Science.gov

Sample records for sutured posterior chamber

  1. Fulminant Panuveitis following Iris Suture Fixation of Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Awwad, Shady T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of fulminant panuveitis following iris suture fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens. We hypothesize that the zonular dehiscence allowed the inflammatory cells in the anterior compartment to gain access to the posterior segment mimicking endophthalmitis or toxic anterior segment syndrome. Also certain bulky lens designs, like the current Rayner hydrophilic acrylic lens, are difficult to manipulate and hold in the optic capture position, and hence the iris fixation of these lenses can be traumatic and lengthy. It is advised to exchange such lenses with 3-piece intraocular lenses that are easy to fixate. PMID:23476849

  2. Long-Term Safety and Visual Outcomes of Transscleral Sutured Posterior Chamber IOLs and Penetrating Keratoplasty Combined with Transscleral Sutured Posterior Chamber IOLs

    PubMed Central

    Nottage, Jennifer Marie; Bhasin, Vikram; Nirankari, Verinder S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of consecutive patients who underwent transscleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (TS PCIOL) implantation as well as patients who had combined penetrating keratoplasty (PK) and TS PCIOL. Methods: Data from all patients who had sutured PCIOL insertion performed by the same surgeon (V.S.N.) between January 2003 and June 2007 were compiled and analyzed. Results: Group 1 consisted of 69 eyes of 67 patients who had TS PCIOL only. Mean age was 65.1 years, and mean follow-up was 14.25 months. Mean best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was 20/80 preoperatively and 20/40 postoperatively. Group 2 consisted of 38 eyes of 37 patients who had combined PK and TS PCIOL. Mean age was 70.21 years, and mean follow-up was 14.29 months. Mean BSCVA was <20/250 preoperatively and between 20/70 and 20/80 postoperatively. In both groups, there were no reported cases of choroidal hemorrhage or hyphema. There was one case (0.9%) of suture erosion (group 1). There were no redislocations, lens tilting, suture breakage, or graft rejections. Postoperative complications included uveitis in 1 eye (0.9%), glaucoma in 5 (4.7%), cystoid macular edema in 6 (5.6%), and retinal detachment in 2 (1.9%). Conclusions: The TS PCIOL procedure, as done by the ab externo method, is safe and effective. It has few intraoperative or postoperative complications, and it improves visual acuity in patients requiring either TS PCIOL alone or combined PK and TS PCIOL. Ultimately, in considering TS PCIOL, patient selection, surgical method, and the surgeon’s comfort with the technique must be weighed. PMID:20126501

  3. Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with cow-hitch knot in posterior chamber intraocular lens decentration

    PubMed Central

    Can, Ertuğrul; Koçak, Nurullah; Yücel, Özlem Eşki; Gül, Adem; Öztürk, Hilal Eser; Sayın, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Aim of Study: To describe a simplified ab-interno cow-hitch suture fixation technique for repositioning decentered posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL). Materials and Methods: Two cases are presented with the surgical correction of decentered and subluxated IOL. Ab-interno scleral suture fixation technique with hitch-cow knot in the eye was performed with a ciliary sulcus guide instrument and 1 year follow-up was completed. Results: Both of the patients had well centered lenses postoperatively. Corrected distant and near visual acuities of the patients were improved. There was no significant postoperative complication. In the follow-up period of 1 year, no evidence of suture erosion was found. Conclusions: Ab-interno scleral suture loop fixation with hitch-cow knot in the eye was effective in repositioning decentered or subluxated PC IOLs with excellent postoperative centered lenses and visual outcomes. PMID:27050346

  4. Corneal astigmatism correction with scleral flaps in trans-scleral suture-fixed posterior chamber lens implantation: a preliminary clinical observation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-Wei; Xuan, Dwight; Li, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2011-01-01

    AIM To study the impact of scleral flap position, under which the posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PC-IOL) were sulcus-fixed by trans-scleral suture, on cornea astigmatism. METHODS Twenty-six aphakic or cataract eyes were comprised in this prospective noncomparative case series study. Eleven eyes had traumatic cataract removed without sufficient capsular support, 3 had blunt trauma with subluxated traumatic cataract, 8 had undergone vitreoretinal surgery and 4 had congenital cataract removed. The average age was 54 years (range 21-74 years), with 17 men and 7 women. The foldable PC-IOL was fixed in sulcus by trans-scleral suture. The incision for IOL implantation was made 1mm posterior to limbus along the steepest meridian of cornea, while scleral flaps to bury the knots of trans-scleral suture were made along the flattest meridian. All the surgeries were performed by a single doctor (Ma L), and the follow up was at least 13 months (range 13-28 months). The preoperative, 3 months and 1 year postoperative corneal curvature along the steepest and flattest cornea meridian and overall cornea astigmatism were compared. RESULTS The curvature along the steepest meridian changed from 44.25±2.22D preoperatively to 44.08±2.16D at 3 months postoperatively, and 43.65±5.23D at 1 year postoperatively (P>0.05); the curvature along the flattest meridian changed from 41.24±2.21D preoperatively to 43.15±3.94D at 3 months postoperatively, and 42.85±5.17D at 1 year postoperatively (P<0.05); and the surgery induced astigmatism (SIA) on cornea was calculated by vector analysis, which was 2.42±2.13D at 3 months postoperatively, and 2.18±3.42D at 1 year postoperatively, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). CONCLUSION The scleral flap made along the flattest meridian, under which the posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOL) were sulcus-fixed by trans-scleral suture, can steepen the cornea in varying degrees, thus reducing preexisting corneal astigmatism

  5. Suture Bridge Fixation Technique for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Avulsion Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Won; Lee, Gyu Sang; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-01-01

    We presented a surgical technique including a suture bridge technique with relatively small incision for the reduction and fixation of posterior ligament avulsion fractures. A suture anchor was used to hold the avulsed fragment and a knotless anchor was used to continuously compress the bony fragment into the fracture site, thereby maintaining reduction during healing. PMID:26640635

  6. A knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lenses: one-year results

    PubMed Central

    Kongsap, Pipat

    2015-01-01

    AIM To assess the results of a modified technique for scleral fixation of a posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes which had deficient of posterior capsular support. METHODS This retrospective study was comprised of ten patients with deficient posterior capsular support who underwent one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs, between February 2010 and October 2011. IOL as implanted with one haptic supported on the capsular remnant and the other haptic drawn into the sulcus by anchoring suture without a knot. All patients were evaluated for pre- and postoperative visual acuity, lens centration, intra-and postoperative complications. RESULTS A knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs has successfully been performed on ten eyes. All cases had inadequate capsular support (i.e. a capsular tear ranged from 5 to 7 clock hours). The average age was 74.25±8.87y (SD). The average postoperative uncorrected visual acuity was 0.51 logMAR. Complications included hyphema in one eye, a mild inflammatory reaction in the anterior chamber in two eyes, and a transient rise in IOP in one eye. Neither IOL tilt nor dislocation was observed and there were no later complications. CONCLUSION In the presence of insufficient capsular support, a knotless, one-haptic fixation of posterior chamber IOLs is a safe and viable option which reduces the operation time, and minimizes postoperative suture-related complications. PMID:25709917

  7. Surgical technique for transscleral fixation of a foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Juan B; de Yepez, Jazmin Cedeño; Valero, Alejandro; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of a modified technique for transscleral fixation of a foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens (IOL) for intracapsular aphakia (secondary IOL) or after complicated phacoemulsification was evaluated. All eyes had inadequate or no posterior capsular support. Follow-up was between 4 and 26 months (mean, 12 months). Uncorrected visual acuity improved (> 2 lines) in all patients. During follow-up, the IOL was correctly positioned in all cases. There were no major complications, such as endophthalmitis or suture erosion through the conjunctiva at the site of fixation. No patient required further surgical interventions. This modified technique of transscleral fixation of foldable posterior chamber IOL offers the advantages of a small incision and rapid visual rehabilitation, and minimizes the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:16749265

  8. Aspheric versus Spherical Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Jafarinasab, Mohammad-Reza; Feizi, Sepehr; Baghi, Ahmad-Reza; Ziaie, Hossein; Yaseri, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare spherical aberration and contrast sensitivity function following implantation of four different foldable posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs), namely Sensar, Akreos AO, Tecnis, and AcrySof IQ. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 68 eyes of 68 patients with senile cataracts underwent phacoemulsification and IOL implantation with Sensar (n=17), Akreos AO (n=17), Tecnis (n=17), or AcrySof IQ (n=17). Uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), spherical aberration and contrast sensitivity function (CSF) were compared among the study groups, 3 months after surgery. Results There was no significant difference between the study groups in terms of age (P = 0.21). Mean postoperative BSCVA with Sensar, Akreos AO, Tecnis, and AcrySof IQ was 0.15±0.10, 0.12±0.9, 0.08±0.08, and 0.08±0.07 logMAR, respectively (P=0.08). Spherical aberration measured over a 4 mm pupil was significantly higher with Sensar and Akreos AO than the two other IOLs. The difference between Tecnis and AcrySof IQ was significantly in favor of the former IOL. Over a 6 mm pupil, spherical aberrations were comparable with Sensar and Akreos AO, furthermore spherical aberration was also comparable among eyes implanted with Akreos AO, AcrySof IQ, and Tecnis. Sensar yielded significantly inferior results as compared to Acrysof IQ and Tecnis. CSF with Sensar was inferior to the three aspheric IOLs at the majority of spatial frequencies. Tecnis yielded significantly better mesopic CSF at 1.5 and 3 cycles per degree spatial frequencies. Conclusion Tecnis and AcrySof IQ provided significantly better visual function as compared to Sensar and Akreos AO, especially with smaller pupil size. However, this difference diminished with increasing pupil size. PMID:22737364

  9. Malik`s Technique of Single Loop Fixation of Posterior Chamber Intraocular Lens in Presence of Partial Capsular Support

    PubMed Central

    Singh Malik, Krishan Pal; Goel, Ruchi; Kishore, Divya; Nagpal, Smriti

    2015-01-01

    Single loop fixation of posterior chamber intraocular lens in the presence of partial capsular support is usually performed by creation of additional scleral flap or tunnel. This extra port may expose the suture holding the intraocular lens or the tucked-in lens haptics to the outside environment thereby increasing the risk of endophthalmitis. We describe a technique of single loop fixation where the scleral tunnel is created adjacent to the site with the absent capsule, the leading haptic is placed on the capsular scaffold, the trailing haptic is tied to 9-0 polypropylene, and the suture is then secured to the inner edge of the scleral lip with enough tension to center the optics and the wound is then closed. The suture knot gets buried within the scleral tunnel with no external communication and does not require a separate port. It is an easy, safe, fast and reproducible technique with a lens tilt of less than 2°. PMID:26962380

  10. The posterior chamber phakic refractive lens (PRL): a review

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cambrodí, R J; Piñero, D P; Ferrer-Blasco, T; Cerviño, A; Brautaset, R

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs) is a reversible refractive procedure, preserving the patient's accommodative function with minimal induction of higher order aberrations compared with corneal photoablative procedures. Despite this, as an intraocular procedure, it has potential risks such as cataracts, chronic uveitis, pupil ovalization, corneal endothelial cell loss, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pupillary block glaucoma, astigmatism, or endophthalmitis. Currently, only two models of posterior chamber pIOLs are commercially available, the implantable collammer lens (STAAR Surgical Co.) and the phakic refractive lens (PRL; Zeiss Meditec). The number of published reports on the latter is very low, and some concerns still remain about its long-term safety. The present article reviews the published literature on the outcomes after PRL implantation in order to provide a general overview and evaluate its real potential as a surgical refractive option. PMID:23222559

  11. The posterior chamber phakic refractive lens (PRL): a review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cambrodí, R J; Piñero, D P; Ferrer-Blasco, T; Cerviño, A; Brautaset, R

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs) is a reversible refractive procedure, preserving the patient's accommodative function with minimal induction of higher order aberrations compared with corneal photoablative procedures. Despite this, as an intraocular procedure, it has potential risks such as cataracts, chronic uveitis, pupil ovalization, corneal endothelial cell loss, pigmentary dispersion syndrome, pupillary block glaucoma, astigmatism, or endophthalmitis. Currently, only two models of posterior chamber pIOLs are commercially available, the implantable collammer lens (STAAR Surgical Co.) and the phakic refractive lens (PRL; Zeiss Meditec). The number of published reports on the latter is very low, and some concerns still remain about its long-term safety. The present article reviews the published literature on the outcomes after PRL implantation in order to provide a general overview and evaluate its real potential as a surgical refractive option. PMID:23222559

  12. [Postoperative opacification of posterior chamber intraocular lenses - a review].

    PubMed

    Schmidbauer, J M; Werner, L; Apple, D J; Pandey, S K; Izak, A M; Trivedi, R H; Macky, T A; Auffarth, G U; Peng, Q; Arthur, S N; Escobar-Gomez, M; Ma, L; Vargas, L G

    2001-09-01

    Postoperative opacification of intraocular lenses (IOLs) is a very unpleasant complication for the ophthalmic surgeon and the patient. We report on our experiences with opacification of different foldable IOL designs and rigid poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) posterior chamber lenses.1. Snowflake degeneration of PMMA IOLs: This condition is an unanticipated and surprising late postoperative finding 8 to 15 years after implantation. In our opinion, this complication is probably not related to the PMMA biomaterial itself, but rather it appears to represent a manufacturing problem that has affected a selected, albeit large number of lenses manufactured in the 1980s-mid 1990s.2. Degeneration of UV absorber material and calcium deposits within the optic of hydrophilic IOLs: Two years postoperatively degenerations of UV absorber material and calcium deposits within the optic of single piece hydrophilic acrylic lenses SC60B-OUV manufactured by MDR (Medical developmental research Inc. Clearwater FL, USA) can occur. Although the precise mechanism is not fully known, it was assumed that these opacifications are due to premature aging of the UV blocking agent incorporated in the lens biomaterial and calcification.3. Calcification on the surface of the Bausch & Lomb Hydroviewtrade mark IOLs: Twelve to 15 months postoperatively granular surface calcifications in Hydroviewtrade mark IOLs occured. The mechanism is not fully understood. According to Bausch and Lomb studies, part of the components of the packaging contained silicone, which may have come off the packaging onto the lens optic, where it then appears to be a catalyst for calcium precipitation. The manufacturer has correlated a change in packaging with the appearance of the opacification. The manufacturer now believes that this problem has been solved. However, final verification will require a careful 1 - 2 years clinical study.4. Glistenings in the hydrophobic acrylic AcrySoftrade mark IOLs: The time frame of

  13. Repair of Unstable Posterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation Using Nonabsorbable Tape Suture and Tension Band Technique: A Case Report with Good Results

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Ekrem; Dülgeroğlu, Turan Cihan; Ateş, Ali; Metineren, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation (PSCJD) is quite a rare condition. Nearly half of the closed reduction attempts fail due to various reasons. In this paper, we present a 25-year-old male patient who was admitted to the emergency department in our hospital after having a motor-vehicle accident. It was decided to do PSCJD after physical and imaging studies. Following necessary preparations, closed reduction was attempted with abduction-traction maneuver under general anesthesia; however, adequate stabilization could not be achieved and redislocation was detected during control. Therefore, joint was stabilized with tension band technique using 6 mm polyamide nonabsorbable type suture during open reduction. Painless and complete range of motion in shoulder was achieved at the postoperative 10th week. PMID:26613059

  14. Easy and Safe All-Inside Suture Technique for Posterior Horn Tears of Lateral Meniscus Using Standard Anteromedial and Anterolateral Portals.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Gennaro; de Caro, Francesca; Cepparulo, Riccardo; Guardoli, Alberto; Berni, Luca; Delcogliano, Marco; Ritali, Alice; Guardoli, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the lateral meniscus in weight bearing, distribution of force, shock absorption, articular cartilage protection, proprioception, stabilization of the joint, and joint lubrication is well known. Surgeons currently agree on the importance of preserving the menisci. Different suture techniques have been standardized. These include outside-in, inside-out, and all-inside techniques. The all-inside technique can be used to repair lesions of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. However, this technique presents important disadvantages, such as the necessity for an accessory portal and a high risk of neurovascular damage. For these reasons, we have developed a technique in which a suture hook and a shuttle relay are used to pass the suture wire through the meniscal lesion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus with an all-inside technique, without the use of accessory portals and cannulas, with a standard 30° arthroscopic camera. PMID:24400182

  15. Comparison of Artisan iris-claw intraocular lens implantation and posterior chamber intraocular lens sulcus fixation for aphakic eyes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, He; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    AIM To compare the efficacy and complications of Artisan iris-claw intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and posterior chamber IOL sulcus fixation for the treatment of aphakic eyes without capsular support after vitrectomy. METHODS A prospective study of 45 cases was conducted. Forty-five eyes without sufficient lens capsule support following pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) combined lens extraction were divided into two groups. Group A: 25 eyes received Artisan iris-claw IOL implantation. Group B: 20 eyes received posterior chamber IOL sulcus fixation. The corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and intraocular pressure (IOP), corneal endothelial cell loss rate, surgical time and complications were compared between the two groups. Pigment changes of trabecular meshwork and anterior chamber depths were measured at each time point in Artisan group. RESULTS The mean surgical time of Artisan group was significantly shorter (P<0.05). No statistically significant difference in endothelial cell loss rate was noted between two groups at any time point (P>0.05). CDVA of Artian group was better than that of the sulcus fixation group 1d after surgery (P<0.05) and there was no statistically significant difference 1 and 3mo after surgery (P>0.05). Mean IOP showed no significant differences between groups before and after surgery. The postoperative complications of Artisan group were anterior uveitis, iris depigmentation, pupillary distortion and spontaneous lens dislocation. The complications of sulcus fixation group include choroidal detachment, intraocular haemorrhage, tilt of IOL optic part and retinal detachment. CONCLUSION Secondary Artisan IOL implantation can be performed less invasively and in a shorter surgical time period with earlier visual recovery after surgery compared to transscleral suturing fixation of an IOL. This technique is an effective and safe procedure. It is a promising option for the treatment of aphakic eyes without capsular support after vitrectomy. PMID

  16. Long-term results of extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens insertion in Nepal.

    PubMed Central

    Ruit, S; Robin, A L; Pokhrel, R P; Sharma, A; DeFaller, J; Maguire, P T

    1991-01-01

    We performed a prospective study evaluating the 2-year success rate of extracapsular cataract surgery and posterior chamber IOL insertion performed in 610 eyes by an experienced surgeon in the Nepal Eye Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal. All patients were followed for 2 years. All eyes underwent manual irrigation and aspiration of cortical materials with the insertion of a modified J-loop posterior chamber IOL. Almost one half of eyes had final uncorrected visual acuities of 20/50 or better. Devastating complications, including retinal detachment, corneal decompensation, and endophthalmitis, occurred in 7 (1.2%) eyes. Extracapsular cataract surgery with IOL implantation appears to be a possible alternative in underdeveloped nations where the prevalence of cataract is high and aphakic spectacles are not easily obtained by poor patients and may be lost or broken. The procedure may improve the quality of vision, and therefore the quality of life, in those patients able to obtain pseudophakic vision. PMID:1808818

  17. Efficacy of single-layer continuous suture of the posterior wall in anastomosis involving a difficult location of the digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    LI, GUO-CAI; XU, YONG; ZHANG, YU-CHUN; ZHANG, FANG-CHENG; WANG, QI; MA, QING-JIU

    2014-01-01

    Surgery for digestive tract disease predominantly consists of reconstruction and anastomosis. Due to the difficult location, anastomosis is extremely challenging and the risk of complication increases accordingly. Traditional manual anastomosis and the application of a stapling device are insufficient. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of a novel manual method in a difficult anastomotic location, consisting of a single-layer continuous suture in the posterior wall. In total, 15 beagle dogs were included in the study; eight underwent surgery with the novel manual method for reconstruction and anastomosis of the digestive tract, while seven underwent surgery with the stapler device as a control. The subsequent postoperative complications were observed and, three months later, the anastomotic ports were excised, and the pathological formation and morphological changes were evaluated. No statistically significant differences were identified between the total (50.0 vs. 57.1%; P=0.782) and anastomotic (0.0 vs. 28.6%; P=0.200) complication rates in the manual suture and staple suture groups, respectively. Compared with the control group, the operative expenditure was lower in the manual group (1726.7±33.5 vs. 2135.7±43.1 renminbi; P=0.001), the diameter of the anastomotic port was larger in the manual group (3.04±0.07 vs. 2.24±0.25 cm; P=0.004) and the thickness of the anastomotic port (in cm) was thinner in the manual group (2.94±0.06 vs. 5.07±0.85; P=0.002). Furthermore, the pathological formation of the anastomositic port in the manual group was improved. The results of the current study suggest single-layer continuous suture of the posterior wall in anastomosis of the digestive tract to be a novel method with feasibility and safety, particularly in difficult anastomotic locations. PMID:25202369

  18. Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome caused by posterior chamber intraocular lens--a rare complication in pediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tan, Chau-Yi; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of postoperative uveitis-glaucome-hyphema (UGH) syndrome following pediatric cataract surgery due to posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL). Slit-lamp examination revealed the optic of PC-IOL migrated into anterior chamber. The PC-IOL explantation was performed and ocular inflammation subsided. PMID:19230361

  19. A retrospective comparison of techniques to prevent secondary cataract formation following posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, D D; Kohnen, T

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of various methods of managing the posterior capsule and anterior vitreous on the rate of posterior capsular opacification in children implanted with posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PC IOL). METHODS: We reviewed the charts of 20 eyes of 15 children (1.5-12 years) who underwent primary cataract surgery with PC IOL in the last 5 years. The posterior capsule and anterior vitreous were managed in a variety of ways: in 5 eyes the posterior capsule was left intact, and 15 eyes underwent posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (PCCC)-nine cases without and 6 with anterior vitrectomy. In 8 eyes posterior optic capture was performed, 3 with and 5 without vitrectomy. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 4.5 years (mean: 2 years). RESULTS: Visually significant secondary cataract developed in all 5 eyes with intact posterior capsules and in the 4 eyes that underwent PCCC without vitrectomy and without posterior optic capture (i.e., the optic was left in the capsular bag). The optical axis remained clear in all 6 eyes that underwent PC IOL implantation with vitrectomy (with or without posterior optic capture). Initially, all optic capture cases without vitrectomy also remained clear, but after 6 months 4 out of 5 developed opacification. CONCLUSIONS: In this series posterior capsulorhexis with anterior vitrectomy was the only effective method of preventing or delaying secondary cataract formation in infants and children. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C PMID:9440179

  20. Studies of aqueous humor proteins in rabbits after posterior chamber lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Kałuzny; Rózyczka, J; Gutsze, A; Mierzejewski, A; Pieniazek, W

    1991-01-01

    In 13 rabbits, 1 month to 1 year after posterior chamber lens implantation/polymethylmetacrylate/, the level of aqueous humor proteins was evaluated and the proteins separation in polyacylamide gel was performed. The studies were also carried out in unoperated eyes of the same animals and control group was composed of the eyes before surgery. It was found that in pseudophakic eyes an increased level of proteins remained during the whole year/the highest one month after surgery, slowly decreasing afterwards/, with the appearance of additional fractions. The moderate increase of the proteins concentration was also observed in unoperated eyes. The increase of aqueous humor proteins in pseudophakic eyes indicates that the presence of polymethyl metacrylate is not completely indifferent to the eyeball in spite of the suggestions derived from the clinical observations. PMID:1911644

  1. Location and composition of haptics of posterior chamber intraocular lenses. Histopathologic study of postmortem eyes.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, P J; Champion, R; Green, W R

    1987-02-01

    Of 110 eyes with posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs) examined postmortem, 37% had both haptics outside of the capsular bag; 57% had one haptic in the capsular bag and the other haptic outside of the bag. Typically, these optics were decentered by 1 to 2 mm. Only six eyes (5%) had both haptics within the capsular bag. Erosion into the ciliary sulcus produced obliteration of the major arterial circle of the iris in 12 eyes (11%). The local tissue response to eroding haptics was similar for haptics composed of polypropylene and haptics composed of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The authors found considerable discrepancy between the actual location of haptics and the surgeon's desired location (i.e., capsular bag or ciliary sulcus). Most of these cases were clinically successful. PMID:3574878

  2. Transscleral fixation of closed loop haptic acrylic posterior chamber intraocular lens in aphakic nonvitrectomized eyes

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Siddharth; Singh, Vinita; Gupta, Sanjiv Kumar; Misra, Nibha; Srivastava, Rajat M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of transscleral fixation of closed loop haptic acrylic posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) in aphakia in nonvitrectomized eyes. Materials and Methods: Patients with postcataract surgery aphakia, trauma with posterior capsule injury, subluxated crystalline lens, and per operative complications where sulcus implantation was not possible were included over a 1-year period. Scleral fixation of acrylic hydrophilic PCIOL was performed according to the described technique, and the patients were evaluated on the day 1, 3, 14, and at 3 and 12 months postoperatively for IOL centration, pseudophakodonesis, change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and any other complications. Results: Out of twenty-nine eyes of 24 patients, who completed the study, 25 (86.2%) eyes had improved, 2 (6.9%) eyes showed no change, and 2 (6.9%) eyes had worsening of BCVA. Three (10.3%) eyes developed postoperative complications. A significant improvement in mean BCVA (P < 0.0001) was observed after the procedure. Mean duration of follow-up was 26.2 months (range 22–35 months). Conclusion: The use of closed loop haptic acrylic IOL for scleral fixation appears to be safe and effective alternative to conventional scleral fixated polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lenses. PMID:26576522

  3. Optimum form of posterior chamber intraocular lenses to minimize aberrational astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Takei, K; Hommura, S; Okajima, H

    1995-01-01

    To optically determine the optimum form for a posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL), we calculated the aberrational astigmatism induced by tilt and decentration of the PCIOL using an exact raytracing. First, the position and the radii of curvatures of the IOL were determined to make an emmetropic eye model using a paraxial raytracing. Next, the chief rays originating from the fovea centralis were traced backward through the tilted and/or decentrated PC IOL, the center of the pupil and the cornea, using trigonometric raytracing. Finally, the maximum and minimum aberrational astigmatism were calculated based on the Coddington's Equations for the sagittal and the tangential foci of the ray. All the refractive parameters in Gullstrand's No. 1 schematic eye were adopted. The effect of varying anterior corneal asphericity on the results was also examined. Four forms of polymethylmethacrylate PC IOLs (refractive index: 1.491) were analyzed; a plano-convex IOL with the curved surface facing the cornea, and three bi-convex forms with the ratio of anterior-to-posterior radii of curvatures of 1:4, 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. The 1:4 bi-convex form showed the lowest values for the maximum aberrational astigmatism calculated at every combination of tilt and decentration except 0 degrees tilt and/or 0 mm decentration. The aberrational astigmatism with the 1:4 bi-convex form of PC IOL did not exceed 1.0 D at the maximum tilt and decentration. The variation of anterior corneal asphericity did not influence the results. We conclude that the 1:4 bi-convex form of PC IOL minimizes the postoperative astigmatism induced by tilt and/or decentration of the lens. PMID:8926647

  4. Postsurgical Cystoid Macular Edema following Posterior Chamber Toric Phakic Intraocular Lens Implantation Surgery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Canan, Julide; Akkan, Umurhan; Tuncer, Kemal; Elbay, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a case of cystoid macular edema (CME) developing after posterior chamber toric phakic intraocular lens (PIOL) implantation. Methods Case report. Results A 33-year-old male underwent implantation of toric implantable collamer lenses (ICL), a new generation of PIOLs, for both eyes. Preoperative best spectacle-corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/25 in the right eye and 20/32 in the left eye, with a manifest refraction of −9.25 −4.0 × 4° and −9.75 −4.25 × 171°, respectively. On day 1 postoperatively, the left eye had an uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) of 20/60 with a refraction of +2.0 −3.5 × 11°. Despite the rotation of the PIOL, the cylindrical refractive component persisted in the left eye with a refraction of +2.0 −3.5 × 11°. Two weeks after the initial surgery, he presented with a decrease in his visual acuity in the left eye. The UDVA and BCVA were both 20/100 in the left eye with a refraction of +2.0 −4.25 × 3°. Dilated fundus examination and macular optical coherence tomography revealed a CME in the left eye. Following topical nepafenac therapy and explantation of the ICL, we observed a complete resolution of the CME at 3 months with an improvement in BCVA to 20/32 in the left eye. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of postsurgical CME following toric ICL implantation. In cases of phakic eyes with an intact posterior capsule, postsurgical CME can develop, thus highlighting the purpose of this report. PMID:26265909

  5. Second-Look Arthroscopic Assessment and Clinical Results of Modified Pull-Out Suture for Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Gwang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify the structural integrity of the healing site after arthroscopic repair of a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus by second-look arthroscopy and to determine the clinical relevance of the findings. Materials and Methods From January 2005 to December 2010, 20 consecutive patients underwent arthroscopic modified pull-out suture repair for a posterior root tear of the medial meniscus. Thirteen patients were available for second-look arthroscopic evaluation. The healing status of the medial meniscus was classified as complete healing, lax healing, scar tissue healing, and failed healing. We evaluated the correlation between the clinical symptoms and second-look arthroscopic findings. Clinical evaluation was based on the Lysholm knee scores and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) scores. Results There were 4 cases of complete healing, 4 lax healing, 4 scar tissue healing, and 1 failed healing. The healing status of the repaired meniscus appeared to be related to the clinical symptoms. Patients who achieved complete tissue healing had no complaint. The healing status exhibited no relationship with age, mechanical axis, degree of subluxation, and symptom duration. The mean Lysholm score improved from 34.7 preoperatively to 75.6 at follow-up and the mean HSS score also significantly increased from 33.5 to 82.2. Conclusions We achieved 4 complete and 8 partial healing (lax or scar) of the medial meniscus in this retrospective case series of posterior horn meniscus root repairs performed by 1 surgeon. Further research is needed to clarify why all patients showed clinical improvement despite findings of partial healing on second-look arthroscopy. PMID:24944976

  6. The Optimal Suture Site for the Repair of Posterior Horn Root Tears: Biomechanical Evaluation of Pullout Strength in Porcine Menisci

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Noh, Chang-Kyun; Park, Il-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There are few studies on biomechanical evaluation of suture points in repair of root tears. The purpose of this study was to determine the point of greatest pullout strength for root tear repair. Materials and Methods A total of 120 fresh porcine medial menisci were obtained. The red-red and red-white zones of the meniscus were divided by two lines designated as lines A and B (groups A and B). Groups A and B were further divided into three groups each by dividing lines A and B into three points: 3, 5, and 7 mm from the meniscal ligament root insertion. Vertical meniscal repair was performed on each point. The pullout failure strength was tested using a biaxial servohydraulic testing machine. Results The average maximal load at failure was significantly greater in group A than group B (87.65 vs. 62.93; p<0.001) The average length at maximal load failure was greater in group A than group B (4.35 vs. 3.2; p<0.001). Among the subgroups of 3, 5, and 7 mm in both groups A and B, 7 mm showed the greatest maximal load (p<0.001). Conclusions The pullout strength was statistically significantly greater in group A than group B and in the 7 mm subgroup than the 3 and 5 mm subgroups. Thus, the 7 mm subgroup in group A showed the greatest pullout strength. PMID:27274472

  7. Simulation of airbag impact on eyes with different axial lengths after transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens by using finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jane; Uchio, Eiichi; Goto, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the biomechanical response of an impacting airbag on eyes with different axial lengths with transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL). Materials and methods Simulations in a model human eye were performed with a computer using a finite element analysis program created by Nihon, ESI Group. The airbag was set to be deployed at five different velocities and to impact on eyes with three different axial lengths. These eyes were set to have transsclerally fixated PC IOL by a 10-0 polypropylene possessing a tensile force limit of 0.16 N according to the United States Pharmacopeia XXII. Results The corneoscleral opening was observed at a speed of 40 m/second or more in all model eyes. Eyes with the longest axial length of 25.85 mm had the greatest extent of deformity at any given impact velocity. The impact force exceeded the tensile force of 10-0 polypropylene at an impact velocity of 60 m/second in all eyes, causing breakage of the suture. Conclusion Eyes with transsclerally fixated PC IOL could rupture from airbag impact at high velocities. Eyes with long axial lengths experienced a greater deformity upon airbag impact due to a thinner eye wall. Further basic research on the biomechanical response for assessing eye injuries could help in developing a better airbag and in the further understanding of ocular traumas. PMID:25709387

  8. Trabeculectomy with releasable sutures.

    PubMed Central

    Kolker, A E; Kass, M A; Rait, J L

    1993-01-01

    We attempted to reduce some of the postoperative complications of trabeculectomy by using releasable scleral flap sutures. This technique allows an initial tight closure of the scleral flap with the option to increase aqueous humor outflow in the early postoperative period. We reviewed our experience with trabeculectomy and releasable sutures in 146 eyes (134 patients) and compared these cases with a prior series of 128 eyes (124 patients) that underwent trabeculectomy with permanent scleral flap sutures. In the control group, 42 eyes (32.8%) had clinically detectable shallowing of the anterior chamber in the postoperative period. In contrast, shallow anterior chamber was noted in 21 eyes (14.4%) in the group with releasable sutures (P = .0003). Flat anterior chamber, defined as iridocorneal touch to the pupil margin, occurred in 11 control eyes (8.6%) but in only 2 eyes (1.4%) with releasable sutures (P = .0078). Surgical intervention to drain suprachoroidal fluid and re-form the anterior chamber was required in eight control eyes (6.2%) but in only one study eye (0.7%) (P = .014). At 1 year of follow-up, the two groups were similar in terms of mean intraocular pressure, the need for ocular hypotensive medications, and failure rate. PMID:8140688

  9. Cranial sutures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Cranial sutures URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002320.htm Cranial sutures To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial sutures ...

  10. [Laser flare measurement with 3 different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after phacoemulsification with posterior chamber lens implantation].

    PubMed

    Schmidl, B; Mester, U; Diestelhorst, M; Konen, W

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective, randomised, double-masked, parallel-group study we compared the antiinflammatory effect of diclofenac sodium 0.1%, flurbiprofen 0.03%, and indomethacin 1.0% ophthalmic suspension in 99 patients undergoing phacoemulsification and posterior chamber lens implantation. The reduction in anterior chamber flare from day 1, as measured with the laser flare-meter (FM-500, KOWA) on day 4-5 postoperatively was significantly greater in the diclofenac group than with flurbiprofen (p = 0.022). Patients treated with diclofenac had significantly less burning and stinging than patients on flurbiprofen and indomethacin on postoperative days 4-5 (p < 0.0001) and 12-14 (p = 0.001). Diclofenac sodium appears to be more potent than flurbiprofen in controlling intraocular inflammation after cataract surgery, while having better local tolerance than flurbiprofen or indomethacin. PMID:9132126

  11. Craniosynostosis of the lambdoid suture.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Jennifer L; Tye, Gary W; Fearon, Jeffrey A

    2014-08-01

    Craniosynostosis affecting the lambdoid suture is uncommon. The definition of lambdoid craniosynostosis solely applies to those cases demonstrating true suture obliteration, similar to other forms of craniosynostosis. In patients presenting with posterior plagiocephaly, true lambdoid craniosynostosis must be differentiated from the much more common positional molding. It can occur in a unilateral form, a bilateral form, or as part of a complex craniosynostosis. In children with craniofacial syndromes, synostosis of the lambdoid suture most often is seen within the context of a pansynostotic picture. Chiari malformations are commonly seen in multisutural and syndromic types of craniosynostosis that affect the lambdoid sutures. Posterior cranial vault remodeling is recommended to provide adequate intracranial volume to allow for brain growth and to normalize the skull shape. Although many techniques have been described for the correction of lambdoid synostosis, optimal outcomes may result from those techniques based on the concept of occipital advancement. PMID:25210507

  12. Craniosynostosis of the Lambdoid Suture

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Jennifer L.; Tye, Gary W.; Fearon, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Craniosynostosis affecting the lambdoid suture is uncommon. The definition of lambdoid craniosynostosis solely applies to those cases demonstrating true suture obliteration, similar to other forms of craniosynostosis. In patients presenting with posterior plagiocephaly, true lambdoid craniosynostosis must be differentiated from the much more common positional molding. It can occur in a unilateral form, a bilateral form, or as part of a complex craniosynostosis. In children with craniofacial syndromes, synostosis of the lambdoid suture most often is seen within the context of a pansynostotic picture. Chiari malformations are commonly seen in multisutural and syndromic types of craniosynostosis that affect the lambdoid sutures. Posterior cranial vault remodeling is recommended to provide adequate intracranial volume to allow for brain growth and to normalize the skull shape. Although many techniques have been described for the correction of lambdoid synostosis, optimal outcomes may result from those techniques based on the concept of occipital advancement. PMID:25210507

  13. Audit of exracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in a tertiary eye care center in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Yonas; Sisay, Alemayehu

    2006-01-01

    A retrospective audit of records of 370 eyes of 315 patients for whom extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (ECCE-PC IOL) was performed between 1998 and 1999 was made to determine postoperative visual outcome and complications. One hundred and ninety three patients were males and one hundred and seventy seven were females making a male to female ratio of 1:0.9. At two months postoperatively 82 (30.4%) of eyes had uncorrected visual acuity of 6/18 or better; while 176 (53.7%) of eyes attained an uncorrected visual acuity between 6/18 and 6/60, and 31 (11.5%) had visual acuity between 3/60 and 6/60. 340 of 358 (94.9%) had a preoperative visual acuity of < 3/60. As a result of the surgery, the percentage of blind eyes dropped from 94.9% to 4.4%. The commonest intra operative and early postoperative complications encountered were posterior capsular tear with vitreous loss (5.7%) and striate keratopathy (11.1%) respectively. Posterior capsular opacity was documented in 17 (4.6%) eyes as a late postoperative complication. Routine biometry, to calculate Intra ocular Lens (IOL) power was not done and this was the major limitation of the study. In conclusion, the study increases awareness of cataract surgery outcomes and provides a feedback to achieve better results both in terms of quality and quantity in cataract surgery. Further study with biometric measurement is recommended. PMID:17447364

  14. Sutures - ridged

    MedlinePlus

    ... to show whether the sutures have closed too early. Although your provider keeps records from routine checkups, you may find it helpful to keep your own records of your child's development. Bring these records to your provider's attention if ...

  15. Sutures - separated

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bony plates that allow for growth. The borders where these plates come together are called sutures ... the head Infectious disease work-up, including blood cultures and possible spinal tap Metabolic work-up, such ...

  16. Cranial sutures

    MedlinePlus

    ... by strong, fibrous, elastic tissues called sutures. The spaces between the bones that remain open in babies and young children are called fontanelles. Sometimes, they are called soft spots. These spaces are a part of normal development. The cranial ...

  17. Long term results of primary posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for congenital cataract in the first year of life

    PubMed Central

    Gouws, P; Hussin, H M; Markham, R H C

    2006-01-01

    Aim To document the long term outcome of congenital cataract surgery with primary posterior chamber (PC) lens implantation in the first year of life. Method A retrospective review of congenital cataract surgery in the first year of life with PC lens implantation in 18 infants, eight with unilateral and 10 with bilateral cataract. The average age at surgery was 15 weeks (range 3–44 weeks). The mean follow up was 95 months (range 60–139 months). Results The best outcomes were in the bilateral group where 50% of eyes achieved 6/18 or better, with a best acuity of 6/9. Acuities were poor in the unilateral group where only 38% achieved 6/60 or better, with a best acuity of 6/24. There was a mean refractive shift between first refraction after surgery and refraction at 36 months after surgery of −3.44 dioptres with a very wide range (+2.00 to −15.50). There was a significantly greater myopic shift in the unilateral cases. Many eyes in both groups continued to show an increasing myopic shift between 36 months after surgery and their final recorded refraction. The main complications were amblyopia, especially in unilateral cataracts, and posterior capsular opacification. Amblyopia was most probably related to a combination of early onset of dense cataract in this young age group, late presentation for initial surgery, delay in capsulotomies, and imperfect compliance with a rigorous occlusion regime. Conclusion Intraocular lens implantation in infants less than 1 year of age is generally a safe procedure. The spread of final refractive error was very wide. Final refraction in the unilateral group was significantly more myopic than the bilateral group. Final acuities were often disappointing especially in the unilateral group. PMID:16597661

  18. Development of lens sutures.

    PubMed

    Kuszak, Jer R; Zoltoski, Rebecca K; Tiedemann, Clifford E

    2004-01-01

    Cylindrical map projections (CMPs) have been used for centuries as an effective means of plotting the features of a 3D spheroidal surfaces (e.g. the earth) on a 2D rectangular map. We have used CMPs to plot primate fiber cell organization from selected growth shells as a function of growth, development and aging. Lens structural parameters and features were derived from slit-lamp, light and transmission and scanning electron micrographs. This information was then used to create CMPs of lenses that were then correlated with azimuthal map projections (AMPs; projections that are radially symmetric around a central point [the poles]) to reveal different suture patterns during distinct time periods. In this manner, both lens fiber and suture branch locations are defined by degrees of longitude and latitude. CMPs and AMPs confirm that throughout defined periods of development, growth and ageing, increasingly complex suture patterns are formed by the precise ordering of straight and opposite end curvature fibers. However, the manner in which additional suture branches are formed anteriorly and posteriorly is not identical. Anteriorly, new branches are added between extant branches. Posteriorly, pairs of new branches are formed that progressively overlay extant branches. The advantage of using CMPs is that the shape and organization of every fiber in a growth shell can be observed in a single image. Thus, the use of CMPs to plot primate fiber cell organization has revealed more complex aspects of fiber formation that may explain, at least in part, changes in lens optical quality as a function of age and pathology. In addition, more accurate measurements of fiber length will be possible by incorporating the latitudinal and longitudinal locations of fibers. PMID:15558480

  19. Tram-Track Suture Technique for Pupillary Capture of a Scleral Fixated Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung In; Kim, Kiseok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a new technique using tram-track suture for pupillary capture of a scleral fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL) to reposition the tilted IOL. Methods In this prospective interventional case series, we describe a tram-track suture for pupillary capture of a scleral fixated PC-IOL. A long straight needle with double-armed 10-0 polypropylene is passed behind the iris and just above the optic portion (tilted forward) of the IOL. The other straight needle with double-armed 10-0 polypropylene is passed just below the optic portion (tilted backward) of the IOL. After the IOL is repositioned properly, the polypropylene sutures are gently pulled and tied. Results Four eyes of 4 patients underwent tram-track suture for pupillary capture of a scleral fixated PC-IOL. No intra- or postoperative complications were noted, and no pupillary captures were detected during the follow-up period. Conclusions The tram-track suture technique provides good centration and stability of a PC-IOL. This technique is an easy and effective way to reposition pupillary capture of an IOL. Further, it is also minimally invasive as it maintains a closed system. PMID:27462257

  20. Arthroscopic all-inside lateral meniscus suture using posterolateral portal.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Oh, Irvin

    2006-05-01

    A new arthroscopic all-inside suture for lateral meniscus posterior horn tear using a single posterolateral portal is described. A lateral meniscus posterior horn peripheral longitudinal tear is often seen with anterior cruciate ligament injury or discoid lateral meniscus tear. Conventional repair methods, such as arthroscopic inside-out, outside-in, or all-inside sutures, can be cumbersome and technically demanding. Our all-inside suture using the posterolateral portal allows thorough visualization of the posterolateral structures, excellent coaptation of torn meniscus, strong knot tightening, and avoidance of inadvertent cartilage injury. The arthroscope is inserted through the anteromedial portal and reaches the posterolateral compartment by a transcondylar approach. A suture hook is introduced into the posterolateral portal without a cannula, penetrates posterior peripheral rim, crosses the tear, and passes through mobile torn fragment. A large amount of No. 0 PDS is passed, so that it curls up inside the joint. After the suture hook is removed, a suture retriever is inserted through the posterolateral portal to pull out 2 ends of the PDS at the same time. The retrieved suture ends are passed through a knot pusher and a 5.5-mm cannula is introduced over the retrieved suture materials for the SMC knot to be tied. A longitudinal tear of lateral meniscus posterior horn is repaired with 2 to 3 sutures. PMID:16651176

  1. The effect of Nd:YAG laser treatment of posterior capsule opacification on anterior chamber depth and refraction in pseudophakic eyes

    PubMed Central

    Khambhiphant, Bharkbhum; Liumsirijarern, Chayata; Saehout, Piyada

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This was a prospective descriptive study to determine the changes in intraocular lens (IOL) position after neodymium-doped yttrium–aluminum–garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy by measuring anterior chamber depth (ACD) and refraction, including the spherical equivalent (SE) and cylinder. Materials and methods Forty-seven pseudophakic eyes with posterior capsule opacification of 29 patients were included. Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy was performed. Patients’ ACD and refraction were measured before the treatment, as well as after the treatment at 1 week and 3 months. IOLMaster® and an automated refractometer were used at the Department of Ophthalmology, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Results There were no statistically significant differences in ACD and SE before and after laser treatment at 1 week and 3 months (repeated analysis of variance, P=0.582 and P=0.269, respectively). Both backward IOL movement (number [n]=29) and forward IOL movement (n=18) were found. Some changes in cylindrical refraction were found at 1 week, but decreased at 3 months after capsulotomy (baseline cylinder: −1.16; cylinder at 1 week and 3 months: −1.00 and −1.14, respectively; P=0.012). These changes were the same with one-piece and three-piece IOLs. Conclusion Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy did not significantly change ACD and SE. It led to cylinder change at 1 week after laser, but the effect decreased at 3 months. This effect was small and may not be clinically significant. PMID:25848207

  2. Craniofacial Sutures: Morphology, Growth, and In Vivo Masticatory Strains

    PubMed Central

    RAFFERTY, KATHERINE L.; HERRING, SUSAN W.

    2010-01-01

    The growth and morphology of craniofacial sutures are thought to reflect their functional environment. However, little is known about in vivo sutural mechanics. The present study investigates the strains experienced by the internasal, nasofrontal, and anterior interfrontal sutures during masticatory activity in 4–6-month-old miniature swine (Sus scrofa). Measurements of the bony/fibrous arrangements and growth rates of these sutures were then examined in the context of their mechanical environment. Large tensile strains were measured in the interfrontal suture (1,036 με ± 400 SD), whereas the posterior internasal suture was under moderate compression (−440 με ± 238) and the nasofrontal suture experienced large compression (−1,583 με ± 506). Sutural interdigitation was associated with compressive strain. The collagen fibers of the internasal and interfrontal sutures were clearly arranged to resist compression and tension, respectively, whereas those of the nasofrontal suture could not be readily characterized as either compression or tension resisting. The average linear rate of growth over a 1-week period at the nasofrontal suture (133.8 μm, ± 50.9 S.D) was significantly greater than that of both the internasal and interfrontal sutures (39.2 μm ± 11.4 and 65.5 μm ± 14.0, respectively). Histological observations suggest that the nasofrontal suture contains chondroid tissue, which may explain the unexpected combination of high compressive loading and rapid growth in this suture. PMID:10521876

  3. Adjustable sutures in children.

    PubMed

    Engel, J Mark; Guyton, David L; Hunter, David G

    2014-06-01

    Although adjustable sutures are considered a standard technique in adult strabismus surgery, most surgeons are hesitant to attempt the technique in children, who are believed to be unlikely to cooperate for postoperative assessment and adjustment. Interest in using adjustable sutures in pediatric patients has increased with the development of surgical techniques specific to infants and children. This workshop briefly reviews the literature supporting the use of adjustable sutures in children and presents the approaches currently used by three experienced strabismus surgeons. PMID:24924284

  4. Suture techniques in rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ronald P; Chang, Edward; Buchanan, Edward

    2010-04-01

    Suture techniques are an indispensable means to biologically sculpt the cartilage of the nose. Here the authors review their use in tip-plasty and present a 4-suture algorithm that allows for simple, complete control in sculpting the shape of all nasal tips in primary rhinoplasty. After a standard cephalic trim of the lateral crus leaving it 6 mm wide, one or more of the four suture techniques are applied. One of the newest techniques that has yielded excellent results is the hemi-transdomal suture, a variation of the conventional transdomal suture. This technique narrows the dome but also everts the lateral crus slightly to avoid concavities of the nostril rim. The 4-suture algorithm is useful in both the open and closed approaches. A more general use of sutures is described and referred to as the "universal horizontal mattress suture," which can be applied to remove all unwanted convexities or concavities and can be used not only to straighten the cartilage but also strengthen it. This suture has applications for the crooked septum, the collapsed lateral crus (external valve), and the collapsed internal valve, as well as for converting ear cartilage grafts into straighter, stronger grafts than previously thought possible. PMID:20206741

  5. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. PMID:21328563

  6. Posterior chamber collagen copolymer phakic intraocular lens with a central hole for moderate-to-high myopia: First experience in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinfang; Wu, Weiliang; Wang, Yang; Xie, Chen; Tong, Jianping; Shen, Ye

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) (Visian Implantable Collamer Lens V4c) for the correction of moderate to high myopia in Chinese eyes.The article is designed as a retrospective case series.This study included the first consecutive eyes that had implantation of a new pIOL design with a central hole, at our department by the same surgeon. The safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, and adverse events of the surgery were evaluated over 6 months.The study enrolled 63 eyes (32 patients). The mean spherical equivalent decreased from -12.81 ± 3.11 diopters (D) preoperatively to -0.05 ± 0.27 D 6 months postoperatively; 96.8% of eyes were within ±0.50 D of the target and 100% of eyes were within ±1.00 D. All eyes had a decimal uncorrected distance visual acuity of 0.5 (20/40) or better at every follow-up visit. The safety and efficacy indices were 1.42 ± 0.34 and 1.11 ± 0.19, respectively. Postoperatively, the intraocular pressure (IOP) remained stable over time. No significant rises in IOP (including pupillary block) and no secondary cataract were found. After 6 months, the mean vault was 505.2 ± 258.9 μm (range 120-990 μm), and the mean endothelial cell loss was 2.0%.Implantation of the pIOL was safe, effective, predictable, and stable in the correction of moderate-to-high myopia in Han Chinese patients, even without peripheral iridectomy. PMID:27603356

  7. Scar tissue orientation in unsutured and sutured corneal wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Melles, G R; Binder, P S; Beekhuis, W H; Wijdh, R H; Moore, M N; Anderson, J A; SundarRaj, N

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--This study aimed to evaluate stromal wound healing morphology in short term unsutured compared with sutured corneal wounds, to define regional variation in healing within radial keratotomy wounds. METHODS--Stromal scar tissue orientation (fibroblast and collagen fibre orientation) was analysed in unsutured and adjacent sutured keratotomy wounds in monkeys, 2 to 9 weeks after surgery, using light and transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS--At 2 to 4 weeks, scar tissue orientation was transverse to the wound edge in unsutured wounds, but sagittal in sutured wounds. At 5 to 9 weeks, a reorientation of scar tissue sagittal to the wound was seen in the unsutured wounds, proceeding from the posterior to anterior wound regions. In sutured wounds, a scar tissue reorientation transverse to the wound was seen, proceeding from the anterior wound region in a posterior direction. CONCLUSIONS--Within the same cornea, sutured and unsutured wounds showed opposite patterns of healing. Sutured wounds initially healed more slowly, but obtained pseudolamellar continuity over time. In contrast, healing of unsutured wounds was characterised by an early approximation towards lamellar repair that was followed by an ineffective reorganisation of the scar. This latter pattern of healing, that may be associated with a variable weakening of the wound, may relate to the clinical findings of unpredictability and/or progression of refractive effect following radial keratotomy. Images PMID:7547789

  8. Underwater robotic suturing.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Shimada, Masanari; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2016-06-01

    Background Laparoscopic and robotic surgeries have become popular, and this popularity is increasing. However, the environment in which such surgeries are performed is rarely discussed. Similar to arthrosurgery performed in water, artificial ascites could be a new environment for laparoscopic surgery. This study was performed to determine whether robotic surgery is applicable to complicated suturing underwater. Material and methods A da Vinci Surgical System S was used. A weighted fabric sheet was placed at the bottom of a tank. Identical sets were made for each environment: One tank was dry, and the other was filled with water. The suturing task involved placement of a running silk suture around the perimeter of a small circle. The task was performed eight times in each environment. The task time and integrity score were determined. The integrity score was calculated by evaluating accuracy, tightness, thread damage, and uniformity; each factor was evaluated using a five-point scale. Results Although statistically significant differences were not shown in either task time or integrity score between the underwater and air environments, robotic suturing underwater is not inferior to performance in air. Conclusions The feasibility of robotic suturing underwater was confirmed under the herein-described experimental conditions. PMID:26853072

  9. 7. Perineal suturing.

    PubMed

    Blease, Megan; Taylor, Kerry

    2016-04-01

    Preceptorship is the 15th series of 'Midwifery basics' targeted at practising midwives. The aim of these articles is to provide information to raise awareness of the impact of the work of midwives on women's experience, and encourage midwives to seek further information through a series of activities relating to the topic. During the transition from student midwife, the newly qualified practitioner (NQM) is required to obtain experience of perineal suturing. With exposure varying from student to student and inconsistency in teaching methods between hospital trusts, the NQM can be left feeling apprehensive and unsupported to learn this skill. Suturing is a major and sometimes traumatic event for childbearing women, whose experience can vary greatly, depending upon many factors, including environment, skill of those suturing, effective analgesia and waiting times. In this penultimate article of the series, Megan Blease and Kerry Taylor address the current issues and provide learning hints and tips for NQMs learning and practising the skill. PMID:27172679

  10. [Skull fracture or accessory suture in a child?].

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Katrin; Lange, Lena M; Plenzig, Stefanie; Verhoff, Marcel A; Kölzer, Sarah C

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between accessory sutures and fractures in the skull of an infant can be difficult. Apart from the regular sutures there is a multitude of variations that may be mistaken for a fracture line. Such variations include for instance the intraparietal suture between the two ossification centers of the parietal bone or the mendosal suture between the supraoccipital and interparietal bone of the occipital squama. The presented case refers to an approximately 20-month-old female child. During autopsy, a discontinuity in the right paramedian posterior cranial fossa parallel to the internal occipital crest with connection to the foramen magnum was observed. The macroscopic findings suggested a fracture line because of its course. However, neither a hemorrhage in the soft tissue nor callus formation was discernible. The discontinuity was preserved with the adjacent parts of the occipital bone for further histological examination. In the report of a cranial CT, which was carried out five days before the child's death, an accessory suture paramedially in the right posterior cranial fossa was described. When the clinical CT records were re-evaluated, a similar discontinuity at the corresponding position on the other side was detected, though of noticeably shorter length. Additionally, the preserved occipital bone fragment including the discontinuity was histologically processed. In the radiological literature, precise (radiological) criteria for differential diagnosis are indicated. A zigzag pattern with sclerotic borders and a bilateral and fairly symmetric occurrence indicate a suture, whereas a sharp lucency with non-sclerotic edges and a unilateral occurrence indicate a fracture. Taking all the findings into account, the depicted discontinuity was regarded as an accessory suture. This case demonstrates that differentiation between a fracture and an accessory suture may be difficult in the autopsy of a child and underlines the importance of a postmortem CT

  11. Bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Matthias; Vogel, Tobias; Weise, Kuno; Muratore, Tim; Trobisch, Per

    2010-07-01

    Posterior sternoclavicular dislocations are a rare injury, representing <5% of all sternoclavicular dislocations and 1 in 1600 shoulder girdle injuries. Proper imaging with computed tomography and prompt diagnosis are essential steps in preventing potentially lethal complications observed in approximately 3% of all posterior sternoclavicular dislocations. Surgical treatment is necessary if closed reduction fails. With the medial clavicular epiphysis being the last to close (between ages 22 and 25), children and adolescents typically present with epiphyseal fractures rather than joint dislocations. If closed reduction fails, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) should be considered in fractures, whereas complex reconstructions with tendon graft procedures have been recommended for joint dislocations. This article presents a case of a traumatic bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation due to an epiphyseal fracture in a 15-year-old boy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral posterior sternoclavicular dislocation. Attempted closed reduction failed with redislocation after 2 days. The patient subsequently required ORIF. This article describes our technique with anterior retraction of the medial clavicle, closure of the posterior periosteum, and ORIF using nonabsorbable sutures. Postoperative shoulder mobilization was started on day 1. At final follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic. PMID:20608625

  12. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  13. Healing of the goat anterior cruciate ligament after a new suture repair technique and bioscaffold treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D Tan; Geel, Jurre; Schulze, Martin; Raschke, Michael J; Woo, Savio L-Y; van Dijk, C Niek; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2013-10-01

    Primary suture repair of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has been used clinically in an attempt to heal the ruptured ACL. The results, however, were not satisfactory, which in retrospect can be attributed to the used suturing technique and the suboptimal healing conditions. These constraining conditions can be improved by introducing a new suturing technique and by using small intestinal submucosa (SIS) as a bioscaffold. It is hypothesized that the suturing technique keep the torn ends together and that SIS enhance and promote the healing of the ACL. The goat was used as the study model. In the Suture group, the left ACL was transected and suture repaired with a new locking suture repair technique (n=5) allowing approximation and fixation under tension. The Suture-SIS group underwent the same procedure with the addition of SIS (n=5). The right ACL served as control. After 12 weeks of healing, anterior-posterior translation and in situ force of the healing ACL were measured, followed by the measurement of the cross-sectional area and structural stiffness. Routine histology was performed on tissue samples. Gross morphology showed that the healing ACL was continuous with collagenous tissue in both groups. The cross-sectional area of the Suture and the Suture-SIS group was 35% and 50% of the intact control, respectively. The anterior-posterior translations at different flexion angles were statistically not different between the Suture group and the Suture-SIS group. Only the in situ force at 30° in the Suture-SIS group was higher than in the Suture group. Tensile tests showed that the stiffness for the Suture group was not different from the Suture-SIS group (31.1±8.1 N/mm vs. 41.9±18.0 N/mm [p>0.05]). Histology showed longitudinally aligned collagen fibers from origo to insertion. More fibroblasts were present in the healing tissue than in the control intact tissue. The study demonstrated the proof of concept of ACL repair in a goat model with a new suture

  14. Suture Forces in Undersized Mitral Annuloplasty: Novel Device and Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Andrew; Pierce, Eric; Lee, Madonna; Jensen, Morten; Aoki, Chikashi; Takebayashi, Satoshi; Gorman, Robert; Gorman, Joseph; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Demonstrate the first use of a novel technology for quantifying suture forces on annuloplasty rings to better understand the mechanisms of ring dehiscence. Description: Force transducers were developed, attached to a size 24 Physio™ ring, and implanted in the mitral annulus of an ovine animal. Ring suture forces were measured after implantation and for cardiac cycles reaching peak left ventricular pressures (LVP) of 100, 125, and 150 mmHg. Evaluation: After implanting the undersized ring to the flaccid annulus, the mean suture force was 2.0±0.6 N. During cyclic contraction, anterior ring suture forces were greater than posterior ring suture forces at peak LVPs of 100 mmHg (4.9±2.0 N vs. 2.1±1.1 N), 125 mmHg (5.4±2.3 N vs. 2.3±1.2 N), and 150 mmHg (5.7±2.4 N vs. 2.4±1.1 N). The largest force was 7.4 N at 150 mmHg. Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrate trends in annuloplasty suture forces and their variation with location and LVP. Future studies will significantly contribute to clinical knowledge by elucidating the mechanisms of ring dehiscence while improving annuloplasty ring design and surgical repair techniques. PMID:24996707

  15. Bilambdoid and posterior sagittal synostosis: the Mercedes Benz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, M H; Abbott, A H; Netherway, D J; Menard, R; Hanieh, A

    1998-09-01

    A consistent pattern of craniosynostosis in the sagittal and bilateral lambdoid sutures is described in three patients. The external cranial ridging associated with fusion of these sutures produces a characteristic triradiate, or "Mercedes Benz," appearance to the posterior skull. Locally marked growth restriction is evident in the posterior fossa with compensatory secondary expansion of the anterior fossa manifesting a degree of frontal bossing which mimics bicoronal synostosis. Although this appearance could lead to inadvertent surgery in the frontal region, attention to the occipital region with wide early suture excision and vault shaping is indicated. PMID:9780908

  16. New insights into the relationship between suture closure and craniofacial dysmorphology in sagittal nonsyndromic craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Heuzé, Yann; Boyadjiev, Simeon A; Marsh, Jeffrey L; Kane, Alex A; Cherkez, Elijah; Boggan, James E; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2010-01-01

    Premature closure of the sagittal suture occurs as an isolated (nonsyndromic) birth defect or as a syndromic anomaly in combination with other congenital dysmorphologies. The genetic causes of sagittal nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (NSC) remain unknown. Although variation of the dysmorphic (scaphocephaly) skull shape of sagittal NSC cases has been acknowledged, this variation has not been quantitatively studied three-dimensionally (3D). We have analyzed the computed tomography skull images of 43 infants (aged 0.9–9 months) with sagittal NSC using anatomical landmarks and semilandmarks to quantify and characterize the within-sample phenotypic variation. Suture closure patterns were defined by dividing the sagittal suture into three sections (anterior, central, posterior) and coding each section as ‘closed’ or ‘fused’. Principal components analysis of the Procrustes shape coordinates representing the skull shape of 43 cases of NSC did not separate individuals by sex, chronological age, or dental stages of the deciduous maxillary first molar. However, analysis of suture closure pattern allowed separation of these data. The central section of the sagittal suture appears to be the first to fuse. Then, at least two different developmental paths towards complete fusion of the sagittal suture exist; either the anterior section or the posterior section is the second to fuse. Results indicate that according to the sequence of sagittal suture closure patterns, different craniofacial complex shapes are observed. The relationship between craniofacial shape and suture closure indicates not only which suture fused prematurely (in our case the sagittal suture), but also the pattern of the suture closure. Whether these patterns indicate differences in etiology cannot be determined with our data and requires analysis of longitudinal data, most appropriately of animal models where prenatal conditions can be monitored. PMID:20572900

  17. Arthroscopic Suture Anchor Tenodesis: Loop-Suture Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis. PMID:23875133

  18. Arthroscopic suture anchor tenodesis: loop-suture technique.

    PubMed

    Shon, Min Soo; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Young Eun; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2013-05-01

    With advancements in arthroscopic surgery, arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor recently has been reported to be a reasonable option for the treatment of biceps pathologies, especially for those that are symptomatic or accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. We introduce our technique of arthroscopic biceps tenodesis with suture anchor that we call the loop-suture technique, which is constructed with 1 loop strand and another sutured strand. This technique can help to improve biceps grip and simultaneously minimize longitudinal splitting of the tendon. In addition, it is relatively simple and can be performed with the use of conventional devices and arthroscopic portals used for rotator cuff repair, without the formation of additional portals or a separate incision for the tenodesis. PMID:23875133

  19. Current applications of endoscopic suturing

    PubMed Central

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Modayil, Rani; Friedel, David

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic suturing had previously been considered an experimental procedure only performed in a few centers and often by surgeons. Now, however, endoscopic suturing has evolved sufficiently to be easily implemented during procedures and is more commonly used by gastroenterologists. We have employed the Apollo OverStitch suturing device in a variety of ways including closure of perforations, closure of full thickness defects in the gastrointestinal wall created during endoscopic full thickness resection, closure of mucosotomies during peroral endoscopic myotomy, stent fixation, fistula closure, post endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic mucosal resection and Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery defect closures, post-bariatric surgery gastrojejunal anastomosis revision and primary sleeve gastroplasty. PMID:26191342

  20. Accuracy of Suture Passage During Arthroscopic Remplissage—What Anatomic Landmarks Can Improve It?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Grant H.; Degen, Ryan M.; Liu, Joseph N.; Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Dines, Joshua S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent data suggest that inaccurate suture passage during remplissage may contribute to a loss of external rotation, with the potential to cause posterior shoulder pain because of the proximity to the musculotendinous junction. Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of suture passage during remplissage and identify surface landmarks to improve accuracy. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Arthroscopic remplissage was performed on 6 cadaveric shoulder specimens. Two single-loaded suture anchors were used for each remplissage. After suture passage, position was recorded in reference to the posterolateral acromion (PLA), with entry perpendicular to the humeral surface. After these measurements, the location of posterior cuff penetration was identified by careful surgical dissection. Results: Twenty-four sutures were passed in 6 specimens: 6 sutures (25.0%) were correctly passed through the infraspinatus tendon, 12 (50%) were through the infraspinatus muscle or musculotendinous junction (MTJ), and 6 (25%) were through the teres minor. Suture passage through the infraspinatus were on average 25 ± 5.4 mm inferior to the PLA, while sutures passing through the teres minor were on average 35.8 ± 5.7 mm inferior to the PLA. There was an odds ratio of 25 (95% CI, 2.1-298.3; P < .001) that the suture would be through the infraspinatus if the passes were less than 3 cm inferior to the PLA. Sutures passing through muscle and the MTJ were significantly more medial than those passing through tendon, measuring on average 8.1 ± 5.1 mm lateral to the PLA compared with 14.5 ± 5.5 mm (P < .02). If suture passes were greater than 1 cm lateral to the PLA, it was significantly more likely to be in tendon (P = .013). Conclusion: We found remplissage suture passage was inaccurate, with only 25% of sutures penetrating the infraspinatus tendon. Passing sutures 1 cm lateral and within 3 cm inferior of the PLA improves the odds of successful infraspinatus tenodesis

  1. Delayed-onset endophthalmitis associated with corneal suture infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the current study was to report the microbiology, risk factors, and treatment outcomes in patients with delayed-onset endophthalmitis associated with corneal suture infections. For this retrospective consecutive case series, a search of the ocular microbiology department database was performed to identify all patients with positive corneal and intraocular cultures (anterior chamber and/or vitreous) between 01 January 1995 and 01 January 2010. A subset of patients with a history of corneal suture infections and delayed-onset endophthalmitis was identified. Results Over the 15-year period of the study, 68 patients were identified to have both positive corneal and intraocular cultures. Among them, six patients were identified to have a culture-proven, delayed-onset endophthalmitis that developed from a culture-positive corneal suture infection. All of the patients in the current study were using topical corticosteroids at the time of diagnosis. In four of six patients, there was documented manipulation of a suture before the development of endophthalmitis. Streptoccocus was identified as the causative organism in five of six patients in the current study. All of the Streptoccocus isolates were sensitive to vancomycin. The single case of Serratia marcescens endophthalmitis was sensitive to amikacin, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin. Treatment modalities varied and were guided by the attending ophthalmologist depending upon clinical presentation. One patient with severe Streptococcus pyogenes keratitis and endophthalmitis underwent a primary enucleation after developing a wound dehiscence. Of the remaining five patients, all received topical and intravitreal antibiotics. Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was performed in three patients. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in two patients. Visual acuity outcomes ranged from 20/150 to no light perception. Conclusions In the current study, Streptococcus was isolated in

  2. Neogene sutures in eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.; Wilson, M. E. J.

    2000-12-01

    Five suture zones are described from the zone of collision between the Eurasian, Indian-Australian and Pacific-Philippine Sea plates within the eastern Indonesia region. These are the Molucca, Sorong, Sulawesi, Banda and Borneo sutures. Each of these sutures has a relatively short history compared to most pre-Neogene orogenic belts, but each preserves a record of major changes in tectonics including subduction polarity reversals, elimination of volcanic arcs, changing plate boundaries, and important extension within an overall contractional setting. Rapid tectonic changes have occurred within periods of less than 5 Ma. Many of these events, although important, would be overlooked in older orogenic belts because the age resolution required to identify them, even when the evidence is preserved, is simply not possible.

  3. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  4. Internal morphology of the nonsyndromic prematurely fused sagittal suture in the human skull--A preliminary micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Nowaczewska, W; Ziółkowski, G; Dybała, B

    2015-10-01

    Although nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (NSC) of the sagittal suture is a well-known type of craniosynostosis, little is currently known about the internal morphology of this prematurely fused suture in modern humans. Recently, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been applied as a new tool for the quantitative evaluation of cranial suture morphology. However, so far there are only a small number of reports concerning studies of the internal morphology of prematurely fused sagittal suture in humans using micro-CT. The primary aim of this study was to examine the internal morphology of a completely obliterated sagittal suture in NSC. Two modern human skulls were used in this study: a skull of a child (aged 10 ± 2.5 years) displaying NSC of the sagittal suture and a skull of an adult showing non-prematurely completely obliterated sagittal suture. Quantitative variables of the sagittal sutures were assessed using method proposed by the authors. Porosity, and relative thickness of three bone layers in two examined skulls (inner cortical, diploë and outer cortical) were analysed using micro-CT in three equal sections of the sagittal suture. In the case of the prematurely fused suture, there were statistically significant differences mainly in the mean values of the porosity, thickness and relative thickness of the diploë between the anterior part and the two other parts (central and posterior) of this suture. Significant differences were also observed in some of the analysed variables between the sections of the sagittal suture of the skull with NSC and the normal skull. PMID:26122169

  5. A modified suture placement technique to avoid suture drag or "cheese wire" effect.

    PubMed

    Cravy, T V

    1980-05-01

    A modified technique is described for microsurgical suture placement, irrespective of the closure technique, to prevent suture drag and loosening of the suture following postoperative wound edema. Fine, elastic, non-absorbable sutures which loosen as a result of suture drag or "cheese wiring" have no more reliability than do absorbable or silk sutures. Predictable and reproducible results of suture placement are necessary to allow the surgeon to effectively use the operating keratometer in the control and modification of corneal astigmatism following anterior segment surgery. PMID:6992018

  6. Long-Term Comparison of Posterior Chamber Phakic Intraocular Lens With and Without a Central Hole (Hole ICL and Conventional ICL) Implantation for Moderate to High Myopia and Myopic Astigmatism

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kimiya; Kamiya, Kazutaka; Igarashi, Akihito; Kobashi, Hidenaga

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study shows a promising next-generation surgical option for the correction of moderate to high ametropia. Hole implantable collamer lens (ICL), STAAR Surgical, is a posterior chamber phakic intraocular lens with a central artificial hole. As yet, however, no long-term comparison of the clinical results of the implantation of ICLs with and without such a hole has hitherto been conducted. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was carried out in order to compare the long-term clinical outcomes of the implantation, in such eyes, of ICLs with and without a central artificial hole. Examinations were conducted of the 64 eyes of 32 consecutive patients with spherical equivalents of −7.53 ± 2.39 diopters (D) (mean ± standard deviation) in whom implantation of a Hole ICL was performed in 1 eye, and that of a conventional ICL was carried out in the other, by randomized assignment. Before 1, 3, and 6 months, and 1, 3, and 5 years after surgery, the safety, efficacy, predictability, stability, intraocular pressure, endothelial cell density, and adverse events of the 2 surgical techniques were assessed and compared over time. The measurements of LogMAR uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity 5 years postoperatively were −0.17 ± 0.14 and −0.24 ± 0.08 in the Hole ICL group, and −0.16 ± 0.10 and −0.25 ± 0.08 in the conventional ICL group. In these 2 groups, 96% and 100% of eyes, respectively, were within 1.0 D of the targeted correction 5 years postoperatively. Manifest refraction changed by −0.17 ± 0.41 D and −0.10 ± 0.26 D occurred in from 1 month to 5 years in the Hole and conventional ICL groups, respectively. Only 1 eye (3.1%), which was in the conventional ICL group, developed an asymptomatic anterior subcapsular cataract. Both Hole and conventional ICLs corrected of ametropia successfully throughout the 5-year observation period. It appears likely that the presence of the central hole does not

  7. New Method of Age Estimation from Maxillary Sutures Closure in a Thai Population.

    PubMed

    Sinthubua, A; Theera-Umpon, N; Auephanwiriyakul, S; Ruengdit, S; Das, S; Mahakkanukrauh, P

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation is one of the major components of forensic identification. Cranial suture closure has long been used as indicator for age estimation. Maxillary sutures have been less studied for estimation of age at death because they vary in their timing of closure with age. The purpose of this study was to estimate age by examining 190 Thai skulls with age ranging between 15-93 years from Forensic Osteology Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, and Chiang Mai University. Four parts of maxillary suture (incisive, anterior, transverse, and posterior sutures) were investigated the suture obliteration of each suture by computerizing from photograph. The suture were measured by pixel counting.The prediction model which based on the support vector machine (SVM) for regression or support vector regression (SVR) was utilized for data analysis. The results showed high correlation (R2 = 0.9086) between the predicted age and actual age. Plot between actual age group and predicted age in seven groups also revealed high correlation (R2 = 0.9434). These can be implied that we are able to use this SVR model to predict age at death using maxillary suture information.The interesting issue is to further apply this model in more cases to ensure the generalization of the finding. This study is the first attempt to estimate age at death using a new method based on novel analysis which considers a characteristic of relationship between maxillary suture closures with age that are not in linear form. The present study may contribute as a basis knowledge and method for further study of age estimation in archaeological and forensic anthropological contexts, especially when only skull or base of skull are found. PMID:27212570

  8. Suture materials - Current and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Christopher; Sethu, Swaminathan; Nayak, Sunita; Mohan, Loganathan; Morsi, Yosry Yos; Manivasagam, Geetha

    2016-06-01

    Surgical sutures are used to facilitate closure and healing of surgical- or trauma-induced wounds by upholding tissues together to facilitate healing process. There is a wide range of suture materials for medical purpose and the main types include absorbable and nonabsorbable. Recently, there is a growth in the development of classes of suture materials based on their properties and capabilities to improve tissue approximation and wound closure. This review outlines and discusses the current and emerging trends in suture technology including knotless barbed sutures, antimicrobial sutures, bio-active sutures such as drug-eluting and stem cells seeded sutures, and smart sutures including elastic, and electronic sutures. These newer strategies expand the versatility of sutures from being used as just a physical entity approximating opposing tissues to a more biologically active component enabling delivery of drugs and cells to the desired site with immense application potential in both therapeutics and diagnostics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1544-1559, 2016. PMID:26860644

  9. Knotless single-row rotator cuff repair: a comparative biomechanical study of 2 knotless suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Efird, Chad; Traub, Shaun; Baldini, Todd; Rioux-Forker, Dana; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana; Hawkins, Monica; McCarty, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gap formation during cyclic loading, maximum repair strength, and failure mode of single-row full-thickness supraspinatus repairs performed using 2 knotless suture anchors with differing internal suture-retention mechanisms in a human cadaver model. Nine matched pairs of cadaver shoulders were used. Full-thickness tears were induced by detaching the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity. Single-row repairs were performed with either type I (Opus Magnum PI; ArthroCare, Austin, Texas) or type II (ReelX STT; Stryker, Mahwah, New Jersey) knotless suture anchors. The repaired tendon was cycled from 10 to 90 N for 500 cycles, followed by load to failure. Gap formation was measured at 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 cycles with a video digitizing system. Anchor type or location (anterior or posterior) had no effect on gap formation during cyclic loading regardless of position (anterior, P=.385; posterior, P=.389). Maximum load to failure was significantly greater (P=.018) for repairs performed with type II anchors (288±62 N) compared with type I anchors (179±39 N). Primary failure modes were anchor pullout and tendon tearing for type II anchors and suture slippage through the anchor for type I anchors. The internal ratcheting suture-retention mechanism of type II anchors may have helped this anchor outperform the suture-cinching mechanism of type I anchors by supporting significantly higher loads before failure and minimizing suture slippage, potentially leading to stronger repairs clinically. PMID:23937749

  10. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  11. Funnel compression suture: a conservative procedure to control postpartum bleeding from the lower uterine segment.

    PubMed

    Li, G T; Li, G R; Li, X F; Wu, B P

    2016-07-01

    Bleeding from the lower uterine segment (LUS) during caesarean section remains a life-threatening obstetric problem, particularly in women with placenta praevia or partial placenta accreta in the LUS. Various conservative measures for the surgical treatment of postpartum haemorrhage have been studied for decades. In this paper we describe a funnel compression suture to staunch intractable bleeding from LUS for placenta praevia accreta. The suture brings the anterior and posterior walls of the LUS together using absorbable thread and was successful in the overwhelming majority of women. It is an easy, safe and effective conservative surgical treatment to stop severe bleeding of the LUS. PMID:26434751

  12. Suturing a tear of the anterior capsulorhexis

    PubMed Central

    Kleinmann, G; Chew, J; Apple, D J; Assia, E I; Mamalis, N

    2006-01-01

    Aim To describe a new technique of suturing a tear in the anterior capsulorhexis. Methods Continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) with lens removal was done in five fresh cadaver eyes. The diameter of the CCC was measured with a calliper. Using the same calliper a tear of the CCC was created while opening the calliper's arms. The distance between the calliper's arms needed to tear the CCC was documented. Using 9‐0 Ethilon 9011, CS 160‐6 sutures in two eyes, 9‐0 Prolene, D‐8229, CTC‐6L sutures in two eyes, and 10‐0 Prolene, 9090, CTC‐6 suture in one eye, the tears were sutured. A tear in the CCC was created again in the same way as the first tear. The distance between the calliper's arms needed to tear the CCC was documented again. Results Suturing of the tear restored some of the strength/elasticity of the CCC. Better results were found while using the 9‐0 Prolene, D‐8229, CTC‐6L sutures than with the two others sutures. Conclusions Suturing of a broken CCC can restore at least some of the strength/elasticity of the CCC. This can be important before intraocular lens (IOL) implantation for the safety of the implantation or after the implantation to ensure proper fixation of the IOL. PMID:16547318

  13. Allergy to Prolene Sutures in a Dural Graft for Chiari Decompression

    PubMed Central

    Cajigas, Iahn; Burks, S. Shelby; Gernsback, Joanna; Fine, Lauren; Moshiree, Baharak; Levi, Allan D.

    2015-01-01

    Allergy to Prolene suture is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases reported in the literature. There have been no such cases associated with neurosurgical procedures. Diagnosis is nearly always delayed in spite of persistent symptomatology. A 27-year-old girl with suspected Ehlers-Danlos, connective tissue disorder, underwent posterior fossa decompression for Chiari Type 1 malformation. One year later, the patient presented with urticarial rash from the neck to chest. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood testing, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative exploration did not suggest allergic reaction. Eventually skin testing proved specific Prolene allergy. After suture material was removed, the patient no longer complained of pruritus or rash. This single case highlights the important entity of allergic reaction to suture material, namely, Prolene, which can present in a delayed basis. Symptomatology can be vague but has typical allergic characteristics. Multidisciplinary approach is helpful with confirmatory skin testing as a vital part of the workup. PMID:26798347

  14. Allergy to Prolene Sutures in a Dural Graft for Chiari Decompression.

    PubMed

    Cajigas, Iahn; Burks, S Shelby; Gernsback, Joanna; Fine, Lauren; Moshiree, Baharak; Levi, Allan D

    2015-01-01

    Allergy to Prolene suture is exceedingly rare with only 5 cases reported in the literature. There have been no such cases associated with neurosurgical procedures. Diagnosis is nearly always delayed in spite of persistent symptomatology. A 27-year-old girl with suspected Ehlers-Danlos, connective tissue disorder, underwent posterior fossa decompression for Chiari Type 1 malformation. One year later, the patient presented with urticarial rash from the neck to chest. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood testing, magnetic resonance imaging, and intraoperative exploration did not suggest allergic reaction. Eventually skin testing proved specific Prolene allergy. After suture material was removed, the patient no longer complained of pruritus or rash. This single case highlights the important entity of allergic reaction to suture material, namely, Prolene, which can present in a delayed basis. Symptomatology can be vague but has typical allergic characteristics. Multidisciplinary approach is helpful with confirmatory skin testing as a vital part of the workup. PMID:26798347

  15. Mapping the suturing of a continental biota.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Nathan G

    2010-12-01

    The present-day spatial distribution of interspecific contact zones and intraspecific phylogeographical breaks provides a window into the past ecological and evolutionary processes that underlie speciation and species ranges. The clustering of contact zones and/or phylogeographical breaks in space indicates the suturing of diverged biotas. The presence of such suture zones indicates that similar ecological and historical factors have influenced the past and present distributions of populations and their divergence. Thus, suture zones are ideal natural laboratories for studying divergence, secondary contact and speciation across many different taxa. The concept of suture zones was formalized decades ago by Remington (1968), but only a few detailed and quantitative investigations of suture zones exist (Swenson & Howard 2004, 2005; Whinnett et al. 2005; Moritz et al. 2009). This limited number of investigations is largely because of a lack of detailed geographical data and sophisticated analytical tools. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Rissler & Smith (2010) have accomplished a detailed investigation into the suturing of amphibian lineages in the United States which uses both detailed geographical data and sophisticated analytical methods. The work greatly enhances our knowledge of suture zones by extending previous work that has focused less on amphibians and by explicitly considering the relationship between species richness and suture zones. PMID:21134009

  16. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  17. Complications and pregnancy outcome following uterine compression suture for postpartum haemorrhage: a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Mathur, M; Tagore, S

    2014-07-01

    In the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage from uterine atony, uterine compression sutures, such as the B-Lynch suture and its modifications have a role with the advantage of preservation of the uterus for fertility. There is however, a risk that apposition of the anterior and posterior walls of the uterus will impede drainage of lochia, resulting in undesirable complications. We undertook a five-year retrospective study of all women who underwent uterine compression sutures at the KK Women's and Children's Hospital, between 2008 and 2012. In total, 23 women had uterine compression sutures during the study period, of which, nineteen women managed to conserve their uterus. Our complication rate was 25%, which included persistent vaginal discharge, pyometra and endometritis. There were three conceptions, with two successful pregnancies. Our study shows uterine compression suture to be a safe and effective alternative to avoid hysterectomy with preservation of fertility at the time of major postpartum haemorrhage. The outcome of subsequent pregnancies is reassuring. PMID:24678816

  18. Lifting and wound closure with barbed sutures.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, R Stephen; Paul, Malcolm D

    2011-07-01

    The advent of barbed sutures has been a novel and useful adjunct for the aesthetic plastic surgeon in properly selected patients. The deployment of a barbed suture minimizes the risks of cheese wiring and stress relaxation, facilitating the minimally invasive repositioning of soft tissue in the head and neck, as well as optimizing and enhancing traditionally long and potentially tedious procedures in body contouring. This article highlights the advances, advantages, and efficacy associated with the use of barbed sutures in lifting and wound closure. PMID:21824547

  19. Suture slippage in knotless suture anchors resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

    PubMed

    Hayeri, Mohammad Reza; Keefe, Daniel T; Chang, Eric Y

    2016-05-01

    Rotator cuff repair using a suture bridge and knotless suture anchors is a relatively new, but increasingly used technique. The suture bridge technique creates an anatomically similar and more secure rotator cuff repair compared with conventional arthroscopic techniques and the use of knotless anchors eliminates the challenges associated with knot tying during arthroscopic surgery. However, previous in vitro biomechanical tests have shown that the hold of the suture in a knotless suture anchor is far lower than the pullout strength of the anchor from bone. Up until now slippage has been a theoretical concern. We present a prospectively diagnosed case of in vivo suture loosening after rotator cuff repair using a knotless bridge technique resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. PMID:26739301

  20. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  1. Treatment of Suture-related Complications of Buried-suture Double-eyelid Blepharoplasty in Asians

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Double-eyelid blepharoplasty is a popular aesthetic surgery in Asians. However, the buried suture technique is associated with complications related to implantation of the suture thread. The present study was performed to identify optimal surgical suture removal techniques in Japanese patients with suture-related complications after buried suture double-eyelid blepharoplasty. Methods: This retrospective study included 210 upper eyelids of 116 consecutive Japanese patients who had undergone buried suture double-eyelid blepharoplasty at other clinics. All patients underwent suture removal surgery at the author's institution for treatment of suture-related complications. Although 12 patients (10.3%) underwent suture removal surgery alone, 104 (89.7%) underwent secondary double-eyelid blepharoplasty. The outcomes of 3 techniques were evaluated: the small skin incision method, the full skin incision method, and the conjunctival method. Results: The small skin incision method was performed in 46 patients, the full skin incision method in 63, and the conjunctival method in 7. The success rate of the full skin incision method was significantly higher than that of the small skin incision method (4.8% vs 37.0%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Patients with an uncomfortable pulling sensation exhibited a linear scar or depressive deformity without inflammation of the tarsal plate and impingement on the subconjunctival capillary vessels of the tarsal plate or a depressive deformity of the levator muscle. Patients with corneal irritation exhibited chronic inflammation of the conjunctival surface of the tarsal plate. Conclusions: Suture-related complications of buried suture double-eyelid blepharoplasty in Asians must be treated with suture removal surgery. The full skin incision method is more reliable than the small incision method for such patients. PMID:27622107

  2. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4495 - Stainless steel suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stainless steel suture. 878.4495 Section 878.4495...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4495 Stainless steel suture. (a) Identification. A stainless steel suture is a needled or unneedled nonabsorbable surgical suture composed of...

  7. 21 CFR 878.5030 - Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. 878... Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. (a) Identification. Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture... Bombycidae. Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture is indicated for use in soft tissue...

  8. 21 CFR 878.5030 - Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. 878... Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. (a) Identification. Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture... Bombycidae. Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture is indicated for use in soft tissue...

  9. Laceration - sutures or staples - at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000498.htm Laceration - sutures or staples - at home To use the ... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A laceration is a cut that goes all the way ...

  10. Subscapularis Tendon Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Bok; Park, Young Eun; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Shon, Min Soo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    The subscapularis tendon plays an essential role in shoulder function. Although subscapularis tendon tears are less common than other rotator cuff tears, tears of the subscapularis tendon have increasingly been recognized with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy. A suture bridge technique for the treatment of posterosuperior rotator cuff tears has provided the opportunity to improve the pressurized contact area and mean footprint pressure. However, suture bridge fixation of subscapularis tendon tears appears to be technically challenging. We describe an arthroscopic surgical technique for suture bridge repair of subscapularis tendon tears that obtains ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. Surgery using such a suture bridge technique is indicated for large tears, such as tears involving the entire first facet or more, tears with a disrupted lateral sling, and combined medium to large supraspinatus/infraspinatus tears. PMID:26052489

  11. Frimand Needle Holder Reduces Suturing Time and Surgical Stress When Suturing in Palm Grip.

    PubMed

    Frimand Rönnow, Carl-Fredrik; Jeppsson, Bengt; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The Frimand needle holder (FNH) was developed to facilitate palm grip suturing. In the present study, we wanted to examine the impact of the FNH compared with a conventional Hegar-styled needle holder (HSNH) on suture time and surgical stress. Methods Thirty-two surgeons were enrolled and they performed sets of 3 continuous sutures on a polyurethane pad with premarked insert and exit points and the time for suturing was measured. Surgical stress was quantified by having the surgeons to perform 10 release maneuvers with the FNH and the HSNH on a needle attached to a scale. The scale sent 5 values per second to a computer. The first measurement of each series was regarded as the starting weight and all subsequent measurements were either regarded as neutral, pressure or traction. The sum of these measurements represented total surgical stress. Results We found that all surgeons reduced their median suturing time by 16% when using FNH for palm grip suturing with no difference between junior and senior surgeons. Moreover, it was observed that FNH decreased median surgical stress by 62% for all surgeons performing palm grip suturing compared with a conventional HSNH. Conclusion We conclude that the FNH reduces suture time and surgical stress compared with HSNH when performing palm grip suturing. These findings warrant studies in surgical patients in order to evaluate the potential clinical impact of FNH. PMID:26474606

  12. Biomechanical Comparison of Parallel and Crossed Suture Repair for Longitudinal Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Milchteim, Charles; Branch, Eric A.; Maughon, Ty; Hughey, Jay; Anz, Adam W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal meniscus tears are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Meniscus repair devices have been previously tested and presented; however, prior studies have not evaluated repair construct designs head to head. This study compared a new-generation meniscus repair device, SpeedCinch, with a similar established device, Fast-Fix 360, and a parallel repair construct to a crossed construct. Both devices utilize self-adjusting No. 2-0 ultra–high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and 2 polyether ether ketone (PEEK) anchors. Hypothesis: Crossed suture repair constructs have higher failure loads and stiffness compared with simple parallel constructs. The newer repair device would exhibit similar performance to an established device. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Sutures were placed in an open fashion into the body and posterior horn regions of the medial and lateral menisci in 16 cadaveric knees. Evaluation of 2 repair devices and 2 repair constructs created 4 groups: 2 parallel vertical sutures created with the Fast-Fix 360 (2PFF), 2 crossed vertical sutures created with the Fast-Fix 360 (2XFF), 2 parallel vertical sutures created with the SpeedCinch (2PSC), and 2 crossed vertical sutures created with the SpeedCinch (2XSC). After open placement of the repair construct, each meniscus was explanted and tested to failure on a uniaxial material testing machine. All data were checked for normality of distribution, and 1-way analysis of variance by ranks was chosen to evaluate for statistical significance of maximum failure load and stiffness between groups. Statistical significance was defined as P < .05. Results: The mean maximum failure loads ± 95% CI (range) were 89.6 ± 16.3 N (125.7-47.8 N) (2PFF), 72.1 ± 11.7 N (103.4-47.6 N) (2XFF), 71.9 ± 15.5 N (109.4-41.3 N) (2PSC), and 79.5 ± 25.4 N (119.1-30.9 N) (2XSC). Interconstruct comparison revealed no statistical difference between all 4 constructs regarding maximum

  13. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  14. [Therapy of posterior and posterolateral knee instability].

    PubMed

    Jakob, R P; Rüegsegger, M

    1993-11-01

    The natural course after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear is a slow process of degeneration starting in the medial compartment. Functional disability is mainly present in those instabilities that are combined with posterolateral insufficiency. The surgical treatment at present mainly addresses these combined types of posterior-posterolateral instability. It is generally agreed that suture of the torn PCL alone is insufficient and augmentation with autologous structures, such as the patellar ligament, are mandatory. Synthetic augmentation to facilitate after treatment is another adjunct. Because of the difficulty of precise tibial tunnel placement a two-stage procedure is advocated, an anterior approach with the patient supine being used for femoral graft placement. If a posterior approach with the patient prone is used, a straight posterior incision is made between the two heads of the gastrocnemius and the neuromuscular bundle. With this approach the tibial bone block is placed in a trough. The accuracy of graft placement and the immediate functional aftertreatment facilitated by the use of osseous fixation of a synthetic augmentation device at both ends have made better results of surgical reconstruction of the PCL possible. PMID:8309701

  15. Shear lag sutures: Improved suture repair through the use of adhesives.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Stephen W; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Gelberman, Richard H; Birman, Victor; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-09-01

    Suture materials and surgical knot tying techniques have improved dramatically since their first use over five millennia ago. However, the approach remains limited by the ability of the suture to transfer load to tissue at suture anchor points. Here, we predict that adhesive-coated sutures can improve mechanical load transfer beyond the range of performance of existing suture methods, thereby strengthening repairs and decreasing the risk of failure. The mechanical properties of suitable adhesives were identified using a shear lag model. Examination of the design space for an optimal adhesive demonstrated requirements for strong adhesion and low stiffness to maximize the strength of the adhesive-coated suture repair construct. To experimentally assess the model, we evaluated single strands of sutures coated with highly flexible cyanoacrylates (Loctite 4903 and 4902), cyanoacrylate (Loctite QuickTite Instant Adhesive Gel), rubber cement, rubber/gasket adhesive (1300 Scotch-Weld Neoprene High Performance Rubber & Gasket Adhesive), an albumin-glutaraldehyde adhesive (BioGlue), or poly(dopamine). As a clinically relevant proof-of-concept, cyanoacrylate-coated sutures were then used to perform a clinically relevant flexor digitorum tendon repair in cadaver tissue. The repair performed with adhesive-coated suture had significantly higher strength compared to the standard repair without adhesive. Notably, cyanoacrylate provides strong adhesion with high stiffness and brittle behavior, and is therefore not an ideal adhesive for enhancing suture repair. Nevertheless, the improvement in repair properties in a clinically relevant setting, even using a non-ideal adhesive, demonstrates the potential for the proposed approach to improve outcomes for treatments requiring suture fixation. Further study is necessary to develop a strongly adherent, compliant adhesive within the optimal design space described by the model. PMID:26022966

  16. Functional implications of squamosal suture size in paranthropus boisei.

    PubMed

    Dzialo, Christine; Wood, Sarah A; Berthaume, Michael; Smith, Amanda; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Benazzi, Stefano; Weber, Gerhard W; Strait, David S; Grosse, Ian R

    2014-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that the extensively overlapping temporal and parietal bones of the squamosal sutures in Paranthropus boisei are adaptations for withstanding loads associated with feeding. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the biomechanical effects of suture size (i.e., the area of overlap between the temporal and parietal bones) on stress, strain energy, and strain ratio in the squamosal sutures of Pan troglodytes and P. boisei (specimen OH 5) during biting. Finite element models (FEMs) of OH 5 and a P. troglodytes cranium were constructed from CT scans. These models contain sutures that approximate the actual suture sizes preserved in both crania. The FEM of Pan was then modified to create two additional FEMs with squamosal sutures that are 50% smaller and 25% larger than those in the original model. Comparisons among the models test the effect of suture size on the structural integrity of the squamosal suture as the temporal squama and parietal bone move relative to each other during simulated premolar biting. Results indicate that with increasing suture size there is a decreased risk of suture failure, and that maximum stress values in the OH 5 suture were favorable compared to values in the Pan model with the normal suture size. Strain ratios suggest that shear is an important strain regime in the squamosal suture. This study is consistent with the hypothesis that larger sutures help reduce the likelihood of suture failure under high biting loads. PMID:24242913

  17. Posterior fixation keratoprostheses and mechanical biocompatibility: determination of critical intraocular pressure causing aqueous humor leak and/or keratoprosthesis extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahi, Hassan; Duchesne, Bernard; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Nose, Izuru; Denham, David B.; Villain, Franck L.; Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1997-05-01

    The effect of increased intraocular pressure (IOP) in human cadaver eyes implanted with posterior fixation keratoprosthesis was evaluated. Experiments were carried out with six fresh pairs of human cadaver eyes. One eye of each pair was implanted with a PCL-5 keratoprosthesis (8.60 mm diameter with an optic of 5.60 nm diameter) and the contralateral eye was used as a control. The keratoprosthesis was inserted through a 6 mm diameter opening trephined in the cornea. The resistance of the implanted eye to pressure on `aqueous humor' leak and/or keratoprosthesis extrusion was tested by infusing water at a constant flow of 60 mmHg/second into the anterior chamber. IOP variations were recorded with a transducer connected to a computer. IOP could be increased up to 1520 to 2324 mmHg before aqueous humor leaks occurred. Leaks were always located at the keratoprosthesis-cornea interface. No prosthesis extrusion was observed. Implanted eyes that did not leak aqueous and control eyes tore at the sclera. All posterior fixation keratoprostheses implanted eyes resisted more than 100 times the normal physiological intraocular pressure and on this standpoint is safe. Additional experiments were needed to assess the influence of suture fixation and wound healing in an animal model.

  18. A New Suturing Device for Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Ryoichi; Itoda, Yoshifumi; Panthee, Nirmal; Inui, Akitoshi; Ashiba, Hiroshi; Ando, Takehiro; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Ono, Minoru

    2016-05-25

    Endoscope-assisted surgery and robot-assisted surgery are not common in cardiac surgery, particularly coronary artery bypass grafting, because of the complex nature of the procedures. We developed a new suturing device that allows for easy performance of such cardiac surgeries in comparison with conventional suturing methods. A total of 63 rabbits were used in this study. The right carotid artery was bypassed using the same side of the jugular vein under endoscopic guidance. Of these, 48 rabbits were operated on using the new devices and 15 rabbits were operated on using conventional polypropylene sutures. The proximal suturing time was 16.6 ± 5.3 minutes in the group that underwent surgery using the new device (group D) and 22.8 ± 7.6 minutes in the control group (group C; P < 0.05). The distal suture time was 16.3 ± 4.2 minutes in group D and 22.8 ± 6.0 minutes in group C (P < 0.05). The operation time was 113.0 ± 15.8 minutes in group D and 136.7 ± 20.6 minutes in group C (P < 0.05). Graft flow was 19.9 ± 12.8 mL/minute in group D and 12.1 ± 11.3 mL/minute in group C (P < 0.05). Thus, the operation time and the suture time differed significantly between the groups. This device provides advantages in endoscopic surgery compared to the conventional suture method. PMID:27181185

  19. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  20. Pediatric Coronal Suture Fiber Alignment and the Effect of Interdigitation on Coronal Suture Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Adamski, Kelly Nicole; Loyd, Andre Matthew; Samost, Albert; Myers, Barry; Nightingale, Roger; Smith, Kathleen; 'Dale' Bass, Cameron R

    2015-09-01

    The morphological and mechanical properties of the pediatric skull are important in understanding pediatric head injury biomechanics. Although previous studies have analyzed the morphology of cranial sutures, none has done so in pediatric specimens nor have previous studies related the morphology to mechanical properties of human sutures. This study quantified the geometry of pediatric cranial sutures and investigated its correlation with the suture mechanical properties. First, the suture fiber alignment was quantified using histological analysis for four ages-neonate, 9 months-old, 11 months-old, and 18 months-old. For the morphometric investigation of the suture interdigitation, suture samples from a 6-year-old were scanned using micro-CT and the level of interdigitation was measured using two techniques. The first technique, the sinuosity index, was calculated by dividing the suture path along the surface of the skull by the suture distance from beginning to end. The second technique, the surface area interdigitation index, was calculated by measuring the surface area of the bone interface outlining the suture and dividing it by the cross-sectional area of the bone. The mechanical properties were obtained using methods reported in Davis et al.6. The results of the histological analysis showed a significant increase in fiber alignment in older specimen; where random fiber alignment has an average angle deviation of 45°, neonatal suture fibers have an average deviation of 32.2° and the 18-month-old fibers had an average deviation of 16.2° (p < 0.0001). For the suture index measurements, only the sinuosity was positively correlated with the ultimate strain (R (2) = 0.62, Bonferroni corrected p = 0.011) but no other measurements showed a significant relationship, including the amount of interdigitation and elastic modulus. Our results demonstrate that there is a distinct developmental progression of the suture fiber alignment at a young age, but the

  1. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism between horizontal and X-pattern sutures in the scleral tunnel incisions for manual small incision cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Yadollah; Mirmohammadsadeghi, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Two types of popular scleral tunnel sutures in the manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) are horizontal and X-pattern sutures. Surgically induced corneal astigmatism (SIA) is a useful indicator of the suturing effect. Aims: To compare SIA between horizontal and X-pattern sutures in the scleral tunnel incisions for MSICS. Design: Prospective, nonrandomized comparative trial. Materials and Methods: After superior scleral tunnel incision and capsulorhexis, the nucleus was prolapsed into the anterior chamber and delivered. The wound was sutured with either horizontal or X-pattern suture. The simulated keratometry values were derived from the corneal topography preoperatively and 1.5 and 3 months postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: The SIA was calculated by Cartesian coordinates based analysis. Results: Sixty-four patients (32 patients in each group) were included in the study. In the horizontal suture group, the SIA centroid values at 1.5 and 3 months after the surgery were 0.87 × 1° and 1.11 × 180°, respectively, showing induction of against-the-rule astigmatism. In the X-pattern suture group, the SIA centroid values at 1.5 and 3 months after the surgery were 0.61 × 97° and 0.66 × 92°, respectively, showing induction of mild with-the-rule astigmatism. The difference between the amount of SIA at 1.5 and 3 months after surgery was small. Conclusion: In the MSICS, the X-pattern sutures were preferred to the horizontal sutures in the patients without significant preoperative steepening in line with the central meridian of the incision. In the cases with significant preoperative steepening, sutureless surgery or horizontal sutures were preferred. Corneal astigmatism in the patients undergoing MSICS was stable at 1.5 months after the surgery. PMID:26458479

  2. The history and evolution of sutures in pelvic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Muffly, Tyler M; Tizzano, Anthony P; Walters, Mark D

    2011-01-01

    Summary The purpose of the study is to review the history and innovations of sutures used in pelvic surgery. Based on a review of the literature using electronic- and hand-searched databases we identified appropriate articles and gynaecology surgical textbooks regarding suture for wound closure. The first documented uses of suture are explored and then the article focuses on the use of knotted materials in pelvic surgery. The development of suture of natural materials is followed chronologically until the present time where synthetic suture is implanted during countless surgeries every day. This millennial history of suture contains an appreciation of the early work of Susruta, Celsus, Paré and Lister, including a survey of some significant developments of suture methods over the last 100 years. Most surgeons know little about the history and science of sutures. A retrospective view of suture is critical to the appreciation of the current work and development of this common tool. PMID:21357979

  3. Fourier technique for studying ammonoid sutures

    SciTech Connect

    Gildner, R.F.; Ackerly, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Suture patterns have long been recognized as being of primary importance in the study of ammonoids. The authors have developed a technique to use Fourier analysis to study these structures by using a simple transformation: x-y data of a digitized suture are transformed to angle of slope versus position along the suture's length. A Fast Fourier Transform applied to the data produces a power spectrum (amplitude versus wave number) providing a precise and accurate measure of suture shape. The authors have applied this technique to the analysis of ontogenetic change in suture morphology. In goniatitic, ceratitic and preadult ammonitic patterns most of the change is exhibited in the amplitudes of the lowest ten wave numbers. Their Fourier coefficients clearly show trends not readily apparent by visual inspection. The more complex ammonitic patterns are reflected in increased amplitudes of higher wave numbers (a broader peak of the power spectrum) and their analysis is necessarily more complex. The Fourier approach presents the opportunity to quantitatively measure and describe the tempo and mode of evolution in the Ammonoidea. Potential applications of the new technique, as well as limitations, are discussed with special attention to investigations of ammonoid ontogeny and phylogeny.

  4. The cell biology of suturing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J.K.F.; Alyouha, S.; Kadler, K.E.; Ferguson, M.W.J.; McGrouther, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed “acellular zones” in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12 h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified “Kessler” clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  5. The cell biology of suturing tendons.

    PubMed

    Wong, J K F; Alyouha, S; Kadler, K E; Ferguson, M W J; McGrouther, D A

    2010-07-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed "acellular zones" in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified "Kessler" clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  6. Endoscopic navigation for minimally invasive suturing.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Christian; Bossard, Lukas; Häberling, Armin; Baur, Charles; Székely, Gábor; Cattin, Philippe C

    2007-01-01

    Manipulating small objects such as needles, screws or plates inside the human body during minimally invasive surgery can be very difficult for less experienced surgeons, due to the loss of 3D depth perception. This paper presents an approach for tracking a suturing needle using a standard endoscope. The resulting pose information of the needle is then used to generate artificial 3D cues on the 2D screen to optimally support surgeons during tissue suturing. Additionally, if an external tracking device is provided to report the endoscope's position, the suturing needle can be tracked in a hybrid fashion with sub-millimeter accuracy. Finally, a visual navigation aid can be incorporated, if a 3D surface is intraoperatively reconstructed from video or registered from preoperative imaging. PMID:18044620

  7. The past and present of liver suture.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Andrzej L; Lukashenko, Andriy; Chang, Yu-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Since the first attempts at resecting parts of diseased livers in the late nineteenth century, hemorrhage has been the main obstacle for surgeons. One of the first hemostasis techniques in liver resection was liver suture. The idea of suturing the liver in order to perform resection was proposed by a team of Russian and Polish surgeons from Kharkiv University in today's Ukraine. The liver suture became widely popular and has been used in various forms throughout the surgical world. Further into the twentieth century, it has lost much of its popularity; however, over more than 100 years of existence it has seen several peaks in interest. Currently, it is still being used by some liver surgeons as it is one of the cheapest ways of obtaining a bloodless liver parenchyma transection. PMID:24132823

  8. Nanostructured medical sutures with antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Cristina; García-Fernández, Luis; Fernández-Blázquez, Juan Pedro; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram; Unger, Ron; Kirkpatrick, James; Arzt, Eduard; Funk, Lutz; Turón, Pau; del Campo, Aránzazu

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial repellence in suture materials is a desirable property that can potentially improve the healing process by preventing infection. We describe a method for generating nanostructures at the surface of commercial sutures of different composition, and their potential for preventing biofilm formation. We show how bacteria attachment is altered in the presence of nanosized topographies and identify optimum designs for preventing it without compromising biocompatibility and applicability in terms of nanostructure robustness or tissue friction. These studies open new possibilities for flexible and cost-effective realization of topography-based antibacterial coatings for absorbable biomedical textiles. PMID:25818435

  9. Isolating Suture Slippage During Cadaveric Testing of Knotless Anchors.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Vopat, Bryan G; Paller, David; Avery, Anthony L; Koruprolu, Sarath; Fadale, Paul D

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated a testing method designed to isolate and analyze the effectiveness of different suture-retention mechanisms in knotless suture anchors used for rotator cuff repairs. Six knotless PushLock implants (Arthrex) with a suture-retention mechanism dependent on a press-fit of suture between the anchor's outer diameter and surrounding bone were compared with 6 ReelX STT devices (Stryker) reliant on an intrinsic suture-locking mechanism. Suture slippage beyond minimal clinical failure thresholds, as well as ultimate failure load, were determined with a novel testing fixture that isolated suture slippage. Suture slippage was isolated from anchor-bone disengagement. Each PushLock exhibited suture slippage of more than 3 mm, and each ReelX exhibited slippage of less than 3 mm. The PushLock implants also exhibited significantly (P < .05) more interval and maximum slippage; 5 of these 6 implants failed via complete suture slippage before dynamic testing could be completed. All ReelX devices survived dynamic testing and ultimately failed via suture breakage. This novel axial load biomechanical testing technique isolated suture slippage in 2 uniquely designed knotless anchors. The press-fit PushLock implant was prone to slippage failure, whereas the ReelX device with its internal suture-locking mechanism exhibited minimal slippage. PMID:26161766

  10. Optimal Suturing Technique and Number of Sutures for Surgical Implantation of Acoustic Transmitters in Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2012-01-02

    The size reduction of acoustic transmitters has led to a reduction in the length of incision needed to implant a transmitter. Smaller suture knot profiles and fewer sutures may be adequate for closing an incision used to surgically implant an acoustic microtransmitter. As a result, faster surgery times and reduced tissue trauma could lead to increased survival and decreased infection for implanted fish. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of five suturing techniques on mortality, tag and suture retention, incision openness, ulceration, and redness in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Suturing was performed by three surgeons, and study fish were held at two water temperatures (12°C and 17°C). Mortality was low and tag retention was high for all treatments on all examination days (7, 14, 21, and 28 days post-surgery). Because there was surgeon variation in suture retention among treatments, further analyses included only the one surgeon who received feedback training in all suturing techniques. Incision openness and tissue redness did not differ among treatments. The only difference observed among treatments was in tissue ulceration. Incisions closed with a horizontal mattress pattern had more ulceration than other treatments among fish held for 28 days at 17°C. Results from this study suggest that one simple interrupted 1 × 1 × 1 × 1 suture is adequate for closing incisions on fish under most circumstances. However, in dynamic environments, two simple interrupted 1 × 1 × 1 × 1 sutures should provide adequate incision closure. Reducing bias in survival and behavior tagging studies is important when making comparisons to the migrating salmon population. Therefore, by minimizing the effects of tagging on juvenile salmon (reduced tissue trauma and reduced surgery time), researchers can more accurately estimate survival and behavior.

  11. Suture needles in Oral Surgery: Alterations depending on the type and number of sutures

    PubMed Central

    Barranco-Piedra, Sebastian; Rodríguez-Caballero, Angela; Serrera-Figallo, María-Angeles; Segura-Egea, Juan-José; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the number and type of sutures used in oral surgery influence two ad hoc variables (incision plane and displaced area), which are two variables related to whether the suture needle is suitable for the task. Seventy-five TB-15 needles were studied, which were used to suture between zero and three mucosa and/subperiosteal sutures, producing 15 groups with 5 needles in each one. The incision plane and displaced area were measured for each group, which are two variables related to how the needle has worn and altered. Statistical treatment was conducted using the Kruskal-Wallis H test to compare multiple values and the Mann-Whitney U test to compare pairs. A multi-stage regression model was applied with the aim of predicting the changes in the dependent variables based on the number and type of sutures performed. The incision plane ranged from 126.67 to 346.24μm among the different groups. The displaced area was measured as being between 14 524.83μm² and 128 311.91μm². The best predictive model for the incision plane obtained a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.149, while it reached 0.249 for the displaced area. Subperiosteal sutures held more weighting among the variables studied. Mucosal sutures did not seem to greatly affect needle wear. Observations reported in this paper indicate that the needle should be changed after having performed two subperiosteal sutures, given the wear and change to the incision plane that is produced, which causes the needle’s cutting ability to reduce. Key words: Needles, sutures, material testing, oral surgery, third molar, scanning electron microscope. PMID:22157669

  12. Use of Barbed Sutures in Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Single-Layer Sutures

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Masahide; Kinoshita, Jun; Shimizu, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopic anastomotic methods are not commonly used because of the cumbersome laparoscopic intracorporeal sutures and tying involved. The barbed suture is one of the various devices developed to simplify the placement of intracorporeal sutures. However, barbed sutures are not commonly used during reconstruction after radical gastrectomy in cancer patients or for single-layer entire-thickness running suturing for intestinal anastomoses. We describe the procedure for using barbed sutures and report on the short-term surgical outcomes. Methods: Between August 2012 and March 2014, 15-cm-long barbed sutures (V-Loc 180; Covidien, Mansfield, MA, USA) were used for laparoscopic intestinal anastomoses, including intestinal hole closure for esophagojejunal and gastrojejunal anastomoses after mechanical anastomoses and gastric wall closure after partial resection. Results: In total, 38 patients underwent 40 laparoscopic anastomoses (esophagojejunostomies, 26; gastrojejunostomies, 7; and simple closure of gastric defect, 7); no cases required conversion to open surgery. Two cases exhibited positive air leak test results during surgery (1 case of esophagojejunostomy and 1 case of simple closure of gastric defect). Two cases of intestinal obstruction were noted; of those, one patient with postoperative intestinal paresis (grade II) was managed conservatively, and the other underwent repeat laparoscopic surgery (grade IIIb) for internal herniation unrelated to V-Loc use. No postoperative complications at the anastomosis site and no surgery-related deaths were noted. Conclusion: Single-layer entire-thickness running suturing with the V-Loc 180 barbed suture after stapled side-to-side intestinal anastomosis was found to be safe and feasible in the reported cases. PMID:27493467

  13. Argon laser suture lysis with different suture materials. An experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Hugkulstone, C E; Spencer, A F; Vernon, S A

    1994-01-01

    In an in vitro study, 10/0 nylon was found to require a significantly lower laser energy density to produce suture lysis following a single shot than either 10/0 Dacron or 10/0 prolene. Nylon and Dacron monofilament sutures ruptured at reproducible energy levels without significant observable changes at subthreshold irradiation. Prolene, however, was observed to stretch at energy levels below the lysis threshold, under the standard tension produced by a weight of 0.36 (SD 0.02) g. This feature may be of value when performing laser treatment to trabeculectomy flap sutures in the early postoperative period. Images PMID:8025074

  14. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  15. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  16. Advances in Suture Material for Obstetric and Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A; Clark, Rachel M

    2009-01-01

    Despite millennia of experience with wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. Tissue characteristics, tensile strength, reactivity, absorption rates, and handling properties should be taken into account when selecting a wound closure suture. This review discusses the wound healing process and the biomechanical properties of currently available suture materials to better understand how to choose suture material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:19826572

  17. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  18. Bone cement improves suture anchor fixation.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Sohn, David H; Mirza, Faisal M; Lindsey, Derek P; Lee, Arthur T

    2006-10-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure can occur if the anchor pulls out of bone. We hypothesized that suture anchor fixation can be augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and that polymethylmethacrylate can be used to improve fixation in a stripped anchor hole. Six matched cadaveric proximal humeri were used. On one side, suture anchors were placed and loaded to failure using a ramped cyclic loading protocol. The stripped anchor holes then were injected with approximately 1 cc polymethylmethacrylate, and anchors were replaced and tested again. In the contralateral humerus, polymethylmethacrylate was injected into anchor holes before anchor placement and testing. In unstripped anchors, polymethylmethacrylate increased the number of cycles to failure by 34% and failure load by 71% compared with anchors not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate. Polymethylmethacrylate haugmentation of stripped anchors increased the cycles to failure by 31% and failure load by 111% compared with unstripped uncemented anchors. No difference was found in cycles to failure or failure load between cemented stripped anchors and cemented unstripped anchors. Polymethylmethacrylate can be used to augment fixation, reducing the risk of anchor pull-out failure, regardless whether the suture anchor hole is stripped or unstripped. PMID:16702922

  19. Aortic valve annuloplasty: new single suture technique.

    PubMed

    Schöllhorn, Joachim; Rylski, Bartosz; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction strategies for aortic valve insufficiency in the presence of aortic annulus dilatation are usually surgically challenging. We demonstrate a simple, modified Taylor technique of downsizing and stabilization of the aortic annulus using a single internal base suture. Since April 2011, 22 consecutive patients have undergone safe aortic valve annuloplasty. No reoperations for aortic valve insufficiency and no deaths occurred. PMID:24882316

  20. Arthroscopic Repair of a Posterior Bony Bankart Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Poehling-Monaghan, Kirsten L.; Krych, Aaron J.; Dahm, Diane L.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior bony defects of the glenoid rim, particularly those associated with instability, are often a frustrating challenge for arthroscopists because of the defects' inaccessibility from standard portals. This challenge is enhanced when the lesion is chronic and fibrous malunion of the fragment makes mobilization difficult. We present our technique for arthroscopic repair of the relatively uncommon chronic posterior bony Bankart lesion. By use of lateral positioning and a standard anterior viewing portal and posterior working portal, as well as a strategically placed posterolateral accessory portal, the lesion is first freed from its malreduced position and ultimately repaired using suture anchor fixation of the bony fragment along with its associated labrum directly to the remaining glenoid rim. This technique, facilitated by precise portal placement, results in satisfactory fragment reduction, appropriate capsular tension, and restoration of anatomy. PMID:26870644

  1. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. Q.; Yang, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures' biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption. PMID:27019589

  2. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Q; Yang, J L

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures' biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption. PMID:27019589

  3. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Pearson, Sara E; Caldwell, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a "reverse Hill-Sachs lesion." The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor-based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  4. Rapid Maxillary Expansion without Posterior Anchorage.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê; Amaral, Cássia

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to evaluate an alternative form of maxillary expansion anchored with mini-implants. A patient 12 years, class III in permanent canine teeth, with multiple agenesis of upper posterior teeth was treated with the aid of four mini-implants in the palate and Haas modified type appliance. During the period of expansion, an interincisal diastema was observed as the first clinical sign of disjunction of the sutures. After correction of cross bite, the expansion of the palate was confirmed by upper occlusal radiographs. Thus, the evaluations showed that the technique was effective and that new scientific studies should be conducted to further develop this subject. Keywords: Appliances; Biomechanics; Implants; Malocclusions PMID:27319047

  5. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Chad D.; Hanzlik, Shane R.; Pearson, Sara E.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a “reverse Hill-Sachs lesion.” The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor–based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  6. Recycling Suture Limbs from Knotless Suture Anchors for Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy S.; DiPompeo, Christine M.; Ismaeli, Zahra C.; Porter, Polly A.; Nicholson, Shannon L.; Johnson, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability often leads to labral abnormality that requires surgical intervention that may require fixation with suture anchors. The proposed surgical technique allows the surgeon to achieve 2 points of fixation around the labrum and/or capsule with a single suture secured to the glenoid with a knotless anchor. Instead of cutting and discarding the residual suture limbs after anchor insertion, this technique uses the residual suture limbs of the knotless anchor for a second suture pass. This technique (1) creates a more cost- and time-efficient surgical procedure than using multiple single-loaded anchors or double-loaded anchors, (2) decreases the known risk of glenoid fracture from the stress riser at the implant tips of multi-anchor repairs by reducing the number of anchors required for stabilization, (3) decreases the surgical time compared with the use of double-loaded anchors through simpler suture management and less knot tying, (4) allows for the secure reapproximation of the labrum to the glenoid while offering a convenient option for capsulorrhaphy without the need to insert another anchor, and (5) yields more points of soft-tissue fixation with fewer anchors drilled into the glenoid. PMID:25126504

  7. Elastic behaviour of sutured calf pericardium: influence of the suture threads.

    PubMed

    García Páez, J M; Carrera San Martin, A; García Sestafe, J V; Jorge Herrero, E; Navidad, R; Cordón, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the elastic behaviour of calf pericardium used in the construction of cardiac bioprosthesis valve leaflets, sutured with different types of commercially available sutures: silk, Gore-Tex, Surgilene and nylon. Thirty-two samples (four series of eight samples each) were subjected to tensile strength testing to breakage. The breaking stress (MPa) ranged between 4.89 MPa for samples sutured with Gore-Tex and 5.22 MPa for those sewn with nylon. Three samples from each series were subjected to a stepwise stress test, involving increasing levels of stress followed by return to zero, to define the elastic limit (the cut-off point beyond which strain is no longer reversible). Analysis of the results provided the mathematical functions that govern the elastic behaviour (stress/strain) within the elastic range for each type of sutured sample. The series sutured with Surgilene presented the highest mean value (1.649 MPa). Finally, a statistical study was carried out to determine which series showed the greatest probability of having the least interaction between the thread and the pericardium. Allowing an interval of +/- 10%, Gore-Tex showed the best probability in this respect. However, real fatigue testing is necessary to definitively determine which is the best suture to use. PMID:8866029

  8. Transfascial suture in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair; friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Sahu, Diwakar; Das, Somak; Wani, Majid Rasool; Reddy, Prasanna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    'Suture hernia' is fairly a new and rare type of ventral hernia. It occurs at the site of transfascial suture, following laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR). Employment of transfascial sutures in LVHR is still debatable in contrast to tackers. Prevention of mesh migration and significant post-operative pain are the pros and cons with the use of transfascial sutures, respectively. We report an unusual case of suture hernia or transfascial hernia, which can further intensify this dispute, but at the same time will provide insight for future consensus. PMID:25883460

  9. Effect of Adhesive Strips and Dermal Sutures vs Dermal Sutures Only on Wound Closure

    PubMed Central

    Custis, Trenton; Armstrong, April W.; King, Thomas H.; Sharon, Victoria R.; Eisen, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although applying adhesive strips to a wound closure has been shown to have outcomes equivalent to those with cuticular suturing, it is unknown whether adhesive strips provide additional benefit compared with dermal suturing alone. OBJECTIVE To determine whether the addition of adhesive strips to a wound closed with buried interrupted subcuticular sutures improves outcomes following wound closure. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective, randomized split-wound intervention was conducted between November 14, 2013, and May 16, 2014, in patients who underwent cutaneous surgical procedures at the University of California, Davis, outpatient dermatology clinic. Fifty-seven patients 18 years or older with postoperative defects of at least 3 cm, resulting from either Mohs micrographic surgical procedures or surgical excision, were screened for participation. Nine patients were excluded and 48 were enrolled. INTERVENTIONS Half of each wound was randomized to receive buried interrupted subcuticular sutures and overlying adhesive strips and the other half received buried interrupted subcuticular sutures only. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES At 3 months’ follow-up, each patient and 2 blinded observers evaluated the wound using the Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale. RESULTS The total mean (SD) Patient Observer Scar Assessment Scale score for observers for the side that received a combination of adhesive strips and buried interrupted subcuticular suturing (12.3 [4.8]) and the side that received sutures only (12.9 [6.3]) did not differ significantly at 3 months (P = .32). There was no significant difference in the total patient assessment scale score between the combination closure (14.0 [7.6]) and sutures only (14.7 [7.6]) sides at 3 months (P = .39). There was also no significant difference between the 2 closure methods in terms of mean (SD) scar width (both methods: 1.1 [0.8] mm, P = .89) at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Combination closure with

  10. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  11. Simplified ab externo fixation technique to treat late dislocation of scleral-sutured polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Lyu, J; Zhao, P-Q

    2016-05-01

    PurposeWe report a simplified ab externo scleral fixation technique to manage the late dislocation of scleral-sutured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lenses (IOLs) in the absence of capsule support.Materials and methodsThe technique was performed on five eyes of five patients. Symmetrical scleral pocket tunnels without conjunctival peritomy were created. An anterior vitrectomy via a limbal approach with an anterior chamber infusion or a 3-port pars plana vitrectomy was performed to rescue the dislocated IOL. A long straight suture needle and 23-gauge vitreoretinal forceps were used to conveniently reposition the IOL and loop sutures through the IOL positioning eyelets without externalizing IOL haptics. The outside suture knots were buried under the roof of the scleral tunnels.ResultsThe patients were followed for 5-14 months after surgery. All the operated eyes quickly recovered with negligible corneal endothelial cell loss and mild inflammation. Visual acuity improvement and IOL centration were achieved in all eyes with no major complications.ConclusionThe simplified ab externo scleral fixation technique offers an effective and minimally invasive surgical alternative to salvage dislocated previously scleral-sutured PMMA IOLs. PMID:26795420

  12. Effect of suture material on platelet deposition onto prosthetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; McEnroe, C.S.; Li, S.; Coleman, J.; Callow, A.D.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of employing prosthetic material with minimal thrombogenicity. However, the role of different suture materials in early thrombotic events on prosthetic materials has not been examined. Experiments were designed to analyze the effects of suture on platelet graft interaction using an in vivo baboon hemocompatability screen. Indium labeled, autologous platelet deposition was determined on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) containing suture lines of polypropylene (Prolene), polybutester (Novafil), and ePTFE (Gore-Tex). A significant increase in platelet deposition was noted not only at the suture line, but proximal and distal to it as well. The results were different for each of the sutures employed and suggest that the suture line may influence early platelet deposition in the perianastomotic region, not only at the suture line, but proximally and distally as well.

  13. [Dissertations 25 years after date 26. Maxillary sutural surfaces].

    PubMed

    Remmelink, H J

    2011-06-01

    In the case of growing children with a deviation in the size or position of the upper jaw orthopaedic devices are often used to direct the growth at the level of the sutures. In the PhD thesis 'The postnatal development of the human maxillary sutural surfaces', published in 1985, the orientation and macroscopic morphology of the sutural surfaces of the maxilla in children's skulls were described. The existence of premaxillomaxillary and pterygomaxillary sutures could not be demonstrated. It was observed that the maxillary sutural surfaces were mainly sagittally oriented. Some sutural surfaces became increasingly rough with age, while the majority of the surfaces remained smooth. It was concluded that advice concerning the determination of the direction of orthopaedic forces in relation to the orientation of the sutures needed revision. Subsequent systematic reviews have reported that so far little is known about the long-term stability of orthopaedic effects in orthodontics. PMID:21761798

  14. Quantitative evaluation of stiffness of commercial suture materials.

    PubMed

    Chu, C C; Kizil, Z

    1989-03-01

    The bending stiffness of 22 commercial suture materials of varying size, chemical structure and physical form was quantitatively evaluated using a stiffness tester (Taber V-5, model 150B, Teledyne). The commercial sutures were Chromic catgut; Dexon (polyglycolic acid); Vicryl (polyglactin 910); PDS (polydioxanone); Maxon (polyglycolide-trimethylene carbonate); Silk (coated with silicone); Mersilene (polyester fiber); Tycron (polyester fiber); Ethibond (polyethylene terephthalate coated with polybutylene); Nurolon (nylon 66); Surgilon (nylon 66 coated with silicone); Ethilon (coated nylon 66), Prolene (polypropylene); Dermalene (polyethylene), and Gore-tex (polytetraflouroethylene). These are both natural and synthetic, absorbable and nonabsorbable and monofilament and multifilament sutures. All of these sutures were size 2-0, but Prolene sutures with sizes ranging from 1-0 to 9-0 were also tested to determine the effect of suture size on stiffness. The bending stiffness data obtained showed that a wide range of bending stiffness was observed among the 22 commercial sutures. The most flexible 2-0 suture was Gore-tex, followed by Dexon, Silk, Surgilon, Vicryl (uncoated), Tycron, Nurolon, Mersilene, Ethibond, Maxon, PDS, Ethilon, Prolene, Chromic catgut, coated Vicryl, and lastly, Dermalene. The large porous volume inherent in Gore-tex monofilament suture was the reason for its lowest flexural stiffness. Sutures with a braided structure were generally more flexible than those of a monofilament structure, irrespective of the chemical constituents. Coated sutures had significantly higher stiffness than the corresponding uncoated ones. This is particularly true when polymers rather than wax were used as the coating material. This increase in stiffness is attributable to the loss of mobility under bending force in the fibers and yarns that make up the sutures. An increase in the size of the suture significantly increased the stiffness, and the magnitude of increase

  15. [Posterior capsule opacification].

    PubMed

    Milazzo, S; Grenot, M; Benzerroug, M

    2014-12-01

    Posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is the most common complication after cataract surgery, with an incidence of 30%. It tends to be considered a normal event in the natural history of cataract surgery. Better understanding of its pathophysiology and advancement of intraocular lens material and design along with the improvement of phacoemulsification technique have contributed to decrease the incidence of PCO. Although treatment by Nd: YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is quick and non-invasive, the opening of the posterior capsule may be associated with numerous complications. Prevention remains the best measure for controlling this pathology. PMID:25455552

  16. Skin tension related to tension reduction sutures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Kim, Kyung Yong; Han, Seung Ho; Hwang, Se Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the skin tension of several fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures. Six upper limbs and 8 lower limbs of 4 fresh cadavers were used. At the deltoid area (10 cm below the palpable acromion) and lateral thigh (midpoint from the palpable greater trochanter to the lateral border of the patella), and within a 3 × 6-cm fusiform area of skin, subcutaneous tissue defects were created. At the midpoint of the defect, a no. 5 silk suture was passed through the dermis at a 5-mm margin of the defect, and the defect was approximated. The initial tension to approximate the margins was measured using a tensiometer.The tension needed to approximate skin without any tension reduction suture (S) was 6.5 ± 4.6 N (Newton). The tensions needed to approximate superficial fascia (SF) and deep fascia (DF) were 7.8 ± 3.4 N and 10.3 ± 5.1 N, respectively. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the SF was 4.1 ± 3.4 N. The tension needed to approximate the skin after approximating the DF was 4.9 ± 4.0 N. The tension reduction effect of approximating the SF was 38.8 ± 16.4% (2.4 ± 1.5 N, P = 0.000 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The tension reduction effect of approximating the DF was 25.2% ± 21.9% (1.5 ± 1.4 N, P = 0.001 [ANOVA, Scheffé]). The reason for this is thought to be that the SF is located closely to the skin unlike the DF. The results of this study might be a basis for tension reduction sutures. PMID:25569413

  17. Coracoclavicular stabilization using a suture anchor technique.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Darren J; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis; Donahue, Joseph P; Zambetti, George

    2008-06-01

    Multiple fixation options exist for coracoclavicular stabilization, but many are technically demanding and require hardware removal. In the study reported here, we reviewed a specific fixation technique that includes suture anchors moored in the base of the coracoid process. We retrospectively reviewed 24 consecutive cases of patients who underwent coracoclavicular stabilization with a suture anchor for a type III or type V acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation or a group II, type II or type V distal clavicle fracture. Eighteen of the 22 patients had full strength and painless range of motion (ROM) in the affected extremity by 3 months and at final follow-up (minimum, 24 months; mean, 39 months). Two patients were lost to follow-up. Four patients had early complications likely secondary to documented noncompliance. Two of these 4 patients underwent reoperation with a similar procedure and remained asymptomatic at a minimum follow-up of 15 months. One patient underwent osteophyte and knot excision 7 months after surgery and remained asymptomatic at 30 months. Our results suggest that coracoclavicular stabilization using a suture anchor technique is a safe and reliable method of treating acromioclavicular joint separations and certain distal clavicle fractures in the compliant patient. PMID:18716693

  18. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the posterior fossa, it can block the flow of spinal fluid and cause increased pressure on the brain and ... the cancer early. A total blockage in the flow of spinal fluid can be life threatening. If tumors are found ...

  19. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  20. Posterior ankle impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier

    2005-10-01

    Posterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical disorder characterized by posterior ankle pain that occurs in forced plantar flexion. The pain may be acute as a result of trauma or chronic from repetitive stress. Pathology of the os trigonum-talar process is the most common cause of this syndrome, but it also may result from flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis, ankle osteochondritis, subtalar joint disease, and fracture. Patients usually report chronic or recurrent posterior ankle pain caused or exacerbated by forced plantar flexion or push-off maneuvers, such as may occur during dancing, kicking, or downhill running. Diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement syndrome is based primarily on clinical history and physical examination. Radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging depict associated bone and soft-tissue abnormalities. Symptoms typically improve with nonsurgical management, but surgery may be required in refractory cases. PMID:16224109

  1. Fiber from ramie plant (Boehmeria nivea): A novel suture biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Devi, Dipali; Kalita, Dhaneswar; Kalita, Kasturi; Dash, Suvakanta; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-05-01

    The quest for developing an ideal suture material prompted our interest to develop a novel suture with advantageous characters to market available ones. From natural origin only silk, cotton and linen fibers are presently available in market as non-absorbable suture biomaterials. In this study, we have developed a novel, cost-effective, and biocompatible suture biomaterial from ramie plant, Boehmeria nivea fiber. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) results revealed the physicochemical properties of raw and degummed ramie fiber, where the former one showed desirable characteristics for suture preparation. The braided multifilament ramie suture prepared from degummed fiber exhibited excellent tensile strength. The suture found to be biocompatible towards human erythrocytes and nontoxic to mammalian cells. The fabricated ramie suture exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus; which can be attributed to the inherent bacteriostatic ability of ramie plant fiber. In vivo wound closure efficacy was evaluated in adult male wister rats by suturing the superficial wound incisions. Within seven days of surgery the wound got completely healed leaving no rash and scar. The role of the ramie suture in complete wound healing was supported by the reduced levels of serum inflammatory mediators. Histopathology studies confirmed the wound healing ability of ramie suture, as rapid synthesis of collagen, connective tissue and other skin adnexal structures were observed within seven days of surgery. Tensile properties, biocompatibility and wound closure efficacy of the ramie suture were comparable with market available BMSF suture. The outcome of this study can drive tremendous possibility for the utilization of ramie plant fiber for

  2. The posterior calf fascial free flap.

    PubMed

    Walton, R L; Matory, W E; Petry, J J

    1985-12-01

    Six posterior calf fascial free flaps were employed to reconstruct defects of the upper and lower extremities. One flap failed due to a constricting dressing. Two flaps sustained partial loss secondary to bleeding and hematoma formation. One flap dehisced at the distal suture line due to mobility of an underlying fracture. All surviving flaps eventually healed and resulted in stable, thin coverage. Donor-site morbidity has been minimal. Shortcomings of this flap model have been defined in the peculiarities of its thinness, diffuse vascular oozing, the extent of the vascular territory, and in postoperative monitoring. These problems are analyzed and recommendations for their resolution are presented. Fascia represents a unique tissue which offers an exciting new dimension in the reconstruction of certain defects--particularly those in which thinness is a desirable option. In the posterior calf model, the inclusion of fat represents an alternative modification that allows the surgeon to tailor the design to a variety of problems where fascia alone is too thin and a cutaneous flap is too thick. This concept may find its greatest application in wounds involving the hand or foot. We believe that this and other fascial flap prototypes may offer an ideal solution for reconstruction of major wounds of the extremities. PMID:3906718

  3. Isolated posterior capsular rupture following blunt head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Jaroudi, Mahmoud O; Hamam, Rola N; Maalouf, Fadi C

    2014-01-01

    Closed-globe traumatic cataract is not uncommon in males in the pediatric age group. However, there is a relative paucity of literature on isolated posterior lens capsule rupture associated with closed-globe traumatic cataract. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with white cataract 1 day after blunt trauma to the forehead associated with posterior capsular rupture that was detected by B-scan ultrasonography preoperatively. No stigmata of trauma outside the posterior capsule could be detected by slit-lamp exam, funduscopy, and optical coherence tomography. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant was performed 24 hours after trauma, with the patient achieving 6/6 visual acuity 1 week and 6 months after surgery. Our case is unique, being the youngest (amblyogenic age) to be reported, with prompt surgical intervention, and with no signs of trauma outside the posterior capsule. PMID:25506201

  4. Role of posterior hypothalamus in hypobaric hypoxia induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Choudhary, R C; Reddy, M K; Ray, A; Ravi, K

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of posterior hypothalamus and central neurotransmitters in the pulmonary edema due to hypobaric hypoxia, rats were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure-294.4 mmHg) for 24 h. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increases in mean arterial blood pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity, right ventricular systolic pressure, lung wet to dry weight ratio and Evans blue dye leakage. There was a significant attenuation in these responses to hypobaric hypoxia (a) after lesioning posterior hypothalamus and (b) after chronic infusion of GABAA receptor agonist muscimol into posterior hypothalamus. No such attenuation was evident with the chronic infusion of the nitric oxide donor SNAP into the posterior hypothalamus. It is concluded that in hypobaric hypoxia, there is over-activity of posterior hypothalamic neurons probably due to a local decrease in GABA-ergic inhibition which increases the sympathetic drive causing pulmonary hypertension and edema. PMID:25448396

  5. New method of posterior scallop augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masakazu; Ito, Toshiaki

    2015-03-01

    We report a new method of posterior middle scallop (P2) augmentation for ischemic mitral regurgitation to achieve deep coaptation. First, P2 was divided straight at the center and partially detached from the annulus in a reverse T shape. A narrow pentagon-shaped section of pericardium was sutured to the divided P2 and annular defect. The tip of the pentagon was attached directly to the papillary muscle, thus creating a very large P2 scallop. A standard-sized ring was placed. We adopted this technique in 2 patients with advanced ischemic cardiomyopathy, and no mitral regurgitation was observed during a 1-year follow-up. PMID:25742844

  6. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be at risk for suture cutting through osteopenic bone

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Y.; Woodmass, J. M.; Nelson, A. A.; Boorman, R. S.; Thornton, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the mechanical performance, under low-load cyclic loading, of two different knotless suture anchor designs: sutures completely internal to the anchor body (SpeedScrew) and sutures external to the anchor body and adjacent to bone (MultiFIX P). Methods Using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the rotator cuff (approximately 60°), anchors were tested in cadaveric bone and foam blocks representing normal to osteopenic bone. Mechanical testing included preloading to 10 N and cyclic loading for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min. The parameters evaluated were initial displacement, cyclic displacement and number of cycles and load at 3 mm displacement relative to preload. Video recording throughout testing documented the predominant source of suture displacement and the distance of ‘suture cutting through bone’. Results In cadaveric bone and foam blocks, MultiFIX P anchors had significantly greater initial displacement, and lower number of cycles and lower load at 3 mm displacement than SpeedScrew anchors. Video analysis revealed ‘suture cutting through bone’ as the predominant source of suture displacement in cadaveric bone (qualitative) and greater ‘suture cutting through bone’ comparing MultiFIX P with SpeedScrew anchors in foam blocks (quantitative). The greater suture displacement in MultiFIX P anchors was predominantly from suture cutting through bone, which was enhanced in an osteopenic bone model. Conclusions Anchors with sutures external to the anchor body are at risk for suture cutting through bone since the suture eyelet is at the distal tip of the implant and the suture directly abrades against the bone edge during cyclic loading. Suture cutting through bone may be a significant source of fixation failure, particularly in osteopenic bone. Cite this article: Y. Ono, J. M. Woodmass, A. A. Nelson, R. S. Boorman, G. M. Thornton, I. K. Y. Lo. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be

  7. Bioactivity of degradable polymer sutures coated with bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Bretcanu, Oana; Verné, Enrica; Borello, Luisa; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2004-08-01

    Novel bioactive materials have been prepared by coating violet resorbable Vicryl sutures with a bioactive glass powder derived from a co-precipitation method. Two techniques have been chosen for the composite preparation: pressing the sutures in a bed of glass powder and slurry-dipping of sutures in liquid suspensions of bioactive glass powders. The uniformity and thickness of the coatings obtained by the two methods were compared. The bioactivity of the sutures with and without bioactive glass coating was tested by soaking in an inorganic acellular simulated body fluid (SBF). The composite sutures were characterised by XRD, SEM and FTIR analyses before and after soaking in SBF solution to assess the formation of hydroxyapatite on their surfaces, which is a qualitative measure of their bioactivity. The possible use of bioactive sutures to produce tissue engineering scaffolds and as reinforcement of resorbable calcium phosphates is discussed. PMID:15477741

  8. The “excluding” suture technique for surgical closure of ventricular septal defects: A retrospective study comparing the standard technique

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Roy; Saheed, Sanni; Ravi, Amrutha K; Sherrif, Ejaz Ahmed; Agarwal, Ravi; Kothandam, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Conventional methods of closure of ventricular septal defects involve placement of sutures 4-5 mm from the posterior inferior margin. This study compares the conventional method with an alternative technique wherein sutures are placed along the edge of the defect thereby “excluding” the conduction system and the tensor apparatus of the tricuspid valve from the suture line. Materials and Methods: Between January 2013 and January 2016, 409 consecutive patients were retrospectively reviewed and divided into two matched groups. Group A (n = 174) underwent closure using the alternative technique and Group B (n = 235) with the conventional technique. Patients with isolated ventricular septal defects (VSDs) (n = 136) were separately analyzed as were infants within this subset. Results: Immediate postoperative results were similar with no statistically significant differences in either group in terms of incidence of residual defects or postoperative tricuspid regurgitation. There was however a significantly increased incidence of post operative complete heart block (CHB) among patients in the conventional group (P = 0.02). Incidence of temporary heart block that reverted to sinus rhythm was also more in the conventional method group (Group B) (P = 0.03) as was right bundle branch block (P ≤ 0.05) in all the subsets of patients analyzed. Conclusion: Surgical closure of VSDs can be accomplished by placing sutures along the margins or away with comparable results. The incidence of CHB, however, seems to be less when the “excluding” technique is employed. PMID:27625520

  9. Mechanics of cranial sutures during simulated cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Jasinoski, S C; Reddy, B D

    2012-07-26

    Previous computational and experimental analyses revealed that cranial sutures, fibrous joints between the bones, can reduce the strain experienced by the surrounding skull bones during mastication. This damping effect reflects the importance of including sutures in finite element (FE) analyses of the skull. Using the FE method, the behaviour of three suture morphologies of increasing complexity (butt-ended, moderate interdigitated, and complex interdigitated) during static loading was recently investigated, and the sutures were assumed to have linear elastic properties. In the current study, viscoelastic properties, derived from published experimental results of the nasofrontal suture of young pigs (Sus scrofa), are applied to the three idealised bone-suture models. The effects of suture viscoelasticity on the stress, strain, and strain energy in the models were computed for three different frequencies (corresponding to periods of 1, 10, and 100s) and compared to the results of a static, linear elastic analysis. The range of applied frequencies broadly represents different physiological activities, with the highest frequency simulating mastication and the lowest frequency simulating growth and pressure of the surrounding tissues. Comparing across all three suture morphologies, strain energy and strain in the suture decreased with the increase in suture complexity. For each suture model, the magnitude of strain decreased with an increase in frequency, and the magnitudes were similar for both the elastic and 1s frequency analyses. In addition, a viscous response is less apparent in the higher frequency analyses, indicating that viscous properties are less important to the behaviour of the suture during those analyses. The FE results suggest that implementation of viscoelastic properties may not be necessary for computational studies of skull behaviour during masticatory loading but instead might be more relevant for studies examining lower frequency physiological

  10. The Use of Barbed Sutures in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the multitude of different procedures performed with a host of different wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. In recent years, a new class of suture material—barbed suture—has been introduced into the surgeon’s armamentarium. This review focuses on barbed suture to better understand the role of this newer material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:21364859

  11. Heterochrony and patterns of cranial suture closure in hystricognath rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2009-01-01

    Sutures, joints that allow one bone to articulate with another through intervening fibrous connective tissue, serve as major sites of bone expansion during postnatal craniofacial growth in the vertebrate skull and represent an aspect of cranial ontogeny which may exhibit functional and phylogenetic correlates. Suture evolution among hystricognath rodents, an ecologically diverse group represented here by 26 species, is examined using sequence heterochrony methods, i.e. event pairing and parsimov. Although minor nuances in suture closure sequence exist between species, the overall sequence was found to be conserved both across the hystricognath group and, to an increasing degree, within selected clades. At species level, suture closure pattern exhibited a significant positive correlation with patterns previously reported for hominoids. Patterns for most clades revealed the first sutures to close are those contacting the exoccipital, interparietal, and palatine bones. Heterochronic shifts were found along 19 of 35 branches within the hystricognath phylogeny. The number of shifts per node ranged from one to seven events and, overall, involved 21 of 34 suture sites. The topology generated by parsimony analyses of the event pair matrix yielded only one grouping that was congruent with the evolutionary relationships, compiled from morphological and molecular studies, taken as framework. Sutures contacting the exoccipital displayed the highest levels of most complete closure across all species. Level of suture closure is negatively correlated with cranial length (P < 0.05). Differing life history and locomotory strategies are coupled in part with differing suture closure patterns among several species. PMID:19245501

  12. Retained strabismus suture material masquerading as nonspecific orbital inflammation.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Alison B; Scofield, Stacy M; Gallin, Pamela F; Kazim, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of orbital myositis of the superior rectus muscle-levator complex masquerading as nonspecific orbital inflammation but corresponding in location to a known braided polyester "chicken suture" placed 20 years earlier during strabismus surgery. The orbital inflammation was refractory to oral steroids but resolved promptly on surgical removal of the suture material. Although suture material is known to cause foreign body granulomatous reactions, to our knowledge this is the first reported case of a deep, diffuse orbital inflammation attributable to chicken suture placed during strabismus surgery. PMID:27112911

  13. Atypical accessory intraparietal sutures mimicking complex fractures in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Meryle J; Carver, Keith C; Stalcup, Seth T; Riemer, Ellen C; Taylor, Michael A; Hill, Jeanne G

    2016-01-01

    Partial or complete division of the parietal bones resulting in anomalous cranial sutures is a rare entity and may raise concern for fracture and potential abuse when identified on radiological examination in young children. We present a case of a 4-week-old male found to have anomalous intraparietal sutures originally interpreted as fractures during a comprehensive evaluation for nonaccidental trauma. Our goal is to raise awareness of a complex branching pattern of accessory intraparietal sutures, which has not been previously described. Additionally, we will review the characteristics that aid in the radiologic differentiation of accessory cranial sutures and fractures. PMID:27130985

  14. Visual measurement of suture strain for robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Martell, John; Elmer, Thomas; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Park, Young Soo

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgical procedures offer advantages of smaller incisions, decreased hospital length of stay, and rapid postoperative recovery to the patient. Surgical robots improve access and visualization intraoperatively and have expanded the indications for minimally invasive procedures. A limitation of the DaVinci surgical robot is a lack of sensory feedback to the operative surgeon. Experienced robotic surgeons use visual interpretation of tissue and suture deformation as a surrogate for tactile feedback. A difficulty encountered during robotic surgery is maintaining adequate suture tension while tying knots or following a running anastomotic suture. Displaying suture strain in real time has potential to decrease the learning curve and improve the performance and safety of robotic surgical procedures. Conventional strain measurement methods involve installation of complex sensors on the robotic instruments. This paper presents a noninvasive video processing-based method to determine strain in surgical sutures. The method accurately calculates strain in suture by processing video from the existing surgical camera, making implementation uncomplicated. The video analysis method was developed and validated using video of suture strain standards on a servohydraulic testing system. The video-based suture strain algorithm is shown capable of measuring suture strains of 0.2% with subpixel resolution and proven reliability under various conditions. PMID:21436874

  15. Cyclic loading comparison of Bio-SutureTak-#2 FiberWire and Bio Mini-Revo-#2 Hi-Fi suture anchor-sutures in cadaveric scapulae.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Brad S; Nyland, John; Nawab, Akbar; Blackburn, Ethan; Krupp, Ryan; Burden, Robert

    2008-03-01

    This study compared tap-in Bio-SutureTak suture anchor-#2 FiberWire suture (Group 1) and screw-in Bio Mini-Revo suture anchor-#2 Hi-Fi suture (Group 2) fixation in the glenoid region of interest for Bankart repair, in addition to evaluation of isolated suture loop biomechanical properties under progressive incremental cyclic loads. With knowledge of glenoid apparent bone mineral density (BMD), implant preparation and fit characteristics, and following application of a light manual tensile load, the primary investigator scored each specimen for perceived within group biomechanical test performance using a 0-10 point modified visual analog scale. After scoring, 12 paired constructs were placed in a servo hydraulic device clamp, preloaded to 25 N, and cycled between 25 and 50 Hz with a 25 N load increase every 25 cycles. Group 2 withstood greater load (104.1 +/- 56 vs. 70 +/- 36.9 N, P = 0.04) and displaced more at failure (13 +/- 4.5 vs. 8.6 +/- 3.3 mm, P = 0.04). All Group 1 specimens failed prior to reaching 150 N, whereas 25% of Group 2 specimens (n = 3) failed at 200 N. All specimens failed by anchor pullout except for three Group 2 specimens that failed by eyelet breakage at 200 N. Isolated suture testing revealed that Group 1 sutures displaced less at each cyclic load (P = 0.028) and withstood greater failure loads (P = 0.028) than that of Group 2 sutures. Group 2 constructs displayed moderately strong relationships between perceived within group biomechanical test performance and ultimate load (r (2) = 0.55) and displacement at failure (r (2) = 0.67). Group 1 did not display significant relationships. Similar biomechanical performance between 50 and 125 N, greater load at failure, and superior biomechanical test prediction accuracy suggest that the screw-in type Bio Mini-Revo suture anchor-#2 Hi-Fi suture combination may be preferred for Bankart lesion repair in low apparent BMD glenoid processes. The #2 Hi-Fi suture, however, allowed significantly greater

  16. Techniques and applications of adjustable sutures.

    PubMed

    Fells, P

    1987-02-01

    The 'rediscovery' of adjustable sutures some 10 years ago has given the ophthalmic surgeon much more confidence in his ability to correct strabismus. Three methods of use are described: during surgery under general anaesthesia with adjustment during the operation using the 'springback' test to centralise the eye; during surgery under general anaesthesia and subsequent adjustment under local anaesthesia using the patient's subjective responses to obtain optimal positioning; and performance of the operation and adjustment under topical local anaesthesia in one procedure. Full details are given of each technique and the indications for their application to particular problems are discussed. PMID:3297111

  17. Suture locking of isolated internal locking knotless suture anchors is not affected by bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Matthewson, Graeme; Ono, Yohei; Bois, Aaron J; Boorman, Richard S; Lo, Ian KY; Thornton, Gail M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical performance of different suture locking mechanisms including: i) interference fit between the anchor and the bone (eg, 4.5 mm PushLock, 5.5 mm SwiveLock), ii) internal locking mechanism within the anchor itself (eg, 5.5 mm SpeedScrew), or iii) a combination of interference fit and internal locking (eg, 4.5 mm MultiFIX P, 5.5 mm MultiFIX S). Methods Anchors were tested in foam blocks representing normal (20/8 foam) or osteopenic (8/8 foam) bone, using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the anchor to isolate suture locking. Mechanical testing included cyclic testing for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min, followed by failure testing at 60 mm/min. Displacement after 500 cycles at 60 N, number of cycles at 3 mm displacement, load at 3 mm displacement, and maximum load were evaluated. Results Comparing 8/8 foam to 20/8 foam, load at 3 mm displacement and maximum load were significantly decreased (P<0.05) with decreased bone quality for anchors that, even in part, relied on an interference fit suture locking mechanism (ie, 4.5 mm PushLock, 5.5 mm SwiveLock, 4.5 mm MultiFIX P, 5.5 mm MultiFIX S). Bone quality did not affect the mechanical performance of 5.5 mm SpeedScrew anchors which have an isolated internal locking mechanism. Conclusion The mechanical performance of anchors that relied, even in part, on interference fit were affected by bone quality. Isolated internal locking knotless suture anchors functioned independently of bone quality. Anchors with a combined type (interference fit and internal locking) suture locking mechanism demonstrated similar mechanical performance to isolated internal locking anchors in osteopenic foam comparing similar sized anchors. Clinical relevance In osteopenic bone, knotless suture anchors that have an internal locking mechanism (isolated or combined type) may be advantageous for secure tendon fixation to bone. PMID:26124683

  18. Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tear: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dhong Won; Ha, Jeong Ku

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the medial meniscus root, for example by a complete radial tear, destroys the ability of the knee to withstand hoop strain, resulting in contact pressure increases and kinematic alterations. For these reasons, several techniques have been developed to repair the medial meniscus posterior root tear (MMPRT), many of which have shown complete healing of the repaired MMPRT. However, efforts to standardize or optimize the treatment for MMPRT are much needed. When planning a surgical intervention for an MMPRT, strict surgical indications regarding the effect of pullout strength on the refixed root, bony degenerative changes, mechanical alignment, and the Kellgren-Lawrence grade should be considered. Although there are several treatment options and controversies, the current trend is to repair the MMPRT using various techniques including suture anchors and pullout sutures if the patient meets the indications. However, there are still debates on the restoration of hoop tension and prevention of arthritis after repair and further biomechanical and clinical studies should be conducted in the future. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literature regarding various diagnosis and treatment strategies of MMPRT, especially focusing on conflict issues including whether repair techniques can restore the main function of normal meniscus and which is the best suture technique to repair the MMPRT. The authors attempted to provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques. PMID:25229041

  19. Tibialis Posterior Tendon Entrapment Within Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fragment.

    PubMed

    Fantry, Amanda; Lareau, Craig; Vopat, Bryan; Blankenhorn, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Management of posterior malleolus fractures continues to be controversial, with respect to both need for fixation and fixation methods. Fixation methods include an open posterior approach to the ankle as well as percutaneous reduction and fixation with or without arthroscopy for visualization of the articular surface. Plain radiographs are unreliable in identifying fracture pattern and intraoperative reduction, making arthroscopy a valuable adjunct to posterior malleolus fracture management. In this article, we report a case of tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus fracture, as identified by arthroscopy and managed with open reduction. Tibialis posterior tendon entrapment within a posterior malleolus has not been previously reported. Ankle arthroscopy for posterior malleolus fractures provides an opportunity to identify soft-tissue or tendinous entrapment, articular surface reduction, and articular cartilage injuries unlikely to be identified with fluoroscopy alone and should be considered in reduction and fixation of posterior malleolus fractures. PMID:26991573

  20. Does UV disinfection compromise sutures? An evaluation of tissue response and suture retention in salmon surgically implanted with transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.; Eppard, M. B.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2013-10-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) can be used as a tool to disinfect surgery tools used for implanting transmitters into fish. However, the use of UVR could possibly degrade monofilament suture material used to close surgical incisions. This research examined the effect of UVR on monofilament sutures to determine if they were compromised and negatively influenced tag and suture retention, incision openness, or tissue reaction. Eighty juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were surgically implanted with an acoustic transmitter and a passive integrated transponder. The incision was closed with a single stitch of either a suture exposed to 20 doses of UV radiation (5 minute duration per dose) or a new, sterile suture. Fish were then held for 28 d and examined under a microscope at day 7, 14, 21 and 28 for incision openness, ulceration, redness, and the presence of water mold. There was no significant difference between treatments for incision openness, redness, ulceration or the presence of water mold on any examination day. On day 28 post-surgery, there were no lost sutures; however, 2 fish lost their transmitters (one from each treatment). The results of this study do not show any differences in negative influences such as tissue response, suture retention or tag retention between a new sterile suture and a suture disinfected with UVR.

  1. Surgical device for supporting corneal suturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Oliveira, Gunter C. D.; De Groote, Jean-Jacques; Sousa, Sidney J. F.; Saia, Paula

    2009-02-01

    A system for ophthalmic surgery support has been developed in order to minimize the residual astigmatism due to the induced irregular shape of the cornea by corneal suture. The system projects 36 light spots, from LEDs, displayed in a precise circle at the lachrymal film of the examined cornea. The displacement, the size and deformation of the reflected image of these light spots are analyzed providing the keratometry and the circularity of the suture. Measurements in the range of 32D - 55D (up to 23D of astigmatism are possible to be obtained) and a self-calibration system has been designed in order to keep the system calibrated. Steel precision spheres have been submitted to the system and the results show 99% of correlation with the fabricant's nominal values. The system has been tested in 13 persons in order to evaluate its clinical applicability and has been compared to a commercial keratometer Topcon OM-4. The correlation factors are 0,92 for the astigmatism and 0.99 for the associated axis. The system indicates that the surgeon should achieve circularity >=98% in order to do not induce astigmatisms over 3D.

  2. Mersilene (polyester), a new suture for penetrating keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ramselaar, J A; Beekhuis, W H; Rijneveld, W J; van Andel, M V; Dijk, F; Jongebloed, W L

    1992-01-01

    Mersilene (polyester monofilament) seems to be suitable for penetrating keratoplasty because it is strong, shows no degradation by ultraviolet light, is insoluble, so that it can be left in situ, and offers the possibility of regulating postoperative astigmatism by suture adjustment. In 12 patients penetrating keratoplasty was performed with the combined interrupted/running suturing technique, using eight interrupted nylon 10-0 sutures and one running Mersilene 11-0 suture. The results were compared with those of 25 patients in whom eight interrupted nylon 10-0 sutures and one running nylon 11-0 suture were used. Six months after penetrating keratoplasty, no differences could be found between the two groups in keratometric astigmatism, visual acuity or slitlamp findings. In three patients postoperative adjustment of the running Mersilene suture reduced astigmatism by 50, 90 and 100% respectively. In an animal study the behaviour of Mersilene in the cornea was evaluated by slitlamp examination, histology and electron-microscopy. The tissue response to Mersilene was minimal. Considering the resemblance to nylon in clinical findings, minimal tissue response, lack of biodegradation and possibility of regulating postoperative astigmatism by suture adjustment, Mersilene seems to be a suitable material for penetrating keratoplasty. PMID:1305032

  3. Interdomal Suture through a Nondelivery Endonasal Approach: A New Technique

    PubMed Central

    Leibou, Lior

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of interdomal sutures for tip refinement is common in open rhinoplasty and in endonasal rhinoplasty using a delivery technique, but there is paucity of reports in the literature regarding the use of interdomal suturing techniques when the nondelivery endonasal approach is chosen. Objective: The authors describe a technique designed to refine the nasal tip with an interdomal suture placed through a nondelivery endonasal approach. Methods: In this study, the authors retrospectively review the cases of 45 patients who underwent endonasal rhinoplasty with the authors’ interdomal suturing technique between the years 2011 and 2013. The average age of the patients was 25.3 years. Intercrural sutures (PDS 4.0 straight needle, Cincinnati, Ohio) were placed as mattress-like suture in the tip region, with the knot buried between both alar cartilages. The suture is tightened progressively according to the tip definition and narrowing sought. Results: The patients were followed for 12 months. All of the patients demonstrated a significant reduction in lobule and tip widths. This series had only 1 complication of tip asymmetry that was revised 1 year after the initial operation. There were no cases of infection, allergic reaction, or extrusion of the suture. Conclusions: Despite the lack of a large volume of patients, our study confirms that this technique is indeed an attractive and highly predictable option for achieving adequate tip refinement and definition when using a nondelivery endonasal rhinoplasty. PMID:27622086

  4. 21 CFR 878.4830 - Absorbable surgical gut suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable surgical gut suture. 878.4830 Section 878.4830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4830 Absorbable surgical gut suture. (a) Identification. An...

  5. Otoplasty Outcomes With Different Suture Materials in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Benjamin A; Hong, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Otoplasty is a commonly performed procedure to correct prominent ears. Many different otoplasty techniques have been described but there is no gold standard technique. As well, many different suture materials are used in otoplasty but studies directly comparing different sutures materials are lacking. An otoplasty outcome study with Nylon and Mersilene (2 of the most commonly used sutures in otoplasty) sutures was conducted using a rabbit model. Each rabbit ear was randomized to receive a Mustardé-type horizontal mattress suture with either 4-0 clear Nylon (N = 12 ears) or 4-0 Mersilene sutures (N = 12 ears). Two weeks after surgery, the auricular bend angle was measured with a finger goniometer and histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed on the rabbit auricular cartilage. Overall, there was no significant difference in the mean bend angle between the 2 groups (Nylon: 135.8°, SD = 22.7° and Mersilene: 143.2°, SD = 19.7°; P = 0.559). Also, no qualitative difference was observed on histologic analysis between the 2 suture groups. In the current rabbit model study, both Nylon and Mersilene sutures performed well and no significant differences were noted. PMID:26967081

  6. Structural grafts and suture techniques in functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Holger G.

    2011-01-01

    Rhinoplasty has undergone important changes. With the advent of the open structure approach, requirements for structural grafting and direct manipulation of the cartilaginous skeleton through suture techniques have increased substantially. The present review analyzes the current literature on frequently referenced structural grafts and suture techniques. Individual techniques are described and their utility is discussed in light of available studies and data. PMID:22073105

  7. 21 CFR 878.4930 - Suture retention device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suture retention device. 878.4930 Section 878.4930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4930 Suture retention...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4930 - Suture retention device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suture retention device. 878.4930 Section 878.4930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4930 Suture retention...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4930 - Suture retention device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suture retention device. 878.4930 Section 878.4930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4930 Suture retention...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4930 - Suture retention device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suture retention device. 878.4930 Section 878.4930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4930 Suture retention...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4930 - Suture retention device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suture retention device. 878.4930 Section 878.4930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4930 Suture retention...

  12. A rabbit model of human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis. I. Synostotic onset, pathology, and sutural growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Mooney, M P; Siegel, M I; Burrows, A M; Smith, T D; Losken, H W; Dechant, J; Cooper, G; Kapucu, M R

    1998-06-01

    Poswillo has stated, "The more severe anomalies of the calvaria, such as plagiocephaly, Crouzon [syndrome], and Apert syndrome still defy explanation, in the absence of an appropriate animal system to study" (p. 207). This two-part study reviews data from a recently developed colony of New Zealand white rabbits with familial, nonsyndromic unilateral coronal suture synostosis. Part 1 presents pathological findings and compensatory sutural growth data from 109 normal rabbits and 82 craniosynostotic rabbits from this colony. Synostotic foci, onset, and progression were described in the calvariae from 102 staged (fetal days 21, 25, 27, 33; term = 30 days) fetuses (39 normal, 63 synostosed). Calvarial suture growth patterns from 10 to 126 days of age were assessed from serial radiographs obtained from 89 rabbits (70 normal rabbits and 19 rabbits with unicoronal suture synostosis) with amalgam bone marker implants. Perinatal results revealed that by fetal day 25 the synostotic focal point in synostotic rabbits consistently originated from the endocortical surface of the calvaria in the middle of the coronal suture at a presumed high-tension, interdigitating zone. Histological analysis revealed hyperostotic osteogenic fronts on the affected side compared with the unaffected side. Postnatal sutural growth data revealed a predictable pattern of plagiocephaly (contralateral coronal sutures growing more than ipsilateral sutures and ipsilateral frontonasal and anterior lambdoidal sutures growing more than contralateral sutures), which resulted in early cranial vault deformities and a double "S" shape torquing towards the affected side. The advantages and disadvantages of these rabbits as a model for human familial, nonsyndromic unicoronal suture synostosis are discussed, especially in light of recent cytokine and genetic findings from human craniosynostotic studies. PMID:9694335

  13. Deployment and testing of a second prototype expandable surgical chamber in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Sanford M.; Rock, John A.

    1991-01-01

    During microgravity exposure, two separate expandable surgical chambers were tested. Both chambers had been modified to fit the microgravity work station without extending over the sides of the table. Both chambers were attached to a portable laminar flow generator which served two purposes: to keep the chambers expanded during use; and to provide an operative area environment free of contamination. During the tests, the chambers were placed on various parts of a total body moulage to simulate management of several types of trauma. The tests consisted of cleansing contusions, debridement of burns, and suturing of lacerations. Also, indigo carmine dye was deliberately injected into the chamber during the tests to determine the ease of cleansing the chamber walls after contamination by escaping fluids. Upon completion of the tests, the expandable surgical chambers were deflated, folded, and placed in a flattened state back into their original containers for storage and later disposal. Results are briefly discussed.

  14. Automatic Initialization and Dynamic Tracking of Surgical Suture Threads

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Russell C.; Yuan, Rick; Chow, Der-Lin; Newman, Wyatt; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize many of the potential benefits associated with robotically assisted minimally invasive surgery, the robot must be more than a remote controlled device. Currently using a surgical robot can be challenging, fatiguing, and time consuming. Teaching the robot to actively assist surgical tasks, such as suturing, has the potential to vastly improve both patient outlook and the surgeon’s efficiency. One obstacle to completing surgical sutures autonomously is the difficulty in tracking surgical suture threads. This paper proposes an algorithm which uses a Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) curve to model a suture thread. The NURBS model is initialized from a single selected point located on the thread. The NURBS curve is optimized by minimizing the image match energy between the projected stereo NURBS image and the segmented thread image. The algorithm is able to accurately track a suture thread as it translates, deforms, and changes length in real-time. PMID:26413383

  15. Combined posterior flap and anterior suspended flap dacryocystorhinostomy: A modification of external dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Amarendra; Saikia, S. P.; Bhuyan, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    Background: External dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) remains a reliable surgical technique for the treatment of obstruction of lacrimal drainage system beyond the common canalicular opening. Aim: To describe a simple modified double flap external DCR technique. Materials and Methods: Ninety six consecutive cases of chronic dacryocystitis with or without mucocele were selected irrespective of age and sex. In a modification to routine external DCR, a modified technique was followed, where both anterior and posterior flaps of lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa are created and sutured. Two double armed sutures were used to join the edges of anterior flaps, and elevate them anteriorly to avoid adhesion or apposition with underlying sutured posterior flaps, and to approximate the deep plane of the wound. Results: At the end of average follow-up period of 13 months, we observed 98.9% objective and 96.8% subjective success rates. The average operation time was 45 minutes. No significant intraoperative or postoperative complications were noticed. Conclusion: We believe that combined posterior flap and anterior suspended flap DCR technique is simple to perform and has the advantage of both double flap DCR and anterior suspension of anterior flaps. The results of the study showed the efficacy of this simple modification. PMID:20606867

  16. All-arthroscopic repair of arcuate avulsion fracture with suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hong, Lei; Wang, Xue-Song; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Xin; Feng, Hua

    2011-05-01

    Arcuate avulsion fractures are very rare but present pathologic posterolateral rotation instability. Untreated instability may lead to overload of the reconstructed posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) graft. Surgical treatment and clinical results have not yet been reported to our knowledge. This study presents the case of a 45-year-old man with PCL injury and an arcuate avulsion fracture of the fibular head. The dial test was positive preoperatively, and magnetic resonance imaging showed an "arcuate" sign. The avulsed bone fragment was reduced and fixed with a suture anchor by an all-arthroscopic technique. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient had resumed all his normal activities, including sports. He scored 1+ on the posterior drawer test, and external rotation was 1° less than that in his contralateral normal knee. Compared with the values in the contralateral normal knee, the posterior tibial translation was reduced from 15.5 mm preoperatively to 6.3 mm postoperatively. The postoperative magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans showed that the reconstructed PCL graft and the osseous fragment of the styloid process of the fibular head attached to the popliteofibular ligament were reduced. This technical note describes an all-arthroscopic reduction and fixation technique of arcuate avulsed fracture of the fibular head. PMID:21398077

  17. Granuloma formation secondary to Achilles tendon repair with nonabsorbable suture

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Seker, Ali; Uysal, Mehmet Ali; Uzun, Metin; Malkoc, Melih

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Several complications can be observed after Achilles tendon repairs. In this study we aimed to report granuloma formation secondary to Achilles tendon repair with Ethibond (Ethicon INC, Somerville, New Jersey) suture. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 31 year-old man operated for Achilles tendon rupture. The Ethibond suture was used for primary repair. The patient attended to polyclinic with the complaints of swelling and discharge around the operation site four months after operation. A mass around distal portion of the Achilles tendon was detected. The granulomatous tissue was excised. Inside the mass Ethibond suture was detected. On histopathologic examination, typical findings of the foreign body reaction were observed. No microorganism was cultivated in the tissue culture. The patient has no complaint on the twelfth month control after surgery. DISCUSSION The results of primary repair of Achilles tendon are good but several complications were reported. In tendon repairs generally nonabsorbable sutures are used. The Ethibond is nonabsorbable, braided suture. In the literature, granuloma formations secondary to the suture materials such as polygylactine and braided polyethylen–polyester after Achilles tendon repair were reported but granuloma secondary to the Ethibond is very rare. CONCLUSION Although Ethibond suture is a strong and safe material for Achilles tendon repairs it may cause soft tissue problems such as granuloma. PMID:25212905

  18. A comparison of ultrasonic suture welding and traditional knot tying.

    PubMed

    Richmond, J C

    2001-01-01

    The slippage of knots and the technical challenge of tying them securely are potential impediments to certain arthroscopic procedures. Ultrasonic energy delivered at 70 kHz can be used to weld No. 2 polypropylene suture. This method was compared with a traditional knot (surgeon's knot with four alternating half hitches) tied with an open technique to determine whether welding of sutures is comparable, in mechanical properties, to hand-tied knots. Both loops were fashioned around a 0.25-inch mandrel and then tested. The load to reach 3-mm elongation (point of likely biologic failure of a repair) was significantly greater for welded sutures than for knots. The elongation at ultimate failure was significantly less for welded sutures than for knots. The number of cycles to failure and the creep after initial displacement were similar for both welded and knotted suture loops. The ultimate load to failure was significantly greater for the knotted than for the welded suture. The welding of suture for the repair of musculoskeletal soft tissue presents an attractive alternative to traditional knot tying, particularly for arthroscopic applications. PMID:11394598

  19. Effects of BMP-12-Releasing Sutures on Achilles Tendon Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Connie S.; Lee, Jae-Sung; Leiferman, Ellen M.; Maassen, Nicholas X.; Baer, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon healing is a complex coordinated event orchestrated by numerous biologically active proteins. Unfortunately, tendons have limited regenerative potential and as a result, repair may be protracted months to years. Current treatment strategies do not offer localized delivery of biologically active proteins, which may result in reduced therapeutic efficacy. Surgical sutures coated with nanostructured minerals may provide a potentially universal tool to efficiently incorporate and deliver biologically active proteins directly to the wound. Additionally, previous reports indicated that treatment with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) improved tendon healing. Based on this information, we hypothesized that mineral-coated surgical sutures may be an effective platform for localized BMP-12 delivery to an injured tendon. The objective of this study was, therefore, to elucidate the healing effects of mineral-coated sutures releasing BMP-12 using a rat Achilles healing model. The effects of BMP-12-releasing sutures were also compared with standard BMP-12 delivery methods, including delivery of BMP-12 through collagen sponge or direct injection. Rat Achilles tendons were unilaterally transected and repaired using BMP-12-releasing suture (0, 0.15, 1.5, or 3.0 μg), collagen sponge (0 or 1.5 μg BMP-12), or direct injection (0 or 1.5 μg). By 14 days postinjury, repair with BMP-12-releasing sutures reduced the appearance of adhesions to the tendon and decreased total cell numbers. BMP-12 released from sutures and collagen sponge also tended to improve collagen organization when compared with BMP-12 delivered through injection. Based on these results, the release of a protein from sutures was able to elicit a biological response. Furthermore, BMP-12-releasing sutures modulated tendon healing, and the delivery method dictated the response of the healing tissue to BMP-12. PMID:25354567

  20. A Case of Intraocular Erosion and Intrusion by an Arruga Suture

    PubMed Central

    Kitagaki, Takakuni; Morishita, Seita; Kohmoto, Ryohsuke; Fukumoto, Masanori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Takaki; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Kida, Teruyo; Nakajima, Masayuki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of intraocular erosion and intrusion by an Arruga suture. Case Report This study involved a 62-year-old male who had undergone scleral buckling surgery 40 or more years ago at another hospital for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, as well as trabeculectomy 20 years ago for primary open-angle glaucoma, in his left eye at the same hospital. However, he recently became aware of blurred vision in that eye. Upon examination, iritis was observed in the anterior portion of his left eye, as well as a great number of pigment cell keratoprecipitates on the posterior surface of the cornea. In the ocular fundus, extensive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium and partial hyperpigmentation was observed, accompanied by subretinal strands, yet the retina remained attached. Around the entire peripheral area of the retina we observed a ring-shaped protrusion, but we also saw a shiny, filamentous material in the vitreous cavity that penetrated the sclera and choroid, completely extending from the 4- to 8-o'clock position of the scleral buckle protrusion. To treat the iritis in the patient's left eye, we began to administrate low-concentration steroid eye drops, after which the inflammation disappeared. Conclusion In this study, we experienced a case of intraocular erosion and intrusion by an Arruga suture, and opted to treat the patient with steroid eye drops and conservative follow-up observations unless retinal redetachment and/or vitreous hemorrhage occurs. PMID:27099609

  1. Minimal incision posterior approach levator plication for aponeurotic ptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, D S; Chan, E; Ko, S T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and predictability of a minimal incision posterior approach levator plication technique for correction of involutional ptosis. Method Retrospective chart review of patients with involutional aponeurotic ptosis underwent minimal incision posterior approach levator plication technique between August 2013 and June 2014 by a single surgeon. The upper lid was double everted, and the conjunctiva and Muller's muscle layers were incised vertically until the levator aponeurosis could be identified. The incision(s) was similar to performing incision and curettage of chalazion, except that the site was above the tarsal plate and extended towards the fornix. Then insertion of aponeurosis was dissected away from the anterior tarsal surface, and the more superiorly located levator was plicated on it with double arm suture(s). No tissue was excised in this procedure. Surgical success was defined as a postoperative margin reflex distance (MRD)>2 mm and<4.5 mm, interlid height<1 mm and satisfactory contour. Results Forty-four lids of 27 patients were included. Preoperative mean MRD was 0.48 +/− 0.56 mm. Severe ptosis of MRD<1 mm was present in 34/44 patients (77.3%). The postoperative mean MRD was 2.49 +/− 0.53 mm, and mean improvement was 2.02 +/− 0.61 mm, which was statistically significant (P<0.001). The overall success rate was 38/44 (86.4%). Conclusions Minimal incision posterior approach to levator plication was effective for the correction of aponeurotic ptosis with moderate to good levator function. PMID:25613849

  2. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  3. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  4. Posterior Urethral Strictures.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  5. A multiphase transitioning peptide hydrogel for suturing ultrasmall vessels.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel J; Brat, Gabriel A; Medina, Scott H; Tong, Dedi; Huang, Yong; Grahammer, Johanna; Furtmüller, Georg J; Oh, Byoung Chol; Nagy-Smith, Katelyn J; Walczak, Piotr; Brandacher, Gerald; Schneider, Joel P

    2016-01-01

    Many surgeries are complicated by the need to anastomose, or reconnect, micrometre-scale vessels. Although suturing remains the gold standard for anastomosing vessels, it is difficult to place sutures correctly through collapsed lumen, making the procedure prone to failure. Here, we report a multiphase transitioning peptide hydrogel that can be injected into the lumen of vessels to facilitate suturing. The peptide, which contains a photocaged glutamic acid, forms a solid-like gel in a syringe and can be shear-thin delivered to the lumen of collapsed vessels (where it distends the vessel) and the space between two vessels (where it is used to approximate the vessel ends). Suturing is performed directly through the gel. Light is used to initiate the final gel-sol phase transition that disrupts the hydrogel network, allowing the gel to be removed and blood flow to resume. This gel adds a new tool to the armamentarium for micro- and supermicrosurgical procedures. PMID:26524396

  6. Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Crutch, Sebastian J; Lehmann, Manja; Schott, Jonathan M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rossor, Martin N; Fox, Nick C

    2013-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome that is characterized by a progressive decline in visuospatial, visuoperceptual, literacy and praxic skills. The progressive neurodegeneration affecting parietal, occipital and occipito-temporal cortices which underlies PCA is attributable to Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the majority of patients. However, alternative underlying aetiologies including Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB), corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and prion disease have also been identified, and not all PCA patients have atrophy on clinical imaging. This heterogeneity has led to diagnostic and terminological inconsistencies, caused difficulty comparing studies from different centres, and limited the generalizability of clinical trials and investigations of factors driving phenotypic variability. Significant challenges remain in identifying the factors associated with both the selective vulnerability of posterior cortical regions and the young age of onset seen in PCA. Greater awareness of the syndrome and agreement over the correspondence between syndrome-and disease-level classifications are required in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, research study design and clinical management. PMID:22265212

  7. Suture materials: composition and applications in veternary wound repair.

    PubMed

    Tan, R H H; Bell, R J W; Dowling, B A; Dart, A J

    2003-03-01

    Suture materials play an important role in veterinary surgery by providing support for healing tissues during wound repair. As there is no single ideal suture material, clinicians must compromise on some properties when selecting a material for a specific purpose. By reviewing the characteristics of absorbable and non-absorbable materials, general recommendations can be made on their usage in skin, fascia, viscera and other tissues. PMID:15080426

  8. Experimental evaluation of horse hair as a nonabsorbable monofilament suture

    PubMed Central

    Yedke, Swati R.; Raut, Subhash Y.; Jangde, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Success of surgery depends on wound closure and healing. Ancients had coated many suture materials from plant and animal origin. As the quest for natural nonabsorbable, monofilament surgical suture continues, horsehair has been taken for study, which is mentioned in ancient literature. Objectives: Aim of the study was to evaluate detail mechanical and biophysical properties of horsehair. Materials and Methods: Physical properties, that are diameter, straight pull and knot pull tensile strength, bioburden, sterility tests were performed. Visual and histological wound healing parameters were studied in experimental Wistar rat incision wound model. Two experimental wounds about 5 cm long were created on each side of dorsal midline. Each animal received two sutures-Horsehair 4-0 and Ethilon 4-0. The sutured areas were grossly examined on 3rd and 7th days for visual observations like congestion, edema, infection, wound disruption, and impression of suture material on healed wound and then subjected for histological study. Results: Revealed that horsehair has got diameter of 0.19 mm which complies with the 4-0 size USP standard. Straight pull tensile strength was found 0.5851 ± 0.122 kg and knot pull tensile strength was 0.3998 ± 0.078 kg, which complies with the standards of United State Pharmacopia for class II nonabsorbable suture materials. In vivo study revealed that there was no evidence of edema, congestion, and discharge in both the groups. Wounds healed with minimum impressions of suture material with minimum scar mark. Mean histological scoring shows very mild tissue reaction. Conclusion: Horsehair has got properties of standard suture material except low tensile strength and hence can be used in reconstructive, plastic surgeries, and ophthalmic surgeries. PMID:24459386

  9. [Suture foreign body reaction as a mammographic pitfall].

    PubMed

    Plagborg, G J; Andersen, H K

    2000-02-14

    A mammographic pitfall is presented. After lumpectomy owing to cancer in the breast a woman developed an immediate allergic reaction presumably caused by the subcutaneous sutures (vicryl). After adjuvant irradiation the breast became swollen and mammography gave suspicion of a recurrent breast cancer. Surgical excision was performed and examination of the biopsy specimen showed a foreign body reaction to the suture material with fibrosis and eosinophilia. PMID:10740437

  10. A new design of a Nitinol ring-like wire for suturing in deep surgical field.

    PubMed

    Nespoli, Adelaide; Dallolio, Villiam; Villa, Elena; Passaretti, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    The present work proposes a new suturing procedure based on self-accommodating suture points. Each suture point is made of a commercial NiTi wire hot-shaped in a single loop ring; a standard suture needle is then fixed at one end of the NiTi suture. According to this simple geometry, several NiTi suture stitches have been prepared and tested by tensile test to verify the closing force in comparison to that of commercial sutures. Further experimental tests have also been performed on anatomic samples from animals to verify the handiness of the NiTi suture. Moreover, surface quality of sutures has been carefully investigated via microscopy. Results show that the NiTi suture expresses high stiffness and a good surface quality. In addition, the absence of manual knotting allows for a simple, fast and safe procedure. PMID:26249562

  11. Bearing area: a new indication for suture anchor pullout strength?

    PubMed

    Yakacki, Christopher Michael; Griffis, Jack; Poukalova, Mariya; Gall, Ken

    2009-08-01

    Studies performed to quantify the pullout strength of suture anchors have not adequately defined the basic device parameters that control monotonic pullout. The bearing area of a suture anchor can be used to understand and predict anchor pullout strength in a soft-bone model. First, conical-shaped test samples were varied in size and shape and tested for pullout in 5, 8, and 10 pcf sawbone models. Next, bearing area and pullout strength relationships developed from the test samples were validated against nine commercially available suture anchors, including the Mitek QuickAnchor and SpiraLok, Opus Magnum(2), ArthroCare ParaSorb, and Arthrex BioCorkscrew. The samples showed a direct correlation between bearing area and pullout strength. Increased insertion depth was a secondary condition that also increased pullout strength. The pullout strength for the suture anchors followed the predicted trends of conical devices based on their individual bearing areas. For the 5 and 8 pcf models, only two and three devices, respectively, fell outside the predicted pullout strength range by more than a standard deviation. The use of a synthetic sawbone model was validated against the pullout strength of an Arthrex Corkscrew in five fresh-frozen cadaver humeral heads. The bearing area of a suture anchor can be used to predict the pullout strength independent of design in a soft-bone model. This work helps provide a foundation to understand the principles that affect the pullout strength of suture anchors. PMID:19226593

  12. Iatrogenic Ulnar Nerve Injury post Laceration Suturing - An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mothilal, Murali; Mothilal, S N; Ravichandran, S; Mohammad, Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nerve entrapment while suturing a lacerated wound is a complication that is easily avoidable. We report a case low ulnar nerve palsy due to nerve entrapment while suturing a lacerated wound. Case Report: A 48 year old lady came with complaints of pain and a lacerated wound over the dorsomedial aspect of lower third of the left forearm. The lacerated wound was sutured elsewhere one week back. She had fracture of lower third of the ulna which was stabilised with plates and screws using a separate dorsal incision. She developed ulnar claw hand on the third postoperative day. Strength duration curve revealed neurotmesis of ulnar nerve. Ulnar nerve exploration was done and the nerve was found to be ligated at the site of original laceration. The ligature was released and nerve was found to be thinned out at the site. There was no neurological recovery at 5 months follow up and reconstruction procedures in form of tendon tranfer are planned for the patient. Conclusion: This is a case of iatrogenic ulnar nerve palsy which is very rare in our literature. This can be easily avoided if proper care is taken while suturing the primary laceration. A nerve can be mistakenly sutured for a bleeding vein and proper exposure while suturing will be necessary especially at areas where nerves are superficial. PMID:27298911

  13. Clinical outcomes of suture delay in forehead flap.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Kiroglu, Faruk; Isik, Yasemin; Goktas, Ugur; Atik, Bekir

    2012-01-01

    The delay phenomenon is a surgical procedure performed to raise a wider skin flap and to improve the survival of skin flaps. Surgery, chemicals, sutures, and lasers can be used for the delay procedure. In this study, delayed forehead flaps created by suturing were used for coverage of nasal skin defects in eleven patients. In 7 patients, the cross-paramedian forehead flap was used to increase the extent of flap lengthening. In the first session, suture delay was performed on both sides of the forehead flap margin. In the second session, the flap was elevated and sutured to its new position, 7 to 10 days after the initial surgery. All flaps were completely viable, and patient satisfaction was optimal in all cases. The positive effect of surgical delay on flap survival has been shown in experimental and clinical studies. However, experimentally, suture delay or chemical delay procedures have been shown to be beneficial in flap survival only. Suture delay seems to be an inexpensive, effective, easily performed, atraumatic, and safe technique, especially among patients with systemic diseases such as diabetes or cardiovascular diseases, smoking patients who may lose the flap, or patients who need very wide and long flaps. PMID:22337378

  14. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  15. Lateral meniscus allograft transplantation: an arthroscopically-assisted single-incision technique using all-inside sutures with a suture hook.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Chan; Chang, Woo-Hyuk; Park, Seung-Jun; Kim, Tae-Ho; Sung, Byung-Yoon

    2014-02-01

    We present an arthroscopically-assisted single-incision technique using all-inside sutures with a suture hook in the lateral meniscus allograft transplantation. Although this technique is technically demanding, it provides vertically oriented and secure sutures with good tissue approximation without the accessory skin incision. PMID:23328984

  16. Disposable circumcision suture device: clinical effect and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhu, Xuan-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang; Chen, Min-Fu; Shen, Hong-Liang; Pei, Zai-Jun; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2014-01-01

    In our experience patients undergoing circumcision are mostly concerned about pain and penile appearances. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess the benefits of a new disposable circumcision suture device (DCSD). A total of 942 patients were equally divided into three groups (conventional circumcision, Shang ring and disposable suture device group). Patients in the DCSD group were anesthetized with compound 5% lidocaine cream, the others with a 2% lidocaine penile block. Operation time, intra-operative blood loss, incision healing time, intra-operative and post-operative pain, the penile appearance and overall satisfaction degree were measured. Operation time and intra-operative blood loss were significantly lower in the Shang ring and suture device groups compared to the conventional group (P < 0.001). Intra-operative pain was less in the suture device group compared with the other two groups (P < 0.001); whereas post-operative pain was higher in the conventional group compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Patients in the suture device (80.57%) and Shang ring (73.57%) groups were more satisfied with penile appearances compared with the conventional circumcision group (20.06%, P < 0.05). Patients in suture device group also healed markedly faster than the conventional group (P < 0.01). The overall satisfaction rate was better in the suture device group (78.66%) compared with the conventional (47.13%) and Shang ring (50.00%) groups (P < 0.05). The combination of DCSD and lidocaine cream resulted in shorter operation and incision healing times, reduced intra-operative and post-operative pain and improved patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearances. PMID:24759586

  17. Diminished suture strength after robotic needle driver manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Daniel; Cerone, Jeffrey; Shie, Scott; Jetley, Ajay; Noe, Donald; Kovacik, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery has become a routine surgical option for the treatment of prostate cancer. Despite its technical advancements, the da Vinci(®) Surgical System still lacks haptic feedback to the surgeon, resulting in a maximally applied compressive force by the robotic needle driver during every grasping maneuver. Without this perceptional sense of touch and grip control, repetitive robotic needle driver manipulation may unknowingly lead to irreparable damage to fine sutures used during delicate anastomotic repairs. For robotic prostatectomy, any such loss of integrity can potentially lead to premature breakdown of the urethrovesical anastomosis and urine extravasation, especially important for a less-than-perfectly fashioned anastomotic repair. Although it has already been established that overhandling of sutures using handheld laparoscopic instruments can lead to reduced suture strength, it has not been established to what extent this may occur after robotic surgical procedures. We present analytical data and analyses concerning the failure strength of fine sutures commonly used for urethrovesical anastomotic repair during robotic prostatectomy, after repetitive robotic needle driver manipulation. When compared with noncompromised monofilament suture controls, the average maximal failure force after repetitive robotic manipulation was significantly reduced by 35% (p < 0.0001). Similarly, the average maximal failure force of braided sutures was significantly reduced after repetitive robotic manipulation by 3% (p = 0.009). This work demonstrates that significant reductions in monofilament and braided suture strength integrity can occur after customary repetitive manipulation by robotic needle drivers in an ex vivo model, with further research warranted in the in vivo setting. PMID:20653422

  18. Disposable circumcision suture device: clinical effect and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhu, Xuan-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang; Chen, Min-Fu; Shen, Hong-Liang; Pei, Zai-Jun; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2014-01-01

    In our experience patients undergoing circumcision are mostly concerned about pain and penile appearances. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess the benefits of a new disposable circumcision suture device (DCSD). A total of 942 patients were equally divided into three groups (conventional circumcision, Shang ring and disposable suture device group). Patients in the DCSD group were anesthetized with compound 5% lidocaine cream, the others with a 2% lidocaine penile block. Operation time, intra-operative blood loss, incision healing time, intra-operative and post-operative pain, the penile appearance and overall satisfaction degree were measured. Operation time and intra-operative blood loss were significantly lower in the Shang ring and suture device groups compared to the conventional group (P < 0.001). Intra-operative pain was less in the suture device group compared with the other two groups (P < 0.001); whereas post-operative pain was higher in the conventional group compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Patients in the suture device (80.57%) and Shang ring (73.57%) groups were more satisfied with penile appearances compared with the conventional circumcision group (20.06%, P < 0.05). Patients in suture device group also healed markedly faster than the conventional group (P < 0.01). The overall satisfaction rate was better in the suture device group (78.66%) compared with the conventional (47.13%) and Shang ring (50.00%) groups (P < 0.05). The combination of DCSD and lidocaine cream resulted in shorter operation and incision healing times, reduced intra-operative and post-operative pain and improved patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearances. PMID:24759586

  19. Nonclosure of rectourethral fistula during posterior sagittal anorectoplasty: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Sudhakar; Raut, Amit; Mandke, Jui; Patil, Santosh; Vora, Ravindra; Kittur, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of nonclosure of rectourethral (RU) fistula and to do a comparative analysis of the complications with and without nonclosure of RU fistula during posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) in anorectal malformation cases (ARM). Materials and Methods: A total of 68 cases of ARM were included in the study group, of which 34 cases were those in whom RU fistula was not closed (group A) during PSARP. Another 34 successive cases were included in study group B in whom the RU fistula was closed as is conventionally done by using interrupted sutures. Results: Comparatively, group A had none or minimum urological complications as compared to Group B. Conclusion: RU fistula closure is not mandatory during PSARP and nonclosure avoids urological complications. It especially avoids urethral complications, which are 100% preventable. PMID:23599574

  20. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  1. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  2. New meniscus repair by an all-inside knot suture technique.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kazumasa; Okano, Tatsumasa; Negishi, Shinichi; Horaguchi, Takashi; Sato, Kenji; Saito, Akiyoshi; Ryu, Junnosuke

    2005-06-01

    The indications for the all-inside knot suture technique include tears in the red-red zone or red-white zone in the meniscus, and a horizontal tear, a vertical tear, and a peripheral tear. First, find an appropriate place for a suture insertion site with a Kateran needle or a spinal needle. Make sure it exits beyond the tear in the meniscus. Once the insertion site is chosen, a suture is passed into and through the joint. The suture is slowly pulled back. You should be able to feel the tip of the suture come out of the joint capsule. If you want to make a vertical suture to suture the tear, move the suture vertically apex. Then insert the suture back into the joint through the capsule. Make sure the suture stays inside the joint. Find and grab the suture with a punch inserted from the clear cannula. Pull the suture out of the joint through the clear cannula with the punch. Tighten the knot with a knot pusher. Then confirm the stability of the sutured site with the probe. Our all-inside knot suture technique can be performed arthroscopically, allowing reliable repair of the torn meniscus. PMID:15944646

  3. A comparison of absorbable suture and argon laser welding for lateral repair of arteries.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, P F; Li, K; Merrell, S W; Goodman, G R

    1991-08-01

    Conventional vascular anastomoses between autogenous vessels are performed with nonabsorbable sutures. Recently, use of absorbable sutures and laser-assisted vascular anastomoses has been advocated because of their improved healing characteristics. This study compared arterial repairs with the argon laser, absorbable suture, and nonabsorbable suture for technical characteristics including additional suture and overall success rates, burst strength, and cost. Absorbable and nonabsorbable suture closures were comparable with respect to technique, but laser-assisted vascular anastomosis was technically more demanding and required almost twice as much time for completion. The argon laser successfully closed only 58.6% of the arteriotomies, and 90% of the closures required additional sutures for complete hemostasis. All sutured arteriotomies were successfully completed by use of either absorbable or nonabsorbable suture. Burst strength was similar for all groups, but was uniformly greater than 300 mm Hg for sutured repairs, whereas two of five laser-assisted closures burst below 300 mm Hg. Finally, costs for purchasing ($35,000) and operating ($300/hr.) an argon laser make laser-assisted vascular anastomosis much more expensive than sutured repair. These data suggest argon laser-assisted vascular anastomoses are more technically demanding, less successful, and more expensive than conventional sutured anastomoses when evaluated in large caliber arteries in a canine model. Absorbable suture, however, is comparable to conventional nonabsorbable sutured arterial repairs in expense, handling characteristics, and success rates with the added advantage of eliminating permanent foreign body in the arterial wall when it is absorbed. PMID:1861329

  4. Gossypiboma mimicking posterior urethral stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bindey; Kumar, Prem; Sinha, Sanjay Kumar; Sinha, Neelam; Hasan, Zaheer; Thakur, Vinit Kumar; Anand, Utpal; Priyadarshi, Rajiv Nayan; Mandal, Manish

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Foreign bodies in the urogenital tract are not uncommon. Hairpins, glass rods, umbilical tapes, ball point pen are described in lower urogenital tract. Retained gauze piece (gossypiboma) in posterior urethra may cause diagnostic dilemma. Symptoms and investigations may mimic stricture of posterior urethra. PRESENTATION OF CASE Two cases of retained gauze pieces in the urethra are described here. The micturating cystourethrogram was suggestive of posterior urethral stricture. DISCUSSION Two cases described here had retained gauze piece as a cause of filling defect and abnormal appearance in the micturating cystourethrogram. Gossypiboma may be a possibility where posterior urethral stricture are seen after previous surgery in paediatric age group. CONCLUSION In the setting of previous urogenital surgery gossypiboma should be kept in the differential diagnosis where posterior urethral stricture are seen in the paediatric age group. PMID:23500749

  5. Suspension of the gluteal region with silhouette sutures.

    PubMed

    de Benito, Javier; Pizzamiglio, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    The authors present their minimally invasive gluteopexy technique, using polypropylene 2-0 sutures with 10 absorbable polylactic cones in their distal section (Silhouette Lift, Irvine, California) to improve the anteroposterior projection of the gluteal region. Histological study of the reaction of adipose tissue surrounding the cones previously has shown that, 3 months after insertion of the sutures, fibrous scar tissue is sufficiently developed to resist the weight of the tissues. On the basis of this finding, the authors decided to perform the gluteopexy with sutures, in 2 surgical steps. During the first step, the sutures are inserted in the adipose tissue without any proximal fixation. In the second step, performed 3 months after the first procedure when the fibrous reaction is more solid, the sutures are tightened to obtain the gluteopexy. Among the advantages of this technique are its simplicity, the fact that it produces no traumatic effects, and the fact that it can be performed with local anesthetic, reducing surgical time. It is also possible to combine this procedure with lipofilling or liposuction techniques. PMID:24084884

  6. Recognizing surgeon's actions during suture operations from video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Ohya, Jun; Chiba, Toshio; Xu, Rong; Yamashita, Hiromasa

    2014-03-01

    Because of the shortage of nurses in the world, the realization of a robotic nurse that can support surgeries autonomously is very important. More specifically, the robotic nurse should be able to autonomously recognize different situations of surgeries so that the robotic nurse can pass necessary surgical tools to the medical doctors in a timely manner. This paper proposes and explores methods that can classify suture and tying actions during suture operations from the video sequence that observes the surgery scene that includes the surgeon's hands. First, the proposed method uses skin pixel detection and foreground extraction to detect the hand area. Then, interest points are randomly chosen from the hand area so that their 3D SIFT descriptors are computed. A word vocabulary is built by applying hierarchical K-means to these descriptors, and the words' frequency histogram, which corresponds to the feature space, is computed. Finally, to classify the actions, either SVM (Support Vector Machine), Nearest Neighbor rule (NN) for the feature space or a method that combines "sliding window" with NN is performed. We collect 53 suture videos and 53 tying videos to build the training set and to test the proposed method experimentally. It turns out that the NN gives higher than 90% accuracies, which are better recognition than SVM. Negative actions, which are different from either suture or tying action, are recognized with quite good accuracies, while "Sliding window" did not show significant improvements for suture and tying and cannot recognize negative actions.

  7. Selective laser vaporization of polypropylene sutures and mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, David; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Complications from polypropylene mesh after surgery for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) may require tedious surgical revision and removal of mesh materials with risk of damage to healthy adjacent tissue. This study explores selective laser vaporization of polypropylene suture/mesh materials commonly used in SUI. A compact, 7 Watt, 647-nm, red diode laser was operated with a radiant exposure of 81 J/cm2, pulse duration of 100 ms, and 1.0-mm-diameter laser spot. The 647-nm wavelength was selected because its absorption by water, hemoglobin, and other major tissue chromophores is low, while polypropylene absorption is high. Laser vaporization of ~200-μm-diameter polypropylene suture/mesh strands, in contact with fresh urinary tissue samples, ex vivo, was performed. Non-contact temperature mapping of the suture/mesh samples with a thermal camera was also conducted. Photoselective vaporization of polypropylene suture and mesh using a single laser pulse was achieved with peak temperatures of 180 and 232 °C, respectively. In control (safety) studies, direct laser irradiation of tissue alone resulted in only a 1 °C temperature increase. Selective laser vaporization of polypropylene suture/mesh materials is feasible without significant thermal damage to tissue. This technique may be useful for SUI procedures requiring surgical revision.

  8. MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF COMMON SUTURE MATERIALS IN ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Najibi, S; Banglmeier, R; Matta, JM; Tannast, M

    2010-01-01

    Suture materials in orthopaedic surgery are used for closure of wounds, repair of fascia, muscles, tendons, ligaments, joint capsules, and cerclage or tension band of certain fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of eleven commonly used sutures in orthopaedic surgery. Three types of braided non-absorbable and one type of braided absorbable suture material with different calibers (n=77) underwent biomechanical testing for maximum load to failure, strain, and stiffness. All samples were tied by one surgeon with a single SMC (Seoul Medical Center) knot and three square knots. The maximum load to failure and strain were highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #0 Ethibond Excel (p<0.001). The stiffness was highest for #5 FiberWire and lowest for #2-0 Vicryl (p<0.001). In all samples, the failure of the suture material occurred at the knot There was no slippage of the knot in any of the samples tested. This data will assist the orthopaedic surgeon in selection and application of appropriate suture materials and calibers to specific tasks. PMID:21045977

  9. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely. PMID:27272329

  10. Is the Kapuskasing structure the site of a cryptic suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.

    1983-01-01

    The demonstration that the Kapuskasing structure involves substantial thrusting of deep continental crustal rocks over shallower continental rocks calls into question an earlier suggestion (by Wilson) that the Circum-Ungaua suture zone continued through the Kapuskasing to join the Penokean fold belt (implying that the Kapuskasing marked the site of what has since come to be called a cryptic suture). Problems are discussed which arose in attempting to reconcile Wilson's idea with data from more recent studies: whether the Kapuskasing and the Thompson belt both mark sutures of about 1700 Ma age; why there is no age difference across the Kapuskasing if it does mark the site of continental collision, and why there is no offset of Superior subprovinces across the Kapuskasing.

  11. Ureteric Suture Urolithiasis Following Open Emergency Ureteric Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Piyush B.; Kelly, Brian D.; Devarajan, Raghuram

    2016-01-01

    Suture urolithiasis is an unusual but recognised phenomenon following surgery on the urinary tract. We report a case in a 30-year-old man who sustained a gunshot injury to the left ureter in Burundi and underwent open ureteric repair in a regional hospital. He migrated to the UK and presented one year later with left loin pain. An intravenous urogram revealed two foci of calcification to the left of L3, within a peri-ureteric position. The patient underwent left-sided ureteroscopy where two calculi each formed around a nylon suture were discovered within a ureteric pseudo-diverticulum, and basketed. This is the first reported case of suture urolithiasis occurring following ureteric surgery. PMID:26989371

  12. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy via suture and ligation technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Ho Yeon; Kim, Bo Wook

    2016-01-01

    Objective The term 'total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) with classical suture method' refers to a surgical procedure performed using only sutures and ligations with intracorporeal or extracorporeal ties, without using any laser or electronic cauterization devices during laparoscopic surgery as in total abdominal hysterectomy. However, the method is not as widely used as electric coagulation equipment for TLH because further advances in technology and surgical technique are required and operative time can take longer. In the current study, we evaluated the benefits of the classical suture method for TLH. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed patients who received TLH using the classical suture method from August 2005 to April 2014. The patients' baseline characteristics were analyzed, including age, parity, cause of operation, medical and surgical history. Surgical outcomes analyzed included the weight of the uterus, operative time, complications, changes in hemoglobin level, blood transfusion requirements, and postoperative hospital stay. Results Of 746 patients who underwent TLH with the classical suture method, mean operation time was 96.9 minutes. Mean average decline in hemoglobin was 1.6 g/dL and transfusion rate was 6.2%. Urinary tract injuries were reported in 8 patients. Urinary tract injuries comprised 6 cases of bladder injury and 3 cases of ureter injury. There were no cases of vaginal stump infection, hematoma, bowel injury or abdominal wound complication. All cases involving complications occurred before 2010. Conclusion The classical suture method for TLH presents tolerable levels of complications and blood loss. Advanced surgical skill is expected to decrease operation time and complications. PMID:26866034

  13. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  14. Influence of metopic suture fusion associated with sagittal synostosis.

    PubMed

    Domeshek, Leahthan F; Das, Rajesh R; Van Aalst, John A; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Marcus, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-01

    Some patients with sagittal synostosis present with a fused metopic suture. We hypothesize that premature metopic suture fusion consistently and identifiably alters form associated with sagittal synostosis. We previously validated three-dimensional vector analysis as a tool for the study of cranial morphology and used it herein to distinguish between dysmorphologies of isolated sagittal synostosis (ISS) and combined sagittal-metopic synostosis (CSM). Preoperative computed tomographic scans for patients with ISS and CSM were compared with matched normative counterparts. Premature metopic suture fusion was defined by established radiographic criteria. Color-coded point clouds were created for each scan, with color gradient based on patient deviation from normal across the dysmorphic skull. Standard deviation data were evaluated in 7 cranial regions and compared between ISS and CSM. Mean ISS and CSM point clouds were evaluated. Using three-dimensional vector analysis, standard anthropometric data/indices were determined and compared between the 2 groups. Differences in ISS and CSM regional deviations and index measurements were not statistically significant. Mean ISS and CSM representations depicted similar overall morphology. Using accepted criteria for identification of metopic synostosis in CSM, only subtle differences appear between the 2 populations on average. Expected morphologic changes associated with metopic synostosis are present in only a small number of patients with CSM, arguing against our hypothesis, and calling into question the criteria used to identify premature metopic suture fusion. Normal metopic suture fusion occurs for a continuum of time. Our findings suggest that the normal continuum may begin earlier than the literature suggests. In the setting of sagittal synostosis, the influence of metopic suture fusion and treatment is best determined by individual morphologic analysis. PMID:21187774

  15. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  16. A carpal ligament substitute part 1: polyester suture.

    PubMed

    Martin, John A; Wehbé, Marwan A

    2013-02-01

    We have searched for a synthetic substitute for the carpal ligaments, which would be widely available and easy to use. Four loops of 2-0 polyester fiber suture (Mersilene) were found to exceed the ultimate tensile strength of the scapholunate interosseous ligament. This construct approximates a normal ligament stress/strain curve and can theoretically facilitate fibrous tissue ingrowth. It is readily available, easy to handle, and inexpensive. Based on these findings, we recommend the use of polyester suture in the reconstruction of carpal and other ligaments. PMID:23168035

  17. Abnormal fiber end migration in Royal College of Surgeons rats during posterior subcapsular cataract formation

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Anita; Al-Ghoul, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Prior structural studies of posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats suggest that migration of basal fiber ends was disrupted, ultimately resulting in a PSC. Therefore the goal of this study was to assess the overall migration patterns as well as changes to the structure and cytoskeleton of basal fiber ends during PSC development. Methods Lenses from 48 RCS dystrophic rats (RCS/Lav) and 24 genetically matched control animals (RCS-rdy+/Lav) from 2 to 8 weeks old were examined. Equatorial diameters were measured and suture patterns were photographed immediately following enucleation/dissection. Right eye lenses were fixed and processed to visualize the actin cytoskeleton via laser scanning confocal microcopy (LSCM), left eye lenses were decapsulated, fixed and processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Scaled 3D-computer assisted drawings (CADs) and animations were constructed from the data to depict the changes in suture patterns and fiber end architecture. Results At 2 weeks, dystrophic lenses displayed an inverted Y suture on the posterior, and by 3 weeks most lenses had at least one sub-branch. Additional sub-branches were observed with time, opacities being visible as early as 4 weeks and progressing into PSC plaques by 6 weeks. Control lenses displayed inverted Y sutures at all ages and were transparent. SEM of dystrophic lenses revealed fiber ends with normal size, shape, arrangement, and filopodia at 2 weeks; scattered areas of dome-shaped fiber ends and small filopodia were present at 3 weeks. At 4 weeks the irregularly arranged domed fiber ends had extremely long filopodia with ‘boutons’ at their tips. By 6 weeks all fiber ends within plaques displayed rounded or domed basal membranes and lacked filopodial extensions. Control lenses at all time points had comparable ultrastructure to the 2 week old dystrophic lenses. F-actin arrangement within the basal membrane complex (BMC) of control

  18. Complexity of suture zones:Example from the Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone , southern Tibet. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, R.; Guilmette, C.

    2013-12-01

    Decade-long investigation of the Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (YZSZ), southern Tibet, has revealed it's high complexity in terms of structure, geochronology and metamorphic and igneous histories. For instance, YZSZ comprises Late Devonian to mid-Miocene rocks, metamorphic intensities vary from high-grade to very-low grade and deformation styles range from ductile to brittle. Late Devonian rocks (363.7 × 1.7 Ma) are alkalic gabbros resulting from activity of a plume active within the Paleo-Tethys basin. Two ophiolite sub-groups are recognized. Sub-group 1 is Mid- to Late Jurassic (150-177 Ma) in age and ill-defined because only few sequences have been found and studied so far. IThis sub-group is probably derived from the destruction of a marginal basin comprising intra-oceanic arc and fore-arc settings. Spontang and Zedong sequences are good examples of this sub-group. Sub-group 2 is Lower Cretaceous (120-130 Ma) and represents the destruction of a marginal basin comprising an arc-back-arc system. These ophiolites are spatially associated with ophiolitic mélanges and flysch respectively representing the reworking of the Cretaceous ophiolites and Indian continental margin and the Neo-Tethyan ocean floor although such affinities need clarification. Most ophiolitic sequences belong to sub-group 2 such as Xiugubagu, Saga, Xigaze. Amphibolite and garnet amphibolite blocks (123-130 Ma) found within the ophiolitic mélange share similar geochemical attributes with sub-group 2 ophiolites. Their protoliths were probably generated within back-arc spreading center and metamorphosed in a subduction zone at depth around 50 km. Some radiometric ages suggest events at 80 Ma and 90 old represent the entry of Indian continental margin into the intra-oceanic subduction zone and/or obduction of ophiolites. However these ages seem to be very rare throughout the whole suture zone and are therefore considered as resulting from local metamorphic events. Some alkaline igneous rocks (131

  19. Biomechanical trial of modified flexor tendon sutures: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vlajcic, Zlatko; Zic, Rado; Skenderi, Zenun; Bilic-Zulle, Lidija; Martic, Kresimir; Stanec, Zdenko

    2012-09-01

    Proven benefits of early active mobilisation for intra-synovial flexor tendon repairs have inducted new criteria for a 'perfect suture'. This study has examined different variations of modified Kessler's suture, which could fulfil the new criteria. A total of 93 swine extensor tendons were transected, repaired and tested using a dynamometer with constant rate of extension. The first part of study tested clinically the most used modified Kessler suture, a variation of double modified Kessler suture and intact tendons as a control group. Further variations in the second part of study were due to type of suture, location and number of the knots and type of peripheral suture. According to the results, the tested version of double modified Kessler suture with crossed peripheral suture was the strongest one among all tested variations. The ultimate force for the authors preferred modification of the double modified Kessler (DMK) is significantly higher than modified Kessler suture. The version of DMK with crossed peripheral suture is the strongest one among all tested variations. The lowest strength manifests variation with two knots between tendon ends. The variations with interlocked and outsided knot or monofilament tread are not statistically significant regarding ultimate force. The frequency of suture failure events (suture pull out or tendon and/or suture rupture) is equal respecting braided or monofilament suture. The preferred modification of the double modified Kessler (DMK) suture with crossed peripheral suture is the strongest one among all tested variations and could achieve, concerning range of force, early active mobilisation. Further variations due to the type of thread and location, type and number of the knots did not show statistical significance. PMID:22784225

  20. Comparison of the cheese-wiring effects among three sutures used in rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Mark; Nazari, Behrooz; Dini, Arash; O'Brien, Michael J.; Heard, Wendell M. R.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to compare the cheese-wiring effects of three sutures with different coefficients of friction. Materials and Methods: Sixteen human cadaveric shoulders were dissected to expose the distal supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle tendons. Three sutures were stitched through the tendons: #2 Orthocord™ suture (reference #223114, DePuy Mitek, Inc., Raynham, MA), #2 ETHIBOND* EXCEL Suture, and #2 FiberWire® suture (FiberWire®, Arthrex, Naples, FL). The sutures were pulled by cyclic axial forces from 10 to 70 N at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles through a MTS machine. The cut-through distance on the tendon was measured with a digital caliper. Results: The cut-through distance in the supraspinatus tendons (mean ± standard deviation, n = 12) were 2.9 ± 0.6 mm for #2 Orthocord™ suture, 3.2 ± 1.2 mm for #2 ETHIBOND* suture, and 4.2 ± 1.7 mm for #2 FiberWire® suture. The differences were statistically significant analyzing with analysis of variance (P = 0.047) and two-tailed Student's t-test, which showed significance between Orthocord™ and FiberWire® sutures (P = 0.026), but not significant between Orthocord™ and ETHIBOND* sutures (P = 0.607) or between ETHIBOND* and FiberWire® sutures (P = 0.103). Conclusion: The cheese-wiring effect is less in the Orthocord™ suture than in the FiberWire® suture in human cadaveric supraspinatus tendons. Clinical Relevance: Identification of sutures that cause high levels of tendon cheese-wiring after rotator cuff repair can lead to better suture selection. PMID:25258499

  1. Laparoscopic hiatal herniorrhaphy with posterior fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Barr, L L

    1998-12-01

    Complications and side effects following laparoscopic antireflux procedures are common. This article describes an alternative laparoscopic technique to prevent gastroesophageal reflux. This method consists of posterior approximation of the diaphragmatic crura followed by a posterior fundoplication of approximately 270 degrees wrap. In avoiding the 360 degree wrap and obtaining length from the longitudinal axis of the stomach, it is not necessary to take down the gastrosplenic vessels. The principle of the procedure is to accentuate the cardioesophageal angle of His. No sutures are placed in the esophagus. While this article primarily concerns technique, it also constitutes a brief report on the first 50 patients who have been followed up for 1 year or more. All patients but one are free of reflux symptoms and have discontinued taking all medication. There has been no dysphagia to liquids, and solid food dysphagia has not lasted >1 month. Bloating from gas is minimal, as most patients are able to burp early in their recovery. An outcome paper describing preoperative and postoperative objective testing and evaluation is in process. PMID:9864104

  2. Management of posterior capsule rupture during phacoemulsification using the dry technique.

    PubMed

    Akura, J; Hatta, S; Kaneda, S; Ishihara, M; Matsuura, K; Tamai, A

    2001-07-01

    To manage posterior capsule rupture during phacoemulsification, we use a dry technique in which all procedures are performed without an irrigation/aspiration system. The dry technique is characterized by (1) continuous viscoelastic injection instead of fluid irrigation to maintain anterior chamber depth with the posterior capsule and vitreous located posteriorly and (2) static removal of most residual lens material by viscoexpression and/or manual small incision extracapsular cataract extraction without aspiration and dynamic water flow. In 16 cases of posterior capsule rupture managed using the dry technique, the residual nucleus and cortex were readily removed with minimum extension of the ruptured area and new vitreous loss. Although large amounts of viscoelastic material (mean 5.8 mL) were required, rapid and stable visual recovery was comparable to that in patients having uneventful surgery. The dry system is a safe and reliable technique for managing posterior capsule rupture during phacoemulsification. PMID:11489564

  3. Angiogenesis and osteogenesis in an orthopedically expanded suture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H. N.; Garetto, L. P.; Potter, R. H.; Katona, T. R.; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the angiogenic and the subsequent osteogenic responses during a 96-hour time-course after sutural expansion. Fifty rats were divided into: (1) a control group that received only angiogenic induction through injection of 5 ng/gm recombinant human endothelial cell growth factor (rhECGF); (2) an experimental group that received orthopedic expansion and rhECGF; (3) a sham group that received expansion and sodium chloride (NaCl) injection; and (4) a baseline group that received no expansion or injection. All rats were injected with 3H-thymidine (1.0 microCi/gm) 1 hour before death to label the DNA of S-phase cells. Demineralized sections (4 microm thick) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Angiogenesis and cell migration were analyzed with a previously established cell kinetics model. Analysis of variance was used to test the hypothesis that enhancement of angiogenesis stimulates reestablishment of osteogenic capability. Blood vessel number, area, and endothelial cell-labeled index significantly increased in experimental groups, but no difference was found between control and baseline groups. Labeled-pericyte index and activated pericyte numbers in the experimental group were also higher than in the sham groups. These results show that supplemental rhECGF enhances angiogenesis in expanded sutures but not in nonexpanded sutures. Data also suggest that pericytes are the source of osteoblasts in an orthopedically expanded suture.

  4. 21 CFR 878.4840 - Absorbable polydioxanone surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable polydioxanone surgical suture. 878.4840 Section 878.4840 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Industry and FDA.” See § 878.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document....

  5. 21 CFR 878.5035 - Nonabsorbable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonabsorbable expanded polytetrafluoroethylene surgical suture. 878.5035 Section 878.5035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...; Guidance for Industry and FDA.” See § 878.1(e) for the availability of this guidance document....

  6. 21 CFR 878.5010 - Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture. 878.5010 Section 878.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... a monofilament, nonabsorbable, sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain polyolefin...

  7. 21 CFR 878.5020 - Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture. 878.5020 Section 878.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain aliphatic polymers Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6 and...

  8. 21 CFR 878.5020 - Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture. 878.5020 Section 878.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain aliphatic polymers Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6 and...

  9. 21 CFR 878.5020 - Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture. 878.5020 Section 878.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain aliphatic polymers Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6 and...

  10. 21 CFR 878.5010 - Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture. 878.5010 Section 878.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... a monofilament, nonabsorbable, sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain polyolefin...

  11. 21 CFR 878.5010 - Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture. 878.5010 Section 878.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... a monofilament, nonabsorbable, sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain polyolefin...

  12. 21 CFR 878.5010 - Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture. 878.5010 Section 878.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... a monofilament, nonabsorbable, sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain polyolefin...

  13. 21 CFR 878.5010 - Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polypropylene surgical suture. 878.5010 Section 878.5010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... a monofilament, nonabsorbable, sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain polyolefin...

  14. 21 CFR 878.5020 - Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture. 878.5020 Section 878.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain aliphatic polymers Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6 and...

  15. 21 CFR 878.5020 - Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonabsorbable polyamide surgical suture. 878.5020 Section 878.5020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., sterile, flexible thread prepared from long-chain aliphatic polymers Nylon 6 and Nylon 6,6 and...

  16. Risk Factors for Mesh/Suture Erosion Following Sacrocolpopexy

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Geoffrey W.; Varner, Edward; Visco, Anthony G.; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Nager, Charles W.; Norton, Peggy A.; Schaffer, Joseph; Brown, Morton B.; Brubaker, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To identify risks for mesh/suture erosions following sacrocolpopexy (ASC). Study Design We analyzed demographic, perioperative variables and erosion status in 322 participants in the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts study two years after sacrocolpopexy. Results The predominant graft used was synthetic mesh; Mersilene (42%) or Polypropylene (48%). Twenty subjects (6%) experienced mesh/suture erosion. Unadjusted risk factors for mesh/suture erosion were expanded polytrafluroethylene (ePTFE) mesh (ePTFE 4/21 (19%) versus non-ePFTE 16/301 (5%): OR 4.2), concurrent hysterectomy (OR 4.9) and current smoking (OR 5.2). Of those with mesh erosion, most affected women (13/17) underwent at least one surgery for partial or total mesh removal. Two were completely resolved, 6 had persistent problems and 5 were lost to follow-up. No resolution was documented in the 4 women who elected observation. Conclusions Expanded PTFE mesh should not be used for sacrocolpopexy. Concurrent hysterectomy and smoking are modifiable risks for mesh/suture erosion. PMID:18976976

  17. Use of Absorbable Sutures in Canine Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Alejandro R.; Carrillo-Farga, Joaquin; Velasco, Carlos O.; Valencia, Martin O.V.

    1990-01-01

    To study the functional and microstructural characteristics of polydioxanone sutures in vascular surgery, we created 48 vascular anastomoses in the right and left common carotid arteries of 24 mongrel dogs. In each animal, polydioxanone sutures were used in 1 carotid artery, and polypropylene sutures were used in the contralateral carotid artery. Twelve groups of 2 animals each were then formed. The 1st group was observed for 1 month, the 2nd for 2 months, the 3rd for 3 months, and so on until the 12th group, which was observed for 12 months. At the end of each observation period, reoperation was undertaken to evaluate the vascular anastomoses by means of angiography and microscopy. The polypropylene anastomoses showed a marked deformity, with tissue retraction and a foreign body reaction. In contrast, the polydioxanone anastomoses exhibited satisfactory healing, without deformity, and were well tolerated histologically. We believe that polydioxanone may be a useful, alternative vascular suture material. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:99-102) Images PMID:15227391

  18. 21 CFR 878.5030 - Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. 878.5030 Section 878.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  19. 21 CFR 878.5030 - Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. 878.5030 Section 878.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  20. 21 CFR 878.5030 - Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Natural nonabsorbable silk surgical suture. 878.5030 Section 878.5030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4493 - Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical....4493 Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture (PGL suture) is an absorbable sterile, flexible strand as prepared...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4493 - Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical....4493 Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture (PGL suture) is an absorbable sterile, flexible strand as prepared...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4493 - Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical....4493 Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture (PGL suture) is an absorbable sterile, flexible strand as prepared...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4493 - Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical....4493 Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture (PGL suture) is an absorbable sterile, flexible strand as prepared...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4493 - Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical....4493 Absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(glycolide/l-lactide) surgical suture (PGL suture) is an absorbable sterile, flexible strand as prepared...

  6. Effects of Citalopram on Sutural and Calvarial Cell Processes

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Emily; Jen, Serena; Wang, Lin; Nasworthy, Joseph; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Weinberg, Seth; Yu, Jack; Cray, James

    2015-01-01

    The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of depression during pregnancy is suggested to increase the incidence of craniofacial abnormalities including craniosynostosis. Little is known about this mechanism, however based on previous data we propose a mechanism that affects cell cycle. Excessive proliferation, and reduction in apoptosis may lead to hyperplasia within the suture that may allow for differentiation, bony infiltration, and fusion. Here we utilized in vivo and in vitro analysis to investigate this proposed phenomenon. For in vivo analysis we used C57BL–6 wild-type breeders treated with a clinical dose of citalopram during the third trimester of pregnancy to produce litters exposed to the SSRI citalopram in utero. At post-natal day 15 sutures were harvested from resulting pups and subjected to histomorphometric analysis for proliferation (PCNA) and apoptosis (TUNEL). For in vitro studies, we used mouse calvarial pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) to assess proliferation (MTS), apoptosis (Caspase 3/7-activity), and gene expression after exposure to titrated doses of citalopram. In vivo analysis for PCNA suggested segregation of effect by location, with the sagittal suture, showing a statistically significant increase in proliferative response. The coronal suture was not similarly affected, however there was a decrease in apoptotic activity at the dural edge as compared to the periosteal edge. No differences in apoptosis by suture or area due to SSRI exposure were observed. In vitro results suggest citalopram exposure increased proliferation and proliferative gene expression, and decreased apoptosis of the MC3T3-E1 cells. Decreased apoptosis was not confirmed in vivo however, an increase in proliferation without a concomitant increase in apoptosis is still defined as hyperplasia. Thus prenatal SSRI exposure may exert a negative effect on post-natal growth through a hyperplasia effect at the cranial growth sites perhaps

  7. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  8. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  9. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  10. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Direct nerve suture and knee immobilization in 90° flexion as a technique for treatment of common peroneal, tibial and sural nerve injuries in complex knee trauma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Robert; Ciritsis, Bernhard; Giesen, Thomas; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    There are different ways to treat peripheral nerve injuries with concomitant defects in the lower extremity. One option is a direct nerve suture followed by immobilization of the knee in flexion as it is described for gunshot wounds that lead to lesions of the sciatic nerve and its terminal branches as well as isolated nerve lesions. We used this technique to treat a case of multiple nerve injuries of the lower extremity combined with a complex knee trauma including a lesion of both bones and the posterior capsule. To our knowledge, this technique has not yet been described for such a combined injury in literature. PMID:24968417

  12. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W.; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  13. Arthroscopic Posterior Shoulder Stabilization With an Iliac Bone Graft and Capsular Repair: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tomas; Goede, Fabian; Struck, Melena; Wellmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Several surgical approaches have been described for the treatment of recurrent posterior shoulder instability. Many authors have performed posterior bone block procedures with good results not only in the presence of glenoid bone loss or dysplasia but also in the case of capsular hyperlaxity and poor soft-tissue quality. Open techniques often require an extensive approach with the disadvantage of a poor cosmetic result and possible insufficiency of the deltoid muscle. Furthermore, the treatment of concomitant pathologies and the correct placement of the bone graft are difficult. Therefore we describe an all-arthroscopic posterior shoulder stabilization technique with an iliac bone graft and capsular repair that is intended to improve the pre-existing open procedure. The key steps of the operation are the precise placement and screw fixation of the bone block at the posterior glenoid under arthroscopic control and the subsequent posterior capsular refixation and plication using 2 suture anchors to create an extra-articular graft position. PMID:23766993

  14. Sandwich Wound Closure Reduces the Risk of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Posterior Fossa Surgery.

    PubMed

    Heymanns, Verena; Oseni, Abidemi W; Alyeldien, Ameer; Maslehaty, Homajoun; Parvin, Richard; Scholz, Martin; Petridis, Athanasios K

    2016-04-26

    Posterior fossa surgery is demanding and hides a significant number of obstacles starting from the approach to the wound closure. The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage in posterior fossa surgery given in the literature is around 8%. The present study aims to introduce a sandwich closure of the dura in posterior fossa surgery, which reduces significantly the number of CSF leaks (3.8%) in the patients treated in our department. Three hundred and ten patients treated in our hospital in the years 2009-2013 for posterior fossa pathologies were retrospectively evaluated. The dura closure method was as following: lyophilized dura put under the dura and sealed with fibrin glue and sutures, dura adapting stitches, TachoSil® (Takeda Pharma A/S, Roskilde, Denmark), Gelfoam® (Pfizer Inc., New York, NY, USA) and polymethylmethacrylate (osteoclastic craniotomy). The incidence of postsurgical complications associated with the dural closure like CSF leakage, infections, bleeding is evaluated. Only 3.8% of patients developed CSF leakage and only 0.5% needed a second surgery for CSF leakage closure. Two percent had a cerebellar bleeding with no need for re-operation and 3% had a wound infection treated with antibiotics. The sandwich wound closure we are applying for posterior fossa surgery in our patients correlates with a significant reduction of CSF leaks compared to the literature. PMID:27478578

  15. Microbiopsy engineered for minimally invasive and suture-free sub-millimetre skin sampling

    PubMed Central

    Prow, Tarl W

    2013-01-01

    We describe the development of a sub-millimetre skin punch biopsy device for minimally invasive and suture-free skin sampling for molecular diagnosis and research. Conventional skin punch biopsies range from 2-4 mm in diameter. Local anaesthesia is required and sutures are usually used to close the wound. Our microbiopsy is 0.50 mm wide and 0.20 mm thick. The microbiopsy device is fabricated from three stacked medical grade stainless steel plates tapered to a point and contains a chamber within the centre plate to collect the skin sample. We observed that the application of this device resulted in a 0.21 ± 0.04 mm wide puncture site in volunteer skin using reflectance confocal microscopy. Histological sections from microbiopsied skin revealed 0.22 ± 0.12 mm wide and 0.26 ± 0.09 mm deep puncture sites. Longitudinal observation in microbiopsied volunteers showed that the wound closed within 1 day and was not visible after 7 days. Reflectance confocal microscope images from these same sites showed the formation of a tiny crust that resolved by 3 weeks and was completely undetectable by the naked eye. The design parameters of the device were optimised for molecular analysis using sampled DNA mass as the primary end point in volunteer studies. Finally, total RNA was characterized. The optimised device extracted 5.9 ± 3.4 ng DNA and 9.0 ± 10.1 ng RNA. We foresee that minimally invasive molecular sampling will play an increasingly significant role in diagnostic dermatology and skin research. PMID:24627782

  16. Isolated Posterior Fossa Involvement in Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yukie; Tha, Khin Khin; Iguchi, Akihiro; Cho, Yuko; Yoshida, Atsushi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Tsukahara, Akiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Terae, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is characterized by reversible vasogenic edema affecting the subcortical white matter of bilateral occipital and parietal lobes. We describe a case of isolated posterior fossa involvement of PRES which occurred during remission induction chemotherapy for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Both the brainstem and cerebellum were extensively involved, but the supratentorial structures were completely spared. The follow-up magnetic resonance images revealed reversibility of most lesions. The knowledge of atypical radiological features of PRES is essential for prompt diagnosis. PMID:24199811

  17. Prospective, noncomparative, nonrandomized case study of short-term outcomes of 360° suture trabeculotomy ab interno in patients with open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoki; Hirata, Akira; Mizoguchi, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background In this paper, we describe 360° suture trabeculotomy (360°LOT) ab interno and the short-term course in patients who underwent this procedure. Methods We prospectively studied 12 patients (12 eyes) with open-angle glaucoma who underwent 360°LOT ab interno at the Sato Eye Clinic between February and July 2014. The surgical procedure involved making a 1.7 mm temporal corneal incision, exposing an approximately 15° opening in the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal (nasal side) using a Trabectome with a gonioscope, and inserting a 5-0 nylon suture rounded at the tip into Schlemm’s canal opened via the anterior chamber. The suture was then threaded around Schlemm’s canal, and the tip of the suture that emerged on the other side was then advanced through the opening to make a circumferential incision. Intraocular pressure (IOP), number of anti-glaucoma medications used, complications, and the surgery completion rate were prospectively studied. Results Mean IOP, which was 19.4 mmHg at baseline, showed a significant decrease at each of the monthly observation points, reaching 13.8 mmHg at 6 months after surgery (P=0.0004, paired t-test). The mean number of anti-glaucoma medications decreased from 3.2 at baseline to 1.1 at 6 months after surgery. IOP spikes ≥30 mmHg were seen in 25% of patients, but there were no other serious complications and the surgery completion rate was 92%. Conclusion The 360°LOT ab interno procedure preserves the conjunctiva and sclera, and has a high surgery completion rate when using the anterior chamber approach, and could therefore be an effective short-term treatment of open-angle glaucoma. PMID:25609906

  18. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  19. Posterior polar cataract: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kalantan, Hatem

    2011-01-01

    Posterior polar cataract is a rare form of congenital cataract. It is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, yet it can be sporadic. Five genes have been attributed to the formation of this disease. It is highly associated with complications during surgery, such as posterior capsule rupture and nucleus drop. The reason for this high complication rate is the strong adherence of the opacity to the weak posterior capsule. Different surgical strategies were described for the handling of this challenging entity, most of which emphasized the need for gentle maneuvering in dealing with these cases. It has a unique clinical appearance that should not be missed in order to anticipate, avoid, and minimize the impact of the complications associated with it. PMID:23960967

  20. Rethinking "posterior" tongue-tie.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Currently, many clinicians who help with breastfeeding problems are diagnosing "posterior" tongue-tie in infants and performing or referring for frenotomy. In this "Speaking Out" article, I argue that the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie has successfully raised awareness of the importance of impaired tongue function in breastfeeding difficulty. However, the diagnosis of "posterior" tongue-tie also applies a reductionist, medicalized theoretical frame to the complex problem of impaired tongue function, risking unintended outcomes. Impaired tongue function arises out of multiple interacting and co-evolving factors, including the interplay between social behaviors concerning breastfeeding and mother-infant biology. Consideration of theoretical frames is vital if we are to build an evidence base through efficient use of the scarce resources available for clinical breastfeeding research and minimize unintended outcomes. PMID:24143939

  1. Assessment of the role of sutures in a lizard skull: a computer modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Moazen, Mehran; Curtis, Neil; O'Higgins, Paul; Jones, Marc E.H; Evans, Susan E; Fagan, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Sutures form an integral part of the functioning skull, but their role has long been debated among vertebrate morphologists and palaeontologists. Furthermore, the relationship between typical skull sutures, and those involved in cranial kinesis, is poorly understood. In a series of computational modelling studies, complex loading conditions obtained through multibody dynamics analysis were imposed on a finite element model of the skull of Uromastyx hardwickii, an akinetic herbivorous lizard. A finite element analysis (FEA) of a skull with no sutures revealed higher patterns of strain in regions where cranial sutures are located in the skull. From these findings, FEAs were performed on skulls with sutures (individual and groups of sutures) to investigate their role and function more thoroughly. Our results showed that individual sutures relieved strain locally, but only at the expense of elevated strain in other regions of the skull. These findings provide an insight into the behaviour of sutures and show how they are adapted to work together to distribute strain around the skull. Premature fusion of one suture could therefore lead to increased abnormal loading on other regions of the skull causing irregular bone growth and deformities. This detailed investigation also revealed that the frontal–parietal suture of the Uromastyx skull played a substantial role in relieving strain compared with the other sutures. This raises questions about the original role of mesokinesis in squamate evolution. PMID:18765341

  2. Cranial sutures work collectively to distribute strain throughout the reptile skull.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, M E H; Evans, S E; O'Higgins, P; Fagan, M J

    2013-09-01

    The skull is composed of many bones that come together at sutures. These sutures are important sites of growth, and as growth ceases some become fused while others remain patent. Their mechanical behaviour and how they interact with changing form and loadings to ensure balanced craniofacial development is still poorly understood. Early suture fusion often leads to disfiguring syndromes, thus is it imperative that we understand the function of sutures more clearly. By applying advanced engineering modelling techniques, we reveal for the first time that patent sutures generate a more widely distributed, high level of strain throughout the reptile skull. Without patent sutures, large regions of the skull are only subjected to infrequent low-level strains that could weaken the bone and result in abnormal development. Sutures are therefore not only sites of bone growth, but could also be essential for the modulation of strains necessary for normal growth and development in reptiles. PMID:23804444

  3. Cranial sutures work collectively to distribute strain throughout the reptile skull

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, M. E. H.; Evans, S. E.; O'Higgins, P.; Fagan, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The skull is composed of many bones that come together at sutures. These sutures are important sites of growth, and as growth ceases some become fused while others remain patent. Their mechanical behaviour and how they interact with changing form and loadings to ensure balanced craniofacial development is still poorly understood. Early suture fusion often leads to disfiguring syndromes, thus is it imperative that we understand the function of sutures more clearly. By applying advanced engineering modelling techniques, we reveal for the first time that patent sutures generate a more widely distributed, high level of strain throughout the reptile skull. Without patent sutures, large regions of the skull are only subjected to infrequent low-level strains that could weaken the bone and result in abnormal development. Sutures are therefore not only sites of bone growth, but could also be essential for the modulation of strains necessary for normal growth and development in reptiles. PMID:23804444

  4. The posterior border of the sphenoid greater wing and its phylogenetic usefulness in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Braga, J; Crubézy, E; Elyaqtine, M

    1998-12-01

    The elucidation of patterns of cranial skeletal maturation and growth in fossil hominids is possible not only through dental studies but also by mapping different aspects of ossification in both extant African apes and humans. However, knowledge of normal skeletal development in large samples of extant great apes is flimsy. To remedy this situation, this paper offers an extensive survey and thorough discussion of the ossification of the posterior border of the sphenoid greater wing. Indeed, this area provides much information about basicranial skeletal maturation. We investigate three variants: the absence of the foramen spinosum and the position of both the foramen spinosum and the foramen ovale in relation to the sphenosquamosal suture. Providing original data about humans and 1,425 extant great ape skulls and using a sample of 64 fossil hominids, this study aimed to test whether different ossification patterns occurred during the course of human evolution. The incidence of three derived morphologies located on the posterior border of the sphenoid greater wing increases during human evolution at different geological periods. The evolutionary polarity of these three derived morphologies is assessed by outgroup comparison and ontogenetic methods. During human evolution, there is a clear trend for the foramen spinosum to be present and wholly located on the posterior area of the sphenoid greater wing. Moreover, in all the great ape species and in Australopithecus afarensis, the sphenosquamosal suture may split the foramen ovale. Inversely, the foramen ovale always lies wholly within the sphenoid greater wing in Australopithecus africanus, robust australopithecines, early Homo, H. erectus (and/or H. ergaster), and Homo sapiens. From ontogenetic studies in humans, we conclude that, during human evolution, the ossification of the posterior area of the sphenoid greater wing progressively surrounded the middle meningeal artery (passing through the foramen spinosum) and

  5. Manual Suture Less Small Incision Cataract Surgery in Patients with Uveitic Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Bashir, Hafsa; Sharma, Shiv Kumar; Mishra, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS) in eyes with uveitic cataract. Setting: Medical college hospital of the subcontinent. Design: Retrospective case series. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, patients who underwent SICS with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for uveitic cataract from 2006 to 2009 were evaluated. Patients with less than 3 months follow-up were excluded. Post-operative vision and complications were analyzed. Results: A total of 54 patients completed the study. The mean age was 52.3 ± 9.3 years. The mean follow-up was 11.53 ± 5.05 months. The mean surgical time was (10.2 ± 3.8 min). Etiological diagnosis was possible in 31.41% (17/54) of patients. There was a statistically significant improvement in vision after surgery (P < 0.001). When uveitis was well-controlled, pre-operative corticosteroids did not change post-operative inflammation (P = 0.796). However, pre-operative corticosteroids were statistically significantly associated to final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (P = 0.010). Conclusion: SICS with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation is safe in most cataracts due to uveitis and improves BCVA at 6 months. Inflammation should be well-controlled pre-operatively for at least 3 months. Posterior capsule opacification, macular edema and persistent uveitis were the main factors affecting visual outcome. SICS requires minimal instrumentation, surgical time is short and can also be performed in rural clinics and eye-camps, where phacoemulsification machines are unavailable. SICS may be a more practical and cost-effective technique for uveitic cataract, in such circumstances. PMID:24669151

  6. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  7. [Nerve anastomoses. Sutures or fibrinogenic glue? Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Boedts, D; Bouckaert, J I

    1984-01-01

    A comparative animal experiment was set up between two nerve anastomosis techniques, one by sealing nerve ends with a fibrinogen-thrombine glue and the other by classical perineural suturing. It was concluded that glueing nerve ends, from the surgical-technical point of view is a better method than suturing. It is an easy, time-sparing method which allows excellent coaptation of the severed nerves with minimal iatrogenic trauma. On the long run however some questions remain. There is the problem of induced fibrosis by using high doses of aprotinine and factor XIII at the site of the nerve junctions and on the other hand the influence of fibrinolysis in traumatized tissues, with early decrease of tensile strength at the junctions before nerve healing. So glued nerve ends should be completely free of tension, protected against secondary shearing forces, and also immobilization of the region is required. PMID:6385609

  8. Meniscal suture. An experimental study in the dog.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Y; Fukubayashi, T; Nishino, J

    1989-06-01

    A longitudinal tear was made and then sutured in the peripheral quarter of the medial meniscus of 43 dogs. The sutured menisci were examined using histologic and microangiographic techniques at regular intervals during a 12-week period. Biomechanical tests were also performed. The healing process was promoted not only by the synovial blood supply but also by the peripheral blood supply. Even at the end of 12 weeks, the healing tissue was mainly composed of fibrous tissue, but chondrocytelike cells were also found. The tensile forces were calculated and compared with the opposite leg. The maximum tensile strength reached 80% of that of the opposite side at the end of the 12-week period. PMID:2656029

  9. Bridging Suture Repair for Acetabular Chondral Carpet Delamination

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirose, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Acetabular chondral carpet delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but deboned from the subchondral bone, without a disruption at the chondrolabral junction. Arthroscopic anatomic repair of delaminated cartilage is challenging. We propose that a combination of microfracture and use of stitches to press the delaminated cartilage against the subchondral bone using a suture limb offers an effective method to provide an environment for cartilage repair. This article describes the technique of bridging suture repair for carpet delamination in detail; the technique enables the surgeon to stabilize the delaminated acetabular cartilage. Intra-articular soft anchors and an acetabular rim knotless anchor footprint provide a stable repair for delaminated cartilage. This technique is especially helpful in cases with acetabular cartilage carpet delamination. PMID:26759774

  10. A Complication in Hypospadias Surgery Due to Anchoring Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gollu, Gulnur; Kucuk, Gonul; Karabulut, Ayse Anıl; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Cakmak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The complication rates are still 1–90% both in proximal and distal hypospadias regardless of the surgeon’s experience and the usage of most developed techniques. The literature survey revealed few complications of glans penis including meatal stenosis, prolapsus and retraction. Despite our literature survey, we could not find any article concerning the permanent scar tissue at the dorsal part of glans following hypospadias surgeries. A new complication can be added to these, concerning glans which is the formation of postoperative scar tissue as a reaction to suture material used in traction, stent anchoring or both. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate four cases which had glanular scar due to traction suture following the surgical procedures for hypospadias repair. PMID:26180503

  11. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  12. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  13. Stereolithography for Posterior Fossa Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Agner, Celso; Dujovny, Manuel; Evenhouse, Raymond; Charbel, Fady T.; Sadler, Lewis

    1998-01-01

    Posterior fossa cranioplasty has been suggested for improvement of neurological symptoms following craniectomy. However, there is no particular recommendation in the literature about techniques for prosthesis manufacture and implantation. We report our experience using rapid prototyping technology and stereolithography for pre-surgical implant design and production of cranioplasties. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171056

  14. A novel postoperative immobilization model for murine Achilles tendon sutures.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Yoichiro; Takayama, Yuzo; Kushige, Hiroko; Jacinto, Sandra; Sekido, Mitsuru; Kida, Yasuyuki S

    2016-08-01

    The body's motion and function are all in part effected by a vital tissue, the tendon. Tendon injury often results in limited functioning after postoperative procedures and even for a long time after rehabilitation. Although numerous studies have reported surgical procedures using animal models which have contributed to both basic and clinical research, modeling of tendon sutures or postoperative immobilizations has not been performed on small experimental animals, such as mice. In this study we have developed an easy Achilles tendon suture and postoperative ankle fixation model in a mouse. Right Achilles tendons were incised and 10-0 nylons were passed through the proximal and distal ends using a modified Kessler method. Subsequently, the right ankle was immobilized in a plantarflexed position with novel splints, which were made from readily available extension tubes. Restriction of the tendon using handmade splints reduced swelling, as opposed to fixating with the usual plaster of Paris. Using this method, the usage of the right Achilles tendons began on postoperative days 13.5 ± 4.6, which indicated healing within two weeks. Therefore our simple short-term murine Achilles tendon suture procedure is useful for studying immediate tendon repair mechanisms in various models, including genetically-modified mice. PMID:26678297

  15. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Brian B; Crall, Timothy S; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  16. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Brian B.; Crall, Timothy S.; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  17. Scleral Fixation of Posteriorly Dislocated Intraocular Lenses by 23-Gauge Vitrectomy without Anterior Segment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Jeroni; Kudsieh, Bachar; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. To evaluate visual outcomes, corneal changes, intraocular lens (IOL) stability, and complications after repositioning posteriorly dislocated IOLs and sulcus fixation with polyester sutures. Design. Prospective consecutive case series. Setting. Institut Universitari Barraquer. Participants. 25 eyes of 25 patients with posteriorly dislocated IOL. Methods. The patients underwent 23-gauge vitrectomy via the sulcus to rescue dislocated IOLs and fix them to the scleral wall with a previously looped nonabsorbable polyester suture. Main Outcome Measures. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) LogMAR, corneal astigmatism, endothelial cell count, IOL stability, and postoperative complications. Results. Mean follow-up time was 18.8 ± 10.9 months. Mean surgery time was 33 ± 2 minutes. Mean BCVA improved from 0.30 ± 0.48 before surgery to 0.18 ± 0.60 (p = 0.015) at 1 month, which persisted to 12 months (0.18 ± 0.60). Neither corneal astigmatism nor endothelial cell count showed alterations 1 year after surgery. Complications included IOL subluxation in 1 eye (4%), vitreous hemorrhage in 2 eyes (8%), transient hypotony in 2 eyes (8%), and cystic macular edema in 1 eye (4%). No patients presented retinal detachment. Conclusion. This surgical technique proved successful in the management of dislocated IOL. Functional results were good and the complications were easily resolved. PMID:26294964

  18. Ultrastructure, histochemistry, and mineralization patterns in the ecdysial suture of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Priester, Carolina; Dillaman, Richard M; Gay, D Mark

    2005-12-01

    The ecdysial suture is the region of the arthropod exoskeleton that splits to allow the animal to emerge during ecdysis. We examined the morphology and composition of the intermolt and premolt suture of the blue crab using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The suture could not be identified by routine histological techniques; however 3 of 22 fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins tested (Lens culinaris agglutinin, Vicia faba agglutinin, and Pisum sativum agglutinin) differentiated the suture, binding more intensely to the suture exocuticle and less intensely to the suture endocuticle. Back-scattered electron (BSE) and secondary electron observations of fracture surfaces of intermolt cuticle showed less mineralized regions in the wedge-shaped suture as did BSE analysis of premolt and intermolt resin-embedded cuticle. The prism regions of the suture exocuticle were not calcified. X-ray microanalysis of both the endocuticle and exocuticle demonstrated that the suture was less calcified than the surrounding cuticle with significantly lower magnesium and phosphorus concentrations, potentially making its mineral more soluble. The presence or absence of a glycoprotein in the organic matrix, the extent and composition of the mineral deposited, and the thickness of the cuticle all likely contribute to the suture being removed by molting fluid, thereby ensuring successful ecdysis. PMID:17481327

  19. Tissue reactions to suture materials in the oral mucosa of beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Seok; Shin, Seung-Il; Herr, Yeek; Park, Joon-Bong; Kwon, Young-Hyuk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the inflammatory responses of three widely used suture materials in the keratinized gingiva and buccal mucosa of beagle dogs. Methods Silk, polyglycolic acid, and nylon sutures were placed within the mandibular keratinized gingiva and maxillary buccal mucosa of four male beagle dogs. Biopsies were taken 3, 7, and 14 days after suturing. Specimens were prepared with hematoxylin-eosin stain for evaluation under a light microscope. Results The suture materials placed in the oral mucosa elicited more inflammatory reactions than did those placed in the keratinized gingiva. The multifilament suture materials caused more inflammatory tissue reactions than did the monofilament suture materials in the oral mucosa. Conclusions If oral hygiene is well maintained and suture materials are placed in the keratinized gingiva, silk, nylon, and polyglycolic acid are considered to be proper suture materials for oral surgery. However, it is advisable to use monofilament suture materials if the suture site is within the oral mucosa. PMID:21954423

  20. Modification of U-Stitch Laparoscopic Gastrostomy Technique to Minimize Suture Knot Abscess Formation.

    PubMed

    McCagg, Jillian; Markham, Sarah; Idowu, Olajire; Newton, Christopher; Palmer, Barnard; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-06-01

    Aim U-stitch laparoscopic gastrostomy is a commonly used technique for placement of balloon gastrostomy for pediatric patients. The U-stitch method was modified by others whereby the stay sutures are placed in a subcutaneous tissue. Although this modification has been reported to be superior, it has led to suture knot abscess formation which was not reported in the original method. We developed further modification whereby the stay-suture knots are positioned within the gastrostomy tract instead of the subcutaneous tissue which minimizes suture knot abscess formation. Methods Modified U-stitch technique was used to place the balloon gastrostomy. The U-stitch stay sutures are placed to hold the stomach to the abdominal wall. These sutures are subcutaneously tunneled toward the gastrostomy tract and tied to the opposing sutures with the resulting knots lying within the tract of the gastrostomy. Chart reviews of patients who underwent this modified U-stitch method were done. Results A total of 27 consecutive patients were evaluated. Minimal follow-up period was 6 months. No suture knot abscess complication was found. One patient for whom we used a polyglactin (Vicryl; Ethicon Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio, United States) suture developed cellulitis around the gastrostomy site which cleared with antibiotic. Remaining 10 patients for whom we used Vicryl suture and 16 patients for whom polydioxanone (PDS; Ethicon Inc.) suture was used did not develop any infections. Conclusion Subcutaneous placement of stay suture within the open gastrostomy tract rather than within closed subcutaneous tissue may minimize suture knot abscess formation. PMID:26011076

  1. Bundles of Spider Silk, Braided into Sutures, Resist Basic Cyclic Tests: Potential Use for Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hennecke, Kathleen; Redeker, Joern; Kuhbier, Joern W.; Strauss, Sarah; Allmeling, Christina; Kasper, Cornelia; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials. PMID:23613793

  2. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  3. Drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye for pharmacologic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shalin S; Denham, Lori Vidal; Elison, Jasmine R; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Clement, Christian; Huq, Tashfin; Hill, James M

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of diseases of the posterior segment of the eye, such as age-related macular degeneration, cytomegalovirus retinitis, diabetic retinopathy, posterior uveitis and retinitis pigmentosa, requires novel drug delivery systems that can overcome the many barriers for efficacious delivery of therapeutic drug concentrations. This challenge has prompted the development of biodegradable and nonbiodegradable sustained-release systems for injection or transplantation into the vitreous as well as drug-loaded nanoparticles, microspheres and liposomes. These drug delivery systems utilize topical, systemic, subconjunctival, intravitreal, transscleral and iontophoretic routes of administration. The focus of research has been the development of methods that will increase the efficacy of spatiotemporal drug application, resulting in more successful therapy for patients with posterior segment diseases. This article summarizes recent advances in the research and development of drug delivery methods of the posterior chamber of the eye, with an emphasis on the use of implantable devices as well as micro- and nanoparticles. PMID:20305803

  4. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  5. Posterior cruciate ligament of the knee (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a powerful ligament extending from the top-rear surface of the tibia to the bottom-front surface of the femur. The ligament prevents the knee joint from posterior instability.

  6. Bilateral posterior cerebral artery infarction.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Davinia; Murphy, Sinead M; Hennessey, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with short-term memory impairment and a homonymous left inferior quadrantanopia secondary to simultaneous bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory infarction. As in more than a quarter of cases of PCA infarction, no aetiological cause was identified. Unlike the transient nature of symptoms in some cases following unilateral infarction, his deficits persisted on 2-month follow-up. PMID:22798298

  7. Orientation of late Precambrian sutures in the Arabian-Nubian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert J.; Nielsen, Kent C.; Best, Eric; Sultan, Mohamed; Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1990-11-01

    Recent tectonic models have resulted in conflicting descriptions of how the late Precambrian sutures of the Arabian-Nubian shield extend into northeast Africa. The Hamisana shear zone in northeastern Sudan is critical to this discussion because it truncates and disrupts two sutures, the Allaqi-Heiani and the Onib-Sol Hamed. Analysis of field structural data, Thematic Mapper imagery, and Rb-Sr and U-Pb geochronology suggests that the Allaqi-Heiani suture is the western extension of the Onib-Sol Hamed suture and that both make up the exposed parts of a far-traveled, polydeformed ophiolitic nappe complex. Subsequent deformation localized in the Hamisana shear zone disrupted this nappe and displaced the suture between 660 and 550 Ma during regional deformation associated with the Najd fault system. These results indicate that at least one suture extends westward into the interior of northern Africa.

  8. Orientation of late Precambrian sutures in the Arabian-Nubian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert J.; Nielsen, Kent C.; Best, Eric; Sultan, Mohamed; Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1990-01-01

    Recent tectonic models have resulted in conflicting descriptions of how the late Precambrian sutures of the Arabian-Nubian shield extend into northeast Africa. The Hamisana shear zone in northeastern Sudan is critical to this discussion because it truncates and disrupts two sutures, the Allaqi-Heiani and the Onib-Sol Hamed. Analysis of field structural data, Thematic Mapper imagery, and Rb-Sr and U-Pb geochronology suggests that the Allaqi-Heiani suture is the western extension of the Onib-Sol Hamed suture and that both make up the exposed parts of a far-traveled, polydeformed ophiolitic nappe complex. Subsequent deformation localized in the Hamisana shear zone disrupted this nappe and displaced the suture between 660 and 550 Ma during regional deformation associated with the Najd fault system. These results indicate that at least one suture extends westward into the interior of northern Africa.

  9. Spinal hemianesthesia: Unilateral and posterior

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The injection of a non-isobaric local anesthetic should induce a unilateral spinal anesthesia in patients in a lateral decubitus position. The posterior spinal hemianesthesia only be obtained with hypobaric solutions injected in the jackknife position. The most important factors to be considered when performing a spinal hemianesthesia are: type and gauge of the needle, density of the local anesthetic relative to the CSF, position of the patient, speed of administration of the solution, time of stay in position, and dose/concentration/volume of the anesthetic solution. The distance between the spinal roots on the right-left sides and anterior-posterior is, approximately, 10-15 mm. This distance allows performing unilateral spinal anesthesia or posterior spinal anesthesia. The great advantage of obtaining spinal hemianesthesia is the reduction of cardiovascular changes. Likewise, both the dorsal and unilateral sensory block predominates in relation to the motor block. Because of the numerous advantages of producing spinal hemianesthesia, anesthesiologists should apply this technique more often. This review considers the factors which are relevant, plausible and proven to obtain spinal hemianesthesia. PMID:25886320

  10. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  11. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  12. Quantitative physical and handling characteristics of novel antibacterial braided silk suture materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Hou, Dandan; Tang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Surgical braided silk sutures have been widely used because these materials exhibit good handling characteristics, ease of use, and ideal knot security. However, surgical silk sutures likely cause surgical site infections because these sutures are composed of natural protein materials with a braided structure. As such, antibacterial silk sutures for clinical wound closure should be developed. Braided silk suture could be treated and modified with antibacterial agent, provided that excellent physical and handling characteristics of this material should maximize maintained. This study aimed to quantitatively investigate the effect of antibacterial treatment with different parameters on physical and handling characteristics of novel antibacterial braided silk sutures. Physical and handling characteristics, including appearance, knot-pull tensile strength, pullout friction resistance, tissue drag friction resistance, and bending stiffness, were evaluated. After physical and handling tests were conducted, images showed morphological characteristics were obtained and evaluated to investigate the relationship between antibacterial treatment and physical and handling properties. Results showed that suture diameter increased and reached the nearest thick size specification; knot-pull tensile strength decreased but remained higher than the standard value by at least 40.73%. Fracture asynchronism during knot-pull tensile strength test suggested that the fineness ratio of shell and core strands may enhance knot-pull tensile strength. Static and dynamic frictions of suture-to-suture friction behavior were slightly affected by antibacterial treatment, and changed to less than 16.07% and 32.77%, respectively. Suture-to-tissue friction and bending stiffness increased by approximately 50%; the bending stiffness of the proposed suture remained efficient compared with that of synthetic sutures. Therefore, good physical and handling characteristics can be maintained by selecting

  13. No-touch, Single-move Technique to Reverse the Needle While Suturing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The aim of the study is to promote the “no-touch” surgical technique while suturing and to describe an easy way to reverse the needle while suturing. We have provided a step-by-step description of how to handle a needle while suturing using the no-touch technique. We have also provided figures for each step. The described technique is an easy, single-move, no-touch technique to reverse the needle.

  14. Electrospun Polymeric Core-sheath Yarns as Drug Eluting Surgical Sutures.

    PubMed

    Padmakumar, Smrithi; Joseph, John; Neppalli, Madhuri Harsha; Mathew, Sumi Elizabeth; Nair, Shantikumar V; Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Menon, Deepthy

    2016-03-23

    Drug-coated sutures are widely used as delivery depots for antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs at surgical wound sites. Although drug-laden coating provides good localized drug concentration, variable loading efficiency and release kinetics limits its use. Alternatively, drug incorporation within suture matrices is hampered by the harsh fabrication conditions required for suture-strength enhancement. To circumvent these limitations, we fabricated mechanically robust electrospun core-sheath yarns as sutures, with a central poly-l-lactic acid core, and a drug-eluting poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid sheath. The electrospun sheath was incorporated with aceclofenac or insulin to demonstrate versatility of the suture in loading both chemical and biological class of drugs. Aceclofenac and insulin incorporated sutures exhibited 15% and 4% loading, and release for 10 and 7 days, respectively. Aceclofenac sutures demonstrated reduced epidermal hyperplasia and cellularity in skin-inflammation animal model, while insulin loaded sutures showed enhanced cellular migration in wound healing assay. In conclusion, we demonstrate an innovative strategy of producing mechanically strong, prolonged drug-release sutures loaded with different classes of drugs. PMID:26936629

  15. Patterns and implications of extensive heterochrony in carnivoran cranial suture closure

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, A; Foley, L; Weisbecker, V

    2013-01-01

    Heterochronic changes in the rate or timing of development underpin many evolutionary transformations. In particular, the onset and rate of bone development have been the focus of many studies across large clades. In contrast, the termination of bone growth, as estimated by suture closure, has been studied far less frequently, although a few recent studies have shown this to represent a variable, although poorly understood, aspect of developmental evolution. Here, we examine suture closure patterns across 25 species of carnivoran mammals, ranging from social-insectivores to hypercarnivores, to assess variation in suture closure across taxa, identify heterochronic shifts in a phylogenetic framework and elucidate the relationship between suture closure timing and ecology. Our results show that heterochronic shifts in suture closure are widespread across Carnivora, with several shifts identified for most major clades. Carnivorans differ from patterns identified for other mammalian clades in showing high variability of palatal suture closure, no correlation between size and level of suture closure, and little phylogenetic signal outside of musteloids. Results further suggest a strong influence of feeding ecology on suture closure pattern. Most of the species with high numbers of heterochronic shifts, such as the walrus and the aardwolf, feed on invertebrates, and these taxa also showed high frequency of closure of the mandibular symphysis, a state that is relatively rare among mammals. Overall, caniforms displayed more heterochronic shifts than feliforms, suggesting that evolutionary changes in suture closure may reflect the lower diversity of cranial morphology in feliforms. PMID:23530892

  16. Differential spatial regulation of BMP molecules is associated with single-suture craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Alaina; Hyzy, Sharon L; Britt, Chelsea; Williams, Joseph K; Boyan, Barbara D; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to examine messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands, receptors, and soluble inhibitors in cells isolated from single-suture synostoses from fused coronal, metopic, sagittal, and lambdoid sutures. METHODS Cells were isolated from bone collected from patients undergoing craniotomies at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to examine mRNA levels in cells isolated from fused sutures or patent sutures in comparison with levels in normal bone from the same patient. RESULTS Cells isolated from fused sutures in cases of sagittal and coronal synostosis highly expressed BMP2, while cells isolated from fused metopic or lambdoid synostosis expressed high BMP4. Noggin, a BMP inhibitor, was lower in fused sutures and had high expression in patent sutures. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that BMPs and inhibitors play a significant role in the regulation of suture fusion as well in the maintenance of patency in the normal suture. PMID:27035551

  17. Microarterial anastomoses: A parameterised computational study examining the effect of suture position on intravascular blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wain, R A J; Hammond, D; McPhillips, M; Whitty, J P M; Ahmed, W

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the extent to which individual aspects of suture placement influence local haemodynamics within microarterial anastomoses. An attempt to physically quantify flow characteristics of blood past microvascular sutures is made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Particular focus has been placed on increased shear strain rate (SSR), a known precipitant of intravascular platelet activation and thrombosis. Measurements were taken from micrographs of sutured anastomoses in chicken femoral vessels, with each assessed for bite width, suture angle and suture spacing. Computational geometries were then created to represent the anastomosis. Each suture characteristic was parameterised to allow independent or simultaneous adjustment. Flow rates were obtained from anonymised Doppler ultrasound scans of analogous vessels during preoperative assessment for autologous breast reconstruction. Vessel simulations were performed in 2.5mm ducts with blood as the working fluid. Vessel walls were non-compliant and a continuous Newtonian flow was applied, in accordance with current literature. Suture bite angle and spacing had significant effects on local haemodynamics, causing notably higher local SSRs, when simulated at extremes of surgical practice. A combined simulation, encompassing subtle changes of each suture parameter simultaneously i.e. representing optimum technique, created a more favourable SSR profile. As such, haemodynamic changes associated with optimum suture placement are unlikely to influence thrombus formation significantly. These findings support adherence to the basic principles of good microsurgical practice. PMID:26876115

  18. Aprotinin extends mechanical integrity time of cell-seeded fibrin sutures.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Spencer T; Gaudette, Glenn R

    2016-09-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to treat different pathologies, including myocardial infarctions (heart attacks), although cell engraftment remains elusive with most delivery methods. Biological sutures composed of fibrin have been shown to effectively deliver human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) to infarcted hearts. However, human MSCs rapidly degrade fibrin making cell seeding and delivery time sensitive. To delay the degradation process, we propose using Aprotinin, a proteolytic enzyme inhibitor that has been shown to slow fibrinolysis. Human MSCs seeded on fibrin sutures and incubated with Aprotinin demonstrated similar cell viability, examined using a LIVE/DEAD stain, to controls. No differences in proliferation, as determined by Ki-67 presence, were observed. Human MSCs incubated in Aprotinin differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes, confirming multipotency. The number of cells adhered to fibrin sutures increased through Aprotinin supplementation at 2, 3, and 5 day time points. Uniaxial tensile testing was used to examine the effect of Aprotinin on suture integrity. Sutures exposed to Aprotinin had higher ultimate tensile strength and modulus when compared to sutures exposed to standard growth media. Fibrin sutures incubated in Aprotinin had larger diameters and less fibrin degradation products compared to the controls, confirming decreased fibrinolysis. These data suggest that Aprotinin can reduce degradation of fibrin sutures without significant effects on MSC function, providing a novel method for extending the implantation window and increasing the number of cells delivered via fibrin sutures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2271-2279, 2016. PMID:27101153

  19. Elimination of stick-slip of elastomeric sutures by radiofrequency glow discharge deposited coatings.

    PubMed

    Griesser, H J; Chatelier, R C; Martin, C; Vasic, Z R; Gengenbach, T R; Jessup, G

    2000-01-01

    Fine elastomeric sutures intended for cardiovascular surgery can exhibit "stick-slip" behavior as they are pulled through tissue; the resulting oscillatory force can damage delicate tissue or cause sutures to snap. To eliminate this undesirable effect, sutures were surface-modified using a radiofrequency glow discharge in a vapor of either hexamethyldisiloxane or hexamethyldisilazane, to produce a thin polymeric coating on the suture. The same coatings were also deposited onto aluminized tape to facilitate their characterization by measurement of air/water contact angles and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Coatings from both monomers were found to be very hydrophobic. The hexamethyldisiloxane glow discharge coatings underwent negligible oxidation when stored in air, and thus remained stable over a shelf-life period akin to what may be required of sutures. The hexamethyldisilazane glow discharge coatings, in contrast, incorporated substantial amounts of oxygen over a 3-month period. The coatings did not measurably alter the tensile properties of the sutures. The frictional properties of coated sutures were assessed by measuring the dynamic friction between the suture and ovine myocardium. Both coatings were effective in removing the inherent stick-slip behavior of polybutester sutures in this model. The coatings remained intact after several passes and proved to be robust and efficacious under various strain regimes. PMID:10813763

  20. Patterns and implications of extensive heterochrony in carnivoran cranial suture closure.

    PubMed

    Goswami, A; Foley, L; Weisbecker, V

    2013-06-01

    Heterochronic changes in the rate or timing of development underpin many evolutionary transformations. In particular, the onset and rate of bone development have been the focus of many studies across large clades. In contrast, the termination of bone growth, as estimated by suture closure, has been studied far less frequently, although a few recent studies have shown this to represent a variable, although poorly understood, aspect of developmental evolution. Here, we examine suture closure patterns across 25 species of carnivoran mammals, ranging from social-insectivores to hypercarnivores, to assess variation in suture closure across taxa, identify heterochronic shifts in a phylogenetic framework and elucidate the relationship between suture closure timing and ecology. Our results show that heterochronic shifts in suture closure are widespread across Carnivora, with several shifts identified for most major clades. Carnivorans differ from patterns identified for other mammalian clades in showing high variability of palatal suture closure, no correlation between size and level of suture closure, and little phylogenetic signal outside of musteloids. Results further suggest a strong influence of feeding ecology on suture closure pattern. Most of the species with high numbers of heterochronic shifts, such as the walrus and the aardwolf, feed on invertebrates, and these taxa also showed high frequency of closure of the mandibular symphysis, a state that is relatively rare among mammals. Overall, caniforms displayed more heterochronic shifts than feliforms, suggesting that evolutionary changes in suture closure may reflect the lower diversity of cranial morphology in feliforms. PMID:23530892

  1. Biologic response to orthopedic sutures: a histologic study in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian J; Ochoa, Leah; Rankin, David; Owens, Brett D

    2009-11-01

    Biologic reactivity to suture materials can have an effect on patient outcomes. The goal of this study was to determine the histologic response to 8 commonly used orthopedic sutures--Ethibond (Ethicon, Somerville, New Jersey), Ticron (Tyco, Waltham, Massachusetts), HiFi (Linvatec, Largo, Florida), Ultrabraid (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, Tennessee), MaxBraid (Biomet, Warsaw, Indiana), Orthocord (Mitek, Raynham, Massachusetts), MagnumWire (Opus Medical, San Juan Capistrano, California), and FiberWire (Arthrex, Naples, Florida)--using a rabbit model. The suture granuloms were evaluated at 30, 60, and 120 days with measurement of the fibrous capsule, the number of giant cells in and near the capsule, and the overall inflammatory grade: 1 (mild), 2 (moderate), and 3 (severe). MagnumWire and Ticron sutures initiated a more intense inflammatory reaction when compared to the other sutures. By 120 days, MagnumWire (P=.0297) and Ticron (P=.1855) had fewer giant cells at the soft tissue-suture interface, fewer giant cells within the capsule (P=.0074 and P=.0377, respectively), and the greatest capsular thickness of all suture types (P<.0001 and P=.1378, respectively). Differences exist between the biologic reactivity of commonly used orthopedic sutures that may be attributable to their material composition and/or braid characteristics. In comparison to other high-strength sutures, MagnumWire and Ticron stimulated a more intense foreign body inflammatory response. PMID:19902886

  2. Recent advances in biodegradable metals for medical sutures: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Jan-Marten; Durisin, Martin; Goldman, Jeremy; Drelich, Jaroslaw W

    2015-09-16

    Sutures that biodegrade and dissolve over a period of several weeks are in great demand to stitch wounds and surgical incisions. These new materials are receiving increased acceptance across surgical procedures whenever permanent sutures and long-term care are not needed. Unfortunately, both inflammatory responses and adverse local tissue reactions in the close-to-stitching environment are often reported for biodegradable polymeric sutures currently used by the medical community. While bioabsorbable metals are predominantly investigated and tested for vascular stent or osteosynthesis applications, they also appear to possess adequate bio-compatibility, mechanical properties, and corrosion stability to replace biodegradable polymeric sutures. In this Review, biodegradable alloys made of iron, magnesium, and zinc are critically evaluated as potential materials for the manufacturing of soft and hard tissue sutures. In the case of soft tissue closing and stitching, these metals have to compete against currently available degradable polymers. In the case of hard tissue closing and stitching, biodegradable sternal wires could replace the permanent sutures made of stainless steel or titanium alloys. This Review discusses the specific materials and degradation properties required by all suture materials, summarizes current suture testing protocols and provides a well-grounded direction for the potential future development of biodegradable metal based sutures. PMID:26172399

  3. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  4. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  5. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  6. Contributions of cat posterior parietal cortex to visuospatial discrimination.

    PubMed

    Lomber, S G; Payne, B R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the contributions made by cat posterior parietal cortex to the analyses of the relative position of objects in visual space. Two cats were trained on a landmark task in which they learned to report the position of a landmark object relative to a right or left food-reward chamber. Subsequently, three pairs of cooling loops were implanted bilaterally in contact with visuoparietal cortices forming the crown of the middle suprasylvian gyrus (MSg; architectonic area 7) and the banks of the posterior-middle suprasylvian sulcus (pMS sulcal cortex) and in contact with the ventral-posterior suprasylvian (vPS) region of visuotemporal cortex. Bilateral deactivation of pMS sulcal cortex resulted in a profound impairment for all six tested positions of the landmark, yet bilateral deactivation of neither area 7 nor vPS cortex yielded any deficits. In control tasks (visual orienting and object discrimination), there was no evidence for any degree of attentional blindness or impairment of form discrimination during bilateral deactivation of pMS cortex. Therefore, we conclude that bilateral cooling of pMS cortex, but neither area 7 nor vPS cortex, induces a specific deficit in spatial localization as examined with the landmark task. These observations have significant bearing on our understanding of visuospatial processing in cat, monkey, and human cortices. PMID:11153650

  7. Barbed Suture as a Treatment Approach in Complex Degloving Injuries.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, David Jean-Guy; Lance, Sam H; Garcia, Jesus A

    2016-05-01

    In the late19th century, French physician Morel-Lavallée was challenged with a group of patients who sustained similar patterns of degloving injuries, which today carry his eponym. In 1853, he reported a series of cases as well as proposed strategies for the management of these complex degloving injuries. Treatment strategies have not varied significantly over the years, and these lesions continue to plague surgeons today with failure rates in excess of 50%. We present 2 case series using barbed suture in the management of these complex injuries. PMID:26954732

  8. Lateral meniscal variant with absence of the posterior coronary ligament.

    PubMed

    Neuschwander, D C; Drez, D; Finney, T P

    1992-09-01

    We reviewed the cases of 3468 patients who had had arthroscopy of the knee between January 1976 and December 1988. Twenty-six patients (0.8 per cent) had a partial or a complete discoid lateral meniscus, and seven (0.2 per cent) had the Wrisberg-variant-type lateral meniscus. Of the seven patients, six had operative stabilization of the meniscus and one had a partial lateral meniscectomy because of an irreparable complex tear. Subjective, objective, and radiographic evaluations were performed on the patients who had had stabilization of the meniscus. According to the scale of Tegner and Lysholm, the result was excellent in four patients, good in one, and fair in one. None of the six patients had a tear of the sutured meniscus after an average follow-up of thirty-two months (range, twenty-four to forty months). Two patients had progressive symptoms attributable to osteoarthrosis, but the changes in the articular cartilage had been present at the time of the index procedure. None of the seven Wrisberg-variant-type menisci demonstrated a true discoid shape of the meniscus. We therefore classified this lesion as a lateral meniscal variant with absence of the posterior coronary ligament. PMID:1400547

  9. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  10. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  11. Combustor with fuel preparation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelina, Joseph (Inventor); Myers, Geoffrey D. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Ram (Inventor); Reynolds, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An annular combustor having fuel preparation chambers mounted in the dome of the combustor. The fuel preparation chamber comprises an annular wall extending axially from an inlet to an exit that defines a mixing chamber. Mounted to the inlet are an air swirler and a fuel atomizer. The air swirler provides swirled air to the mixing chamber while the atomizer provides a fuel spray. On the downstream side of the exit, the fuel preparation chamber has an inwardly extending conical wall that compresses the swirling mixture of fuel and air exiting the mixing chamber.

  12. 50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ENCLOSURE (LOCATION III) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  13. 61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION PPP) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  14. 44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING DRAIN PIPE FROM SUMP - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  15. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  16. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  17. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  18. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  19. Posterior ankyloglossia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W; Bloom, David C

    2009-06-01

    Ankyloglossia, or tongue-tie, refers to an abnormally short lingual frenulum. Ankyloglossia is a recognized but poorly defined condition and has been reported to cause feeding difficulties, dysarthria, dyspnea, and social or mechanical problems. In infants, the most concerning symptoms are feeding difficulties and inability to breastfeed. While a recent trend toward breastfeeding has brought frenulectomy back into favor, the literature regarding treatment remains inconclusive. We report a case of posterior ankyloglossia with anterior mucosal hooding and a simple, safe, and effective way to treat it to improve breastfeeding. PMID:19303646

  20. Suture of a stab wound of the heart.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Over many centuries, from the early writings of Galen, 'the father of Medicine', wounds of the heart were considered fatal and outside the remit of surgery. With the advent of anaesthesia, (ether was introduced by William Morton in 1846) and of antiseptic surgery, (Joseph Lister's first publication was in 1867), there was an explosion in the surgery of the abdominal cavity, the chest, the skull and the limbs, yet the heart was considered by the surgical fraternity to be the 'no-go' area of the body. Theodor Billroth, Professor of Surgery in Vienna and himself a pioneer of modern surgery, (he performed the first successful partial gastrectomy for carcinoma of the stomach in 1881), wrote "the surgeon who would attempt to suture a wound of the heart should lose the respect of his colleagues". In London, Stephen Paget, in 1896, wrote: "No new method and no new discovery can overcome the natural difficulties that attend a wound of the heart. It is true that suture has been vaguely proposed as a possible procedure and has been done in animals but I cannot find that it has ever been attempted in practice". (In fact, the heart is an amazingly tough and efficient pump that goes on working, year after year, without ever stopping for a service!). PMID:26309960

  1. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of a displaced tibial eminence fracture.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Ronald A; Murphy, Kevin P; Machen, M Shaun; Kuklo, Timothy R

    2003-02-01

    This study describes a new arthroscopic method using a whip-stitch technique for treating a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture. A 12-year-old girl who sustained a displaced type III tibial eminence fracture was treated with arthroscopic fixation using the Arthrosew disposable suture device (Surgical Dynamics, Norwalk, CT) to place a whip stitch into the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The Arthrex ACL guide (Arthrex, Naples, FL) was used to reduce the avulsed tibial spine fragment. Sutures were then passed through the tibial tunnel and secured over a bony bridge with the knee in 20 degrees of flexion. At 9 months, the patient has a full range of motion with normal Lachman and anterior drawer testing, and she has returned to competitive basketball. Radiographs show complete fracture healing. KT-1000 and isokinetic testing at 9-month follow-up show only minimal side-to-side differences. The Arthrosew device provides a significant advantage in the treatment of type III and IV fractures of the tibial eminence by obtaining arthroscopic fixation within the substance of the ACL, thus obviating arthrotomy and hardware placement. This technique also restores the proper length and tension to the ACL, and provides a simplified, reproducible method of treatment for this injury. PMID:12579135

  2. Modification of the Internal Suture Technique for Mallet Finger

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Peiji; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Jiaju; Dong, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article describes a treatment of tendinous mallet finger deformities using a modified internal suture technique for the stable fixation of the terminal extensor tendon and bone. Between March 2011 and July 2013, 15 patients with mallet fingers who had been treated using this modification were included in this study. The patients included 10 men and 5 women with a mean age of 33 years (range, 19–50 years). Of these patients, 9 had chronic mallet fingers, 3 were unable to comply with a splinting regimen, and 3 had a history of unsuccessful splinting therapy. The mean time between the injury and surgery was 5.5 months (range, 1–15 months). We graded the results using Crawford criteria. The mean follow-up period was 12 months (range, 9–16 months). The mean final active range of motion of the distal interphalangeal joint flexion was 73° (range, 60°–90°). Based on Crawford evaluation criteria, 8 patients were graded as excellent, 6 were graded as good, and 1 was graded as fair. Apart from 2 documented mild nail deformities, no complications were encountered. This modified technique should be considered for the management of a tendinous mallet finger deformity when the internal suture technique is planned. PMID:25674757

  3. Suture rupture in acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated with flip buttons.

    PubMed

    Motta, Pierorazio; Maderni, Alberto; Bruno, Laura; Mariotti, Umberto

    2011-02-01

    Acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations (ACDs) may be treated arthroscopically with flip buttons. This extra-articular fixation is easy to implant and is well tolerated. Between 2007 and 2009, 20 ACD patients (2 women and 18 men; mean age, 32 years) had surgery by the arthroscopic TightRope technique (Arthrex, Naples, FL). The main complication of this technique that has been reported is the partial loss of reduction at follow-up due to clavicular osteolysis under the superior flip button. We describe 4 cases with loss of reduction due to rupture of the sutures running across the buttons: 2 women with joint hyperlaxity and acute Rockwood grade IV ACD and 2 men, heavy manual workers, with joint hyperlaxity and acute Rockwood grade IV ACD. The use of flip buttons might not be indicated in patients with joint hyperlaxity because they are able to obtain immediate stability only on the vertical plane and not on the horizontal plane. Anteroposterior movements of the acromioclavicular joint might rub the suture against the bone tunnels leading to wear and cutting. PMID:21266279

  4. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  5. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  6. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  7. Advanced thrust chamber designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, F. J.; Leach, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A regeneratively cooled thrust chamber has been designed and fabricated, consisting of an inner TD nickel liner which was spin formed, welded, and machined and an outer shell of electroformed nickel. Coolant channels were produced in the outer surface of the inner liner by the electric discharge machining process before electroforming the shell. Accessory manifolds and piping were attached by welding. Manufacturing processes employed are described.

  8. Digital optical spark chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul; Tuska, Evelyn

    1989-01-01

    The authors constructed and tested a prototype digital readout system for optical spark chambers using a linear, solid-state charge-coupled-device detector array. Position resolution of 0.013 mm (sigma) over a 25-cm field of view has been demonstrated. It is concluded that this technique should permit the construction of economical, lightweight and low-power trajectory hodoscopes for use in cosmic-ray instrumentation on balloons and in spacecraft.

  9. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  10. Huge interparietal posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Manuel Filipe Dias; de Santa Barbara, Rita de Cassia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital encephalocele is a neural tube defect characterized by a sac-like protrusion of the brain, meninges, and other intracranial structures through the skull, which is caused by an embryonic development abnormality. The most common location is at the occipital bone, and its incidence varies according to different world regions. We report a case of an 1-month and 7-day-old male child with a huge interparietal-posterior fontanel meningohydroencephalocele, a rare occurrence. Physical examination and volumetric computed tomography were diagnostic. The encephalocele was surgically resected. Intradural and extradural approaches were performed; the bone defect was not primarily closed. Two days after surgery, the patient developed hydrocephaly requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The surgical treatment of the meningohydroencephalocele of the interparietal-posterior fontanel may be accompanied by technical challenges and followed by complications due to the presence of large blood vessels under the overlying skin. In these cases, huge sacs herniate through large bone defects including meninges, brain, and blood vessels. The latter present communication with the superior sagittal sinus and ventricular system. A favorable surgical outcome generally follows an accurate strategy taking into account individual features of the lesion. PMID:26484324

  11. Interactive Virtual Suturing Simulations: Enhancement of Student Learning in Veterinary Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staton, Amy J.; Boyd, Christine B.

    2013-01-01

    This capstone addresses an instructional gap in the Morehead State University Veterinary Technology Program and in other similar programs around the globe. Students do not retain the knowledge needed to proficiently complete suture patterns nor do students receive sufficient instructional time during the year to master each suture pattern that is…

  12. Blood flow through sutured and coupled microvascular anastomoses: a comparative computational study.

    PubMed

    Wain, Richard A J; Whitty, Justin P M; Dalal, Milind D; Holmes, Michael C; Ahmed, Waqar

    2014-07-01

    This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model blood flow through idealised sutured and coupled arterial anastomoses to investigate the affect of each technique on intravascular blood flow. Local flow phenomena are examined in detail to study characteristics that potentially initiate thrombus formation; for example, changes in velocity profile, wall shear stress (WSS), and shear strain rate (SSR). Idealised geometries of sutured and coupled anastomoses were created with dimensions identical to microvascular suture material and a commercially available coupling device using CFD software. Vessels were modelled as non-compliant 1 mm diameter ducts, and blood was simulated as a Newtonian fluid, in keeping with previous studies. All analyses were steady-state and performed on arteries. The sutured simulation revealed a reduced boundary velocity profile; high WSS; and high SSR at the suture sites. The coupled anastomosis simulation showed a small increase in maximum WSS at the anastomotic region compared to a pristine vessel, however, this was less than half that of the sutured model. The coupled vessel displayed an average WSS equivalent to a pristine vessel simulation. Taken together these observations demonstrate a theoretically more thrombogenic profile in a sutured anastomosis when compared to a coupled vessel. Data from simulations on a coupled anastomosis reveal a profile that is nearly equivalent to that of a pristine vessel. Based purely on the combination of less favourable flow properties shown using these idealised arterial models, the sutured method is potentially more thrombogenic than a coupled anastomosis. PMID:24731801

  13. Arthroscopic repair of peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex tears with suture welding: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Badia, Alejandro; Jiménez, Alexis

    2006-10-01

    This report presents a method of arthroscopic repair of the peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex tears that replaces traditional suture knots with ultrasonic welding of sutures. This will help eliminate potential causes of ulnar-sided wrist discomfort during the postoperative period. PMID:17027791

  14. Barbed Suture: A Review of the Technology and Clinical Uses in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A; Goldman, Randi H

    2013-01-01

    Surgical knots are simply a necessary evil needed to anchor smooth suture to allow it to function in its role in tissue reapproximation. Surgical knots reduce the tensile strength of all sutures by thinning and stretching the material. The tying of surgical knots introduces the potential of human error and interuser variability. Knot-secured smooth suture must create an uneven distribution of tension across the wound with the higher tension burdens placed at the knots. Given the excessive relative wound tension on the knot and the reasonable concerns of surgeons for suture failure due to knot slippage, there is a natural tendency toward overcoming these concerns by over-tightening knots; however, tighter knots may be worse for wound healing and strength than looser knots. In minimally invasive laparoscopic surgeries, the ability to quickly and properly tie surgical knots presents a new challenge. In cases in which knot tying is difficult, the use of knotless barbed suture can securely reapproximate tissues with less time, cost, and aggravation. This article reviews the technology behind barbed sutures with a focus on understanding how they differ from traditional smooth sutures and how barbed sutures have performed in in vitro and animal model testing, as well as in human clinical trials. PMID:24920976

  15. Adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius to suture materials commonly used in small animal surgery.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Shauna; Singh, Ameet; Rousseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate adherence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) to 5 suture materials commonly used in small animal surgery. SAMPLE 10 epidemiologically unrelated MRSP isolates (obtained from dogs with clinical infections) that had strong biofilm-forming ability and 5 types of suture. PROCEDURES The 5 types of suture evaluated were monofilament polyglecaprone 25, monofilament polydioxanone, triclosan-coated (TC)-monofilament polydioxanone, braided polyglactin 910, and barbed monofilament polydioxanone. Suture segments were incubated in standard suspensions of MRSP for 2 minutes. Segments were then placed in tryptone soy broth and incubated overnight. After incubation, segments were rinsed with PBS solution and sonicated to dislodge adherent bacteria. Resulting suspensions were used to create serial dilutions that were plated, incubated overnight, and counted the following day. Bacterial adherence to 1 segment of each suture type was assessed by use of scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS There was significantly less adherence of MSRP to TC-monofilament polydioxanone than to polyglecaprone 25, polyglactin 910, barbed monofilament polydioxanone, and monofilament polydioxanone. There was significantly less adherence of MSRP to polyglecaprone than to polyglactin 910. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Barbed suture had a bacterial adherence profile comparable to that for monofilament suture. Adherence of MRSP was greatest for braided polyglactin 910. Use of TC-monofilament polydioxanone can be considered for patients that are at high risk of developing surgical site infections and for which a surgeon chooses a multifilament suture. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:194-198). PMID:27027714

  16. In vivo and in vitro degradation of monofilament absorbable sutures, PDS and Maxon.

    PubMed

    Metz, S A; Chegini, N; Masterson, B J

    1990-01-01

    Two new absorbable monofilament suture materials polydioxanone and Maxon are being employed increasingly in abdominal surgery because of increased strength retention and decreased tissue reactivity compared with previously available materials. As part of our investigation of the behaviour of suture materials, 3-0 sutures of polydioxanone and Maxon were enclosed in nylon pouches, a technique developed for in vivo experiments to prevent cellular interaction with implanted devices. The pouched sutures were gas sterilized, then implanted in either the extrafascial space or peritoneal cavity for periods of 1-5 wk. Sterilized sutures were also incubated in Ringer's lactate at 37 degrees C. Tensile strength of the exposed sutures was measured. For a given suture material and duration of incubation, there was no significant difference in tensile strength degradation among the three test environments. Although the strength of unexposed Maxon is greater than that of polydioxanone, the residual strength of Maxon decreases more rapidly in use, so that, after 2 wk, the strength of polydioxanone is greater. Scanning electron microscope examination of the suture surfaces reveals that polydioxanone develops surface crazing with time, whereas the surface morphology of Maxon remains relatively unaltered. PMID:2105750

  17. A mathematical model for mechanotransduction at the early steps of suture formation

    PubMed Central

    Khonsari, R. H.; Olivier, J.; Vigneaux, P.; Sanchez, S.; Tafforeau, P.; Ahlberg, P. E.; Di Rocco, F.; Bresch, D.; Corre, P.; Ohazama, A.; Sharpe, P. T.; Calvez, V.

    2013-01-01

    Growth and patterning of craniofacial sutures is subjected to the effects of mechanical stress. Mechanotransduction processes occurring at the margins of the sutures are not precisely understood. Here, we propose a simple theoretical model based on the orientation of collagen fibres within the suture in response to local stress. We demonstrate that fibre alignment generates an instability leading to the emergence of interdigitations. We confirm the appearance of this instability both analytically and numerically. To support our model, we use histology and synchrotron X-ray microtomography and reveal the fine structure of fibres within the sutural mesenchyme and their insertion into the bone. Furthermore, using a mouse model with impaired mechanotransduction, we show that the architecture of sutures is disturbed when forces are not interpreted properly. Finally, by studying the structure of sutures in the mouse, the rat, an actinopterygian (Polypterus bichir) and a placoderm (Compagopiscis croucheri), we show that bone deposition patterns during dermal bone growth are conserved within jawed vertebrates. In total, these results support the role of mechanical constraints in the growth and patterning of craniofacial sutures, a process that was probably effective at the emergence of gnathostomes, and provide new directions for the understanding of normal and pathological suture fusion. PMID:23516237

  18. Mechanical Properties of Cranial Bones and Sutures in 1–2-Year-Old Infants

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiawen; Zou, Donghua; Li, Zhengdong; Huang, Ping; Li, Dongri; Shao, Yu; Wang, Huijun; Chen, Yijiu

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanical properties of 1–2-year-old pediatric cranial bones and sutures and their influential factors were studied to better understand how the pediatric calvarium reacts to loading. Material/Methods Cranial bone and suture specimens were extracted from seven fresh-frozen human infant cadavers (1.5±0.5 years old). Eight specimens were obtained from each subject: two frontal bones, two parietal bones, two sagittal suture samples, and two coronal suture samples. The specimens were tested in a three-point bend setup at 1.5 mm/s. The mechanical properties, such as ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain, were calculated for each specimen. Results The ultimate stress and elastic modulus of the frontal bone were higher than those of the parietal bone (P<0.05). No differences were found between the coronal and sagittal sutures in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain (P>0.05). The ultimate stress and elastic modulus of the frontal and parietal bones were higher than those of the sagittal and coronal sutures (P<0.05), whereas the opposite ultimate strain findings were revealed (P<0.05). Conclusions There was no significant difference in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, or ultimate strain between the sagittal and coronal sutures. However, there were significant differences in ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and ultimate strain between the frontal and parietal bones as well as between the cranial bones and sutures. PMID:25279966

  19. A novel suture retention test for scaffold strength characterization in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Küng, Florian; Schubert, Dirk W; Stafiej, Piotr; Kruse, Friedrich E; Fuchsluger, Thomas A

    2016-12-01

    Sutures are a common way to attach scaffolds in patients. For tubular cardiac scaffolds, the 'suture retention strength' is commonly used to evaluate the resistance of a scaffold against the pull-out of a suture. In order to make this quantity accessible for ophthalmological scaffolds the test procedure has been modified in a novel way. Polycaprolactone (PCL) films of different thicknesses and an amniotic membrane (AM) were used for the experiments. Circular samples with a radius of 7mm were taken and a suture was passed through each sample and tied to a loop. The sample was clamped in a tensile tester and a bolt was passed through the loop. The suture was then pulled with a constant deformation rate until pull-out occurred. The suture retention strength, the deformation at the suture retention strength, and the deformation at rupture were determined for each sample. The presented modified suture retention test allows to measure the relevant parameters of samples on the scale of ophthalmological scaffolds in a reproducible way. A comparison between the first data on PCL and AM has been made. PMID:27612789

  20. Mussel-inspired nanofibrous sheet for suture-less stomach incision surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Wan, W; Ge, L; Bu, S; Zhong, W; Xing, M

    2015-05-21

    We report a dopamine-based crosslinker-conjugated gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous sheet. The nanosheet was then employed to treat stomach incisions without sutures during surgery. The mussel-inspired nanosheets, combining the advantages adhesion and tissue repair, show promise for use in treatments of fragile tissues and to avoid suture-caused stress concentration. PMID:25912340

  1. Evaluation of five different suture materials in the skin of the earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris).

    PubMed

    Salgado, Melissa A; Lewbart, Gregory A; Christian, Larry S; Griffith, Emily H; Law, Jerry McHugh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which suture material is the most appropriate for dermal closure of terrestrial annelids. This paper describes the tissue reactions of the earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, to five different types of suture materials in order to determine which suture material is the most appropriate for dermal closure. Silk, monofilament nylon, polydiaxonone, polyglactin 910, and chromic gut were studied. There was mild to moderate tissue reaction to all five suture materials. In all of the biopsies wound-healing reaction consisted of aggregates of blastemal cells which appeared in various stages of dedifferentiation from the body wall. Inflammatory cells infiltrated the wound sites, reminiscent of the typical foreign body reaction in vertebrates. The results indicate polyglactin 910 would be the best suture material with regards to tissue security and reaction scores. Chromic gut occupies the next position but there were problems with suture security over time. This appears to be the first suture material performance study on a terrestrial invertebrate. The earthworm, Lumbricus terrestris, was chosen for its wide availability, size, and the extensive species knowledge base. The earthworm may prove to be a good surgical/suture model for economically important invertebrates such as mollusks, tunicates, and insect larval stages. PMID:25143875

  2. An innovative method to evaluate the suture compliance in sealing the surgical wound lips

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Farid; Palmieri, Beniamino; Lodi, Danielle; Al-Sebeih, Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Background and aim: The increasing number of surgical procedures performed with local anesthesia, followed by immediate patient discharge from the hospital, emphasizes the need for a tight waterproof suture that is capable of maintaining its tensile strength in the postoperative phase when the wound tumescence, edema due to the anesthetic drug, and surgical trauma disappear. Moreover, the issue of having an accurate surgical wound closure is very relevant in vivo in order to prevent hemorrhage and exogenous microbial infections. This study aimed at designing a new a lab technique that could be used for evaluating the best surgical material. Using such a technique, we compared the wound-lip-sealing properties of three commonly-used suture threads, namely polyurethane, polypropylene, and polyamide. Materials and methods: The mechanical properties of same-size suture threads made from polyurethane, polypropylene, and polyamide, were compared in order to define the one that possess the best elastic properties by being able to counteract the tension-relaxation process in the first 12 hours following surgery. The tension holding capacity of the suture materials was measured in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. The surface area of the scar associated with the three different suture threads was measured and compared, and the permeability of the three different suture threads was assessed at 0 minute, 2 minute, 4 minute, 6 minute, and 8 minute- interval. Results: Results showed that polyurethane suture threads had significantly (P < 0.05) better tensile strength, elongation endurance before breakage, and better elasticity coefficient as compared to polypropylene and polyamide suture threads. Moreover, polyurethane suture threads were significantly (P < 0.05) more impermeable as compared to the other two suture thread types (polypropylene and polyamide). This impermeability was also associated with a tighter wound-lip-sealing ability, and with significantly (P < 0

  3. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  4. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  5. Lateral intercrural suture in the caucasian nose: Decreased domal divergence angle in endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf; Mocelin, Marcos; Soares, Caio Márcio Correia; Pasinato, Rogério; Frota, Andreia Ellery

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Several techniques can be performed to improve nasal tip definition such as cartilage resection, tip grafts, or sutures. Objctive: To evaluate the outcome of lateral intercrural suture at the lower lateral cartilage by endonasal rhinoplasty with a basic technique without delivery in decreasing the angle of domal divergence and improving the nasal tip definition. Method: This prospective study was performed in 64 patients in which a suture was made on the board head of the lower lateral cartilage in the joint between the dome and lateral crus, using polydioxanone (PDS) with sharp, curved needle. Results: In all of the cases, better definition of the nasal tip was achieved by intercrural suturing for at least 6 months postoperatively. Conclusion: Lateral intercrural suture of the lower lateral cartilage provides improved nasal tip definition and can be performed by endonasal rhinoplasty without delivery in the Caucasian nose. PMID:25991941

  6. Comparison of the reaction of the cornea to nylon and stainless steel sutures: an animal study.

    PubMed

    Rijneveld, W J; Jongebloed, W L; Worst, J G; Houtman, W A

    1989-08-01

    In 11 rabbits a comparison was made between the reactions of the cornea to nylon and to stainless steel sutures, macroscopically and by means of scanning electron-microscopy (SEM). Macroscopically, the wounds sutured with steel thread showed much less reaction than the wounds sutured with nylon. Vascularization was never encountered in the wounds sutured with steel thread. SEM examination also showed clear differences, which became noticeable within a short time. Both on the suture and round the opening in the cornea extensive deposits of material are seen within a short time (1 week) in the case of nylon, in the case of stainless steel this reaction is much less marked. A few weeks later deposits also appear on the steel thread, but these have a different composition and contain no material suggestive of an inflammatory reaction. PMID:2483135

  7. A New Removable Uterine Compression by a Brace Suture in the Management of Severe Postpartum Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aboulfalah, Abderrahim; Fakhir, Bouchra; Ait Ben Kaddour, Yassir; Asmouki, Hamid; Soummani, Abderraouf

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a life-threatening complication of delivery. It is the leading cause of maternal mortality. During the last 15 years, several total uterine compressive sutures were described in literature. They have proven their effectiveness and safety in the management of severe PPH as an alternative to hysterectomy. We present in this paper a new technique of uterine compressive sutures based on removable uterine brace compressive sutures with compression of the uterus against the pubis. This technique may be more effective by using two mechanisms of uterine bleeding control and also may prevent uterine synechia by respecting the uterine cavity and the removal of the suture 1 or 2 days later. We also present the results of a 15 patients’ series using this new suture. PMID:25593967

  8. Optimal Needle Grasp Selection for Automatic Execution of Suturing Tasks in Robotic Minimally Invasive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for optimal selection of needle grasp, for autonomous robotic execution of the minimally invasive surgical suturing task. In order to minimize the tissue trauma during the suturing motion, the best practices of needle path planning that are used by surgeons are applied for autonomous robotic surgical suturing tasks. Once an optimal needle trajectory in a well-defined suturing scenario is chosen, another critical issue for suturing is the choice of needle grasp for the robotic system. Inappropriate needle grasp increases operating time requiring multiple re-grasps to complete the desired task. The proposed methods use manipulability, dexterity and torque metrics for needle grasp selection. A simulation demonstrates the proposed methods and recommends a variety of grasps. Then a realistic demonstration compares the performances of the manipulator using different grasps. PMID:26413382

  9. Tibetan Apples and Oranges: Surficial Sutures and Overlapping Lithospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Hung, S. H.; Wang, C. Y.; Tseng, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Multi-scale, finite-frequency tomography across the Himalayas-Tibet shows a clear, subhorizontal anomaly of high VP and VSin the upper mantle that can be traced from under N. India all the way to beneath central Tibet. This configuration of the "Greater India" (GI), or the submerged, northern portion of the Indian shield, is combined with other constraints to reconstruct position of the Indian lithospheric mantle (ILM) relative to Asia back to about 15 Ma ago, or the onset of the latest magmatic activity in Tibet. By then, the leading edge of the ILM (Indian mantle front, IMF) has advanced subhorizontally past the entire Lhasa terrane and also probably have caused the lithospheric mantle beneath the Qiangtang terrane to thicken. The thickening is likely to have led to Rayleigh-Taylor instability, causing widespread but small volume of magmatic activity in northern Tibet. Meanwhile, the detached lithospheric mantle foundered through the upper mantle to rest at the bottom of the mantle transition zone (MTZ), just above the lower mantle. This detached lithospheric mantle manifests itself as a large-scale seismic anomaly of high compressional wave speed (VP) but curiously is undetectable through shear-waves. Based on laboratory data for nominally anhydrous olivine and its high-pressure polymorphs (NAO), the discordant results between P- and S-waves is explained by abundant hydroxyls in the foundered lithospheric mantle, a hypothesis supported by other evidences as well. Since NAO can hold ~1 wt% of water throughout the upper mantle and the MTZ, foundering of thickened lithospheric mantle caused by continental collision is an under-appreciated but effective pathway for water to enter the deep mantle. Currently, the Indus-Yarlung suture between northern India and the Lhasa terrane appears to be an inactive, crustal feature, as the GI continues to pass beneath it. On the other hand, even though the IMF has now advanced northward beyond the Bangong-Nujiang suture (BNS

  10. An All-Inside Repair for Full Radial Posterior Lateral Meniscus Tears.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Tabuchi, Kousuke; Noguchi, Kouji; Inoue, Takashi; Katouda, Michihiro; Murakami, Hidetaka; Horibe, Shuji

    2016-02-01

    There is controversy about the treatment for unstable full radial posterior lateral meniscus tears, particularly that involving the posterior root. Some surgeons have advocated repairing these types of meniscus tears using various techniques, but their methods are somewhat technical. We developed the technique for an all-inside repair for full radial posterior lateral meniscus tears using the Meniscal Viper (Arthrex, Naples, FL). A doubled thread is passed through 1 edge of the radial tear by the Meniscal Viper and is kept in place without tying the knot. The Meniscal Viper is used again to set a new thread, repeating the same procedure to another edge of the tear. At this step, 2 doubled threads are passed through each stump of the tear, and both a loop end and 2 free ends of each thread are located outside of the joint. Then, 2 doubled threads pass the third thread into its own loop, pulling it out. Finally, the third thread becomes the mattress suture over the radial tear site and is fastened by sliding knot techniques. This procedure makes it easy to strictly, smoothly, and less invasively shorten the gap by drawing each stump of the meniscus in the direction of the circumference. PMID:27274444

  11. Microbiology of Explanted Suture Segments from Infected and Noninfected Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Krepel, Candace J.; Marks, Richard M.; Rossi, Peter J.; Sanger, James; Goldblatt, Matthew; Graham, Mary Beth; Rothenburger, Stephen; Collier, John; Seabrook, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    Sutures under selective host/environmental factors can potentiate postoperative surgical site infection (SSI). The present investigation characterized microbial recovery and biofilm formation from explanted absorbable (AB) and nonabsorbable (NAB) sutures from infected and noninfected sites. AB and NAB sutures were harvested from noninfected (70.9%) and infected (29.1%) sites in 158 patients. At explantation, devices were sonicated and processed for qualitative/quantitative bacteriology; selective sutures were processed for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Bacteria were recovered from 85 (53.8%) explanted sites; 39 sites were noninfected, and 46 were infected. Suture recovery ranged from 11.1 to 574.6 days postinsertion. A significant difference in mean microbial recovery between noninfected (1.2 isolates) and infected (2.7 isolates) devices (P < 0.05) was noted. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia spp. were recovered from infected devices, while commensal skin flora was recovered from noninfected devices. No significant difference in quantitative microbial recovery between infected monofilament and multifilament sutures was noted. Biofilm was present in 100% and 66.6% of infected and noninfected devices, respectively (P < 0.042). We conclude that both monofilament and braided sutures provide a hospitable surface for microbial adherence: (i) a significant difference in microbial recovery from infected and noninfected sutures was noted, (ii) infected sutures harbored a mixed flora, including multidrug-resistant health care-associated pathogens, and (iii) a significant difference in the presence or absence of a biofilm in infected versus noninfected explanted devices was noted. Further studies to document the benefit of focused risk reduction strategies to minimize suture contamination and

  12. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of the mid-palatal suture in rapid palatal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Gumussoy, I; Bayrakdar, I S; Dagistan, S; Caglayan, F

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Orthodontists usually evaluate the mid-palatal sutural opening with occlusal radiography. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the sutural opening with ultrasonography (USG) in a series of patients undergoing rapid palatal expansion (RPE). Methods: The study included 87 USG images and 87 occlusal radiographs from 29 healthy patients (mean age, 13.9 years; range, 11–20 years; boys, 12; girls, 17) who required RPE treatment. The sutural opening was assessed with USG, and the amount of sutural expansion as mesiodistal length was measured immediately after appliance practice (T0), 10 turns (T1) and 20 turns (T2) during the expansion period. Sutural expansion evaluated by occlusal radiographs was scored at every stage. Measurements obtained by USG and scores observed in the occlusal radiographs were compared by non-parametric Kendall's tau test. Results: Both USG and radiographic images revealed normal anatomical structure during pre-expansion (stage T0). On USG, sutural expansion was seen in 19 patients at stage T1. There was no expansion at this stage in ten patients. At stage T2, on USG and radiography, an increase in the amount of expansion was observed in 19 patients with sutural expansion at stage T1 and sutural expansion was observed in 5 patients without sutural expansion at stage T1. No expansion was observed at both stages T1 and T2 in five patients. USG measurements and occlusal scores in both T1 and T2 turns showed statistically significant correlation (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The results indicate that USG might be a useful method to assess mid-palatal sutural opening in patients undergoing RPE. PMID:25168810

  13. Biomechanical evaluation of suture holding properties of native and tissue engineered articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    DuRaine, GD; Arzi, B; Lee, JK; Lee, CA; Responte, DJ; Hu, JC; Athanasiou, KA

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine suture-holding properties of tissue engineered neocartilage relative to native articular cartilage. To this end, suture pull-out strength was quantified for native articular cartilage and for neocartilages possessing various mechanical properties. Methods Suture holding properties were examined in vitro and in vivo. Neocartilage from bovine chondrocytes was engineered using two sets of exogenous stimuli resulting in neotissue of different biochemical compositions. Compressive and tensile properties and glycosaminoglycan, collagen, and pyridinoline cross-link contents were assayed (study 1). Suture pull-out strength was compared between neocartilage constructs, and bovine and leporine native cartilage. Uniaxial pull-out test until failure was performed after passing 6-0 Vicryl through each tissue (study 2). Subsequently, neocartilage was implanted into a rabbit model to examine short-term suture holding ability in vivo (study 3). Results Neocartilage glycosaminoglycan and collagen content per wet weight reached 4.55% ± 1.62% and 4.21 ± 0.77%, respectively. Tensile properties for neocartilage constructs reached 2.6 ± 0.77 MPa for Young’s modulus and 1.39 ± 0.63 MPa for ultimate tensile strength. Neocartilage reached ~33% of suture pull-out strength of native articular cartilage. Neocartilage cross-link content reached 50% of native values, and suture pull-out strength correlated positively with cross-link content (R2=0.74). Neocartilage sutured into rabbit osteochondral defects was successfully maintained for 3 weeks. Conclusion This study shows that pyridinoline cross-links in neocartilage may be vital in controlling suture pull-out strength. Neocartilage produced in vitro with one-third of native tissue pull-out strength appears sufficient for construct suturing and retention in vivo. PMID:24848644

  14. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Trent J; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  15. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  16. Primary Burkitt lymphoma in the posterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Zied; Charfi, Slim; Hentati, Abdessalem; Ayadi, Ines; Abid, Hanene; Frikha, Imed

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with complaints of posterior chest pain and dyspnea. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a mass in the posterior mediastinum, extending from T8 to T11 with intraspinal involvement. A percutaneous core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma. He was treated according to the Lymphoma Malignancy B protocol 2001 arm C3, but he presented with liver and brain relapses and died 7.5 months after admission. Although lymphoma is rarely localized in the posterior mediastinum, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal masses in children. PMID:26038605

  17. Uterine artery suture: a preventive approach for pernicious placenta previa.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaodong; Xie, Xiaoe; Wang, Yi

    2014-03-01

    Pernicious placenta previa is an obstetric complication that results in a crisis situation for many patients. Most existing options deal with the problems after delivery leading to unfavorable outcomes. To circumvent this situation, a few preventive simple surgical options have been discussed in this paper. The highlight of the approach is the application of ascending uterine artery suture that drastically reduced the amount of bleeding as compared to that observed in regular surgeries. Combined with the placenta accrete location, wedge resection and 'patch' homeostasis of the serous membrane, the surgical modifications adopted effectively reduced the need for hysterectomy thus preserving the fertility of the patients for the future. Since fetuses were safely removed within 1-2 min, the Apgar scores of the neonates were also largely unaffected. PMID:23949849

  18. An accessory skull suture mimicking a skull fracture.

    PubMed

    Wiedijk, J E F; Soerdjbalie-Maikoe, V; Maat, G J R; Maes, A; van Rijn, R R; de Boer, H H

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the sudden and unexpected death of a five-and-a-half-month-old boy. As in every Dutch case of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI), a multidisciplinary diagnostic approach was used. This included post-mortem radiography, showing a linear discontinuity of the parietal bone. Originally this was interpreted as a skull fracture, but autopsy indicated no signs of mechanical trauma. Instead the defect was defined as a unilateral accessory suture of the parietal bone. The initial erroneous diagnosis had severe adverse consequences and thus every health care professional or forensic specialist dealing with paediatric mechanical traumas should be cautious of this rare anomaly. PMID:26860068

  19. Identification of IGF-I in the calvarial suture of young rats: histochemical analysis of the cranial sagittal sutures in a hyperthyroid rat model.

    PubMed

    Akita, S; Hirano, A; Fujii, T

    1996-01-01

    Premature closure of cranial sutures has been known as one of the complications of juvenile or congenital hyperthyroidism. Thyroid hormone is an anabolic agent for bone formation in the early stages of childhood development. In children, excess thyroid hormone acts as an acceleration factor for the skeletal bone, whereas in adult hyperthyroidism, it causes bone mineral loss due to the high turnover rate of bone formation and consequently bone resorption. In addition, there are numerous literature descriptions concerning the interactions among bone metabolism, hormones, and growth factors, among which insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is the most abundantly found growth factor in osteoblasts and in bone models in vivo. We therefore investigated whether or not the cranial sutures show accelerated closure and how the local growth factors or cytokines participate and function in local bone metabolism after administration of exogenous excess thyroid hormone in a rat model. A total of 60 female Wistar rats, aged 10 days, were divided into two groups, the triiodothyronine (T3)-treated group (n = 30, T3 0.1 microgram/gm of body weight per day) and the control group (n = 30, saline vehicle only), and were maintained and subsequently sacrificed at 15, 30, and 60 days. The parameters of cranial width derived from the morphologic measurements of the skull indicated that the lambda-asterion distance at 30 days and the pterion-bregma distance at 60 days in the T3-treated group were significantly decreased compared with those of the control group. Furthermore, the fluorescent histologic findings showed fluorescent labeling with no interruption along the suture edges, suggesting continuous bone formation, and displayed narrowing of the suture gap of the sagittal suture in the T3-treated group. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase staining showed very little osteoclastic activity in the sagittal suture, especially in the T3-treated group. The intensity of immunohistochemical

  20. Wire chambers revisited.

    PubMed

    Ott, R J

    1993-04-01

    Detectors used for radioisotope imaging have, historically, been based on scintillating crystal/photomultiplier combinations in various forms. From the rectilinear scanner through to modern gamma cameras and positron cameras, the basic technology has remained much the same. Efforts to overcome the limitations of this form of technology have foundered on the inability to reproduce the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and sensitive area at acceptable cost. Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. As gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of "gas only" photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera. The MWPC camera produces quantitative

  1. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Anterior Chamber Iris Claw Lens for the Treatment of Aphakia in a Patient with Megalocornea

    PubMed Central

    Saffra, Norman; Rakhamimov, Aleksandr; Masini, Robert; Rosenthal, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Megalocornea in isolation is a rare congenital enlargement of the cornea greater than 13 mm in diameter. Patients with megalocornea are prone to cataract formation, crystalline lens subluxation, zonular deficiencies and dislocation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) within the capsular bag. A 55-year-old male with megalocornea in isolation developed subluxation of the capsular bag and PCIOL. The PCIOL and capsular bag were explanted, and the patient was subsequently implanted with an anterior chamber iris claw lens. An anterior chamber iris claw lens is an effective option for the correction of aphakia in patients with megalocornea. PMID:26120314

  3. Bilateral anterior chamber intraocular lenses dislocation in a patient with habitual eye rubbing.

    PubMed

    Poh, E P; Fariza, N Nor; Mariam, I

    2005-08-01

    A 61-year-old Chinese man presented with bilateral posteriorly dislocated anterior chamber intraocular lenses (AC IOLs) one year after successful vitrectomy, removal of bilateral dislocated mature cataractous lenses and AC IOLs implantation. A thorough clinical evaluation revealed habitual eye rubbing as the only possible cause. PMID:16379196

  4. Arthroscopic repair of "peel-off" lesion of the posterior cruciate ligament at the femoral condyle.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are uncommon, and most occur in association with other lesions. The treatment of PCL injuries remains controversial; in addition, PCL injuries have been documented to have a propensity to heal. In the literature several different patterns of PCL injury have been described including midsubstance tears/injuries, tibial bony avulsions, femoral bony avulsions, and femoral "peel-off" injuries. A peel-off injury is a complete or incomplete soft-tissue disruption of the PCL at its femoral attachment site without associated bony avulsion. In recent years arthroscopic repair of femoral avulsion and peel-off lesions of the PCL has been reported. In most of these articles, a transosseous repair with sutures passed through 2 bone tunnels into the medial femoral condyle has been described. We present a case of a femoral PCL avulsion in a 20-year-old collegiate football player with an associated medial collateral ligament injury, and we report about a novel technique for PCL repair using 2 No. 2 FiberWire sutures and two 2.9-mm PushLock anchors (Arthrex) to secure tensioning the ligament at its footprint. PMID:24749037

  5. Bilateral Serous Retinal Detachment Associated with Inferior Posterior Staphyloma Treated with Scleral Shortening and Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Akihito; Kanda, Naotaka; Sekiryu, Tetsuju

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report a case of bilateral serous retinal detachment (SRD) associated with inferior posterior staphyloma (IPS) treated successfully with scleral shortening. Patient and Methods A 63-year-old woman presented with bilateral visual loss due to an SRD with IPS. The best-corrected visual acuity levels were 0.6 (20/30) and 0.5 (20/40) in the right and left eye, respectively. The patient underwent vitrectomy and scleral shortening in the right eye. The lamellar scleral crescent was resected 4 mm in width from the 5- to 8-o'clock positions. Seven interrupted 5-0 polyester sutures were placed at the edge of the lamellar scleral crescent. After 25-gauge three-port vitrectomy, the sutures were tightened. Optical coherence tomography showed decreased curvature at the staphyloma border. The choroidal thickness decreased in the superior flat portion of the fundus and increased slightly in the staphyloma. The SRD resolved 3 months postoperatively. The best-corrected visual acuity in the right eye improved to 0.8 (20/25) 6 months postoperatively. Angiography 6 months postoperatively showed decreased diffuse dye leakage at the fovea in the right eye; indocyanine green angiography did not show marked changes. Discussion Scleral shortening with vitrectomy changes the eye wall shape, may improve the retinal pigment epithelial integrity, and may be a treatment option for SRD with IPS PMID:27403132

  6. Rat posterior facial vein interpositional graft: a more relevant training model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nicolas; Daley, Roger A; Cooley, Brian C

    2014-11-01

    Microvascular training models for vein grafting most often use the rat epigastric vein interpositioned to the femoral artery. We describe the rat posterior facial vein as an alternative vein graft model; it has at least a 2:1 diametric ratio to the femoral artery and a tougher connective tissue, making it more similar to clinical vein grafting for reconstructive microsurgery. A series of 24 grafts interpositioned to the femoral artery were done using 11-12 sutures per end-to-end anastomosis and yielded early patency rates of 96% at 20 min and 92% at 2 and 4 weeks for subsets of 12 grafts. As a training model the diametric disparity provides unique challenges with clinical relevance, for which a number of different techniques for matching arterial to venous circumferences can be done. PMID:24848809

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  8. The role of graft materials in suture augmentation for tendon repairs and reattachment.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J; Iesaka, Kazuho

    2005-08-01

    Various biomaterials have been used to augment sutures for the repair and reattachment of tendons. This study examined four different graft materials in a simple and reproducible model using chicken Achilles tendons to determine the strength and mechanism of suture reinforcement of tendon repairs. The graft materials tested were Gore-Tex(R) Soft Tissue Patch, Graftjacket, bovine pericardium, and an experimental graft material from Xylos Corporation. Testing was performed in shear to simulate forces on a torn tendon repair and pull-off to simulate those on a tendon reattachment to bone. Compared to unaugmented suture, grafts increased suture fixation strength from 10% to 60% in shear and from 0% to 36% in pull-off with the bovine pericardium graft, providing significant improvement in both tests. In no cases (even unaugmented) did the suture pull directly through the tendon, but instead sliced along it, demonstrating that the interface between the suture and the tendon determines fixation strength. Grafts function by increasing the area, friction, and nature of this interface, not by acting as a barrier for suture pull-through. PMID:15981174

  9. Enhanced Zone II Flexor Tendon Repair through a New Half Hitch Loop Suture Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a new half hitch loop suture configuration on flexor tendon repair mechanics. Cadaver canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were repaired with 4- or 8-strands, 4–0 or 3–0 suture, with and without half hitch loops. An additional group underwent repair with half hitch loops but without the terminal knot. Half hitch loops improved the strength of 8-strand repairs by 21% when 4–0, and 33% when 3–0 suture was used, and caused a shift in failure mode from suture pullout to suture breakage. 8-strand repairs with half hitch loops but without a terminal knot produced equivalent mechanical properties to those without half hitch loops but with a terminal knot. 4-strand repairs were limited by the strength of the suture in all groups and, as a result, the presence of half hitch loops did not alter the mechanical properties. Overall, half hitch loops improved repair mechanics, allowing failure strength to reach the full capability of suture strength. Improving the mechanical properties of flexor tendon repair with half hitch loops has the potential to reduce the postoperative risk of gap formation and catastrophic rupture in the early postoperative period. PMID:27101409

  10. Tissue Reactions to Various Suture Materials Used in Oral Surgical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Fawad; Al-Askar, Mansour; Almas, Khalid; Romanos, Georgios E.; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    A variety of suture materials are available for primary wound closure following oral surgical procedures. The aim was to review the tissue reactions to the various suture materials used in oral surgical interventions. Databases were searched using the following keywords: cotton, nylon, polyglecaprone 25, polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE), Polyglactin 910, polyglycolic acid (PGA), polylactic acid, silk, surgery, suture, and tissue reaction. Articles published only in English language were included. Seventeen studies were included. Two studies reported that polyglecaprone 25 had positive effects on wound-healing as compared to silk. Six studies reported that silk elicits more intense tissue inflammatory response and delayed wound healing as compared to other suture materials (including ePTFE, polyglecaprone-25, PGA, and nylon). Polyglactin 910 sutures were associated with the development of stitch abscess in one clinical study. Eight studies reported that tissue reactions are minimal with nylon sutures. Tissue reactions to suture materials used for oral surgical interventions may vary depending on the surface properties and bacterial adherence properties of the material. PMID:22645688

  11. BCL11B expression in intramembranous osteogenesis during murine craniofacial suture development

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Greg; van Bakel, Harm; Zhou, Xueyan; Losic, Bojan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Sutures, where neighboring craniofacial bones are separated by undifferentiated mesenchyme, are major growth sites during craniofacial development. Pathologic fusion of bones within sutures occurs in a wide variety of craniosynostosis conditions and can result in dysmorphic craniofacial growth and secondary neurologic deficits. Our knowledge of the genes involved in suture formation is poor. Here we describe the novel expression pattern of the BCL11B transcription factor protein during murine embryonic craniofacial bone formation. We examined BCL11B protein expression at E14.5, E16.5, and E18.5 in 14 major craniofacial sutures of C57BL/6J mice. We found BCL11B expression to be associated with all intramembranous craniofacial bones examined. The most striking aspects of BCL11B expression were its high levels in suture mesenchyme and increasingly complementary expression with RUNX2 in differentiating osteoblasts during development. BCL11B was also expressed in mesenchyme at the non-sutural edges of intramembranous bones. No expression was seen in osteoblasts involved in endochondral ossification of the cartilaginous cranial base. BCL11B is expressed to potentially regulate the transition of mesenchymal differentiation and suture formation within craniofacial intramembranous bone. PMID:25511173

  12. Application of modified reverse panoramic radiograph on lambdoid suture for age estimation

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedy, Shweta; Sah, Kunal; Sinha, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Background Cranial suture closure has long been recognized as a character of human development related to aging. For this reason, it has been utilized for various forensic and archaeological studies to determine the age of an unidentified/or skeletonized individuals. Various cadaveric studies have established the role of lambdoid suture in age estimation, but not routinely practiced. The objective is to establish if any correlation exists between individual’s age and lambdoid sutures closure status (ectocranially) in mortals through modified reverse panoramic radiograph (RPRg). Methods Total number of 85 subjects, 25 years and beyond were included in the study, and divided into four groups with an age interval of 10 years. Assessment of lambdoid suture closure was done according to Frederic Rating Scale on modified RPRg. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using Spearman’s correlation test. Results A significant difference was observed between the age group and suture closure. Correlation coefficient of 0.570 was obtained, and was interpreted as a good correlation between the age and suture closure status with a P value of <0.001. Conclusions Lambdoid suture can be very effective and practical tool for age assessment in mortals through modified RPRg (ectocranially). PMID:26435915

  13. FGFR2c-mediated ERK-MAPK activity regulates coronal suture development.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Miles J; Xue, Ke; Li, Li; Horowitz, Mark C; Steinbacher, Derek M; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P

    2016-07-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) signaling is critical for proper craniofacial development. A gain-of-function mutation in the 2c splice variant of the receptor's gene is associated with Crouzon syndrome, which is characterized by craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial vault sutures, leading to craniofacial maldevelopment. Insight into the molecular mechanism of craniosynostosis has identified the ERK-MAPK signaling cascade as a critical regulator of suture patency. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of FGFR2c-induced ERK-MAPK activation in the regulation of coronal suture development. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function Fgfr2c mutant mice have overlapping phenotypes, including coronal synostosis and craniofacial dysmorphia. In vivo analysis of coronal sutures in loss-of-function and gain-of-function models demonstrated fundamentally different pathogenesis underlying coronal suture synostosis. Calvarial osteoblasts from gain-of-function mice demonstrated enhanced osteoblastic function and maturation with concomitant increase in ERK-MAPK activation. In vitro inhibition with the ERK protein inhibitor U0126 mitigated ERK protein activation levels with a concomitant reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity. This study identifies FGFR2c-mediated ERK-MAPK signaling as a key mediator of craniofacial growth and coronal suture development. Furthermore, our results solve the apparent paradox between loss-of-function and gain-of-function FGFR2c mutants with respect to coronal suture synostosis. PMID:27034231

  14. Posterior Deep Infiltrating Endometriotic Nodules: Operative Considerations according to Lesion Size, Location, and Geometry, during One's Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Protopapas, Athanasios; Giannoulis, Georgios; Chatzipapas, Ioannis; Athanasiou, Stavros; Grigoriadis, Themistoklis; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Antsaklis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    We conducted this prospective cohort study to standardize our laparoscopic technique of excision of posterior deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) nodules, according to their size, location, and geometry, including 36 patients who were grouped, according to principal pelvic expansion of the nodule, into groups with central (group 1) and lateral (group 2) lesions, and according to nodule size, into ≤2 cm (group A) and >2 cm (group B) lesions, respectively. In cases of group 1 the following operative steps were more frequently performed compared to those of group 2: suspension of the rectosigmoid, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. The opposite was true regarding suspension of the adnexa, systematic ureteric dissection, and removal of the diseased pelvic peritoneum. When grouping patients according to nodule size, almost all of the examined parameters were more frequently applied to patients of group B: adnexal suspension, suspension of the rectosigmoid, systematic ureteric dissection, division of uterine vein, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. Nodule size was the single most important determinant of duration of surgery. In conclusion, during the building-up of one's learning curve of laparoscopic excision of posterior DIE nodules, technique standardization is very important to avoid complications. PMID:24579050

  15. Posterior Deep Infiltrating Endometriotic Nodules: Operative Considerations according to Lesion Size, Location, and Geometry, during One's Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Giannoulis, Georgios; Chatzipapas, Ioannis; Athanasiou, Stavros; Haidopoulos, Dimitrios; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Antsaklis, Aris

    2014-01-01

    We conducted this prospective cohort study to standardize our laparoscopic technique of excision of posterior deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) nodules, according to their size, location, and geometry, including 36 patients who were grouped, according to principal pelvic expansion of the nodule, into groups with central (group 1) and lateral (group 2) lesions, and according to nodule size, into ≤2 cm (group A) and >2 cm (group B) lesions, respectively. In cases of group 1 the following operative steps were more frequently performed compared to those of group 2: suspension of the rectosigmoid, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. The opposite was true regarding suspension of the adnexa, systematic ureteric dissection, and removal of the diseased pelvic peritoneum. When grouping patients according to nodule size, almost all of the examined parameters were more frequently applied to patients of group B: adnexal suspension, suspension of the rectosigmoid, systematic ureteric dissection, division of uterine vein, colpectomy, and placement of bowel wall reinforcement sutures. Nodule size was the single most important determinant of duration of surgery. In conclusion, during the building-up of one's learning curve of laparoscopic excision of posterior DIE nodules, technique standardization is very important to avoid complications. PMID:24579050

  16. Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy: Indications, Technique, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dodwad, Shah-Jahan M; Dodwad, Shah-Nawaz M; Prasarn, Mark L; Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy presents with upper extremity pain, decreased sensation, and decreased strength caused by irritation of specific nerve root(s). After failure of conservative management, surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, disk arthroplasty, and posterior cervical foraminotomy. In this review, we discuss indications, techniques, and outcomes of posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy. PMID:27187617

  17. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall.

    PubMed

    Hale, Douglass S; Fenner, Dee

    2016-03-01

    Posterior vaginal wall prolapse is one of the most common prolapses encountered by gynecological surgeons. What appears to be a straightforward condition to diagnose and treat surgically for physicians has proven to be frustratingly unpredictable with regard to symptom relief for patients. Functional disorders such as dyssynergic defecation and constipation are often attributed to posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Little scientific evidence supports this assumption, emphasizing that structure and function are not synonymous when treating posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Rectoceles, enteroceles, sigmoidoceles, peritoneoceles, rectal and intraanal intussusception, rectal prolapse, and descending perineal syndrome are all conditions that have an impact on the posterior vaginal wall. All too often these different anatomic conditions are treated with the same surgical approach, addressing a posterior vaginal wall bulge with a traditional posterior colporrhaphy. Studies that examine the correlation between stage of posterior wall prolapse and patient symptoms have failed to reliably do so. Surgical outcomes measured by prolapse staging appear successful, yet patient expectations are often not met. As increasing attention is being placed on patient satisfaction outcomes concerning surgical treatments, this fact will need to be addressed. Surgeons will have to clearly communicate what can and what cannot be expected with surgical repair of posterior vaginal wall prolapse. PMID:26348375

  18. All-inside arthroscopic suturing technique for meniscal ruptures.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Nikica; Dovzak-Bajs, Ivana; Bilić, Vide; Darabos, Anela; Popović, Iva; Cengić, Tomislav

    2012-03-01

    The most frequent indication for surgical treatment of the knee is lesion of the meniscus. The "all inside" arthroscopic technique with bioresorptive material for meniscus lesion is becoming the most popular treatment. This prospective study included 10 patients with posterior meniscal horn lesion operatively treated at Sports Traumatology Department. The "all inside" technique was performed by intra-articular application of bioresorptive pins-Darts sticks or Meniscus Viper and bioresorptive string. Patients were followed up for 2-6 months postoperatively and graded according to the IKDC 2000 scale. All surgical treatments showed satisfactory results. Young patients with acute longitudinal peripheral lesion-posterior horn lesions, in the red-red or red-white meniscal zone, 1-2 centimeters long are most appropriate for this type of treatment. In these patients, this technique proved to be superior and free from the risk of neurovascular damage. For better authentication of this conclusion, additional prospective randomized studies should be performed. PMID:22920001

  19. Needle infusion avoids using sutures and prevents hypotony in the 23 gauge sutureless vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Zhu, Dongqing; Zhou, Jibo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of needle infusion on preventing wound leakage and hypotony in sutureless vitrectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 230 consecutive eyes of 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy with or without needle infusion, and further measured the wound leakage and intraocular pressure (IOP) without using a suture. Results: In the eyes with primary needle infusion inserted before infusion cannula removal, IOP was stable during and after infusion cannula removal. No suture was needed in the procedure. Postoperative hypotony did not occurred in all eyes with needle infusion either. Conclusion: Needle infusion inserted before infusion cannula removal can avoid using sutures and prevent hypotony intraoperatively and postoperatively. PMID:26770552

  20. Operating Endoscopically with “Two Hands” to Remove Calcified Permanent Suture After Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Robert M.; Anderson, James Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We describe a combined percutaneous and endoscopic approach to remove encrusted permanent suture in the renal pelvis that was placed during pyeloplasty repair. Our index patient had a laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty at an outside institution 10 years before presenting with flank pain and nondependent nephrolithiasis. This proved to be an encrusted permanent suture material. There is limited data on incidence of nephrolithiasis after ureteropelvic junction repair, but it is well documented that nonabsorbable suture lines should be avoided in the urinary tract as they may serve as a nidus for stone formation.

  1. Tandem suturing and disarticulation of the Taiwan orogen revealed by its neotectonic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, J. Bruce H.; Sieh, Kerry; Chen, Yue-Gau

    2005-04-01

    Taiwan's numerous active faults and folds demarcate distinct eastern and western neotectonic belts. The western belt results from the attachment and subsequent detachment of a sliver of continental lithosphere to the Eurasian continental margin. The eastern belt is the product of the same continental sliver docking with and then separating from the Luzon volcanic arc. Thus, the active Taiwan orogen is a tandem suturing and tandem disengagement of a volcanic arc and a continental sliver to and from the Eurasian continental margin. This progressive suturing and separation is a superb, living demonstration of the fundamental weakness of lithospheric sutures. Furthermore, this neotectonic architecture provides the basis for understanding the Taiwan's seismic sources.

  2. [Morphological changes of tissues in formation of a welding suture on the large intestine].

    PubMed

    Bondar', G V; Basheev, V Kh; Borota, A V; Miroshnichenko, E Iu; Koshik, E A

    2011-01-01

    Abdominoanal resection with descending of left colon on perineum, leaving additional part of a descended intestine, was performed. For the hemorrhage arrest the welding sutures were put on intestinal wall. According to morphological investigations data, a damage of intestinal wall in the zone of a welding suture application is a reversible one, it spreads from the electrode branch on 2-3 mm. The presence of undamaged structures witnesses the presence of an active regeneration process in tissues around the welding suture. PMID:21512998

  3. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  4. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  5. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  6. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  7. The suture provides a niche for mesenchymal stem cells of craniofacial bones

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hu; Feng, Jifan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Grimes, Weston; Urata, Mark; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue undergoes constant turnover supported by stem cells. Recent studies showed that perivascular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to the turnover of long bones. Craniofacial bones are flat bones derived from a different embryonic origin than the long bones. The identity and regulating niche for craniofacial bone MSCs remain unknown. Here, we identify Gli1+ cells within the suture mesenchyme as the major MSC population for craniofacial bones. They are not associated with vasculature, give rise to all craniofacial bones in the adult and are activated during injury repair. Gli1+ cells are typical MSCs in vitro. Ablation of Gli1+ cells leads to craniosynostosis and arrest of skull growth, indicating these cells are an indispensible stem cell population. Twist1+/− mice with craniosynostosis show reduced Gli1+ MSCs in sutures, suggesting that craniosynostosis may result from diminished suture stem cells. Our study indicates that craniofacial sutures provide a unique niche for MSCs for craniofacial bone homeostasis and repair. PMID:25799059

  8. Timing of cranial suture closure in placental mammals: phylogenetic patterns, intraspecific variation, and comparison with marsupials.

    PubMed

    Rager, Lisa; Hautier, Lionel; Forasiepi, Analía; Goswami, Anjali; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2014-02-01

    Used as markers of postnatal growth closure sequences of 22 ectocranial sutures and synchondroses were recorded in a sample of 1161 skulls belonging to 38 species from all major placental clades: Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires (Boreoeutheria). The maximum closure level, which is not significantly correlated to body mass, is higher in Afrotheria and Xenarthra than in Boreoeutheria. Only the basioccipito-basisphenoid and the basioccipito-exoccipital synchondroses close in all species sampled, the supraoccipito-exoccipital and the inter-parietal sutures do in most species. Parsimov retrieved more heterochronic shifts for Afrotheria and Xenarthra than for Boreoeutheria. The amount of intraspecific variation differs among the species sampled being high among xenarthran species and low among afrotherians. Specimens (162) representing 12 marsupial genera were also analysed. Placentals exhibit a larger number of suture closures than marsupials and in both groups the sutures at the base of the skull are the first to fuse starting with the basioccipito-exoccipital. PMID:24127274

  9. BCL11B regulates sutural patency in the mouse craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Kyrylkova, Kateryna; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Philbrick, Kenneth A; Leid, Mark

    2016-07-15

    The transcription factor BCL11B plays essential roles during development of the immune, nervous, and cutaneous systems. Here we show that BCL11B is expressed in both osteogenic and sutural mesenchyme of the developing craniofacial complex. Bcl11b(-/-) mice exhibit increased proliferation of osteoprogenitors, premature osteoblast differentiation, and enhanced skull mineralization leading to synostoses of facial and calvarial sutures. Ectopic expression of Fgfr2c, a gene implicated in craniosynostosis in mice and humans, and that of Runx2 was detected within the affected sutures of Bcl11b(-/-) mice. These data suggest that ectopic expression of Fgfr2c in the sutural mesenchyme, without concomitant changes in the expression of FGF ligands, appears to induce the RUNX2-dependent osteogenic program and craniosynostosis in Bcl11b(-/-) mice. PMID:26453795

  10. Loss of rotator cuff tendon-to-bone interface pressure after reattachment using a suture anchor.

    PubMed

    Brassart, Nicolas; Sanghavi, Sanjay; Hansen, Ulrich N; Emery, Roger J; Amis, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the tendon-to-bone interface pressure, contact area, and force after reattaching a tendon to bone by use of a suture and suture anchor. Repairs were made in 8 ovine shoulders in vitro, by use of 3 suture types in each: Ethibond, polydioxanone, or Orthocord. A Tekscan pressure sensor was placed between the tendon and bone and monitored for 1 hour after the repair. The principal finding was a significant loss of approximately 60% of the contact parameters immediately after the suture was tied, followed by further significant loss over the next hour to a mean of only 14% of the initial readings. We concluded that pressure measurement systems that only record the initial maximum pressure would yield overly optimistic results for the actual repair pressure after the repair is completed. The Tekscan system, however, allowed us to monitor pressure reductions that occurred both during and after the repair. PMID:18504147

  11. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine. PMID:26830436

  12. Deformation and sedimentation along a developing terrane suture: Eastern Sunda forearc, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.L.; Silver, E.A.; Prasetyo, H.; Meyer, A.W.

    1986-12-01

    The collision of the eastern Sunda arc with northwest Australia has resulted in the development of a suture between the Sumba ridge and Sawu-Timor terranes along a zone of intraforearc convergence. The developing suture varies from the low-angle Sawu thrust, with attendant mud diapirs in the Sumba basin, to high-angle reverse faults near a basement high of the underthrust Sumba ridge terrane. Bottom currents, associated with the flow of Pacific Ocean deep water into the Indian Ocean, have eroded the terranes and subsequently deposited the detritus in an assemblage of contourites along the suture. This study reveals the high structural variability of a terrane suture and the oceanographic influence on the deposition of overlap assemblages.

  13. Bioinspired, mechanical, deterministic fractal model for hierarchical suture joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaning; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary C.

    2012-03-01

    Many biological systems possess hierarchical and fractal-like interfaces and joint structures that bear and transmit loads, absorb energy, and accommodate growth, respiration, and/or locomotion. In this paper, an elastic deterministic fractal composite mechanical model was formulated to quantitatively investigate the role of structural hierarchy on the stiffness, strength, and failure of suture joints. From this model, it was revealed that the number of hierarchies (N) can be used to tailor and to amplify mechanical properties nonlinearly and with high sensitivity over a wide range of values (orders of magnitude) for a given volume and weight. Additionally, increasing hierarchy was found to result in mechanical interlocking of higher-order teeth, which creates additional load resistance capability, thereby preventing catastrophic failure in major teeth and providing flaw tolerance. Hence, this paper shows that the diversity of hierarchical and fractal-like interfaces and joints found in nature have definitive functional consequences and is an effective geometric-structural strategy to achieve different properties with limited material options in nature when other structural geometries and parameters are biologically challenging or inaccessible. This paper also indicates the use of hierarchy as a design strategy to increase design space and provides predictive capabilities to guide the mechanical design of synthetic flaw-tolerant bioinspired interfaces and joints.

  14. Sickle cell disease and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Cole, Catherine; Herkes, Geoffrey K; Barnett, Yael; Lin, Jamie; Needham, Merrilee

    2014-08-01

    Sickle cell disease can present with neurological manifestations. One such presentation is with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy also known as reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. The condition is classically described as reversible over time; it commonly presents with oedematous changes involving the white matter of the occipital and parietal regions. Only a few patients with the association between sickle cell disease and posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy have been described in the adult literature. We present two patients from our institutions to emphasise the association between the two conditions and summarise the published cases in the literature. PMID:24656986

  15. Peripunctal "anchor" suture for securing the silicone bicanalicular stent in the repair of canalicular lacerations.

    PubMed

    Benger, Ross S; Nemet, Arie Y

    2008-01-01

    We used punctal absorbable suture in 8 patients (8 eyes) for silicone stent stabilization in canalicular repair surgery to prevent the postoperative complication of "cheese-wiring." Postoperatively there was 1 case of cheese-wiring of the repaired canaliculus, and no other complication related to the bicanalicular stent. The pericanalicular "anchor" suture may reduce the incidence of cheese-wiring by silicone bicanalicular stents after repair of canalicular lacerations or resections for stenosis. PMID:18209644

  16. An Alternative Bundle-to-Bundle Suturing Technique for Repairing Fresh Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Bin; Xie, Ming; Huang, Ruokun; Xiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The main concern about conventional Achilles tendon repair surgical techniques is how to maintain the initial strength of the ruptured Achilles tendon through complicated suturing methods. The primary surgical problem lies in the properties of the soft tissue; the deterioration of the Achilles tendon, especially in its elasticity; and the surface lubricity of the local tissues. In the present study, we describe an innovative bundle-to-bundle suturing method that addresses these potential problems. PMID:26970908

  17. Small rocket flowfield diagnostic chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morren, Sybil; Reed, Brian

    1993-01-01

    Instrumented and optically-accessible rocket chambers are being developed to be used for diagnostics of small rocket (less than 440 N thrust level) flowfields. These chambers are being tested to gather local fluid dynamic and thermodynamic flowfield data over a range of test conditions. This flowfield database is being used to better understand mixing and heat transfer phenomena in small rockets, influence the numerical modeling of small rocket flowfields, and characterize small rocket components. The diagnostic chamber designs include: a chamber design for gathering wall temperature profiles to be used as boundary conditions in a finite element heat flux model; a chamber design for gathering inner wall temperature and static pressure profiles; and optically-accessible chamber designs, to be used with a suite of laser-based diagnostics for gathering local species concentration, temperature, density, and velocity profiles. These chambers were run with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GH2/GO2) propellants, while subsequent versions will be run on liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon (LOX/HC) propellants. The purpose, design, and initial test results of these small rocket flowfield diagnostic chambers are summarized.

  18. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  19. Beam Window for Pressure Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Austin, J. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Window resists products of combustion experiments. Sodium chloride window seals over chamber pressures from 0.1 to 13.8 MPa while absorbing minimal energy from CO2 laser beam that passes through it into chamber. Window inexpensive and easily replacable.

  20. Chamber Music: Skills and Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarrubia, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the benefits of participating in chamber music ensembles, such as the development of a heightened level of awareness, and considers the role of the music educator/conductor. Provides tools and exercises that teachers can introduce to chamber music players to improve their rehearsals and performances. (CMK)

  1. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  2. Subsurface geometry of the Siletz-Klamath suture in southwest Oregon from mangnetotelluric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Box, S.; Bedrosian, P. A.

    2006-12-01

    Siletzia, a Paleocene to early Eocene basaltic seamount terrane, was sutured onto western North America in Eocene times and comprises the modern forearc basement throughout the Pacific Northwest. The suture zone is mostly obscured by the Cascades Arc. In southwest Oregon, however, it is preserved where previously accreted Mesozoic terranes in the Klamath Moutains overthrust Siletzia. The geometry of this suture at depth, however, is poorly constrained. In summer 2006, long-period (deep-crustal) and broadband (shallow-crustal) magnetotelluric (MT) data were collected along a 200-km profile stretching from the Pacific coast north of Coos Bay, OR to the California border south of Medford, OR, with an average site spacing of 4 km. South of the suture, the profile crosses Franciscan and Great Valley equivalents, arc lavas and sediments of the Western Klamath terrane, ophiolitic mélange of the Rattlesnake Creek terrane, and the Hayfork volcanic arc terrane, ending within the Condry Mountain Window. The data are in general agreement with the NW surface strike of the suture and the Klamath terranes. A smooth regularized two-dimensional inversion of the data resulted in a preliminary model extending to ~ 50 km depth which fits the data and is in accordance with observed surface geology. The imaged subsurface geometry of the Siletzia-Klamath suture is compared to previous potential-field modeling that suggested a thinning wedge of Silitzia has been thrust within the Klamath terranes.

  3. Cranial Suture Closure in Domestic Dog Breeds and Its Relationships to Skull Morphology.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Madeleine; Haussman, Sinah

    2016-04-01

    Bulldog-type brachycephalic domestic dog breeds are characterized by a relatively short and broad skull with a dorsally rotated rostrum (airorhynchy). Not much is known about the association between a bulldog-type skull conformation and peculiar patterns of suture and synchondrosis closure in domestic dogs. In this study, we aim to explore breed-specific patterns of cranial suture and synchondrosis closure in relation to the prebasial angle (proxy for airorhynchy and thus bulldog-type skull conformation) in domestic dogs. For this purpose, we coded closure of 18 sutures and synchondroses in 26 wolves, that is, the wild ancestor of all domestic dogs, and 134 domestic dogs comprising 11 breeds. Comparisons of the relative amount of closing and closed sutures and synchondroses (closure scores) in adult individuals showed that bulldog-type breeds have significantly higher closure scores than non-bulldog-type breeds and that domestic dogs have significantly higher closure scores than the wolf. We further found that the prebasial angle is significantly positively correlated with the amount of closure of the basispheno-presphenoid synchondrosis and sutures of the nose (premaxillo-nasal and maxillo-nasal) and the palate (premaxillo-maxillary and interpalatine). Our results show that there is a correlation between patterns of suture and synchondrosis closure and skull shape in domestic dogs, although the causal relationships remain elusive. Anat Rec, 299:412-420, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26995336

  4. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis regulates neovascularization and lymphangiogenesis in sutured corneas in mice

    PubMed Central

    DU, LING-LING; LIU, PING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the plausible functional role of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12)/chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) in inflammatory corneal hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in vivo. Corneal hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis were induced by placing an 11-0 nylon suture in an intrastromal position. The expression levels of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family, CXCL12 and CXCR4 in the corneas were investigated in the corneas using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Corneal hemangiogenic and lymphangiogenic responses were assessed by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies against cluster of differentiation 31 and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1. Subconjunctival injection of AMD3100 to the sutured corneas was also performed. CXCL12/CXCR4 mRNA and protein expression levels increased markedly in suture-induced corneal neovascularization (CNV) and decreased with AMD3100 treatment. Hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis were captured in images using immunofluorescence and were shown to be markedly increased with suture placement and reduced with AMD3100 treatment. VEGF-A/VEGFR-1 and VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 mRNA expression levels were upregulated in the suture placement and control groups, whereas the expression levels of all the factors were downregulated in the AMD3100 treatment group. The results from the present study demonstrated that CXCL12/CXCR4 interactions regulate hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in suture-induced CNV. AMD3100 may be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention of blindness. PMID:27121088

  5. Bacterial Biofilms on Implanted Suture Material Are a Cause of Surgical Site Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nistico, Laura; Tower, Irene; Lasko, Leslie-Ann; Stoodley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Surgical site infection (SSI) has been estimated to occur in up to 5% of all procedures, accounting for up to 0.5% of all hospital costs. Bacterial biofilms residing on implanted foreign bodies have been implicated as contributing or causative factors in a wide variety of infectious scenarios, but little consideration has been given to the potential for implanted, submerged suture material to act as a host for biofilm and thus serve as a nidus of infection. Methods: We report a series of 15 patients who underwent open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (with musculofascial closure with permanent, multifilament sutures) who developed longstanding and refractory SSIs in the abdominal wall. Explanted suture material at subsequent exploration was examined for biofilm with confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Results: All 15 patients at re-exploration were found to have gross evidence of a “slimy” matrix or dense reactive granulation tissue localized to the implanted sutures. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy revealed abundant biofilm present on all sutures examined; FISH was able to identify the presence of specific pathogens in the biofilm. Complete removal of the foreign bodies (and attendant biofilms) resulted in all cases in cure of the SSI. Conclusion: Bacterial biofilms on implanted suture material can manifest as persistent surgical site infections that require complete removal of the underlying foreign body substrata for resolution. PMID:24833403

  6. Virtual reality robotic surgery simulation curriculum to teach robotic suturing: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Daniel J; Gotlieb, Walter H; Lau, Susie; Zeng, Xing; Samouelian, Vanessa; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V; Zakrzewski, Helena; Brin, Sonya; Fraser, Shannon A; Korsieporn, Pira; Drudi, Laura; Press, Joshua Z

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this randomized, controlled trial was to assess whether voluntary participation in a proctored, proficiency-based, virtual reality robotic suturing curriculum using the da Vinci(®) Skills Simulator™ improves robotic suturing performance. Residents and attending surgeons were randomized to participation or non-participation during a 5 week training curriculum. Robotic suturing skills were evaluated before and after training using an inanimate vaginal cuff model, which participants sutured for 10 min using the da Vinci(®) Surgical System. Performances were videotaped, anonymized, and subsequently graded independently by three robotic surgeons. 27 participants were randomized. 23 of the 27 completed both the pre- and post-test, 13 in the training group and 10 in the control group. Mean training time in the intervention group was 238 ± 136 min (SD) over the 5 weeks. The primary outcome (improvement in GOALS+ score) and the secondary outcomes (improvement in GEARS, total knots, satisfactory knots, and the virtual reality suture sponge 1 task) were significantly greater in the training group than the control group in unadjusted analysis. After adjusting for lower baseline scores in the training group, improvement in the suture sponge 1 task remained significantly greater in the training group and a trend was demonstrated to greater improvement in the training group for the GOALS+ score, GEARS score, total knots, and satisfactory knots. PMID:26531197

  7. Effect of Dietary Ascorbic Acid on Osteogenesis of Expanding Midpalatal Suture in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farhadian, Nasrin; Miresmaeili, Amirfarhang; Azar, Ramin; Zargaran, Massoumeh; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Soheilifar, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: After maxillary expansion, a long period of retention is necessary to prevent early relapse. Therefore, it is beneficial to accelerate bone formation in the expanding midpalatal suture to reduce relapse. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of dietary vitamin C on osteogenesis of rat midpalatal suture during expansion. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups, each with a control and an experimental subgroup. An open-loop spring was bonded to maxillary incisors of each animal to expand the premaxillary suture. Experimental groups received dietary vitamin C in their water. The rats in the three groups were sacrificed at three, nine or 17-day intervals after bonding the spring. Then, the premaxilla was dissected and sections were made and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and osteopontin marker. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts were counted in the suture. Two-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney-U test were used for analyzing the data. Results: After three days, the number of osteoblasts was significantly higher in the vitamin C group but after nine days it was significantly higher in the control group and after seventeen days there were no significant differences between the groups. Osteoclast counts were not significantly different between vitamin C and control groups. Conclusion: Vitamin C had a positive effect on osteogenesis at the beginning of bone formation in the expanding suture, but after nine days it had a negative effect on suture osteogenesis in rats. PMID:26005453

  8. Suture anchor versus screw fixation for greater tuberosity fractures of the humerus--a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Hong, Chih-Kai; Jou, I-Ming; Lin, Chii-Jeng; Su, Fong-Chin; Su, Wei-Ren

    2012-03-01

    Suture anchors and screws are commonly used for fixation of humeral greater tuberosity (GT) fractures in either arthroscopic or open surgeries, but no biomechanical studies have been performed to compare the strength of fixation constructs using these two implants. This cadaveric study aimed to compare the biomechanical strength of three different fixation constructs in the management of GT fractures: Double-Row Suture Anchor Fixation (DR); Suture-Bridge Technique using suture anchors and knotless suture anchors (SB); and Two-Screw Fixation (TS). The experimental procedure was designed to assess fracture displacement after cyclic loading, failure load, and failure mode of the fixation construct. Significant differences were found among the SB (321 N), DR (263 N), and TS (187 N) groups (SB > DR > TS, p < 0.05) in the mean force of cyclic loading to create 3 mm displacement. Regarding the mean force of cyclic loading to create 5 mm displacement and ultimate failure load, no significant difference was found between the DR (370 N, 480 N) and SB (399 N, 493 N) groups, but both groups achieved superior results compared with the TS group (249 N, 340 N) (p < 0.05). The results suggested that the suture anchor constructs would be stronger than the fixation construct using screws for the humeral GT fracture. PMID:21858857

  9. Identification and dynamics of a cryptic suture zone in tropical rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, C.; Hoskin, C.J.; MacKenzie, J.B.; Phillips, B.L.; Tonione, M.; Silva, N.; VanDerWal, J.; Williams, S.E.; Graham, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    Suture zones, shared regions of secondary contact between long-isolated lineages, are natural laboratories for studying divergence and speciation. For tropical rainforest, the existence of suture zones and their significance for speciation has been controversial. Using comparative phylogeographic evidence, we locate a morphologically cryptic suture zone in the Australian Wet Tropics rainforest. Fourteen out of 18 contacts involve morphologically cryptic phylogeographic lineages, with mtDNA sequence divergences ranging from 2 to 15 per cent. Contact zones are significantly clustered in a suture zone located between two major Quaternary refugia. Within this area, there is a trend for secondary contacts to occur in regions with low environmental suitability relative to both adjacent refugia and, by inference, the parental lineages. The extent and form of reproductive isolation among interacting lineages varies across species, ranging from random admixture to speciation, in one case via reinforcement. Comparative phylogeographic studies, combined with environmental analysis at a fine-scale and across varying climates, can generate new insights into suture zone formation and to diversification processes in species-rich tropical rainforests. As arenas for evolutionary experimentation, suture zones merit special attention for conservation. PMID:19203915

  10. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  11. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  12. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration.

    PubMed

    Gomà, C; Lorentini, S; Meer, D; Safai, S

    2014-09-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences-of the order of 3%-were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth-i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers-rather than cylindrical chambers-for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. PMID:25109620

  13. Fusion Patterns in the Skulls of Modern Archosaurs Reveal That Sutures Are Ambiguous Maturity Indicators for the Dinosauria.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Alida M; Scannella, John B; Horner, John R; Evans, David C

    2016-01-01

    The sutures of the skulls of vertebrates are generally open early in life and slowly close as maturity is attained. The assumption that all vertebrates follow this pattern of progressive sutural closure has been used to assess maturity in the fossil remains of non-avian dinosaurs. Here, we test this assumption in two members of the Extant Phylogenetic Bracket of the Dinosauria, the emu, Dromaius novaehollandiae and the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, by investigating the sequence and timing of sutural fusion in their skulls. As expected, almost all the sutures in the emu skull progressively close (i.e., they get narrower) and then obliterate during ontogeny. However, in the American alligator, only two sutures out of 36 obliterate completely and they do so during embryonic development. Surprisingly, as maturity progresses, many sutures of alligators become wider in large individuals compared to younger, smaller individuals. Histological and histomorphometric analyses on two sutures and one synchondrosis in an ontogenetic series of American alligator confirmed our morphological observations. This pattern of sutural widening might reflect feeding biomechanics and dietary changes through ontogeny. Our findings show that progressive sutural closure is not always observed in extant archosaurs, and therefore suggest that cranial sutural fusion is an ambiguous proxy for assessing maturity in non-avian dinosaurs. PMID:26862766

  14. Fusion Patterns in the Skulls of Modern Archosaurs Reveal That Sutures Are Ambiguous Maturity Indicators for the Dinosauria

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, Alida M.; Scannella, John B.; Horner, John R.; Evans, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The sutures of the skulls of vertebrates are generally open early in life and slowly close as maturity is attained. The assumption that all vertebrates follow this pattern of progressive sutural closure has been used to assess maturity in the fossil remains of non-avian dinosaurs. Here, we test this assumption in two members of the Extant Phylogenetic Bracket of the Dinosauria, the emu, Dromaius novaehollandiae and the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, by investigating the sequence and timing of sutural fusion in their skulls. As expected, almost all the sutures in the emu skull progressively close (i.e., they get narrower) and then obliterate during ontogeny. However, in the American alligator, only two sutures out of 36 obliterate completely and they do so during embryonic development. Surprisingly, as maturity progresses, many sutures of alligators become wider in large individuals compared to younger, smaller individuals. Histological and histomorphometric analyses on two sutures and one synchondrosis in an ontogenetic series of American alligator confirmed our morphological observations. This pattern of sutural widening might reflect feeding biomechanics and dietary changes through ontogeny. Our findings show that progressive sutural closure is not always observed in extant archosaurs, and therefore suggest that cranial sutural fusion is an ambiguous proxy for assessing maturity in non-avian dinosaurs. PMID:26862766

  15. Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2010-05-01

    This study assessed performance of seven suture types in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Nonabsorbable (Ethilon) and absorbable (Monocryl) monofilament and nonabsorbable (Nurolon, silk) and absorbable (Vicryl, Vicryl Plus, Vicryl Rapide) braided sutures were used to close incisions in Chinook salmon. Monocryl exhibited greater suture retention than all other suture types 7 d after surgery. Both monofilament suture types were retained better than all braided suture types at 14 d. Incision openness and tag retention did not differ among suture types. Wound inflammation was similar for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon at 7 d. Wound ulceration was lower for Ethilon, Monocryl, and Nurolon than for all other suture types at 14 d post-surgery. Fish held in 12°C water had more desirable post-surgery healing characteristics (i.e., higher suture and tag retention and lower incision openness, wound inflammation, and ulceration) at 7 and 14 d after surgery than those held in 17°C water. The effect of surgeon was a significant predictor for all response variables at 7 d. This result emphasizes the importance of including surgeon as a variable in telemetry study analyses when multiple surgeons are used. Monocryl performed better with regard to post-surgery healing characteristics in the study fish. The overall results support the conclusion that Monocryl is the best suture material to close incisions created during surgical implantation of acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon.

  16. Ultrastructure, Histochemistry, and Mineralization Patterns in the Ecdysial Suture of the Blue Crab, Callinectes sapidus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priester, Carolina; Dillaman, Richard M.; Gay, D. Mark

    2005-12-01

    The ecdysial suture is the region of the arthropod exoskeleton that splits to allow the animal to emerge during ecdysis. We examined the morphology and composition of the intermolt and premolt suture of the blue crab using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The suture could not be identified by routine histological techniques; however 3 of 22 fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins tested (Lens culinaris agglutinin, Vicia faba agglutinin, and Pisum sativum agglutinin) differentiated the suture, binding more intensely to the suture exocuticle and less intensely to the suture endocuticle. Back-scattered electron (BSE) and secondary electron observations of fracture surfaces of intermolt cuticle showed less mineralized regions in the wedge-shaped suture as did BSE analysis of premolt and intermolt resin-embedded cuticle. The prism regions of the suture exocuticle were not calcified. X-ray microanalysis of both the endocuticle and exocuticle demonstrated that the suture was less calcified than the surrounding cuticle with significantly lower magnesium and phosphorus concentrations, potentially making its mineral more soluble. The presence or absence of a glycoprotein in the organic matrix, the extent and composition of the mineral deposited, and the thickness of the cuticle all likely contribute to the suture being removed by molting fluid, thereby ensuring successful ecdysis.

  17. Efficacy of Single-Suture Incision Closures in Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon Exposed to Simulated Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, James W.; Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

    2011-09-01

    Reductions in the size of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision-one that may warrant only a single suture for closure. However, it is not known whether a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and when outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during turbine passage through hydroelectric dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of single-suture incision closures on five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were subjected to simulated turbine passage. An acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air) were implanted in each fish; the 6-mm incisions were closed with either one suture or two sutures. After exposure to simulated turbine passage, none of the fish exhibited expulsion of transmitters. In addition, the percentage of fish with suture tearing, incision tearing, or mortal injury did not differ between treatments. Expulsion of viscera through the incision was higher among fish that received one suture (12%) than among fish that received two sutures (1%). The higher incidence of visceral expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, for cases in which tagged juvenile salmonidsmay be exposed to turbine passage, we do not recommend the use of one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation.

  18. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in ALL.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Soochow University, Suzhou, China, studied the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) observed in 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) after induction chemotherapy. PMID:26933594

  19. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is located inside your knee joint and connects the bones of your upper and ... such as a knee dislocation , you will need knee surgery to repair the joint. For milder injuries, you may not need surgery. ...

  20. Cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Krueger, R P; Hardy, B E; Churchill, B M

    1980-07-01

    A review of 207 male children with poterior urethral valves revealed an over-all incidence of cryptorchidism of 12 per cent. This association of cryptorchidism in boys with posterior urethral valves has not been described previously. PMID:6106069

  1. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  2. Deep suture zone in the North Barents Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsenko, Viktor; Kireev, Artem; Piskarev, Alexey; Savin, Vasily; Smirnov, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    Study of sedimentary basin evolution is a part of research for the forecast of oil and gas capacity of the North Barents shelf. Maps of potential fields anomalies are compiled on the basis of the latest geophysical databases, structural maps of the seismic horizons are analyzed, the location of sources of potential fields anomalies are calculated, 3D density and magnetic models of Earth's crust are constructed. Six seismic complexes are allocated in sedimentary cover structure: Devonian - Lower Carboniferous, Upper Carboniferous - Lower Permian, Mid Permian - Lower Triassic, Triassic - Lower Jurassic, Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous, Lower Cretaceous - Quaternary. The research of lateral changes of allocated layers thickness gives an idea of sedimentation in the region on various time intervals. The structural and tectonic scheme of the region is made after analysis of new geologic-geophysical materials. Contact zones of heterogeneous blocks of the crystalline basement are marked, disjunctive dislocations in a sedimentary cover and the upper crust, and also zones of increase of sediments thickness in various seismic complexes are designated. The deep suture zone delimiting Mesozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary basins has the most important geological value among disjunctive zones of the region. This zone stretches along the Admiralty Arch in East part of the North Barents shelf and is marked by negative magnetic anomaly 30-50 km wide. In view of special tectonic value of the suture zone marked by this anomaly we have calculated the 3D magnetic crust model. The sedimentary layers of a model section is based on seismic data. As a result of modeling the studied anomaly of a magnetic field can be approximated by the block of basement rocks of the lowered magnetization (1.2 A/m). The surface of this block is located in a zone of anomaly at a depth of 12-14 km. The asymmetry of anomaly is accounted by an inclination to East of the borders of the block with low

  3. Starting a High School Chamber Music Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Presents ideas on how to begin a chamber music ensemble. Discusses how to find time to accomplish chamber music playing in and around the school day. Presents short descriptions of chamber music that can be used with ensembles. Includes chamber music resources and additional chamber works. (CMK)

  4. Oval capsulorhexis for phacoemulsification in posterior polar cataract with preexisting posterior capsule rupture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kiranjit; Mittal, Vikas; Kaur, Harmit

    2011-07-01

    We describe use of an oval capsulorhexis rather than the conventional circular capsulorhexis for phacoemulsification in posterior polar cataract with preexisting posterior capsule rupture. An oval capsulorhexis minimizes the turbulence in the capsular bag by increasing the area available for efflux of fluid. It also enables end-to-end nuclear sculpting, removal of the nuclear fragment from the bag, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and vitrectomy without stretching the capsular bag. The smaller axis of the oval capsulorhexis facilitates optic capture of a sulcus-fixated IOL. The oval capsulorhexis can be used safely for phacoemulsification of all grades of nuclear sclerosis in posterior polar cataract with preexisting posterior capsule rupture. PMID:21700098

  5. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography. PMID:16005238

  6. Characterization of Posterior Glenoid Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yanke, Adam Blair; Frank, Rachel M.; Shin, Jason J.; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Provencher, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to characterize the morphology and location of posterior glenoid bone loss in pat ients with posterior instability instability utilizing computed tomography (CT). Methods: Clinical data was selected for patients with posterior shoulder instability that had undergone posterior stabilization (open or arthroscopic) or posterior osseous augmentation (distal tibia or iliac crest). Three fellowship-trained surgeons from two institutions contributed patients. Pre-operative CT data was collected for all patients. The axial cuts were segmented and reformatted in three-dimensions for glenoid analysis using Osirix. From this three-dimensional model, the following was calculated: percent bone loss (Nobuhara), total arc of the defect (degrees), and a clock-face description (start point, stop point, and average or direction). Pearson correlation coefficients were performed using significance of p<0.05. Results: Fifty shoulders from 50 patients were reviewed. Fourteen patients (average age 30 years; 93% male) had evidence of posterior glenoid bone loss and were included for evaluation. Defects on average involved 13.7±8.6% of the glenoid (range, 2-35%). The average start time (assuming all right shoulders) on the clock face was 10 o’clock ± 40 minutes and stopped at 6:30 ± 25 minutes. The average direction of the defect pointed toward 8:15 ± 25 minutes. The percent bone loss correlated with the total arc of the defect (Pearson: 0.93, p<0.05, R2: 0.86) and the direction of the bone loss (Pearson: 0.64, p<0.05, R2: 0.40). The direction of bone loss significantly moved more posterosuperior the larger the defect became (Pearson: 0.63, p<0.05, R2: 0.40). Conclusion: Posterior bone loss associated with posterior glenohumeral instability is typically directed posteriorly at 8:15 on the clock. As defect get bigger, this direction moves more posterosuperior. This information will help guide clinicians in understanding the typical location of

  7. A pilot study evaluating laparoscopic closure of the nephrosplenic space using an endoscopic suturing device in standing horses.

    PubMed

    Bracamonte, José L; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the use of an articulating automated suturing device for laparoscopic closure of the nephrosplenic space in standing horses. Closure of the nephrosplenic space was performed in 4 horses using an automated suturing device. Second-look laparoscopy was performed at 5 weeks. A smooth fibrous adhesion formed between the spleen, the perirenal fascia, and the nephrosplenic ligament in 3 of the 4 horses in which the nephrosplenic space was closed using the automated suturing device. In 1 horse, closure of the nephrosplenic space was not possible due to constant breakage of the endoscopic needle. Intra-operative complications encountered with the automated suturing device were tearing of the perirenal fascia, nephrosplenic ligament, and dorsal splenic capsule along with breakage of the needle. The automated suturing device used in this study for laparoscopic closure of the nephrosplenic space resulted in longer surgery times, suffered instrument failures and delivered inadequate suture. PMID:27247467

  8. The B-Lynch uterine brace suture, and a bit of this and a bit of that...

    PubMed

    Karoshi, Mahantesh

    2010-03-01

    The widespread application of the B-Lynch brace suture to control postpartum hemorrhage has sparked interest in a variety of adjunctive methods, used alone or in combination, to control uterine bleeding. Although the B-Lynch brace suture has been used with good results throughout the world, failures can and do occur in rare instances, especially when the suture is incorrectly placed for use for an inappropriate indication. Four reports of additional methods to control postpartum hemorrhage are published in this issue of IJGO. Three use the B-Lynch brace suture combined with other techniques. The need for additional techniques reminds the reader of the importance of proper suture application for proper indication. Potential reasons for failure of the B-Lynch suture are provided. PMID:20070962

  9. Comparison of CO2 laser welding with suture technique for repair of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Neven A.; Johnstone, Frederic L.; Kilkelly, Francis X.; McKinney, LuAnn; Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Smith, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, histology, and strength of laser welding in repair of sharply transected rat Achilles tendons. In 26 adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats, the severed tendons were repaired with a 7-0 nylon, modified Kessler core suture followed by either a running 9-0 nylon epitendinous suture or a circumferential CO2 laser epidendinous weld using 25% human albumin as a solder. All repairs were timed and post- operative tensile strength was analyzed with material testing equipment. In addition, histologic testing was performed on both types of repairs. The mean time to complete the epitendinous repair in the laser group was 3.5 minutes and in the suture group, 8 minutes. The mean ultimate tensile strength in 6 normal tendons was 40.9 Newtons (N) with group standard deviation of 5.2 N. When compared with normal controls, post-operatively both types of tendon repairs resulted in tensile failure at lower forces. The ultimate tensile strength for the epitendinous suture repair and the laser welds were 13% and 6% of normal controls, respectively. Twenty tendons with epidendinous suture repair had mean ultimate tensile strength of 5.4 (+/- 1.2) N, while the 17 tendons with laser wends failed at 2.6 (+/- 0.9) N. Histologic evaluation of tendons repaired with CO2 laser revealed areas of coagulation and edema on the surface of tendon edges. Post-operatively, greater tissue changes were noted in laser treated tendons than those repaired with sutures. Laser welding of epitenon is possible and can be completed faster than the suture repair. The repaired tendon surface appears smoother and less bulky after laser treatment. However, significantly decreased immediate post-operative strength was demonstrated by the use of Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance and Turkey's pairwise comparison.

  10. Suture Line Response of End-to-Side Anastomosis: A Stress Concentration Methodology.

    PubMed

    Roussis, P C; Giannakopoulos, A E; Charalambous, H P

    2015-03-01

    End-to-side vascular anastomosis has a considerable complexity regarding the suturing of the juncture line between the artery and the graft. The present study proposes a stress-concentration methodology for the prediction of the stress distribution at the juncture line, aiming to provide generic expressions describing the response of an end-to-side anastomosis. The proposed methodology is based on general results obtained from the analysis of pipe connections, a topic that has been investigated in recent years in the field of offshore structural engineering. A key aspect for implementing the stress-concentration-factor approach is the recognition that the axial load due to pressure and flow dynamics exerted along the graft axis controls the "hot spots" on the juncture line, which in turn affects the mechanical response of the sutures. Several parameters, identified to influence the suture line response, are introduced in closed-form expressions for the suture line response calculations. The obtained results compare favorably with finite element results published in the literature. The proposed model predicts analytically the suture line response of end-to-side anastomosis, while capturing the influence of and interdependence among the problem parameters. Lower values of the graft radius, the distance between sequential stitches, and the intersecting angle between the artery and the graft are some of the key parameters that reduce the suture line response. The findings of this study are broad in scope and potentially applicable to improving the end-to-side anastomosis technique through improved functionality of the sutures and optimal selection of materials and anastomosis angle. PMID:26577101

  11. Antibacterial suture vs silk for the surgical removal of impacted lower third molars. A randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Pérez, Sergi; López-Ramírez, Marta; Quinteros-Borgarello, Milva; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological impact of an antibacterial suture (Monocryl® Plus) in the surgical removal of I3M. Material and Methods A “split-mouth”, prospective pilot clinical study was designed involving 20 patients programmed for the surgical removal of I3M. Each side was randomly sutured with Monocryl® Plus or silk suture and removed for microbiological study 72 hours and 7 days after surgery. Presence of SSI, wound bleeding and the degree of discomfort associated with each type of suture material (scored by means of a visual analog scale) were evaluated. The level of contamination of each material was observed under the scanning electron microscope. Results Wound bleeding upon suture removing was slightly greater after 72 hours and 7 days with black silk suture, though the differences were not statistically significant (p=0.752 and p=0.113, respectively). Patient discomfort was very similar with both types of suture material (p=0.861). Only one case of SSI was recorded with black silk suture after 72 hours. Microbiologically, the antibacterial suture showed a lesser presence of microorganisms (p<0.001, at 72h and p=0.033 at 7th day, respectively). The most common bacterial species included grampositive cocci (Streptococcus viridans group, Neisseria spp., Coagulasenegative Staphylococcus and Peptostreptococcus), gramnegative cocci (Veillonella), grampositive Bacilli (Lactobacillus), and gramnegative Bacilli (Prevotella). Conclusions The greatest antibacterial effect of Monocryl Plus suture was observed after 72 hours. According to most authors, there is no doubt that this antibacterial suture can provide little safety in the control of SSI. Key words:Antibacterial suture, monocryl® plus, vicryl® plus, third molar surgery, postoperative infection, surgical site infection (SSI). PMID:26615503

  12. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeballos, E. Cerron; Crotty, I.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Valverde, J. Lamas; Neupane, S.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  13. Perspectives on anechoic chamber qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunefare, Kenneth A.; Biesel, Van B.

    2002-11-01

    The qualification of a new anechoic chamber requires demonstration that the chamber produces a free-field environment within some tolerance bounds and over some acceptable volume. At the most basic level, qualification requires measurement of sound levels at increasing distances from a test source, and then comparing the levels to a theoretical free-field decay. While simple in concept, the actual performance of a qualification test is problematic in implementation, with troublesome issues relevant to the nature of the sound source, test signal (broadband or pure tone), spatial resolution of measurements (e.g., measurements at discrete locations or spatially continuous), and comparison of the data to a theoretical decay. This presentation will provide a brief historical perspective on chamber qualification and review current practice. It will demonstrate the inadequacy of broadband noise and widely spaced discrete measurements for qualification purposes. It will demonstrate that pure tone signals and spatially continuous measurements provide a rigorous test of a chambers performance.

  14. Drift and proportional tracking chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, J. A.

    1980-11-01

    The many techniques exploited in constructing tracking chambers, particle detectors which measure the trajectories and momenta of charged particles, are discussed. In high energy interactions, the final states are dominated by closely collimated jets of high multiplicity, requiring good track-pair resolution in the tracking chamber. High energy particles deflect very little in limited magnetic field volumes, necessitating good spatial resolution for accurate momentum measurements. The colliding beam technique requires a device easily adapted to full solid angle coverage, and the high event rates expected in some of these machines put a premium on good time resolution. Finally, the production and subsequent decays of the tau, charmed and beautiful mesons provide multiple vertex topologies. To reconstruct these vertices reliably requires improvements in spatial resolution and track pair resolution. The proportional counter and its descendant, the drift chamber, are considered as tracking chambers. The physics of this device are discussed in order to understand its performance limitations and promises.

  15. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  16. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  17. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  18. Internal calvarial bone distraction in rabbits with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis.

    PubMed

    Losken, H W; Mooney, M P; Zoldos, J; Tschakaloff, A; Burrows, A M; Smith, T D; Cooper, G M; Kapucu, M R; Siegel, M I

    1998-09-01

    Recent studies have identified a subpopulation of craniosynostotic individuals who exhibit progressive or delayed-onset synostosis and mild craniofacial growth abnormalities. These individuals may be good candidates for nonextirpation, distraction osteogenesis therapy. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis by using internal calvarial bone distraction in a rabbit model with familial delayed-onset craniosynostosis. Data were collected from 159 rabbits: 71 normal controls, 72 with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis, 8 with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis and coronal suturectomy, and 8 with delayed-onset coronal suture synostosis and distraction. At 10 days of age, all rabbits had amalgam markers placed on both sides of the frontonasal, coronal, and anterior lambdoidal sutures. At 25 days of age, correction was accomplished through either a 5-mm-wide suturectomy or distraction osteogenesis. An internal distraction appliance was fixed to the frontal and parietal bones and percutaneously and intermittently activated at an average of 0.10 mm/day for 42 days (4.11 mm total). Serial radiographs were taken at 10, 25, 42, and 84 days of age. Results revealed that rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis had significantly (p < 0.01) reduced coronal suture growth rates (0.04 mm/day) compared with the other three groups (0.07 mm/day). Rabbits with suturectomy and rabbits with distraction showed similar coronal suture responses. However, from 42 to 84 days of age, rabbits with distraction showed reduced growth at the vault sutures and abnormal growth patterns in cranial vault width, cranial vault shape, and cranial base angulation compared with the other three groups. Results demonstrated that, although the normal coronal suture growth rate was maintained in rabbits with delayed-onset synostosis using intermittent distraction osteogenesis, normal adult craniofacial structure was not achieved. Such anomalous growth was probably a result of altered growth

  19. Posterior Predictive Bayesian Phylogenetic Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Paul O.; Xie, Wangang; Chen, Ming-Hui; Fan, Yu; Kuo, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present two distinctly different posterior predictive approaches to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection and illustrate these methods using examples from green algal protein-coding cpDNA sequences and flowering plant rDNA sequences. The Gelfand–Ghosh (GG) approach allows dissection of an overall measure of model fit into components due to posterior predictive variance (GGp) and goodness-of-fit (GGg), which distinguishes this method from the posterior predictive P-value approach. The conditional predictive ordinate (CPO) method provides a site-specific measure of model fit useful for exploratory analyses and can be combined over sites yielding the log pseudomarginal likelihood (LPML) which is useful as an overall measure of model fit. CPO provides a useful cross-validation approach that is computationally efficient, requiring only a sample from the posterior distribution (no additional simulation is required). Both GG and CPO add new perspectives to Bayesian phylogenetic model selection based on the predictive abilities of models and complement the perspective provided by the marginal likelihood (including Bayes Factor comparisons) based solely on the fit of competing models to observed data. [Bayesian; conditional predictive ordinate; CPO; L-measure; LPML; model selection; phylogenetics; posterior predictive.] PMID:24193892

  20. [In vitro studies of the mechanical load capability of resorbable monofilament suture materials].

    PubMed

    Bremer, Felicia; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Stiesch, Meike

    2009-01-01

    In a vast spectrum of wound closures there is an indication for resorbable suture materials. For surgeons detailed knowledge of the physicochemical properties is important in order to find the right suture for each indication. For this purpose, various new monofilament polymers were employed. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of hydrolysis and gamma-irradiation on the linear strength. The final analysis of all tested suture materials concluded that gamma-irradiation had no effects on linear strength. However, the analysis showed significant discrepancies between individual polymers with regard to loss of tensile strength associated with hydrolysis. Polydioxanone- and caprolactone-lactid-based resorbable suture materials both displayed adequate tensile strength after a five-week period of hydrolysis. In comparison the triblock-copolymer is subject to rapid degradation. Polydioxanone- and caprolactone-lactid-based resorbable suture materials are indicated for use in tissues which require mechanical support over a longer period. Monosyn is more suitable for short-term wound support. PMID:19852206

  1. The Optimal Placement of Sutures in All-inside Repair of Meniscocapsular Separation

    PubMed Central

    Tiftikci, Uğur; Serbest, Sancar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to show the effects on the meniscus of repair applied from the femoral, the femoral-tibial and the tibial surfaces. Methods: In the treatment of meniscocapsular separation, although the accepted gold standard technique in the past was the inside-out suture technique, the current treatment method is all-inside repair methods. The all-inside techniques include the hook method and applications with a meniscus suture device. The hook method is difficult with a steep learning curve. In meniscus repair applied with the all-inside meniscus devices, the application of the suture can change the anatomic structure and position of the meniscus. Results: The suturing method applied from the tibial section of the meniscus does not disrupt the anatomic position of the meniscus in meniscocapsular separation. Thus, the optimum conditions are provided for restoration of the functions of the meniscus. Conclusion: The optimal repair in meniscocapsular separations can be considered to be that made with sutures from the tibial section of the meniscus. This technique may be helpful in obtaining better clinical results. PMID:27347236

  2. LED phototherapy on midpalatal suture after rapid maxilla expansion: a Raman spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Cristiane B.; Habib, Fernando Antonio L.; de Araújo, Telma M.; dos Santos, Jean N.; Cangussu, Maria Cristina T.; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S.; de Castro, Isabele Cardoso V.; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2015-03-01

    A quick bone formation after maxillary expansion would reduce treatment timeand the biomodulating effects of LED light could contribute for it. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of LED phototherapy on the acceleration of bone formation at the midpalatal suture after maxilla expansion. Thirty rats divided into 6 groups were used on the study at 2 time points - 7 days: Control; Expansion; and Expansion + LED; and 14 days: Expansion; Expansion + LED in the first week; Expansion and LED in the first and second weeks. LED irradiation occurred at every 48 h during 2 weeks. Expansion was accomplished using a spatula and maintained with a triple helicoid of 0.020" stainless steel orthodontic wire. A LED light (λ850 ± 10nm, 150mW ± 10mW, spot of 0.5cm2, t=120 sec, SAEF of 18J/cm2) was applied in one point in the midpalatal suture immediately behind the upper incisors. Near infrared Raman spectroscopic analysis of the suture region was carried and data submitted to statistical analyzes (p≤0.05). Raman spectrum analysis demonstrated that irradiation increased hydroxyapatite in the midpalatal suture after expansion. The results of this indicate that LED irradiation; have a positive biomodulation contributing to the acceleration of bone formation in the midpalatal suture after expansion procedure.

  3. Creep rupture behavior of polypropylene suture material and its applications as a time-release mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kusy, R.P.; Whitley, J.Q.

    1983-05-01

    The controlled failure of polypropylene (PP) sutures is studied via creep rupture tests. From plots of log time (tB) vs. stress (sigma), linear relationships are generated over the failure times of 1-1000 h. Results show that as a function of stress, the time dependence varies with irradiation dose (15, 20, 25, and 50 Mrad), irradiation atmosphere (air and vacuum), suture diameter (7-0, 6-0, 5-0, and 4-0), and test temperature (26 and 37 degrees C). For a given stress, the time to failure is least for the greatest dose in the presence of air and at the highest temperature. When suture loops are wrapped around a small wire sheave, however, failure occurs in the largest suture as much as two decades sooner than the smallest suture studied. Within the limitations stated herein, they are independent of test method, loop diameter, aging, and humidity. Consequently, after irradiation in vacuum and postirradiation heat treatment, the processed material may be stored at room temperature for at least 1 month. Such materials are advocated when the time release of a dental or medical device is required, for example, in the self-activating cleft palate appliance.

  4. Comparison of fibrin glue and suture in the healing of teat incisions in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Alan, M; Yener, Z; Tasal, I; Bakir, B

    2008-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether fibrin glue can be used to close experimentally induced incisions of the teat (mammary papillae) in lactating goats and to compare the healing of the glued with the sutured incisions. Four clinically healthy lactating dairy goats, namely 8 mammary papillae were used. After surgical preparation of the papillae, a 3.5 cm long incision of each papilla was made through skin, muscular layer and mucosa into the papillary sinus. The wounds in the right papillae in all goats were closed with U-shaped uninterrupted 00 chromic catgut sutures. The wounds in the left papillae in all goats were closed, using fibrin glue. One incision was seen to be dehisced and fistulous one day after in fibrin glued teats. The animals were slaughtered 8 days after surgical manipulation. The mammary papillae were removed and examined in the viewpoint on gross and microscopic findings. The healing of wounds was slower and feeble in glued mammary papillary incisions, however faster and stronger in sutured incisions on day 8 after operations. But, available outcomes like less tissue thickness and positive cosmetic results could be obtained byfibrin glue used on mammary papillary incisions, which are very important for teats to be milked by hand and milking machine. Results suggest that it is advisable to use only one or two simple interrupted sutures in teat incisions glued with fibrin to prevent the dehiscence but with a more reliable healing than the sutured incisions. PMID:18547021

  5. Upper Mantle Structure Around the Trans-European Suture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janutyte, Ilma; Majdanski, Mariusz; Voss, Peter H.; Kozlovskaya, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) is the transition between old Proterozoic lithosphere in Northern and Eastern Europe and the younger Phanerozoic lithosphere in Central and Western Europe. The presented study is a part of the PASSEQ 2006-2008 project which is linked to the TOR project realized during 1996-1997. The PASSEQ and the TOR projects aimed to study the lithosphere and asthenosphere structure around the TESZ, but the latter was focused on the northwestern part of the TESZ between Sweden and Denmark - Germany, while the PASSEQ project was focused on the TESZ mainly beneath Poland. During the PASSEQ project 139 short-period and 49 broadband temporary seismic stations were deployed along the transect stretching from Germany throughout Czech Republic and Poland to Lithuania. The array recorded continuous seismic data from May, 2006 to June, 2008. In our study we used data of all available PASSEQ seismic stations and seismic stations of the national seismological networks of the participating countries and compiled a data set of teleseismic P-wave arrivals. The full data set consists of 8308 manually picked arrivals. Due to limited computational power we used the data of the highest quality only, i.e. 6008 picks. The non-linear teleseismic tomography algorithm TELINV was used to obtain the model of P-wave velocity perturbations in the upper mantle around the TESZ. We recovered the upper mantle structure from 70 km down to 350 km in the study area. The results show ±6.5 % P-wave velocity variations compared to the IASP91 velocity model. We found higher velocities beneath the old East European Craton (EEC) east of the TESZ and lower ones beneath the younger Western Europe west of the TESZ. The thickest litosphere was found beneath the EEC (Lithuania) where the higher velocities continue to about 300 km or even more. To the west of the TESZ under the Variscides the average depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) is about 100 km. The TESZ appears

  6. Posterior osseous bridging of C1.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Serkan; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Comert, Ayhan; Acar, Halil I; Seckin, Hakan; Er, Uygur; Belen, Deniz; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Elhan, Alaittin

    2008-06-01

    The sulcus of the vertebral artery is located behind the lateral mass of the atlas and in some cases is converted into a foramen by anomalous ossification known as the posterior ponticulus (osseous bridge). This study involved anatomical observations of 158 isolated anatomical specimens of dry C1 vertebrae. The incidence and types of posterior osseous bridging were identified for the 158 dry samples of atlas vertebrae. In nine (5.6%) dry C1 vertebrae, partial osseous bridging was detected (bilaterally in eight vertebrae and unilaterally on the left in one). Complete osseous bridging (arcuate foramen) was observed in six (3.8%) dry C1 vertebrae (bilaterally in one vertebra, unilaterally on the left in three, and on the right in two). Awareness of the types of posterior osseous bridging of C1 in craniocervical junction surgery is essential, and may be helpful in surgical interventions in this region. PMID:18378457

  7. A live cysticercosis in anterior chamber leading to glaucoma secondary to pupilary block.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Abhishek; Singh, Mahendra Kumar; Singh, Virendra Pratap; Rai, Amit Kumar; Chakraborty, Somnath; Maurya, Om Prakash Singh

    2007-03-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with pain and redness in her left eye. On examination, a free-floating cyst of size 4 mm with prominent scolex was observed in the anterior chamber. Scolex was occasionally moving in and out of its bag. To prevent the cyst migrating to the posterior chamber, pilocarpine eye drops were instilled. After 2 hours, the patient developed total pupilary block with iris bombe. The intraocular tension was 48 mm Hg. The diagnosis of cysticercosis leading to glaucoma secondary to pupilary block was made. The cyst was removed surgically by viscoexpression. The histopathology proved to be a cysticercosis. PMID:17473746

  8. Posterior predictive checking of multiple imputation models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cattram D; Lee, Katherine J; Carlin, John B

    2015-07-01

    Multiple imputation is gaining popularity as a strategy for handling missing data, but there is a scarcity of tools for checking imputation models, a critical step in model fitting. Posterior predictive checking (PPC) has been recommended as an imputation diagnostic. PPC involves simulating "replicated" data from the posterior predictive distribution of the model under scrutiny. Model fit is assessed by examining whether the analysis from the observed data appears typical of results obtained from the replicates produced by the model. A proposed diagnostic measure is the posterior predictive "p-value", an extreme value of which (i.e., a value close to 0 or 1) suggests a misfit between the model and the data. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the posterior predictive p-value as an imputation diagnostic. Using simulation methods, we deliberately misspecified imputation models to determine whether posterior predictive p-values were effective in identifying these problems. When estimating the regression parameter of interest, we found that more extreme p-values were associated with poorer imputation model performance, although the results highlighted that traditional thresholds for classical p-values do not apply in this context. A shortcoming of the PPC method was its reduced ability to detect misspecified models with increasing amounts of missing data. Despite the limitations of posterior predictive p-values, they appear to have a valuable place in the imputer's toolkit. In addition to automated checking using p-values, we recommend imputers perform graphical checks and examine other summaries of the test quantity distribution. PMID:25939490

  9. [A study of restoration of seriously damaged posterior teeth by cast metal prostheses].

    PubMed

    Li, N Y

    1993-09-01

    A total of 38 seriously damaged posterior teeth were restored by cast metal prostheses, including onlays (with pulp chamber retainer and radicular retainer), cast dowelcore, two-piece dowel-core or cast dowel crown. As followed up for 6-48 months, 37 prostheses remained firm and sound, with perfect periphery seal, no secondary caries and pathological changes of peridontium were observed, The clinical consummate rate was 97%, The occlusal force of the restored teeth measured in 14 cases was 13.6-30.2 kg, which can satisfy the needs of masticatory function. The selection of retainers should be in accordance with the position and degree of crown damage of the posterior teeth. The key links guaranteeing smooth insertion and perfect periphery seal of cast metal prostheses were also pointed out. PMID:8194413

  10. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H.; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L.; Bankier, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  11. Imaging the posterior mediastinum: a multimodality approach.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Mariaelena; Heidinger, Benedikt H; Franquet, Elisa; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Bankier, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    The posterior mediastinum contains several structures that can produce a wide variety of pathologic conditions. Descending thoracic aorta, esophagus, azygos and hemiazygos veins, thoracic duct, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, and nerves are all located in this anatomical region and can produce diverse abnormalities. Although chest radiography may detect many of these pathologic conditions, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are the imaging modalities of choice for further defining the relationship of posterior mediastinal lesions to neighboring structures and showing specific imaging features that narrow the differential diagnosis. This review emphasizes modality-related answers to morphologic questions, which provide precise diagnostic information. PMID:25993732

  12. Arthroscopic Approach to Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Michael H; Bohman, Laura

    2016-10-01

    Posterior ankle pain can occur for many reasons. If it is produced by forced plantarflexion of the foot, it is often a result of impingement from an enlarged posterior talar process or an os trigonum. This condition may present in an acute or chronic state. Management is initially nonoperative, but surgical treatments are available. This condition is often seen in athletes, so procedures that limit surgical trauma and allow early return to activity are ideal. An arthroscopic approach for this disorder produces good outcomes with limited complications. Understanding the indications, local anatomy, and surgical technique, allows good, reproducible outcomes. PMID:27599438

  13. Osterix/Sp7 limits cranial bone initiation sites and is required for formation of sutures.

    PubMed

    Kague, Erika; Roy, Paula; Asselin, Garrett; Hu, Gui; Simonet, Jacqueline; Stanley, Alexandra; Albertson, Craig; Fisher, Shannon

    2016-05-15

    During growth, individual skull bones overlap at sutures, where osteoblast differentiation and bone deposition occur. Mutations causing skull malformations have revealed some required genes, but many aspects of suture regulation remain poorly understood. We describe a zebrafish mutation in osterix/sp7, which causes a generalized delay in osteoblast maturation. While most of the skeleton is patterned normally, mutants have specific defects in the anterior skull and upper jaw, and the top of the skull comprises a random mosaic of bones derived from individual initiation sites. Osteoblasts at the edges of the bones are highly proliferative and fail to differentiate, consistent with global changes in gene expression. We propose that signals from the bone itself are required for orderly recruitment of precursor cells and growth along the edges. The delay in bone maturation caused by loss of Sp7 leads to unregulated bone formation, revealing a new mechanism for patterning the skull and sutures. PMID:26992365

  14. Light-guided localization within tissue using biocompatible surgical suture fiber as an optical waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Park, Kwan Seob; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2014-09-01

    In breast-conserving surgery, an optical wire is a useful surgical guiding tool to optically locate small lesions within the breast tissue. However, the use of a long silica glass fiber as the optical wire can be burdensome to patients because of its stiffness and nonbiocompatibility. We investigate the use of a biocompatible fiber for light localization in tissue. A surgical suture with a diameter of 400 μm and a few centimeters long is employed as the biocompatible optical waveguide to transport the visible laser light to the inner tissue site. Optical location is confirmed with glow ball-like red laser illumination at the tip of the suture embedded within a fresh chicken breast tissue. Effective optical power coupling to the suture is made by using a double-cladding fiber coupler. From this preliminary result, we realize practical light localization with biopolymer waveguides.

  15. Necrotizing scleritis after intraocular surgery associated with the use of polyester nonabsorbable sutures.

    PubMed

    Stokes, John; Wright, Mark; Ramaesh, Kanna; Smith, Colin; Dhillon, Baljean

    2003-09-01

    We present 2 elderly patients who developed necrotizing scleritis after cataract extraction in which the wound was sutured with polyester. In the first case, a 73-year-old woman who had right phacoemulsification via a limbal incision developed necrotizing scleritis 8 months after surgery. The eye became progressively painful and phthisical, necessitating enucleation. Microscopic examination of the enucleated globe showed a predominantly lymphocytic infiltration of the ocular tissues with no evidence of an infectious agent. In the second case, a 78-year-old woman had bilateral extracapsular cataract extraction through a limbal incision closed with a polyester suture. The patient presented 3 years later with bilateral necrotizing sclerokeratitis. No underlying systemic vasculitis or autoimmune condition was identified in either patient. To our knowledge, the association of necrotizing scleritis after intraocular surgery and polyester fiber suture material (Mersilene) has not been described. PMID:14522309

  16. Light-guided localization within tissue using biocompatible surgical suture fiber as an optical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo June; Park, Kwan Seob; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2014-09-01

    In breast-conserving surgery, an optical wire is a useful surgical guiding tool to optically locate small lesions within the breast tissue. However, the use of a long silica glass fiber as the optical wire can be burdensome to patients because of its stiffness and nonbiocompatibility. We investigate the use of a biocompatible fiber for light localization in tissue. A surgical suture with a diameter of 400 μm and a few centimeters long is employed as the biocompatible optical waveguide to transport the visible laser light to the inner tissue site. Optical location is confirmed with glow ball-like red laser illumination at the tip of the suture embedded within a fresh chicken breast tissue. Effective optical power coupling to the suture is made by using a double-cladding fiber coupler. From this preliminary result, we realize practical light localization with biopolymer waveguides. PMID:25202898

  17. Suture-bridge subscapularis tendon repair technique using low anterior portals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Jun-Suk; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Kumar, Praveen; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2011-02-01

    A suture-bridge technique has been introduced to facilitate fixation procedures and to achieve increased holding strength in posterosuperior rotator cuff. Based on biomechanical studies, this technique has been suggested as an effective method that could optimize rotator cuff tendon-footprint contact area and mean pressure, as well as holding strength. In this technique, the suture-bridge creation is adapted for arthroscopic subscapularis repair to attain the ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. To obtain enough working portals and space, two accessory portals were made on the anterior aspect of the shoulder and use an elevator to retract the conjoined tendons and deltoid muscle. This technique could be useful for the repair of subscapularis tears, which are not easily approached using other arthroscopic techniques. From a biomechanical point of view, the subscapularis tendon could be restored more ideally using the suture-bridge technique. PMID:20890701

  18. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  19. Limited open repair of ruptured Achilles tendons with Bunnel-type sutures.

    PubMed

    Park, H G; Moon, D H; Yoon, J M

    2001-12-01

    A new method of repairing Achilles tendons, which uses a small medial skin incision with a Bunnel-type suture, was performed on 14 patients, and the clinical results were found satisfying. In order to restore the Achilles tendon to its original length, restore tensile strength in the suture site, and minimize injury to the sural nerve, an operative procedure has been devised which uses a limited open repair with a Bunnel-type suture. We followed 14 patients who had undergone the new procedure for a mean interval of 26 months after the injury. They returned to work in six weeks and to playing sports in 25 weeks. There were no cases of late rerupture nor injuries to the sural nerve. This technique approximated the preinjury length and resting tension of the musculo-tendinous apparatus and minimized sural nerve injury. PMID:11783926

  20. Novel High Efficient Coatings for Anti-Microbial Surgical Sutures Using Chlorhexidine in Fatty Acid Slow-Release Carrier Systems

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Andreas; Schneider, Jochen; Wehner, Steffen; Matl, Florian Dominik; Schieker, Matthias; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Stemberger, Axel; Burgkart, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Sutures can cause challenging surgical site infections, due to capillary effects resulting in bacteria permeating wounds. Anti-microbial sutures may avoid these complications by inhibiting bacterial pathogens. Recently, first triclosan-resistances were reported and therefore alternative substances are becoming clinically relevant. As triclosan alternative chlorhexidine, the “gold standard” in oral antiseptics was used. The aim of the study was to optimize novel slow release chlorhexidine coatings based on fatty acids in surgical sutures, to reach a high anti-microbial efficacy and simultaneously high biocompatibility. Sutures were coated with chlorhexidine laurate and chlorhexidine palmitate solutions leading to 11, 22 or 33 µg/cm drug concentration per length. Drug release profiles were determined in aqueous elutions. Antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus was assessed in agar diffusion tests. Biocompatibility was evaluated via established cytotoxicity assay (WST-1). A commercially triclosan-containing suture (Vicryl Plus), was used as anti-microbial reference. All coated sutures fulfilled European Pharmacopoeia required tensile strength and proved continuous slow drug release over 96 hours without complete wash out of the coated drug. High anti-microbial efficacy for up to 5 days was observed. Regarding biocompatibility, sutures using 11 µg/cm drug content displayed acceptable cytotoxic levels according to ISO 10993-5. The highest potential for human application were shown by the 11 µg/cm chlorhexidine coated sutures with palmitic acid. These novel coated sutures might be alternatives to already established anti-microbial sutures such as Vicryl Plus in case of triclosan-resistance. Chlorhexidine is already an established oral antiseptic, safety and efficacy should be proven for clinical applications in anti-microbial sutures. PMID:24983633

  1. Arthroscopic fixation of an avulsion fracture of the tibia involving the posterior cruciate ligament: a modified technique in a series of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, L B; Wang, H; Tie, K; Mohammed, A; Qi, Y J

    2015-09-01

    A total of 22 patients with a tibial avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with grade II or III posterior laxity were reduced and fixed arthroscopically using routine anterior and double posteromedial portals. A double-strand Ethibond suture was inserted into the joint and wrapped around the PCL from anterior to posterior to secure the ligament above the avulsed bony fragment. Two tibial bone tunnels were created using the PCL reconstruction guide, aiming at the medial and lateral borders of the tibial bed. The ends of the suture were pulled out through the bone tunnels and tied over the tibial cortex between the openings of the tunnels to reduce and secure the bony fragment. Satisfactory reduction of the fracture was checked arthroscopically and radiographically. The patients were followed-up for a mean of 24.5 months (19 to 28). Bone union occurred six weeks post-operatively. At final follow-up, all patients had a negative posterior drawer test and a full range of movement. KT-1000 arthrometer examination showed that the mean post-operative side-to-side difference improved from 10.9 mm (standard deviation (sd) 0.7) pre-operatively to 1.5 mm (sd 0.6) (p = 0.001). The mean Tegner and the International Knee Documentation Committee scores improved significantly (p = 0.001). The mean Lysholm score at final follow-up was 92.0 (85 to 96). We conclude that this technique is convenient, reliable and minimally invasive and successfully restores the stability and function of the knee. PMID:26330588

  2. 63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber was completed in the first stages of phase III construction. The paneled wall to the fireplace's right displays a phase III molding profile. The mark between the cabinet doors and on the large lower panel indicates the former position of a partition wall. The chimney-breast paneling bears a phase I profile and might have been moved to the room when the fireplace mass in the hall was reduced. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. The effect of adjustable suture (Khaw) trabeculectomy on intraocular pressure: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ahmet; Kocatürk, Tolga; Dayanır, Volkan

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate long-term intraocular pressure (IOP) outcome as well as complications associated with adjustable suture trabeculectomy in glaucoma patients who were uncontrolled under maximum medical therapy. In this retrospective case series, 35 eyes of 30 patients are included in the study. Adjustable suture trabeculectomy with 0.2 mg/cc mitomycin-C for 3 min was performed by the same surgeon. Subconjunctival 5-fluorouracil injection, transconjunctival suture adjustment, digital massage, and/or argon suturolysis were utilized postoperatively as needed. Complete success, qualified success, and failure were defined as IOP ≤ 18 mmHg without medication, IOP ≤ 18 mmHg with one or more medications, and IOP >18 mmHg with medication or need for additional glaucoma surgery, respectively. Of the 35 eyes, 13 had primary open angle, 18 had psuedoexfoliative, 1 had juvenile, 1 had pigmentary, 1 had uveitic, and 1 had chronic angle-closure glaucoma. Mean preoperative IOP of 30.1 ± 10.5 mmHg dropped to 10.8 ± 4.7 mmHg (p < 0.001) after a mean follow-up of 595 ± 435 days. Nine eyes had the desired IOP on first postoperative day where no transconjunctival suture adjustment was performed. Remaining 26 eyes required a mean of two adjustments (range 1-7) during the first postoperative 24 days in order to achieve a desirable IOP. Complete success, qualified success, and failure were observed in 28 (80 %), 5 (14 %), and 2 (6 %) eyes, respectively. There were no serious complications related to adjustable suture trabeculectomy. We believe adjustable suture trabeculectomy to be a safe and effective alternative to standard trabeculectomy where a desirable low IOP can be achieved. PMID:26002838

  4. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  5. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  6. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  7. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  8. Modified Mason-Allen Suture Bridge Technique: A New Suture Bridge Technique with Improved Tissue Holding by the Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong Gun; Cho, Nam Su

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method of suture bridge technique for medial row fixation using a modified Mason-Allen stitch instead of a horizontal mattress. Medial row configuration of the technique is composed of the simple stitch limb and the modified Mason-Allen stitch limb. The limbs are passed through the tendon by a shuttle relay. The simple stitch limb passes the cuff once and the modified Mason-Allen stitch limb passes three times which creates a rip stop that prevents tendon pull-out. In addition, the Mason-Allen suture bridge configuration is basically a knotless technique which has an advantage of reducing a possibility of strangulation of the rotator cuff tendon, impingement or irritation that may be caused by knot. PMID:22949957

  9. Image-based tracking of the suturing needle during laparoscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, S.; Kroehnert, A.; Bodenstedt, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B.; Dillmann, R.

    2015-03-01

    One of the most complex and difficult tasks for surgeons during minimally invasive interventions is suturing. A prerequisite to assist the suturing process is the tracking of the needle. The endoscopic images provide a rich source of information which can be used for needle tracking. In this paper, we present an image-based method for markerless needle tracking. The method uses a color-based and geometry-based segmentation to detect the needle. Once an initial needle detection is obtained, a region of interest enclosing the extracted needle contour is passed on to a reduced segmentation. It is evaluated with in vivo images from da Vinci interventions.

  10. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katrina J; Favreau, John T; Guyette, Jacques P; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R; Fitzpatrick, John P; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area was

  11. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  12. Sutures versus staples for skin closure in orthopaedic surgery: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Debbie; Mann, Charles; Donell, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes of staples versus sutures in wound closure after orthopaedic surgery. Design Meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, CINAHL, AMED, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched, in addition to the grey literature, in all languages from 1950 to September 2009. Additional studies were identified from cited references. Selection criteria Two authors independently assessed papers for eligibility. Included studies were randomised and non-randomised controlled trials that compared the use of staples with suture material for wound closure after orthopaedic surgery procedures. All studies were included, and publications were not excluded because of poor methodological quality. Review methods Two authors independently reviewed studies for methodological quality and extracted data from each paper. Final data for analysis were collated through consensus. The primary outcome measure was the assessment of superficial wound infection after wound closure with staples compared with sutures. Relative risk and mean difference with 95% confidence intervals were calculated and pooled with a random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed with I2 and χ2 statistical test. Results Six papers, which included 683 wounds, were identified; 332 patients underwent suture closure and 351 staple closure. The risk of developing a superficial wound infection after orthopaedic procedures was over three times greater after staple closure than suture closure (relative risk 3.83, 95% confidence interval 1.38 to 10.68; P=0.01). On subgroup analysis of hip surgery alone, the risk of developing a wound infection was four times greater after staple closure than suture closure (4.79, 1.24 to 18.47; P=0.02). There was no significant difference between sutures and staples in the development of inflammation, discharge, dehiscence, necrosis, and allergic reaction. The included studies had several major methodological limitations, including the

  13. [Astigmatism following cataract surgery: comparison following wound closure with nylon suture and Mersilene].

    PubMed

    Bigar, F

    1990-05-01

    Mersilene (polyester fiber) is stronger and less elastic than nylon suture material. In contrast to nylon, Mersilene does not appear to be susceptible to biodegradation in the long term. After a follow-up period of 6 months, the regression of surgically induced astigmatism following extracapsular cataract extraction and lens implantation with a conventional 150 degree corneoscleral incision was in the same range with nylon monofilament 10-0 and Mersilene 10-0. With nylon single sutures (14 patients) there was a reduction from 3.5 and with Mersilene (12 patients) from 3.9 to 0.9 diopters. PMID:2195225

  14. ASSESSMENT OF MECHANICAL AND MANUAL SUTURE IN THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE PHARYNGOESOPHAGEAL DIVERTICULUM

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; CHAGAS, José Francisco Salles; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PASCOAL, Maria Beatriz Nogueira; BRANDI-FILHO, Luis Antonio; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; FRUET, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of the pharyngoesophageal, or Zenker diverticulum is not frequent in the national scenario, and the technique of the diverticulectomy with cricomyotomy in medium and great dimension diverticula is still the most indicated. Because the resection of the diverticulum requires the suture of the pharynx, dehiscence can occur, thereafter delaying swallowing. Hence, the idea is to accomplish this surgical procedure, comparing the manual and mechanical suture, in order to evaluate the real benefit of the mechanical technique. Aim: To evaluate the results of the pharyngoesophageal diverticulectomy with cricomyotomy using manual and mechanical suture with regard to local and systemic complications. Method: Fifty-seven patients with pharyngoesophageal diverticula diagnosed through high digestive endoscopy and pharyngeal esophagogram were studied. The applied surgical technique was diverticulectomy with myotomy of the cricopharyngeal muscle, done in 24 patients (42.2%) the mechanical suture (group A) with the mechanical linear suture device and in 33 (57.8%) a manual closure of the pharynx (group B). Results: In the postoperative period, one patient of group A (4.1%) presented fistula caused by dehiscence of the pharyngeal suture, and three of group B (15.1%) presented the same complication, with a good outcome using a conservative treatment. In the same group, three patients (9.0%) presented stenosis of the suture of the pharynx, with good outcome and with endoscopic dilatations, and no patient from group A presented such complication. Lung infection was present in five patients, being two (8.3%) of group A and three (9.0%) on B, having good outcomes after specific treatment. In the late review, done with 43 patients (94.4%) of group A and 22 (88.0%) on B, the patients declared to be pleased with the surgical procedure, because they were able to regain normal swallowing. Conclusion: The diverticulectomy with myotomy and pharyngeal closure using

  15. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  16. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  17. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  18. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  19. Posterior instability caused by batter's shoulder.

    PubMed

    Kang, Richard W; Mahony, Gregory T; Harris, Thomas C; Dines, Joshua S

    2013-10-01

    In summary, batter’s shoulder is a rare and only recently recognized entity. This condition is posterior shoulder instability caused by a missed attempt at hitting a pitch, especially with an outside pitch. The lack of counterforce from hitting a ball produces increased forces imparted on the posterior capsulolabral complex of the lead shoulder during batting. If the player fails conservative management, she or he can undergo an arthroscopic posterior labral repair instead of debridement. After treatment, the player can expect to return to play after approximately 6 to 7 months. Initial results from a small, retrospective series demonstrate greater than 90% excellent results. These findings are similar to current literature for arthroscopic treatment of posterior instability, which reports success rates that range from 75% to 91%. Longer-term follow-up will be needed to determine the natural history and prognosis or batter’s shoulder. Based on initial results, the authors predict good to excellent results for most players with batter’s shoulder who undergo proper treatment. Additionally, with the exception of switch hitters, the nonthrowing arm is affected. This can also improve the athlete’s return to play. PMID:24079435

  20. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  1. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  2. Prevention of Incisional Surgical Site Infection Using a Subcuticular Absorbable Suture in Elective Surgery for Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bou, Hideki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Maejima, Kentarou; Uchida, Eiji; Tokunaga, Akira

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether subcuticular absorbable sutures actually reduce incisional SSI in patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Surgical site infection (SSI) is still a source of major complications in digestive tract surgery. Reportedly, incisional SSI can be reduced using subcuticular suturing. We performed subcuticular suturing using a 4-0 absorbable monofilament in patients undergoing elective surgery for GI cancer beginning in 2008. Using an interrupted technique, sutures were placed 1.5-2.0cm from the edge of the wound, with everted subcuticular sutures created at intervals of 1.5-2.0cm. The control group consisted of cases in which the common subcutaneous suture method using clip. One hundred cases were examined in the subcuticular group. The incidence of SSI was 0% in the subcuticular suture group, compared with 13.9% in the control group; this difference was significant. Incisional SSI can be prevented using the devised subcuticular absorbable sutures in patients undergoing elective surgery for GI cancer. PMID:26414820

  3. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  4. CHAMBERS FERRY ROADLESS AREA, TEXAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, B.B.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation of the Chambers Ferry Roadless Area, Texas was conducted. The area has probable mineral-resource potential for oil and gas and for lignite. No metallic or additional energy resources were identified in the investigation. Detailed analyses of well logs from the vicinity of the Chambers Ferry Roadless Area, in conjunction with seismic data, are necessary to determine if the subsurface stratigraphy and structure are favorable for the accumulation of oil and gas. A shallow drilling program involving coring on a close-space grid is necessary for determination of the rank and continuity of seams of lignitic sediments in the area.

  5. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  6. Double window viewing chamber assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Inventor); Owen, R. B. (Inventor); Elkins, B. R. (Inventor); White, W. T. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A viewing chamber which permits observation of a sample retained therein includes a pair of double window assemblies mounted in opposed openings in the walls thereof so that a light beam can directly enter and exit from the chamber. A flexible mounting arrangement for the outer windows of the window assemblies enables the windows to be brought into proper alignment. An electrical heating arrangement prevents fogging of the outer windows whereas desiccated air in the volume between the outer and inner windows prevents fogging of the latter.

  7. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  8. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs. PMID:26200620

  9. The Use of Unidirectional Barbed Suture for Urethrovesical Anastomosis during Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Efficacy and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huixin; Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Haibin; Xu, Wenfeng; Liu, Jianhua; Chen, Yong; Li, Tangxuan; Li, Bin; Wu, Zhenquan; Xia, Taolin

    2015-01-01

    Background Unidirectional barbed suture (UBS) has been widely used for surgery in recent years, especially for urethrovesical anastomosis (UVA) during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). However, the efficacy and safety comparing it with conventional non-barbed suture (CS) for UVA is still controversial. Aims The objective of this study is to assess the current evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of UBS compared with CS for UVA during RARP. Methods We comprehensively searched PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, SinoMed (Chinese) and other databases on Oct. 9, 2014 to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and other comparative studies evaluating these two types of suture. The outcome measures included anastomosis time operative time, posterior reconstruction (PR) time, postoperative leakage (PL) rate and continence rates at different time points (4-6 weeks, 3 months, 6-12 months) after surgery. Secondary outcomes included estimated blood loss (EBL) and length of catheterization (LOC). Results Three RCTs and six observational studies including 786 cases were identified. Meta-analysis of extractable data showed that use of UBS could significantly reduce anastomosis time (weighted mean difference [WMD]:-3.98min; 95% confidence interval [CI], -6.02 -1.95; p = 0.0001), operative time (WMD:-10.06min; 95% CI, -15.45–-4.67; p = 0.0003) and PR time (WMD:-0.93min; 95% CI, -1.52–-0.34; p = 0.002). No significant difference was found in PL rate, EBL, LOC, or continence rates at 4-6 weeks, 3 months and 6–12 months after surgery. Conclusions Our meta-analysis indicates that UBS appears to be safe and efficient as CS for UVA during RARP with not only shorter anastomosis time, operative time, PR time, but also equivalent PL rate, EBL, LOC, and continence rates at 4-6 weeks, 3 months and 6-12 months after surgery. For the inherent limitations of the eligible studies, future more persuasive RCTs are needed to

  10. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  11. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a "catching" sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  12. Posterior cruciate-retaining versus posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bercik, Michael J; Joshi, Ashish; Parvizi, Javad

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to compare outcomes of posterior cruciate-retaining and posterior stabilized prostheses. A computerized literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical outcomes of cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized designs. The table of contents of four major Orthopaedic journals and the references section of two arthroplasty text books were reviewed to identify other relevant studies. Ultimately, 1114 patients (1265 knees) were compared. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference in flexion and range of motion in favor of posterior-stabilized knees, but no difference in complication rates. The clinical importance of this remains unknown. The decision to use one design versus the other should rest with the surgeon's preference and comfort with a particular design. PMID:23433255

  13. An Unusual Cause of Posterior Elbow Impingement: Detachment of a Hypertrophied Posterior Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Sugiura, Kosuke; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Suzue, Naoto; Goto, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Wada, Keizo; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 47-year-old woman who developed posterior impingement of the elbow due to detachment of a hypertrophied posterior fat pad. She reported acute left elbow pain after leaning back onto a hard object with her hand and subsequently experienced a “catching” sensation. Comparison with the magnetic resonance images of a normal elbow revealed a hypertrophied posterior fat pad interposed between the olecranon and olecranon fossa in both elbows, with the fat pad in the left elbow located more inferiorly than that in the right elbow. Elbow arthroscopy showed the olecranon fossa covered by the fat pad, a portion of which was detached from the rest of the pad. Debridement of the detached portion was performed until no impingement was evident. Postoperatively, full extension of the elbow did not elicit pain. Clinicians should include this pathology among the differential diagnoses for posterior elbow pain. PMID:26613057

  14. Nondestructive test of regenerative chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Stauffis, R.; Wood, R.

    1972-01-01

    Flat panels simulating internally cooled regenerative thrust chamber walls were fabricated by electroforming, brazing and diffusion bonding to evaluate the feasibility of nondestructive evaluation techniques to detect bonds of various strength integrities. Ultrasonics, holography, and acoustic emission were investigated and found to yield useful and informative data regarding the presence of bond defects in these structures.

  15. Simulation of Layered Magma Chambers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthorn, Richard Grant

    1991-01-01

    The principles of magma addition and liquid layering in magma chambers can be demonstrated by dissolving colored crystals. The concepts of density stratification and apparent lack of mixing of miscible liquids is convincingly illustrated with hydrous solutions at room temperature. The behavior of interstitial liquids in "cumulus" piles can be…

  16. Chamber Music for Every Instrumentalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latten, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses why students who play musical instruments should participate in a chamber music ensemble. Provides rationale for using small ensembles in the high school band curriculum. Focuses on the topic of scheduling, illustrating how to insert small ensembles into the lesson schedule, and how to set up a new schedule. (CMK)

  17. Chamber Music for Better Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Considers why students should participate in a chamber music ensemble: (1) students develop a sense of collegiality and self-worth; (2) ensembles encourage practice time; and (3) ensembles provide flexible performance opportunities. Highlights the different aspects of creating an ensemble from the availability of faculty to selecting challenging…

  18. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  19. Effect of the suture on the durability of bovine pericardium used in cardiac bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    García Paez, J M; Carrera San Martín, A; Jorge-Herrero, E; Millán, I; Navidad, R; Candela, I; García Sestafe, J V; Castillo-Olivares, J L

    1994-02-01

    Our study of the different biomaterials used in the construction of biological cardiac prostheses has shown it to be of vital importance that the physical properties of the tissue and of the suture that anchors it to the rigid polymeric support are compatible. By means of dynamic tests, we have determined the fatigue curve in sutured bovine pericardial tissue, expressed by the equation log y = 1.27 +/- 0.18 (0.26 +/- 0.05) log t, where y is the initial fatigue stress (MPa) and t is the time (min) it takes to achieve permanent deformation of the tissue. By applying this correction, we determine a set of values for stress-time which, when compared with those obtained with a non-sutured sample, reveal a significant fall in this ratio and, thus, a decrease in the durability. The use of suture threads of lesser elasticity than the pericardium may play an important role in reducing the durability of the bioprosthesis constructed with these materials. PMID:8199289

  20. Hereditary premature closure of a coronal suture in the Abraham Lincoln family.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ronald S

    2013-10-01

    The most easily recognized facial features of unilateral premature closure of a coronal suture in the skull are an upward arching of the superior orbital rim and a smaller face on the involved side. Photographs indicate that at least 9 individuals over 5 generations of the Abraham Lincoln family showed this anomaly. PMID:23856133