas L. oil as the feedstock for biodiesel production because it is non-edible and thus does not compromise the edible oils, which are mainly used for food consumption. Further, J. curcas L. seed has a high content of free fatty acids that is converted in to biodiesel by trans esterification with alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. The biodiesel produced has similar properties to that of petroleum-based diesel. Biodiesel fuel has better properties than petro diesel fuel; it is renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic, and essentially free of sulfur and aromatics. Biodiesel seems to be a realistic fuel for future. Biodiesel has the potential to economically, socially, and environmentally benefit communities as well as countries, and to contribute toward their sustainable development.

Yadav, Amit Kumar; Krishna, Vijai

2012-10-01

374

Assessing Farmers' Sustainable Agricultural Practice Needs: Implication for a Sustainable Farming System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary purpose of this study was to assess the farmers' sustainable agricultural practice needs (SAPN) as determined conversely by their level of technical knowledge and understanding on sustainable corn farming practices. The population of this study consisted of all corn growers in Fars, a southern province of Iran. A questionnaire was developed to gather required information from 159 randomly

Hassan Sadighi

375

Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Ris NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy  

E-print Network

Energy for the future ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Risø NatioNal labo ­ with Risø from nuclear power to sustainable energy Translated from 'Energi til fremtiden ­ med Risø fra technologies. In 1958, it was nuclear power. On the occasion of its 50th anniversary, Risø is working

376

10.391J / 1.818J / 2.65J / 3.564J / 11.371J / 22.811J / ESD.166J Sustainable Energy, Spring 2003  

E-print Network

Assessment of current and potential energy systems, covering extraction, conversion and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Examination of energy ...

Tester, Jefferson W.

377

Cloudy Computing: Leveraging Weather Forecasts in Energy Harvesting Sensor Systems  

E-print Network

Cloudy Computing: Leveraging Weather Forecasts in Energy Harvesting Sensor Systems Navin Sharma,gummeson,irwin,shenoy}@cs.umass.edu Abstract--To sustain perpetual operation, systems that harvest environmental energy must carefully regulate their usage to satisfy their demand. Regulating energy usage is challenging if a system's demands

Shenoy, Prashant

378

GREEN KIT: A MODULAR, VARIABLE APPLICATION SYSTEM FOR SUSTAINABLE COOLING  

EPA Science Inventory

Definition of technical challenge to sustainability One of the challenges to sustainability is to build shelters that provide human comfort (people) using limited resources (prosperity) and minimum environment impact (planet). Current practices in building ...

379

Development of a rating system for sustainable bridges  

E-print Network

One of the latest trends in engineering is sustainable design, which is designing so that resources are available for many generations to come. Sustainable design considers the ecological, economic, and socio-cultural ...

Hunt, Lauren R., 1982-

2005-01-01

380

A decision-support system for sustainable urban metabolism in Europe  

SciTech Connect

Urban metabolism components define the energy and material exchanges within a city and, therefore, can provide valuable information on the environmental quality of urban areas. Assessing the potential impact of urban planning alternatives on urban metabolism components (such as energy, water, carbon and pollutants fluxes) can provide a quantitative estimation of their sustainability performance. Urban metabolism impact assessment can, therefore, contribute to the identification of sustainable urban structures with regards, for example, to building types, materials and layout, as well as to location and capacity of transportation and infrastructural developments. In this way, it enables the formulation of planning and policy recommendations to promote efficient use of resources and enhance environmental quality in urban areas. The European FP7 project BRIDGE (sustainaBle uRban plannIng Decision support accountinG for urban mEtabolism) has developed a decision-support system (DSS) that systematically integrates urban metabolism components into impact assessment processes with the aim of accurately quantifying the potential effects of proposed planning interventions. The DSS enables integration of multiple spatial and non-spatial datasets (e.g. physical flows of energy and material with variables of social and economic change) in a systematic manner to obtain spatially defined assessment results and to thus inform planners and decision-makers. This multi-criteria approach also enables incorporation of stakeholders' perceptions in order to prioritise decisive assessment criteria. This paper describes the methodological framework used to develop the DSS and critically examines the results of its practical application in five European cities. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Urban metabolism in sustainability assessment of planning alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer European FP7 project applied to 5 real life case studies across Europe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decision support system enables incorporating scientific knowledge into planning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Scale, data availability and stakeholder representativeness limit its application.

Gonzalez, Ainhoa, E-mail: ainhoag@yahoo.com [Trinity Centre for Biodiversity Research, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Donnelly, Alison, E-mail: donnelac@tcd.ie [Centre for the Environment, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Jones, Mike, E-mail: mike.jones@tcd.ie [Discipline of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Chrysoulakis, Nektarios, E-mail: zedd2@iacm.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Applied and Computational Mathematics (Greece); Lopes, Myriam, E-mail: myr@ua.pt [Departamento de Ambiente e Ordenamento and CESAM, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

2013-01-15

381

Energetic composite and system with enhanced mechanical sensitivity to initiation of self-sustained reaction  

DOEpatents

An energetic composition and system using amassed energetic multilayer pieces which are formed from the division, such as for example by cutting, scoring, breaking, crushing, shearing, etc., of a mechanically activatable monolithic energetic multilayer(s) (e.g. macro-scale sheets of multilayer films), for enhancing the sensitivity of the energetic composite and system to mechanical initiation of self-sustained reaction. In particular, mechanical initiation of the energetic composition may be achieved with significantly lower mechanical energy inputs than that typically required for initiating the monolithic energetic multilayers from which it is derived.

Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-29

382

Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System  

E-print Network

Medicinal plants are increasingly recognized worldwide as an alternative source of efficacious and inexpensive medications to synthetic chemo-therapeutic compound. Rapid declining wild stocks of medicinal plants accompanied by adulteration and species substitutions reduce their efficacy, quality and safety. Consequently, the low accessibility to and non-affordability of orthodox medicine costs by rural dwellers to be healthy and economically productive further threaten their life expectancy. Finding comprehensive information on medicinal plants of conservation concern at a global level has been difficult. This has created a gap between computing technologies' promises and expectations in the healing process under complementary and alternative medicine. This paper presents the design and implementation of a Multimedia-based Medicinal Plants Sustainability Management System addressing these concerns. Medicinal plants' details for designing the system were collected through semi-structured interviews and databas...

Omogbadegun, Zacchaeus; Ayo, Charles; Mbarika, Victor; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Otofia, Efe; Chieze, Frank

2011-01-01

383

Sustainability evaluation of automatic and conventional milking systems on organic dairy farms in Denmark  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic dairy farmers in Denmark currently are implementing automatic milking systems (AMS) to save labour costs. As organic agriculture aims at sustainable production, the introduction of a new technology such as AMS should be evaluated regarding its economic viability, environmental impact, and social acceptability, i.e., its contribution to sustainable development. The objective of this research, therefore, was to evaluate sustainability

F. W. Oudshoorn; T. Kristensen; A. J. van der Zijpp; I. J. M. de Boer

384

Sustainability evaluation of automatic and conventional milking systems on organic dairy farms in Denmark  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organic dairy farmers in Denmark currently are implementing automatic milking systems (AMS) to save labour costs. As organic agriculture aims at sustainable production, the introduction of a new technology such as AMS should be evaluated regarding its economic viability, environmental impact, and social acceptability, i.e., its contribution to sustainable development. The objective of this research, therefore, was to evaluate sustainability

F. W. Oudshoorn; T. Kristensen; Zijpp van der A. J; Boer de I. J. M

2012-01-01

385

Toward cropping systems that enhance productivity and sustainability  

PubMed Central

The defining features of any cropping system are (i) the crop rotation and (ii) the kind or intensity of tillage. The trend worldwide starting in the late 20th century has been (i) to specialize competitively in the production of two, three, a single, or closely related crops such as different market classes of wheat and barley, and (ii) to use direct seeding, also known as no-till, to cut costs and save soil, time, and fuel. The availability of glyphosate- and insect-resistant varieties of soybeans, corn, cotton, and canola has helped greatly to address weed and insect pest pressures favored by direct seeding these crops. However, little has been done through genetics and breeding to address diseases caused by residue- and soil-inhabiting pathogens that remain major obstacles to wider adoption of these potentially more productive and sustainable systems. Instead, the gains have been due largely to innovations in management, including enhancement of root defense by antibiotic-producing rhizosphere-inhabiting bacteria inhibitory to root pathogens. Historically, new varieties have facilitated wider adoption of new management, and changes in management have facilitated wider adoption of new varieties. Although actual yields may be lower in direct-seed compared with conventional cropping systems, largely due to diseases, the yield potential is higher because of more available water and increases in soil organic matter. Achieving the full production potential of these more-sustainable cropping systems must now await the development of varieties adapted to or resistant to the hazards shown to account for the yield depressions associated with direct seeding. PMID:17130454

Cook, R. James

2006-01-01

386

Organic farming and the sustainability of agricultural systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The desire for a sustainable agriculture is universal, yet agreement on how to progress towards it remains elusive. The extent to which the concept of sustainable agriculture has any operational meaning is discussed. Sustainability is considered in relation to organic farming — a sector growing rapidly in many countries. The role of regulation and the use of synthetic agrochemicals, the desired

D. Rigby; D. Cáceres

2001-01-01

387

Center for Coal-Derived Low Energy Materials for Sustainable Construction  

SciTech Connect

The overarching goal of this project was to create a sustained center to support the continued development of new products and industries that manufacture construction materials from coal combustion by-products or CCB’s (e.g., cements, grouts, wallboard, masonry block, fillers, roofing materials, etc). Specific objectives includes the development of a research kiln and associated system and the formulation and production of high performance low-energy, low-CO2 emitting calcium sulfoaluminate (CAS) cement that utilize coal combustion byproducts as raw materials.

Jewell, Robert; Robl, Tom; Rathbone, Robert

2012-06-30

388

Ammonia recycling enables sustainable operation of bioelectrochemical systems.  

PubMed

Ammonium (NH4(+)) migration across a cation exchange membrane is commonly observed during the operation of bioelectrochemical systems (BES). This often leads to anolyte acidification (pH <5.5) and complete inactivation of biofilm electroactivity. Without using conventional pH controls (dosage of alkali or pH buffers), the present study revealed that anodic biofilm activity (current) could be sustained if recycling of ammonia (NH3) was implemented. A simple gas-exchange apparatus was designed to enable continuous recycling of NH3 (released from the catholyte at pH >10) from the cathodic headspace to the acidified anolyte. Results indicated that current (110 mA or 688 Am(-3) net anodic chamber volume) was sustained as long as the NH3 recycling path was enabled, facilitating continuous anolyte neutralization with the recycled NH3. Since the microbial current enabled NH4(+) migration against a strong concentration gradient (~10-fold), a novel way of ammonia recovery from wastewaters could be envisaged. PMID:23774293

Cheng, Ka Yu; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

2013-09-01

389

Analysis of irrigation systems using sustainability-related criteria.  

PubMed

Sustainable agricultural development as a desired goal in irrigation management is a result of recent public awareness of the scarcity of water for food production. In order to incorporate sustainability-related criteria in the analysis of irrigation systems, the present study aims at introducing environmental indices that represent irrigation water conservation and satisfactory production and income for farmers under stress conditions. An experiment was conducted in Chania, Greece, during the irrigation periods of 1989 and 1990. The irrigation water delivered to 40 experimental plots and the relevant soil moisture content at the root zone were recorded. The data, collected in real time, were used for the calculation of the corresponding environmental indices. The variation of indices in time and space was high, and demonstrated that up to 13% of water was delivered to crops, 82% was yield loss, and 84% was economic return. The study indicated that environmental indices could be easily computed by means of routinely collected data, and could also be incorporated into decision-making approaches, such as compromise programming, in order to develop policies for irrigation water allocation. PMID:11476491

Manoliadis, O G

2001-01-01

390

A total system approach to sustainable pest management  

PubMed Central

A fundamental shift to a total system approach for crop protection is urgently needed to resolve escalating economic and environmental consequences of combating agricultural pests. Pest management strategies have long been dominated by quests for “silver bullet” products to control pest outbreaks. However, managing undesired variables in ecosystems is similar to that for other systems, including the human body and social orders. Experience in these fields substantiates the fact that therapeutic interventions into any system are effective only for short term relief because these externalities are soon “neutralized” by countermoves within the system. Long term resolutions can be achieved only by restructuring and managing these systems in ways that maximize the array of “built-in” preventive strengths, with therapeutic tactics serving strictly as backups to these natural regulators. To date, we have failed to incorporate this basic principle into the mainstream of pest management science and continue to regress into a foot race with nature. In this report, we establish why a total system approach is essential as the guiding premise of pest management and provide arguments as to how earlier attempts for change and current mainstream initiatives generally fail to follow this principle. We then draw on emerging knowledge about multitrophic level interactions and other specific findings about management of ecosystems to propose a pivotal redirection of pest management strategies that would honor this principle and, thus, be sustainable. Finally, we discuss the potential immense benefits of such a central shift in pest management philosophy. PMID:9356432

Lewis, W. J.; van Lenteren, J. C.; Phatak, Sharad C.; Tumlinson, J. H.

1997-01-01

391

A total system approach to sustainable pest management.  

PubMed

A fundamental shift to a total system approach for crop protection is urgently needed to resolve escalating economic and environmental consequences of combating agricultural pests. Pest management strategies have long been dominated by quests for "silver bullet" products to control pest outbreaks. However, managing undesired variables in ecosystems is similar to that for other systems, including the human body and social orders. Experience in these fields substantiates the fact that therapeutic interventions into any system are effective only for short term relief because these externalities are soon "neutralized" by countermoves within the system. Long term resolutions can be achieved only by restructuring and managing these systems in ways that maximize the array of "built-in" preventive strengths, with therapeutic tactics serving strictly as backups to these natural regulators. To date, we have failed to incorporate this basic principle into the mainstream of pest management science and continue to regress into a foot race with nature. In this report, we establish why a total system approach is essential as the guiding premise of pest management and provide arguments as to how earlier attempts for change and current mainstream initiatives generally fail to follow this principle. We then draw on emerging knowledge about multitrophic level interactions and other specific findings about management of ecosystems to propose a pivotal redirection of pest management strategies that would honor this principle and, thus, be sustainable. Finally, we discuss the potential immense benefits of such a central shift in pest management philosophy. PMID:9356432

Lewis, W J; van Lenteren, J C; Phatak, S C; Tumlinson, J H

1997-11-11

392

Anschutz Library receives plaque recognizing outstanding efforts in energy conservation and sustainability  

E-print Network

12/5/13 Anschutz Library recognized for outstanding efforts in conservation and sustainability www.lib.ku.edu/news/anschutz.conservation.plaque.shtml 1/1 Contact Us KU Libraries Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (785) 864-8983 AT THE CROSSROADS OF PEOPLE... to recognize outstanding efforts in energy conservation and sustainability. Building operations manager Robert Szabo and Libraries sustainability ambassador Amalia Monroe will accept on behalf of KU Libraries. The presentation will take place at 10 am in Watson...

2009-01-01

393

Carbon Footprint and Sustainability of Agricultural Production Systems in Punjab, India, and Ohio, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainability of agricultural systems depends on their carbon (C) footprint, and the Coutput:Cinput ratio. Thus, this study was conducted with the objectives to: (i) assess the agricultural C emissions in relation to predominant farming systems in Punjab, India, and Ohio, USA; (ii) evaluate C-use efficiency of production systems; and (iii) determine the relative sustainability of agronomic production systems as determined

Anjali Dubey; Rattan Lal

2009-01-01

394

Sustainable PV-powered FPGA-controlled high brightness LED illumination systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a road map for the design and development of sustainable hybrid Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) controlled High Brightness Light Emitting Diode (HB LED) illumination systems. The proposed hybrid system design presents the foundation for future sustainable high efficiency illumination systems. In this system design, an FPGA is used to individually control an array of HB LEDs.

Akram Abu-aisheh; Sameer Khader; Omar Hasan

2012-01-01

395

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Distributed Wind Case Study: Cross more sustainable. According to Baker, they wanted to reduce air pollution as well as be able to make a living off their farm. "Controlling costs is a big part of that," Baker said. "If we can produce all

396

Evaluating the sustainability of space life support systems: case study on air revitalisation systems ARES and BIORAT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space life support systems can be taken as kinds of miniature models of industrial systems found on Earth. The term "industrial" is employed here in a generic sense, referring to all human technological activities. The time scale as well as the physical scope of space life support systems is reduced compared to most terrestrial systems and so is consequently their complexity. These systems can thus be used as a kind of a "laboratory of sustainability" to examine concerns related to the environmental sustainability of industrial systems and in particular to their resource use. Two air revitalisation systems, ARES and BIORAT, were chosen as the test cases of our study. They represent respectively a physico-chemical and a biological life support system. In order to analyse the sustainability of these systems, we began by constructing a generic system representation applicable to both these systems (and to others). The metabolism of the systems was analysed by performing Material Flow Analyses—MFA is a tool frequently employed on terrestrial systems in the field of industrial ecology. Afterwards, static simulation models were developed for both ARES and BIORAT, focusing, firstly, on the oxygen balances of the systems and, secondly, on the total mass balances. It was also necessary to define sustainability indicators adapted to space life support systems in order to evaluate and to compare the performances of ARES and BIORAT. The defined indicators were partly inspired from concepts used in Material Flow Accounting and they were divided into four broad categories: 1. recycling and material use efficiency, 2. autarky and coverage time, 3. resource use and waste creation, and 4. system mass and energy consumption. The preliminary results of our analyses show that the performance of BIORAT is superior compared to ARES in terms of the defined resource use indicators. BIORAT seems especially effective in reprocessing carbon dioxide created by human metabolism. The performances of ARES and BIORAT are somewhat closer in terms of material use efficiency and resource intensity. However, the excellence of BIORAT in terms of resource use is countered by the fact that its energy consumption is greater than that of ARES by a factor of ten.

Suomalainen, Emilia; Erkman, Suren

397

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency Department as Leader in Global Energy Dialogue . . . . . . . . . 20 JISEA: Looking Beyond Clean and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. #12;Realizing a Clean Energy Future2

398

Seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining systemic cultural competence.  

PubMed

Racial and ethnic disparities are disturbing facets of the American healthcare system that document the reality of unequal treatment. Research consistently shows that patients of color experience poorer quality of care and health outcomes contributing to increased risks and accelerated mortality rates relative to their white counterparts. While initially conceptualized as an approach for increasing the responsiveness of children's behavioral health care, cultural competence has been adopted as a key strategy for eliminating racial and ethnic health disparities across the healthcare system. However, cultural competence research and practices largely focus on improving provider competencies, while agency and system level approaches for meeting the service needs of diverse populations are given less attention. In this article we offer seven essential strategies for promoting and sustaining organizational and systemic cultural competence. These strategies are to: (1) Provide executive level support and accountability, (2) Foster patient, community and stakeholder participation and partnerships, (3) Conduct organizational cultural competence assessments, (4) Develop incremental and realistic cultural competence action plans, (5) Ensure linguistic competence, (6) Diversify, develop, and retain a culturally competent workforce, and (7) Develop an agency or system strategy for managing staff and patient grievances. For each strategy we offer several recommendations for implementation. PMID:22581030

Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E; Andres-Hyman, Raquel; Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Davidson, Larry

2013-03-01

399

Annual cycle energy system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The annual cycle energy system (ACES) program which incorporates in a practical system the outstanding energy conservation potential that exists when the unidirectional heat pump and the interseasonal storage of energy are combined to provide heating, cooling, and domestic hot water to buildings is described. Information on the system, its applicability to different geographic areas, and the methodology for designing

R. E. Minturn

1981-01-01

400

Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking  

ScienceCinema

INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

2013-05-28

401

Protective sustainability of ecosystems using Department of Energy buffer lands as a case study.  

PubMed

State and federal agencies are faced with protecting human health and the environment for a range of hazardous sites, including nuclear waste storage facilities. At some sites, nuclear materials must be stored for the foreseeable future because no technology currently exists for safe treatment and disposal. Using Department of Energy (DOE) lands as a case study, this article examines the meaning of protective sustainability for ecosystems and proposes a tiered approach to such protection with stakeholder participation during all phases. The approach includes: (1) governmental, institutional and public support to maintain the system, (2) agreement on the ecosystem to sustain, (3) agreement on the goods and services that the ecosystem should provide, (4) methods of monitoring the status of the ecosystem (usually involving bioindicators), (5) methods of evaluating the trends and changes within that system, and (6) methods of managing or restoring components of the ecosystem (response and corrective actions). The latter three steps are those normally considered for management and maintenance of healthy ecosystems, and figure prominently in natural resource damage assessment (NRDA). However, the former three are necessary components for sustainability. Regardless of technologies or technical expertise, the ecosystem will not be protected sustainably unless there is governmental, institutional, and public support for its protection, as well as consensus about the features of the ecosystem to be protected. While the selection of a preferred ecosystem at DOE sites will likely occur as part of remediation/restoration/NRDA, decisions about ecosystem services and human use on buffer lands can be revisited periodically. Monitoring is an integral part of evaluating continued health and safety of the ecosystem and its component parts, and such data should then be used to evaluate status and trends. These evaluations, however, will be most useful when they include hypothesis testing, tribal involvement stakeholder involvement, and comanagement among all the interested and affected parties. The tiered approach for ecosystem protection described here can be used for any ecosystems. PMID:17934954

Burger, Joanna

2007-11-01

402

Communication : S4FE2009 (International Conference on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy), Rome, 6 au 10 juillet 2009  

E-print Network

Communication : S4FE2009 (International Conference on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy), Rome : Italy (2009)" #12;Communication : S4FE2009 (International Conference on Sustainable Fossil Fuels for Future Energy), Rome, 6 au 10 juillet 2009 2 FFiigguurree 11

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

403

Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface (2011 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Pam Silver of Harvard University gives a presentation on "Designing Biological Systems for Sustainability and Programmed Environmental Interface" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

Silver, Pam [Harvard University

2011-06-03

404

Characteristics and energy balance of a plasma column sustained by a surface wave  

E-print Network

L-71 Characteristics and energy balance of a plasma column sustained by a surface wave M. Chaker, P expérimentale. Abstract. 2014 In this paper, we consider the case of a travelling surface wave sustaining,] Classification Physics Abstracts 52.40D - 52.80 1. Introduction. - The propagation of electron surface waves can

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Toward sustainable energy development in the Indian power sector: A critique of fifty years of power development in India and an analysis of sustainable energy alternatives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At present, the Indian electric power sector (EPS) finds itself in a "triple bind," plagued by a severe resource crunch, adverse environmental impacts and unequal social access to energy services, and a poor record of technical performance in generation and distribution of electricity. The problems of the EPS are seen in this dissertation as manifestations of a larger crisis of unsustainable energy development, rooted in the political economy of power development in India. A theoretical framework is articulated based on a political economy approach constructed for this dissertation. The political economy framework is comprised of three elements: a materialization thesis that describes the core social relations in support of a specific political and economic structure; an institutionalization thesis that describes how these material relations are reproduced; and an ideology thesis which argues that a pervasive ideology exists making intelligible the existence of a particular form of political economy. From the vantage-point of this framework, and through a detailed examination of the political history of the power sector in India, the crisis in the Indian power sector is linked to the contradictions of what is termed as the "conventional model of energy development" (CMED) embraced by Indian planners at the time of independence. It is argued that the crisis in the EPS is caused by the intensive bureaucratization and technicization of the system, all but removing it from social and environmental evaluation. Current policy prescriptions for the Indian EPS, both Western as well as domestic, call for further strengthening the technocratic construct of the EPS. Privatization and restructuring experiments, underway in India, rather than breaking away from the existing approach, actually deepen the institutional hold of the CMED. Sustainable energy development (SED) is examined as an alternative to the CMED. The meaning and relevance of this concept in the context of the Indian EPS are examined, and guideposts to sustainability are identified. Linking SED back to the political economy framework, it is argued that if the concept is to signify a real departure from the current EPS, ideological, material and institutional changes will be required. These changes will result not only in a transformation of technology, but in a reconstruction of the energy system, from its values and philosophy to its social, political, economic, and environmental relations.

Govindarajalu, Chandrasekhar

406

Ensuring the Sustainability of Russian Federation National Nuclear Material Accounting System  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Information System (FIS) is the national information source on nuclear material accounting of the Russian Federation (RF). RF regulations mandated the creation of a national nuclear material accounting system to be managed by Federal Agency For Atomic Energy (Rosatom), and for the past decade, the FIS has been developed for all organizations required to report to Rosatom. The system represents a successful integration of U.S. financial support and consulting with Russian vision and technical expertise, creating a viable national nuclear material accounting system. This paper discusses crucial elements to ensure Sustainability of the FIS. A long-term plan for operation and maintenance of the information system is critical to a sustainable national accounting system. Plans undertaken throughout the FIS Project lifecycle have supported the necessary elements to ensure success. Through the next two years, long-term planning will be reevaluated and the successful elements and new initiatives will become part of an overall Operations Management Program. FIS resource needs will be managed through prioritization and ranking for each Program element, including: system operation; revising and implementing supporting regulations; establishing monitoring and control mechanisms to ensure validity of the data reported; maintaining and improving communication channels; and establishing regular FIS training. The results of a survey on improving FIS reporting, expected in June 2006, will be used in the prioritization and ranking process. Developing the Program and planning for long-term sustainability of the FIS will ensure a viable national nuclear material accounting system for the future.

Pitel, V; Kasumova, L; Kushnaryov, M; Babcock, R

2006-06-07

407

R E S U M E Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development of Indonesia and Germany  

E-print Network

R E S U M E Renewable Energy for Sustainable Development of Indonesia and Germany (RESDIG is organizing a two-day seminar on renewable energies and a two-day field-trip to some renewable energy projects of Oldenburg ­ UO and Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember ­ ITS on Post Graduate Program in Renewable Energy

Peinke, Joachim

408

DOES THE LOCAL EMBEDDEDNESS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT? SOME  

E-print Network

1 DOES THE LOCAL EMBEDDEDNESS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT underlines the spatial transition of energy production relating to the spreading of wind turbines Europe. From a rural perspective, the spreading of wind energy parks is the comeback of energy production

Boyer, Edmond

409

Sustainability decision-making frameworks and the application of systems thinking: an urban context  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature cites the importance of systems thinking to operationalise sustainability. However, the application of a systems approach for sustainable development is not widely applied. The failure to take advantage of systems thinking results in decision-making processes being less effective than they could be. As the complexity of decision-making for built environment professionals becomes more challenging with increasing pressures, such

Kathryn M. Davidson; Jackie Venning

2011-01-01

410

Piezoelectric transducer based devices for development of a sustainable machining system - A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainability in production is to develop a system that reduces usage of resources for converting raw material into useful product; Moreover, it could produce waste that can be directly used by another production system. Intentionally inducing vibration to make machining system sustainable started from the work of Kumabe. Based on the direction of modulation with respect to workpiece motion three

Ravinder Singh Joshi; Harpreet Singh

2011-01-01

411

Solar energy collection system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved solar energy collection system, having enhanced energy collection and conversion capabilities, is delineated. The system is characterized by a plurality of receivers suspended above a heliostat field comprising a multiplicity of reflector surfaces, each being adapted to direct a concentrated beam of solar energy to illuminate a target surface for a given receiver. A magnitude of efficiency, suitable for effectively competing with systems employed in collecting and converting energy extracted from fossil fuels, is indicated.

Selcuk, M. K. (inventor)

1977-01-01

412

Sustainable Energy Research Team publications Whittaker, C., Adams, P., McManus, M.C Securing a Bioenergy Supply: UK and US in  

E-print Network

.K. and Norman, J.B., (2011). The Impact of UK Government Industrial Energy Efficiency RD&D (Research methodologies. Energy Policy. doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2011.06.054 · Hammond, G.P., S.S. Ondo Akwe and S. Williams.B. Winnett, 2010, 'The Lebanese electricity system in the context of sustainable development', Energy Policy

Martin, Ralph R.

413

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Energy Finance Solar--in the form of sunshine--than the country uses in an entire year.3 The ability to convert solar energy targeted an additional two-thirds cost reduction by 2020 and set a goal of solar energy production

414

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

, DOE. #12;iv List of Acronyms ABS asset-backed security DOE U.S. Department of Energy DSCR debt serviceNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

415

State Energy Data System  

EIA Publications

The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) source for comprehensive state energy statistics. Included are estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Production and consumption estimates begin with the year 1960 while price and expenditure estimates begin with 1970. The multidimensional completeness of SEDS allows users to make comparisons across states, energy sources, sectors, and over time.

2013-01-01

416

A sustainability analysis of geothermal energy development on the island of Dominica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dominica is heavily dependent on fossil fuels to meet its electricity generation needs. Dominica's volcanic origin and current volcanic activity allow the island to be an ideal place for the production of geothermal energy. Once geothermal exploration and development has begun in Dominica, it is uncertain whether the efforts will produce an environmentally, economically and socially feasible exploitation of the resource. Using content analysis and cost benefit analysis, this study examined the impacts of geothermal energy development based on the triple bottom line of sustainability for the Wotten Waven community, as well as the island as a whole. The results indicate that this project will have an overall positive impact on the triple bottom line of sustainability for Dominica. Therefore, geothermal energy may provide substantial net benefits to economic and sustainable development of the island. Assessing the sustainability of geothermal development is important as Dominica begins to produce geothermal energy.

Edwards, Kiyana Marie-Jose

417

The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)  

E-print Network

The Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pleased Regional Sun Grant Center that advances biomass and bioenergy throughout the region. Dr. Rials was recently

418

Solar energy collection system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solar energy collection system for a building is described. A solar energy collector is disposed at the exterior surface of the building and includes a solar energy absorbent body having a surface which is exposed to sunlight and from which solar energy can be transmitted as sensible heat. A panel which is transparent to sunlight is spaced from the

Hummell

1978-01-01

419

Solar energy collection system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solar energy collection system for a building is described. A solar energy collector is disposed at the exterior surface of the building and includes a solar energy absorbent body having a surface which is exposed to sunlight and from which solar energy can be transmitted as sensible heat. A panel which is transparent to sunlight is spaced from the

1982-01-01

420

Alternative Farming Systems Information Center: Sustainable Agriculture Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains the following categories of information related to sustainable agriculture: Bibliographies of articles and research publications, searchable sites and databases, educational resources for elementary, high school, and college instructors, and lists of people and institutions that are involved in researching or promoting sustainable agriculture.

2008-10-13

421

Socially sustainable work organizations : a chaordic systems approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines both theoretical and practical approaches to socially sustainable work organizations. Socially sustainable work organizations have a dynamic ability to function both by repeating accustomed and by devising innovative solutions, and they maintain this operational viability by promoting the functioning capabilities of their stakeholders. The organizational and stakeholder functioning capabilities are founded on complexity stemming from the simultaneous

Mari Kira; Frans M. van Eijnatten

2008-01-01

422

ELEMENTS OF A MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS  

EPA Science Inventory

The subject of Sustainability has recently attracted enormous interest in the minds of both the public and the scientific and engineering community. The reason for this interest is the fact that the concept of Sustainability holds the promise of a solution to society's long-term ...

423

Chapter 2: Agricultural Landscapes and Ecologically Based Farming Systems Building a Sustainable Future: Ecologically Based Farming Systems  

E-print Network

13 Chapter 2: Agricultural Landscapes and Ecologically Based Farming Systems Building a Sustainable Future: Ecologically Based Farming Systems Agricultural Landscapes and Ecologically Based Farming Systems, California. Figure 4. Irrigation system in Colorado. Ecological principles Agricultural landscapes

Landis, Doug

424

Design considerations for solar energy harvesting wireless embedded systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable operation of battery powered wireless embed- ded systems (such as sensor nodes) is a key challenge, and considerable research effort has been devoted to energy optimization of such systems. Environmental energy harvesting, in particular solar based, has emerged as a viable technique to supplement battery supplies. However, designing an efficient solar harvesting system to realize the potential benefits of

Vijay Raghunathan; Aman Kansal; Jason Hsu; Jonathan Friedman; Mani B. Srivastava

2005-01-01

425

Approaches for Planning and Implementing Sustainable Energy Growth in a Complex World: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The subject of sustainable energy development has been widely discussed and debated in recent years. However, despite widespread interest, progress toward this goal has been limited. This paper will build on current thinking related to sustainable development, energy forecasting, and complexity theory and show how past roadmapping methodologies fall short. While proposing ways of thinking about our responses to global changes, we consider how we can create and discover the pathways through those unpredictable changes toward high global renewables penetration.

Snyder, N.; Schwab, A.

2012-06-01

426

Thermochemical energy storage systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thermochemical energy storage system is based on a reversible chemical reaction which consumes heat when proceeding in one direction and releases heat when proceeding in the opposite direction. The paper presents an overview of chemical reactions which can be used in a thermochemical energy storage (CES) system. Selection criteria for candidate CES systems are presented. Emphasis is on thermal

E. W. Schmidt; P. A. Lowe

1976-01-01

427

ONLINE LEARNING Managing energy for a sustainable future  

E-print Network

portfolio strategies n Examine energy security risk analysis methods n Learn innovative methods; energy security risk analysis methods; and financing energy management projects. Plant energy managers energy supplies, energy security and energy trading. You will also explore reliability and risk analysis

California at Davis, University of

428

Qualitative system analysis as a means for sustainable governance of emerging technologies: the case of nanotechnology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable governance of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology is a demanding societal challenge due to the “technological throughput” of today's and tomorrow's social life. A prerequisite for sustainable governance is an integrated understanding of the factors, interdependencies and developmental potentials of the technological system under investigation. This paper presents a transdisciplinary qualitative system analysis on nanotechnology in Switzerland, integrating perspectives

Arnim Wiek; Daniel J. Lang; Michael Siegrist

2008-01-01

429

Culture, Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Sustainable Development: A Critical View of Education in an African Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article's focus is the relationship between culture, indigenous knowledge systems (IKS), sustainable development and education in Africa. It analyzes the concept of sustainability with particular reference to education and indigenous knowledge systems. In particular the article analyzes the documents from the World Summit in Johannesburg in…

Breidlid, Anders

2009-01-01

430

Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological and geochemical variations in  

E-print Network

Large sedimentary aquifer system and sustainable management: investigations of hydrogeological issues are essential for the sustainable management in this region. The system extends over 116,000 km of molassic sediments. The groundwater recharge is assumed to occur through the Eocene outcrops located

Boyer, Edmond

431

10.391J / 1.818J / 2.65J / 11.371J / 22.811J / ESD.166J Sustainable Energy, January IAP 2007 - Spring 2007  

E-print Network

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. ...

Drake, Elisabeth

2007-01-01

432

Energy Recovery System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cogeneration system is one in which the energy ordinarily wasted in an industrial process is recovered and reused to create a second form of energy. Such an energy recovery system is in use at Crane Company's plant in Ferguson, KY, which manufactures ceramic bathroom fixtures. Crane's system captures hot stack gases from the company's four ceramic kilns and uses them to produce electrical power for plant operations.

1983-01-01

433

Energy scalable system design  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce the notion of energy-scalable system- design. The principal idea is to maximize computational quality for a given energy constraint at all levels of the system hierarchy. The desirable energy-quality (E-Q) characteristics of systems are dis- cussed. E-Q behavior of algorithms is considered and transforms that significantly improve scalability are analyzed using three dis- tinct categories of commonly used

Amit Sinha; Alice Wang; Anantha Chandrakasan

2002-01-01

434

Dynamic earth-contact building: A sustainable low-energy technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustainable development includes low-energy buildings, which reduce energy consumption, green house gases emission, water usage, etc. The choice of subsurface wall at varying depths for construction of buildings has a direct impact on energy consumption and the environment. This paper includes in its scope all building structures in which a significant area is in direct contact with the earth, and

Rakesh Kumar; Shweta Sachdeva; S. C. Kaushik

2007-01-01

435

The Potential for Launching a Postgraduate Course on Sustainable Energy in Saudi Arabia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The pressures of a growing global population, compounded by environmental degradation, escalating energy use and the depletion of natural energy resources, have led to sustainable energy (SE) holding a prominent position on the international agenda. In spite of the widespread recognition of the important role of SE education in securing a…

Taleb, Hanan M.

2014-01-01

436

Developing sustainable tourism, using a multicriteria analysis on renewable energy in Mediterranean Islands  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work attempts to assess existing approaches to study the implementation of renewable energy technologies (RET) in specific islands in order to test if classification of islands is possible on the basis of renewable energy approach used, if there is a certain degree of correlation between renewable energy and sustainable tourism development, and if a path towards thematic tourism development

Evanthie Michalena; Jeremy Hills; Jean-Paul Amat

2009-01-01

437

Investigating the need of nuclear power plants for sustainable energy in Iran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the decades, the consumption of all types of energy such as electricity increased rapidly in Iran. Therefore, the government decided to redevelop its nuclear program to meet the rising electricity demand and decrease consumption of fossil fuels. In this paper, the effect of this policy in four major aspects of energy sustainability in the country, including energy price, environmental

A. Mazandarani; T. M. I. Mahlia; W. T. Chong; M. Moghavvemi

2011-01-01

438

Moving Sustainability Forward: Energy Efficient Renovations and Solar Solutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For any goal to be a "smart goal" it needs to be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time sensitive. This is equally true for sustainability goals for educational facilities. Evidence abounds that "green strategies" greatly impact both the academic and operational performance of a school. Agencies from the U.S. Environmental Protection…

Taylor, Bill

2011-01-01

439

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Western Wind and SolarNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency Integration Study Phase 2 An examination of how wind and solar power affect operations, costs, and emissions

440

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

to load. Statistical analysis was conducted to investigate wind and solar impacts at timescales rangingNREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308

441

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.  

E-print Network

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Final Report K. Wipke, S. Sprik, J. Kurtz, T

442

Challenges and opportunities for implementing sustainable energy strategies in coastal communities of Baja California Sur, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation explores the potential of renewable energy and efficiency strategies to solve the energy challenges faced by the people living in the biosphere reserve of El Vizcaino, which is located in the North Pacific region of the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. This research setting provides a practical analytical milieu to understand better the multiple problems faced by practitioners and agencies trying to implement sustainable energy solutions in Mexico. The thesis starts with a literature review (chapter two) that examines accumulated international experience regarding the development of renewable energy projects as a prelude to identifying the most salient implementation barriers impeding this type of initiatives. Two particularly salient findings from the literature review include the importance of considering gender issues in energy analysis and the value of using participatory research methods. These findings informed fieldwork design and the analytical framework of the dissertation. Chapter three surveys electricity generation as well as residential and commercial electricity use in nine coastal communities located in El Vizcaino. Chapter three summarizes the fieldwork methodology used, which relies on a mix of qualitative and quantitative research methods that aim at enabling a gender-disaggregated analysis to describe more accurately local energy uses, needs, and barriers. Chapter four describes the current plans of the state government, which are focused in expanding one of the state's diesel-powered electricity grids to El Vizcaino. The Chapter also examines the potential for replacing diesel generators with a combination of renewable energy systems and efficiency measures in the coastal communities sampled. Chapter five analyzes strategies to enable the implementation of sustainable energy approaches in El Vizcaino. Chapter five highlights several international examples that could be useful to inform organizational changes at the federal and state level aimed at fostering renewable energy and efficiency initiatives that enhance energy security, protect the environment, and also increase economic opportunities in El Vizcaino and elsewhere in Mexico. Chapter six concludes the thesis by providing: a summary of all key findings, a broad analysis of the implications of the research, and an overview of future lines of inquiry.

Etcheverry, Jose R.

443

SUSTAINABILITY: ECOLOGICAL, SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, TECHNOLOGICAL, AND SYSTEMS ASPECTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Sustainability is generally associated with a definition by the World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987: "? development that ?meets the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising the ability to meet those of the future' ?" However, a mathematical theo...

444

Integrating Participatory Learning and Action Research and Systems Ecology: A Potential for Sustainable Agriculture Transitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the potential of integrating Participatory Learning and Action Research (PLAR) and Systems Ecology (SE)\\u000a for improving research capability in facilitating sustainable development transitions in agriculture. Goal conflicts that\\u000a arose in a PLAR group working on sustainability issues in small-scale organic tomato production are analysed from the perspective\\u000a of SE. The possibility to improve agency for sustainable development

Karin Eksvärd; Torbjörn Rydberg

2010-01-01

445

Exploring intersectoral convergence of sustainable energy and disaster management for residential buildings in the U.S  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Housing in the U.S. is a major focal point for both sustainability and disaster management. This study assesses intersectoral convergence of sustainable energy and disaster management affecting residential buildings in the U.S. using an interpretive content analysis and thematic text analysis of written materials. Twenty-four word combinations were searched for in 62 written materials to identify occurrences of convergence and to uncover how the terms are used in the separate policy fields. The disaster management and sustainable energy domains have some complementary public policies, actors, interest groups, regulatory systems, goals and desired outcomes; however, these two fields have not adequately converged, missing opportunities for greater positive impact on society. Convergence is found in isolated examples. Namely, convergence is found in federal interagency collaboration, policies that are general enough to span both domains, and policies that address long-range actions rather than emergency response. One voluntary program, FORTIFIED Homes, was identified. The Center for Housing Policy is noted as a key interest group guiding the convergence of disaster and sustainable energy policy.

Martel, J. C.

446

Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in using and interpreting EC flux measurements. We compare EC observations from two towers established over sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in Hawai'i, USA under similar cultivation, temperature, sunlight, and precipitation, but drastically different wind conditions due to orographic effects. At a daily scale, we find that energy closure for both towers occurs on days when the entire 24 hours has sufficient turbulence. At our windier site, this turbulence condition occurs over 60% of the time, which contributes to substantially better daily energy closure (~98%) than at the calmer site (~75%). At our windy site, we then invert the daily energy closure for continuously windy days to calculate canopy energy storage. At full canopy, peak daily canopy energy storage fluxes (200-400 Wm-2) are approximately an order of magnitude larger than soil heat flux (20-40 Wm-2). As a fraction of net radiation, canopy energy storage appears to vary seasonally and shows substantially greater variability than soil heat flux. The results illustrate the importance of sustained turbulence for accurate, direct measurement of land-atmosphere fluxes. As increasing number of EC towers are established in complex terrain, these results indicate the need for preliminary wind studies to optimize tower placement where orography enhances, rather than suppresses, turbulence.

Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.

2012-12-01

447

Annual cycle energy system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design, operation, and performance of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES) which provides space heating and cooling and hot water for an experimental house in Knoxville, TN are described. ACES is basically an assisted heat pump with energy storage in an ice-water bin. Solar panels are used to replenish the stored energy. The bin must be large enough to

Minturn

1979-01-01

448

Solar energy collecting system  

Microsoft Academic Search

A solar energy collecting system is described, which may be operated to provide usable energy throughout the year, comprises a plurality of rows of elongate radiant solar energy collecting panels, each having upper and lower edges, being mounted to form an angle to the horizon and to face the sun's position at solar noon. An elongate reflector, also having upper

Broberg

1977-01-01

449

Analysis of the interrelationship of energy, economy, and environment: A model of a sustainable energy future for Korea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary purpose of this dissertation is to provide the groundwork for a sustainable energy future in Korea. For this purpose, a conceptual framework of sustainable energy development was developed to provide a deeper understanding of interrelationships between energy, the economy, and the environment (E 3). Based on this theoretical work, an empirical simulation model was developed to investigate the ways in which E3 interact. This dissertation attempts to develop a unified concept of sustainable energy development by surveying multiple efforts to integrate various definitions of sustainability. Sustainable energy development should be built on the basis of three principles: ecological carrying capacity, economic efficiency, and socio-political equity. Ecological carrying capacity delineates the earth's resource constraints as well as its ability to assimilate wastes. Socio-political equity implies an equitable distribution of the benefits and costs of energy consumption and an equitable distribution of environmental burdens. Economic efficiency dictates efficient allocation of scarce resources. The simulation model is composed of three modules: an energy module, an environmental module and an economic module. Because the model is grounded on economic structural behaviorism, the dynamic nature of the current economy is effectively depicted and simulated through manipulating exogenous policy variables. This macro-economic model is used to simulate six major policy intervention scenarios. Major findings from these policy simulations were: (1) carbon taxes are the most effective means of reducing air-pollutant emissions; (2) sustainable energy development can be achieved through reinvestment of carbon taxes into energy efficiency and renewable energy programs; and (3) carbon taxes would increase a nation's welfare if reinvested in relevant areas. The policy simulation model, because it is based on neoclassical economics, has limitations such that it cannot fully account for socio-political realities (inter- and intra-generational equity) which are core feature of sustainability. Thus, alternative approaches based on qualitative analysis, such as the multi-criteria approach, will be required to complement the current policy simulation model.

Boo, Kyung-Jin

450

Biomass as a Renewable Energy Source for Sustainable Fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attempts to establish regenerative energy sources are still being rejected. Only since the oil crises, have regenerative energy sources been included in energy policy discussions. Compared with conventional sources of energy that have been used a much longer period of time, there appears to be a considerable lack of knowledge on regenerative sources of energy. In contrast, renewable sources of

K. Kaygusuz

2009-01-01

451

A screening life cycle metric to benchmark the environmental sustainability of waste management systems.  

PubMed

The disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) can lead to significant environmental burdens. The implementation of effective waste management practices, however, requires the ability to benchmark alternative systems from an environmental sustainability perspective. Existing metrics--such as recycling and generation rates, or the emissions of individual pollutants--often are not goal-oriented, are not readily comparable, and may not provide insight into the most effective options for improvement. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is an effective approach to quantify and compare systems, but full LCA comparisons typically involve significant expenditure of resources and time. In this work we develop a metric called the Resource Conservation Efficiency (RCE) that is based on a screening-LCA approach, and that can be used to rapidly and effectively benchmark (on a screening level) the ecological sustainability of waste management practices across multiple locations. We first demonstrate that this measure is an effective proxy by comparing RCE results with existing LCA inventory and impact assessment methods. We then demonstrate the use of the RCE metric by benchmarking the sustainability of waste management practices in two U.S. cities: San Francisco and Honolulu. The results show that while San Francisco does an excellent job recovering recyclable materials, adding a waste to energy (WTE) facility to their infrastructure would most beneficially impact the environmental performance of their waste management system. Honolulu would achieve the greatest gains by increasing the capture of easily recycled materials not currently being recovered. Overall results also highlight how the RCE metric may be used to provide insight into effective actions cities can take to boost the environmental performance of their waste management practices. PMID:20666561

Kaufman, Scott M; Krishnan, Nikhil; Themelis, Nickolas J

2010-08-01

452

A system approach for reducing the environmental impact of manufacturing and sustainability improvement of nano-scale manufacturing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation develops an effective and economical system approach to reduce the environmental impact of manufacturing. The system approach is developed by using a process-based holistic method for upstream analysis and source reduction of the environmental impact of manufacturing. The system approach developed consists of three components of a manufacturing system: technology, energy and material, and is useful for sustainable manufacturing as it establishes a clear link between manufacturing system components and its overall sustainability performance, and provides a framework for environmental impact reductions. In this dissertation, the system approach developed is applied for environmental impact reduction of a semiconductor nano-scale manufacturing system, with three case scenarios analyzed in depth on manufacturing process improvement, clean energy supply, and toxic chemical material selection. The analysis on manufacturing process improvement is conducted on Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 dielectric gate on semiconductor microelectronics devices. Sustainability performance and scale-up impact of the ALD technology in terms of environmental emissions, energy consumption, nano-waste generation and manufacturing productivity are systematically investigated and the ways to improve the sustainability of the ALD technology are successfully developed. The clean energy supply is studied using solar photovoltaic, wind, and fuel cells systems for electricity generation. Environmental savings from each clean energy supply over grid power are quantitatively analyzed, and costs for greenhouse gas reductions on each clean energy supply are comparatively studied. For toxic chemical material selection, an innovative schematic method is developed as a visual decision tool for characterizing and benchmarking the human health impact of toxic chemicals, with a case study conducted on six chemicals commonly used as solvents in semiconductor manufacturing. Reliability of the schematic method is validated by comparing its benchmark results on 104 chemicals with that from the conventional Human Toxicity Potential (HTP) method. This dissertation concludes with discussions on environmental impact assessment of nanotechnologies and sustainability management of nano-particles. As nano-manufacturing is emerging for wide industrial applications, improvement and expansion of the system approach would be valuable for use in the environmental management of nano-manufacturing and in the risk control of nano-particles in the interests of public health and the environment.

Yuan, Yingchun

453

Decision Support Systems for Sustainable Management of Water Resources: 2. Case Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new ethic of sustainable development extends the main principles of water resources management. Computer-based decision support systems are explored in order to identify their role in the implementation of these principles into water resource management practice. The first part of this research (see the previous article in this issue) has demonstrated that sustainable development is a global concept that

Slobodan I Simonovic

1996-01-01

454

A FRAMEWORK FOR PROCESS INDICATORS TO MONITOR FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT: PRACTICE TO AN URBAN WATER SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although very often used, the concept of sustainable development has not yet been perceived pragmatically. Due to its process\\u000a nature, in this paper, we argue that sustainable development is a process in which the essential feedback loops, or Viability Loops as we name them, in the system in question are kept healthy and functional. This process deals with evolutionary changes

ALI BAGHERI; PEDER HJORTH

2007-01-01

455

Investigating Sustainable Technologies for the Humidification System at the Earth Rangers Centre  

E-print Network

Investigating Sustainable Technologies for the Humidification System at the Earth Rangers Centre consumer of a fossil fuel (natural gas) in the Earth Rangers Centre (ERC) Project Goals · Reduce/remove dependence on natural gas · Implement existing and new sustainable technologies to power the humidification

456

On the Sustainability and Management of a Model System with Ecological, Macroeconomic, and Legal Components  

EPA Science Inventory

Sustainability is essentially about insuring that human existence can be indefinitely supported by the biological system of the Earth at an appropriate level of civilization. Hence, one of the most fundamental questions in sustainability is the extent to which human activities a...

457

Assessing Sustainability in Real Urban Systems: The Greater Cincinnati Metropolitan Area in Ohio  

EPA Science Inventory

The goal of this research article is to present a practical and general methodology for a sustainability assessment in real urban systems. The method is based on the computation and interpretation of Fisher Information (FI) as a sustainability metric using time series for 29 soci...

458

SUSTAINABILITY, RESOURCE SUBSTITUTION IN ENERGY INPUTS AND LEARNING  

E-print Network

-02 Abstract: We assess the impact of the existence of a costly energy substitute (like wind, solar) for a non. In Brazil, Ethanol became the main substitute for petrol (85% of cars are flex-fuel in Brazil resources (in the sense of non-depletable energy which also includes hydro power, wind energy, solar energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

459

Integrating environmental equity, energy and sustainability: A spatial-temporal study of electric power generation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The theoretical scope of this dissertation encompasses the ecological factors of equity and energy. Literature important to environmental justice and sustainability are reviewed, and a general integration of global concepts is delineated. The conceptual framework includes ecological integrity, quality human development, intra- and inter-generational equity and risk originating from human economic activity and modern energy production. The empirical focus of

George Earl Touche

2002-01-01

460

Population growth, sustainable development, energy resources and environmental protection: the nuclear option  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the satisfaction of the future global energy demand. The gravity of the situation the world is going to face in the coming years is due to many and conflicting problems (world population growth, sustainable development, energy resources, environmental protection). Probably some Countries like Italy live these gravity much more then others, may be because they renounced

Daniele Menniti; Alessandro Burgio; Nadia Scordino

2007-01-01

461

International Conference on Sustainable Energy Storage, June 19-21, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland  

E-print Network

2nd International Conference on Sustainable Energy Storage, June 19-21, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland Experimental assessment of a PCM to air heat exchanger for heating peak loads shaving Labat M.labat@insa-lyon.fr Keywords: Phase Change Material, heat storage, experimental tests 1. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, thermal energy

Boyer, Edmond

462

February 22, 2010 Shifting from the Economics of Obesity to Sustainable Energy  

E-print Network

of the Copenhagen tunnel, a clean energy economy is emerging. From 2006 to 2008, energy efficiency and renewables to remove the problem rather than waste time counting molecules. Unleashing the social and market forces those communities and businesses willing to build an entirely new future. Just What Is a Sustainable

Delaware, University of

463

Energy for sustainable road transportation in China: Challenges, initiatives and policy implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of the initiatives launched in energy supply and consumption and the challenges encountered in sustainable road transportation development in China. It analyzes the main energy challenges related to road transportation development arising in the context of economic development, rapid urbanization, and improvement in living standards. It also discusses technological- and policy initiatives needed to deal

Xiaojun Hu; Shiyan Chang; Jingjie Li; Yining Qin

2010-01-01

464

Nanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics  

E-print Network

-free, and green power source for wireless, portable, or implanted electronics. Mechanical energy scavenging basedNanoscale Triboelectric-Effect-Enabled Energy Conversion for Sustainably Powering Portable Electronics Sihong Wang,,§ Long Lin,,§ and Zhong Lin Wang,, * School of Materials Science and Engineering

Wang, Zhong L.

465

Sustainable Energy for Development The evolution of technologies provides remote, non-grid  

E-print Network

Sustainable Energy for Development GOALS: The evolution of technologies provides remote, non-grid connected communities in developing countries the opportunity to take advantage of small power devices/EME/CES: Individuals should have a background or strong interest in renewable generation, portable energy solutions

Mottram, Nigel

466

Biogas: A Promising Sustainable Energy Source for Rural Based Economy in LDC and MDC  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) provides this presentation on biogas. Specifically, the material discusses the economic possibilities the sustainable energy source has for both less developed and more developed countries. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

2013-01-01

467

Energy transition towards economic and environmental sustainability: feasible paths and policy implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on growth feasibility in an era of increasing scarcity of fossil fuels. A stylised dynamic model illustrates the implications of investing in smooth technological progress in the field of renewable energy. Positive rates of GDP growth sustained by fossil fuels entail, on the one hand, more income available for R&D in renewable energy sources, and on the

Simone D'Alessandro; Tommaso Luzzati; Mario Morroni

2010-01-01

468

SD Dimensions: Geographic Information Systems in Sustainable Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Sustainable Development Dimensions, provided by the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, serves as a gateway to FAO sustainable development information. This site is divided into four major categories: people, institutions, knowledge, and environment. Topics covered include women and population, land tenure, extension and education, and environmental policy. Sections link to specific selections or full text of FAO articles, studies, periodicals, and conference papers. The Land Reform section provides an information-rich example; in it resides the full text of Land Reform for 1996 and 1997 (1997 available in Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only at this time): eighteen articles discussing various aspects of the topic around the world.

1998-01-01

469

Automotive energy management system  

SciTech Connect

A hydromechanical/hydrostatic automotive energy management system is described that is comprised of two hydraulic units, the system adapted to provide: an efficient, continuously variable optimal transmission ratio, an intermittent optimal engine operation in city traffic and regenerative braking, thereby, the system is able to reduce a car's fuel consumption by as much as one half while improving drivability.

Shiber, S.

1980-09-23

470

The UN's 'Sustainable Energy for All' initiative is compatible with a warming limit of 2 °C  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Progress towards climate protection has been modest over the past decades despite the ever-increasing urgency for concerted action against global warming. Partly as a response to this, but more directly as a means to promote sustainable development and poverty eradication, the United Nations has initiated a process to promote three global energy objectives: energy access, renewable energy and energy efficiency. Here we discuss the consistency of the proposed energy-related objectives with the overarching climate goal of limiting global temperature increase to below 2 °C. We find that achieving the three energy objectives could provide an important entry point to climate protection, and that sustainability and poverty eradication can go hand in hand with mitigating climate risks. Using energy indicators as the sole metrics for climate action may, however, ultimately fall short of the mark: eventually, only limits on cumulative greenhouse gas emissions will lead to stringent climate protection.

Rogelj, Joeri; McCollum, David L.; Riahi, Keywan

2013-06-01

471

Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: breeding programmes.  

PubMed

The sustainability of breeding activities in 15 pig farming systems in five European countries was evaluated. One conventional and two differentiated systems per country were studied. The Conventional systems were the standard systems in their countries. The differentiated systems were of three categories: Adapted Conventional with focus on animal welfare, meat quality or environment (five systems); Traditional with local breeds in small-scale production (three systems) and Organic (two systems). Data were collected with a questionnaire from nine breeding organisations providing animals and semen to the studied farming systems and from, on average, five farmers per farming system. The sustainability assessment of breeding activities was performed in four dimensions. The first dimension described whether the market for the product was well defined, and whether the breeding goal reflected the farming system and the farmers' demands. The second dimension described recording and selection procedures, together with genetic change in traits that were important in the system. The third dimension described genetic variation, both within and between pig breeds. The fourth dimension described the management of the breeding organisation, including communication, transparency, and technical and human resources. The results show substantial differences in the sustainability of breeding activities, both between farming systems within the same category and between different categories of farming systems. The breeding activities are assessed to be more sustainable for conventional systems than for differentiated systems in three of the four dimensions. In most differentiated farming systems, breeding goals are not related to the system, as these systems use the same genetic material as conventional systems. The breeds used in Traditional farming systems are important for genetic biodiversity, but the small scale of these systems renders them vulnerable. It is hoped that, by reflecting on different aspects of sustainability, this study will encourage sustainable developments in pig production. PMID:25166468

Rydhmer, L; Gourdine, J L; de Greef, K; Bonneau, M

2014-12-01

472

A Model for Sustainable Building Energy Efficiency Retrofit (BEER) Using Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) Mechanism for Hotel Buildings in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hotel building is one of the high-energy-consuming building types, and retrofitting hotel buildings is an untapped solution to help cut carbon emissions contributing towards sustainable development. Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) has b