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1

Technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

Handley, Thomas

1992-01-01

2

Technology Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can reach their maximum effectiveness.

Smith, Nanette R.

1995-01-01

3

Technology Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

Bullock, Kimberly R.

1995-01-01

4

Trends in Technology Transfer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Various forms of technology transfer in Europe and North America are discussed including research contracts, cooperative research centers, and personnel transfer. Examples of approaches to technology transfer are given and the establishment of personnel transfer is discussed. Preconditions for successful technology transfer in the future are…

Starnick, Jurgen

1988-01-01

5

Technology Transfer Center | Technology Transfer Education  

Cancer.gov

SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview NCI TTC Fellowship Program NIH Technology Transfer Training Programs NIH

6

Technology transfer methodology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Information on technology transfer methodology is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on new systems development, the developer's perspective, barriers to providing a home for technology, and incentives for using new technologies.

Labotz, Rich; Connell, Don; Kroll, Ken

1991-01-01

7

National Technology Transfer Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

Rivers, Lee W.

1992-01-01

8

Technology transfer for adaptation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

2014-09-01

9

Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

2010-01-01

10

Technology Transfer Report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since its inception, Goddard has pursued a commitment to technology transfer and commercialization. For every space technology developed, Goddard strives to identify secondary applications. Goddard then provides the technologies, as well as NASA expertise and facilities, to U.S. companies, universities, and government agencies. These efforts are based in Goddard's Technology Commercialization Office. This report presents new technologies, commercialization success stories, and other Technology Commercialization Office activities in 1999.

2000-01-01

11

Making behavioral technology transferable.  

PubMed

The paucity of transferred behavioral technologies is traced to the absence of strategies for developing technology that is transferable, as distinct from strategies for conducting research, whether basic or applied. In the field of engineering, the results of basic research are transformed to candidate technologies that meet standardized criteria with respect to three properties: quantification, repetition, and verification. The technology of vitrification and storage of nuclear waste is used to illustrate the application of these criteria. Examples from behavior analysis are provided, together with suggestions regarding changes in practice that will accelerate the development and application of behavioral technologies. PMID:22478284

Pennypacker, H S; Hench, L L

1997-01-01

12

Making behavioral technology transferable  

PubMed Central

The paucity of transferred behavioral technologies is traced to the absence of strategies for developing technology that is transferable, as distinct from strategies for conducting research, whether basic or applied. In the field of engineering, the results of basic research are transformed to candidate technologies that meet standardized criteria with respect to three properties: quantification, repetition, and verification. The technology of vitrification and storage of nuclear waste is used to illustrate the application of these criteria. Examples from behavior analysis are provided, together with suggestions regarding changes in practice that will accelerate the development and application of behavioral technologies. PMID:22478284

Pennypacker, H. S.; Hench, Larry L.

1997-01-01

13

Technology Transfer: Marketing Tomorrow's Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The globalization of the economy and the end of the Cold War have triggered many changes in the traditional practices of U.S. industry. To effectively apply the resources available to the United States, the federal government has firmly advocated a policy of technology transfer between private industry and government labs, in this case the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin is a strong proponent of this policy and has organized technology transfer or commercialization programs at each of the NASA field centers. Here at Langley Research Center, the Technology Applications Group (TAG) is responsible for facilitating the transfer of Langley developed research and technology to U.S. industry. Entering the program, I had many objectives for my summer research with TAG. Certainly, I wanted to gain a more thorough understanding of the concept of technology transfer and Langley's implementation of a system to promote it to both the Langley community and the community at large. Also, I hoped to become more familiar with Langley's research capabilities and technology inventory available to the public. More specifically, I wanted to learn about the technology transfer process at Langley. Because my mentor is a member of Materials and Manufacturing marketing sector of the Technology Transfer Team, another overriding objective for my research was to take advantage of his work and experience in materials research to learn about the Advanced Materials Research agency wide and help market these developments to private industry. Through the various projects I have been assigned to work on in TAG, I have successfully satisfied the majority of these objectives. Work on the Problem Statement Process for TAG as well as the development of the Advanced Materials Research Brochure have provided me with the opportunity to learn about the technology transfer process from the outside looking in and the inside looking out. Because TAG covers all of the research efforts conducted at Langley, my studies with TAG were ab!e to provide me an excellent overview of Langley's contribution to the aeronautics industry.

Tcheng, Erene

1995-01-01

14

National Technology Transfer Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) "provides access to federal technology information, technology and market assessment services, technology marketing and assistance in finding strategic partners." The purpose of the Center is to help make "commercialization deals happen" by fostering relationships with federal clients, showcasing technologies and facilitating partnerships between clients and US industry. The technologies showcased here have been assessed by a team of market and technology analysts for their commercial potential. This extensive database of technologies, which largely seems to come from NASA, can be searched by keyword or browsed by category, such as medical devices, communications, software, or aerodynamics. NTTC's services and programs that promote business partnerships are described further on this website.

15

Departmental technology transfer update  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective is the following: to provide the perspective of the Department of Energy (DOE); emphasize new and emerging initiatives; and address unresolved issues that might impact successful program implementation. The approach is the following: to provide a brief overview of DOE, its R&D, and its technology transfer assets; to briefly describe the evolution of DOE's enhanced technology transfer program; to report on specific progress and achievements over the past year--as the spring board for our current and future plans; to present our near and longer term plans; and to survey the remaining issues and the resolution process.

Lewis, Roger A.

1992-01-01

16

Assessing Software Engineering Technology Transfer  

E-print Network

Assessing Software Engineering Technology Transfer within NASA Marvin V. Zelkowitz Institute Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and in particular emphasize the domain of technologies for software de- velopment. We examine the established NASA mechanisms for achieving technology transfer

Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

17

Technology transfer initiatives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer activities with the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the period of April 1993 through December 1993. Early in 1993, the MSFC/TUO and UAH conceived of the concept of developing stand-alone, integrated data packages on MSFC technology that would serve industrial needs previously determined to be critical. Furthermore, after reviewing over 500 problem statements received by MSFC, it became obvious that many of these requests could be satisfied by a standard type of response. As a result, UAH has developed two critical area response (CAR) packages: CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) replacements and modular manufacturing and simulation. Publicity included news releases, seminars, articles and conference papers. The Huntsville Chamber of Commerce established the Technology Transfer Subcommittee with the charge to identify approaches for the Chamber to assist its members, as well as non-members, access to the technologies at the federal laboratories in North Alabama. The Birmingham Chamber of Commerce has expressed interest in establishing a similar technology transfer program. This report concludes with a section containing a tabulation of the problem statements, including CAR packages, submitted to MSFC from January 1992 through December 1993.

Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Ziemke, M. Carl

1994-01-01

18

Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer  

ScienceCinema

Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

Covey, Debra

2012-08-29

19

Technology transfer within the government  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The suggested subtopics for the panel were as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA U.S. government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other U.S. government civil space mission programs. Two presentations were made to the panel: Roles/Value of Early Strategic Planning Within the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) to Facilitate Later Technology Transfer To and From Industry; and NOAA Satellite Programs and Technology Requirements. The panel discussion addresses the following major issues: DOD/NASA cooperation; alternative mechanisms for interagency communication and interactions; current technology transfer relationships among federal research agencies, and strategies for improving this transfer; technology transfer mechanisms appropriate to intragovernment transfer; the importance of industry as a technology transfer conduit; and measures of merit.

Christensen, Carissa Bryce

1992-01-01

20

Technology Transfer Center | Staff Directory  

Cancer.gov

Charlotte McGuinness - Unit Supervisor CSC and Specialist for NCCAM Tawanda Abdelmouti - Technology Development Administrative Specialist Vio Conley - Technology Transfer Specialist for NIA and NIDA Joseph M.

21

Technology transfer 1995  

SciTech Connect

Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

Not Available

1995-01-01

22

Dual Space Technology Transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past fifteen years, MER has had several NASA SBIR Phase II programs in the area of space technology, based upon carbon-carbon (C-C) composites. In addition, in November 2004, leading edges supplied by MER provided the enabling technology to reach a Mach 10 record for an air breathing engine on the X-43 A flight. The MER business model constitutes a spin-off of technologies initially by incubating in house, and ultimately creating spin-off stand alone companies. FMC was formed to provide for technology transfer in the area of fabrication of C-C composites. FMC has acquired ISO 9000 and AS9100 quality certifications. FMC is fabricating under AS9100 certification, flight parts for several flight programs. In addition, FMC is expanding the application of carbon-carbon composites to several critical military programs. In addition to space technology transfer to critical military programs, FMC is becoming the world leader in the commercial area of low-cost C-C composites for furnace fixtures. Market penetrations have been accomplished in North America, Europe and Asia. Low-cost, quick turn-around and excellent quality of FMC products paves the way to greatly increased sales. In addition, FMC is actively pursuing a joint venture with a new partner, near closure, to become the leading supplier of high temperature carbon based composites. In addition, several other spin-off companies such as TMC, FiC, Li-Tech and NMIC were formed by MER with a plethora of potential space applications.

Kowbel, W.; Loutfy, R.

2009-03-01

23

Technology transfer within the government  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The presentation is made in vugraph form. The assigned subtopic for this panel are as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA US government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other US government space mission programs. A specific area of inquiry was Technology Maturation Milestones. Three areas were investigated: technology development; advanced development; and flight hardware development.

Russell, John

1992-01-01

24

Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer  

E-print Network

Industrial DSM programs cannot succeed unless customers learn about and implement new technologies in a timely manner. Why? Because this expeditious transfer of new technologies represents the key challenge for the 1990s. This paper explores...

Kuhel, G. J.

25

Technology Transfer: A Selected Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bibliography of 428 items, a product of the NASA-sponsored Project for the Analysis of Technology Transfer (PATT) at the University of Denver's Research Institute (DRI), is the initial attempt at compiling a comprehensive listing on the subject of technology transfer. The bibliography is further concerned with information which leads to a…

Sovel, M. Terry

26

Technology Transfer Office November 2009  

E-print Network

Technology Transfer Office November 2009 INVENTION AGREEMENT In consideration of my employment in writing to Dartmouth through the Technology Transfer Office any such discovery or invention and identify this page and fill it out. Please scan it and email PDF directly to the Office of Sponsored Projects

Myers, Lawrence C.

27

Technology utilization. [aerospace technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA developed technologies were used to tackle problems associated with safety, transportation, industry, manufacturing, construction and state and local governments. Aerospace programs were responsible for more innovations for the benefit of mankind than those brought about by either major wars, or peacetime programs. Briefly outlined are some innovations for manned space flight, satellite surveillance applications, and pollution monitoring techniques.

Kubokawa, C. C.

1978-01-01

28

Technology Transfer Center | NIH Technology Transfer Training Programs  

Cancer.gov

SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview NCI TTC Fellowship Program NIH Technology Transfer Training Programs NIH

29

Statewide Coordination in Technology Transfer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology transfer, that is, the dissemination of the results of research and development to the general community, is discussed in this report in relation to the learning society and the mission of the community college. First, definitions of technology are presented and the rapid pace of technological change worldwide is examined. Then, the…

Groff, Warren H.

30

SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

2008-03-07

31

Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program  

Cancer.gov

The NCI Technology Transfer Center offers two tracks of technology transfer fellowships under the Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) program. These fellowships provide scientists with training and mentored work experience in technology transfer.

32

Technology Transfer Center | Careers & Training  

Cancer.gov

Technology transfer is a growing field encompassing the convergence of research, innovation, and commercialization. In order to facilitate the growth of this field, several training and education opportunities are available.

33

Technology transfer policy considerations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two approaches to the problem of using advanced technology for specific applications are presented. The first and more usual approach is to identify a problem and look for the appropriate technology to solve it. The second, favored by the author, is to pursue the momentum of technological development and find applications for it. It is pointed out that a problem may be identified only after a new technology comes into being. The development of the automobile during a period when there was no ready market for it is mentioned by way of illustration, i.e., the automobile created its own market and thereby helped solve the problem of transporting people and goods.

Frosch, R. A.

1978-01-01

34

Technology transfer: Transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The application of NASA derived technology in solving problems related to highways, railroads, and other rapid systems is described. Additional areas/are identified where space technology may be utilized to meet requirements related to waterways, law enforcement agencies, and the trucking and recreational vehicle industries.

Anyos, T.; Brown, I.; Lizak, R.; Loomis, A.; Wilhelm, J.

1977-01-01

35

Technological transfers to Eastern Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given, as follows. The author compares and contrasts the evolving laws to protect industrial technology in Eastern European countries such as Poland, Yugoslavia, Romania, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia. The advantages and disadvantages of each country's patent, trademark, service mark, and copyright laws have been compared. Treatment of industrial development and transfers of technology as trade secrets are examined

D. E. Bell

1991-01-01

36

Technology Transfer Center | Success Stories  

Cancer.gov

The success of technology transfer activities can be gauged by the advent of a therapeutic, a device, a vaccine, a diagnostic, as well as any new method or improvement to a technology that results in some benefit to patients. Please see below for some examples of notable success stories for which NCI TTC is proud to have made a contribution.

37

Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology.  

SciTech Connect

Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology (ESTT) program is that entrepreneurs terminate their employment with Sandia. The term of the separation is two years with the option to request a third year. Entrepreneurs are guaranteed reinstatement by Sandia if they return before ESTT expiration. Participants may start up or helpe expand technology businesses.

Fairbanks, Richard R.

2010-09-01

38

Technology Transfer | Poster  

Cancer.gov

Patents provide a period of exclusivity and are a way to exclude others from making, using, or selling an inventor’s novel technology. For the National Institutes of Health (NIH), patents are an incentive for an outside party to license, develop, and commercialize NIH technologies that will benefit public health, especially those that require substantial further development by an outside party, such as therapeutics and diagnostics.

39

Transporting values by technology transfer.  

PubMed

The introduction of new medical technologies into a developing country is usually greeted with enthusiasm as the possible benefits become an object of great anticipation and provide new hope for therapy or relief. The prompt utilization of new discoveries and inventions by a medical practitioner serves as a positive indicator of high standing in the professional community. But the transfer of medical technology also involves a transfer of concomitant values. There is a danger that, in the process of adopting a particular technology, the user takes for granted the general utility and desirability of the implements and procedures under consideration without recognizing the socio-cultural peculiarities of the adopting country. A sensitivity to the social conditions and cultural traditions is important so that the emergence of new values can be examined critically and the transfer of necessary technology can be effected smoothly. In the Philippines, efforts to boost patronage of transplant technology appear to have overlooked this need for socio-cultural sensitivity. Legislative fiat cannot be used to override deep-seated values. There is a need to be more sensitive to the possible confrontation of values that the transfer of technology brings in order to avoid the erosion of indigenous socio-cultural values and minimize the intrusiveness of beneficial medical technology. PMID:11654773

De Castro, Leonardo D

1997-01-01

40

Software engineering technology transfer: Understanding the process  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this report, the mechanisms developed by NASA to transfer technology are explored and the actual mechanisms used to transfer software development technologies are investigated. Time, cost, and effectiveness of software engineering technology transfer is reported.

Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

1993-01-01

41

Technology Transfer Center | Institutes Served By TTC  

Cancer.gov

The Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides technology transfer services to NCI. In addition, TTC is a designated Competitive Service Center (CSC) for technology transfer, offering to other NIH institutes a range of services from consultations to full technology transfer services. TTC serves the twelve institutes listed below.

42

Understanding University Technology Transfer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

Association of American Universities, 2011

2011-01-01

43

Technology transfer-transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Problems in the public transportation industry and refining methods for decreasing the time gap between the development and the marketing of new technology are considered. Eight NASA innovations are either being adapted for use on highways, railways, or rapid transit, or are already entering the marketplace. Chronologies for three of these programs are provided.

Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Wilhelm, J.

1974-01-01

44

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-print Network

the road." In recent years, increasing amounts of crumb rubber from recycled tires have been added solve the very serious problem of waste tire disposal. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2009, VOL. 1, NO. 2 § Rubber Roads: Waste Tires Find a Home By Larry Santucci, PE Pavement Specialist

California at Berkeley, University of

45

Lake restoration technology transfer assessment  

SciTech Connect

Based upon a review of the eutrophication problem and its impact on lake restoration (LR) programs, treatment of the relatively new problem of acid deposition and its impact on LR activities, consideration of the LR programs of the Environmental Protection Agency and several states, and a review of individual LR technology transfer publications, it is recommended that new LR technology transfer programs be given a low priority until more new information is available on the restoration of acidified lakes. Both primary and secondary users of LR research, technology transfer documents, and public awareness documents were considered in this assessment. Primary users included the general public and recreationists, lakeshore property owners, lake/homeowner associations, lake/sanitary districts, and research and environmental organizations; secondary users included state/county/local officials who administer/manage water-related regulations/activities. 4 tables.

Daschbach, M.H.; Roe, E.M.; Sharpe, W.E.

1982-06-01

46

Technology transfer: Transportation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Standard Research Institute (SRI) has operated a NASA-sponsored team for four years. The SRI Team is concentrating on solving problems in the public transportation area and on developing methods for decreasing the time gap between the development and the marketing of new technology and for aiding the movement of knowledge across industrial, disciplinary, and regional boundaries. The SRI TAT has developed a methodology that includes adaptive engineering of the aerospace technology and commercialization when a market is indicated. The SRI Team has handled highway problems on a regional rather than a state basis, because many states in similar climatic or geologic regions have similar problems. Program exposure has been increased to encompass almost all of the fifty states.

Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Merrifield, D.

1973-01-01

47

Technology transfer and space science missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs on technology transfer and space science missions are provided. Topics covered include: project scientist role within NASA; role of universities in technology transfer; role of government laboratories in research; and technology issues associated with science.

Acuna, Mario

1992-01-01

48

Technology Transfer Plan  

SciTech Connect

BPF developed the concept of a mobile, on-site NORM remediation and disposal process in late 1993. Working with Conoco and receiving encouragement born the Department of Energy, Metarie Office, and the Texas Railroad Commission the corporation conducted extensive feasibility studies on an on-site disposal concept. In May 1994, the Department of Energy issued a solicitation for cooperative agreement proposal for, "Development and Testing of a Method for Treatment and Underground Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)". BPF submitted a proposal to the solicitation in July 1994, and was awarded a cooperative agreement in September 1995. BPF proposed and believed that proven equipment and technology could be incorporated in to a mobile system. The system would allow BPF to demonstrate an environmentally sound and commercially affordable method for treatment and underground disposal of NORM. The key stop in the BPF process incorporates injection of the dissolved radioactive materials into a water injection or disposal well. Disposal costs in the BPF proposal of July 1995 were projected to range from $1000 to $5000 per cubic yard. The process included four separate steps. (1) De-oiling (2) Volume Reduction (3) Chemical Dissolution of the Radium (4) Injection

None

1998-12-31

49

Innovative Technology Transfer Partnerships  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks to license its Advanced Tire and Strut Pressure Monitor (TSPM) technology. The TSPM is a handheld system to accurately measure tire and strut pressure and temperature over a wide temperature range (20 to 120 OF), as well as improve personnel safety. Sensor accuracy, electronics design, and a simple user interface allow operators quick, easy access to required measurements. The handheld electronics, powered by 12-VAC or by 9-VDC batteries, provide the user with an easy-to-read visual display of pressure/temperature or the streaming of pressure/temperature data via an RS-232 interface. When connected to a laptop computer, this new measurement system can provide users with automated data recording and trending, eliminating the chance for data hand-recording errors. In addition, calibration software allows for calibration data to be automatically utilized for the generation of new data conversion equations, simplifying the calibration processes that are so critical to reliable measurements. The design places a high-accuracy pressure sensor (also used as a temperature sensor) as close to the tire or strut measurement location as possible, allowing the user to make accurate measurements rapidly, minimizing the amount of high-pressure volumes, and allowing reasonable distance between the tire or strut and the operator. The pressure sensor attaches directly to the pressure supply/relief valve on the tire and/or strut, with necessary electronics contained in the handheld enclosure. A software algorithm ensures high accuracy of the device over the wide temperature range. Using the pressure sensor as a temperature sensor permits measurement of the actual temperature of the pressurized gas. This device can be adapted to create a portable calibration standard that does not require thermal conditioning. This allows accurate pressure measurements without disturbing the gas temperature. In-place calibration can save considerable time and money and is suitable in many process applications throughout industry.

Kohler, Jeff

2004-01-01

50

Construction industry development: role of technology transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

For several decades, transfer of technologies from industrialized countries has been viewed as a key to addressing the low level of technological development of developing countries. This paper considers technology transfer as a mechanism for improving construction industries in developing countries. It discusses the nature of technology and its development and the relevance of its transfer. It outlines differences between

George Ofori

1994-01-01

51

Technology Transfer: A Contact Sport  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology transfer is a dynamic process, involving dynamic people as the bridge between NASA Langley Research Center and the outside world. This bridge, for nonaerospace applications, is known as the Technology Applications Group. The introduction of new innovations and expertise where they are needed occurs through a 'push' and 'pull' process. A 'push' occurs when a new technology is first developed with high commercial potential and then a company is found to licence or further develop the technology. The 'pull' process occurs through problem statements. A company or group will submit a written statement of what they need and the shortcomings of commercially available technology. The Technology Transfer Team (T3) reviews these problem statements and decides where NASA LaRC can offer assistance. A researcher or group of researchers are then identified who can help solve the problem and they are put in contact with the company. Depending upon the situation in either method, a Space Act Agreement (SAA), or outline of the responsibilities for each party, is developed.

Paynter, Nina P.

1995-01-01

52

The human element in technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A transfer model composed of three roles and their linkages was considered. This model and a growing body of experience was analyzed to provide guidance in the human elements of technology transfer. For example, criteria for selection of technology transfer agents was described, and some needed working climate factors were known. These concepts were successfully applied to transfer activities.

Peake, H. J.

1978-01-01

53

Federal Laboratory Consortium Technology Transfer Desk Reference  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released this month, the Technology Transfer Desk Reference is a publication of the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer (FLC). It is a 200-page guide that defines technology transfer, explains why it is important, and discusses how to implement it effectively. Although it is targeted at federal laboratories, other organizations can benefit from the material as well. For instance, certain sections describe "procedures that can be used to identify and transfer technologies from the government sector to the private sector." With technology advancing at the current rate, it is increasingly important to have proper transfer practices to avoid reinventing technologies that already exist.

Federal Laboratory Consortium (U.S.).

2002-01-01

54

Technology Transfer at Penn State University  

E-print Network

, and relationships with indus- try, among other things. For the purposes of this guide, technology transfer refersTechnology Transfer at Penn State University An Inventor's Guide to #12;Our mission is to protect development through the transfer of Penn State technologies to the marketplace. Note: This booklet is based

Lee, Dongwon

55

Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program  

Cancer.gov

The DHHS, NIH, NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) has fellowship opportunities available to qualified candidates in one of the fastest growing fields, technology transfer. These fellowship opportunities let you combine your science background with a new career in the technology transfer field.

56

Technology Transfer Center | NCI TTC Fellowship Program  

Cancer.gov

The DHHS, NIH, NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) has a fellowship opportunity available to qualified candidates in one of the fastest growing fields, technology transfer. This fellowship opportunity lets you combine your science, legal or business background with a new career in the technology transfer field.

57

Technology business incubators: how effective as technology transfer mechanisms?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology business incubators provide a mechanism for technology transfer, promote the concept of growth through innovation and application of technology, support economic development strategies for small business development, and encourage growth from within local economies. This study provides a profile of technology business incubators in the United States, reviews previous research, and reports results of research on the technology transfer

Rhonda G. Phillips

2002-01-01

58

Reconciling water harvesting and soil erosion control by thoughtful implementation of SWC measures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil and water conservation (SWC) structures are largely present in Southeast Spain. Traditionally, SWC structures such as step terraces and earthen check dams were implemented in agricultural fields. They are usually found in semi-arid traditional rainfed agricultural systems that heavily rely on SWC structures to supplement the sparse rainfall. The on-site SWC measures favor water infiltration and reduce water runoff and soil erosion. In the river system (off site), large concrete/gabion check dams have been constructed since the 70's. The analysis of orthophotographs and field survey observations indicate a severe decay of on-site SWC structures in the agricultural area. This has been observed for the Cárcavo catchment (Murcia). The density of step terraces and check dams decreased by 25% between 1956 and 2005. Changes in the agricultural area can be summarized as: (i) rapid expansion of rainfed crops in marginal areas and (ii) mechanization of agriculture associated with frequent tillage operations. It became evident that the high density of SWC structures has now become a nuisance in rainfed orchards that are maintained by regular shallow tillage. We constrained the effects of SWC structures on hydrological connectivity by assessing their functioning during a heavy storm (return period 8.2 yrs in 2006). The percentage of cropland draining directly on the river system without interference of a check dam has increased from 9% in 1956 to 31% in 2005 and 40 % after the storm in November 2006. While there is a strong decrease of traditional SWC structures, several hundred large check dams have been constructed during the last decades in ephemeral streams (Almeria). 36 of them have been investigated in selected Sierras. The volume of sediment retained was found low (mean: 1.4 t ha-1 yr-1). 67% of the variability has been explained by topographical, land use and agricultural activities. After a field survey in 2009, a large majority of check dams located in non-agricultural catchments have been found only partially filled with sediments. Extensive reforestation programs, recovery of natural vegetation (dense matorral) and abandonment of agricultural fields in the Sierras led to a strong reduction of the sediment transport towards the river system. Although the effect of the check dams on the transport of sediment has not been important, the check dams have played a major role in flood control in the area. Our data indicate that thoughtful design of SWC schemes is necessary to reconcile water harvesting, erosion mitigation and flood control. Currently, the erosion hotspots are clearly localized in the agricultural fields, and not in the marginal lands in the Sierras. The combination of on-site and off-site SWC measures in the agricultural areas is highly efficient to reduce fluxes of sediment and surface water.

Bellin, N.; Vanacker, V.; van Wesemael, B.

2012-04-01

59

A Small Business Model for Technology Transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Government funding of technology transfer and technological innovation through the Small Business Innovative Research program has had many successes during the nearly two decades of its operations. A means is suggested here to enhance the conditions for successful commercialization of both existing government technology transfer programs and for developing new technology that address technology needs of the various agencies and departments. Small businesses are critical sources of new technology and have been for many years. A business model that will foster technology innovation and help small businesses be successful developing technology and making the technology commercially viable will enhance the value of the program to the government and small business community.

Steinman, D. K.

2002-10-01

60

Technology Transfer: Programs, Procedures, and Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A view of the appropriate role of community colleges in the transfer of technology to business and industry is presented in this paper. Introductory material defines technology transfer as a strategy integrating knowledge of the latest technological practices, procedures for their implementation, tactics for their integration into existing…

Parsons, Michael H.

61

Technology Transfer Center | Role of TTC  

Cancer.gov

Review, negotiate, and execute appropriate technology transfer agreements (including Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA), Clinical Trial Agreements, Material Transfer Agreements, and Confidential Disclosure Agreements) to ensure that they are in accord with applicable laws and policies.

62

Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards  

E-print Network

6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award expenditure 2012/13 by value On 1 October 2013 we were funding 125 active awards through our Technology

Rambaut, Andrew

63

National Cancer Institute | Technology Transfer Center  

Cancer.gov

The Technology Transfer Center (TTC) of the National Cancer Institute makes it easy for industry and academia to interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities.

64

SWAMI II technology transfer plan  

SciTech Connect

Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

1995-12-31

65

Technology transfer to a developing nation, Korea  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental project is reported which was undertaken. to determine if selected types of technology developed for the aerospace program during the past decade are relevant to specific industrial problems of a developing nation and to test whether a structured program could facilitate the transfer of relevant technologies. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology and the IIT Research Institute were selected as the active transfer agents to participate in the program. The pilot project was based upon the approach to the transfer of domestic technology developed by the NASA Technology Utilization Division and utilized the extensive data and technical resources available through the Space Agency and its contractors. This pilot project has helped to clarify some aspects of the international technology transfer process and to upgrade Korean technological capabilities.

Stone, C. A.; Uccetta, S. J.

1973-01-01

66

The Effectiveness of University Technology Transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, there have been numerous studies of the effectiveness of university technology transfer. Such technology transfer mechanisms include licensing agreements between the university and private firms, science parks, incubators, and university-based startups. We review and synthesize these papers and present some pointed recommendations on how to enhance effectiveness. Implementation of these recommenda- tions will depend on the mechanisms

Phillip H. Phan; Donald S. Siegel

2006-01-01

67

Technology transfer to the broader economy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approaches to the transfer of government-funded civil space technology to the broader commercial economy were addressed by Working Panel no. 4. Some of the problems related to current strategies for technology transfer and recommendations for new approaches are described in outline form.

Dyer, Gordon; Clark, Robert

1992-01-01

68

Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Technology Afshin Izadian  

E-print Network

Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Technology Afshin Izadian Purdue School of Engineering and Technology wind power, and by doing so, it reduces the capital equipment of the entire power plant and substantially increases power transfer efficiency. The system operates when a wind-driven hydraulic pump

Zhou, Yaoqi

69

Technology Transfer at the University of Washington.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recently-implemented university technology transfer program is described and discussed, including the context, elements required for technology transfer, federal patent policy, university policies and organization, the operating model, early results, university-industry interactions, and anticipated benefits to the university and industry. A…

Baldwin, Donald R.

1986-01-01

70

Petroleum Technology Transfer Council boosts North Mid-continent technology  

SciTech Connect

The Kansas Tertiary Oil Recovery Project served as one of the primary models for the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council, so it`s fitting this series on regional applications should start with the North Mid-Continent organization. The technology transfer program is described.

Lyle, D.

1995-10-01

71

Biomedical technology transfer applications of NASA science and technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The identification and solution of research and clinical problems in cardiovascular medicine which were investigated by means of biomedical data transfer are reported. The following are sample areas that were focused upon by the Stanford University Biomedical Technology Transfer Team: electrodes for hemiplegia research; vectorcardiogram computer analysis; respiration and phonation electrodes; radiotelemetry of intracranial pressure; and audiotransformation of the electrocardiographic signal. It is concluded that this biomedical technology transfer is significantly aiding present research in cardiovascular medicine.

1972-01-01

72

Maximizing profits in international technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Maximum profit can be introduced into international technology transfer by observing the following: (1) ethical and open dealing between the parties; (2) maximum knowledge of all facts concerning the technology, the use of the technology, the market, competition, prices, and alternatives; (3) ability to coordinate exports, service, support activities, licensing and cross licensing; and (4) knowledgeable people which put these factors together.

Straube, W.

1974-01-01

73

Communication technology transfer : Impact on economic development  

Microsoft Academic Search

International technology transfer is defined and described from the economics perspective, with emphasis on costs. Its role in economic development is discussed, including its impact on social values and the question of 'appropriate' technology for developing countries. Examples are provided for communications technology, particularly in the areas of telecommunications and satellite communications.

Meheroo Jussawalla

1980-01-01

74

A case history of technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A sequence of events, occurring over the last 25 years, are described that chronicle the evolution of ion-bombardment electric propulsion technology. Emphasis is placed on the latter phases of this evolution, where special efforts were made to pave the way toward the use of this technology in operational space flight systems. These efforts consisted of a planned program to focus the technology toward its end applications and an organized process that was followed to transfer the technology from the research-technology NASA Center to the user-development NASA Center and its industry team. Major milestones in this evolution, which are described, include the development of thruster technology across a large size range, the successful completion of two space electric rocket tests, SERT I and SERT II, development of power-processing technology for electric propulsion, completion of a program to make the technology ready for flight system development, and finally the technology transfer events.

1981-01-01

75

Gene transfer technology in aquaculture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gene transfer technique, transgenesis, has permitted the transfer of genes from one organism to another to create new lineages of organisms with improvement in traits important to aquaculture. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), therefore, hold promise for producing genetic improvements, such as enhanced growth rate, increased production and efficiency, disease resistance and expanded ecological ranges. The basic procedure to generate

J. A. Levy; L. F. Marins; A. Sanchez

2000-01-01

76

48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technology transfer mission. 970.5227-3...Operating Contracts 970.5227-3 Technology transfer mission. As prescribed...a), insert the following clause: Technology Transfer Mission (AUG 2002)...

2014-10-01

77

48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technology transfer mission. 970.5227-3...Operating Contracts 970.5227-3 Technology transfer mission. As prescribed...a), insert the following clause: Technology Transfer Mission (AUG 2002)...

2013-10-01

78

48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technology transfer mission. 970.5227-3...Operating Contracts 970.5227-3 Technology transfer mission. As prescribed...a), insert the following clause: Technology Transfer Mission (AUG 2002)...

2012-10-01

79

Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012  

E-print Network

Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012 SRS was set up by Dr Paul Sutton and Prof Linda'Leary & Stephen Finn in Histopathology are conducting cancer research funded by this annual campaign. TCD both

O'Mahony, Donal E.

80

Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology  

E-print Network

This paper reviews current activity in the field of enhanced heat transfer, with the aim of illustrating the technology and typical applications. Guidelines for application of enhanced surfaces are given, and practical concerns and economics...

Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

1984-01-01

81

Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford  

E-print Network

Oxford Technology Transfer IP, Patents, Licences, Spin-outs, Material Sales, Seed Funds, Isis Angels of stimulating consultancy opportunities through our strategic client relationships To register with OUC, protecting, negotiating and licensing: > Patentable ideas > Software > Materials sales Further information

Paxton, Anthony T.

82

Technology Transfer: Creating the Right Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Small and medium-sized enterprises are considered to be the backbone of many European economies and a catalyst for economic growth. Universities are key players in encouraging and supporting economic growth through technology and knowledge-related transfer. The right environment to foster transfer is a proactive culture. (Contains 22 references.)…

McCullough, John M.

2003-01-01

83

WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY?  

E-print Network

1 WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY? A Comparison with Biotech.genet@grenoble-em.com Website: www.nanoeconomics.eu Abstract. Nanotechnologies are often presented as breakthrough innovations. This article investigates the model of knowledge transfer in the nanotechnologies in depth, by comparing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Reciprocal Technology Transfer: Changing Partnerships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Partnerships between businesses and higher education institutions can help meet the training and information-technology needs of businesses and simultaneously increase the expertise and technology base of the institutions. Challenges include obtaining venture capital, personnel, cultural differences, and legal issues. A Kent State University…

Barton, Lyle; Cartwright, G. Phillip

1997-01-01

85

Transfer of space technology to industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some of the most significant applications of the NASA aerospace technology transfer to industry and other government agencies are briefly outlined. The technology utilization program encompasses computer programs for structural problems, life support systems, fuel cell development, and rechargeable cardiac pacemakers as well as reliability and quality research for oil recovery operations and pollution control.

Hamilton, J. T.

1974-01-01

86

Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Services  

E-print Network

chancellor of Research. It meets periodically to assess UCSD technology transfer policy and guide the technology "nuclear winter" of 2002­2003. UCSD innovations were the Alan S. Paau, M.B.A., Ph.D. Assistant questions or suggestions for future re- ports, please do not hesitate to contact us. UCSD TechTIPS welcomes

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

87

EPA's Technology Transfer: Now Geared to Industry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Through capsule reports, seminars, and design manuals, Environmental Protection Agency has activated its industrial technology transfer program for marketing the products of federal research, development, and demonstration activities. Its purpose is to disseminate information to industry on available technology for control and treatment of air,…

Environmental Science and Technology, 1973

1973-01-01

88

NASA partnership with industry: Enhancing technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recognizing the need to accelerate and expand the application of NASA-derived technology for other civil uses in the United States, potential opportunities were assessed; the range of benefits to NASA, industry and the nations were explored; public policy implications were assessed; and this new range of opportunities were related to current technology transfer programs of NASA.

1983-01-01

89

The process for technology transfer in Baltimore  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ingredients essential for a successful decision process relative to proper technological choices for a large city were determined during four years of experience in the NASA/Baltimore Applications Project. The general approach, rationale, and process of technology transfer are discussed.

Golden, T. S.

1978-01-01

90

Development of Technology Transfer Economic Growth Metrics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of producing technology transfer metrics that answer the question: Do NASA/MSFC technical assistance activities impact economic growth? The data for this project resides in a 7800-record database maintained by Tec-Masters, Incorporated. The technology assistance data results from survey responses from companies and individuals who have interacted with NASA via a Technology Transfer Agreement, or TTA. The goal of this project was to determine if the existing data could provide indications of increased wealth. This work demonstrates that there is evidence that companies that used NASA technology transfer have a higher job growth rate than the rest of the economy. It also shows that the jobs being supported are jobs in higher wage SIC codes, and this indicates improvements in personal wealth. Finally, this work suggests that with correct data, the wealth issue may be addressed.

Mastrangelo, Christina M.

1998-01-01

91

Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

2006-09-29

92

Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer and Training Initiative (ECMT3I) Technology Transfer Model Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer and Training Initiative (ECMT3I) is a cooperative effort among education and research institutions in New Mexico to analyze problems in transferring environmental technologies from Department of Energy laboratories to small and medium enterprises (SME's). The goal of the ECMT3I is to…

Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM.

93

Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

2000-05-01

94

Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce. Their achievements and recognized capabilities are what make the accomplishments cataloged here possible. Without them, none of these transactions would occur.

Michelle R. Blacker

2008-12-01

95

Transferring technology to the public sector.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Approximately four years ago the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA sponsorship, began to devote some of its resources to examining ways to transfer space technology to the civil sector. As experience accumulated under this program, certain principles basic to success in technology transfer became apparent. An adequate definition of each problem must be developed before any substantial effort is expended on a solution. In most instances, a source of funds other than the potential user is required to support the problem definition phase of the work. Sensitivity to the user's concerns and effective interpersonal communications between the user and technical personnel are essential to success.

Alper, M. E.

1972-01-01

96

PNNL wins Four Technology Transfer Awards  

SciTech Connect

PNNL wins 4 Technology Transfer Awards Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has received four 2006 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium - a nationwide network of more than 700 major federal laboratories and centers as well as their parent departments and agencies that provides a forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking technology with the mission and the marketplace. The FLC presents its Awards for Excellence in Technology Transfer to federal laboratory employees who have done outstanding work in transferring U.S. government-sponsored technologies to the public and private sectors. Since 1984, when the awards program was established, Pacific Northwest has earned 62 of these awards, far more than any other national laboratory. This year, PNNL won all four of the nominations that were submitted--the most that any laboratory can submit. PNNL was recognized for transferring technologies that treat and cure cancer, uniquely analyze massive sets of data, increase surgical implant success rates, and neutralize toxic chemicals from the environment. Through collaboration with PNNL researchers and access to facilities at PNNL, IsoRay Medical, Inc. (http://www.isoray.com), expanded its brachytherapy technology for treating prostate and other cancers. The medical isotope ?seed? products are available at more than 17 implant centers nationwide. More than 40 organizations, including Fortune 500 companies, are using the Starlight information visualization software to mine and interpret massive amounts of data. Bacterin International licensed bioactive thin-film coatings which reduce infection rates associated with surgical implants. Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Silica (SAMMS), a process for removing mercury and other toxic chemicals from the environment, was licensed to Steward Advanced Materials for use in coal-fired power plants, municipal incinerators, and other plants.

Fisher, Julie A.; McMakin, Andrea H.

2006-06-01

97

A regional technology transfer program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The final report is presented for the North Carolina Science and Technology Research Center's 14th consecutive contract period as a NASA Industrial Applications Center, serving the information needs of nine Southeastern states. Included in the report are figures for and analysis of marketing efforts, file usage, search delivered, and other services performed for clients; and information on staff changes, workshops, and special projects in 1978. An appendix contains copies of NC/STRC magazine advertisements, letters from clients, and supplementary information on NC/STRC staff and services.

1978-01-01

98

Technology transfer trends in Indian space programme  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Indian space programme, whose objectives involve acceleration of economic and social development through applications of space technology, has been engaged in the development of state-of-the-art satellite systems, launch vehicles and equipment necessary for applications. Even during the early phase of evolution of this Programme, deliberate policies have been adopted by the national space agency, namely, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), to promote spin-off benefit from the technologies developed for the use of space projects. Consistently adhering to this policy, ISRO has transferred over 280 technologies till date, spanning a wide spectrum of disciplines. This has resulted in a fruitful two-way cooperation between a number of SMEs and the ISRO. In order to make the technology transfer process effective, ISRO has adopted a variety of functional and organizational policies that included awareness building measures, licensee selection methods, innovative contract systems, diverse transfer processes, post licencing services and feedback mechanisms. Besides analyzing these policies and their evolution, the paper discusses various models adopted for technology transfer and their impact on assessment. It also touches upon relevant issues relating to creating interface between public funded R&D and the private commercial enterprises. It suggests few models in which international cooperation could be pursued in this field.

Sridhara Murthi, K. R.; Shoba, T. S.

2010-10-01

99

Resources in Support of Technology Transfer: A Selective Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes electronic resources to support the technology transfer process. Resources are organized in the following categories: Research Facility Directories; Technology Transfer Contacts; Research and Laboratory Information Systems; Federal Government Databases and Information Systems; Aerospace, Technology, and Defence Databases; New Products…

Hanne, Daniel; Zeller, Martin

1994-01-01

100

Technology transfer by state and local government  

SciTech Connect

The essays in this book describe how to facilitate the transfer and application of modern technology to the operations of state and local government and propose policy options to improve the quantity and quality of technology used by these organizations. They emphasize the role of the private business sector and the need for the Federal government to provide incentives for more private-sector leadership and involvement. The authors suggest policy options that would produce greater efforts to promote private-sector involvement in technology transfer to take advantage of the flexibility and adaptability of business to deal with the complex and fragmented state and local government market. They also suggest policy options that concentrate efforts to introduce new technology in areas where resource expenditures are largest and where the greatest savings can be achieved. 79 references, 5 figures, 17 tables.

Doctors, S.I. (ed.)

1981-01-01

101

National Cancer Institute | Technology Transfer Center  

Cancer.gov

The first-of-its-kind, the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge, an international university student-based startup competition, was launched by the National Cancer Institute's Technology Transfer Center in partnership with the non-profit organizations Avon Foundation and the Center for Advancing Innovation. The primary goals of this challenge were to accelerate the process of bringing emerging technologies from the NCI Intramural Research Program to market and stimulate the creation of start-up businesses around NCI’s discoveries.

102

Technology transfer report. FY 1985  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1985, the ORTA intensified its efforts in interacting with the private sector. Visits to the laboratory by industrial scientists searching for laboratory capabilities or inventions that would be of value to them increased. Several venture capital groups visited the laboratory and discussed mechanisms by which they might be able to implement the commercialization of laboratory technology. The ORTA has interacted with neighboring educational institutions and local government officials in the interest of establishing an incubator facility, a 'middle ground' research facility, and a NASA sponsored space commercialization center. These activities will continue and a proposal has been submitted to DOE to initiate a mini-incubator at the laboratory to serve as an interim facility until a permanent facility is established.

Not Available

1986-01-01

103

Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Food technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Food processing and preservation technologies are reviewed, expected technological advances are considered including processing and market factors. NASA contributions to food technology and nutrition are presented with examples of transfer from NASA to industry.

Murray, D. M.

1971-01-01

104

Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

Wright, David

2013-01-01

105

Technology Transfer and the Community College: A New Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the present state of community college-based technology transfer. Offers a brief history of corporate-university relationships and analyzes worker training as technology transfer. Describes the activities of the Pennsylvania College of Technology (PCT). Offers a general paradigm of technology transfer for community colleges based on the…

Sugarman, Barry

1992-01-01

106

Urban development applications project. Urban technology transfer study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology transfer is defined along with reasons for attempting to transfer technology. Topics discussed include theoretical models, stages of the innovation model, communication process model, behavior of industrial organizations, problem identification, technology search and match, establishment of a market mechanism, applications engineering, commercialization, and management of technology transfer.

1975-01-01

107

Welding technology. [technology transfer of NASA developments to commercial organizations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Welding processes which have been developed during NASA space program activities are discussed. The subjects considered are: (1) welding with an electron gun, (2) technology of welding special alloys, and (3) welding shop techniques and equipment. The material presented is part of the combined efforts of NASA and the Small Business Administration to provide technology transfer of space-related developments to the benefit of commercial organizations.

1974-01-01

108

Technology Transfer Materials--Are We Learning the Technology of Transfer?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Makes recommendations for improving the written documents used for technology transfer: (1) focus on document purpose; (2) raise awareness of design aspects of good communication; and (3) evaluate at all stages of production with input from the target group. (SK)

Velasco, M. R.; And Others

1996-01-01

109

Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging.  

PubMed

In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed. PMID:11541150

Winfield, D L

1997-01-01

110

Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U. S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed.

Winfield, Daniel L.

111

Technology transfer in the national laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The title of this paper might unfairly provoke readers if it conjures up visions of vast stores of high-tech gadgets in several hundred technology warehouses'' (also known as federal laboratories) around the country, open for browsing by those in search of a bargain. That vision, unfortunately, is a mirage. The term technology transfer'' is not really as accurate as is the term technology team-work,'' a process of sharing ideas and knowledge rather than widgets. In addition, instead of discussing the efforts of more than 700 federal labs in the US, I mean to address only those nine government-owned, contractor-operated multiprogram labs run by the Department of Energy. Nevertheless, the topic of technology team-work opportunities with DOE multiprogram national lab is of significance to those concerned with increasing economic competitiveness and finding technological solutions to a host of national problems. A significant fraction of US R D capabilities rests in the nine DOE multiprogram national laboratories -- and these labs have only just begun to join the other federal laboratories in these efforts due to the passage and recent implementation of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989.

Yonas, G.

1991-08-01

112

MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee  

SciTech Connect

As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

Not Available

1989-10-01

113

FY86 Technology Transfer Program Morgantown Energy Technology Center  

SciTech Connect

The actual technology transfer was accomplished by several integrated activities during fiscal year (FY) 1986: R and D contracts with industry and academia, including cost-shared contracts; technical information exchange for scientist-to-scientist communication through conferences, visitors to the Center, and federal personnel visits with US industry; technical documents for information dissemination; patents to advance technology adoption and use in US industry; on-site training activities as personnel exchange; and technical assistance through the use of fossil energy technology data bases.

Not Available

1986-10-01

114

The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

Wittig, T. [Geo-Centers, Inc. (United States); Greenfield, J. [Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

1996-10-01

115

Using the MCPLXS Generator for Technology Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this paper is to acquaint you with some of the approaches we are taking at Langley to incorporate escalations (or de-escalations) of technology when modeling futuristic systems. Since we have a short turnaround between the time we receive enough descriptive information to start estimating the project and when the estimate is needed (the "we-want-it-yesterday syndrome"), creativity is often necessary. There is not much time available for tool development. It is expedient to use existing tools in an adaptive manner to model the situation at hand. Specifically, this paper describes the use of the RCA PRICE MCPLXS Generator to incorporate technology transfer and technology escalation in estimates for advanced space systems such as Shuttle II and NASA advanced technology vehicles. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the RCA PRICE family of models as well as the RCA PRICE utility programs such as SCPLX, PARAM, PARASYN, and the MCPLXS Generator.

Moore, Arlene A.; Dean, Edwin B.

1987-01-01

116

Cooperative water resource technology transfer program  

SciTech Connect

This cooperative water resource technology transfer program sought to develop/present educational programs (conferences/seminars/workshops) and technology transfer brochures to enhance public awareness/appreciation of state water quality problems and to stress economic tradeoffs needed to resolve given problems. Accomplishments of this program for the different conferences held 1979-1981 are described (inland lake eutrophication: causes, effects, and remedies; contamination of groundwater supplies by toxic chemicals: causes, effects, and prevention; supplemental irrigation; stormwater management; cooperative research needs for renovation and reuse of municipal water in agriculture; selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow land application systems to treat municipal wastewater; effects of acid precipitation on ecological systems: Great Lakes region; water competition in Michigan; Michigan natural resources outlook.

D'itri, F.M.

1982-06-01

117

MHD technology transfer, integration and review committee  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This seventh semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1991 through September 1991. It includes a summary and minutes of the General Committee meeting, progress summaries of ongoing POC contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months. The meeting included test plan with western coal, seed regeneration economics, power management for the integrated topping cycle, and status of the Clean Coal Technology Proposal activities. Appendices cover CDIF operations HRSR development, CFFF operations, etc.

1993-02-01

118

MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee  

SciTech Connect

This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

Not Available

1992-01-01

119

Climate Change, Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology development and transfer has been identified as a key element in the Bali Action Plan. In the negotiations on a global climate treaty the developing nations have put forth ideas and plans to ensure that intellectual property rights (IPRs) do not become a barrier to transfer of climate friendly technology. In this discussion paper, this question of technology transfer,

K. Ravi Srinivas

2009-01-01

120

Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang  

E-print Network

Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang Institute of Information Security, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract. This paper presents our experience of knowledge and technology transfer within the lessons learned and what we would do differently in future technology transfer projects. Keywords

Basin, David

121

Technology Transfer and the Product Development Process  

SciTech Connect

It is my pleasure this morning to address a topic that is much talked about in passing but rarely examined from a first person point of view. That topic is Technology Transfer. Over the next 30 minutes I'd like to approach Technology Transfer within the context of the Product Development Process looking at it from the perspectives of the federal government researcher and the industry manufacturer/user. Fist let us recognize that we are living in an ''Information Age'', where global economic and military competition is determined as much by technology as it is by natural resource assets. It is estimated that technical/scientific information is presently growing at a rate of l3 percent per year; this is expected to increase to 30 percent per year by the turn of the century. In fact, something like 90 percent of all scientific knowledge has been generated in the last 30 years; this pool will double again in the next 10-15 years (Exhibit 1). Of all the scientists and engineers throughout history, 90% live and work in the present time. Successfully managing this technical information/knowledge--i.e., transforming the results of R&D to practical applications--will be an important measure of national strength. A little over a dozen years ago, the United States with only 5 percent of the world's population was generating approximately 75 percent of the world's technology. The US. share is now 50 percent and may decline to 30 percent by the turn of the century. This decline won't be because of downturn in U.S. technological advances but because the other 95 percent of the world's population will be increasing its contribution. Economic and military strength then, will be determined by how quickly and successfully companies, industries, and nations can apply new technological information to practical applications--i.e., how they manage technology transfer within the context of the product development process. Much discussion and pronouncements are ongoing in public forums today over the apparent decline in global competitiveness of U.S. industry. The question is why does U.S. industry not succeed in the development and marketing of competitive products when they lead in the generation of new technology.

Mock, John E.

1989-03-21

122

The flight telerobotic servicer and technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an advanced telerobotic system to assist in and reduce crew extravehicular activity (EVA) for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The FTS will provide a telerobotic capability in the early phases of the SSF program and will be employed for assembly, maintenance, and inspection applications. The current state of space technology and the general nature of the FTS tasks dictate that the FTS be designed with sophisticated teleoperational capabilities for its internal primary operating mode. However, technologies such as advanced computer vision and autonomous planning techniques would greatly enhance the FTS capabilities to perform autonomously in less structured work environments. Another objective of the FTS program is to accelerate technology transfer from research to U.S. industry.

Andary, James F.; Bradford, Kayland Z.

1991-01-01

123

Federal Technology Transfer Data 1987-2009 Gary Anderson  

E-print Network

. Among other things, this Act explicitly incorporated technology transfer into the mission of all federalFederal Technology Transfer Data 1987-2009 Gary Anderson Economist National Institute of Standards and Technology Economic Analysis Office October 2011 #12;1. Background In 1980, the Stevenson-Wydler Technology

Perkins, Richard A.

124

Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, and International Technology Transfer: A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

What role does trade play in international technology transfer? Do technologies introduced by multinational firms diffuse to local firms? What kinds of policies have proved successful in encouraging technology absorption from abroad and why? Using these questions as motivation, this article surveys the recent trade literature on international technology transfer, paying particular attention to the role of foreign direct investment.

Kamal Saggi

2002-01-01

125

TARGETED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO US INDEPENDENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers with timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY04). PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 2 satellite offices. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and other cooperative outreach efforts. PTTC's Headquarters (HQ) staff receives direction from a National Board of Directors predominantly comprised of American natural gas and oil producers to plan and manage the overall technology transfer program. PTTC HQ implements a comprehensive communications program by interconnecting the talents of the National Board, 10 Regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAG) and the RLOs with industry across the U.S. PTTC effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, namely the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil with state and industry contributions to share application of upstream technologies. Ultimately, these efforts factor in to provide a safe, secure and reliable energy supply for American consumers. This integrated resource base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results regarding domestic production figures. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies by providing direct contact with research, development and demonstration (RD&D) results. A key to the program is demonstrating proven technologies that can be applied broadly and rapidly. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY04. Activities remained at high levels. Board and staff interaction has defined strategic thrusts to further outreach. Networking, involvement in technical activities and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database and a growing E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience.

Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

2005-01-01

126

National Cancer Institute | Technology Transfer Center  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center, the Avon Foundation and The Center for Advancing Innovation have partnered to create a “first-of-a-kind” Breast Cancer Start-up Challenge. The Challenge is a business plan and start-up challenge among multi-disciplinary university-led teams. The finalists in the best business plan phase of the challenge will launch a start-up, compete for seed funding, and negotiate a license for the invention in the final phase of the challenge.

127

NASA Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The advanced expander cycle engine with a 15,000 lb thrust level and a 6:1 mixture ratio and optimized performance was used as the baseline for a design study of the hydrogen/oxgyen propulsion system for the orbit transfer vehicle. The critical components of this engine are the thrust chamber, the turbomachinery, the extendible nozzle system, and the engine throttling system. Turbomachinery technology is examined for gears, bearing, seals, and rapid solidification rate turbopump shafts. Continuous throttling concepts are discussed. Components of the OTV engine described include the thrust chamber/nozzle assembly design, nozzles, the hydrogen regenerator, the gaseous oxygen heat exchanger, turbopumps, and the engine control valves.

1984-01-01

128

Technology transfer from the space exploration initiative  

SciTech Connect

Space exploration has demonstrated that it stimulates the national economy by creating new and improved products, increased employment, and provides a stimulus to education. The exploration of the Moon and Mars under the Space Exploration Initiative has the potential of accelerating this stimulates to the economy. It is difficult to identify all of the concrete ways this will be accomplished. However, many areas can be identified. The space exploration building blocks of power, propulsion, spacecraft, robotics, rovers, mining and manufacturing, communications, navigation, habitats, life support and infrastructures are reviewed to identify possible technology areas. For example, better means for working in hazardous areas and handling hazardous waste are potential outcomes of this initiative. Methods to produce higher quality goods and improve America's competitiveness in manufacturing will undoubtedly evolve from the need to produce products that must last many years in the harsh environments of space and planetary surfaces. Some ideas for technology transfer are covered in this paper.

Buden, D.

1991-06-14

129

Technology transfer from the space exploration initiative  

SciTech Connect

Space exploration has demonstrated that it stimulates the national economy by creating new and improved products, increased employment, and provides a stimulus to education. The exploration of the Moon and Mars under the Space Exploration Initiative has the potential of accelerating this stimulates to the economy. It is difficult to identify all of the concrete ways this will be accomplished. However, many areas can be identified. The space exploration building blocks of power, propulsion, spacecraft, robotics, rovers, mining and manufacturing, communications, navigation, habitats, life support and infrastructures are reviewed to identify possible technology areas. For example, better means for working in hazardous areas and handling hazardous waste are potential outcomes of this initiative. Methods to produce higher quality goods and improve America`s competitiveness in manufacturing will undoubtedly evolve from the need to produce products that must last many years in the harsh environments of space and planetary surfaces. Some ideas for technology transfer are covered in this paper.

Buden, D.

1991-06-14

130

Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the period was approximately 32,000, 70% of whom were repeat attendees. Participant feedback established that 40% of them said they had applied a technology they learned of through PTTC. Central/Eastern Gulf Univ. of Alabama, LSU Center for Energy Studies 77 Eastern West Virginia University, Illinois Geological Survey, W. Michigan Univ. 99 Midcontinent University of Kansas, University of Tulsa, Okla. Geological Survey (past) 123 Rocky Mountains Colorado School of Mines 147 Texas/SE New Mexico Bureau of Economic Geology, U. of Texas at Austin 85 West Coast Conservation Committee of California O&G Producers, Univ. So. Cal. (past) 54 At the national level HQ went from an office in Houston to a virtual office in the Tulsa, Okla. area with AAPG providing any physical assets required. There are no employees, rather several full time and several part time contractors. Since inception, PTTC has produced quarterly and mailed the 16-page Network News newsletter. It highlights new advances in technology and has a circulation of 19,000. It also produces the Tech Connections Column in The American Oil & Gas Reporter, with a circulation of 13,000. On an approximate three-week frequency, the electronic Email Tech Alert goes out to 9,000 readers. The national staff also maintains a central website with information of national interest and individual sections for each of the six regions. The national organization also provides legal and accounting services, coordinates the RLO activities, exhibits at at least major national and other meetings, supports the volunteer Board as it provides strategic direction, and is working to restore the Producer Advisory Groups to bolster the regional presence. Qualitative Value: Three qualitative factors confirm PTTC's value to the domestic O&G producing industry. First, AAPG was willing to step in and rescue PTTC, believing it was of significant interest to its domestic membership and of potential value internationally. Second, through a period of turmoil and now with participant fees dramatically increased, industry participants 'keep coming back' to wo

E. Lance Cole

2009-09-30

131

Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advanced near term (1990's) space-based Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine (OTVE) system was designed, and the technologies applicable to its construction, maintenance, and operations were developed under Tasks A through F of the Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program. Task A was a reporting task. In Task B, promising OTV turbomachinery technologies were explored: two stage partial admission turbines, high velocity ratio diffusing crossovers, soft wear ring seals, advanced bearing concepts, and a rotordynamic analysis. In Task C, a ribbed combustor design was developed. Possible rib and channel geometries were chosen analytically. Rib candidates were hot air tested and laser velocimeter boundary layer analyses were conducted. A channel geometry was also chosen on the basis of laser velocimeter data. To verify the predicted heat enhancement effects, a ribbed calorimeter spool was hot fire tested. Under Task D, the optimum expander cycle engine thrust, performance and envelope were established for a set of OTV missions. Optimal nozzle contours and quick disconnects for modularity were developed. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses, maintenance and reliability studies and component study results were incorporated into the engine system. Parametric trades on engine thrust, mixture ratio, and area ratio were also generated. A control system and the health monitoring and maintenance operations necessary for a space-based engine were outlined in Task E. In addition, combustor wall thickness measuring devices and a fiberoptic shaft monitor were developed. These monitoring devices were incorporated into preflight engine readiness checkout procedures. In Task F, the Integrated Component Evaluator (I.C.E.) was used to demonstrate performance and operational characteristics of an advanced expander cycle engine system and its component technologies. Sub-system checkouts and a system blowdown were performed. Short transitions were then made into main combustor ignition and main stage operation.

Gustafson, N. B.; Harmon, T. J.

1993-01-01

132

A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

Schoeling, L.G.

1993-09-01

133

NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report is a summary of the primary activities and metrics for the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center, operated by the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC). This report covers the contract period January 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001. This report includes a summary of the overall CTC Metrics, a summary of the Major Outreach Events, an overview of the NASA Business Outreach Program, a summary of the Activities and Results of the Technology into the Zone program, and a Summary of the Major Activities and Initiatives performed by CTC in supporting this contract. Between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001, CTC has facilitated 10 license agreements, established 35 partnerships, provided assistance 517 times to companies, and performed 593 outreach activities including participation in 57 outreach events. CTC also assisted Goddard in executing a successful 'Technology into the Zone' program.' CTC is pleased to have performed this contract, and looks forward to continue providing their specialized services in support of the new 5 year RTTC Contract for the Northeast region.

Dunn, James P.

2001-01-01

134

Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology  

SciTech Connect

The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

1996-04-01

135

A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

1990-07-01

136

A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies: Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report summarizes some of the key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (the full report is published under SERI number TP-260-3729). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes in summary these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some example technology transfer activities; and summarizes the Advisory Group's recommendations.

Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

1990-08-01

137

Technology transfer -- protecting technologies during the transfer cycle (intellectual property issues)  

SciTech Connect

The success of technology transfer agreements depends not just on the technical work, but on how well the arrangements to protect and dispose of the intellectual properties that make up the technologies are handled. Pertinent issues that impact the protection and disposition of intellectual properties during the technology transfer process at Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram laboratory operated for the Department of Energy by the Martin Marietta Corporation, are discussed. Subjects addressed include the contracting mechanisms (including the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement [CRADA] and the Work-for-Others agreement), proprietary information, The Freedom of Information Act, patents and copyrights, the statement of work, Protected CRADA Information, licensing considerations, title to intellectual properties, march-in rights, and nondisclosure agreements.

Graham, G.G.

1993-12-31

138

Space technology transfer policies: Learning from scientific satellite case studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper reports research into the transfer of technology typically used in the construction of scientific satellites. Four case studies are analyzed to clarify some basic mechanisms of the transfer of space technology to the industrial system. The paper finds that the technologies analyzed in the construction of satellites for the most part stem from the integration of technical processes

Giorgio Petroni; Karen Venturini; Stefano Santini

2010-01-01

139

Spillovers of technology transfer from FDI: the case of Estonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is expected to generate technology spillovers to indigenous firms in transition economies. This paper disentangles the positive effect of technology transfer on the productivity of domestic firms from that of competition. We use a production function framework to estimate the impact of technology transfer from FDI on the growth of sales of domestic firms in Estonia

Evis Sinani; Klaus E. Meyer

2004-01-01

140

University Technology Transfer Programs: A Profit\\/Loss Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis was made of the financial profitability\\/loss of technology transfer programs in U.S. universities, hospitals, and research centers for 1995. Data were extracted from the AUTM (Association of University Technology Managers) survey and other published information. Royalty payments were compared to estimates of technology transfer office costs, patent fees, legal expenses, and new research grants. Approximately half of the

Dennis R Trune; Lewis N Goslin

1998-01-01

141

Technology Transfer through the Pipeline and Other Channels: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Examines some success stories of tech transfer and lessons learned from these experiences that point to possible improvements to expedite transfer to future technologies.

Benner, J.; Hulstrom, R.; Sheldon, P.

2001-10-01

142

Low-G fluid transfer technology study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology gaps and system characteristics critical to cryogenic and noncryogenic in-orbit fluid transfer were identified. Four different supply systems were conceptually designed as space shuttle payloads. These were; (1) space tug supply - LH2, LO2, N2H4, He - linear acceleration for liquid acquisition with supply module and tug separated from shuttle, (2) tug supply using orbiter drag, (3) orbiter supply - N2O4,MMH,He, H2,O2 - surface tension screens, (4) multiple receivers supply 0 solar electric propulsion stage, Hg, diaphragm - HEAO B, HEe, paddle fluid rotation-satellite control section, N2H4, screens. It was found that screens had the best overall potential for low weight and simplicity, however, thermal problems with cryogenics still need final resolution.

Stark, J. A.

1976-01-01

143

Technology transfer at NASA - A librarian's view  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA programs, publications, and services promoting the transfer and utilization of aerospace technology developed by and for NASA are briefly surveyed. Topics addressed include the corporate sources of NASA technical information and its interest for corporate users of information services; the IAA and STAR abstract journals; NASA/RECON, NTIS, and the AIAA Aerospace Database; the RECON Space Commercialization file; the Computer Software Management and Information Center file; company information in the RECON database; and services to small businesses. Also discussed are the NASA publications Tech Briefs and Spinoff, the Industrial Applications Centers, NASA continuing bibliographies on management and patent abstracts (indexed using the NASA Thesaurus), the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches, and the Aerospace Research Information Network (ARIN).

Buchan, Ronald L.

1991-01-01

144

Gulf Coast Addiction Technology Transfer Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Based at the University of Texas at Austin, the Gulf Coast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (GCATTC) is one of 14 such regional university centers in the United States. The Center's work includes creating high-quality training materials for health care professionals, convening research conferences, and providing technical assistance to state agencies and providers. On the website, visitors can learn about research projects, pilot programs for transforming mental health service delivery programs, and work on the abuse of prescription drugs. The left-hand side of the page includes sections like Grant Writing, Products, and Offender Education Programs. In the Products area, visitors can look over publications and presentations by Center staff and also view a list of resources for treatment of substance use disorders.

2012-01-01

145

Dissemination of CERN's Technology Transfer: Added Value from Regional Transfer Agents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technologies developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are disseminated via a network of external technology transfer officers. Each of CERN's 20 member states has appointed at least one technology transfer officer to help establish links with CERN. This network has been in place since 2001 and early experiences indicate…

Hofer, Franz

2005-01-01

146

Transfer of hot dry rock technology  

SciTech Connect

The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

Smith, M.C.

1985-11-01

147

TEKTRAN: Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) ARS' (Agricultural Research Service) TEKTRAN (Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System) "is a dynamic database containing nearly 13,000 interpretive summaries of research results that have been peer reviewed and cleared by ARS. These are pre-publication notices, and as such, they forecast the future for improved food, feed, and fiber products and processes. TEKTRAN changes when scientists submit articles for publication and when previously submitted articles are published. TEKTRAN on the Internet is updated monthly." The system allows three different types of searches (each thoroughly explained), as well as browsing in over 60 categories from agrochemical technology to weeds. Each record contains title, author(s), an interpretive summary, keywords, contact information, and an ARS report number. The number of citations, as well as the power of the searching systems, make this one of the better agricultural bibliographic databases. As with most large databases, studying the searching FAQs is a must in order to exploit the resource.

1998-01-01

148

Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986  

SciTech Connect

An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

Not Available

1986-01-01

149

A continuing program for technology transfer to the apparel industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A six month program has been carried out to investigate various mechanisms for transferring technology to industry. This program has focused on transfer to the apparel industry through the Apparel Research Foundation. The procedure was to analyze the problem, obtain potentially relevant aerospace technology, and then transfer this technology to the industry organization. This was done in a specific case. Technology was identified relevant to stitchless joining, and this technology was transferred to the Apparel Research Foundation. The feasibility and ground rules for carrying out such activities on a broader scale were established. A specific objective was to transfer new technology from the industry organization to the industry itself. This required the establishment of an application engineering program. Another transfer mechanism tested was publication of solutions to industry problems in a format familiar to the industry. This is to be distinguished from circulating descriptions of new technology. Focus is on the industry problem and the manager is given a formula for solving it that he can follow. It was concluded that this mechanism can complement the problem statement approach to technology transfer. It is useful in achieving transfer when a large amount of application engineering is not necessary. A wide audience is immediately exposed to the technology. On the other hand, the major manufacturing problems which require a sophisticated technical solution integrating many innovations are less likely to be helped.

Clingman, W. H.

1971-01-01

150

Mode of foreign entry, technology transfer, and FDI policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foreign direct investment (FDI) can take place either through the direct entry of foreign firms or the acquisition of existing domestic firms. The preferences of a foreign firm and a welfare-maximizing host country government over these two modes of FDI are examined in the presence of costly technology transfer. The trade-off between technology transfer and market competition emerges as a

Aaditya Mattoo; Marcelo Olarreaga; Kamal Saggi

2004-01-01

151

CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Innovation and international technology transfer  

E-print Network

1 CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Innovation and international technology transfer: The case ­ France Tél. : 33 (1) 40 51 90 00 July 2010 hal-00498578,version1-7Jul2010 Author manuscript, published technology transfer: The case of the Chinese photovoltaic industry Arnaud de la Tour, Matthieu Glachant, Yann

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

TRANSFER CREDIT GUIDE: TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT AND TRAINING MANAGEMENT  

E-print Network

, and Sport management to pursue a major in technology support and training management, you should consider will transfer to degree programs within the College of Hospitality, Retail, and Sport Management. This list doesTRANSFER CREDIT GUIDE: TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT AND TRAINING MANAGEMENT If you are a South Carolina

Almor, Amit

153

Technology Transfer Educational Curriculum Plan for the State of Colorado.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recommended plan for an educational curriculum on the topic of technology transfer is outlined. A survey was conducted to determine the current levels of ability and knowledge of technology users and of transfer intermediaries. Information was collected from three sources: individuals and organizations currently presenting educational programs…

Dakin, Karl J.

154

Academic Technology Transfer: Tracking, Measuring and Enhancing Its Impact  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the 1980 passage of the US Bayh-Dole Act, academic technology transfer has gained profile globally as a key component of knowledge-driven economic development. Research universities are seen as key contributors. In this article, focusing on the USA and drawing on over twenty years of experience in the field of academic technology transfer in…

Fraser, John

2010-01-01

155

A model technology transfer program for independent operators  

SciTech Connect

In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

Schoeling, L.G.

1996-08-01

156

Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

This is the second volume of papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools; systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development; perception and vision technologies. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for some articles from this meeting.

Krishen, K.

1994-05-01

157

Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

This document contains papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; new ways of doing business; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development perception and vision technology. Separate abstracts have beem submitted to the database for some articles from this conference.

Krishen, K.

1994-05-01

158

NASA'S Changing Role in Technology Development and Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA has historically had to develop new technology to meet its mission objectives. The newly developed technologies have then been transferred to the private sector to assist US industry's worldwide competitiveness and thereby spur the US economy. The renewed emphasis by the US Government on a proactive technology transfer approach has produced a number of contractual vehicles that assist technology transfer to industrial, aerospace and research firms. NASA's focus has also been on leveraging the shrinking space budget to accomplish "more with less." NASA's cooperative agreements and resource sharing agreements are measures taken to achieve this goal, and typify the changing role of government technology development and transfer with industry. Large commercial partnerships with aerospace firms, as typified by the X-33 and X-34 Programs, are evolving. A new emphasis on commercialization in the Small Business Innovative Research and Dual Use programs paves the way for more rapid commercial application of new technologies developed for NASA.

Griner, Carolyn S.; Craft, Harry G., Jr.

1997-01-01

159

Effective Transfer of Industrial Energy Conservation Technologies  

E-print Network

to accept and use these new technologies at an accelerated rate. Examples of several technologies that were used by industry at an accelerated rate are described in this paper. These technologies are; textile foam finishing and dyeing, forging furnace...

Clement, M.; Vallario, R. W.

1983-01-01

160

Technology transfer? The rise of China and India in green technology sectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

International technology transfer is central to the debate about how to curb the carbon emissions from rapid economic growth in China and India. But given China and India's great progress in building innovation capabilities and green industries, how relevant is technology transfer for these countries? This paper seeks insights from three green technology sectors in both countries: wind power, solar

Rasmus Lema; Adrian Lema

2012-01-01

161

Nuclear transfer technologies: between successes and doubts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cloning of mammals by nuclear transfer can lead to the birth of healthy adult animals but more often compromises the development of the reconstructed embryos. A high incidence of fetal and postnatal losses has been observed in several species, revealing the existence of long-lasting effects induced by the nuclear transfer procedures. Remodeling of donor chromatin by the recipient cytoplasm after

J. P. Renard; Qi Zhou; D. LeBourhis; P. Chavatte-Palmer; I. Hue; Y. Heyman; X. Vignon

2002-01-01

162

Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile, nondestructive testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of nondestructive testing procedures by NASA and the transfer of nondestructive testing to technology to civilian industry are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) an overview of the nondestructive testing field, (2) NASA contributions to the field of nondestructive testing, (3) dissemination of NASA contributions, and (4) a transfer profile. Attachments are included which provide a brief description of common nondestructive testing methods and summarize the technology transfer reports involving NASA generated nondestructive testing technology.

1972-01-01

163

48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technology transfer and patent rights. 970...and Copyrights 970.2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 (NCTTA)...

2014-10-01

164

48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technology transfer and patent rights. 970...and Copyrights 970.2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 (NCTTA)...

2010-10-01

165

48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technology transfer and patent rights. 970...and Copyrights 970.2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 (NCTTA)...

2012-10-01

166

48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technology transfer and patent rights. 970...and Copyrights 970.2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 (NCTTA)...

2011-10-01

167

Technology Transfer Center | Confidential Disclosure Agreement  

Cancer.gov

SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview Material Transfer Agreement Confidential Disclosure Agreement Clinical

168

Technology transfer in the space sector: an international perspective.  

PubMed

This article is an introduction to four articles in this issue, all related to the different policy objectives and approaches of technology transfer in space programs run by the United States, the European Space Agency, Canada, and Russia. PMID:14983841

Hertzfeld, Henry R

2002-12-01

169

76 FR 52670 - 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Maarten deJong, Managing Director, Barclays Capital --Andrew Robertson, Chief Policy Officer, BIO Ventures for Global Health --Orin Herskowitz, Executive Director & Vice President, Intellectual Property Technology Transfer, Columbia...

2011-08-23

170

Research and Technology Transfer Organization www.techtransfer.psu.edu  

E-print Network

channels such as trade shows, The IRON (Industrial Research Office Newsletter), Internet, and direct e and Technology Transfer Organization (RTTO) consists of four units working together to connect industry to Penn Research. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Industrial Research Office

Guiltinan, Mark

171

The challenge of technology transfer: Buying in without selling out  

PubMed Central

Highly effective technologies flowing from the discipline of behavior analysis have not been widely adopted, thus threatening the survival of the discipline itself. An analysis of the contingencies underlying successful technology transfer suggests the need for direct, empirical involvement in the marketplace in order to insure that the maximum demonstrable benefits reach the ultimate users. A successful example of this strategy of technology transfer is provided. Three areas of intense national concern—urban violence, illiteracy, and declining industrial productivity—provide immediate opportunities for the technologies of behavior analysis to secure the place of the discipline in the intellectual mosaic of the 21st century. PMID:22478656

Pennypacker, H. S.

1986-01-01

172

Technology transfer in pharmaceuticals. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in pharmaceuticals. Topics include technology transfer in pharmaceutical research, production, and manufacture. Technology transfer using genetic engineering to develop pharmaceuticals and vaccines is described. University-to-industry technology transfer and transfer to developing nations are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 53 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-10-01

173

Fruit Fly Liquid Larval Diet Technology Transfer and Update  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Since October 2006, USDA-ARS has been implementing a fruit fly liquid larval diet technology transfer, which has proceeded according to the following steps: (1) Recruitment of interested groups through request; (2) Establishment of the Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) with ARS; (3) Fruit fly liquid...

174

Does Foreign Direct Investment Transfer Technology Across Borders?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have found that importing goods from R&D-intensive countries raises a country's productivity. In this paper, we investigate econometrically whether foreign direct investment (FDI) also transfers technology across borders. The data indicates that FDI transfers technology, but only in one direction: a country's productivity is increased if it invests in R&D-intensive foreign countries-particularly in recent years-but not if foreign

Bruno Van Pottelsberghe De La Potterie; Frank Lichtenberg

2001-01-01

175

Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer to three target industries with focus on the apparel manufacturing industry in Alabama. Also included in this report are an analysis of the 1992 problem statements submitted by Alabama firms, the results of the survey of 1987-88 NASA Tech Brief requests, the results of the followup to Alabama submitted problem statements, and the development of the model describing the MSFC technology transfer process.

Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

1993-01-01

176

76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions...of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI). Type of Information...

2011-03-02

177

75 FR 80830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the...Title: Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI). Type of Information...

2010-12-23

178

Societal and economic valuation of technology-transfer deals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The industrial adoption of concepts such as open innovation brings new legitimacy to activities technology-transfer professionals have conducted for over 20 years. This movement highlights the need for an increased understanding of the valuation of intellectual property (IP) and technology-transfer deals. Valuation, though a centerpiece of corporate finance, is more challenging when applied to the inherent uncertainty surrounding innovation. Technology-transfer professionals are often overwhelmed by the complexity and data requirements of valuation techniques and skeptical of their applicability to and utility for technology transfer. The market longs for an approach which bridges the gap between valuation fundamentals and technology-transfer realities. This paper presents the foundations of a simple, flexible, precise/accurate, and useful framework for considering the valuation of technology-transfer deals. The approach is predicated on a 12-factor model—a 3×4 value matrix predicated on categories of economic, societal, and strategic value. Each of these three categories consists of three core subcategories followed by a fourth "other" category to facilitate inevitable special considerations. This 12-factor value matrix provides a framework for harvesting data during deals and for the application of best-of-breed valuation techniques which can be employed on a per-factor basis. Future work will include framework implementation within a database platform.

Holmes, Joseph S., Jr.

2009-09-01

179

Technology transfer and evaluation for Space Station telerobotics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The international space station (SS) must take advantage of advanced telerobotics in order to maximize productivity and safety and to reduce maintenance costs. The Automation and Robotics Division at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has designed, developed, and constructed the Automated Robotics Maintenance of Space Station (ARMSS) facility for the purpose of transferring and evaluating robotic technology that will reduce SS operation costs. Additionally, JSC had developed a process for expediting the transfer of technology from NASA research centers and evaluating these technologies in SS applications. Software and hardware system developed at the research centers and NASA sponsored universities are currently being transferred to JSC and integrated into the ARMSS for flight crew personnel testing. These technologies will be assessed relative to the SS baseline, and, after refinements, those technologies that provide significant performance improvements will be recommended as upgrades to the SS. Proximity sensors, vision algorithms, and manipulator controllers are among the systems scheduled for evaluation.

Price, Charles R.; Stokes, Lebarian; Diftler, Myron A.

1994-01-01

180

Technology Transfer Center | Standard Forms & Agreements  

Cancer.gov

Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) are used to collaborate and develop technologies for commercialization. Research projects under a CRADA can span from basic research to clinical work.

181

Polymer solidification: Technology transfer to DOE and industry  

SciTech Connect

In keeping with the congressional mandate for technology transfer between federal research and development institutions and U.S. industry, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Environmental and Waste Technology Center is pursuing industrial partnership with industry. These efforts, supported by the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management involve both the transfer of BNL developed technology to industry and the use of commercially developed technologies as part of an integrated waste treatment system. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement has been established with VECTRA Technologies, Inc. (formerly Pacific Nuclear), a U.S. company that provides waste treatment and other services to the commercial nuclear power industry. The agreement involves investigation of polyethylene encapsulation for treatment of ion exchange resin wastes. In addition, other avenues of cooperation are being investigated including use of a VECTRA Technologies volume reduction pre-treatment process for use with the polyethylene technology in treating aqueous radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes.

Kalb, P.D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Strand, G. [VECTRA Technologies, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States)

1994-12-31

182

Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program enhanced heat transfer combustor technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to increase the performance of a high performance, advanced expander-cycle engine combustor, higher chamber pressures are required. In order to increase chamber pressure, more heat energy is required to be transferred to the combustor coolant circuit fluid which drives the turbomachinery. This requirement was fulfilled by increasing the area exposed to the hot-gas by using combustor ribs. A previous technology task conducted 2-d hot air and cold flow tests to determine an optimum rib height and configuration. In task C.5 a combustor calorimeter was fabricated with the optimum rib configuration, 0.040 in. high ribs, in order to determine their enhancing capability. A secondary objective was to determine the effects of mixture ratio changers on the enhancement during hot-fire testing. The program used the Rocketdyne Integrated Component Evaluator (ICE) reconfigured into a thrust chamber only mode. The test results were extrapolated to give a projected enhancement from the ribs for a 16 in. long cylindrical combustor at 15 Klb nominal thrust level. The hot-gas wall ribs resulted in a 58 percent increase in heat transfer. When projected to a full size 15K combustor, it becomes a 46 percent increase. The results of those tests, a comparison with previous 2-d results, the effects of mixture ratio and combustion gas flow on the ribs and the potential ramifications for expander cycle combustors are detailed.

Brown, William S.

1991-01-01

183

Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Lubrication  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology transfer in the lubrication field is discussed in terms of the movement of NASA-generated lubrication technology into the private sector as affected by evolving industrial requirements. An overview of the field is presented, and NASA technical contributions to lubrication technology are described. Specific examples in which these technologies have been used in the private sector are summarized.

Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Heins, C. R.; Hildred, W. M.; Johnson, F. D.; Staskin, E. R.

1971-01-01

184

Nuclear Transfer Technology in Mammalian Cloning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in mammalian cloning using nuclear transfer (NT). Until 1997 and the announcement of the successful cloning of sheep from adult mammary gland or fetal fibroblast cells (1), our working assumption was that cloning by NT could only be accomplished with relatively undifferentiated embryonic cells. Indeed, live offspring were first produced by NT

Don P Wolf; Shoukhrat Mitalipov; Robert B Norgren

2001-01-01

185

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall  

E-print Network

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall 1230 York Avenue New-Binding Proteins RU 648, 864 Technology Summary RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are the key components in RNA-wide insights into brain alternative RNA processing. Nature 456: 464-469. · Chi et al., 2009. Ago HITS

186

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall  

E-print Network

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall 1230 York Avenue New Disorders using Ion Channel Modulators RU 1118 Technology Summary Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) include of causative factors. Every year, about 20,000 children develop ASD in the U.S. alone. About 50% of them

de Lange, Titia

187

Sharp Technologies as Applied to a Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the efforts of Ames Research Center to develop Slender Hypersonic Aerothermodynamic Research Probes (SHARP) technologies as applied to the new Crew Transfer Vehicle (CTV). Amongst these technologies are ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC). The results of Computational Fluid Dynamic simulations on prospective designs of the CTV are shown as well as wind tunnel test results.

Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Kinney, David; Reuther, James; Saunders, David

2003-01-01

188

Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived…

Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

2013-01-01

189

Medical technologies in developing countries: Issues of technology development, transfer, diffusion and use  

Microsoft Academic Search

The difficulties experienced in transfer of medical technology to developing countries are aggravated by partial and incomplete understanding of the cultural, social, economic, and institutional factors affecting technology development, transfer, dissemination and use. In this paper, it is argued that a more dynamic and comprehensive approach is needed for the analysis of these factors. Such an approach would provide the

Ann Bonair; Patricia Rosenfield; Karin Tengvald

1989-01-01

190

Development of a nationwide network for technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The winter and spring of 1987 saw the cooperative nationwide network for technology transfer translated from concept to reality. The most obvious of the network relationships which were developed or which are anticipated are summarized. The objective was to help assure that every U.S. business which has the capacity to exploit, or the need to obtain new technology in any form, has access to the technology it needs or can use.

Fong, Louis B. C.; Brockman, Paul R.

1987-01-01

191

Federal laboratories: technology resources and transfer champions  

SciTech Connect

The Federal laboratories in the US employ a significant fraction of the nation's research and development resources, including technical staff, facilities and operating budgets. With a maturing base of national policy that encourages technical interchange with industry, universities and state and local governments, and with a breadth of technical areas under study, these laboratories represent a major national contingent asset - valuable yet not fully utilized. The laboratories have developed many methods of interaction with other organizations, providing a variety of ways to match needs and opportunities and to exploit any confluence of interests. The Federal Laboratory Consortium assists these laboratories in their transfer operations and helps to develop linkage opportunities. Many barriers to successful transfer are defined and surmountable.

Stark, E.E. Jr.

1984-08-01

192

OAST space research and technology applications: Technology transfer successes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The ultimate measure of success in the Space Research and Technology Program is the incorporation of a technology into an operational mission. Charts are presented that describe technology products which OAST has helped support that (1) have been used in a space mission, (2) have been incorporated into the baseline design of a flight system in the development phase, or (3) have been picked up by a commercial or other non-NASA user. We hope that these examples will demonstrate the value of investment in technology. Pictured on the charts are illustrations of the technology product, the mission or user which has incorporated the technology, and where appropriate, results from the mission itself.

Reck, Gregory M.

1992-01-01

193

A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

Not Available

1993-07-01

194

Advanced manufacturing technology: a Department of Energy technology transfer initiative  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program is described. The AMT Program seeks to assist the US manufacturing community in regaining some of the market share that it has lost to competing companies in Europe and the Far East. One key element to this program is the establishment of teaching and development facilities called manufacturing technology centers (MTCs), which will showcase

W. E. Barkman

1990-01-01

195

Advanced Manufacturing Technology: A Department of Energy technology transfer initiative  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new initiative called the Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Program that is managed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Martin Marietta Energy Systems in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The AMT Program seeks to assist the US manufacturing community regain some of the market share that it has lost to competiting companies in both Europe and the Far East. One key element to this program is the establishment of teaching and development facilities called manufacturing technology centers (MTCs) which will showcase unclassified DOE manufacturing technologies. This paper describes some of the precision flexible manufacturing system (PFMS) technology that is available through the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This technology will be highlighted in the first of the MTCs that is being established. 4 figs.

Steele, R.S. Jr.; Barkman, W.E.

1990-02-01

196

Building technology transfer meetings: A collaborative model for transferring DOE research results to potential users  

SciTech Connect

Transferring the technology and results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored building energy research to potential users is a critical part of DOE`s successful research programs. To assist in this transfer of information and technologies, the DOE Office of Building Technologies (OBT) has established Building Technology Transfer Meetings that are held twice each year at one of the 10 DOE Regional Support Offices. Meeting participants include DOE personnel and representatives from each of the national laboratories involved in OBT buildings energy research as well as representatives from the DOE Regional Support Offices and other agencies involved in the buildings sector. Since 1991, OBT has held five meetings: Washington D.C., San Francisco, Denver, Oak Ridge, and Seattle. The purpose of these meetings is twofold: (1) for DOE to share information about such topics as new research results, new technologies, and new ways to collaborate with industry and universities to leverage resources; and (2) for the participants to use this information within their region to accelerate the transfer and deployment of new energy-efficient building technologies. The meetings include presentations, demonstrations, and tours. The meetings have provided an excellent opportunity for staff from the Regional Support Offices to learn about new technologies through their interactions with OBT and national laboratory program managers. Meeting tours and demonstrations have provided beneficial opportunities to get hands-on experience with new technologies and to see them in practice.

Shankle, D.L.; Hawkins, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Love, P.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilde, G.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-08-01

197

Technology Transfer Center | Sample IP Plan  

Cancer.gov

As applicant's investigator is the lead principal investigator for this project, the institutions represented by applicant's team members have agreed that applicant through its technology licensing office ("TLO") will coordinate patenting and licensing activities relating to inventions arising out of this project either directly or through an intellectual property management firm.

198

Technology transfer of military space microprocessor developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past 13 years the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has led the development of microprocessors and computers for USAF space and strategic missile applications. As a result of these Air Force development programs, advanced computer technology is available for use by civil and commercial space customers as well. The Generic VHSIC Spaceborne Computer (GVSC) program began in 1985

C. Gorden; D. King; L. Byington; D. Lanza

1999-01-01

199

REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AT JPL\\/NASA  

Microsoft Academic Search

this report was carried out by the Jet PropulsionLaboratory, California Institute of Technology, a contract with the NationalAeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Funding for spin-off technologydevelopments has been provided by NASA, Southern California Gas Company,Corporation, and Ford Automotive,7Table 1. Mixture Replacements for R 12Mixture23456

Jack A. Jones

1995-01-01

200

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

SciTech Connect

To assess the stimulation technology developed in the oil and gas industry as to its applicability to the problems of geothermal well stimulation, a literature search was performed through on-line computer systems. Also, field records of well stimulation programs that have worked successfully were obtained from oil and gas operators and service companies. The results of these surveys are presented. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01

201

Technology and Know-how Transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

st century in much the same way that the steam engine did in the 19 th century. Everything today indicates that unforeseen achievements will be made in all scientific and technological disciplines. Why does Switzerland suggest itself as a venue for a Europe-wide specialist congress such as the NanoEurope? Switzerland has few natural resour- ces, and its prosperity therefore depends

Louis Schlapbach; Heinrich Hofmann; Alex Dommann; Jens Gobrecht; Christopher Hierold; Giovanni De Micheli; Paolo Ermanni; Ulrich W. Suter; Nicolas F. De Rooij; Ulrich Rüdiger; Martina Hirayama; André Bernard; Günter Tovar; Johannes Edlinger; David Grainger

2008-01-01

202

MORE THAN MONEY: THE EXPONENTIAL IMPACT OF ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

PubMed Central

Academic technology transfer in its current form began with the passage of the Bayh–Dole Act in 1980, which allowed universities to retain ownership of federally funded intellectual property. Since that time, a profession has evolved that has transformed how inventions arising in universities are treated, resulting in significant impact to US society. While there have been a number of articles highlighting benefits of technology transfer, now, more than at any other time since the Bayh–Dole Act was passed, the profession and the impacts of this groundbreaking legislation have come under intense scrutiny. This article serves as an examination of the many positive benefits and evolution, both financial and intrinsic, provided by academic invention and technology transfer, summarized in Table 1. PMID:25061505

McDevitt, Valerie Landrio; Mendez-Hinds, Joelle; Winwood, David; Nijhawan, Vinit; Sherer, Todd; Ritter, John F.; Sanberg, Paul R.

2014-01-01

203

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek  

E-print Network

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek. Vienna University of Technology found a solution to move and intermix even fragile substrates by a new is a tricky task, especially when the particles are of an inert or insulating nature. Magnetron sputtering

Szmolyan, Peter

204

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic  

E-print Network

Technology Researchers of the Vienna University of Technology and the Medical University of Vienna have foundtechnology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic.sovic@tuwien.ac.at | http://www.rt.tuwien.ac.at Medical University of Vienna | Claudia Ballaun Spitalgasse 23 |A-1090 Vienna

Szmolyan, Peter

205

NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

1973-01-01

206

Technology transfer of NASA microwave remote sensing system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viable techniques for effecting the transfer from NASA to a user agency of state-of-the-art airborne microwave remote sensing technology for oceanographic applications were studied. A detailed analysis of potential users, their needs and priorities; platform options; airborne microwave instrument candidates; ancillary instrumentation; and other, less obvious factors that must be considered were studied. Conclusions and recommendations for the development of an orderly and effective technology transfer of an airborne microwave system that could meet the specific needs of the selected user agencies are reported.

Akey, N. D.

1981-01-01

207

Precise time transfer using MKIII VLBI technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is well known that Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of precise time synchronization at subnanosecond levels. This paper deals with a demonstration of clock synchronization using the MKIII VBLI system. The results are compared with clock synchronization by traveling cesium clocks and GPS. The comparison agrees within the errors of the portable clocks (+ 5 ns) and GPS(+ or - 30 ns) systems. The MKIII technology appears to be capable of clock synchronization at subnanosecond levels and appears to be very good benchmark system against which future time synchronization systems can be evaluated.

Johnston, K. J.; Buisson, J. A.; Lister, M. J.; Oaks, O. J.; Spencer, J. H.; Waltman, W. B.; Elgered, G.; Lundqvist, G.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Clark, T. A.

1984-01-01

208

MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACTIVITIES OF THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

EPA Science Inventory

Technology transfer is an important activity within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Specific technology transfer programs, such as the activities of the Center for Environmental Research Information, the Innovative and Alternative Technology Program, as well as the Smal...

209

THE FEDERAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACT - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES OPPORTUNITIES  

EPA Science Inventory

To enhance and maintain a clean environment while imporiving the nation's productivity, the U.S. EPA is joining with private industry and academia to seek new, cost-effective technologies to prevent and control environmental pollution. Both the U.S. government and the private sec...

210

Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This volume contains the following materials to support Volume 1: (1) Survey of Metal Fabrication Industry in Alabama; (2) Survey of Electronics Manufacturing/Assembly Industry in Alabama; (3) Apparel Modular Manufacturing Simulators; (4) Synopsis of a Stereolithography Project; (5) Transferring Modular Manufacturing Technology to an Apparel Firm; (6) Letters of Support; (7) Fact Sheets; (8) Publications; and (9) One Stop Access to NASA Technology Brochure.

Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

1993-01-01

211

Technology transfer into the solid propulsion industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper is a survey of the waste minimization efforts of industries outside of aerospace for possible applications in the manufacture of solid rocket motors (SRM) for NASA. The Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) manufacturing plan was used as the model for processes involved in the production of an SRM. A literature search was conducted to determine the recycling, waste minimization, and waste treatment methods used in the commercial sector that might find application in SRM production. Manufacturers, trade organizations, and professional associations were also contacted. Waste minimization efforts for current processes and replacement technologies, which might reduce the amount or severity of the wastes generated in SRM production, were investigated. An overview of the results of this effort are presented in this paper.

Campbell, Ralph L.; Thomson, Lawrence J.

1995-01-01

212

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY : CONTROL OF PATHOGENS IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER SLUDGE  

EPA Science Inventory

This 71 - page Technology Transfer Environmental Regulations and echnology publication describes the Federal requirements promulgated in 1979 for reducing pathogens n wastewater sludge and provides guidance in determining whether individual sludge treatment andated or particular ...

213

Remote sensing education in NASA's technology transfer program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Remote sensing is a principal focus of NASA's technology transfer program activity with major attention to remote sensing education the Regional Program and the University Applications Program. Relevant activities over the past five years are reviewed and perspective on future directions is presented.

Weinstein, R. H.

1981-01-01

214

Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, and International Technology Transfer: A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

May 2000How much a developing country can take advantage of technology transfer from foreign direct investment depends partly on how well educated and well trained its workforce is, how much it is willing to invest in research and development, and how much protection it offers for intellectual property rights.Saggi surveys the literature on trade and foreign direct investment - especially

Kamal Saggi

1999-01-01

215

Application of Program Logic Model to Agricultural Technology Transfer Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Program logic models provide a method of presenting program objectives schematically. This article presents a model that explicitly recognizes the ultimate societal-level benefits and accommodates identification of outputs, performance indicators, and targets. The model is illustrated with a hypothetical agricultural technology transfer program.…

Framst, Gordon

1995-01-01

216

Technology Transfer to Industry of Biotechnology on Rhizopus sp Inoculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective is to create new Rhizopus sp inoculum product in order to provide market need for Tempe industries. The benefit is to utilize the appropriate traditional biotechnology for the development of a high quality inoculum product. The methods used is research and development to create new products. Technology transfer to industry of traditional biotechnology on Rhizopus sp inoculum was

Ign. Suharto; A. Prima K; YIP Arry Miryanti

2011-01-01

217

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PRODUCTS FOR THE EPA EMPACT PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

A presentation was given for a National Satellite Broadcast on the development of technology transfer handbooks for the EMPACT program. These handbooks help spread the knowledge and experience developed from the EMPACT projects. Handbooks are being prepared for every fully implem...

218

48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...States may require some form of export control license or other authority...that failure to obtain such export control license may result in...responsible to conduct internal export control reviews and assure that...to DOE a technology transfer plan for conducting its...

2011-10-01

219

48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...States may require some form of export control license or other authority...that failure to obtain such export control license may result in...responsible to conduct internal export control reviews and assure that...to DOE a technology transfer plan for conducting its...

2010-10-01

220

Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

1974-01-01

221

National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA Technology Transfer Program  

E-print Network

of technology transfer that NASA maximizes the benefit of the Nation's investment in cutting-edge research, design tools, data handling, and image processing, as well as solutions for life support functions in the catalog is available at no cost and has been evaluated for access requirements and restrictions: General

Waliser, Duane E.

222

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall  

E-print Network

Transfer (212) 327-7095 tsuprapto@rockefeller.edu Alleles of Human Kappa Opioid Receptors and Uses Thereof RU 505 Technology Summary Opioid drugs such as morphine, heroin, fentanyl and methadone have. These drugs exert their effect through the opioid receptors, which are molecules on the cell surface

223

Cultural Technology Transfer: Redefining Content in the Chinese Television Industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at programming strategies adopted by Chinese television producers, drawing on an ongoing large-scale study of Asia-Pacific television format trade currently being conducted by the Australian Key Centre for Cultural and Media Policy. The paper argues that the concept of cultural technology transfer is a useful way of theorizing the positive benefits of program replication in China. On

Michael Keane

2001-01-01

224

Bio-recognition and functional lipidomics by glycosphingolipid transfer technology  

PubMed Central

Through glycosphingolipid biochemical research, we developed two types of transcription technologies. One is a biochemical transfer of glycosphingolipids to peptides. The other is a physicochemical transfer of glycosphingolipids in silica gel to the surface of a plastic membrane. Using the first technology, we could prepare peptides which mimic the shapes of glycosphingolipid molecules by biopanning with a phage-displayed peptide library and anti-glycosphingolipid antibodies as templates. The peptides thus obtained showed biological properties and functions similar to those of the original glycosphingolipids, such as lectin binding, glycosidase modulation, inhibition of tumor metastasis and immune response against the original antigen glycosphingolipid, and we named them glyco-replica peptides. The results showed that the newly prepared peptides could be used effectively as a bio-recognition system and suggest that the glyco-replica peptides can be widely applied to therapeutic fields. Using the second technology, we could establish a functional lipidomics with a thin-layer chromatography-blot/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (TLC-Blot/MALDI-TOF MS) system. By transferring glycosphingolipids on a plastic membrane surface from a TLC plate, innovative biochemical approaches such as simple purification of individual glycosphingolipids, binding studies, and enzyme reactions could be developed. The combinations of these biochemical approaches and MALDI-TOF MS on the plastic membrane could provide new strategies for glycosphingolipid science and the field of lipidomics. In this review, typical applications of these two transfer technologies are introduced. PMID:23883610

TAKI, Takao

2013-01-01

225

Technology transfer between the government and the aerospace industry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The object of this working group panel was to review questions and issues pertaining to technology transfer between the government and the aerospace industry for use on both government and commercial space customer applications. The results of this review are presented in vugraph form.

Sackheim, Robert; Dunbar, Dennis

1992-01-01

226

Technology Transfer in European Regions: Introduction to the Special Issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regions can be considered as “regional innovation systems,” but the question of whether and to what extent technology transfer is taking place at this or other (e.g., national and global) levels remains empirical. The theme issue contains a number of case studies of “regional innovation systems” within the European Union. Other papers elaborate on the pros and cons of the

Loet Leydesdorff; Philip Cooke; Mikel Olazaran

2002-01-01

227

A Wafer Transfer Technology for MEMS Adaptive Optics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adaptive optics systems require the combination of several advanced technologies such as precision optics, wavefront sensors, deformable mirrors, and lasers with high-speed control systems. The deformable mirror with a continuous membrane is a key component of these systems. This paper describes a new technique for transferring an entire wafer-level silicon membrane from one substrate to another. This technology is developed for the fabrication of a compact deformable mirror with a continuous facet. A 1 (mu)m thick silicon membrane, 100 mm in diameter, has been successfully transferred without using adhesives or polymers (i.e. wax, epoxy, or photoresist). Smaller or larger diameter membranes can also be transferred using this technique. The fabricated actuator membrane with an electrode gap of 1.5 (mu)m shows a vertical deflection of 0.37 (mu)m at 55 V.

Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wiberg, Dean V.

2001-01-01

228

Biomedical technology transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ongoing projects described address: (1) intracranial pressure monitoring; (2) versatile portable speech prosthesis; (3) cardiovascular magnetic measurements; (4) improved EMG biotelemetry for pediatrics; (5) ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration; (6) pediatric roentgen densitometry; (7) X-ray spatial frequency multiplexing; (8) mechanical impedance determination of bone strength; (9) visual-to-tactile mobility aid for the blind; (10) Purkinje image eyetracker and stabilized photocoalqulator; (11) neurological applications of NASA-SRI eyetracker; (12) ICU synthesized speech alarm; (13) NANOPHOR: microelectrophoresis instrument; (14) WRISTCOM: tactile communication system for the deaf-blind; (15) medical applications of NASA liquid-circulating garments; and (16) hip prosthesis with biotelemetry. Potential transfer projects include a person-portable versatile speech prosthesis, a critical care transport sytem, a clinical information system for cardiology, a programmable biofeedback orthosis for scoliosis a pediatric long-bone reconstruction, and spinal immobilization apparatus.

Harrison, D. C.

1980-01-01

229

State of the Science in Technology Transfer: At the Confluence of Academic Research and Business Development--Merging Technology Transfer with Knowledge Translation to Deliver Value  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The practice of technology transfer continues to evolve into a discipline. Efforts continue in the field of assistive technology (AT) to move technology-related prototypes, resulting from development in the academic sector, to product commercialization within the business sector. The article describes how technology transfer can be linked to…

Lane, Joseph P.

2010-01-01

230

Research in space commercialization, technology transfer, and communications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research and internship programs in technology transfer, space commercialization, and information and communications policy are described. The intern's activities are reviewed. On-campus research involved work on the costs of conventional telephone technology in rural areas, an investigation of the lag between the start of a research and development project and the development of new technology, using NASA patent and patent waiver data, studies of the financial impact and economic prospects of a space operation center, a study of the accuracy of expert forecasts of uncertain quantities and a report on frequency coordination in the fixed and fixed satellite services at 4 and 6 GHz.

1982-01-01

231

Technology transfer at the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 15 years, efforts to move technology generated from government-funded research and development activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories into commercial application by the private sector have faced an ever-changing environment. This environment has been primarily dictated by changes in the governing political philosophies of the Congress and the Administration that fund the laboratories and direct their activities. To review the role of the DOE laboratories, the following are discussed: the past, current, and potential future legislative and political environment impacting upon technology transfer from the laboratories; mechanisms of technology transfer; and three selected projects involving transfer of nondestructive evaluation technologies to the private sector. The technologies include computer-aided fabric evaluation (CAFE), measurement of the depth to which steel parts are hardened, and compensation for wear variations in the grinding wheel during the fabrication of wood shaper tools. These respectively deal with a large partnership of companies and institutes, a single but large manufacturing company, and a small business.

Harrer, B.J.; Good, M.S.; Lemon, D.K.; Morgen, G.P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-12-31

232

Technology transfer personnel exchange at the Boeing Company  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the exchange was to transfer Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) technology and expertise in advanced ceramic fabric composites (ACFC) to the Boeing Defense Space Group (Boeing Aerospace). Boeing Aerospace was especially interested in applying PNL-developed ACFC technology to its current and future spacecraft and space missions. Boeing has on-going independent research and development (R D) programs on advanced radiators and heat pipes, therefore, PNL research in ceramic fabric heat pipes was of particular interest to Boeing. Thus, this exchange assisted in the transfer of PNL's ACFC heat pipe technology and other, related research capabilities to private industrial application. The project was proposed as an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between Boeing and PNL that may result in future Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and/or other types of collaborative efforts.

Antoniak, Z.I.

1993-03-01

233

Technology transfer personnel exchange at the Boeing Company  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the exchange was to transfer Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) technology and expertise in advanced ceramic fabric composites (ACFC) to the Boeing Defense & Space Group (Boeing Aerospace). Boeing Aerospace was especially interested in applying PNL-developed ACFC technology to its current and future spacecraft and space missions. Boeing has on-going independent research and development (R&D) programs on advanced radiators and heat pipes, therefore, PNL research in ceramic fabric heat pipes was of particular interest to Boeing. Thus, this exchange assisted in the transfer of PNL`s ACFC heat pipe technology and other, related research capabilities to private industrial application. The project was proposed as an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between Boeing and PNL that may result in future Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and/or other types of collaborative efforts.

Antoniak, Z.I.

1993-03-01

234

Nanolitre-scale crystallization using acoustic liquid-transfer technology  

PubMed Central

Focused acoustic energy allows accurate and precise liquid transfer on scales from picolitre to microlitre volumes. This technology was applied in protein crystallization, successfully transferring a diverse set of proteins as well as hundreds of precipitant solutions from custom and commercial crystallization screens and achieving crystallization in drop volumes as small as 20?nl. Only higher concentrations (>50%) of 2-­methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) appeared to be systematically problematic in delivery. The acoustic technology was implemented in a workflow, successfully reproducing active crystallization systems and leading to the discovery of crystallization conditions for previously uncharacterized proteins. The technology offers compelling advantages in low-nanolitre crystallization trials by providing significant reagent savings and presenting seamless scalability for those crystals that require larger volume optimization experiments using the same vapor-diffusion format. PMID:22868754

Villaseñor, Armando G.; Wong, April; Shao, Ada; Garg, Ankur; Donohue, Timothy J.; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Harris, Seth F.

2012-01-01

235

NASA - Johnson Space Center: Office of Technology Transfer and Commercialization  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Johnson Technology Commercialization Center (JTCC) opened in 1993 and is located close to the Johnson Space Center. The JTCC is funded by a grant from NASA and is managed by the IC2 Institute, an international research center for the study of Innovation, Creativity and Capital (ICC) at the University of Texas at Austin. Among its credits, the IC2 Institute manages the Austin Technology Incubator (ATI), a recognized resource for the development of emerging technology companies a model for JTCC. The IC2 introduced a a laboratory-to-market approach, utilized by JTCC, which takes technology output from JSC and matches it with accomplished business and financial partners in the local community. The final transfer can be the result of either of two primary methods, "Small Business Incubator Services" and technology licensing.

236

Proceedings of Military Librarians' Workshop (16th, October 2-4, 1972) Technology Transfer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The major emphasis of this workshop is on "Technology Transfer." Although there appear to be many definitions of technology transfer, the basic concept is always the same -- finding ways to get technology out of the laboratory and into industrial or governmental applications. It is also clear that so far technology transfer has not been as…

Redstone Scientific Information Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL.

237

Technology transfer in agriculture. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in agriculture. Topics include applications of technology transfer in aquaculture, forestry, soil maintenance, agricultural pollution, agricultural biotechnology, and control of disease and insect pests. Use of computer technology in agriculture and technology transfers to developing countries are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 178 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-10-01

238

Technology transfer in agriculture. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in agriculture. Topics include applications of technology transfer in aquaculture, forestry, soil maintenance, agricultural pollution, agricultural biotechnology, and control of disease and insect pests. Use of computer technology in agriculture and technology transfers to developing countries are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 235 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01

239

Technology Transfer: A Case Study of Programs and Practices at NASA, DOD, DOC, and Academia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology transfer is vital to humanity. It spurs innovation, promotes commerce, and provides technology-based goods and services. Technology transfer is also highly complex and interdependent in nature. This interdependence is exemplified principally by the various technology transfer interactions between government, industry, and academia. …

Blood, John R.

2009-01-01

240

Biomedical technology transfer: Applications of NASA science and technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The major efforts of the Stanford Biomedical Applications Team Program at the Stanford University School of Medicine for the period from October 1, 1975 to September 31, 1976 are covered. A completed EMG biotelemetry system which monitors the physiological signals of man and animals in space related research is discussed. The results of a pilot study involving lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative pressure unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology utilizes vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Extremely stable long term data using capacative pressure sensors has lead to the order of commercially manufactured monitoring systems base. Projects involving commercialization are: flexible medical electrodes, an echocardioscope, a miniature biotelemetry system, and an on-line ventricular contour detector.

1976-01-01

241

Tech transfer outreach. An informal proceedings of the first technology transfer/communications conference  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. ``Tech Transfer Outreach!`` was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

Liebetrau, S. [ed.

1992-10-01

242

Technology transfer for Ukrainian milk treatment: A case study  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, radioactive fission products have contaminated the food chain in the Ukraine. The highest doses to humans are a result of cesium contamination in milk. The milk produced in the Ukraine contains radioactive cesium at levels up to 10 times the acceptance standards. Bradtec has developed and demonstrated technology for the US Department of Energy for the treatment of groundwater and effluent water. This technology has also been tested and demonstrated for the Ukrainian government for the purpose of treating contaminated milk. Bradtec, a small business offering specialized technologies in the field of environmental remediation and waste management, has successfully worked with a consortium of businesses, National Laboratories and DOE Headquarters staff to develop and implement a technology demonstration strategy which has led to the implementation of a series collaboration agreements with Ukrainian officials. This paper describes, in a case study approach, the path followed by Bradtec and its collaboration partners in successfully implementing a technology transfer strategy. Also presented is an update on new programs that can provide benefit to private sector companies as DOE seeks to assist the private sector in joint venture/technology transfer relationships with the NIS (New Independent States). This paper should be of interest to all businesses seeking to participate in business opportunities in the NIS.

Dunn, M.J. [Bradtec, Atlanta, GA (United States); Walker, J.S.

1994-12-31

243

The role of technology transfer and emerging technologies in California`s economic recovery  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared as part of a study supported by the California Trade and Commerce Agency (TCA), Defense Conversion/Base Closure Planning Program. It is one of several reports supporting the TCA`s efforts to develop a State Plan to address the economic impact of defense downsizing and base closures in California. The report focuses on: Examining existing federal technology transfer efforts -- the organizations involved, the funding mechanisms that are available, the processes by which technology transfer takes place -- and how they can help the state deal with the economic impact of base closures and defense downsizing. Evaluating the role of technology transfer in helping California develop a strong, technology-based economy capable of competing in an increasingly competitive world marketplace. Identifying ``critical technologies,`` and determining which of these technologies are likely to have the most impact on the economic future of the state and the nation. Reviewing current and proposed California technology transfer programs/initiatives and examining the role the state should play in supporting these efforts.

Al-Ayat, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Moody, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Graduate School of Public Policy

1994-02-01

244

Technology Parks, Knowledge Transfer and Innovation: the Case of Malaysia's Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Small and Medium Enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper attempts to explore the views of key ICT stakeholders on the role of technology parks in promoting innovation via knowledge transfer. Many developed and developing countries use technology parks as an instrument to promote knowledge transfer and innovation. Policy makers incor- porate this idea into public policy for science and technology. The study observes that Malaysia's technology parks

Suhaimi Mhd Sarif; Yusof Ismail

2006-01-01

245

The uncounted benefits: Federal efforts in domestic technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Organized technology transfer activities conducted by the agencies of the U.S. government are described. The focus is upon agency or departmental level activity rather than the laboratory level. None of the programs on which information was collected has been assessed or evaluated individually. However, the aggregate programs of the government have been judged in terms of obvious gaps and opportunities for future improvement. An overview, descriptions of the various agency or department programs of technology transfer, a list of persons interviewed or consulted during the survey, and a bibliography of publications, reports and other material made available to the study staff are given. An extensive appendix of illustrative material collected from the various programs is also given.

Chapman, R. L.; Hirst, K.

1986-01-01

246

Future orbital transfer vehicle technology study. Volume 2: Technical report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Missions for future orbit transfer vehicles (1995-2010) are identified and the technology, operations and vehicle concepts that satisfy the transportation requirements are defined. Comparison of reusable space and ground based LO2/LH2 OTV's was made. Both vehicles used advanced space engines and aero assist capability. The SB OTV provided advantages in life cycle cost, performance and potential for improvement. Comparison of an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet with a fleet of LO2/LH2 OTVs and electric OTV's was also made. The normal growth technology electric OTV used silicon cells with heavy shielding and argon ion thrusters. This provided a 23% advantage in total transportation cost. The impact of accelerated technology was considered in terms of improvements in performance and cost effectiveness. The accelerated technology electric vehicle used GaAs cells and annealing but did not result in the mixed fleet being any cheaper than an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet. It is concluded that reusable LO2/LH2 OTV's can serve all general purpose cargo roles between LEO and GEO for the forseeable future. The most significant technology for the second generation vehicle would be space debris protection, on-orbit propellant storage and transfer and on-orbit maintenance capability.

Davis, E. E.

1982-01-01

247

Indirect Heat Transfer Technology For Waste Heat Recovery Can Save You Money  

E-print Network

constraints of an existing installation makes the conventional flue gas to air energy recovery technology impractical to employ. A successful alternative is the transfer of waste heat to an intermediate heat transfer fluid (i.e., DOWTHERM Heat Transfer Fluid...

Beyrau, J. A.; Bogel, N. G.; Seifert, W. F.; Wuelpern, L. E.

1984-01-01

248

The EMDEX Project: Technology transfer and occupational measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the EPRI EMDEX Project -- is a multifaceted project entailing technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. The specific objectives of the project in order of priority were: to transfer the EMDEX technology to utilities; to develop measurement protocols and data management capabilities for large exposure data sets; and to collect, analyze, and document 60-Hz electric and magnetic field exposures for a diverse population. Transfer of the EPRI Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure system (EMDEX) technology to the participating utilities was accomplished through training and through extensive involvement in the exposure data collection effort. Field exposure data measured by an EMDEX system were collected by volunteer utility employees at 59 sites in the US and three other countries between October 1988 and September 1989. Approximately 50,000 hours of magnetic field and 23,000 hours of electric field exposure records taken at 10-second intervals were obtained, of which 70% were from Work environments. Exposures and time spent in environments have been analyzed by Primary Work Environment, by occupied environment, and by job classification. Generally, the measured fields and exposures in the Generation, Transmission, Distribution and Substation environments were higher than in other occupational environments in utilities. The Nonwork fields and exposures for workers associated with various categories were comparable. Evaluation of the project by participants indicated general satisfaction with the EMDEX system and with this approach to technology transfer. This document, Volume 3 contains appendices with a complete set of project protocols, project materials, and extensive data tables.

Not Available

1990-11-01

249

Technology Maturation in Preparation for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In support of its goal to find an innovative path for human space exploration, NASA embarked on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Project, a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large in-space cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. Recognizing that key Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration would benefit from additional maturation to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) authorized funding for a one-year technology maturation phase of the CPST project. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, concept studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer of CFM technology sub-elements and components that were lower than a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. The specific technologies selected were grouped into five major categories: thick multilayer insulation, tank applied active thermal control, cryogenic fluid transfer, propellant gauging, and analytical tool development. Based on the success of the technology maturation efforts, the CPST project was approved to proceed to flight system development.

Meyer, Michael L.; Doherty, Michael P.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

2014-01-01

250

Midcourse Space Experiment Data Certification and Technology Transfer. Supplement 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The University of Alabama in Huntsville contributes to the Technical Management of the Midcourse Space Experiment Program, to the Certification of the Level 2 data produced by the Midcourse Space Experiment's suite of in-orbit imaging radiometers, imaging spectro-radiometers and an interferometer and to the Transfer of the Midcourse Space Experiment Technology to other Government Programs. The Technical Management of the Midcourse Space Experiment Program is expected to continue through out the spacecraft's useful life time. The Transfer of Midcourse Space Experiment Technology to other government elements is expected to be on a demand basis by the United States Government and other organizations. The University, of Alabama Huntsville' contribution specifically supports the Principal Investigator's Executive Committee, the Deputy Principal Investigator for Data Certification and Technology Transfer team, the nine Ultraviolet Visible Imagers and Spectrographic Imagers (UVISI) and the Pointing and Alignment of all eleven of the science instruments. The science instruments effectively cover the 0.1 to 28 micron spectral region. The Midcourse Space Experiment spacecraft, launched April 24, 1996, is expected to have a 5 year useful lifetime. The cryogenically cooled IR sensor, SPIRIT III, performed through February, 1997 when its cryogen expired. A pre-launch, ground based calibration of the instruments provided a basis for the pre-launch certification of the Level 2 data base these instruments produce. With the spacecraft in-orbit the certification of the instrument's Level 2 data base was extended to the in-orbit environment.

Pollock, David B.

1998-01-01

251

Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal  

E-print Network

1 Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal...................................................................................................... 11 2. DUCT SEALANTS AND LONGEVITY TESTING

252

An extended model for measuring the technology transfer potentials at the industrial level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology contributes to the development of society and economy of the nation through the invention, diffusion, transfer, and application of new knowledge. In the emerging global economy of the 21st century, technology is a key to sustainable economic prosperity. Transfer of technology is the key element for the industrialization, growth, and economic development of the countries. The knowledge transferring capabilities

Sathayanarayanan Pachamuthu

2011-01-01

253

Welcome to Ames Research Center (1987 forum on Federal technology transfer)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Ames Research Center has a long and distinguished history of technology development and transfer. Recently, in a welcoming speech to the Forum on Federal Technology Transfer, Director Ballhouse of Ames described significant technologies which have been transferred from Ames to the private sector and identifies future opportunities.

Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

1988-01-01

254

48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 false Patent costs and technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70...3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management...include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission, the cost...

2010-10-01

255

48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Patent costs and technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70...3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management...include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission, the cost...

2013-10-01

256

48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Patent costs and technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70...3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management...include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission, the cost...

2011-10-01

257

48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Patent costs and technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70...3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management...include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission, the cost...

2012-10-01

258

48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-10-01 false Patent costs and technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70...3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management...include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission, the cost...

2014-10-01

259

An assessment of the international technology transfer systems and the new Law of the Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews some of the major issues in the international transfer of technology and the role of international organizations such as the United Nations in the transfer of technology. In 1975, the UN General Assembly endorsed the New International Economic Order (NIEO) which contained many resolutions including improvement of the terms of technology transfer in favor of developing nations.

A. Marvasti

1998-01-01

260

Technology transfer in the Life Sciences. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in the life sciences. Topics include technology transfer in biogas energy production, biotechnology, pollution control, aquaculture, agriculture, oceanography, and forestry. Technology transfer to developing countries and to small businesses, as well as university-industry partnerships, is described. (Contains a minimum of 67 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-03-01

261

A study of technology transfer in a multinational cooperative joint venture  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of technology transfer has been extensively addressed from many different perspectives. Very few of the research studies, however, have examined it as a process, trying to understand more about how different kinds of technologies are transferred across organizational boundaries. This research examines the transfer of technologies over a three-year period in an international joint venture comprising three operating

Ralph Katz; Eric S. Rebentisch; T. J. Alien

1996-01-01

262

februari 2008 MassMass transfer & separation technology 424302 2008transfer & separation technology 424302 2008 --APPENDIXAPPENDIX  

E-print Network

Multicomponent mixturesmixtures"" by J.A.by J.A. WesselinghWesselingh & R. Krishna,& R. Krishna, DelftDelft University Press (2000Transfer in MulticomponentMulticomponent mixturesmixtures"" by J.A.by J.A. WesselinghWesselingh & R. Krishna,& R. Krishna"" by J.A.by J.A. WesselinghWesselingh & R. Krishna,& R. Krishna, DelftDelft University Press (2000

Zevenhoven, Ron

263

23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It...

2014-04-01

264

23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It...

2011-04-01

265

14 CFR 1274.915 - Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions...Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions...Restrictions on Sale or Transfer of Technology to Foreign Firms or...

2011-01-01

266

23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?...

2012-04-01

267

23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?...

2013-04-01

268

23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It...

2013-04-01

269

23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?...

2014-04-01

270

23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?...

2011-04-01

271

14 CFR 1274.915 - Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions...Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions...Restrictions on Sale or Transfer of Technology to Foreign Firms or...

2010-01-01

272

23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It...

2012-04-01

273

23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207...ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420...requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?...

2010-04-01

274

14 CFR 1274.915 - Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions...Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions...Restrictions on Sale or Transfer of Technology to Foreign Firms or...

2014-01-01

275

FY05 Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents  

SciTech Connect

Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. PTTC's technology-transfer programs enhance U.S. national security. PTTC administers the only nation-wide, comprehensive program dedicated to maximizing America's supplies of domestic oil and gas. PTTC conducts grassroots programs through 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices, leveraging their preexisting connections with industry. This organizational structure helps bring researchers and academia to the table. Nationally and regionally, volunteers within a National Board and Regional Producer Advisory Groups guide efforts. The National Board meets three times per year, an important function being approving the annual plans and budgets developed by the regions and Headquarters (HQ). Between Board meetings, an active Management and Budget Committee guide HQ activity. PTTC itself undergoes a thorough financial audit each year. The PTTC's HQ staff plans and manages all aspects of the PTTC program, conducts nation-wide technology-transfer activities, and implements a comprehensive communications program. Networking, involvement in technical activities, and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the oilfield service sector. Circulation for ''PTTC Network News'', the quarterly newsletter, has risen to nearly 17,500. About 7,500 people receive an email Technology Alert on an approximate three-week frequency. Case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' appear monthly, as do ''Tech Connections'' columns in ''The American Oil and Gas Reporter''. As part of its oversight responsibility for the regions, the PTTC from the start has captured and reported data that document the myriad ways its programs impact industry. Of 119 workshops in FY05 where repeat attendance was reported, 59 percent of attendees on average had attended a PTTC event previously, indicating that a majority felt they were receiving enough value to come back. It also is encouraging that, after 11 years, PTTC events continue to attract new people. The form used at workshops to get participants feedback asks for a ''yes'' or ''no'' response to the question: ''Have you used any new technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC?'' With data now available from 611 workshops, 41 percent of respondents said, ''yes'', confirming that people are applying the information they receive at PTTC workshops. PTTC in FY04 asked RLO directors, oilfield service companies and producers in 11 areas with significant technological barriers to adding new reserves to estimate the ''PTTC Impact Factor''--that is, the percentage of the total reserves added in their areas that logically could be attributed to PTTC's efforts. Of the estimated 1,266 million barrels of oil equivalent (BOE) added in the 11 areas, participants estimated that roughly 88 million BOE had been added as a result of PTTC's techtransfer efforts. PTTC's 10 regions are the primary delivery mechanism for technology transfer. Attendance at PTTC regional activities set a record in FY05, with 8,900 individuals attending 154 workshops, lunch-and-learn events, or student training and internships. When appropriate, regional workshops incorporate R&D findings from DOE-funded projects. This year HQ began a ''Microhole Technology Integration'' Initiative with DOE to more clearly present their microhole program to producers. Often events are held cooperatively with other national organizations, regional producer associations and professional society groups. This practice leverages outreach and engenders future cooperation. Of the more than 61,000 individuals PTTC has attracted to its events since its inception, more than 15,000 have attended in the past two years. Eight-eight percent of PTTC event attendees during FY05 were from industry. The numb

Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

2005-11-01

276

Technology transfer. Determining industry needs: A guide for communities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Guide was developed in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center and the following States: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, West Virginia. The economic welfare of individual communities is currently a matter of considerable interest. Concern for the position of US industry in the competitive world marketplace is a matter of growing concern as well. This 'guide' describes a process whereby communities may seize the opportunity to improve their own economic destiny. The method described involves linking the technology needs of existing industries to the technologies which are available from Federal Laboratories. Community technology transfer is an 'action possibility' which allows individual citizen groups to do something tangible to improve the economic climate of the places where they live and work. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama is pledged to promote and encourage such efforts, and stands ready to help communities both large and small in that regard.

1993-01-01

277

Improving NASA's technology transfer process through increased screening and evaluation in the information dissemination program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current status of NASA's technology transfer system can be improved if the technology transfer process is better understood. This understanding will only be gained if a detailed knowledge about factors generally influencing technology transfer is developed, and particularly those factors affecting technology transfer from government R and D agencies to industry. Secondary utilization of aerospace technology is made more difficult because it depends on a transfer process which crosses established organizational lines of authority and which is outside well understood patterns of technical applications. In the absence of a sound theory about technology transfer and because of the limited capability of government agencies to explore industry's needs, a team approach to screening and evaluation of NASA generated technologies is proposed which calls for NASA, and other organizations of the private and public sectors which influence the transfer of NASA generated technology, to participate in a screening and evaluation process to determine the commercial feasibility of a wide range of technical applications.

Laepple, H.

1979-01-01

278

The growth of worldwide technology transfer: The ADOE experience  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge is often equated to success. In forming the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority, the Alberta Government recognized that the collection and dissemination of information about state-of-the-art technology was essential to the accelerated development of Alberta`s oil sands. Since 1974, the Authority, through its work with industry, assembled a large database of technology and information on the recovery and processing of petroleum from Alberta oil sands and heavy oils. The Authority has created a unique oil sands awareness throughout the world, and interest in the technologies it developed has increased. The unique government-industry relationship established in cooperative research has attracted worldwide interest. In 1994, the Authority, the Alberta Geological Survey, and the Alberta Department of Energy`s Non-Conventional Energy Development and Research & Technology Branches were merged to form the Oil Sands and Research Division. This division`s major task is to accelerate development of Alberta`s immense resources of bitumen, oil, gas, and coal. A key part of this task is to adapt state-of-the-art technology for the gathering of data and information, and the dissemination and reporting of selected information to clients in a useful format. The effect of this accelerated transfer of knowledge is an acceleration of the development of oil sands and heavy oils on a worldwide basis.

Polikar, M.; Hsi, C.; Petri, H. [Alberta Dept. of Energy, Edmonton (Canada)] [and others

1995-12-31

279

Technology transfer to small manufacturers: A literature review. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In the past 25 years, significant changes have radically altered the competitive environment for U.S. manufacturers. Advances in technology are at the root of these changes. Economic well-being in the U.S. is in part a function of the competitiveness of its manufacturing sector. And competitiveness is in part a function of product and process technology. Competitiveness and technology are appropriate targets of public policy. Small and medium-sized manufacturers are worthy of particular policy attention, for several reasons. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) employ over one-third of U.S. manufacturing workers and comprise 99 percent of all U.S. manufacturing establishments. As it is believed that the majority of SMEs are suppliers to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), it is thought that the product cost and quality of SME suppliers affect the competitiveness of buyer firms downstream. And a small core of SMEs are very productive commercializers of new technology. At present, there is a wide array of publicly funded and private market mechanisms seeking to bring technology to America`s manufacturers. The aim of the study is to review the literature to ascertain best principles and practices in technology transfer to SMEs, identify important gaps in the literature, and recommend an agenda for future research.

NONE

1995-08-01

280

EPA and the Federal Technology Transfer Act: Opportunity knocks  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was established to promote a closer, collaborative relationship between federal government agencies and the private sector. With the increasing need for new cost-effective technologies to prevent and control pollution, both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and private industry are encouraged to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology under this Act. The FTTA removed several of the legal and institutional barriers to cooperative research that existed before the Act`s passage. Through the FTTA, the government strives to promote the movement of its products, processes, skills, and knowledge into the private sector for further development and commercialization by encouraging the exchange of technical personnel and the sharing of facilities and other resources. Collaborative efforts between industry, federal agencies, and academia are made possible through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Forty-two CRADAs and five licensing agreements have been initiated with EPA under this program. This paper provides an overview of this new and innovative program within the EPA. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Gatchett, A.M.; Fradkin, L.; Moore, M.; Gorman, T.; Ehrlich, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31

281

Technology of H-II Transfer Vehicle Rendezvous System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), which is a Japanese unmanned cargo transfer spacecraft, will deliver supplies to the International Space Station (ISS). The first HTV will be launched in 2009 from the Tanegashima Space Center aboard an H-IIB launch vehicle with up to 6,000kg of supplies. HTV approaches to the ISS and the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS), known as Canadarm2, will grapple the HTV and berth it to the ISS. After the supplies, the HTV will then be loaded with waste materials and then separated from the ISS by SSRMS. HTV conducts departure sequence from ISS after release from SSRMS and reentry to the atmosphere. In this paper, technology of HTV automated Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system is presented.

Kasai, Toru; Ueda, Satoshi; Uematsu, Hirohiko

282

Engineering the Technology: Basic Conditions To Transfer Technology Innovation to Industrial Production.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the need for engineering education to address research and development, applied research, and technology transfer. It is important that engineering education considers as a major objective for engineering students the need of bridging the gap between what is produced in laboratories and the full scale of industrial production.…

Jones, Ary Marques

283

Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Plastics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New plastics technology bred out of the space program has moved steadily into the U.S. economy in a variety of organized and deliberate ways. Examples are presented of the transfer of plastics know-how into the plants and eventually the products of American business.

1971-01-01

284

Technology transfer: Half-way houses. No. 17  

SciTech Connect

In the fall of 1993, 1 was asked by the Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the ways in which technology transfer and defense conversion had been accomplished at General Atomics (GA) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) by interviewing Harold Agnew, who had served as director of Los Alamos before becoming president of General Atomics in 1979, and J. Robert Beyster, who had been a staff member at Los Alamos and at General Atomics before founding SAIC in 1969. Harold Agnew readily complied with my request for an interview and also suggested that I talk to Douglas Fouquet, who is in charge of public relations at General Atomics and is their unofficial historian. Robert Beyster was not available for an interview, but, through the courtesy of John C. Hopkins, a former director of CNSS, I was able to interview SAIC`s executive vice president, Donald M. Kerr, who is also a former director at Los Alamos, and Steven Rockwood, a sector vice president at SAIC who was formerly a staff member at the Laboratory Because Agnew, Kerr, and Rockwood are all familiar with LANL, as well as with their respective companies, the interviews becam exercises In comparative analyses of technology transfer. In what follows, I have tried to summarize both the interviews and some of the research which attended them. It is the historian`s hope that by use of comparative institutional analyses, Laboratory administrators may learn something of value in directing their efforts toward the transfer of technology to private industry and other government agencies.

Seidel, R.W.

1995-05-01

285

Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, new technologies enabling energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements are slow to develop, and have trouble obtaining a broad application. The CMC team was able to effectively and efficiently transfer the results of DOE's metalcasting R&D projects to industry by utilizing and delivering the numerous communication vehicles identified in the proposal. The three metalcasting technical associations achieved significant technology transition results under this program. In addition to reaching over 23,000 people per year through Modern Casting and 28,000 through Engineered Casting Solutions, AFS had 84 national publications and reached over 1,200 people annually through Cast Metals Institute (CMI) education courses. NADCA's education department reached over 1,000 people each year through their courses, in addition to reaching over 6,000 people annually through Die Casting Engineer, and publishing 58 papers. The SFSA also published 99 research papers and reached over 1,000 people annually through their member newsletters. In addition to these communication vehicles, the CMC team conducted numerous technical committee meetings, project reviews, and onsite visits. All of these efforts to distribute the latest metalcasting technologies contributed to the successful deployment of DOE's R&D projects into industry. The DOE/CMC partnership demonstrated significant success in the identification and review of relevant and easy-to-implement metalcasting energy-saving processes and technologies so that the results are quickly implemented and become general practice. The results achieved in this program demonstrate that sustained technology transfer efforts are a critical step in the deployment of R&D projects to industry.

Gwyn, Mike

2009-03-31

286

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III  

SciTech Connect

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

NONE

1995-02-14

287

Joint development research and technology transfer for AC traction drives  

SciTech Connect

In 1991, an agreement was signed between the University of Central Queensland and Queensland Rail for joint development research and technology transfer on a three phase asynchronous motor drive suitable for electric traction vehicle (AC Traction Drive Project). The aim of this project is to develop a program of continuing education based on the design, simulation, analysis and prototype construction of converter/inverter and drive control for a three phase induction motor for traction systems. This research work is carried out by the staff of the Drives, Power Electronics and Traction Systems Laboratory. Some of the results so far are highlighted. 18 refs.

Oghanna, W.; Stephens, B. [Univ. of Central Queensland (Australia)

1994-12-31

288

User Interface Technology Transfer to NASA's Virtual Wind Tunnel System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Funded by NASA grants for four years, the Brown Computer Graphics Group has developed novel 3D user interfaces for desktop and immersive scientific visualization applications. This past grant period supported the design and development of a software library, the 3D Widget Library, which supports the construction and run-time management of 3D widgets. The 3D Widget Library is a mechanism for transferring user interface technology from the Brown Graphics Group to the Virtual Wind Tunnel system at NASA Ames as well as the public domain.

vanDam, Andries

1998-01-01

289

Technology transfer in the DOE Three Mile Island research programs  

SciTech Connect

In a joint US government-nuclear power industry effort the Technical Information and Examination Program (TI and EP) for TMI-2 research was established because of the significance of the accident and subsequent events at the damaged nuclear plant. TI and EP research develops nuclear plant safety and accident-response information of value to the nuclear power industry. Effective technology transfer constitutes an essential part of the research programs. Several mechanisms communicate the results of TI and EP work to the diverse nuclear power industry. These mechanisms include seminars; technical reports; a widely distributed technical newsletter; journal articles, meeting papers, and presentations; videotapes; and two computer conferencing networks.

Meltzer, F.L.; Ettinger, B.A.

1982-01-01

290

Opportunities for the transfer of astronomical technology to medicine.  

PubMed

There are many examples of technology transfer from astronomy to medicine, for example algorithms for reconstructing X-ray CT images were first developed for processing radio astronomy images. In more recent times, X-ray detectors developed for the Hubble Space Telescope have been used in a fine-needle breast biopsy system. Software originally developed to mosaic planetary images has been incorporated into a system for detecting breast cancer. Australia has expertise in the development of instrumentation for producing radio images from an array of radio telescopes and in multi-object fibre systems for capturing the spectra of hundreds of stellar objects simultaneously. Two possible applications of these Australian technologies are suggested that may merit further exploration. A meeting between interested parties is suggested to discuss future directions and funding. PMID:18274070

Hughes, S

2007-12-01

291

Transferring new technologies within the federal sector: The New Technology Demonstration Program  

SciTech Connect

The federal sector is the largest consumer of products in the United States and annually purchases almost 1.5 quads of energy measured at the building site at a cost of almost $10 billion (U.S. Department of Energy 1991). A review of design, construction, and procurement practices in the federal sector, as well as discussions with manufacturers and vendors, indicated that new technologies are not utilized in as timely a manner as possible. As a consequence of this technology transfer lag, the federal sector loses valuable energy and environmental benefits that can be derived through the application of new technologies. In addition, opportunities are lost to reduce federal energy expenditures and spur U.S. economic growth through the procurement of such technologies. In 1990, under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the design of a program to accelerate the introduction of new U.S. technologies into the federal sector. Designated first as the Test Bed Demonstration Program and more recently the New Technology Demonstration Program, it sought to shorten the acceptance period of new technologies within the federal sector. By installing and evaluating various new technologies at federal facilities, the Program attempts to increase the acceptance of those new technologies through the results of {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} federal installations. Since that time, the Program has conducted new technology demonstrations and evaluations, evolved to address the need for more timely information transfer, and explored collaborative opportunities with other DOE offices and laboratories. This paper explains the processes by which a new technology demonstration project is implemented and presents a general description of the Program results to date.

Conover, D.R.; Hunt, D.M.

1994-08-01

292

Technology transfer in the oceanographic sciences. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in the oceanographic sciences. Topics include technology transfer in aquaculture, energy production, sea bed mining, pollution control, shoreline protection, and coastal engineering. Use of satellite technology in resource location, communication, and navigation is described. The citations also describe technology transfer to assist developing countries. (Contains a minimum of 106 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-11-01

293

Future orbital transfer vehicle technology study. Volume 1: Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reusable space and ground based LO2/LH2 OTV's, both advanced space engines and aero assist capability were compared. The SB OTV provided advantages in life cycle cost, performance and potential for improvement. An all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet was also compared with a fleet of LO2/.H2 OTV's and electric OTV's. The normal growth technology electric OTV used silicon cells with heavy shielding and argon ion thrusters. In this case, the LO2/LH2 OTV fleet provided a 23% advantage in total transportation cost. An accelerated technology LF2/LH2 OTV provided improvements in performance relative to LO2/.H2 OTV but has higher DDT&E cost which negated its cost effectiveness. The accelerated technology electric vehicle used GaAs cells and annealing but still did not result in the mixed fleet being any cheaper than an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet. It is concluded that reusable LO2/LH2 OTV's can serve all general purpose cargo roles between LEO and GEO for the forseeable future. The most significant technology for the second generation vehicle would be space debris protection, on orbit propellant storage and transfer and on orbit maintenance capability.

Davis, E. E.

1982-01-01

294

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (S provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: Defense Programs, Energy and Environment, and Work for Others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W.W.

1993-12-31

295

Australian University Technology Transfer Managers: Backgrounds, Work Roles, Specialist Skills and Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology transfer managers are a new group of specialist professionals engaged in facilitating transfer of university research discoveries and inventions to business firms and other research users. With relatively high academic qualifications and enjoying higher salaries than many other comparable university staff, technology transfer managers…

Harman, Grant; Stone, Christopher

2006-01-01

296

Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 1, Recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Technologies developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Storage (STOR) Program must be converted into products, processes, or services that benefit the private sector. The process of technology transfer is the primary means of accomplishing this. The purpose of this report is to examine the technology transfer activities of the STOR Program and suggest mechanisms that might make the transfer of technologies from national laboratories and universities to the private sector more effective. A brief summary of recommendations that would improve the effectiveness of the transfer of energy storage technologies from the national laboratories to the private sector is discussed. 33 refs., 2 figs.

Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

1988-10-01

297

Technology transfer of foreign direct investment in China-based on two-sector model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foreign direct investment (FDI) inflow increases greatly since China's openness and whether FDI is conducive to promote China's technology advance via technology transfer still remains a controversial issue. The paper first uses a classical two-factor production function which divide the economy into domestic and foreign sector, then augments the model, taking into account the externalities by technology transfer of FDI

Jing-mei Ma; Hong-yu Jia

2011-01-01

298

Information to Change the World--Fulfilling the Information Needs of Technology Transfer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an introduction to fulfilling the information needs of technology transfer. Highlights include a definition of technology transfer; government and university involvement; industry's role; publishers; an annotated list of information sources and contacts; technology assessment, including patent searching, competitive intelligence, and…

Duberman, Josh; Zeller, Martin

1996-01-01

299

Manufacturing process applications team (MATEAM). [technology transfer in the areas of machine tools and robots  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The transfer of NASA technology to the industrial sector is reported. Presentations to the machine tool and robot industries and direct technology transfers of the Adams Manipulator arm, a-c motor control, and the bolt tension monitor are discussed. A listing of proposed RTOP programs with strong potential is included. A detailed description of the rotor technology available to industry is given.

1979-01-01

300

48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...transfer clauses with the contractors managing and operating its laboratories. Those technology transfer clauses must be read in concert with the patent rights clause required by this subpart. Thus, each management and operating contractor holds title to...

2013-10-01

301

The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

1992-01-01

302

Technology 2001: The Second National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proceedings of the workshop are presented. The mission of the conference was to transfer advanced technologies developed by the Federal government, its contractors, and other high-tech organizations to U.S. industries for their use in developing new or improved products and processes. Volume two presents papers on the following topics: materials science, robotics, test and measurement, advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, electronics, and software engineering.

1991-01-01

303

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14

304

From computer images to video presentation: Enhancing technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With NASA placing increased emphasis on transferring technology to outside industry, NASA researchers need to evaluate many aspects of their efforts in this regard. Often it may seem like too much self-promotion to many researchers. However, industry's use of video presentations in sales, advertising, public relations and training should be considered. Today, the most typical presentation at NASA is through the use of vu-graphs (overhead transparencies) which can be effective for text or static presentations. For full blown color and sound presentations, however, the best method is videotape. In fact, it is frequently more convenient due to its portability and the availability of viewing equipment. This talk describes techniques for creating a video presentation through the use of a combined researcher and video professional team.

Beam, Sherilee F.

1994-01-01

305

Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

NONE

1995-02-14

306

Federal technology transfer and the human genome project. Background paper  

SciTech Connect

As with other areas of biomedical research, the expectation is that the results of genome research will yield commercially valuable products of benefits to human health. The report, analyzes universities`, companies`, and researchers` experiences and perspectives since enactment of federal laws to enhance technology transfer--especially as it pertains to research funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Energy, the agencies funding U.S. efforts in the Human Genome Project. OTA prepared this background paper with the assistance of a panel of advisors and reviewers selected for their expertise and diverse points of view. Additionally, hundreds of individuals cooperated with OTA staff through interviews or by providing written material. These authorities were drawn from government, academia, industry, and professional societies worldwide.

NONE

1995-09-01

307

Technology transfer significance of the International Safeguards Project Office  

SciTech Connect

The safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are of major importance to the non-proliferation objectives of the United States of America and other nations of the world. Assurance of safeguards effectiveness is mandatory to continued peaceful use of nuclear power. To enhance the ability of the IAEA to apply safeguards effectively, and to ensure that the IAEA does not lack technical assistance in critical areas, the US Congress has made available a special authorization for a Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS). This substantial program of technology transfer was initiated in 1976. The United States Departments of State and Energy, the Arms control and Disarmament Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have each accepted responsibility for parts of the Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards. Funding is provided by state through the Foreign Assistance Act. This report provides a discussion of this program.

Marcuse, W.; Waligura, A.J.

1988-06-01

308

A technology transfer tracking system for NREL: Overview and results  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study has been to assess the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL) technology, transfer--both the activities and the system, with the objective of developing a system to track the benefits of NREL-sponsored or conducted research. There were two factors which facilitated this study and which were important in the ability to make a detailed analysis and series of recommendations. First, was the nature of the lab, being one which, from its beginning, has worked closely with industry and, therefore has been directed toward research which would be of value to industry and hopefully commercialized. Second, the size of the laboratory made it relatively more easy to address issues and to become familiar with the organization and with the scientists themselves.

Chapman, R.L.; Chapman, M.J. [Chapman Research Group, Inc., Littleton, CO (United States)

1996-07-01

309

Analysis and technology transfer report, 1989 and 1990  

SciTech Connect

The buildings sector used 29.6 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy in 1989, or 36 percent of the total primary energy consumed in the United States. The major uses are for space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and lighting. Electricity is the dominant fuel, followed by natural gas, petroleum, and other fuels. Although there were dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in this sector from 1975 to 1985, in recent years energy use has grown rapidly. The large growth expected in commercial building floor space and in residential units means that total building-sector energy consumption could increase dramatically by the year 2030. The mission of the US DOE's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) is to lead a national program supporting private sector efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings and to increase their utilization of renewable energy sources. The Office is also responsible for energy efficiency planning and management for Federal buildings as well as buildings-related associated information, financial incentives, and regulatory functions that are determined to be appropriate for the Federal government. To accomplish its goals, OBT plans and conducts research and development to make technologies available and provides information on their effectiveness. The selection and management of OBT research activities requires an understanding of where and how energy is used within the buildings sectors, how energy use is expected to change in the future, and the potential impact of new and emerging technologies on energy use. Analysis activities serve to collect energy use information, provide the analysis necessary to apply this information to research and development planning, and develop analysis tools which the program uses to set priorities for research projects. This report summarizes analysis and technology transfer activities undertaken by OBT during 1989 and 1990. 101 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01

310

Definition of technology development missions for early space station, orbit transfer vehicle servicing, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Propellant transfer, storage, and reliquefaction TDM; docking and berthing technology development mission; maintenance technology development mission; OTV/payload integration, space station interface/accommodations; combined TDM conceptual design; programmatic analysis; and TDM equipment usage are discussed.

1983-01-01

311

Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition. Volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document contains papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; new ways of doing business; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development perception and vision technologies; integrated vehicle health management; automation technologies; advanced avionics; ans robotics technologies. More than 77 papers, 20 presentations, and 20 exhibits covering various disciplines were presented b experts from NASA, universities, and industry.

Krishen, Kumar (Compiler)

1994-01-01

312

Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition. Volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is the second volume of papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools; systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development; perception and vision technologies; integrated vehicle health management; automation technologies; advanced avionics; and robotics technologies.

Krishen, Kumar (Compiler)

1994-01-01

313

SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (3RD): VOLUME IV. ATYPICAL APPLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document the Third Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology, in Orlando, FL, March 9-13, 1981, sponsored by the Particulate Technology Branch of EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. The ...

314

SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (3RD): VOLUME II. ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATORS  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document the Third Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology, in Orlando, FL, March 9-13, 1981, sponsored by the Particulate Technology Branch of EPA's Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. The ...

315

Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs.

Bennett, P.C.

1994-10-01

316

Moving R&D to the Marketplace, A Guidebook for Technology Transfer Managers  

SciTech Connect

This Guidebook serves as an introduction as well as a refresher for technology transfer managers. It focuses on the question: What can the Technology Transfer manager do when confronted by complex situations and events? The main functional issues addressed here concern the conduct of technology transfer in Technology Utilization programs. These R&D programs whose primary mission is to develop technologies that will be used outside of the Federal sector. Renewable energy, health care, and agricultural advances are technologies of this type. The contents of this Guidebook will be of value to managers in a variety of Federal, State, university and industry technology development and transfer programs. The general area of transferring service innovations is not covered here. The Guidebook is primarily about the development and care of hardware. This Guidebook makes no attempt to judge the value of specific technologies in meeting societal needs. Rather, it addresses the improvement of the technology transfer process itself. It does, however, include reminders that ascertainment of the social value of specific technologies is one of the important yet difficult tasks of R&D and technology transfer programs. [DJE-2005

Mock, John E.; Kenkeremath, Deepak C.; Janis, F. Timothy

1993-01-01

317

Analyzing the Effectiveness of University Technology Transfer: Implications for Entrepreneurship Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review and synthesize the burgeoning literature on institutions and agents engaged in the commercialization of university-based intellectual property. These studies indicate that institutional incentives and organizational practices both play an important role in enhancing the effectiveness of technology transfer. We conclude that university technology transfer should be considered from a strategic perspective. Institutions that choose to stress the entrepreneurial

Donald S. Siegel; Phillip H. Phan

2004-01-01

318

Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

1988-10-01

319

An Analysis of NASA Technology Transfer. Degree awarded by Pennsylvania State Univ.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of previous technology transfer metrics, recommendations, and measurements is presented within the paper. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of NASA's technology transfer efforts is performed. As a relative indicator, NASA's intellectual property performance is benchmarked against a database of over 100 universities. Successful technology transfer (commercial sales, production savings, etc.) cases were tracked backwards through their history to identify the key critical elements that lead to success. Results of this research indicate that although NASA's performance is not measured well by quantitative values (intellectual property stream data), it has a net positive impact on the private sector economy. Policy recommendations are made regarding technology transfer within the context of the documented technology transfer policies since the framing of the Constitution. In the second thrust of this study, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center were surveyed to determine their awareness of, attitude toward, and perception about technology transfer. Results indicate that although researchers believe technology transfer to be a mission of the Agency, they should not be held accountable or responsible for its performance. In addition, the researchers are not well educated about the mechanisms to perform, or policies regarding, technology transfer.

Bush, Lance B.

1996-01-01

320

A Southern Critique of the Globalist Assumptions about Technology Transfer in Climate Change Treaty Negotiations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article critically evaluates the process of technology transfer from developed to developing countries. It considers market-based policies contained in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which are proposed as tools to promote the transfer of technologies that can abate greenhouse gas emissions contributing to climate change. It uses the case of India to exemplify the conditions that

Jyoti S. Kulkarni

2003-01-01

321

A New Technology Transfer Paradigm: How State Universities Can Collaborate with Industry in the USA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In some US states, policy makers, pressed by local and regional industrial interests, are debating how to "reform" technology transfer at public universities. "Reform" in this context is generally understood to mean redirecting university technology transfer activities to increase the benefits of state-funded research to local industries.…

Renault, Catherine S.; Cope, Jeff; Dix, Molly; Hersey, Karen

2008-01-01

322

Reframing norms: boundary maintenance and partial accommodations in the work of academic technology transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Much has been written about the commercialization of academic research and the role of technology transfer (TT) in mobilizing public sector science. Much of this literature maps a process of institutional isomorphism through which the norms of academy and industry are seen to grow increasingly aligned, facilitated, in part, by new organizations such as offices of technology transfer. Yet questions

Carrie B Sanders; Fiona Alice Miller

2010-01-01

323

University technology transfer: A conceptual model of impacting factors and phased process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a comprehensive review of literature on university technology transfer. The success of nations depends on how efficient research can be translated into commercial products. Universities play a key role in this. There are two major areas that need to be understood to build an efficient technology transfer mechanisms. First are the characteristics of each university. The literature

Jisun Kim; Tugrul U. Daim; Timothy R. Anderson

2009-01-01

324

Public Relations and Technology Transfer Offices: An Assessment of US Universities' Relations with Media and Government  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the importance for technology transfer offices of sound media and government relations strategies. It reports the results of a nationwide electronic survey in the USA and interviews with technology transfer managers on how they handle public relations issues in their offices. Strengths and weaknesses of their communication …

Haney, James M.; Cohn, Andrew

2004-01-01

325

Using CASE to Exploit Process Modeling in Technology Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A successful business will be one that has processes in place to run that business. Creating processes, reengineering processes, and continually improving processes can be accomplished through extensive modeling. Casewise(R) Corporate Modeler(TM) CASE is a computer aided software engineering tool that will enable the Technology Transfer Department (TT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to capture these abilities. After successful implementation of CASE, it could then go on to be applied in other departments at MSFC and other centers at NASA. The success of a business process is dependent upon the players working as a team and continuously improving the process. A good process fosters customer satisfaction as well as internal satisfaction in the organizational infrastructure. CASE provides a method for business process success through functions consisting of systems and processes business models; specialized diagrams; matrix management; simulation; report generation and publishing; and, linking, importing, and exporting documents and files. The software has an underlying repository or database to support these functions. The Casewise. manual informs us that dynamics modeling is a technique used in business design and analysis. Feedback is used as a tool for the end users and generates different ways of dealing with the process. Feedback on this project resulted from collection of issues through a systems analyst interface approach of interviews with process coordinators and Technical Points of Contact (TPOCs).

Renz-Olar, Cheryl

2003-01-01

326

Your Idea and Your University: Issues in Academic Technology Transfer  

PubMed Central

Structured Abstract Research discoveries may lead to products for commercial development. A central consideration for the researcher is how involved s/he will be in the commercialization process. In some cases a university out-licenses the intellectual property, while in other cases the investigator may want to be involved in the development process and choose to start his or her own company to develop, and possibly to manufacture and sell the product. Before undertaking such a challenge, however, the investigator-turned-entrepreneur must consider a variety of issues, including: career goals, financial and time commitments, potential conflicts of interest and/or commitment, start-up funding, as well as his or her ability to run a company or step aside to allow business experts to make necessary decisions. This article discusses some personal considerations in deciding to start a spin-out company and provides information on some of the available government grants to assist you should you decide to undertake your product’s commercial development. In particular, the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs of federal funding agencies are often the source of very early funding for new biomedical companies. PMID:21245769

Smith, Charles D.

2013-01-01

327

77 FR 46855 - Small Business Technology Transfer Program Policy Directive  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the STTR awardee wishes to transfer its STTR data rights to the...the awardee to relinquish, transfer, or modify in any way its...with the awarding agency to transfer or modify the data rights...STTR Phase III award. Such a bilateral data rights agreement...

2012-08-06

328

Advanced Life Support Systems: Opportunities for Technology Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's future missions to explore the solar system will be of long-duration possibly lasting years at a time. Human life support systems will have to operate with very high reliability for these long periods with essentially no resupply from Earth. Such life support systems will make extensive use of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes for recycling air and water, processing wastes, and producing food. Development of regenerative life support systems will be a pivotal capability for NASA's future human missions. A fully functional closed loop human life support system currently does not exist and thus represents a major technical challenge for space exploration. Technologies where all life support consumables are recycled have many potential terrestrial applications as well. Potential applications include providing human habitation in hostile environments such as the polar regions or the desert in such a way as to minimize energy expenditures and to minimize negative impacts on those often ecologically-sensitive areas. Other potential applications include production of food and ornamental crops without damaging the environment from fertilizers that contaminate water supplies; removal of trace gas contaminants from tightly sealed, energy-efficient buildings (the so-called sick building syndrome); and even the potential of gaining insight into the dynamics of the Earth's biosphere such that we can better manage our global environment. Two specific advanced life support technologies being developed by NASA, with potential terrestrial application, are the zeoponic plant growth system and the Hybrid Regenerative Water Recovery System (HRWRS). The potential applications for these candidate dual use technologies are quite different as are the mechanisms for transfer. In the case of zeoponics, a variety of commercial applications has been suggested which represent potentially lucrative markets. Also, the patented nature of this product offers opportunities for licensing to commercial entities. In the case of the HRWRS, commercial markets with broad applications have not been identified but some terrestrial applications are being explored where this approach has advantages over other methods of waste water processing. Although these potential applications do not appear to have the same broad attraction from the standpoint of rapid commercialization, they represent niches where commercialization possibilities as well as social benefits could be realized.

Fields, B.; Henninger, D.; Ming, D.; Verostko, C. E.

1994-01-01

329

Geothermal Elastomeric Materials Technology-Transfer (GEM-TT) Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective, to promote broad use of the earlier developed elastomers technology appears to have been successfully accomplished. The expertise was transferred to three rubber products manufacturers, and is currently commercially available. Significant substantiation of the viability of the technology was fostered through supporting and tracking numerous test efforts in various industry laboratories and out in the field. Numerous papers were presented on the technology and information was also disseminated verbally and by providing data packages. The formal and informal technology transfer effort are described. Several secondary spin-offs also resulted. Steps toward a better understanding of the complex technology transfer process were achieved. The experience provides a data point illustrating one way that technology transfer can be accomplished and a data point which can be used to evaluate its effectiveness. And finally studies were made assessing the potential of elastomers to perform at even higher temperatures.

Hirasuna, A.R.; Friese, G.J.; Stephens, C.A.

1982-12-01

330

NASA programs in technology transfer and their relation to remote sensing education  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology transfer to users is a central feature of NASA programs. In each major area of responsibility, a variety of mechanisms was established to provide for this transfer of operational capability to the proper end user, be it a Federal agency, industry, or other public sector users. In addition, the Technology Utilization program was established to cut across all program areas and to make available a wealth of 'spinoff' technology (i.e., secondary applications of space technology to ground-based use). The transfer of remote sensing technology, particularly to state and local users, presents some real challenges in application and education for NASA and the university community. The agency's approach to the transfer of remote sensing technology and the current and potential role of universities in the process are considered.

Weinstein, R. H.

1980-01-01

331

Technology transfer metrics: Measurement and verification of data/reusable launch vehicle business analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Congress and the Executive Branch have mandated that all branches of the Federal Government exert a concentrated effort to transfer appropriate government and government contractor-developed technology to the industrial use in the U.S. economy. For many years, NASA has had a formal technology transfer program to transmit information about new technologies developed for space applications into the industrial or commercial sector. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been in the forefront of the development of U.S. industrial assistance programs using technologies developed at the Center. During 1992-93, MSFC initiated a technology transfer metrics study. The MSFC study was the first of its kind among the various NASA centers. The metrics study is a continuing process, with periodic updates that reflect on-going technology transfer activities.

Trivoli, George W.

1996-01-01

332

Consumer Acceptance of Nutritionally Enhanced Genetically Modified Food: Relevance of Gene Transfer Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines consumer's willingness to consume different types of a nutritionally enhanced food product (i.e., breakfast cereal with calcium, omega fatty acids, or anti-oxidants) derived from grains genetically modified using two types of technologies: plant-to-plant gene transfer technology and animal-to plant gene transfer technology. Findings indicate a majority of the respondents are willing or somewhat willing to consume the

Benjamin M. Onyango; Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr.

2004-01-01

333

Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy  

SciTech Connect

In order to remain competitive, it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them, is also given.

Lippmann, M.J.; Antunez, E.

1996-01-01

334

Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy  

SciTech Connect

In order to remain competitive it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them is also given.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Antunez, Emilio u.

1996-01-24

335

A hypertext-based Internet-assessable database for the MSFC Technology Transfer Office  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There exists a continuing need to disseminate technical information and facilities capabilities from NASA field centers in an effort to promote the successful transfer of technologies developed with public funds to the private sector. As technology transfer is a stated NASA mission, there exists a critical need for NASA centers to document technology capabilities and disseminate this information on as wide a basis as possible. Certainly local and regional dissemination is critical, but global dissemination of scientific and engineering facilities and capabilities gives NASA centers the ability to contribute to technology transfer on a much broader scale. Additionally, information should be disseminated in a complete and rapidly available form. To accomplish this information dissemination, the unique capabilities of the Internet are being exploited. The Internet allows widescale information distribution in a rapid fashion to aid in the accomplishment of technology transfer goals established by the NASA/MSFC Technology Transfer Office. Rapid information retrieval coupled with appropriate electronic feedback, allows the scientific and technical capabilities of Marshall Space Flight Center, often unique in the world, to be explored by a large number of potential benefactors of NASA (or NASA-derived) technologies. Electronic feedback, coupled with personal contact with the MSFC Technology Transfer Office personnel, allows rapid responses to technical requests from industry and academic personnel as well as private citizens. The remainder of this report gives a brief overview of the Mosaic software and a discussion of technology transfer office and laboratory facilities data that have been made available on the Internet to promote technology transfer.

Jackson, Jeff

1994-01-01

336

Technology transfer in the life sciences. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in the life sciences. Topics include technology transfer in biogas energy production, biotechnology, pollution control, aquaculture, agriculture, oceanography, and forestry. Technology transfer to developing countries and to small businesses, as well as university-industry partnerships, is described. (Contains a minimum of 71 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-09-01

337

USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE  

EPA Science Inventory

The SITE Program was created to meet the increased demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. To accomplish this mission, the program seeks to advance the development, implementation and commercialization of innovative technologies for hazardous waste chara...

338

Technologies for Lunar Surface Power Systems Power Beaming and Transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wireless power transmission within a given working area is required or enabling for many NASA Exploration Systems. Fields of application include robotics, habitats, autonomous rendezvous and docking, life support, EVA, and many others. In robotics applications, for example, the robots must move in the working area without being hampered by power cables and, meanwhile, obtain a continuous and constant power from a power transmitter. The development of modern technology for transmitting electric power over free space has been studied for several decades, but its use in a system has been mainly limited to low power, 1-2 Vdc output voltage at a transmission distance of few meters for which relatively less than 0.5 mW/cm2 is required (e.g., Radio frequency identification RFID). Most of the rectenna conversion efficiency research to date has concentrated in low GHz frequency range of 2.45 to 10 GHz, with some work at 35 GHz. However, for space application, atmospheric adsorbtion is irrelevant and higher frequency systems with smaller transmit and receive apertures may be appropriate. For high power, most of the work on rectennas has concentrated on optimizing the conversion efficiency of the microwave rectifier element; the highest power demonstrated was 35 kW of power over a distance of 1.5 km. The objective of this paper is to establish the manner in which a very large number of very low power microwave devices can be synchronized to provide a beam of microwaves that can be used to efficiently and safely transport a significant amount of power to a remote location where it can be converted to dc (or ac) power by a ``rectenna.'' The proposed system is based on spatial power combining of the outputs of a large number of devices synchronized by mutual injection locking. We have demonstrated at JPL that such power could be achieved by combining 25 sources in a configuration that allows for convenient steering of the resulting beam of microwaves. Retrodirective beam steering for microwave power transmission (the ability to accurately track a moving receiver) has been demonstrated at Texas A&M. It is proposed that the next step in development of this concept is a modest scale up from 25 elements to 435 followed by a further scale up using such 435 element arrays as subarrays for a still larger retrodirective system. Ultimately, transmit antenna sizes on the order of 100 meters are envisioned permitting transfer levels on the order of 30 kW to aerial vehicles up to 20 km.

Marzwell, Neville; Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Chang, Kai; Little, Frank

2008-01-01

339

Technology Transfer Center | Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA)  

Cancer.gov

SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview Material Transfer Agreement Confidential Disclosure Agreement Clinical

340

The role of immigrant scientists and entrepreneurs in international technology transfer  

E-print Network

This thesis characterizes the important role of US ethnic scientists and entrepreneurs for international technology diffusion. Chapter 1 studies the transfer of tacit knowledge regarding new innovations through ethnic ...

Kerr, William Robert, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01

341

Closing the loop : improving technology transfer by learning from the past  

E-print Network

Technology transfer is a significant challenge within the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry. While much focus is put on the logistics and strategy of the process, less attention has been paid to how to change the ...

Witinski, Paul (Paul F.)

2010-01-01

342

Commercial non-aerospace technology transfer program for the 2000s: Strategic analysis and implementation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents a strategic analysis and implementation plan for NASA's Office of Commercial Programs (OCP), Technology Transfer Division's (TTD), Technology Transfer Program. The main objectives of this study are to: (1) characterize the NASA TTD's environment and past organizational structure; (2) clearly identify current and prospective programmatic efforts; (3) determine an evolutionary view of an organizational structure which could lead to the accomplishment of NASA's future technology transfer aims; and (4) formulate a strategy and plan to improve NASA's (and other federal agencies) ability to transfer technology to the non-aerospace sectors of the U.S. economy. The planning horizon for this study extends through the remainder of the 1990s to the year 2000.

Horsham, Gary A. P.

1992-01-01

343

Technology transfer at Department of Energy and Office of Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Technology transfer is a timely topic. International and national events have come together in a way that has motivated the federal government to use the major technology resources at government labs to help strengthen the economy. Within DOE, industry business principles are being employed in support of technology transfer. The question, {open_quotes}Who is the customer?{close_quotes} is being asked more and more. A transition is occurring from {open_quotes}technology-push{close_quotes} to {open_quotes}market pull.{close_quotes}

Marton, W. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-12-01

344

MassMass transfer andtransfer and separation technologyseparation technology  

E-print Network

; for example L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/Sexample L/L, L/S, S/S, G/L, G/L/S ­ Improved heat transfer to walls or heat exchange surfaces ­ Improved mass transfer, especially for immiscible liquids, G/L and L is to get the correct balance between mixingg and segregation. Liquid mixing is usually done in l ith t ti

Zevenhoven, Ron

345

Image State Mediated Electron Transfer at Surfaces Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology  

E-print Network

Image State Mediated Electron Transfer at Surfaces Shiwu Gao Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology S­412 96 G¨oteborg, Sweden David C. Langreth Department of Physics states provide an important channel for electron transfer between an atom and a surface, especially

Langreth, David C.

346

Comparative Study of Technology Transfer Practices in Europe and the USA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology transfer practices in the European Union emphasize industry-science relationships and protection of intellectual property. The United States has impressive success in transfer for commercial application due to the regulatory environment. Global interaction of research, industry, and international patent systems is needed to manage a…

de Juan, Veronica

2003-01-01

347

Environmental Policy, Technology Substitution and Cross-Media Transfers. Livestock Series Report 6  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a framework to analyze environmental policy when the transfer of pollutants from one medium to another is deemed important. The authors characterize the conditions under which such cross-media transfers are socially beneficial, and provide criteria for the choice of technologies as functions of the society's preferences for different environmental media. Society's solution is shown to lead to

Edward Osei; Bruce A. Babcock

1996-01-01

348

Technology and Knowledge Transfer in the Graz Region Ten Years of Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology and knowledge transfer from universities to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is seen as one way to strengthen a region's innovation capability. But what if SMEs do not want to play along? Looking back at some 10 years' experience of supporting SMEs, the authors describe in detail the 'Active Knowledge Transfer' programme, which…

Hofer, Franz; Adametz, Christoph; Holzer, Franz

2004-01-01

349

Commercial feasibility and impact of embryo transfer technology on the diary industry: case study  

E-print Network

COMMERCIAL FEASIBILITY AND IMPACT OF EMBRYO TRANSFER TECHNOLOGY ON THE DAIRY INDUSTRY: CASE STUDY A Thesis DANIEL LEE MARTIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics COMMERCIAL FEASIBILITY AND IMPACT OP EMBRYO TRANSFER TECHNOLOGY ON THE DAIRY INDUSTRY: A CASE STUDY A Thesis DANIEL LEE MARTIN Approved as to style and content by: Ronald D...

Martin, Daniel Lee

1985-01-01

350

Influenza vaccine production for Brazil: a classic example of successful North-South bilateral technology transfer.  

PubMed

Technology transfer is a promising approach to increase vaccine production at an affordable price in developing countries. In the case of influenza, it is imperative that developing countries acquire the technology to produce pandemic vaccines through the transfer of know-how, as this will be the only way for the majority of these countries to face the huge demand for vaccine created by influenza pandemics. Access to domestically produced influenza vaccine in such health crises is thus an important national defence strategy. However, technology transfer is not a simple undertaking. It requires a committed provider who is willing to transfer a complete production process, and not just the formulation and fill-finish parts of the process. It requires a recipient with established experience in vaccine production for human use and the ability to conduct research into new developments. In addition, the country of the recipient should preferably have sufficient financial resources to support the undertaking, and an internal market for the new vaccine. Technology transfer should create a solid partnership that results in the joint development of new competency, improvements to the product, and to further innovation. The Instituto Butantan-sanofi pasteur partnership can be seen as a model for successful technology transfer and has led to the technological independence of the Instituto Butantan in the use a strategic public health tool. PMID:21684420

Miyaki, Cosue; Meros, Mauricio; Precioso, Alexander R; Raw, Isaias

2011-07-01

351

Technology Transfer and the Civil Space Program. Volume 2: Workshop proceedings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives were to (1) provide a top-level review of the Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) and current civil space technology plans, including planning processes and technologies; (2) discuss and assess technology transfer (TT) experiences across a wide range of participants; (3) identify alternate categories/strategies for TT and define the objectives of transfer processes in each case; (4) identify the roles of various government 'stakeholders', aerospace industry, industries at large, and universities in civil space technology research, development, demonstration, and transfer; (5) identify potential barriers and/or opportunities to successful civil space TT; (6) identify specific needs for innovations in policy, programs, and/or procedures to facilitate TT; and (7) develop a plan of attack for the development of a workshop report. Papers from the workshop are presented.

1992-01-01

352

Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory10 11 Technology Transfer 2011-2012 Progress Report Technology Transfer 2011-2012 Progress Report  

E-print Network

-2012 Progress Report Technology Transfer 2011-2012 Progress Report Laney Smith and Tom Rock were ready to diversify their RockSmith Precision Machining custom machine shop business. They jumped at the chance, and in 2010 RockSmith bid for the production of 80 utility tool kits that were completed in September 2011

353

Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

Not Available

1993-07-01

354

Assay validation and technology transfer: problems and solutions.  

PubMed

In the industry of fine chemicals, including pharmaceutical and agricultural chemicals, analytical tests are performed by production departments or contract research organizations at some stage in the research and development of products. These external organizations are required to maintain the capabilities to perform analytical tests using methods that are equivalent to or better than those specified by analytical method validation. For this reason, transfer of analytical procedures to an alternative site becomes necessary. In this review, the relationship between transfer of analytical procedures and assay validation is introduced, focusing on analytical procedures that include HPLC. PMID:23876302

Okamoto, Masahiko

2014-01-01

355

The Baltimore applications project: A new look at technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The history of cooperation between Goddard Space Flight Center and Baltimore City administrators in solving urban problems is summarized. NASA provided consultation and advisory services as well as technology resources and demonstrations. Research and development programs for 69 tasks are briefly described. Technology utilization for incinerator energy, data collection, Health Department problems, and solarization experiments are presented as case histories.

1977-01-01

356

Case Studying Technology Transfer in an Objective 1 Area  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two major initiatives are in place in Wales that aim to create a strong and internationally competitive small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) sector. These are the Technology Exploitation Programme (TEP) and the Centres of Excellence for Technology and Industrial Collaboration (CETIC) programme. The Materials Centre of Excellence at the…

Lavery, N.; Stratford, G.

2003-01-01

357

COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology  

E-print Network

is identified. The deadline is 90 days from the date when the charge is first posted in OGM (which will not necessarily be the date the cost was originally incurred). For example: for a charge first posted in OGM for review, approval, and input into OGM. Attach supporting documentation. · If the transfer is made from

Heaton, Thomas H.

358

Technology Transfer Activities of NASA/MSFC: Enhancing the Southeast Region's Production Capabilities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The researcher was charged with the task of developing a simplified model to illustrate the impact of how NASA/MSFC technology transfer activities contribute to shifting outward the Southeast region's and the nation's productive capacity. The report is a background of the impact of technological growth on the nation's production possibility frontier (ppf).

Trivoli, George W.

1998-01-01

359

OPEN SOURCE: THE NEXT BIG THING IN TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO DEVELOPING NATIONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Free Open Source (FOS) should be one of the least expensive and most effective solutions for technology and knowledge transfer to developing nations. This concept has diffused to several fields such as software, hardware, and content. FOS offers not only a low cost alternative for technology acquisition, but also for networking based on cooperation. In addition, the transaction costs of

JAMIL ALKHATIB; Handasa Arabia; MOHAB ANIS; HAMID NOORI

360

International Space Station LABS: Technology Activity 1 Heat Transfer: Keeping Cool in Space  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about the technology as it relates to heat transfer (conduction and convection)on the International Space Station. Learners will investigate how to build a space suit that keeps astronauts cool. This is technology activity 1 of 2 found in the ISS L.A.B.S. Educator Resource Guide.

2012-12-06

361

Technology transfer in a changing national security environment. Final report May-Nov 90  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines U.S. export control, with particular emphasis on technology transfer as it affects our relationship with Japan. It describes the evolution of export control in the United States, including the Bucy Report, the impact of Afghanistan, and policy changes regarding the People's Republic of China. U.S. control mechanisms for critical technology currently in place are described; these include

R. A. Finkler; G. L. Boezer; E. J. Foss; N. D. Jorstad; A. J. Ramsbotham

1990-01-01

362

NASA's Technology Transfer Program for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has led the development of advanced imaging sensors and image processing technologies for space science and Earth science missions. NASA considers the transfer and commercialization of such technologies a fundamental mission of the agency. Over the last two years, efforts have been focused on the application of aerospace imaging and computing to the field of diagnostic imaging, specifically to breast cancer imaging. These technology transfer efforts offer significant promise in helping in the national public health priority of the early detection of breast cancer.

Schmidt, Gregory; Frey, Mary Anne; Vernikos, Joan; Winfield, Daniel; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

1996-01-01

363

Assuring process safety in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide manufacturing technology.  

PubMed

This paper outlines the critical issues to be addressed in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) manufacturing technology to a licensee. Process safety management (PSM) is of critical importance because of the toxicity, flammability and reactivity of HCN. The critical issues are based on experience that DuPont has gained (1) while safely manufacturing hydrogen cyanide for over 50 years, and (2) while DuPont has safely licensed HCN technology to other firms at locations around the world. DuPont's HCN experience has been combined with Aker Kvaerner's project engineering experience to insure the safe transfer of HCN technology to a licensee. PMID:16911858

Maxwell, Gary R; Edwards, Victor H; Robertson, Mark; Shah, Kamal

2007-04-11

364

The name-locator guide: A new resource for technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new transfer mechanism to facilitate technology transfer between aerospace technology and nonaerospace industries, was proposed with the following sequence of steps. First, the key technical problems in a given industry would be analyzed. The analysis will define the characteristics which relevant technology will have. Second, a limited list of subject terms will be developed using words familiar to those working in the industry. It is these which will be applied in subsequent steps to the NASA technology and used to locate technology relevant to a specific problem in the industry. Third, for each Required Technology Program, terms applicable to that program would be chosen from this list. Fourth, a name-locator guide would be provided to the Regional Dissemination Centers. This guide would be analogous to an index. The key words would be chosen from the special subject term list for the given industry.

Clingman, W. H.

1974-01-01

365

NASA technology transfer network communications and information system: TUNS user survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Applied Expertise surveyed the users of the deployed Technology Utilization Network System (TUNS) and surveyed prospective new users in order to gather background information for developing the Concept Document of the system that will upgrade and replace TUNS. Survey participants broadly agree that automated mechanisms for acquiring, managing, and disseminating new technology and spinoff benefits information can and should play an important role in meeting NASA technology utilization goals. However, TUNS does not meet this need for most users. The survey describes a number of systematic improvements that will make it easier to use the technology transfer mechanism, and thus expedite the collection and dissemination of technology information. The survey identified 26 suggestions for enhancing the technology transfer system and related processes.

1992-01-01

366

Reverse licensing: international technology transfer to the United States  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation, theoretically and empirically, focuses on US licensees as the recipient of foreign technology, and investigates characteristics of licensees, licenses, and licensed technology. The viability of reverse licensing, as an international growth strategy, is evaluated from the standpoint of two groups of firms. The first consists of thousands of small and medium sized US manufacturing firms, with few products and virtually no R and D expenditures. Without R and D, new technology and stiff international competition, they are forced into bankruptcies despite their extreme importance in the economy (48% of private workforce, 42% of sales, and 38% of GNP). The second group consists of thousands of small and medium sized firms overseas, with a relatively good supply of technology (i.e., patents) and anxious to exploit the US market but lack required resources for FDI. Technology licensing is, perhaps, the only viable option available to them. Reverse licensing provides both groups with a mechanism for their growth, survival, and prosperity. Many US firms have utilized this strategy for many years (i.e, 118 in Ohio) for tapping foreign sources including Soviet bloc technology.

Sharokhi, M.

1985-01-01

367

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

Berry, Noemi

1995-01-01

368

Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

2003-01-01

369

Fire safety: A case study of technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two basic ways in which NASA-generated technology is being used by the fire safety community are described. First, improved products and systems that embody NASA technical advances are entering the marketplace. Second, NASA test data and technical information related to fire safety are being used by persons concerned with reducing the hazards of fire through improved design information and standards. The development of commercial fire safety products and systems typically requires adaptation and integration of aerospace technologies that may not have been originated for NASA fire safety applications.

Heins, C. F.

1975-01-01

370

Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including asteroids, Lagrange points, the Moon and Mars. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages (CPS) and propellant depots. The TDM CPST project will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration which is relevant to enable long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Recognizing that key cryogenic fluid management technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration needed to be matured to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate authorized funding for a one-year (FY12) ground based technology maturation program. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technology sub-elements and components that were not already at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. This paper will present the testing, studies, and modeling that occurred in FY12 to mature cryogenic fluid management technologies for propellant storage, transfer, and supply, to examine extensibility to full scale, long duration missions, and to develop and validate analytical models. Finally, the paper will briefly describe an upcoming test to demonstrate Liquid Oxygen (LO2) Zero Boil-Off (ZBO).

Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.

2014-01-01

371

Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including asteroids, Lagrange points, the Moon and Mars. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages (CPS) and propellant depots. The TDM CPST project will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration which is relevant to enable long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Recognizing that key cryogenic fluid management technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration needed to be matured to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate authorized funding for a one-year (FY12) ground based technology maturation program. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technology sub-elements and components that were not already at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. This paper will present the testing, studies, and modeling that occurred in FY12 to mature cryogenic fluid management technologies for propellant storage, transfer, and supply, to examine extensibility to full scale, long duration missions, and to develop and validate analytical models. Finally, the paper will briefly describe an upcoming test to demonstrate Liquid Oxygen (LO2) Zero Boil- Off (ZBO).

Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.

2013-01-01

372

Transferring building energy technologies by linking government and private-sector programs  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) may wish to use existing networks and infrastructures wherever possible to transfer energy-efficiency technologies for buildings. The advantages of relying on already existing networks are numerous. These networks have in place mechanisms for reaching audiences interested in energy-efficiency technologies in buildings. Because staffs in trade and professional organizations and in state and local programs have responsibilities for brokering information for their members or client organizations, they are open to opportunities to improve their performance in information transfer. OBT, as an entity with primarily R D functions, is, by cooperating with other programs, spared the necessity of developing an extensive technology transfer program of its own, thus reinventing the wheel.'' Instead, OBT can minimize its investment in technology transfer by relying extensively on programs and networks already in place. OBT can work carefully with staff in other organizations to support and facilitate their efforts at information transfer and getting energy-efficiency tools and technologies into actual use. Consequently, representatives of some 22 programs and organizations were contacted, and face-to-face conversations held, to explore what the potential might be for transferring technology by linking with OBT. The briefs included in this document were derived from the discussions, the newly published Directory of Energy Efficiency Information Services for the Residential and Commercial Sectors, and other sources provided by respondents. Each brief has been sent to persons contacted for their review and comment one or more times, and each has been revised to reflect the review comments.

Farhar, B.C.

1990-07-01

373

Laser propulsion for orbit transfer - Laser technology issues  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using reasonable near-term mission traffic models (1991-2000 being the assumed operational time of the system) and the most current unclassified laser and laser thruster information available, it was found that space-based laser propulsion orbit transfer vehicles (OTVs) can outperform the aerobraked chemical OTV over a 10-year life-cycle. The conservative traffic models used resulted in an optimum laser power of about 1 MW per laser. This is significantly lower than the power levels considered in other studies. Trip time was taken into account only to the extent that the system was sized to accomplish the mission schedule.

Horvath, J. C.; Frisbee, R. H.

1985-01-01

374

Comparative study of university technology transfer between Germany and China  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rush to create top-tier institutions globally makes China and Germany strengthen a small group of world best universities, by programs of the Project 985 in China and the Excellence Initiative in Germany striving to realize national aims in both countries. Both Project 985 and Excellence Initiative emphasize research performance of elite universities. Comprehensive universities and technological universities dominate the

Shuiyuan Tang; Jiping Lu; Harald Kunz; Jianhua Zuo; Zhonghua Jian

2011-01-01

375

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall  

E-print Network

of Tumors RU 999 Technology Summary Proliferative diseases, such as non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) and ChronicRIIB, and this antibody showed a 10-fold increase in the tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell response in lymphoma and melanoma antibodies have been tested in humanized mouse models for lymphoma and melanoma. Lead Inventor Jeffrey V

376

Technology transfer through climate change: Setting a sustainable energy pattern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change mitigation is considered as a high priority internationally and is placed in the top of the agenda for most politicians and decision makers. The key challenge is that low-carbon sustainable technologies need to be adopted both by developed as well as developing countries, in an effort to avoid past unsustainable practices and being locked into old, less sustainable

Charikleia Karakosta; Haris Doukas; John Psarras

2010-01-01

377

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall  

E-print Network

skin cancer (~260,000 new cases diagnosed per year), and ovarian cancer is the leading gynecological of Various Cancers RU 824 Technology Summary Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women after cancer (~20,000 new cases per year) in the United States. A large proportion of breast and ovarian tumors

378

An Action Research on Open Knowledge and Technology Transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

R&D has always been considered a strategic asset of companies. Traditionally, companies that have their own R&D function are better prepared to compete in the globalized economy because they are able to produce the knowledge and technology required to advance products and services. SMEs also need to become highly innovative and competitive in order to be successful. Nevertheless, their ability to have an internal R&D function that effectively meets their innovation needs is usually very weak. Open innovation provides access to a vast amount of new ideas and technologies at lower costs than closed innovation. This paper presents an action research study being carried out at University of Minho to develop a business model and technology platform for an innovation brokering service connecting ideas and technologies being developed at Universities with the specific innovation needs of SMEs. The expected contributions of the study include the empirical investigation of the effectiveness and risks of crowdsourcing innovation when applied in the socio-economic context of a European developing country where SMEs represent 99,6% of the businesses.

Ramos, Isabel; Cardoso, Margarida; Carvalho, João Vidal; Graça, José Ismael

379

Technology Transfer at VTIP VTIP in 20 Minutes  

E-print Network

· Commercialize VT Inventions · Technology evaluation, protection, licensing · Monitor licensees for success #12 Plants: Asexual Reproduction · Plant Patent · Granted for inventing or discovering asexually reproducible plants · Does not cover tuber propagated plants or plant found in an uncultivated, natural state · 20

Liskiewicz, Maciej

380

The Rockefeller University Office of Technology Transfer 502 Founders Hall  

E-print Network

, endometrial cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, Ewing carcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma Advantages of Cancer RU 1101 Technology Summary The major challenges in cancer treatment are the overall lack to general cytotoxicity. To overcome these hurdles, current research in cancer biology focuses on elucidating

381

EXHIBIT OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND SUPPORT DIVISION PUBLICATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

TTSD helps NRMRL meet its goal of providing information to the community, regulators, environmental consultants and decision makers to keep them aware of the latest advances in risk management approaches and decision options. They achieve this goal by producing technology transfe...

382

IPAD: A unique approach to government/industry cooperation for technology development and transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A key element to improved industry productivity is effective management of Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) information. To stimulate advancement, a unique joint government/industry project designated Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) was carried out from 1971 to 1984. The goal was to raise aerospace industry productivity through advancement of computer based technology to integrate and manage information involved in the design and manufacturing process. IPAD research was guided by an Industry Technical Advisory Board (ITAB) composed of over 100 representatives from aerospace and computer companies. The project complemented traditional NASA/DOD research to develop aerospace design technology and the Air Force's Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) program to advance CAM technology. IPAD had unprecedented industry support and involvement and served as a unique approach to government industry cooperation in the development and transfer of advanced technology. The IPAD project background, approach, accomplishments, industry involvement, technology transfer mechanisms and lessons learned are summarized.

Fulton, Robert E.; Salley, George C.

1985-01-01

383

A New Approach For A Low Cost CPV Module Design Utilizing Micro-Transfer Printing Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semprius is applying a novel massively parallel, automated production process to address CPV's reliability, performance, cost, and scalability requirements. The new design approach utilizing patented micro-transfer printing technology enables the use of many very small cells (0.36 mm2) with benefits including high efficiency, simple distributed heat transfer, high concentration ratio, and small thin concentrating optical elements. We briefly describe the design approach and provide detailed supporting on-sun measurements.

Burroughs, Scott; Conner, Robert; Furman, Bruce; Menard, Etienne; Gray, Allen; Meitl, Matthew; Bonafede, Salvatore; Kneeburg, David; Ghosal, Kanchan; Bukovnik, Rudolf; Wagner, Wolfgang; Seel, Steven; Sullivan, Michael

2010-10-01

384

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

ScienceCinema

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

Nakhla, Tony;

2014-06-25

385

GIS technology transfer for use in private sector consulting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Summit Envirosolutions, Inc. (Summit) is an EOCAP '93 company working in partnership with NASA's Commercial Remote Sensing Program to integrate the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technology into our environmental consulting business. The EOCAP program has allowed us to obtain the hardware and software necessary for this technology that would have been difficult for a small company, such as Summit, to purchase outright. We are integrating GIS/RS into our consulting business in several areas including wellhead protection and environmental assessments. The major emphasis in the EOCAP project is to develop a system, termed RealFlowSM. The goals of RealFlowSM are to reduce client costs associated with environmental compliance (in particular preparation of EPA-mandated Wellhead Protection Plans), more accurately characterize aquifer parameters, provide a scientifically sound basis for delineating Wellhead Protection Areas, and readily assess changes in well field operations and potential impacts of environmental stresses. RealFlowSM utilizes real-time telemetric data, digital imagery, GIS, Global Positioning System (GPS), and field data to characterize a study area at a lower cost. In addition, we are applying this technology in other service areas and showing a reduction in the overall costs for large projects.

Gibas, Dawn R.; Davis, Roger J.

1996-03-01

386

Incorporating the Delphi Technique to investigate renewable energy technology transfer in Saudi Arabia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Saudi Arabia is a major oil-producing nation facing a rapidly-growing population, high unemployment, climate change, and the depletion of its natural resources, potentially including its oil supply. Technology transfer is regarded as a means to diversify countries' economies beyond their natural resources. This dissertation examined the opportunities and barriers to utilizing technology transfer successfully to build renewable energy resources in Saudi Arabia to diversify the economy beyond oil production. Examples of other developing countries that have successfully used technology transfer to transform their economies are explored, including Japan, Malayasia, and the United Arab Emirates. Brazil is presented as a detailed case study to illustrate its transition to an economy based to a much greater degree than before on renewable energy. Following a pilot study, the Delphi Method was used in this research to gather the opinions of a panel of technology transfer experts consisting of 10 heterogeneous members of different institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, including aviation, telecommunication, oil industry, education, health systems, and military and governmental organizations. In three rounds of questioning, the experts identified Education, Dependence on Oil, and Manpower as the 3 most significant factors influencing the potential for success of renewable energy technology transfer for Saudi Arabia. Political factors were also rated toward the "Very Important" end of a Likert scale and were discussed as they impact Education, Oil Dependence, and Manpower. The experts' opinions are presented and interpreted. They form the basis for recommended future research and discussion of how in light of its political system and its dependence on oil, Saudi Arabia can realistically move forward on renewable energy technology transfer and secure its economic future.

Al-Otaibi, Nasir K.

387

NASA Langley Research and Technology-Transfer Program in Formal Methods  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents an overview of NASA Langley research program in formal methods. The major goals of this work are to make formal methods practical for use on life critical systems, and to orchestrate the transfer of this technology to U.S. industry through use of carefully designed demonstration projects. Several direct technology transfer efforts have been initiated that apply formal methods to critical subsystems of real aerospace computer systems. The research team consists of five NASA civil servants and contractors from Odyssey Research Associates, SRI International, and VIGYAN Inc.

Butler, Ricky W.; Caldwell, James L.; Carreno, Victor A.; Holloway, C. Michael; Miner, Paul S.; DiVito, Ben L.

1995-01-01

388

From Becquerel to Nanotechnology:. One Century of Decline of Scientific Dissemination, Publishing and Technology Transfer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

2008 marks the 100th anniversary of Henri Becquerel's death, the discoverer of radioactivity and a leading contributor to the birth of modern physics. In addition to well-deserved celebrations, this offers a chance for a sobering look at scientific dissemination then and now and at the evolution of technology transfer. The facts are shocking: both dissemination and technology transfer were much faster and effective at the time of Becquerel, in spite of all the new communication techniques. I briefly speculate on the causes of these dismal failures, arguing that they are primarily rooted in society, academic management and industrial management — and therefore very difficult to reverse.

Margaritondo, G.

389

Transferring jet engine diagnostic and control technology to liquid propellant rocket engines  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the methodology for developing a diagnostic and control system for a current, operational jet engine. A description is given of each development stage, the system components and the technologies which could be transferred to liquid propellant rocket engines. Finally, the operational impact is described in terms of cost and maintenance based on actual jet engine experience. Efforts are continuing to develop new diagnostic techniques under IR D for application on the advanced technical fighter. Already improved techniques and application methods are becoming available. This technology is being evaluated and may also be transferred to rocket engine diagnostic and control system development.

Alcock, J.F.; Hagar, S.K.

1989-01-01

390

Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.

Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Jinming, Cai [Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)

2012-11-15

391

LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech  

ScienceCinema

Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

Rorick, Kevin

2012-08-02

392

National security and technology transfer: the strategic dimensions of east-west trade  

SciTech Connect

Deterioration of detente in the wake of the ongoing Soviet arms buildup has focused sharply the east-west trade debate on the question of advanced technology transfer from the United States and its allies to the Soviet bloc. The transfer and acquisition of high technology have become central ingredients in superpower relations and are key elements of any national security policy. President Reagan, among others, has questioned the wisdom of the policies of the 1960s and early 1970s, when trade with the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe expanded rapidly. At recent industrial-nation summits, conferees of Western countries agreed to high-level review of their east-west technology trade policies. But in light of the apparent West European commitment to continue and expand trade with the east, as exemplified by the Siberian gas pipeline project, and the growing US opposition to such technology transfer, divisions between US and Western trade policies toward the East are likely to become increasingly acute in the years ahead. In this book, the editors have selected comprehensive and representative articles to examine the question of technology transfer from a variety of perspectives - political, economic, and military - emphasizing both the US and the Western allies' points of view and offering insights into the complex issues raised by the strategic dimensions of east-west trade.

Bertsch, G.K.; McIntyre, J.R. (eds.)

1983-01-01

393

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

2000-05-01

394

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Unknown

1999-10-31

395

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

Donald Duttlinger

1999-12-01

396

An overview of remote sensing technology transfer in Canada and the United States  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To realize the maximum potential benefits of remote sensing, the technology must be applied by personnel responsible for the management of natural resources and the environment. In Canada and the United States, these managers are often in local offices and are not those responsible for the development of systems to acquire, preprocess, and disseminate remotely sensed data, nor those leading the research and development of techniques for analysis of the data. However, the latter organizations have recognized that the technology they develop must be transferred to the management agencies if the technology is to be useful to society. Problems of motivation and communication associated with the technology transfer process, and some of the methods employed by Federal, State, Provincial, and local agencies, academic institutions, and private organizations to overcome these problems are explored.

Strome, W. M.; Lauer, D. T.

1977-01-01

397

Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

Lariviere, Brian W.

1992-01-01

398

technology offer Vienna University of Technology/ Research and Transfer Support | Hildegard Sieberth  

E-print Network

developed. The liquid precursors can be either cured in vivo or printed by additive manufacturing technology be tuned, in-vivo curing or high resolution additive manufacturing is not possible Technology A new

Szmolyan, Peter

399

The 1973 GSFC battery workshop, second day. [technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technological progress in the development, testing, and manufacturing of nickel-cadmium battery cells as well as hydrogen cells is presented. The following major topics were discussed: (1) carbonate analysis; (2) nickel-cadmium memory effect; (3) use of batteries in an automatic acquisition and control system; (4) accelerated testing; (5) formulation of a mathematical odel for a nickel-cadmium cell; (6) development of a light weight nickel-cadmium battery capable of delivering 20 watt hours per pound; (7) magnetic testing of nickel-cadmium cells; (8) design and performance characteristics of nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells; and (9) development of a semiprismatic cell design. For Vol. 1, see N75-15152.

1973-01-01

400

Technology transfer of operator-in-the-loop simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology developed for operator-in-the-loop simulation in space teleoperation has been applied to Caterpillar's backhoe, wheel loader, and off-highway truck. On an SGI workstation, the simulation integrates computer modeling of kinematics and dynamics, real-time computational and visualization, and an interface with the operator through the operator's console. The console is interfaced with the workstation through an IBM-PC in which the operator's commands were digitized and sent through an RS-232 serial port. The simulation gave visual feedback adequate for the operator in the loop, with the camera's field of vision projected on a large screen in multiple view windows. The view control can emulate either stationary or moving cameras. This simulator created an innovative engineering design environment by integrating computer software and hardware with the human operator's interactions. The backhoe simulation has been adopted by Caterpillar in building a virtual reality tool for backhoe design.

Yae, K. H.; Lin, H. C.; Lin, T. C.; Frisch, H. P.

1994-01-01

401

Cross-border transfer of climate change mitigation technologies : the case of wind energy from Denmark and Germany to India  

E-print Network

This research investigated the causal factors and processes of international development and diffusion of wind energy technology by examining private sector cross-border technology transfer from Denmark and Germany to India ...

Mizuno, Emi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01

402

Technology 2003: The Fourth National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proceedings from symposia of the Technology 2003 Conference and Exposition, December 7-9, 1993, Anaheim, CA, was discussed. Volume 1 features the Plenary Session and the Plenary Workshop, plus papers presented in Advanced Manufacturing, Biotechnology/Medical Technology, Environmental Technology, Materials Science, and Power and Energy.

Hackett, Michael (compiler)

1994-01-01

403

Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China.  

PubMed

Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future. PMID:22770778

Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

2012-11-01

404

Strengthening the Technology Transfer Framework in Developing Countries. A Michigan State University Internship Programme.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An internship program on intellectual property management and technology transfer was attended by 11 participants from eight developing countries. The interns developed an informal network and are advising institutions and governments in their nations on development of intellectual property policies and laws. (SK)

Maredia, Karim M.; And Others

1997-01-01

405

Beyond Technology Transfer: Quality of Life Impacts from R&D Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents methodology and findings from three product efficacy studies that verify the quality of life benefits resulting from prior research, development, and transfer activities. The paper then discusses key lessons learned with implications for product evaluation practice. The studies assessed the quality of three assistive technology

Stone, Vathsala I.; Lockett, Michelle; Usiak, Douglas J.; Arthanat, Sajay

2010-01-01

406

NASA/BLM Applications Pilot Test (APT), phase 2. Volume 3: Technology transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques used and materials presented at a planning session and two workshops held to provide hands-on training in the integration of quantitatively based remote sensing data are described as well as methods used to enhance understanding of approaches to inventories that integrate multiple data sources given various resource information objectives. Significant results from each of the technology transfer sessions are examined.

1981-01-01

407

X. SELECTED ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES FOR FACULTY H. Technology Transfer (Patent) Policy  

E-print Network

X. SELECTED ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES FOR FACULTY H. Technology Transfer (Patent) Policy 1, and that the protection and control provided under patent laws and other legal means for the protection of property rights that employees of the College may require assistance in determining and evaluating patentability

Kasman, Alex

408

Determining the Success or Failure of International Technology Transfer: A Conceptual Framework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors present a conceptual framework that is considered useful for investment studies and consultancy activities on international technology transfer (ITT). Thoroughly elaborated investment studies--by which possible risks and constraints can be identified--can provide valuable support to decision makers in an ITT project. There appears to…

van Egmond-de Wilde de Ligny, E. L. C.; Kumaraswamy, M. M.

2003-01-01

409

NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 1: Data processing and transfer panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The data processing and transfer technology areas that need to be developed and that could benefit from space flight experiments are identified. Factors considered include: user requirements, concepts in 'Outlook for Space', and cost reduction. Major program thrusts formulated are an increase in end-to-end information handling and a reduction in life cycle costs.

1975-01-01

410

CONNET -DESIGN ISSUES1 Issues in Designing a European Technology Transfer Network for the  

E-print Network

for the Construction Industry ZIGA TURK, TOMO CEROVSEK University of Ljubljana, Slovenia AND ROBERT AMOR Building of European Union's Technology Transfer Network such a one-stop-shop for the construction industry of Europe in the construction industry, the need for easy access to Community-wide information is rising. Construction industry

Amor, Robert

411

PROCEEDINGS: SEVENTH SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY. VOLUME 2  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document presentations from the seventh symposium on the transfer and utilization of particulate control technology, March 22-25, 1988, in Nashville, TN. Objectives of the symposium were to encourage the exchange of new knowledge in the particulate control field b...

412

PROCEEDINGS: SEVENTH SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY. VOLUME 1  

EPA Science Inventory

The proceedings document presentations from the seventh symposium on the transfer and utilization of particulate control technology, March 22-25, 1988, in Nashville, TN. Objectives of the symposium were to encourage the exchange of new knowledge in the particulate control field b...

413

from the old, arrogant and unlamented `technology transfer' approach, through participatory research and actor-  

E-print Network

research and actor- oriented or action research and, finally, to research as `part of a social learningfrom the old, arrogant and unlamented `technology transfer' approach, through participatory process', in which researchers and the information that they can provide represent just one element

414

Analysis of Soviet Technology Transfer in the Development of China's Nuclear Weapons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because China built its atomic and hydrogen bombs at a time of resource scarcity and rudimentary industrial development, it is generally believed that it got a great deal of help from Soviet nuclear technology transfer during the late 1950s. In particular, Soviet leaders and scientists asserted that they supplied China with extensive and critical assistance; some even claimed that this

2009-01-01

415

SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (4TH). VOLUME 1. FABRIC FILTRATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The papers in the three volumes (of which this is one) were presented at the Fourth Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology in Houston, TX, October 11-14, 1982. Volume I relates to fabric filtration; Volume II, to electrostatic precipitation; a...

416

SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (4TH). VOLUME 2. ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The papers in the three volumes (of which this is one) were presented at the Fourth Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology in Houston, TX, October 11-14, 1982. Volume I relates to fabric filtration; Volume II, to electrostatic precipitation; a...

417

Transferring the Soft-Skills Technology of Workplace Learning and Performance to China.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses international business and workplace learning and performance (WLP), and describes a long-term strategic alliance between Motorola University China, Penn State University, Beijing University, and Nankai University. Highlights include a needs assessment of multinational corporations in China; transferring the soft-skills technology of WLP…

Yan, Jenny; Rothwell, William J.; Webster, Lois

2001-01-01

418

Technology transfer potential of an automated water monitoring system. [market research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nature and characteristics of the potential economic need (markets) for a highly integrated water quality monitoring system were investigated. The technological, institutional and marketing factors that would influence the transfer and adoption of an automated system were studied for application to public and private water supply, public and private wastewater treatment and environmental monitoring of rivers and lakes.

Jamieson, W. M.; Hillman, M. E. D.; Eischen, M. A.; Stilwell, J. M.

1976-01-01

419

Brokerage and SME Innovation: An Analysis of the Technology Transfer Service at Area Science Park, Italy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper contributes to the literature on innovation brokerage by analysing the effects of brokerage activities on the innovation and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The authors provide a detailed description of the Technology Transfer Service (TTS), credited as a European best-practice innovation broker, at Area Science…

Cattapan, Paolo; Passarelli, Mariacarmela; Petrone, Michele

2012-01-01

420

Texas Schools, Inc.: A Case Study of the Transfer of Technology at a Pilot Bilingual Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Texas Schools, Inc. (TSI) developed a pilot program in bilingual education for Mexican-American vocational workers in the Department of Diesel Mechanics at Texas Tech University. This study assesses the transfer of technology in that environment using quantitative and qualitative measures. TSI, a technical and vocational school in Lubbock, Texas,…

Pearson, Vangie L.

421

Spin-out Company PortfolioTechnology Transfer The Sir Colin Campbell Building  

E-print Network

Spin-out Company PortfolioTechnology Transfer The Sir Colin Campbell Building The University innovation and excellence in all that we do, we make both knowledge and discoveries matter." Professor David of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by Professor Sir Peter Mansfield in the 1980s which underpinned

Nottingham, University of

422

The following national Sea Grant aquaculture extension and technology transfer projects were awarded in 2012  

E-print Network

The following national Sea Grant aquaculture extension and technology transfer projects were for Progressive Development of the Nation's Offshore Aquaculture Industry - PI Petterson 322,802 California Sea aquaculture development in the context of multiple ocean uses: PI Lester 486,544 Florida Sea Grant University

423

EMAP-WEST COMMUNICATIONS: DATA ANALYSIS WORKSHOPS TRANSFER STATISTICAL TECHNOLOGY TO REGIONS, STATES, AND TRIBES  

EPA Science Inventory

Transferring monitoring technology is a key component of EMAP-West. The Coastal Team has begun that process with respect to data analyses with a series of workshops to train Regional/State/Tribal cooperators in how to conduct the statistical analysis of EMAP data. The three coast...

424

Research Universities, Technology Transfer, and Job Creation: What Infrastructure, For What Training?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology transfer and innovation are considered major drivers of sustainable development; they place knowledge and its dissemination in society at the heart of the development process. This article considers the role of research universities, and how they can interact with key actors and institutions involved in "innovation…

Brodhag, Christian

2013-01-01

425

Trinity Technology Transfer News TTCCDD CCaammppuuss CCoommppaannyy ttoo llaauunncchh nneeww pprroodduucctt  

E-print Network

communities. All members of the TTO deliver seminars, workshops, and course modules on IP, technology transfer Health & Disease and M.Sc. Immunology. If your reserarch group, Department or School would like to learn more, any member of the TTO will be pleased to give a customised seminar - please just contact one

O'Mahony, Donal E.

426

Trends in Technology Transfer at Universities. Report of the Clearinghouse on University-Industry Relations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Trends in university technology transfer activities and the commercialization of research results are discussed, based on a 1985 survey. Responses revealed widespread changes in internal patent and licensing activities and increased disclosure of inventions by faculty to the university. Factors contributing to this trend include: changes in…

Association of American Universities, Washington, DC.

427

Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements study. Volume 2, book 4: Integrated advanced technology development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) program provides both an opportunity and a requirement to increase our upper stage capabilities with the development and applications of new technologies. Issues such as man rating, space basing, reusability, and long lunar surface storage times drive the need for new technology developments and applications. In addition, satisfaction of mission requirements such as lunar cargo delivery capability and lunar landing either require new technology development or can be achieved in a more cost-effective manner with judicious applications of advanced technology. During the STV study, advanced technology development requirements and plans have been addressed by the Technology/Advanced Development Working Group composed of NASA and contractor representatives. This report discusses the results to date of this working group. The first section gives an overview of the technologies that have potential or required applications for the STV and identifies those technologies baselined for the STV. Figures are provided that list the technology categories and show the priority placed on those technology categories for either the space-based or ground-based options. The second section covers the plans and schedules for incorporating the technologies into the STV program.

Weber, Gary A.

1991-01-01

428

The initiatives of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in the transfer of a new excavation technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A system for making vertical or horizontal holes in rock or soil by progressive local melting is described. In one operation the three major tasks of excavation are performed with the Subterrene concept: (1) rock fracturing; (2) debris removal; and (3) wall stabilization. Potential applications of the Subterrene system are indicated, with emphasis on extraction of geothermal energy and development of superconduction transmission lines for electrical power. A program in technology dissemination implemented by the staff members is described. It is indicated that a large scale commercial utilization of the technology is required to complete the transfer of technology.

Hanold, R. J.; Bankston, C. A.; Rowley, J. C.; Long, W. W.

1974-01-01

429

From Know-how to Show-how? Questioning the Role of Information and Communication Technologies in Knowledge Transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores and critically reviews the ability of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to improve the transferability of knowledge. The aim here is to look beyond knowledge transfer at a general level. By distinguishing between codified knowledge and tacit knowledge, a more thorough understanding of knowledge transfer is sought, and in particular of the role of ICTs in this

Joanne Roberts

2000-01-01

430

[Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways].  

PubMed

The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25791189

Crager, Sara Eve

2015-01-01

431

Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.  

PubMed

The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25211753

Crager, Sara Eve

2014-11-01

432

Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Advancing Technologies for Future Mission Architectures Beyond Low Earth Orbit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including the Moon, asteroids, Lagrange points, and Mars and its environs. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. The TDM CPST will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration that enables long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. This paper will present a summary of the cryogenic fluid management technology maturation effort, infusion of those technologies into flight hardware development, and a summary of the CPST preliminary design.

Chojnacki, Kent T.; Crane, Deborah J.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.; Tofil, Todd A.

2014-01-01

433

Technology 2001: The Second National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 1  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers from the technical sessions of the Technology 2001 Conference and Exposition are presented. The technical sessions featured discussions of advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, computer graphics and simulation, communications, data and information management, electronics, electro-optics, environmental technology, life sciences, materials science, medical advances, robotics, software engineering, and test and measurement.

1991-01-01

434

Electronic Transfer: Moving Technology Dollars in New Directions--Technology Counts 2005  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the special issues of the eighth edition of "Education Week's" annual report on education technology, "Technology Counts." The annual report tracks the economic and policy forces that are converging to push those changes, which are happening at the federal, state, and local levels. States and school districts are spending…

Edwards, Virginia

2005-01-01

435

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek  

E-print Network

.doubek@tuwien.ac.at | http://www.rt.tuwien.ac.at Combined biogas upgrading & power-to-gas energy storage wind/solar gas of the gas to store. The novel combined power-to-gas & biogas upgrading technology is producing high further. The solution is to combine power-to-gas energy storage with biogas upgrading. Technology

Szmolyan, Peter

436

System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report, phase 1 and 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio (L/D) aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. The methodology employed to generate technology payoffs, the major payoffs identified, the urgency of the technology effort required, and the technology plans suggested are summarized for both study phases. Technology issues concerning aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, thermal protection, propulsion, and guidance, navigation and control are addressed.

1985-01-01

437

Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration For Long Duration In-Space Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high specific impulse of cryogenic propellants can provide a significant performance advantage for in-space transfer vehicles. The upper stages of the Saturn V and various commercial expendable launch vehicles have used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen propellants; however, the application of cryogenic propellants has been limited to relatively short duration missions due to the propensity of cryogens to absorb environmental heat resulting in fluid losses. Utilizing advanced cryogenic propellant technologies can enable the efficient use of high performance propellants for long duration missions. Crewed mission architectures for beyond low Earth orbit exploration can significantly benefit from this capability by developing realistic launch spacing for multiple launch missions, by prepositioning stages and by staging propellants at an in-space depot. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Office of the Chief Technologist is formulating a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission to mitigate the technical and programmatic risks of infusing these advanced technologies into the development of future cryogenic propellant stages or in-space propellant depots. NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. This mission will test and validate key cryogenic technological capabilities and has the objectives of demonstrating advanced thermal control technologies to minimize propellant loss during loiter, demonstrating robust operation in a microgravity environment, and demonstrating efficient propellant transfer on orbit. The status of the demonstration mission concept development, technology demonstration planning and technology maturation activities in preparation for flight system development are described.

Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Kortes, Trudy F.; Taylor, William J.; McRight, Patrick S.

2012-01-01

438

MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Second semiannual status report, July 1988--March 1989  

SciTech Connect

As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee`s activities to date have focused primarily on the ``technology transfer`` aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

Not Available

1989-10-01

439

Technology Transfer  

Cancer.gov

The bisulfite-conversion portion of this process is currently being assessed for conversion efficiency, template loss, and stability of bisulfite-converted DNA before being implemented into a production offering.

440

Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)  

SciTech Connect

Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

Ando, K., E-mail: ando-koji@aist.go.jp; Yuasa, S. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki 212-8582 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Nakatani, Y. [Department of Communication Engineering and Informatics, University of Electro-Communication, Chofu 182-8585 (Japan); Miyazaki, T. [WPI-AIMR, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2014-05-07

441

Orbit transfer rocket engine integrated control and health monitoring system technology readiness assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of this task were to: (1) estimate the technology readiness of an integrated control and health monitoring (ICHM) system for the Aerojet 7500 lbF Orbit Transfer Vehicle engine preliminary design assuming space based operations; and (2) estimate the remaining cost to advance this technology to a NASA defined 'readiness level 6' by 1996 wherein the technology has been demonstrated with a system validation model in a simulated environment. The work was accomplished through the conduct of four subtasks. In subtask 1 the minimally required functions for the control and monitoring system was specified. The elements required to perform these functions were specified in Subtask 2. In Subtask 3, the technology readiness level of each element was assessed. Finally, in Subtask 4, the development cost and schedule requirements were estimated for bringing each element to 'readiness level 6'.

Bickford, R. L.; Collamore, F. N.; Gage, M. L.; Morgan, D. B.; Thomas, E. R.

1992-01-01

442

A project to transfer technology from NASA centers in support of industrial innovation in the midwest  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A technology transfer program utilizing graduate students in mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas was initiated in early 1981. The objective of the program was to encourage industrial innovation in the Midwest through improved industry/university cooperation and the utilization of NASA technology. A related and important aspect of the program was the improvement of graduate engineering education through the involvement of students in the identification and accomplishment of technological objectives in cooperation with scientists at NASA centers and engineers in industry. The pilot NASA/University Industrial Innovation Program was an outstanding success based on its ability to: attract top graduate students; secure industry support; and stimulate industry/university cooperation leading to enhanced university capability and utilization of advanced technology by industry.

Barr, B. G.

1986-01-01

443

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

Unknown

2003-04-30

444

Technical assistance and the transfer of remote sensing technology. [for economic development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The transfer of technology from industrialized countries to the third world is a very complicated process and one that requires a great deal of research and development. The political and social obstacles to this transfer are generally greater than the technical obstacles, but technical assistance programs have neither the competence nor the inclination to deal with these factors adequately. Funding for technical assistance in remote sensing is now expanding rapidly, and there is a growing need for institutions to study and promote the effective use of this technology for economic development. The United Nations, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Bank, the United States Agency for International Development and the Canadian technical assistance agencies take different approaches to the problem and deal with the political pressures in different ways.

Chipman, R.

1977-01-01

445

Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning.

Not Available

1985-06-01

446

Stress Measurements on Blair High School Gymnasium: A Demonstration of Space Technology Transfer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This Report describes an actual demonstration of transfer to non-space use of technologies developed for space programs applications. Techniques used in assessing static and dynamic characteristics of the Blair High School gymnasium involved data acquisition by continuous scanning of strain gauge data acquired over a time of wide-temperature range, and analysis by a computer routine developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory five years ago. The advantage of this method over conventional structural testing of uniquely designed structures was proved. More importantly, the process of demonstration was shown to be of great assistance to, and extension of, normal methods of disseminating information of new technologies. It is felt that significant benefit will derive from this improved mode oi concept transfer.

Kastel, Dean

1966-01-01

447

Strategic factors in the development of the National Technology Transfer Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Broad consensus among industry and government leaders has developed over the last decade on the importance of applying the U.S. leadership in research and development (R&D) to strengthen competitiveness in the global marketplace, and thus enhance national prosperity. This consensus has emerged against the backdrop of increasing economic competition, and the dramatic reduction of military threats to national security with the end of the Cold War. This paper reviews the key factors and considerations that shaped - and continue to influence - the development of the Regional Technoloty Transfer Centers (RTTC) and the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC). Also, the future role of the national network in support of emerging technology policy initiatives will be explored.

Root, Jonathan F.; Stone, Barbara A.

1993-01-01

448

Cryogenic gear technology for an orbital transfer vehicle engine and tester design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Technology available for gears used in advanced Orbital Transfer Vehicle rocket engines and the design of a cryogenic adapted tester used for evaluating advanced gears are presented. The only high-speed, unlubricated gears currently in cryogenic service are used in the RL10 rocket engine turbomachinery. Advanced rocket engine gear systems experience operational load conditions and rotational speed that are beyond current experience levels. The work under this task consisted of a technology assessment and requirements definition followed by design of a self-contained portable cryogenic adapted gear test rig system.

Calandra, M.; Duncan, G.

1986-01-01

449

Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Prephase A Government Point-of-Departure Concept Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary purpose of this study was to define a point-of-departure prephase A mission concept for the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer technology demonstration mission to be conducted by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The mission concept includes identification of the cryogenic propellant management technologies to be demonstrated, definition of a representative mission timeline, and definition of a viable flight system design concept. The resulting mission concept will serve as a point of departure for evaluating alternative mission concepts and synthesizing the results of industry- defined mission concepts developed under the OCT contracted studies

Mulqueen, J. A.; Addona, B. M.; Gwaltney, D. A.; Holt, K. A.; Hopkins, R. C.; Matis, J. A.; McRight, P. S.; Popp, C. G.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Thomas, H. D.; Baysinger, M. F.; Maples, C. D.; Capizzo, P. D.; Fabisinski, L. L.; Hornsby, L. S.; Percy, T. K.; Thomas, S. D.

2012-01-01

450

Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile. Visual display systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The growth of common as well as emerging visual display technologies are surveyed. The major inference is that contemporary society is rapidly growing evermore reliant on visual display for a variety of purposes. Because of its unique mission requirements, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has contributed in an important and specific way to the growth of visual display technology. These contributions are characterized by the use of computer-driven visual displays to provide an enormous amount of information concisely, rapidly and accurately.

1972-01-01

451

The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission:. [Progress and Transition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation provides an overview of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Mission from formulation through Systems Requirements Review and into preparation for Preliminary Design Review. Accomplishments of the technology maturation phase of the project are included. The presentation then summarizes the transition, due to Agency budget constraints, of CPST from a flight project into a ground project titled evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo).

Meyer, Michael L.; Taylor, William J.; Ginty, Carol A.; Melis, Matthew E.

2014-01-01

452

Modeling the international technology transfer process in construction projects: evidence from Thailand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many developing and newly industrialized countries lack the technical and management capabilities to undertake large and\\/or\\u000a complex infrastructure projects. In an effort to more rapidly develop their infrastructure, economies and living standards,\\u000a many have embarked on a series of international Technology Transfer (TT) initiatives within the construction and other industries.\\u000a However, these initiatives have not immediately translated into enhanced capabilities

Tanut Waroonkun; Rodney Anthony Stewart

2008-01-01

453

A mould-and-transfer technology for fabricating scanning probe microscopy probes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a general fabrication technology for realizing singular or arrayed probes for scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications. This method allows SPM probes to be made of a variety of materials, including metal, polymer (e.g., polyimide, SU-8), elastomer and silicon nitride. The probe shank and tip may be made of different materials. The mould-and-transfer fabrication process can realize arrayed tips

Jun Zou; Xuefeng Wang; David Bullen; Kee Ryu; Chang Liu; Chad A. Mirkin

2004-01-01

454

Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology: Baffled injector design, fabrication, and verification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New technologies for space-based, reusable, throttleable, cryogenic orbit transfer propulsion are being evaluated. Supporting tasks for the design of a dual expander cycle engine thrust chamber design are documented. The purpose of the studies was to research the materials used in the thrust chamber design, the supporting fabrication methods necessary to complete the design, and the modification of the injector element for optimum injector/chamber compatibility.

Schneider, J. A.

1991-01-01

455

Preclinical evaluation of a Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine process intended for technology transfer.  

PubMed

Introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine in low- and middle-income countries has been limited by cost and availability of Hib conjugate vaccines for a long time. It was previously recognized by the Institute for Translational Vaccinology (Intravacc, originating from the former Vaccinology Unit of the National Institute of Public Health [RIVM] and the Netherlands Vaccine Institute [NVI]) that local production of a Hib conjugate vaccine would increase the affordability and sustainability of the vaccine and thereby help to speed up Hib introduction in these countries. A new affordable and a non-infringing production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine was developed, including relevant quality control tests, and the technology was transferred to a number of vaccine manufacturers in India, Indonesia, and China. As part of the Hib technology transfer project managed by Intravacc, a preclinical toxicity study was conducted in the Netherlands to test the safety and immunogenicity of this new Hib conjugate vaccine. The data generated by this study were used by the technology transfer partners to accelerate the clinical development of the new Hib conjugate vaccine. A repeated dose toxicity and local tolerance study in rats was performed to assess the reactogenicity and immunogenicity of a new Hib conjugate vaccine compared to a licensed vaccine. The results showed that the vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in rats, no major differences in both safety and immunogenicity in rats were found between the vaccine produced according to the production process developed by Intravacc and the licensed one. Rats may be useful to verify the immunogenicity of Hib conjugate vaccines and for preclinical evaluation. In general, nonclinical evaluation of the new Hib conjugate vaccine, including this proof of concept (safety and immunogenicity study in rats), made it possible for technology transfer partners, having implemented the original process with no changes in the manufacturing process and vaccine formulation, to start directly with phase 1 clinical trials. PMID:25483504

Hamidi, Ahd; Verdijk, Pauline; Kreeftenberg, Hans

2014-01-01

456

Computer-Based Learning: The Key 'Technological Multiplier' for Technology Transfer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of computer-based learning (CBL) is discussed. The author examines the appropriate use of the technology; its cost; identifying the best potential applications of CBL; and the use of CBL by major airlines, oil companies, universities, manufacturers, and government. (CT)

Reynolds, Angus

1982-01-01

457

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek  

E-print Network

.doubek@tuwien.ac.at | http://www.rt.tuwien.ac.at SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage Thermal Energy for efficient thermal energy storage systems (TES). The novel TES of Vienna University of Technology (VUT (100-800°C) Potential Applications Concentrating Solar Power Adiabatic Compressed air storage (CAS

Szmolyan, Peter

458

Technology 2003: The Fourth National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proceedings from symposia of the Technology 2003 Conference and Exposition, Dec. 7-9, 1993, Anaheim, CA, are presented. Volume 2 features papers on artificial intelligence, CAD&E, computer hardware, computer software, information management, photonics, robotics, test and measurement, video and imaging, and virtual reality/simulation.

Hackett, Michael (compiler)

1994-01-01

459

technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic-Gasser  

E-print Network

chemical flow-reactors capable of reaching temperatures down to -50°C within a short period of time. Technology Devices for cooling or heating vessels and containers for carrying out chemical or physical were manufactured in-house using high precision CNC milling, being easily scaled up to small series pre

Szmolyan, Peter

460

Information and Communication Technologies and the Global Digital Divide: Technology Transfer, Development, and Least Developing Countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the global digital di- vide and discusses conditions and circumstances that have con- tributed to its creation. An important issue this article explores is whether there is a convergence, absolute convergence, divergence, or relative divergence in the application and diffusion of Informa- tion and Communication Technologies (ICTs) between developed countries and Least Developed Countries (LDCs), and if

Mitchell F. Rice

2003-01-01

461

EV Charging Through Wireless Power Transfer: Analysis of Efficiency Optimization and Technology Trends  

SciTech Connect

This paper is aimed at reviewing the technology trends for wireless power transfer (WPT) for electric vehicles (EV). It also analyzes the factors affecting its efficiency and describes the techniques currently used for its optimization. The review of the technology trends encompasses both stationary and moving vehicle charging systems. The study of the stationary vehicle charging technology is based on current implementations and on-going developments at WiTricity and Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). The moving vehicle charging technology is primarily described through the results achieved by the Korean Advanced Institute of Technology (KAIST) along with on-going efforts at Stanford University. The factors affecting the efficiency are determined through the analysis of the equivalent circuit of magnetic resonant coupling. The air gap between both transmitting and receiving coils along with the magnetic field distribution and the relative impedance mismatch between the related circuits are the primary factors affecting the WPT efficiency. Currently the industry is looking at an air gap of 25 cm or below. To control the magnetic field distribution, Kaist has recently developed the Shaped Magnetic Field In Resonance (SMFIR) technology that uses conveniently shaped ferrite material to provide low reluctance path. The efficiency can be further increased by means of impedance matching. As a result, Delphi's implementation of the WiTricity's technology exhibits a WPT efficiency above 90% for stationary charging while KAIST has demonstrated a maximum efficiency of 83% for moving vehicle with its On Line Vehicle (OLEV) project. This study is restricted to near-field applications (short and mid-range) and does not address long-range technology such as microwave power transfer that has low efficiency as it is based on radiating electromagnetic waves. This paper exemplifies Delphi's work in powertrain electrification as part of its innovation for the real world program geared toward a safer, greener and more connected driving. Moreover, it draws from and adds to Dr. Andrew Brown Jr.'s SAE books 'Active Safety and the Mobility Industry', 'Connectivity and Mobility Industry', and 'Green Technologies and the Mobility Industry'. Magnetic resonant coupling is the foundation of modern wireless power transfer. Its efficiency can be controlled through impedance matching and magnetic field shaping. Current implementations use one or both of these control methods and enable both stationary and mobile charging with typical efficiency within the 80% and 90% range for an air gap up to 25 cm.

Miller, John M [ORNL; Rakouth, Heri [Delphi Automotive Systems, USA; Suh, In-Soo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

2012-01-01

462

Technology transfer in a changing national security environment. Final report May-Nov 90  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines U.S. export control, with particular emphasis on technology transfer as it affects our relationship with Japan. It describes the evolution of export control in the United States, including the Bucy Report, the impact of Afghanistan, and policy changes regarding the People's Republic of China. U.S. control mechanisms for critical technology currently in place are described; these include the Export Administration Regulations, the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), and the Militarily Critical Technologies List (MCTL). The evolution of Japan's technology base and export control mechanisms are discussed, as well as its military capabilities. Japan and the United States have had different philosophies regarding export control, with the United States more likely to use controls as part of its foreign policy. However, U.S. export control policy is increasingly seen as having an important economic security aspect in addition to its national security objectives. Changes in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have placed the issue of export control in a new perspective. Therefore, the paper also examines in some detail the major developments in the European community which will affect the future technology environment and its relationship to national security. This paper was originally presented at a workshop of the Japan-U.S. Joint Study Group on Trade, Finance and Technology in East-West Economic Relations. A primary purpose of the paper was to enhance mutual understanding between the United States and Japan, and to facilitate the resolution of differences in the technology security arena.

Finkler, R.A.; Boezer, G.L.; Foss, E.J.; Jorstad, N.D.; Ramsbotham, A.J.

1990-12-01

463

Hyperspectral Technology Transfer to the US Department of Interior: Summary of Results of the NASA/DOI Hyperspectral Technology Transfer Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In 1997 the Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO), Biological Resources Division, US Geological Survey and NASA, Office of Earth Science (OES), initiated a coordinated effort for applying Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data and analysis, as a technology transfer project, to critical DOI environmental issues in four study sites throughout the United States. This work was accomplished by four US Department of the Interior (DOI) study teams with support from NASA/OES principal investigators and the Office of Earth Science programs. The studies, including personnel, objectives, background, project plans, and milestones were documented in a project website at . This report summarizes the final outcomes of the project, detailing accomplishments, lessons learned, and benefits realized to NASA, the US Geological Survey, and the participating DOI bureaus.

Root, Ralph; Wickland, Diane

2001-01-01

464

Technological requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems for fast Earth-Mars transfers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent advances in electric propulsion technologies such as magnetoplasma rockets gave a new momentum to the study of nuclear electric propulsion concepts for Mars missions. Some recent works have been focused on very short Earth-to-Mars transfers of about 40 days with high-power, variable specific impulse propulsion systems [1]. While the interest of nuclear electric propulsion appears clearly with regard to the payload mass ratio (due to a high level of specific impulse), its interest with regard to the transfer time is more complex to define, as it depends on many design parameters. In this paper, a general analysis of the capability of nuclear electric propulsion systems considering both criteria (the payload mass ratio and the transfer time) is performed, and the technological requirements for fast Earth-Mars transfers are studied. This analysis has been performed in two steps. First, complete trajectory optimizations have been performed by CNES-DCT in order to obtain the propulsion requirements of the mission for different technological hypotheses regarding the engine technology (specific impulse levels and the throttling capability) and different mission requirements. The methodology used for designing fuel-optimal heliocentric trajectories, based on the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be presented. Trajectories have been computed for various power levels combined with either variable or fixed Isp. The second step consisted in evaluating a simpler method that could easily link the main mission requirements (the transfer time and the payload fraction) to the main technological requirements (the specific mass of the power generation system and the structure mass ratio of the whole vehicle, excluding the power generation system). Indeed, for power-limited systems, propulsion requirements can be characterized through the "trajectory characteristic" parameter, defined as the integral over time of the squared thrust acceleration. Technological requirements for the vehicle can then be derived from the propulsion requirements using a simplified performance model designed by Onera [2]. This model yields the optimum vehicle design in terms of the payload mass ratio as well as the theoretical upper limit of the power source's specific mass as a function of the transfer time. Both studies show that the key to very fast Earth-Mars transfers (40 days, or less) is the reduction of the power source specific mass below 1 kg/kW. On-going French studies [3] tend to show that specific masses of nuclear reactors for exploration mission are expected to be much higher, even at very high power levels, so this requirement is unlikely to be met at short or medium term. Finally, a synthesis of these results will outline the performance of a nuclear electric propulsion system for fast Earth-Mars transfer that could be achievable considering "reasonably optimistic" hypotheses for the specific mass of the power generator.

Bérend, N.; Epenoy, R.; Cliquet, E.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Avril, S.

2013-03-01

465

Transfers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper I develop a positive theory of intergenerational transfers. I argue that transfers are a means to induce retirement. that is, to buy the elderly out of the labor force. The reason why societies choose to do such a thing is that aggregate output is higher if the elderly do not work. I model this idea through positive

Xavier Sala-i-Martin

1992-01-01

466

Geothermal technology transfer for direct heat applications: Final report, 1983--1988  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a geothermal technology transfer program, performed by Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, used to aid in the development of geothermal energy for direct heat applications. It provides a summary of 88 technical assistance projects performed in 10 states for space heating, district heating, green-houses, aquaculture, industrial processing, small scale binary electric power generation and heat pump applications. It describes an inventory compiled for over 100 direct heat projects that contains information on project site, resource and engineering data. An overview of information services is provided to users of the program which includes; advisory, referrals, literature distribution, geothermal technology library, quarterly Bulletin, training programs, presentations and tours, and reporting of activities for the USDOE Geothermal Progress Monitor.

Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.

1988-01-01

467

Energy efficiency: Policies for technology transfer in Eastern Europe, the Former Soviet Union, and China  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the energy-efficiency potential in three major regions of the world -- the Former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and China and discusses policy measures that might stimulate adoption of technologies that constitute that potential. The authors suggest that major gains in energy efficiency are indeed possible, and that capturing this potential would provide a major reduction in future levels of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. The authors indicate, however, that the requisite technological improvement -- often referred to as technology transfer -- is unlikely without the stimulus of strong policy measures. These measures include the rapid introduction of market mechanisms as well as policy intervention to overcome significant market barriers. Moreover, we observe that strong policies -- heavy taxes and performance standards are becoming increasingly unpopular and problematic, but can be replaced to some extent by incentive, market-pull, and research and development programs.

Chandler, W.U.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Hamburger, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bashmakov, I. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)]|[Center for Energy Efficiencies (CENEf), Moscow (Russian Federation)

1993-10-01

468

Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Automated preflight methods concept definition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possibility of automating preflight engine checkouts on orbit transfer engines is discussed. The minimum requirements in terms of information and processing necessary to assess the engine'e integrity and readiness to perform its mission were first defined. A variety of ways for remotely obtaining that information were generated. The sophistication of these approaches varied from a simple preliminary power up, where the engine is fired up for the first time, to the most advanced approach where the sensor and operational history data system alone indicates engine integrity. The critical issues and benefits of these methods were identified, outlined, and prioritized. The technology readiness of each of these automated preflight methods were then rated on a NASA Office of Exploration scale used for comparing technology options for future mission choices. Finally, estimates were made of the remaining cost to advance the technology for each method to a level where the system validation models have been demonstrated in a simulated environment.

Erickson, C. M.; Hertzberg, D. W.

1991-01-01

469

The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

1994-01-01

470

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization efficiently has an impact on business economics as the focus remains on proven applicable technologies, which target cost reduction and efficiency gains.

Donald Duttlinger

2001-11-01

471

Definition of technology development missions for early space station, orbit transfer vehicle servicing. Volume 1: Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) servicing study scope, propellant transfer, storage and reliquefaction technology development missions (TDM), docking and berthing TDM, maintenance TDM, OTV/payload integration TDM, combined TDMS design, summary space station accomodations, programmatic analysis, and TDM equipment operational usage are discussed.

1983-01-01

472

Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

Marton, L.

1994-12-31

473

"Kaizen" and Technology Transfer Instructors as Work-based Learning Facilitators in Overseas Transplants: A Case Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 240 instructors of kaizen (continuous quality improvement) and technology transfer in overseas assignments for Toyota found that commitment to work and corporate cultural values were significant. Instructors recognized the responsibility and challenges of communicating and transferring their know-how across cultures. (SK)

Elsey, Barry; Fujiwara, Asahi

2000-01-01

474

Electrical Stimulation Technologies for Wound Healing  

PubMed Central

Objective: To discuss the physiological bases for using exogenously applied electric field (EF) energy to enhance wound healing with conductive electrical stimulation (ES) devices. Approach: To describe the types of electrical currents that have been reported to enhance chronic wound-healing rate and closure. Results: Commercial ES devices that generate direct current (DC), and mono and biphasic pulsed current waveforms represent the principal ES technologies which are reported to enhance wound healing. Innovation: Wafer-thin, disposable ES technologies (wound dressings) that utilize mini or micro-batteries to deliver low-level DC for wound healing and antibacterial wound-treatment purposes are commercially available. Microfluidic wound-healing chips are currently being used with greater accuracy to investigate the EF effects on cellular electrotaxis. Conclusion: Numerous clinical trials described in subsequent sections of this issue have demonstrated that ES used adjunctively with standard wound care (SWC), enhances wound healing rate faster than SWC alone. PMID:24761348

Kloth, Luther C.

2014-01-01

475

Solar Electric Propulsion Technologies Being Designed for Orbit Transfer Vehicle Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There is increasing interest in employing Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) for new missions requiring transfer from low Earth orbit to the Earth-Moon Lagrange point, L1. Mission architecture plans place the Gateway Habitat at L1 in the 2011 to 2016 timeframe. The Gateway Habitat is envisioned to be used for Lunar exploration, space telescopes, and planetary mission staging. In these scenarios, an SEP stage, or "tug," is used to transport payloads to L1--such as the habitat module, lunar excursion and return vehicles, and chemical propellant for return crew trips. SEP tugs are attractive because they are able to efficiently transport large (less than 10,000 kg) payloads while minimizing propellant requirements. To meet the needs of these missions, a preliminary conceptual design for a general-purpose SEP tug was developed that incorporates several of the advanced space power and in-space propulsion technologies (such as high-power gridded ion and Hall thrusters, high-performance thin-film photovoltaics, lithium-ion batteries, and advanced high-voltage power processing) being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A spreadsheet-based vehicle system model was developed for component sizing and is currently being used for mission planning. This model incorporates a low-thrust orbit transfer algorithm to make preliminary determinations of transfer times and propellant requirements. Results from this combined tug mass estimation and orbit transfer model will be used in a higher fidelity trajectory model to refine the analysis.

Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Hoffman, David J.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Oleson, Steven R.; Falck, Robert D.

2002-01-01

476

Innovation and technology transfer in the health sciences: a cross-sectional perspective.  

PubMed

This article is based on the strategic reflection and discussion that took place on occasion of the first conference on innovation and technology transfer in the health sciences organized by the REGIC-ENS-FENIN-SEMICYUC and held in Madrid in the Instituto de Salud Carlos III on May 7th, 2013, with the aim of promoting the transfer of technological innovation in medicine and health care beyond the European program "Horizon 2020". The presentations dealt with key issues such as evaluation of the use of new technologies, the need to impregnate the decisions related to adoption and innovation with the concepts of value and sustainability, and the implication of knowledge networks in the need to strengthen their influence upon the creation of a "culture of innovation" among health professionals. But above all, emphasis was placed on the latent innovation potential of hospitals, and the fact that these, being the large companies that they are, should seriously consider that much of their future sustainability may depend on proper management of their ability to generate innovation, which is not only the generation of ideas but also their transformation into products or processes that create value and economic returns. PMID:24958440

Blanch, L; Guerra, L; Lanuza, A; Palomar, G

2014-11-01

477

A technology transfer plan for the US Department of Energy's Electric Energy Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this study was to develop a technology transfer plan that would be both practical and effective in promoting the transfer of the products of DOE/EES research to appropriate target audiences. The study drew upon several major components of the marketing process in developing this plan: definition/charcterization of the products being produced by the DOE/EES program, identification/characterization of possible users of the products being produced by the program, and documentation/analysis of the methods currently being used to promote the adoption of DOE/EES products. Fields covered include HVDC, new materials, superconductors, electric field effects, EMP impacts, battery storage/load leveling, automation/processing concepts, normal/emergency operating concepts, Hawaii deep water cable, and failure mechanisms.

Harrer, B.J.; Hurwitch, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

1986-11-01

478

From technology transfer to local manufacturing: China's emergence in the global wind power industry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation examines the development of China's large wind turbine industry, including the players, the status of the technology, and the strategies used to develop turbines for the Chinese market. The primary goals of this research project are to identify the models of international technology transfer that have been used among firms in China's wind power industry; examine to what extent these technology transfers have contributed to China's ability to locally manufacture large wind turbine technology; and evaluate China's ability to become a major player in the global wind industry. China is a particularly important place to study the opportunities for and dynamics of clean energy development due to its role in global energy consumption. China is the largest coal consuming and producing nation in the world, and consequently the second largest national emitter of carbon dioxide after only the United States. Energy consumption and carbon emissions are growing rapidly, and China is expected to surpass the US and become the largest energy consuming nation and carbon dioxide emitter in coming decades. The central finding of this dissertation is that even though each firm involved in the large wind turbine manufacturing industry in China has followed a very different pathway of technology procurement for the Chinese market, all of the firms are increasing the utilization of locally-manufactured components, and many are doing so without transferring turbine technology or the associated intellectual property. Only one fully Chinese-owned firm, Goldwind, has succeeded in developing a commercially available large wind turbine for the Chinese market. No Chinese firms or foreign firms are manufacturing turbines in China for export overseas, though many have stated plans to do so. There already exists a possible niche market for the smaller turbines that are currently being made in China, particularly in less developed countries that are looking for less expensive, smaller turbines. These market opportunities, in conjunction with the continued implementation of Chinese government policies that differentially support locally-manufactured turbines, are likely to provide the necessary stimulus for China's domestic wind industry development, and its eventual emergence in the global wind industry.

Lewis, Joanna Ingram

479

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

Unknown

2002-05-31

480

Space benefits: The secondary application of aerospace technology in other sectors of the economy. [(information dissemination and technology transfer from NASA programs)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space Benefits is a publication that has been prepared for the NASA Technology Utilization Office by the Denver Research Institute's Program for Transfer Research and Impact Studies, to provide the Agency with accurate, convenient, and integrated resource information on the transfer of aerospace technology to other sectors of the U.S. economy. The technological innovations derived from NASA space programs and their current applications in the following areas are considered: (1) manufacturing consumer products, (2) manufacturing capital goods, (3) new consumer products and retailing, (4) electric utilities, (5) environmental quality, (6) food production and processing, (7) government, (8) petroleum and gas, (9) construction, (10) law enforcement, and (11) highway transportation.

1974-01-01

481

Lessons learned during the development and transfer of technology related to a new Hib conjugate vaccine to emerging vaccine manufacturers.  

PubMed

The incidence of Haemophilus Influenzae type b (Hib) disease in developed countries has decreased since the introduction of Hib conjugate vaccines in their National Immunization Programs (NIP). In countries where Hib vaccination is not applied routinely, due to limited availability and high cost of the vaccines, invasive Hib disease is still a cause of mortality. Through the development of a production process for a Hib conjugate vaccine and related quality control tests and the transfer of this technology to emerging vaccine manufacturers in developing countries, a substantial contribution was made to the availability and affordability of Hib conjugate vaccines in these countries. Technology transfer is considered to be one of the fastest ways to get access to the technology needed for the production of vaccines. The first Hib conjugate vaccine based on the transferred technology was licensed in 2007, since then more Hib vaccines based on this technology were licensed. This paper describes the successful development and transfer of Hib conjugate vaccine technology to vaccine manufacturers in India, China and Indonesia. By describing the lessons learned in this process, it is hoped that other technology transfer projects can benefit from the knowledge and experience gained. PMID:24923635

Hamidi, A; Boog, C; Jadhav, S; Kreeftenberg, H

2014-07-16

482

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is