Science.gov

Sample records for symptom og operation

  1. LLCD operations using the Lunar Lasercom OGS Terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodnik, Zoran; Smit, Hans; Sans, Marc; Zayer, Igor; Lanucara, Marco; Montilla, Iciar; Alonso, Angel

    2014-03-01

    The paper describes the operations of ESA's Optical Ground Station (OGS) during the Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration (LLCD) experiment, performed in October and November 2013 with NASA's Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environmental Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. First the transmitter and receiver designs at the OGS telescope are described, which are geometrically separated to prevent cross-talk. Problems encountered and the lesson learned will be explained. As it turned the chosen arrangement was not sufficiently stable in terms of alignment and the paper will describe the solution found. A new industrial contract has been placed for improvement of the design of two solutions will be presented, which will both be tested in a follow-up laser communication campaign, scheduled for end March 2014.

  2. Comparison of the symptoms reported by post-operative patients with cancer and nurses' perception of patient symptoms.

    PubMed

    Guner, C K; Akin, S; Durna, Z

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the symptoms reported by patients with cancer after palliative surgery and mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit (ICU) with their primary nurses' perception of the symptoms. The study adopted a descriptive and correlational study design. The sample comprised 60 Turkish patients with cancer who had been mechanically ventilated for 1-12?h at the ICU following palliative surgery. In addition to the patients' reports, the nurses (=?8) independently rated their own perceptions of the patients' symptoms. Data were collected using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS). The mean age of the sample was 62.28 years (SD = 15.02; range: 27-86). The mean score of the patients on the ESAS was 55.17 (SD = 26.16) and that of the nurses was 55.48 (SD = 27.13). The study found no statistically significant differences between scores of patients' reports and nurses' assessments of symptoms, except for the category of pain. Patients reported more pain than the nurses' perceived (Z = -2.311, P = 0.021). Systematic and frequent symptom assessments of patients in ICUs after palliative surgical operations should be an integral part of nursing care. PMID:24134532

  3. An analysis of post-traumatic stress symptoms in United States Air Force drone operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne; Goodman, Tanya; Reardon, Laura; Thompson, William

    2014-06-01

    Remotely piloted aircraft (RPA), commonly referred to as "drones," have emerged over the past decade as an innovative warfighting tool. Given there is a paucity of empirical research assessing drone operators, the purpose of this study was to assess for the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among this cohort. Of the 1084 United States Air Force (USAF) drone operators that participated, a total of 4.3% endorsed a pattern of symptoms of moderate to extreme level of severity meeting criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th edition. The incidence of PTSD among USAF drone operators in this study was lower than rates of PTSD (10-18%) among military personnel returning from deployment but higher than incidence rates (less than 1%) of USAF drone operators reported in electronic medical records. Although low PTSD rates may be promising, limitations to this study are discussed. PMID:24907535

  4. Antenatal Depressive Symptoms and the Risk of Preeclampsia or Operative Deliveries: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rong; Li, Yingxue; Zhang, Zhixia; Yan, Weirong

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to investigate the association between depression and/or depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the risk of an operative delivery or preeclampsia, and to quantify the strength of the association. Methods A search of the PubMed, SCI/SSCI, Proquest PsycARTICLES and CINAHL databases was supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of key retrieved articles and review articles. We aimed to include case control or cohort studies that reported data on antenatal depression and /or depressive symptoms and the risk of an operative delivery and/or preeclampsia. Results Twelve studies with self-reported screening instruments were eligible for inclusion with a total of 8400 participants. Seven articles that contained 4421 total participants reported the risk for an operative delivery, and five articles that contained 3979 total participants reported the risk for preeclampsia. The pooled analyses showed that both operative delivery and preeclampsia had a statistically significant association with antenatal depressive symptoms (RR = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.35, and OR = 1.63, 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.02, respectively). When the pre-pregnancy body mass indices were controlled in their initial design, the risk for preeclampsia still existed (OR = 1.48, 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.01), while the risk for an operative delivery became uncertain (RR = 1.01, 95% CI, 0.85 to 1.22). Conclusions Antenatal depressive symptoms are associated with a moderately increased risk of an operative delivery and preeclampsia. An abnormal pre-pregnancy body mass index may modify this association. PMID:25789626

  5. Ear and vestibular symptoms in train operators after sudden air pressure changes in trains.

    PubMed

    Francois, Hugues M A; Vantrappen, Luc; Van Rompaey, Vincent; Godderis, Lode

    2015-01-01

    A healthy 31-year-old train operator presented to our occupational health clinic reporting ear aches, headaches, dizziness, unsteadiness and even slight tinnitus. These symptoms first appeared when the patient started operating from a new train cabin. He described a sudden pressure gradient, experienced on some parts of the trajectory, which might have caused these problems. Although the cabins were equipped with a pressure equalising device, this was usually switched off because of the device creating an uncomfortable feeling in the cabin. The literature describes sudden pressure gradients as possible factors for passenger discomfort. PMID:26678694

  6. Pre-operative function, motivation and duration of symptoms predict sporting participation after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, M; Frey, S; Parratte, S; Flecher, X; Argenson, J N

    2014-08-01

    There is little in the literature on the level of participation in sports which patients undertake after total hip replacement (THR). Our aims in this study were to determine first, the level of sporting activity, second, the predictive factors for returning to sporting activity, and third, the correlation between participation in sports and satisfaction after THR. We retrospectively identified 815 patients who had undergone THR between 1995 and 2005. All were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire regarding their sporting activity. A total of 571 patients (71%) met the inclusion criteria and completed the evaluation. At a mean follow-up of 9.8 years (sd 2.9), 366 patients (64%) returned to sporting activity as defined by a University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score of > 5. The main reasons that patients had for refraining from sports were fear of dislocation (65; 31.6%), avoiding wear (52; 25.4%), and the recommendation of the surgeon (34; 16.6%). There was a significant relationship between higher post-operative participation in sport in those patients with a higher pre-operative Harris hip score (HHS) (p = 0.0074), motivation to participate in sporting activities (p = 0.00022) and a shorter duration of symptoms (p = 0.0034). Finally, there was a correlation between age (p = 0.00013), UCLA score (p = 0.012) and pre-operative HHS (p = 0.00091) and satisfaction. In conclusion, we found that most patients participate in sporting activity after THR, regardless of the advice of their surgeon, and that there is a correlation between the level of participation and pre-operative function, motivation, duration of symptoms and post-operative satisfaction. PMID:25086119

  7. Cloud Computing og availability

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

  8. Subjective symptoms and their evolution in a small group of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operators recently engaged.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, G; Ligabue, G; Gobba, F

    2015-09-01

    Using a specific questionnaire, we examined subjective symptoms in a group of 17 physicians (9 males and 8 females, mean age 32.9?±?3.71), attending a Postgraduate Medical School in Radiology and engaged in MRI for less than 1 year. Sixteen subjects (94%) reported the presence of at least one of the investigated symptoms during the period of MRI activity. The main symptoms were: unusual drowsiness/tiredness (88%), concentration problems (82%), headaches (76%), sleep disorders (47%), nausea (47%), illusion of movement (47%) and dizziness/vertigo (35%); the former two were subjectively related to MRI by the majority of the operators. These symptoms appeared (or worsened) in more than 15?min and, in the vast majority disappeared 30?min, or more, after the end of exposure. In 13 subjects (81%), the symptom (or some symptoms) appeared at least weekly. In this small group of health care workers recently exposed to MRI, the prevalence of subjective symptoms was higher than reported in other similar studies but, notably, the majority of subjects (77%) reported a regression within 4-8 weeks, suggesting some form of adaptation. PMID:26444203

  9. Screening for Depressive Disorders Using the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire Anhedonic Depression Scale: A Receiver-Operating Characteristic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredemeier, Keith; Spielberg, Jeffery M.; Silton, Rebecca Levin; Berenbaum, Howard; Heller, Wendy; Miller, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the utility of the anhedonic depression scale from the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire (MASQ-AD scale) as a way to screen for depressive disorders. Using receiver-operating characteristic analysis, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of the full 22-item MASQ-AD scale, as well as the 8- and 14-item…

  10. Association of individual and work-related risk factors with musculoskeletal symptoms among Iranian sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Iman; Kord, Madeh; Yahyazade, Parvin; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Stedmon, Alex W

    2015-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated working conditions and the occurrence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 251 Iranian sewing machine operators. A questionnaire and direct observations of working postures using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) method were used. A high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, particularly in the neck/shoulders, back and hands/wrists were found. The mean RULA grand score of 5.7 highlighted a poor sewing workstation design and indicated that most operators (with posture assessed at action level 3) needed an investigation and changes in their working habits soon. Work-related factors (including number of years worked as an operator, prolonged working hours per shift, long duration of sitting work without a break, feeling pressure due to work and working postures) and individual factors (including age, gender, BMI and regular sport/physical activities) were associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in multiple logistic regression models. The findings add to the understanding of working conditions of those jobs involving sewing activities and emphasise the need for ergonomic interventions to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the future. PMID:26154216

  11. Communication Research in Aviation and Space Operations: Symptoms and Strategies of Crew Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The day-to-day operators of today's aerospace systems work under increasing pressures to accomplish more with less. They work in operational systems which are complex, technology-based, and high-risk; in which incidents and accidents have far-reaching and costly consequences. For these and other reasons, there is concern that the safety net formerly built upon redundant systems and abundant resources may become overburdened. Although we know that human ingenuity can overcome incredible odds, human nature can also fail in unpredictable ways. Over the last 20 years, a large percentage of aviation accidents and incidents have been attributed to human errors rather than hardware or environmental factors alone. A class of errors have been identified which are not due to a lack of individual, technical competencies. Rather, they are due to the failure of teams to utilize readily available resources or information in a timely fashion. These insights began a training revolution in the aviation industry called Cockpit Resource Management, which later became known as Crew Resource Management (CRM) as its concepts and applications extended to teams beyond the flightdeck. Then, as now, communication has been a cornerstone in CRM training since crew coordination and resource management largely resides within information transfer processes--both within flightcrews, and between flightcrews and the ground operations teams that support them. The research I will describe takes its roots in CRM history as we began to study communication processes in order to discover symptoms of crew coordination problems, as well as strategies of effective crew management. On the one hand, communication is often the means or the tool by which team members manage their resources, solve problems, maintain situational awareness and procedural discipline. Conversely, it is the lack of planning and resource management, loss of vigilance and situational awareness, and non-standard communications that are implicated in accidents and incidents. NASA/Ames Crew Factors researchers have been developing a model of effective crew coordination in order to understand the sources of performance breakdowns, and to develop effective solutions and interventions. Because communication is a primary mechanism by which information is received and transmitted, and because it is observable behavior, we focus on these group processes in order to identify patterns of communication that distinguish effective from less effective crew performance. Since a prime objective is to develop training recommendations for enhancing communication skills, we interpret our findings in the context of relevant task and environmental conditions, role and procedural constraints, and the normal real-time parameters of flight operations. Another research objective is to consider how communication and coordination can be enhanced through design. For example, flight deck and hardware design as well as procedural and software design may greatly influence the efficiency with which crews communicate and coordinate their work. In addition, teams and tasks may be designed, organized, and trained so that team interactions with each other are based upon appropriately shared knowledge, procedures and situation awareness. In short, we are interested in enhancing communication practices through (1) the training of specific communication skills, and (2) the design of equipment, tasks, procedures, and teams that optimize smooth, unambiguous communication processes. Two examples of communication research will be described; one in aviation and one in space operations. The first example is a high-fidelity full mission simulation study which investigates the affect of flightdeck automation on crew coordination and communication (contrasting crew performance in the DC-9 vs. MD88). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Chronic dry eye symptoms after LASIK: parallels and lessons to be learned from other persistent post-operative pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Alexandra E; Galor, Anat; Weiss, Jayne S; Felix, Elizabeth R; Martin, Eden R; Patin, Dennis J; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D; Levitt, Roy C

    2015-01-01

    Laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) is a commonly performed surgical procedure used to correct refractive error. LASIK surgery involves cutting a corneal flap and ablating the stroma underneath, with known damage to corneal nerves. Despite this, the epidemiology of persistent pain and other long-term outcomes after LASIK surgery are not well understood. Available data suggest that approximately 20-55% of patients report persistent eye symptoms (generally regarded as at least 6 months post-operation) after LASIK surgery. While it was initially believed that these symptoms were caused by ocular surface dryness, and referred to as "dry eye," it is now increasingly understood that corneal nerve damage produced by LASIK surgery resembles the pathologic neuroplasticity associated with other forms of persistent post-operative pain. In susceptible patients, these neuropathological changes, including peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, and altered descending modulation, may underlie certain persistent dry eye symptoms after LASIK surgery. This review will focus on the known epidemiology of symptoms after LASIK and discuss mechanisms of persistent post-op pain due to nerve injury that may be relevant to these patients. Potential preventative and treatment options based on approaches used for other forms of persistent post-op pain and their application to LASIK patients are also discussed. Finally, the concept of genetic susceptibility to post-LASIK ocular surface pain is presented. PMID:25896684

  13. Gastrointestinal symptoms, motility, and transit after the Roux-en-Y operation

    SciTech Connect

    Perino, L.E.; Adcock, K.A.; Goff, J.S.

    1988-04-01

    Roux-en-Y patients have symptoms that vary from almost none to inability to tolerate oral feedings. This study was designed to determine whether there is a relationship between a patient's symptoms and the function of the gastric remnant or the Roux-limb. Gastric remnant and Roux-limb emptying were studied in eight patients with technetium-99m-labeled oatmeal and Roux-limb motor activity was measured with a water-perfused manometry system. We found that gastric emptying was rarely significantly slowed, but emptying of the Roux-limb was delayed in several patients. We also found that there was a rough correlation between the patient's symptoms and the degree of abnormal motility found in the Roux-limb. There is no known reason for these abnormalities in Roux-limb function in some patients after a Roux-en-Y, but our finding of worse abnormalities in those who had multiple previous gastric surgeries suggests that the symptoms and dysfunction may be related to the number of surgeries, as well as to the type of surgery.

  14. Algebraen og talteorien bag o entlig n gle kryptering og

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Johan P.

    . Matematikken bag ubrydelige koder, digital signatur og kryptering 35 Tekst til tal og tal til tekst 35 O#11 divisor Lad m og n v#26;re hele tal, som bekendt siger vi at m g#23;ar op i n, hvis der #12;ndes et helt tal k, s#23;a n = km. Vi siger ogs#23;a, at m er en divisor i n, eller n er et (helt) multiplum af m

  15. Symptoms of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder in United States Air Force "drone" operators.

    PubMed

    Chappelle, Wayne L; McDonald, Kent D; Prince, Lillian; Goodman, Tanya; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie N; Thompson, William

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this study is to repeat a survey administered in 2010 to assess for changes in mental health among United States Air Force aircrew operating Predator/Reaper remotely piloted aircraft, also commonly referred to as "drones." Participants were assessed for self-reported sources of occupational stress, levels of clinical distress using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the PTSD Checklist-Military Version. A total of 1,094 aircrew responded to the web-based survey composed of the commercially available standardized instruments mentioned above. The survey also contained nonstandardized items asking participants to report the main sources of their occupational stress, as well as questions addressing demographics and work-related characteristics. The estimated response rate to the survey was 49%. Study results reveal the most problematic self-reported stressors are operational: low manning, extra duties/administrative tasks, rotating shift work, and long hours. The results also reveal 10.72% of operators self-reported experiencing high levels of distress and 1.57% reported high levels of PTSD symptomology. The results are lower than findings from the 2010 survey and from soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. Implications of the study and recommendations for United States Air Force line leadership and mental health providers are discussed. PMID:25102551

  16. Optimism measured pre-operatively is associated with reduced pain intensity and physical symptom reporting after coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Amy; Poole, Lydia; Kidd, Tara; Leigh, Elizabeth; Jahangiri, Marjan; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Optimism is thought to be associated with long-term favourable outcomes for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Our objective was to examine the association between optimism and post-operative pain and physical symptoms in CABG patients. Methods We assessed optimism pre-operatively in 197 adults undergoing CABG surgery, and then followed them up 6–8 weeks after the procedure to measure affective pain, pain intensity, and physical symptom reporting directly pertaining to CABG surgery. Results Greater optimism measured pre-operatively was significantly associated with lower pain intensity (? = ? 0.150, CI = ? 0.196 to ? 0.004, p = .042) and fewer physical symptoms following surgery (? = ? 0.287, CI = ? 0.537 to ? 0.036, p = .025), but not with affective pain, after controlling for demographic, clinical and behavioural covariates, including negative affectivity. Conclusions Optimism is a modest, yet significant, predictor of pain intensity and physical symptom reporting after CABG surgery. Having positive expectations may promote better recovery. PMID:25129850

  17. Premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    1973-03-24

    Data is reviewed on premenstrual symptoms which have been related to high suicide and accident rates, employment absentee rates, poor academic performance and acute psychiatric problems. A recent study of healthy young women indicated that 39% had troublesome premenstrual symptoms, 54% passed clots in their menses, 70% had cyclical localized acneiform eruptions and only 17% failed to experience menstrual pain. Common menstrual disorders are classified as either dysmenorrhea or the premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms for the latter usually begin 2-12 days prior to menstruation and include nervous tension, irritability, anxiety, depression, bloated breasts and abdomen, swollen fingers and legs, headaches, dizziness, occasional hypersomia, excessive thirst and appetite. Some women may display an increased susceptibility to migraine, vasomotor rhinitis, asthma, urticaria and epilepsy. Symptoms are usually relieved with the onset of menses. While a definitive etiological theory remains to be substantiated, symptomatic relief has been reported with salt and water restriction and simple diuretics used 7 to 10 days premenstrually. Diazapam or chlordiazepoxide treatment is recommended before oral contraceptive therapy. The premenstrual syndrome may persist after menopause, is unaffected by parity, and sufferers score highly on neuroticism tests. Primary or spasmodic dysmenorrhea occurs in young women, tends to decline with age and parity and has no correlation with premenstrual symptoms or neuroticism. Spasmodic or colicky pain begins and is most severe on the first day of menstruation and may continue for 2-3 days. Treatment of dysmenorrhea with psychotropic drugs or narcotics is discouraged due to the risk of dependence and abuse. Temporary relief for disabling pain may be obtained with oral contraceptives containing synthetic estrogen and progestogen but the inherent risks should be acknowledged. Both disorders have been correlated to menstrual irregularity. Amenorrhea in many women may be precipitated by simple psychological events such as leaving home, while severely stressful events produce a higher incidence. Unless a physiological factor such as malnutrition is operating, menses usually recur spontaneously within a few months. Amenorrhea is a constant feature of anorexia nervosa and may precede related attitudes toward eating and body weight. This syndrome is best regarded as a chronic and often severe neurotic disorder requiring combined physiological and psychological treatment, although some evidence exists to indicate an endocrine disorder. Extensive basic research is needed on the complex relationship between the neuroendocrine system and emotion. PMID:4735136

  18. Recognizing Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us Donate Recognizing Symptoms An attack of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can happen at any time. It ... factors. Get the Symptom Diary Attack of the Irritable Bowel From " The Art of IBS " © IFFGD Pain or ...

  19. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov Facing AIDS ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  20. Frodig natur, historiske byer, pomp og prakt og tradisjon! Bli med Universitetets Seniorforening til

    E-print Network

    Gerhardy, Philipp

    til SKOTTLAND M ILITARY TATTOO #12;Dag 1: Norge - Skottland Fra Oslo flyr vi direkte til Edinburgh førsteklasses skotske råvarer som biff, laks og lam. Dag 5: Edinburgh og Tattoo (frivillig utflukt) Idag tilbyr

  1. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  2. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... Norovirus Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How ...

  3. Symptom Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Studies DVBIC Publications Concussion Literature Information Papers Study Manuals DVBIC Locations Service Members & Veterans Family & Caregivers Medical ... event like combat, terrorist attacks, natural disasters, or car crashes. Thinking / Cognitive Symptoms After a brain injury ...

  4. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Remifemin on Peri-Menopausal Symptoms Induced by Post-Operative GnRH-a Therapy for Endometriosis: A Randomized Study versus Tibolone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiming; Gao, Hongyan; Li, Qin; Cong, Jing; Wu, Jie; Pu, Dahua; Jiang, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate clinical efficacy and safety of Remifemin on peri-menopausal symptoms in endometriosis patients with a post-operative GnRH-a therapy. Material/Methods We treated 116 women who had endometriosis with either Remifemin (n=56) 20 mg bid po or Tibolone (n=60) 2.5 mg qd po for 12 weeks after GnRH-a injection. The efficacy was evaluated by Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and hot flash/sweating scores. The safety parameters such as liver and renal functions, lipid profile, endometrial thickness, and serum sex hormone level, as well as the incidence of adverse events were recorded. Results (1) After GnRH-a therapy, KMI and hot flash/sweating scores in both groups increased significantly (P<0.05) but we found no significant difference for KMI (2.87±1.40 for Remifemin and 2.70±1.26 for Tibolone) and hot flash/sweating scores (0.94±1.72 for Remifemin and 1.06±1.78 for Tibolone) between the 2 groups (P>0.05). (2) No statistical change was observed in liver or renal functions and lipid profile in both groups before and after the treatment (P>0.05). The post-therapeutic serum FSH, LH, and E2 level and endometrial thickness decreased remarkably in both groups (P<0.05). E2 level in the Remifemin group was obviously lower than that in the Tibolone group (P<0.05), and FSH and LH levels were strongly higher (P<0.05). No significant difference in thickness were found in either group (P>0.05). The Remifemin group had far fewer adverse events than the Tibolone group (P<0. 05). Conclusions Compared with Tibolone, Remifemin had a similar clinical efficacy and was safer for the peri-menopausal symptoms induced by GnRH-a in endometriosis patients. PMID:25321621

  6. Tal og gruppeteori Jesper M. Mller

    E-print Network

    Møller, Jesper Michael

    Tal­ og gruppeteori Jesper M. Møller Author address: Matematisk Institut, Universitetsparken 5. Induktion Alle kender de naturlige tal N = f1; 2; 3; : : : g og de hele tal Z = f: : : ; \\Gamma3; \\Gamma2; \\Gamma1; 0; 1; 2; 3; : : : g sša de behøver ingen yderligere introduktion. De naturlige tal opfylder

  7. Multiple Myeloma Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ET. CALL NOW Home » About Multiple Myeloma » Symptoms Multiple Myeloma Symptoms Multiple myeloma symptoms may vary by patient, ... to be managed or prevented. The most common multiple myeloma symptoms may include: • Bone pain or bone fractures • ...

  8. Aalborg Universitet ADHD SOM SOCIALT OG KULTURELT FNOMEN

    E-print Network

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    Aalborg Universitet ADHD SOM SOCIALT OG KULTURELT FÆNOMEN Berger, Nichlas Permin Publication date for published version (APA): Berger, N. P. (2015). ADHD SOM SOCIALT OG KULTURELT FÆNOMEN: EN ANALYSE AF, HVORDAN DIAGNOSTICEREDE DØMTE VOKSNE OG FRONTMEDARBEJDERE MED RELATION TIL KRIMINALFORSORGEN TILSKRIVER ADHD

  9. Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Share Compartir Symptoms of Pneumocystis pneumonia The symptoms of PCP are fever, dry cough, ... Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Statistics More Resources Pneumocystis pneumonia Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ...

  10. OGS improvements in the year 2011 in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragato, P. L.; Pesaresi, D.; Saraò, A.; Di Bartolomeo, P.; Dur?, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Center) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 15 very sensitive broad band and 21 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data center in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of Northeastern Italy. Since 2002 OGS-CRS is using the Antelope software suite on several workstations plus a SUN Cluster as the main tool for collecting, analyzing, archiving and exchanging seismic data, initially in the framework of the EU Interreg IIIA project "Trans-national seismological networks in the South-Eastern Alps". SeisComP is also used as a real time data exchange server tool. In order to improve the seismological monitoring of the Northeastern Italy area, at OGS-CRS we tuned existing programs and created ad hoc ones like: a customized web server named PickServer to manually relocate earthquakes, a script for automatic moment tensor determination, scripts for web publishing of earthquake parametric data, waveforms, state of health parameters and shaking maps, noise characterization by means of automatic spectra analysis, and last but not least scripts for email/SMS/fax alerting. The OGS-CRS Real Time Seismological website (RTS, http://rts.crs.inogs.it/) operative since several years was initially developed in the framework of the Italian DPC-INGV S3 Project: the RTS website shows classic earthquake locations parametric data plus ShakeMap and moment tensor information. At OGS-CRS we also spent a considerable amount of efforts in improving the long-period performances of broadband seismic stations, either by carrying out full re-installations and/or applying thermal insulations to the seismometers: more examples of PSD plots of the PRED broad band seismic station installation in the cave tunnel of Cave del Predil using a Quanterra Q330HR high resolution digitizer and a Sterckeisen STS-2 broadband seismometer will be illustrated. Efforts in strengthening the reliability of data links, exploring the use of redundant satellite/radio/GPRS links will also be shown.

  11. Institut for Matematik og Datalogi Syddansk Universitet

    E-print Network

    Boyar, Joan

    Institut for Matematik og Datalogi Syddansk Universitet April 26, 2006 JFB On-Line Algorithms ­ F06 ­ Lecture 13 Lecture, April 26 We covered up through section 9.4 of chapter 9 in the textbook (we. What is its complexity? 1 #12;Problems for May 9 1. What is the complexity of the dynamic programming

  12. Institut for Matematik og Datalogi Syddansk Universitet

    E-print Network

    Boyar, Joan

    Institut for Matematik og Datalogi Syddansk Universitet April 26, 2006 JFB On­Line Algorithms -- F06 -- Lecture 13 Lecture, April 26 We covered up through section 9.4 of chapter 9 in the textbook (we. What is its complexity? 1 #12; Problems for May 9 1. What is the complexity of the dynamic programming

  13. ogs6 - a new concept for porous-fractured media simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, Dmitri; Bilke, Lars; Fischer, Thomas; Rink, Karsten; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THMC) processes in porous and fractured media, continuously developed since the mid-eighties. The basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework for solving coupled multi-field problems. OGS is targeting mainly on applications in environmental geoscience, e.g. in the fields of contaminant hydrology, water resources management, waste deposits, or geothermal energy systems, but it has also been successfully applied to new topics in energy storage recently. OGS is actively participating several international benchmarking initiatives, e.g. DECOVALEX (waste management), CO2BENCH (CO2 storage and sequestration), SeSBENCH (reactive transport processes) and HM-Intercomp (coupled hydrosystems). Despite the broad applicability of OGS in geo-, hydro- and energy-sciences, several shortcomings became obvious concerning the computational efficiency as well as the code structure became too sophisticated for further efficient development. OGS-5 was designed for object-oriented FEM applications. However, in many multi-field problems a certain flexibility of tailored numerical schemes is essential. Therefore, a new concept was designed to overcome existing bottlenecks. The paradigms for ogs6 are: - Flexibility of numerical schemes (FEM#FVM#FDM), - Computational efficiency (PetaScale ready), - Developer- and user-friendly. ogs6 has a module-oriented architecture based on thematic libraries (e.g. MeshLib, NumLib) on the large scale and uses object-oriented approach for the small scale interfaces. Usage of a linear algebra library (Eigen3) for the mathematical operations together with the ISO C++11 standard increases the expressiveness of the code and makes it more developer-friendly. The new C++ standard also makes the template meta-programming technique code used for compile-time optimizations more compact. We have transitioned the main code development to the GitHub code hosting system (https://github.com/ufz/ogs). The very flexible revision control system Git in combination with issue tracking, developer feedback and the code review options improve the code quality and the development process in general. The continuous testing procedure of the benchmarks as it was established for OGS-5 is maintained. Additionally unit testing, which is automatically triggered by any code changes, is executed by two continuous integration frameworks (Jenkins CI, Travis CI) which build and test the code on different operating systems (Windows, Linux, Mac OS), in multiple configurations and with different compilers (GCC, Clang, Visual Studio). To improve the testing possibilities further, XML based file input formats are introduced helping with automatic validation of the user contributed benchmarks. The first ogs6 prototype version 6.0.1 has been implemented for solving generic elliptic problems. Next steps are envisaged to transient, non-linear and coupled problems. Literature: [1] Kolditz O, Shao H, Wang W, Bauer S (eds) (2014): Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Processes in Fractured Porous Media: Modelling and Benchmarking - Closed Form Solutions. In: Terrestrial Environmental Sciences, Vol. 1, Springer, Heidelberg, ISBN 978-3-319-11893-2, 315pp. http://www.springer.com/earth+sciences+and+geography/geology/book/978-3-319-11893-2 [2] Naumov D (2015): Computational Fluid Dynamics in Unconsolidated Sediments: Model Generation and Discrete Flow Simulations, PhD thesis, Technische Universität Dresden.

  14. Eksamen marts 2014 Algoritmer og Datastrukturer 1 (2003-ordning)

    E-print Network

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    Eksamen marts 2014 Algoritmer og Datastrukturer 1 (2003-ordning) Skriftlig prøve Side 1 af 10 sider (Opgavesættet fortsætter) #12;Eksamen marts 2014 Algoritmer og Datastrukturer 1 (2003-ordning) Skriftlig prøve Loop2: O(n n) Svar Loop3: O( 3 n) (Opgavesættet fortsætter) #12;Eksamen marts 2014 Algoritmer og

  15. Bedbugs: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and treatments A - D Bedbugs Signs, symptoms Bedbugs: Signs and symptoms Bedbug bites : The bites often ... hiding place. Serious and life-threatening reactions to bedbug bites Although less common, it is possible to ...

  16. Acne: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and treatments A - D Acne Signs, symptoms Acne: Signs and symptoms Blackheads and whiteheads Blackheads and ... sandpaper. View as one page View as slideshow Acne signs Many people think that acne is just ...

  17. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood Swings & Cognitive Changes Fatigue Other Symptoms Diagnosis Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us ...

  18. Shingles: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diseases and treatments Q - T Shingles Signs, symptoms Shingles: Signs and symptoms Shingles tends to cause more ... painful before the shingles appeared. Learn more about shingles: Shingles Shingles: Who gets, causes Shingles: Diagnosis, treatment, ...

  19. Long-term symptom relief after septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sundh, Carolina; Sunnergren, Ola

    2015-10-01

    The results for long-term symptom relief after septoplasty are contradictory in reviewed publications but the findings suggest that results are unsatisfactory. In this study, we analyzed and compared short- and long-term symptom relief after septoplasty and factors possibly associated with symptom relief. 111 patients that underwent septoplasty between 2008 and 2010 were included in the study. Medical charts were reviewed for preoperative characteristics and assessments. Data on short-term symptom relief (6 months) were retrieved from the Swedish National Quality Registry for Septoplasty; data on long-term symptom relief (34-70 months) were collected through a questionnaire. Upon the 34-70 month follow-up, 53% of the patients reported that symptoms either remained or had worsened and 83% reported nasal obstruction. Degree of symptom relief was significantly higher among patients not reporting nasal obstruction than among patients reporting nasal obstruction at long-term follow-up. The proportion of patients that reported "my symptoms are gone" declined from 53% after 6 months to 18% after 34-70 months. None of the factors taken into consideration, age at surgery, gender, follow-up time, primary operation/reoperation, history of nasal trauma, self-reported allergy, rhinometric obstruction, or same sided rhinometric, clinical and subjective nasal obstruction were associated with symptom relief. The long-term results after septoplasty are unsatisfactory. A majority of patients report that their symptoms remain after septoplasty. PMID:25432640

  20. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this…

  1. Wiki'er og Wikipedia Finn Arup Nielsen

    E-print Network

    Wiki'er og Wikipedia Finn °Arup Nielsen DTU Compute Technical University of Denmark April 23, 2013 #12;Wiki'er og Wikipedia Resum´e Wiki'er er efterh°anden alle vegne. De nyeste udviklinger muliggør struk- turering af data, s°a man kan opbygge sin egne specialiserede wiki-baserede database eller trække

  2. Del 2: Enkel elektrisk transistor modell og introduksjon til CMOS prosess

    E-print Network

    Stølen, Ketil

    Del 2: Enkel elektrisk transistor modell og introduksjon til CMOS prosess YNGVAR BERG I. Innhold GJ ennomgang av CMOS prosess, tverrsnitt av nMOS- og pMOS transistor og tverrsnitt av CMOS inverter. Enkel forklaring p°a begreper som akkumulasjon, deplesjon og inver- sjon. Enkel fysikalsk forklaring p°a transistor

  3. Projekt i RSA Available og Reliable persistering

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    .6 Eksperimentering med cloud-persistering 2.7 Amazon 2.7.1 AWS RDS 2.7.2 AWS S3 2.7.3 AWS DynamoDB 2.7.4 Evaluering af AWS-services 2.8 Google 2.8.1 Google Cloud SQL 2.8.2 Google Cloud Storage 2.8.3 Google Cloud Datastore 2.8.4 Evaluering af Google services 2.9 Sammenligning af AWS og GCS 2.9.1 SLA defineret

  4. Vidensintensive virksomheder, offentlige myndigheder, biblioteker og mange andre producerer, indsamler og udnytter viden i mange forskellige typer af dokumenter. P fagpakken Enterprise

    E-print Network

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    , indsamler og udnytter viden i mange forskellige typer af dokumenter. På fagpakken Enterprise Information kilder. Udbytte Fagpakken Enterprise Information Search and Management giver dig kendskab til begreber og sammenligne søgeresultater fra interne kilder og websøgninger. Enterprise Information Search and Management

  5. Rungende malm og rbende roser.* En anmeldelse af Jakob Wolf (2004): Rosens Rb. Intelligent design i naturen.

    E-print Network

    Emmeche, Claus

    2004-01-01

    dårlig teologi, naturvidenskabelige åbne spørgsmål og fejlagtige argumenter og slutninger ud fra vores, der er gode afsnit om Kants teleologi, og bogen kan anbefales som en første indføring i denne bizarre

  6. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, D.; Romanelli, M.; Barnaba, C.; Bragato, P. L.; Durì, G.

    2014-07-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Centre) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data centre in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of North-eastern Italy. The south-western edge of the OGS seismic network (Fig. 1) stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML = 5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on 20 May 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of the Ferrara VBB borehole station configuration and installation, with first results.

  7. Eksamen marts 2011 Algoritmer og Datastrukturer 1 (2003-ordning)

    E-print Network

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    Eksamen marts 2011 Algoritmer og Datastrukturer 1 (2003-ordning) Skriftlig prøve Side 3 af 12 sider-case tid? Svar: O(n2 ) Forventet tid? Svar: O(n) (Opgavesættet fortsætter) #12;Eksamen marts 2011 fortsætter) #12;Eksamen marts 2011 Algoritmer og Datastrukturer 1 (2003-ordning) Skriftlig prøve Side 5 af 12

  8. Listeriosis: Definition and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Listeria (Listeriosis) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Listeria (Listeriosis) Definition & Symptoms Outbreaks Soft Cheeses Distributed by ...

  9. About Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may signal the very early stages ... in areas of the brain that control language, reasoning, sensory processing, and conscious thought. Symptoms may include: ...

  10. Symptoms and Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Glossary Downloadable Publications Symptoms and Diagnosis If you are new to dystonia, it can ... conditions. The words used to describe your specific diagnosis may be confusing. To accurately describe the form ...

  11. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms Transmission Prevention Treatment 2003 U.S. Outbreak African Rodent Importation Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection ... Veterinarians Transmission Examining Animals with Suspected Monkeypox African Rodent Importation ... Resources Related Links Poxvirus Molluscum Contagiosum ...

  12. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result ... or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to ...

  13. About Kennedy's Disease: Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What is Kennedy's Disease Symptoms Common Misdiagnosis Treatments DNA Testing and Labs Genetic Counseling and Inheritance Issues Doctors ... Counter Frequently Used Links What is Kennedy's Disease DNA Testing for KD Frequently Asked Questions Doctors familiar with ...

  14. Medically Unexplained Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    WRIISC War Related Illness and Injury Study Center Office of Public Health Department of Veterans Affairs MEDICALLY UNEXPLAINED SYMPTOMS ... showed that CFS was more common in Gulf War Veterans than non- Gulf War Veterans ( Kang et ...

  15. Module 3 – Symptoms

    Cancer.gov

    Module three of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version presents approaches to and management of commonly encountered symptoms and syndromes of cancer patients.

  16. Tetanus: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the muscles of the jaw, or "lockjaw". Tetanus symptoms include: Headache Jaw cramping Sudden, involuntary muscle ... sweating High blood pressure and fast heart rate Tetanus complications include: Uncontrolled/involuntary muscular contraction of the ...

  17. Cholera Illness and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Cholera - Vibrio cholerae infection Share Compartir Illness & Symptoms Cholera is an ... by infection of the intestine with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and is spread by ingestion of contaminated food ...

  18. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? A reddish or purplish rash and scaly, rough ... organs can be damaged as a result. Disease: Dermatomyositis (DM) Printer-friendly version Send by email Dermatomyositis ...

  19. Contact Dermatitis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatments A - D Contact dermatitis Signs and symptoms Contact dermatitis: Signs and symptoms Allergic contact dermatitis : Testing ... these symptoms, you need immediate medical care. Allergic contact dermatitis This skin condition occurs when you have ...

  20. Menopause: Symptom Relief and Treatments

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Menopause symptom relief and treatments Menopause Menopause symptom relief and treatments Working with your doctor If you ... Return to top More information on Menopause symptom relief and treatments Read more from womenshealth.gov Menopause ...

  1. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Share Compartir Symptoms On this Page Primary ... Other Symptoms What's the Clinical Course of CFS? Chronic fatigue syndrome can be misdiagnosed or overlooked because its symptoms ...

  2. Management of Menopausal Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kaunitz, Andrew M; Manson, JoAnn E

    2015-10-01

    Most menopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms with bothersome symptoms often lasting longer than one decade. Hormone therapy (HT) represents the most effective treatment for these symptoms with oral and transdermal estrogen formulations having comparable efficacy. Findings from the Women's Health Initiative and other recent randomized clinical trials have helped to clarify the benefits and risks of combination estrogen-progestin and estrogen-alone therapy. Absolute risks observed with HT tended to be small, especially in younger women. Neither regimen increased all-cause mortality rates. Given the lower rates of adverse events on HT among women close to menopause onset and at lower baseline risk of cardiovascular disease, risk stratification and personalized risk assessment appear to represent a sound strategy for optimizing the benefit-risk profile and safety of HT. Systemic HT should not be arbitrarily stopped at age 65 years; instead treatment duration should be individualized based on patients' risk profiles and personal preferences. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause represents a common condition that adversely affects the quality of life of many menopausal women. Without treatment, symptoms worsen over time. Low-dose vaginal estrogen represents highly effective treatment for this condition. Because custom-compounded hormones have not been tested for efficacy or safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved HT is preferred. A low-dose formulation of paroxetine mesylate currently represents the only nonhormonal medication FDA-approved to treat vasomotor symptoms. Gynecologists and other clinicians who remain abreast of data addressing the benefit-risk profile of hormonal and nonhormonal treatments can help menopausal women make sound choices regarding management of menopausal symptoms. PMID:26348174

  3. Handleplan -PAPV 2012 Institut for Datalogi, revideret november 2014 og juni 2015

    E-print Network

    Tiltag Ansvar (og evt Hjælper) Frist Status IT understøttelse O: Kortere responstid/opfølgning ved, revideret november 2014 og juni 2015 Indsatsområder Tiltag Ansvar (og evt Hjælper) Frist Status I

  4. Bullying and PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idsoe, Thormod; Dyregrov, Atle; Idsoe, Ella Cosmovici

    2012-01-01

    PTSD symptoms related to school bullying have rarely been investigated, and never in national samples. We used data from a national survey to investigate this among students from grades 8 and 9 (n = 963). The prevalence estimates of exposure to bullying were within the range of earlier research findings. Multinomial logistic regression showed that…

  5. Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can spread up the spine and into the neck. Pain and tenderness spreading to the ribs, shoulder blades, ... have stated that their symptoms started in the neck rather than in the lower back. ... a minority of individuals, the pain does not start in the lower back, but ...

  6. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Eye Flashes of Light Irritation Itchiness Light Sensitivity Red Eye Reduced Vision Tearing See all Symptoms > Glasses, Contacts & ... around the jaw on the affected side; Increased sensitivity to sound; Excessive tearing in the eye or dry eye; Headache or neck pain; Loss ...

  7. Maternal Psychological Control, Use of Supportive Parenting, and Childhood Depressive Symptoms

    E-print Network

    Frazer, Andrew

    2015-05-31

    Given the developmental importance of the family system, research on child depressive symptoms often examines the impact of parenting practices as either sources of or buffers against depressive symptoms. The current study, operating from a stress...

  8. ADHD Symptoms and Subtypes: Relationship between Childhood and Adolescent Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtig, Tuula; Ebeling, Hanna; Taanila, Anja; Miettunen, Jouko; Smalley, Susan L.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Moilanen, Irma K.

    2007-01-01

    A study aims to examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) symptoms and subtypes in childhood and adolescence. The results conclude the persistence of ADHD from childhood to adolescence with specific symptoms contributing to persistent ADHD.

  9. Hearing symptoms personal stereos

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Tiara Santos; Borja, Ana Lúcia Vieira de Freitas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Practical and portable the personal stereos if had become almost indispensable accessories in the day the day. Studies disclose that the portable players of music can cause auditory damages in the long run for who hear music in high volume for a drawn out time. Objective:?to verify the prevalence of auditory symptoms in users of amplified players and to know its habits of use Method:?Observational prospective study of transversal cut carried through in three institutions of education of the city of Salvador BA, being two of public net and one of the private net. 400 students had answered to the questionnaire, of both the sex, between 14 and 30 years that had related the habit to use personal stereos. Results:?The symptoms most prevalent had been hyperacusis (43.5%), auricular fullness (30.5%) and humming (27.5), being that the humming is the symptom most present in the population youngest. How much to the daily habits: 62.3% frequent use, 57% in raised intensities, 34% in drawn out periods. An inverse relation between exposition time was verified and the band of age (p?=?0,000) and direct with the prevalence of the humming. Conclusion:?Although to admit to have knowledge on the damages that the exposition the sound of high intensity can cause the hearing, the daily habits of the young evidence the inadequate use of the portable stereos characterized by long periods of exposition, raised intensities, frequent use and preference for the insertion phones. The high prevalence of symptoms after the use suggests a bigger risk for the hearing of these young. PMID:25991931

  10. Skriftlig Eksamen Algoritmer og Datastrukturer (dADS)

    E-print Network

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    et positivt heltal ved udelukkende at anvende addition, subtraktion og halvering af lige tal en adjacency list repræsentation. # #12; Opgave 3 (25%) I denne opgave betragter vi mængder af tal hvor hvert tal enten er blšat eller gult. For en mængde af n tal x 1

  11. Skriftlig Eksamen Algoritmer og Datastrukturer (dADS)

    E-print Network

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    et positivt heltal ved udelukkende at anvende addition, subtraktion og halvering af lige tal;Opgave 3 (25%) I denne opgave betragter vi mængder af tal hvor hvert tal enten er bl°at eller gult. For en mængde af n tal x1

  12. AUAARHUS UNIVERSITET Google Chrome AU konomi og Bygninger

    E-print Network

    Bataillon, Thomas

    AUAARHUS UNIVERSITET Google Chrome AU Økonomi og Bygninger Økonomisekretariatet 22-06-2015 Side 1 af 2 How to access IndFak2 through Google Chrome Google has chosen to remove Silverlight from their Google Chrome browser. Presently you need to actively install Silverlight on the Google Chrome browser

  13. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  14. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety (worry and oversensitivity, social concerns and concentration, and physiological anxiety) as well as total anxiety symptoms at an initial assessment and 1 year later. Total anxiety and worry and oversensitivity symptoms are found to predict later depressive symptoms more strongly for girls than for boys. There is a similar pattern of results for social concerns and concentration symptoms, although this does not reach statistical significance. Physiological anxiety predicts later depressive symptoms for both boys and girls. These findings highlight the importance of anxiety for the development of depression in adolescence, particularly worry and oversensitivity among girls. PMID:19756209

  15. Menopausal symptoms: is spirituality associated with the severity of symptoms?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Filipa; Maroco, João; Ramos, Catarina; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether spirituality was associated with menopausal symptoms. Menopausal symptoms, spirituality, health and menopausal status, and socio-demographic variables were assessed in a community sample of 710 peri- and postmenopausal women. A structural model was explored using structural equation modeling. The results evidence spirituality as a significant contributor regarding the severity of most menopausal symptoms. Among others, spirituality had a significant weight in depressive mood (? = -.414; p < .001), anxiety (? = -.308; p < .001), cognitive impairment (? = -.287; p < .001), aches/pain (? = -.148; p < .001), vasomotor (? = -.125; p = .005) and sexual symptoms (? = -.211; p < .001). Some socio-demographic variables, as well as perceived health, also predicted the menopausal symptoms' severity. Therefore, spirituality can have a positive impact on the menopausal symptoms' reporting. PMID:23471772

  16. Symptom-Specific or Holistic”: Menopausal Symptom Management

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ko, Young; Hwang, Hyenam; Chee, Wonshik

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to identify differences in menopausal symptom management among four major ethnic groups in the U.S. This was a secondary analysis of the qualitative data from a larger Internet-based study. We analyzed data from 90 middle-aged women in the U.S using thematic analysis. We extracted four themes during the data analysis process: (a) “seeking formal or informal advice,” (b) “medication as the first or final choice,” (c) “symptom-specific or holistic,” and (d) “avoiding or pursuing specific foods.” Health care providers need to develop menopausal symptom management programs while considering ethnic differences in menopausal symptom management. PMID:22577743

  17. Three Years of on Orbit ISS Oxygen Generation System Operation 2007-2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diderich, Greg S.; Polis, Pete; VanKeuren, Steven P.; Erickson, Bob

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) has accumulated 240 days of continuous operation at varied oxygen production rates within the US Laboratory Module (LAB) since it was first activated in July 2007. OGS relocated from the ISS LAB to Node 3 during 20A Flight (February 2010). The OGS rack delivery was accelerated for on-orbit checkout in the LAB, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006. During the on-orbit checkout interval within the LAB from July 2007 to October 2008, OGS operational times were limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Longer runtimes are now achievable due to the continuous feedwater availability after ULF2 delivery and activation of the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) racks. OGS is considered a critical function to maintaining six crew capability. There have been a number of failures which interrupted or threatened to interrupt oxygen production. Filters in the recirculation loop have clogged and have been replaced, Hydrogen sensors have fallen out of specifications, a pump delta pressure sensor failed, a pump failed to start, and the voltage on the cell stack increased out of tolerance. This paper will discuss the operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  18. OG&E's Power Quality Program 

    E-print Network

    Davis, M.

    1989-01-01

    Our commitment to reliable electric power does not stop at the meter, but extends all the way to the equipment that it operates. Through the Power Quality Program, we provide professional power consultants to assure that the customer has quality...

  19. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-08-16

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and related conditions like Parkinson's disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  20. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions like Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  1. Symptom report in detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei R; Axelrod, Deborah; Cleland, Charles M; Qiu, Zeyuan; Guth, Amber A; Kleinman, Robin; Scagliola, Joan; Haber, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema is a syndrome of abnormal swelling coupled with multiple symptoms resulting from obstruction or disruption of the lymphatic system associated with cancer treatment. Research has demonstrated that with increased number of symptoms reported, breast cancer survivors’ limb volume increased. Lymphedema symptoms in the affected limb may indicate a latent stage of lymphedema in which changes cannot be detected by objective measures. The latent stage of lymphedema may exist months or years before overt swelling occurs. Symptom report may play an important role in detecting lymphedema in clinical practice. The purposes of this study were to: 1) examine the validity, sensitivity, and specificity of symptoms for detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema and 2) determine the best clinical cutoff point for the count of symptoms that maximized the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Data were collected from 250 women, including healthy female adults, breast cancer survivors with lymphedema, and those at risk for lymphedema. Lymphedema symptoms were assessed using a reliable and valid instrument. Validity, sensitivity, and specificity were evaluated using logistic regression, analysis of variance, and areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Count of lymphedema symptoms was able to differentiate healthy adults from breast cancer survivors with lymphedema and those at risk for lymphedema. A diagnostic cutoff of three symptoms discriminated breast cancer survivors with lymphedema from healthy women with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 97% (area under the curve =0.98). A diagnostic cutoff of nine symptoms discriminated at-risk survivors from survivors with lymphedema with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80% (area under the curve =0.72). In the absence of objective measurements capable of detecting latent stages of lymphedema, count of symptoms may be a cost-effective initial screening tool for detecting lymphedema. PMID:26527899

  2. COMPARATIVE DYNAMICS OF FOUR SMOKING WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOM SCALES

    PubMed Central

    Javitz, Harold S.; Lerman, Caryn; Swan, Gary E.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Examine the association of person-specific trajectories of withdrawal symptoms of urge-to-smoke, negative affect, physical symptoms, and hunger during the first 7 days after smoking cessation with abstinence at end of treatment (EOT) and 6 months. Design Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) was used to model person-specific trajectory parameters (level, slope, curvature and volatility) for withdrawal symptoms. Setting University-based smoking cessation trials. Participants Treatment seeking smokers in clinical trials of transdermal nicotine versus nicotine spray (n=514) and bupropion versus placebo (n=421) Measurements Self-reported withdrawal symptoms for 7 days after the planned quit date, and 7 day point prevalence and continuous abstinence at EOT and 6 months. Findings In regressions that included trajectory parameters for one group of withdrawal symptoms, both urge-to-smoke and negative affect were predictive of abstinence while physical symptoms and hunger were generally not predictive. In stepwise regressions that included the complete set of trajectory parameters across withdrawal symptoms (for urge-to-smoke, negative affect, physical symptoms, and hunger), with a single exception, only the trajectory parameters for urge-to-smoke were predictive. Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristic curve was 0.594 for covariates alone, and 0.670 for covariates plus urge-to-smoke trajectory parameters. Conclusion Among a number of different withdrawal symptoms (urge-to-smoke, negative affect, physical symptoms, and hunger) urge-to-smoke trajectory parameters (level, slope, and volatility) over the first 7 days of smoking cessation show the strongest prediction of both short and long term relapse. Other withdrawal symptoms increase the predictive ability by negligible amounts. PMID:22321019

  3. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:25797499

  4. PERMANENT FLYTNING Folkeregisternavn p alle der skifter adresse, inkl. evt. firmanavn og CVR-nr. (Benyt venligst blokbogstaver)

    E-print Network

    PERMANENT FLYTNING Folkeregisternavn på alle der skifter adresse, inkl. evt. firmanavn og CVR (person eller firma) Gade/vej, nr., bogstav, etage, th/tv, lejlighedsnummer Postnr. og by (og evt. land Vigtigt, så vi evt. kan kontakte dig vedr. din flytning Ved spørgsmål kontakt kundeservice på 70 10 00 54

  5. Alan M. Turing23.juni 1912 7.juni 1954 Dette dokumentet inneholder oversikt over bker og filmer relatert til Alan

    E-print Network

    Gerhardy, Philipp

    Alan M. Turing23.juni 1912 ­ 7.juni 1954 Dette dokumentet inneholder oversikt over bøker og filmer relatert til Alan M.Turings liv og virke. Alle er til utlån i Informatikkbiblioteket og andre av- delinger. Codebreaker. The Alan Turing story. Story Center Productions. (DVD). url: http

  6. KORT OG GODT OM MYPRINT Sdan bruger du MyPrint/Go

    E-print Network

    Bataillon, Thomas

    gemme dokumenterne på din printkonto. Herefter kan du udskrive dokumenterne på enhver printer "Advanced", og foretage dine valg i den menu, som bliver vist. Herefter skal du klikke på knappen "Click, du skal blot gå hen til den printer/multi- funktionsmaskine, hvor du ønsker at udskrive dokumentet og

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV): Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Symptoms Most children ... that can be heard High fever Cough with green or yellow mucus back to top Last Updated ...

  8. Symptoms of Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Most people (60%) who are exposed to the fungus Coccidioides never have symptoms. 1 Other people may ... Testing Treatment & Outcomes Statistics Additional Information Other Pathogenic Fungi Exserohilum Cladosporium Who Gets Fungal Infections HIV/AIDS ...

  9. TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... of coordination, and increased confusion, restlessness or agitation. Diagnosis Imaging tests, including X-rays of the head ...

  10. Signs and Symptoms of Mumps

    MedlinePLUS

    ... IgM Serology Publications and Resources MMWR Articles Outbreak Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Signs & Symptoms of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ...

  11. Low blood sugar symptoms (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nervousness and irritability are signs that a person's blood sugar is getting dangerously low. A person showing any of these symptoms should check their blood sugar. If the level is low (70 mg/dl), ...

  12. Poison Ivy: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A - D E - H I - L M - P Melanoma Melasma Merkel cell carcinoma Microdermabrasion Moles Molluscum contagiosum Neurodermatitis Nummular dermatitis Pityriasis rosea Poison ivy Signs, symptoms Who gets, causes Diagnosis, treatment Tips Psoriasis Psoriatic arthritis Q - T ...

  13. 10 Symptoms of Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anything, just totally drained." Symptom 4: Skin Rash/Itching Kidneys remove wastes from the bloodstream. When the ... of wastes in your blood can cause severe itching. What patients said: "It's not really a skin ...

  14. What Are the Symptoms of Endometriosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... symptoms, may cause these endometriosis symptoms to continue. Endometriosis-Related Pain Researchers know that pain is a ...

  15. Symptoms experienced by cancer patients and barriers to symptom management

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Malathi G; George, Anice; Vidyasagar, MS; Mathew, Stanley; Nayak, Sudhakar; Nayak, Baby S; Shashidhara, YN; Kamath, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Background: People living with cancer experience wide variety of symptoms. If symptoms are not managed well, it may hamper an individual's ability to continue his or her activities of daily life. Treatment of symptoms relieves suffering and improves the rate of recovery as well as the quality of life. Objectives: To assess the symptoms of suffering among cancer patients and to identify the perceived barriers to their symptom management. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 768 cancer patients selected by stratified sampling with a proportionate selection from each stratum. Data were collected from cancer patients by interview technique using structured validated questionnaire. Results: Majority of the samples (30.2%) belonged to the age group of 51–60 years, most of them were diagnosed with head and neck cancer (40.1%) and 57.7% had stage III disease. The majority of the patients studied had pain (77%), tiredness (96.5%), disturbed sleep (96.4%), weight loss (63.3%), and irritability (85.7%). Most of the patients had lack of appetite (89.4%), feeling of sadness (96.6%), worry (94.5%), and feeling of nervousness (82.8%). Majority of the patients had some misconception regarding symptoms, that is, increasing pain signifies disease progression (92.7%), medicine to control pain may weaken the immune system (89.9%) and pain is inevitable for cancer patients (78.5%). Seventy-seven percent of samples reported that the anxiety or depression is expected after the diagnosis of cancer. Conclusion: This study provides an overview of symptoms among cancer patients and barriers experienced by them.

  16. Stone symptoms and urinary deposits.

    PubMed

    Fazil Marickar, Y M; Salim, Abiya; Vijay, Adarsh

    2010-02-01

    There is a general belief among the public and clinicians that urinary stone problem is always associated with symptoms like pain, dysuria and haematuria. Many patients stop medical treatment when they are symptom free and return with excruciating pain, dysuria and haematuria either alone or in combination. The objective of this study was to determine stone activity in an individual patient by assessing the urinary deposits at the time of the visit to the stone clinic and correlate with the presence or absence of symptoms at that time. 418 patients who attended the stone clinic in 2007 with proved urinary stone disease, including stone, colic and crystalluria, were studied. Presence or absence of symptoms at the time of presentation was recorded. Minimum of two samples of urine was collected (early morning and random) to assess the presence and extent (1-5) of urinary deposits namely red blood cells (RBC), pus cells (PC), calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD), uric acid and phosphate. The scores obtained were correlated with the presence or absence of symptoms by logistic regression. Of the 418 patients studied, 238 had symptoms and 180 had no symptoms. The total score of the deposits of patients with symptoms was 1,215 with a mean of 3.39 per patient against the score of 350 in the patients without symptoms with a mean of 2.99. This difference was not statistically significant. The total values and mean scores of the urinary deposits of all patients grouped together were RBC 561 (3.51), PC 434 (3.29), COM 177 (3.34), COD 237 (3.25), phosphate 113 (3.23) and uric acid 43 (1.95). Comparison of the total values and mean scores of the deposits of the patients with and without symptoms showed the variations as RBC 428 (3.51) versus 133 (3.5) PC 341 (3.38) versus 93 (3.0), COM 143 (3.25) versus 34 (3.78), COD 190 (3.88) versus 47 (1.96), phosphate 76 (3.3) versus 37 (3.1) and uric acid/ammonium urate 37 (1.95) versus 6 (2.0). Of these, the RBC, PC, uric acid and phosphates were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the presence of COD was significantly more in patients with symptoms (P < 0.05) and COM was significantly more in patients without symptoms (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the presence or absence of symptoms does not alter the presence and extent of urinary deposits significantly in the urinary stone patients. COD was more in symptomatic patients and COM was more in the asymptomatic patients. This contrast could be due to the morphology of the COD crystal which is dipyramidal and produces injury to urolthelium whereas COM is dumbbell shaped and produces lesser injury and lesser symptoms. PMID:19888570

  17. Depressive Symptoms in Chiropractic Students

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Stuart; Puhl, Aaron Anthony; Reinhart, Christine J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The intensive training associated with health care education has been suggested to have unintended negative consequences on students’ mental or emotional health that may interfere with the development of qualities deemed essential for proficient health care professionals. This longitudinal study examined the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms among students at a chiropractic educational institution. Methods: Chiropractic students at all levels of training were surveyed at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College during the academic years of 2000/2001, 2001/2002, and 2002/2003. The measurement tool employed was the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II). Previously established BDI-II cutoff scores were used to assess the severity of reported depression symptoms, and these were compared by sex and year of training. Results: The survey was completed by 1303 students (70%) over the 3 years of the study. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was nearly 25%, with 13.7% of respondents indicating a rating of mild depression, 7.1% indicating moderate depressive symptoms, and 2.8% indicating severe symptoms. Significant differences were found between years of training, with 2nd-year students having the highest prevalence of depressive symptoms, and sex, with females having a higher rate of symptoms. Conclusions: Chiropractic students surveyed at Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College had high rates of depression similar to those measured in other health care profession students. Chiropractic educational institutions should be aware of this situation and are encouraged to emphasize students’ awareness of their own personal health and well-being and their access to appropriate care, in addition to the same concerns for their future patients. PMID:22069339

  18. Psychopharmacotherapy of somatic symptoms disorders.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, Bettahalasoor; Jainer, Ashok; Wuntakal, Balaji

    2013-02-01

    Somatic symptoms are often common causes for medical consultation. The treatment of somatic symptoms disorders is complicated by lack of boundary, conceptual clarity, and overemphasis on psychosocial causation and effectiveness of psychological treatments. In clinical practice all classes of psychotropics are used to treat somatic symptoms disorder. Five principal groups of drugs such as tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), atypical antipsychotics and herbal medication are systematically studied. The evidence indicates that all five groups are effective in a wide range of disorders. All classes of antidepressants seem to be effective against somatoform and related disorders. SSRIs are more effective against hypochondriasis and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), and SNRIs appear to be more effective than other antidepressants when pain is the predominant symptom. Research leaves many unanswered questions regarding dosing, duration of treatment, sustainability of improvement in the long term and differential response to different class drugs. Further studies need to focus on treatments based on clinical features/psychopathology and collaborative research with other specialists in understanding the relation of somatic symptom disorders and functional somatic syndromes (FSS), and comparing psychotropics and non-psychotropics and combinations treatments. PMID:23383672

  19. Demographic and clinical correlates of autism symptom domains and autism spectrum diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Embacher, Rebecca; Hardan, Antonio Y; Constantino, John N; Law, Paul; Findling, Robert L; Eng, Charis

    2014-01-01

    Demographic and clinical factors may influence assessment of autism symptoms. This study evaluated these correlates and also examined whether social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior provided unique prediction of autism spectrum disorder diagnosis. We analyzed data from 7352 siblings included in the Interactive Autism Network registry. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms were obtained using caregiver-reports on the Social Responsiveness Scale. Demographic and clinical correlates were covariates in regression models predicting social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses evaluated the incremental validity of social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior domains over and above global autism symptoms. Autism spectrum disorder diagnosis was the strongest correlate of caregiver-reported social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms. The presence of comorbid diagnoses also increased symptom levels. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms provided significant, but modest, incremental validity in predicting diagnosis beyond global autism symptoms. These findings suggest that autism spectrum disorder diagnosis is by far the largest determinant of quantitatively measured autism symptoms. Externalizing (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and internalizing (anxiety) behavior, low cognitive ability, and demographic factors may confound caregiver-report of autism symptoms, potentially necessitating a continuous norming approach to the revision of symptom measures. Social communication and interaction and restricted/repetitive behavior symptoms may provide incremental validity in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24104512

  20. 2008 OG$_{19}$: A highly elongated Trans-Neptunian Object

    E-print Network

    Fernández-Valenzuela, Estela; Duffard, René; Santos-Sanz, Pablo; Morales, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    From two observing runs during the 2014 summer at Calar Alto Observatory in Almer\\'ia (Spain) and at Sierra Nevada Observatory in Granada (Spain), we were able to derive CCD photometry of the Trans-Neptunian Object 2008 OG$_{19}$. We analyzed the time series and obtained a double-peaked light curve with a peak to valley amplitude of (0.437 $\\pm$ 0.011) mag and a rotational period of (8.727$\\pm$ 0.003) h. This implies that this object is very elongated, closely resembling Varuna's case. The photometry also allowed us to obtain an absolute magnitude in R-band of (4.39 $\\pm$ 0.07) mag. From this result we estimated an equivalent diameter of 2008 OG$_{19}$ which is 619$^{+56}_{-113}$ km using an average albedo for Scattered Disk Objects. Finally we interpreted the results under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium and found a lower limit for the density of 544$^{+42}_{-4}$ kg$\\,$m$^{-3}$. However, a more likely density is (609 $\\pm$ 4) kg$\\,$m$^{-3}$ using an aspect angle of 60$^\\circ$, which corresponds to ...

  1. Symptoms and Symptom Clusters Identified by Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer Using a Symptom Heuristics App.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Suzanne; Erickson, Jeanne M; Macpherson, Catherine Fiona; Stegenga, Kristin; Linder, Lauri A

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer experience multiple distressing symptoms during treatment. Because the typical approach to symptom assessment does not easily reflect the symptom experience of individuals, alternative approaches to enhancing communication between the patient and provider are needed. We developed an iPad-based application that uses a heuristic approach to explore AYAs' cancer symptom experiences. In this mixed-methods descriptive study, 72 AYAs (13-29 years old) with cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy used the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT) to create images of the symptoms and symptom clusters they experienced from a list of 30 symptoms. They answered open-ended questions within the C-SCAT about the causes of their symptoms and symptom clusters. The images generated through the C-SCAT and accompanying free-text data were analyzed using descriptive, content, and visual analyses. Most participants (n?=?70) reported multiple symptoms (M?=?8.14). The most frequently reported symptoms were nausea (65.3%), feeling drowsy (55.6%), lack of appetite (55.6%), and lack of energy (55.6%). Forty-six grouped their symptoms into one or more clusters. The most common symptom cluster was nausea/eating problems/appetite problems. Nausea was most frequently named as the priority symptom in a cluster and as a cause of other symptoms. Although common threads were present in the symptoms experienced by AYAs, the graphic images revealed unique perspectives and a range of complexity of symptom relationships, clusters, and causes. Results highlight the need for a tailored approach to symptom management based on how the AYA with cancer perceives his or her symptom experience. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26455729

  2. BMN operators with a scalar fermion pair and operator mixing in N=4 Super Yang-Mills Theory

    E-print Network

    Zhiguang Xiao

    2009-10-18

    The mixings between BMN operators with two scalar impurities and those with a scalar fermion pair are discussed to the lowest order at planar level. For this purpose, matrix model effective vertices are calculated to O(g^3). All the mixing patterns are explicitly obtained.

  3. [Alexithymia in negative symptom and non-negative symptom schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Nkam, I; Langlois-Thery, S; Dollfus, S; Petit, M

    1997-01-01

    Coined by Sifneos in 1972, alexithymia refers to a relative narrowing in emotional functioning, an inability to find appropriate words to describe their emotions and, a poverty of fantasy life. Although initially described in the context of psychosomatic illness, alexithymic characteristics may be observed in patients with a wide range of medical and psychiatric disorders: Parkinson disease, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and eating disorders. Flattening of affect and poverty of speech, major negative symptoms, referred to chronic schizophrenia: there is a lack of outward display of emotion. Accordingly, some disturbances of alexithymia's scores would be expected in schizophrenic patients. The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of alexithymia in deficit and non-deficit schizophrenia. The term "deficit symptoms" may be used as Carpenter, to refer specifically to those negative symptoms that are not considered secondary. The influence of patients' symptoms has also been studied on alexithymia scores: negative and positive symptoms of schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, anhedonia and effects of neuroleptics. Twenty-five patients, meeting DSM III-R criteria for schizophrenia have been studied. All of them treated by neuroleptics, were in a stable clinical status for at least one month. The patients have been categorized into deficit (n = 12) and non-deficit (n = 13) subgroups by one trained psychiatrist (SD), using the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome. The subjects have been assessed by the same rater (IN), blind to deficit status, using six rating scales: Beth Israel Questionnaire (BIQ) and Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) for alexithymia, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), revised Physical Anhedonia Scale (PAS), and finally, Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS). Using TAS, alexithymic characteristics were more prevalent in the deficit subgroup as compared to non-deficit subgroup (83% versus 30.76%; p < 0.01). Significant correlations were observed in the non-deficit subgroup between: TAS and anxiety (r = 0.743; p < 0.01), TAS and depression (r = 0.568; p < 0.05), BIQ and blunted affect (r = 0.636; p < 0.02), BIQ and poverty of speech (r = 0.629; p < 0.02). These correlations were not significant in the deficit group of patients. Alexithymia in schizophrenic patients seems to be a trait characteristic in deficit patients, and a state related to many symptoms, such as flattening of affect, poverty of speech, depression and anxiety in nondeficit patients. PMID:9453928

  4. Schizophrenia and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Elmas; Ayer, Ahmet; Bozo?lan, Hümeyra; Ozen, Cigdem; Eslek, Ilhan; Yüceyar, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychological factors and psychiatric disorders play a role in a variety of gastrointestinal illnesses, including esophageal diseases. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients with schizophrenia in Turkey. Patients and Methods: Ninety-eight patients with schizophrenia and one hundred control individuals were enrolled in the study, which was undertaken at the Manisa State Hospital for Mental Health and Neurological Disorders and Celal Bayar University Gastroenterology Department. Case and control subjects alike underwent 30–45 min oral interviews conducted by a designated study coordinator (E.K.). The coordinator gathered information about demographic characteristics, social habits, and a large variety of symptoms suggestive of reflux disease or other gastrointestinal conditions. Results: In terms of reflux symptoms, cough was the only significant association in schizophrenic patients than controls. Heartburn and regurgitation were more frequent in schizophrenic patients who smoked than in controls who were smokers. However, the prevalence of reflux symptoms in cigarette smokers versus nonsmoker patients with schizophrenia was similar. Heartburn and/or regurgitation occurred more frequently in patients with schizophrenic than controls with alcohol use. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders might indirectly affect esophageal physiology through increased consumption of alcohol and nicotine. PMID:25657460

  5. Perfectionism, Shame, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Jeffrey S.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Martin, James L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between depression, maladaptive perfectionism, and shame. Regression analyses were used to replicate a model in which maladaptive perfectionism was negatively associated with self-esteem and positively associated with symptoms of depression, with self-esteem mediating the effects of maladaptive perfectionism…

  6. Planlgning og optimering af logistiske problemstillinger i et kulturelt divergent milj

    E-print Network

    logistikvirksomheden DHL. At udarbejde et speciale er et projekt, hvorigennem man oplever mange forskellige følelser inspiration undervejs i forløbet. Herudover vil vi gerne sige tak til DHL og de mange medarbejdere, som vi

  7. Technology for a better society 1 Seminar om hvordan aggregere risiko og risikoanalyser

    E-print Network

    Stølen, Ketil

    autentiserings-komponent Social engineering-angrep [5:1 år] Hacker tilegner seg brukernavn og passord til pasient [2:1 år]Manglende bevissthet om sikkerhet Hacker 0.3 1.0 SQL injection-angrep [30:1 år] SQL injection input 0.5 Brute force- angrep på brukernavn og passord [60:1 år] Svake passord 0.05 Hacker gjetter

  8. Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ... Epinephrine Emotional & Social Issues Find a Support Group Bullying Prevention Spread the Word True Stories Stay Informed ...

  9. Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Less - 2016-jan-fitness-100-calories.html Food & Fitness Burn 100 Calories in 30 Minutes or Less ... Power of Avocados - 2016-jan-avocados.html Food & Fitness The Power of Avocados Celebrate good fats as ...

  10. Symptoms of Concussion and Comorbid Disorders.

    PubMed

    Junn, Cherry; Bell, Kathleen R; Shenouda, Christian; Hoffman, Jeanne M

    2015-09-01

    Symptoms of concussion are divided into three major domains: physical, cognitive, and emotional. These symptoms including headache, neck pain, vision changes, cognitive deficits, and emotional changes can be seen immediately after the injury and usually resolve within the first 3 months. However, some of these symptoms may persist for several months afterward. Risk factors have been identified for prolonged symptoms. Certain early interventions may decrease persistent symptoms. In this chapter, we discuss common acute and persistent symptoms after concussion and provide an overview of assessment tools and management options. PMID:26253164

  11. Symptoms of menopause: hot flushes.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Nanette

    2008-09-01

    Vasomotor symptoms (VMSs) are highly prevalent during the peri- and early postmenopause. They constitute a major driver for patient self-referral for medical care. Although most women will experience an abatement of their VMS by 5 years after their final menses, women with early or surgical menopause may have worse or more persistent symptoms, and up to 16% of naturally menopausal women continue to experience VMS well after their menopause is past. Although estrogen is the most effective known therapy, it is neither appropriate nor desirable for every symptomatic woman, and nonhormonal treatments such as gabapentin, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors drugs, and the antihypertensives clonidine and alphamethyldopa may be helpful for some women. There is mounting evidence to support the ineffectiveness of many proposed complementary and alternative modalities. This review will highlight the natural history of VMS and the current medical evidence supporting various treatments. PMID:18677148

  12. P uddannelsen elektronikingenirer lrer du at udvikle og de-signe elektronikprodukter lige fra forbrugerelektronik til avance-

    E-print Network

    Bataillon, Thomas

    undervisningsformer ser dagens lys. Du undervises eksempelvis via Flipped Classroom, og du har også mulighed hverdag. FLIPPED CLASSROOM Undervisningsformen "Flipped Classroom" foregår ved, at du forud

  13. Mindfulness Is Associated with Fewer PTSD Symptoms, Depressive Symptoms, Physical Symptoms, and Alcohol Problems in Urban Firefighters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce W.; Ortiz, J. Alexis; Steffen, Laurie E.; Tooley, Erin M.; Wiggins, Kathryn T.; Yeater, Elizabeth A.; Montoya, John D.; Bernard, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the association between mindfulness, other resilience resources, and several measures of health in 124 urban firefighters. Method: Participants completed health measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depressive symptoms, physical symptoms, and alcohol problems and measures of resilience…

  14. Manic symptoms and impulsivity during bipolar depressive episodes

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Alan C; Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Schneider, Laurie; Barratt, Ernest S; Dougherty, Donald M

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In contrast to the extensive literature on the frequent occurrence of depressive symptoms in manic patients, there is little information about manic symptoms in bipolar depressions. Impulsivity is a prominent component of the manic syndrome, so manic features during depressive syndromes may be associated with impulsivity and its consequences, including increased risk of substance abuse and suicidal behavior. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of manic symptoms and their relationships to impulsivity and clinical characteristics in patients with bipolar depressive episodes. Methods In 56 bipolar I or II depressed subjects, we investigated the presence of manic symptoms, using Mania Rating Scale (MRS) scores from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS), and examined its association with other psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety, and psychosis), age of onset, history of alcohol and/or other substance abuse and of suicidal behavior, and measures of impulsivity. Results MRS ranged from 0 to 29 (25th–75th percentile, range 4–13), and correlated significantly with anxiety and psychosis, but not with depression, suggesting the superimposition of a separate psychopathological mechanism. Impulsivity and history of substance abuse, head trauma, or suicide attempt increased with increasing MRS. Receiver-operating curve analysis showed that MRS could divide patients into two groups based on history of alcohol abuse and suicide attempt, with an inflection point corresponding to an MRS score of 6. Discussion Even modest manic symptoms during bipolar depressive episodes were associated with greater impulsivity, and with histories of alcohol abuse and suicide attempts. Manic symptoms during depressive episodes suggest the presence of a potentially dangerous combination of depression and impulsivity. PMID:17430294

  15. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  16. Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Glaucoma Glaucoma: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Latest Research Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Symptoms and Diagnosis Glaucoma can develop in one or both eyes. ...

  17. Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enter ZIP code here Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, Family, & Friends Aging Veterans and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms For many Veterans, memories of their wartime ...

  18. Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Symptoms and Diagnosis of Metabolic Syndrome Updated:Nov 20,2014 What are the symptoms ... content was last reviewed on 05/14/2014. Metabolic Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • ...

  19. What Are Common Symptoms of Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are common symptoms of Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The symptoms of Down syndrome vary from person to person, and people with ...

  20. What Are the Symptoms of Cushing's Syndrome?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Most people with Cushing’s syndrome have a range of symptoms, 1 and one ...

  1. Signs and Symptoms of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... occurs . Early Signs and Symptoms (3 to 30 days after tick bite) Fever, chills, headache, fatigue, muscle ... examples of EM rashes Later Signs and Symptoms (days to months after tick bite) Severe headaches and ...

  2. Signs and Symptoms of Mood Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of your family's history. Signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder Bipolar disorder differs significantly from clinical depression, although ... or restlessness. Symptoms of mania - the "highs" of bipolar disorder Increased physical and mental activity and energy Heightened ...

  3. Tools to assess negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M

    2013-06-01

    Although effective treatments for negative symptoms are currently limited, clinicians still need to assess and monitor them because of their impact on patient functioning. Further, documenting patients' negative symptoms provides a complete clinical record that the clinician can use to make systematic and careful treatment decisions. Several tools for assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia are available, including the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the 16-item Negative Symptoms Assessment (NSA-16), and the Schedule for Deficit Syndrome (SDS). Additionally, newer instruments are in development-the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptoms Scale (BNSS)-and are yielding promising results. This overview outlines these assessment tools so that clinicians can measure negative symptom severity and track treatment response for their patients with schizophrenia. PMID:23842020

  4. Recognizing the symptoms of employee fraud.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, D M; Albrecht, W S

    1994-05-01

    Unlike crimes that leave easily detectable physical evidence, employee fraud may be difficult to detect because often only symptoms of such crimes are readily apparent, and the symptoms may or may not signal actual fraud. This article discusses six categories of symptoms that indicate fraud may have been committed by an employee, and presents a case study example to illustrate symptoms auditors and financial managers should investigate. PMID:10145997

  5. Psychological Symptoms in Sexually Abused Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.

    1988-01-01

    The report examined psychological symptoms exhibited by 24 girls (ages 6-12) evaluated within six months of being sexually abused. Results showed a marked discrepancy between child and parent reports of symptoms with children not reporting as many symptoms of depression, anxiety, or low self-esteem as parents. (Author/DB)

  6. Kongsberg Gruppen er et internasjonalt og kunnskapsbasert teknologikonsern med over 5 200 ansatte i mer enn 25 land. Konsernet leverer hyteknologiske

    E-print Network

    Gerhardy, Philipp

    mer enn 25 land. Konsernet leverer høyteknologiske systemer til krevende kunder innen olje- og dynamisk og hektisk med et godt arbeidsmiljø. Konkurransedyktige betingelser Et meget solid selskap For mer

  7. Kongsberg Gruppen er et internasjonalt og kunnskapsbasert teknologikonsern med over 5 200 ansatte i mer enn 25 land. Konsernet leverer hyteknologiske

    E-print Network

    Gerhardy, Philipp

    mer enn 25 land. Konsernet leverer høyteknologiske systemer til krevende kunder innen olje- og utviklingsmuligheter. Vår hverdag er dynamisk og hektisk med et godt arbeidsmiljø. Et solid selskap For mer informasjon

  8. Postural tachycardia syndrome is associated with significant symptoms and functional impairment predominantly affecting young women: a UK perspective

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Claire; Koshi, Sharon; Busner, Lorna; Kavi, Lesley; Newton, Julia L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine a large UK cohort of patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), to compare demographic characteristics, symptoms and treatment of PoTS at one centre compared to the largest patient group PoTS UK and to verify if their functional limitation is similar to patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Design A cross-sectional study assessed the frequency of symptoms and their associated variables. Patients and setting Two PoTS cohorts were: (1) recruited via PoTS UK, (2) diagnosed at Newcastle Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust 2009–2012. Patients with PoTS were then compared to a matched cohort with CFS. Main outcome measures Patients’ detailed demographics, time to diagnosis, education, disability, medications, comorbidity and precipitants. Symptom assessment tools captured, Fatigue Impact Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Orthostatic Grading Scale (OGS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Health Assessment Questionnaire, Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Results 136 patients with PoTS participated (84 members of PoTS UK (170 cohort; 50% return) and 52 (87 cohort; 60%) from Newcastle Clinics). The PoTS UK population was significantly younger than the clinic patients, with significantly fewer men (p=0.005). Over 60% had a university or postgraduate degree. Significantly more of the PoTS UK cohort were working, with hours worked being significantly higher (p=0.001). Time to diagnosis was significantly longer in the PoTS UK cohort (p=0.04). Symptom severity was comparable between cohorts. The PoTS total group was compared with a matched CFS cohort; despite comparable levels of fatigue and sleepiness, autonomic symptom burden (OGS) was statistically significantly higher. The most common treatment regime included ?-blockers. Overall, 21 treatment combinations were described. Up to 1/3 were taking no treatment. Conclusions Patients with PoTS are predominantly women, young, well educated and have significant and debilitating symptoms that impact significantly on quality of life. Despite this, there is no consistent treatment. PMID:24934205

  9. Diplomoppgaven tar for seg emnet datamodeller for digitale film-og video-arkiv. Vren 1993 utfrte jeg et vrprosjekt med tittelen "Datamodeller for film".

    E-print Network

    Forord Diplomoppgaven tar for seg emnet datamodeller for digitale film- og video-arkiv. Våren 1993 utførte jeg et vårprosjekt med tittelen "Datamodeller for film". Diplomoppgaven utdyper og viderefører. Trondheim, 22. desember, 1993 Petter Merok Datamodeller for digitale film- og videoarkiv i #12;ii

  10. kandidat-og sidefagsdag 2015 5. marts kl. 13.30-17.30 Kroghstrde 3 9220 Aalborg

    E-print Network

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    ) Iværksætteri ­ SEA og Kickstart Historie IT, Læring og Organisatorisk Omstilling Culture / European Studies UrbanDesign­MobilitiesandUrbanStudies Mediefag Historie Idræt Matematik Biologi Dansk evaluér dagen via din smartphone eller brug en af de computere, der er opstillet i standområdet. Når du

  11. What Engages Students in MetaL-FrOG? A Triarchy Perspective on Meta-Cognitive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fa, Ng Sen; Hussin, Firuz Hussin

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the central ideas of a grounded theory research by the name of Triarchy Perspective on Metacognitive Learning in Free Online Groups, or "TriP on MetaL-FrOG" in short. The research setting was online learning community on the platform of Free Online Group web (FrOG) intended for post-graduate students. The research…

  12. Spouses and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, Neeti; Sutin, Angelina R.

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms may co-occur within couples and follow similar trajectories, but relatively little is known about this process in old age. This study thus examined the association between some spousal characteristics (spouse's depressive symptoms, age difference between spouses) and the trajectory of depressive symptoms in older adults. Participants ?65 years old were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 12,010; Mean age = 70.60 and 69.16 for target husbands and wives, respectively). Depressive symptoms were measured with a short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to model up to 9 assessments of depressive symptoms of target spouses (Mean number of CESD assessments per target spouse = 3, range 1–9). Depressive symptoms between spouses were correlated; convergence over time was modest. For both husbands and wives, having a younger spouse was associated with more depressive symptoms at age 65. These results suggest that there is concordance between spouses' depressive symptoms and that the age difference between spouses contribute to depressive symptoms as couples enter old age. The association between spouses' depressive symptoms is nearly as strong as the effect of each decade increase in age. PMID:25716455

  13. Spouses and depressive symptoms in older adulthood.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, Neeti; Sutin, Angelina R

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms may co-occur within couples and follow similar trajectories, but relatively little is known about this process in old age. This study thus examined the association between some spousal characteristics (spouse's depressive symptoms, age difference between spouses) and the trajectory of depressive symptoms in older adults. Participants ? 65 years old were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (N = 12,010; Mean age = 70.60 and 69.16 for target husbands and wives, respectively). Depressive symptoms were measured with a short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to model up to 9 assessments of depressive symptoms of target spouses (Mean number of CESD assessments per target spouse = 3, range 1-9). Depressive symptoms between spouses were correlated; convergence over time was modest. For both husbands and wives, having a younger spouse was associated with more depressive symptoms at age 65. These results suggest that there is concordance between spouses' depressive symptoms and that the age difference between spouses contribute to depressive symptoms as couples enter old age. The association between spouses' depressive symptoms is nearly as strong as the effect of each decade increase in age. PMID:25716455

  14. Dynamic Associations between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Adolescents’ Depressive and Externalizing Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Garber, Judy

    2012-01-01

    The current prospective study investigated transactional relations between maternal depressive symptoms and children’s depressive and externalizing symptoms. Participants included 240 children (M age = 11.86 years, SD = 0.56; 53.9 % female) and their mothers who were part of a 6-year longitudinal study. Measures of maternal depression (Beck Depression Inventory), child depression (Children’s Depression Inventory), and children’s externalizing symptoms (Youth Self-Report Form) were assessed annually. Data analyses using dynamic latent difference score structural equation models indicated that the observed relations between mothers’ and adolescents’ symptoms were stable across the 6 years. Higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in children’s depressive symptoms and in their externalizing problems over time. Among mothers with high initial levels of depression, children’s depressive symptoms predicted subsequent declines in mothers’ depressive symptoms. Children’s externalizing problems were not related to subsequent change in maternal symptoms. PMID:20607385

  15. Dynamic associations between maternal depressive symptoms and adolescents' depressive and externalizing symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kouros, Chrystyna D; Garber, Judy

    2010-11-01

    The current prospective study investigated transactional relations between maternal depressive symptoms and children's depressive and externalizing symptoms. Participants included 240 children (M age = 11.86 years, SD = 0.56; 53.9% female) and their mothers who were part of a 6-year longitudinal study. Measures of maternal depression (Beck Depression Inventory), child depression (Children's Depression Inventory), and children's externalizing symptoms (Youth Self-Report Form) were assessed annually. Data analyses using dynamic latent difference score structural equation models indicated that the observed relations between mothers' and adolescents' symptoms were stable across the 6 years. Higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in children's depressive symptoms and in their externalizing problems over time. Among mothers with high initial levels of depression, children's depressive symptoms predicted subsequent declines in mothers' depressive symptoms. Children's externalizing problems were not related to subsequent change in maternal symptoms. PMID:20607385

  16. Treatment of Non Pain-Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Charles F.; Gafford, Ellin

    2013-01-01

    Relieving the suffering associated with cancer and its treatment in the physical, emotional, practical and spiritual domains is impossible without impeccable symptom control. This review summarizes key features essential to the management of: anorexia/cachexia, bowel obstruction, diarrhea, fatigue, mucositis, and nausea/vomiting. Taken together, these are some of the most vexing symptoms for cancer patients. Well-managed symptoms enable the course of overall cancer care to be unimpeded. PMID:24051612

  17. Social and psychological correlates of menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Polit, D F; LaRocco, S A

    1980-05-01

    The present study explored the effects of various demographic and personality variables on the nature and intensity of subjectively menopausal symptoms. Data were collected by means of a mailed questionnaire from 135 menopausal and postmenopausal women from a general urban population. It was found that women who reported a higher number of menopausal symptoms tended to be less well-educated, were less likely to be working, and viewed themselves in poorer health than women with fewer or no symptoms. Psychosomatic and psychologic symptoms such as nervousness, depression, headaches, and irritability were found to be signififantly related to such personality attributes as self-confidence, personal adjustment, nurturance, and aggression. PMID:7443933

  18. Symptom burden in individuals with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Adam T.; Gallegos, Juan C.; Gertz, Kevin J.; Engel, Joyce M.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    The current study sought to (1) determine the relative frequency and severity of eight symptoms in adults with cerebral palsy (CP), (2) examine the perceived course of these eight symptoms over time, and (3) determine the associations between the severity of these symptoms and psychosocial functioning. Eighty-three adults with CP completed a measure assessing the frequency, severity, and perceived course of eight symptoms (pain, weakness, fatigue, imbalance, numbness, memory loss, vision loss, and shortness of breath). Respondents also completed measures of community integration and psychological functioning. The results indicated that pain, fatigue, imbalance, and weakness were the most common and severe symptoms reported. All symptoms were reported to have either stayed the same or worsened, rather than resolved, over time. The symptoms were more closely related to social integration than to home integration, productive activity, or psychological functioning. Memory loss was a unique predictor of social integration in the multivariate context. This study highlighted several common and problematic symptoms experienced by adults with CP. Additional research is needed to identify the most effective treatments for those symptoms that affect community integration and psychological functioning as a way to improve the quality of life of individuals with CP. PMID:21174251

  19. Depressive symptoms and observed eating in youth.

    PubMed

    Mooreville, Mira; Shomaker, Lauren B; Reina, Samantha A; Hannallah, Louise M; Adelyn Cohen, L; Courville, Amber B; Kozlosky, Merel; Brady, Sheila M; Condarco, Tania; Yanovski, Susan Z; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-04-01

    Depressive symptoms in youth may be a risk factor for obesity, with altered eating behaviors as one possible mechanism. We tested whether depressive symptoms were associated with observed eating patterns expected to promote excessive weight gain in two separate samples. In Study 1, 228 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 12-17y (15.3±1.4y; 54.7% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 10,934-kcal buffet meal served at 11:00am after an overnight fast. In Study 2, 204 non-treatment-seeking youth, ages 8-17y (13.0±2.8y; 49.5% female), self-reported depressive symptoms using the Children's Depression Inventory. Energy intake was measured as consumption from a 9835-kcal buffet meal served at 2:30pm after a standard breakfast. In Study 1, controlling for body composition and other relevant covariates, depressive symptoms were positively related to total energy intake in girls and boys. In Study 2, adjusting for the same covariates, depressive symptoms among girls only were positively associated with total energy intake. Youth high in depressive symptoms and dietary restraint consumed the most energy from sweets. In both studies, the effects of depressive symptoms on intake were small. Nevertheless, depressive symptoms were associated with significantly greater consumption of total energy and energy from sweet snack foods, which, over time, could be anticipated to promote excess weight gain. PMID:24424352

  20. Dimensions of Temperament and Depressive Symptoms: Replicating a Three-Way Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vasey, Michael W.; Harbaugh, Casaundra N.; Lonigan, Chistopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Willem, Lore; Bijttebier, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    High negative emotionality (NE), low positive emotionality (PE), and low self-regulatory capacity (i.e., effortful control or EC) are related to depressive symptoms and furthermore, may moderate one another’s relations to such symptoms. Indeed, preliminary evidence suggests they may operate in a three-way interaction (Dinovo & Vasey, 2011), but the replicability of that finding remains unknown. Therefore, we tested this NExPExEC interaction in association with depressive symptoms in 5 independent samples. This interaction was significant in 4 of the 5 samples and a combined sample and approached significance in the fifth sample. In contrast, the NExPExEC interaction was unrelated to general anxious symptoms and thus may be specific to symptoms of depression. Implications, directions for future research, and limitations are discussed. PMID:24493906

  1. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in detecting ordered symptom statuses without a gold standard

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheyu; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Miqu

    2011-01-01

    Our research is motivated by 2 methodological problems in assessing diagnostic accuracy of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) doctors in detecting a particular symptom whose true status has an ordinal scale and is unknown—imperfect gold standard bias and ordinal scale symptom status. In this paper, we proposed a nonparametric maximum likelihood method for estimating and comparing the accuracy of different doctors in detecting a particular symptom without a gold standard when the true symptom status had an ordered multiple class. In addition, we extended the concept of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to a hyper-dimensional overall accuracy for diagnostic accuracy and alternative graphs for displaying a visual result. The simulation studies showed that the proposed method had good performance in terms of bias and mean squared error. Finally, we applied our method to our motivating example on assessing the diagnostic abilities of 5 TCM doctors in detecting symptoms related to Chills disease. PMID:21209155

  2. Autism and ADHD Symptoms in Patients with OCD: Are They Associated with Specific OC Symptom Dimensions or OC Symptom Severity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anholt, Gideon E.; Cath, Danielle C.; van Oppen, Patricia; Eikelenboom, Merijn; Smit, Johannes H.; van Megen, Harold; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2010-01-01

    In obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), the relationship between autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptom dimensions and severity has scarcely been studied. Therefore, 109 adult outpatients with primary OCD were compared to 87 healthy controls on OC, ADHD and…

  3. Male hypogonadism: Symptoms and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Peeyush; Kumar, Nitish; Thakur, Devendra Singh; Patidar, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body does not produce enough of the testosterone hormone; the hormone that plays a key role in masculine growth and development during puberty. There is a clear need to increase the awareness of hypogonadism throughout the medical profession, especially in primary care physicians who are usually the first port of call for the patient. Hypogonadism can significantly reduce the quality of life and has resulted in the loss of livelihood and separation of couples, leading to divorce. It is also important for doctors to recognize that testosterone is not just a sex hormone. There is an important research being published to demonstrate that testosterone may have key actions on metabolism, on the vasculature, and on brain function, in addition to its well-known effects on bone and body composition. This article has been used as an introduction for the need to develop sensitive and reliable assays for sex hormones and for symptoms and treatment of hypogonadism. PMID:22247861

  4. Effect of Symptom Over-Reporting on Heart Rate Variability in Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Brady, Robert E; Constans, Joseph I; Marx, Brian P; Spira, James L; Gevirtz, Richard; Kimbrell, Timothy A; Kramer, Teresa L; Pyne, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) presents an additional avenue for evaluating the severity of PTSD symptoms. We investigated whether the presence of a high number of uncommon symptoms attenuated the relation between self-reported PTSD symptoms and heart rate variability (HRV). Participants were 115 veterans from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom with or without PTSD. Symptom over-report was assessed using the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST). Participants completed the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and M-FAST and underwent physiological assessment to determine HRV. These data were then entered into a hierarchical linear regression equation to test the moderating effect of over-reporting on the relation between PTSD symptom severity and HRV. The result of this analysis failed to demonstrate a significant moderating effect of over-reporting on the PTSD and HRV relation. HRV was a significant predictor of PTSD symptom severity, and this relation did not differ across levels of over-reporting. These findings did not support the hypothesis that over-reporting would attenuate the relation between PTSD and HRV. Clinical and research implications and directions for future investigation are discussed. PMID:26011249

  5. Association of ventilation system type with SBS symptoms in office workers

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2001-02-07

    This paper provides a review and synthesis of current knowledge about the associations of ventilation system types in office buildings with sick building syndrome symptoms and discusses potential explanations for the associations. Relative to natural ventilation, air conditioning, with or without humidification, was consistently associated with a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of one or more SBS symptoms. Prevalences were typically higher by approximately 30% to 200% in the air conditioned buildings. In two of three assessments from a single study, symptom prevalences were also significantly higher in air conditioned buildings than in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation and no humidification. In approximately half of assessments, SBS symptom prevalences were significantly higher in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation than in buildings with natural ventilation. Insufficient information was available for conclusions about the potential increased risk of SBS symptoms with humidification. The statistically significant associations of mechanical ventilation and air conditioning with SBS symptoms are much more frequent than expected from chance and also not likely to be a consequence of confounding by several potential personal, job, or building related confounders. The reasons for the increases in symptom prevalences with mechanical ventilation and particularly with air conditioning remain unclear. Multiple deficiencies in HVAC system design, construction, operation, or maintenance, including some which cause pollutant emissions from HVAC systems, may contribute to the increases in symptom prevalences.

  6. Emotionally Biased Cognitive Processes: The Weakest Link Predicts Prospective Changes in Depressive Symptom Severity

    PubMed Central

    Everaert, Jonas; Duyck, Wouter; Koster, Ernst H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory are predictive of future depressive symptoms. It remains unknown, however, how these biased cognitive processes interact to predict depressive symptom levels in the long-term. In the present study, we tested the predictive value of two integrative approaches to model relations between multiple biased cognitive processes, namely the additive (i.e., cognitive processes have a cumulative effect) vs. the weakest link (i.e., the dominant pathogenic process is important) model. We also tested whether these integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict prospective changes in depressive symptom severity. At Time 1, participants completed measures of depressive symptom severity and emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory. At Time 2, one year later, participants were reassessed to determine depressive symptom levels and perceived stress. Results revealed that the weakest link model had incremental validity over the additive model in predicting prospective changes in depressive symptoms, though both models explained a significant proportion of variance in the change in depressive symptoms from Time 1 to Time 2. None of the integrative models interacted with perceived stress to predict changes in depressive symptomatology. These findings suggest that the best cognitive marker of the evolution in depressive symptoms is the cognitive process that is dominantly biased toward negative material, which operates independent from experienced stress. This highlights the importance of considering idiographic cognitive profiles with multiple cognitive processes for understanding and modifying effects of cognitive biases in depression. PMID:25951241

  7. Medically Unexplained Symptoms: an acceptable term?

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    Background: The term ‘Medically Unexplained Symptoms’ (MUS) is used by health professionals and researchers to refer to persistent bodily complaints, including pain and discomfort. Aims: This study explores the views held by a lay sample on the clinical terminology used to describe ‘MUS’, to ascertain reasons for particular preferences and whether preferences differ between individuals who experience more somatic symptoms. Design and methods: A sample (n = 844) of healthy adults completed an online survey, which included a questionnaire measuring somatic symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15)) and a question about their preferences for terminology used to describe MUS. Results: Of 844 participants, 698 offered their preferences for terminology. The most popular terms were ‘Persistent Physical Symptoms’ (20%) and ‘Functional Symptoms’ (17%). ‘MUS’ (15%), ‘Body Distress Disorder’ (13%) and ‘Complex Physical Symptoms’ (5%) were less popular. And 24% indicated no preference, but high PHQ-15 scorers were more likely to express preferences than low scorers. Conclusion: Persistent Physical Symptoms and Functional Symptoms are more acceptable to this sample of healthy adults than the more commonly used term ‘MUS’. PMID:26516565

  8. Maternal Depressive Symptoms following Autism Spectrum Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Julie Lounds; Warren, Zachary E.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined depressive symptoms, concerning the week following autism spectrum diagnosis and an average of 1.4 years later, in mothers (n = 75) of young children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Over three-quarters of mothers (78.7%) provided retrospective reports of clinically significant depressive symptoms

  9. Some Symptoms, Causes, and Remediations of Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Charlotte V.

    A literature review was conducted to determine the meaning, symptoms, causes, and treatment of dyslexia. The review revealed that dyslexia simply means "distorted words," and is the inability to read either phonetically or visually. Among the symptoms of dyslexia disclosed by the review are motion sickness, retardation in reading of from 6 months…

  10. INFLUENZA 101 Symptoms of the flu

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    INFLUENZA 101 Symptoms of the flu Sudden onset of fever/chills, coughing, muscle aches, headache) a pharmacist may suggest other things for symptoms When you need to seek medical attention for Influenza dehydration) · Disorientation or confusion *Most people with influenza do not benefit from seeing their doctor

  11. Parental Knowledge of Child Sexual Abuse Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullins, Lane Geddie; Jones, Jennifer D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of symptoms of child sexual abuse (CSA), and to determine the factors associated with that knowledge. A total of 150 parents listed symptoms of CSA in the following areas: physical/medical, emotional, sexual behavior, and behavior towards others. Results suggest that, although most…

  12. Warning signs and symptoms of heart disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or discomfort in the muscles of your feet, calves, or thighs. Symptoms that usually appear during walking ... If you have any signs of heart disease, call your health care ... to see if the symptoms go away or dismiss them as nothing. Call ...

  13. Functional symptoms in neurology: mimics and chameleons.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Reuber, Markus; Carson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The mimics and chameleons of functional symptoms in neurology could be a whole textbook of neurology. Nevertheless, there are some recurring themes when things go wrong, notably diagnostic bias introduced by the presence or absence of psychiatric comorbidity or life events, neurological diseases that look 'weird' and lack of appreciation of the more unusual features of functional symptoms themselves. PMID:23468561

  14. Somatic Symptoms in Traumatized Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kugler, Brittany B.; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B.; Truax, Tatyana V.; Storch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the…

  15. Does cold winter weather produce depressive symptoms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Michael J.; Goodes, Mike; Furlong, Candy; Tollefson, Gary D.

    1988-06-01

    To examine whether harsh winter weather is associated with depressive symptoms, 45 healthy subjects from Minnesota were compared to 42 subjects from California near the end of the winter season. No differences in the prevalence of depressive symptoms were found between the two groups.

  16. Autism Symptom Topography and Maternal Socioemotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekas, Naomi; Whitman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers examining the relationship of autism "symptomatology" and maternal stress have defined symptomatology in terms of level of severity, frequency of occurrence, or symptom type. In the present study, the relationship of maternal perceptions of these dimensions, along with a fourth, symptom diversity, and negative and positive indices of…

  17. Parent Ratings of ADHD Symptoms: Differential Symptom Functioning across Malaysian Malay and Chinese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rapson; Vance, Alasdair

    2008-01-01

    This study examined differential symptom functioning (DSF) in ADHD symptoms across Malay and Chinese children in Malaysia. Malay (N = 571) and Chinese (N = 254) parents completed the Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale, which lists the DSM-IV ADHD symptoms. DSF was examined using the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) structural equation…

  18. Evaluation of Cognitive Symptoms Following Concussion.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Myron; Madathil, Renee

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of cognitive symptoms following concussion has evolved over the last several decades as a distinct focus in research and an essential component of clinical decision making and management. The aims of this paper are to (1) identify issues related to assessment of postconcussion cognitive functioning and (2) provide a review of common self-report and performance-based measures, including computerized-based assessments (CBAs), and, more traditional, comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations. We conclude that (1) there has yet to emerge one cognitive-symptom measurement method that can be considered the "gold standard" for all settings, (2) the usefulness of cognitive symptoms assessment findings in the clinical management decisions rests a great deal on the background of the practitioner, and (3) cognitive-symptom assessment needs to be considered in the context of a broader evaluation of other postconcussion symptoms. PMID:26224031

  19. OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    OG 4.4.06 1 Use of Instrumented Water Tanks for the Improvement of Air Shower Detector Sensitivity sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS. Considerable efforts have also been made to develop telescopes which detect VHE extensive air showers (EAS

  20. OG.4.3.34 1 Atmospheric Cherenkov Detectors at Milagro to Measure

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    OG.4.3.34 1 Atmospheric Cherenkov Detectors at Milagro to Measure Cosmic­Ray Composition Above 50 emulsion detectors, or other types of particle detectors high in the atmosphere. This technique is limited, or by nitrogen fluorescence in the atmosphere. These methods can have large effective areas, but are complicated

  1. Characteristics of thyroid nodules causing globus symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nam, Inn-Chul; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Eun-Sook; Mo, Eun-Young; Park, Young-Hak; Sun, Dong-Il

    2015-05-01

    A globus sensation is one of the most common complaints in otolaryngologic clinics, and laryngopharyngeal reflux is the most common cause. However, thyroid nodules also can cause globus symptoms. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of thyroid nodules that cause globus. We selected patients prospectively with a single thyroid nodule on ultrasonograms. Patients with other causes of globus symptoms were excluded using questionnaires, fiber optic laryngoscopic examinations, and a psychiatric screening tool. In total, 175 patients were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups according to globus symptoms. Ultrasonographic characteristics and clinicopathological parameters were compared between the groups. Among various clinicopathologic and ultrasonographic parameters, size and horizontal location of the thyroid nodule showed significant differences between the groups. Nodules larger than 3 cm and those located anterior to the trachea had a tendency to cause globus symptoms. Regarding horizontal location, nodules that all parts were located anterior to the trachea showed a higher tendency to cause globus symptoms than nodules that only some parts were located anterior to the trachea. In conclusion, thyroid nodules with specific size and location can cause globus symptoms, and this finding can be indicated in patient counseling. Also, conservative treatments or thyroidectomy may be helpful in relieving patients' globus symptoms. PMID:25636252

  2. Menopausal hormone therapy and menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Al-Safi, Zain A; Santoro, Nanette

    2014-04-01

    A majority of women will experience bothersome symptoms related to declining and/or fluctuating levels of estrogen during their menopausal transition. Vasomotor symptoms, vaginal dryness, poor sleep, and depressed mood have all been found to worsen during the menopausal transition. While vasomotor symptoms gradually improve after menopause, the time course can be many years. Vaginal dryness does not improve without treatment, while the long-term course of sleep and mood deterioration is not clearly defined at this time. A small minority of women have vasomotor symptoms that persist throughout the remainder of their lives. These common menopausal symptoms all improve with estrogen treatment. Over the last 10 years, we have witnessed a dramatic reduction in enthusiasm for menopausal hormone therapy, despite its high efficacy relative to other treatments. We have also seen the emergence of sound, evidence-based clinical trials of non-hormonal alternatives that can control the common menopausal symptoms. Understanding the natural history of menopausal symptoms, and the risks and benefits of both hormonal and non-hormonal alternatives, helps the clinician individualize management plans to improve quality of life. PMID:24613533

  3. Depressive symptoms modify relationship between inflammation and physical symptoms in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Seongkum; Moser, Debra K.; Pressler, Susan J.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Dekker, Rebecca L.; Lennie, Terry A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) often have physical symptoms that result in poor health-related quality of life and are antecedents of hospitalization. Inflammation, as part of the pathological response in HF, can produce physical symptoms. Depressive symptoms can affect this relationship. Purpose To examine the relationship between soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNF-RI) and physical symptoms and the effects of depressive symptoms on this relationship in patients with HF, controlling for covariates (age, body mass index [BMI], social support, comorbidities, and medication). Methods Data on physical symptoms (Symptom Status Questionnaire-Heart Failure), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]-II), and sTNF-RI (blood samples) were collected from 145 patients with HF (age 60±12 years; 51% New York Heart Association class III/IIV). Data on sTNF-RI were square root transformed to achieve normality. Patients were divided into two groups based on their score on the BDI-II (non-depressed < 14 and depressed ? 14). Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze the data. Results In the total sample, higher sTNF-RI was significantly related to more severe physical symptoms, controlling for covariates (F = 7.915, p < .001). In subgroup analyses, sTNF-RI was significantly related to physical symptoms only in the non-depressed subgroup, controlling for covariates (F = 3.174, p = .005). Conclusion Depressive symptoms as well as inflammation need to be considered physical symptoms in patients with HF. Further studies are needed to determine the effects of improvement in inflammation on improvement in physical symptoms, taking into consideration the effects of depressive symptoms. PMID:25179036

  4. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p?symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p?symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  5. Non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    With the growing awareness of the presence of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) has come the realization that these non-motor features play a tremendously important, and sometimes dominant, role in the management and even the diagnosis of the disorder. Despite this, a reluctance to formally address and treat the non-motor symptoms of PD remains and quality of life for PD patients suffers. This review provides an overview of the impact non-motor symptoms have on persons with PD, along with a brief description of some of the more common non-motor features of PD. PMID:26372623

  6. Negative symptom assessment of chronic schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Raskin, A; Pelchat, R; Sood, R; Alphs, L D; Levine, J

    1993-01-01

    A new scale for assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia, the Negative Symptom Assessment (NSA), was administered to 101 male chronic, inpatient schizophrenia patients. Factor analysis of the NSA yielded seven factors, but most of the explained variance resided in Factor 1, Restricted Affect/Emotion. The factors that emerged from this study closely resembled NSA factors derived from an earlier study of outpatient schizophrenia patients, which indicates the factor structure of the NSA is robust. A constellation of variables reflecting long-term or chronic illness were significantly related to six of the seven factors. These results suggest that "institutionalism" may play a role in the evolution of some negative symptoms. PMID:8235463

  7. Generation of restriction map of Enterococcus faecalis OG1 and investigation of growth requirements and regions encoding biosynthetic function.

    PubMed

    Murray, B E; Singh, K V; Ross, R P; Heath, J D; Dunny, G M; Weinstock, G M

    1993-08-01

    A defined synthetic medium was used to determine the amino acid requirements of Enterococcus faecalis OG1 and to demonstrate the absence of a requirement for exogenous purines or pyrimidines. Genomic libraries prepared from strain OG1 were transduced into Escherichia coli auxotrophic mutants, and cloned DNAs which complemented pyrC, pyrD, purF, purL, and guaAB mutations were identified. These and other cloned DNAs with known functions were localized on a restriction map of OG1 which was generated with SfiI (5 fragments), AscI (9 fragments), and NotI (15 fragments); the size of the OG1 chromosome was revised from a previous estimate of approximately 2,750 kb to 2,825 kb. The synthetic medium and the restriction map should be useful for studying enterococcal metabolic functions and the relationships between chromosomally encoded genes. PMID:8349561

  8. Sjldne fugle i Danmark og Grnland i 2005 OLE AMSTRUP, ALEX SAND FRICH, TIM HESSELBALLE HANSEN, HENRIK HAANING NIELSEN,

    E-print Network

    Thorup, Kasper

    75 og 83 de seneste 10 år. 78 (57%) af de godkendte sager blev dokumenteret ved hjælp af foto, video dokumenteret med foto (Foto), video- film (Video), lydoptagelse (Bånd) eller dødfunden fugl (Død). Desuden er

  9. Symptom attribution after a plane crash: comparison between self-reported symptoms and GP records.

    PubMed Central

    Donker, G A; Yzermans, C J; Spreeuwenberg, P; van der Zee, J

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On 4 October 1992, an El Al Boeing 747-F cargo aeroplane crashed on two apartment buildings in Amsterdam. Thirty-nine residents on the ground and the four crew members of the plane died. In the years after, a gradually increasing number of people attributed physical signs and symptoms to their presence at the disaster scene. AIM: To investigate the consistency between patients' symptoms attributed to the crash and GPs' diagnoses and perception of the association with the crash. DESIGN OF STUDY: Comparison between self-reported symptoms to a call centre and GPs' medical records on onset and type of symptoms, diagnoses, and GPs' perception of association with the disaster, assessed by questionnaire. SETTING: Consenting patients (n = 621) contacting the call centre and their GPs. METHOD: Patients were interviewed by the call centre staff and interview data were recorded on a database. Questionnaires were sent to the consenting patients' GPs, requesting their opinions on whether or not their patients' symptoms were attributable to the effects of disaster. Baseline differences and differences in reported symptoms between interviewed patients and their GP records were tested using the chi2 test. RESULTS: The 553 responders reported on average 4.3 symptoms to the call centre. The majority of these symptoms (74%) were reported to the GP. Of the ten most commonly reported symptoms, fatigue, skin complaints, feeling anxious or nervous, dyspnoea, and backache featured in 80% of symptoms reported to the GP. One out of four symptoms was either reported to the GP before the disaster took place, or six or more years after (1998/1999, during a period of much media attention). Depression (7%), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (5%) and eczema (5%) were most frequently diagnosed by GPs. They related 6% of all reported symptoms to the disaster. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the symptoms attributed to a disaster by patients have been reported to their GP, who related only a small proportion of these to the disaster. PMID:12434961

  10. Buteyko technique use to control asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    Austin, Gillian

    The Buteyko breathing technique is recommended in national guidance for control of asthma symptoms. This article explores the evidence base for the technique, outlines its main principles and includes two cases studies. PMID:23697004

  11. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ingredients have been carefully studied) and well standardized. Mind and Body Therapies for Menopausal Symptoms A growing body of ... TK, Taylor AG. Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies. Menopause. 2008;15(5):1005–1013. Innes ...

  12. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  13. 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Alzheimer's

    MedlinePLUS

    ... An Interactive Tour Risk Factors Diagnosis Treatments Myths Clinical ... brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. There are 10 warning signs and symptoms. ...

  14. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... Diseases HPV-Associated Cancers Gynecologic Cancers Redirect CDC - HPV - Symptoms and Health Consequences Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome -- Causes and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sleep Habits Sleep Disorders by Category Insomnias Insomnia Child Insomnia Short Sleeper Hypersomnias Narcolepsy Insufficient Sleep Syndrome Long Sleeper Sleep Breathing Disorders Sleep Apnea Snoring Central Sleep Apnea Overview & Facts Symptoms & Risk Factors ...

  17. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Multimedia Related Links Global Hib Vaccination Hib Vaccination Meningitis Pneumonia Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... disease are: Pneumonia (lung infection) Bacteremia (bloodstream infection) Meningitis (infection of the covering of the brain and ...

  18. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / Summer ... and have resulted in a dramatic decrease in AIDS deaths in the U.S. NIH Research to Results ...

  19. What Are the Symptoms of Learning Disabilities?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Difficulty with reading and/or writing Problems with math skills Difficulty remembering Problems paying attention Trouble following ... numbers. Other symptoms may include 7 : Difficulty with math-related word problems Trouble making change in cash ...

  20. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Children's understanding of the symptoms of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, M R; Schonfeld, D J; O'Hare, L L; Showalter, D R; Cicchetti, D V

    1996-10-01

    Symptoms are the outward manifestations that allow children to identify and recognize illness; children's understanding of the symptoms of an illness may be directly related to their understanding of its cause or means of transmission. This study is the first empirical investigation of children's conceptual understanding and factual knowledge of the symptoms of AIDS. Children (N = 361; grades K to 6; 57% black, 24% Hispanic, 19% white; 52% female) attending four public schools in New Haven, Connecticut, were interviewed using a standardized semistructured interview (ASK, AIDS Survey for Kids) that included open-ended questions about the symptoms of AIDS and, for comparison, cancer and colds. Responses were scored for level of conceptual understanding and coded for factual content. For each illness, grade level was the variable most strongly correlated with symptomatology concept score (R = .42-.48, p < .0001) and contributed significantly (p < .0001) to the variance observed in concept score even after controlling for race, gender, verbal fluency, and socioeconomic status. The mean concept score was lower (p < .01) for symptomatology of AIDS (2.8 of possible 5) than for cancer (3.1) or colds (3.9). In addition, far more symptoms were named for colds than for either cancer or AIDS. Children who believed that HIV is spread via each of five potential means of transmission by casual contact were more likely (p < 01) to cite cold symptoms as symptoms of AIDS. We conclude that there exists a developmental progression in children's understanding of the symptomatology of AIDS. Children have a less sophisticated conceptual understanding and narrower factual knowledge base for AIDS than for colds and therefore have the capability to increase their understanding and knowledge about AIDS. Furthermore, improving children's understanding of the symptoms of AIDS may diminish misconceptions about transmission of HIV via casual contact. PMID:8911568

  2. Association of ventilation system type with SBS symptoms in office workers.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, O; Fisk, W J

    2002-06-01

    This paper provides a synthesis of current knowledge about the associations of ventilation system types in office buildings with sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms and discusses potential explanations for the associations. Most studies completed to date indicate that relative to natural ventilation, air conditioning, with or without humidification, was consistently associated with a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of one or more SBS symptoms, by approximately 30 to 200%. In two of three analyses from a single study (assessments), symptom prevalences were also significantly higher in air-conditioned buildings than in buildings with simple mechanical ventilation and no humidification. The available data also suggest, with less consistency, an increase in risk of symptoms with simple mechanical ventilation relative to natural ventilation. Insufficient information was available for conclusions about the potential increased risk of SBS symptoms with humidification or recirculation of return air. The statistically significant associations of mechanical ventilation and air conditioning with SBS symptoms are much more frequent than expected from chance and also not likely to be a consequence of confounding by several potential personal, job, or building-related confounders. Multiple deficiencies in HVAC system design, construction, operation, or maintenance, including some which cause pollutant emissions from HVAC systems, may contribute to the increases in symptom prevalences but other possible reasons remain unclear. PMID:12216473

  3. Patients' descriptions of angina symptoms: a qualitative study of primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melvyn M; Somerville, Claire; Feder, Gene; Foster, Gill

    2010-01-01

    Background Initial diagnosis of angina in primary care is based on the history of symptoms as described by the patient in consultation with their GP. Deciphering and categorising often complex symptom narratives, therefore, represents an ongoing challenge in the early diagnosis of angina in primary care. Aim To explore how patients with a preexisting angina diagnosis describe their symptoms. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 64 males and females, identified from general practice records as having received a diagnosis of angina within the previous 5 years. Results While some patients described their angina symptoms in narratives consistent with typical anginal symptoms, others offered more complex descriptions of their angina experiences, which were less easy to classify. The latter was particularly the case for severe coronary artery disease, where some patients tended to downplay chest pain or attribute their experience to other causes. Conclusion Patients with a known diagnosis of angina do not always describe their symptoms in a way that is consistent with Diamond and Forrester’s diagnostic framework for typicality of angina. Early diagnosis of angina in primary care requires that GPs operate with a broad level of awareness of the various ways in which their patients describe their symptoms. PMID:20883622

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure? The most common signs and symptoms of heart ... in your lungs. The condition requires emergency treatment. Heart Failure Signs and Symptoms The image shows the major ...

  5. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Coronary Heart Disease? A common symptom of coronary heart disease ( ... narrow the coronary arteries. Signs and Symptoms of Heart Problems Related to Coronary Heart Disease Some people ...

  6. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit, a ...

  7. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...and intensity of the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...taken to alleviate the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...claimant receives or has received for relief of pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  8. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...and intensity of the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...taken to alleviate the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...claimant receives or has received for relief of pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  9. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...and intensity of the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...taken to alleviate the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...claimant receives or has received for relief of pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  10. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...and intensity of the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...taken to alleviate the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...claimant receives or has received for relief of pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  11. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...and intensity of the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...taken to alleviate the claimant's pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...claimant receives or has received for relief of pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  12. Hypothyroidism:Symptoms,Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH Medlineplus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2012 Table ... of its symptoms are seen in other diseases, hypothyroidism usually cannot be diagnosed based on symptoms alone. ...

  13. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Sarcoidosis? Many people who have sarcoidosis have no signs ... symptom is more common in women than men. Sarcoidosis Signs and Symptoms The illustration shows the major ...

  14. Tackling Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia with Memantine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 52-year-old male patient suffering from chronic schizophrenia stabilized on risperidone long-acting injection (37,5?mg/2 weeks) and biperiden 4?mg/day. Residual symptoms are affective flattening, alogia, avolition, and asociality. Memantine 10?mg/day was added. After 1.5 months, the patient spontaneously referred to “feel better being in company of my relatives.” The following scales have been completed: the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (96), the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (3), the Mini Mental Scale Examination (26), and the Calgary Depression for Schizophrenia Scale (2). Memantine was increased to 20?mg/day and biperiden was decreased to 2?mg/day. Two months later, apathy and asociality considerably improved and affective flattening, alogia, and attention slightly got better (SANS 76, SAPS 1, MMSE 26, and CDSS 1). After two more months, the improvement continued in the same domains (SANS: 70, SAPS: 1 MMSE: 27, and CDSS: 1). Positive symptoms remained in full remission. It has been hypothesized that one of the causes of schizophrenia is glutamate excitotoxicity. Memantine, a glutamate receptor antagonist, could possibly ameliorate schizophrenia symptoms, the negative ones among them, used as add-on therapy to atypical antipsychotics. Memantine could be of potential help in schizophrenia patients with severe residual negative symptoms. PMID:24818033

  15. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  16. Mental symptoms in patients with cardiac symptoms and normal coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Christoph, Marian; Christoph, Antje; Dannemann, Stephanie; Poitz, David; Pfluecke, Christian; Strasser, Ruth H; Wunderlich, Carsten; Koellner, Volker; Ibrahim, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Patients with chest pain and normal coronary arteries often suffer from physical and psychological symptoms. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the incidence of mental symptoms in patients with angiographic exclusion of a coronary heart disease. Design In 253 patients with angiographic exclusion of a coronary heart disease the type and intensity of their symptoms were evaluated before and after coronary angiography. In addition, the incidence of psychopathological symptoms was quantified by standardised questionnaires such as general anxiety and depression (HADS), heart-focused anxiety (CAQ), hypochondria (Whiteley Index) and somatoform disorder (SOMS) and quality of life (SF-12). Finally, the incidence of psychological symptoms in these patients was compared to the incidence in the normal population. Results Despite the absence of a coronary artery disease, 70% of patients continue to suffer from cardiac symptoms. The incidence of general anxiety was increased by 37% in women and by 22% in men in comparison to the normal population. Heart-focused anxiety was raised by 27%. Somatoform disorder appeared 120% more often in patients after cardiac catheterisation in comparison to the normal population. In addition, the incidence of hypochondria was elevated by 68% in patients after coronary angiography compared to normal population. This increased appearance of psychological symptoms was reflected in a significantly lower quality of life (SF-12) in patients with inconspicuous coronary angiography. Conclusions Patients with cardiac symptoms and normal coronary arteries more often suffer from mental symptoms in comparison to the healthy population. PMID:25436115

  17. Characteristics of fathers with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David G; Learned, Nicole; Liu, Ying-Hua; Weitzman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research shows maternal depression to be associated with poorer child outcomes, and characteristics of these mothers have been described. Recent research describes associations of paternal depressive symptoms and child behavioral and emotional outcomes, but characteristics of these fathers have not been investigated. This study describes characteristics of fathers with depressive symptoms in the USA. Utilizing data from 7,247 fathers and mothers living in households with children aged 5-17 years who participated in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey 2004-2006, the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 was used to assess parental depressive symptoms, the Short Form-12 was used to examine paternal and maternal physical health, the Columbia Impairment Scale was used to measure child behavioral or emotional problems, and the Children with Special Health Care Needs Screener was used to identify children with special health care needs. In multivariate analyses, poverty (AOR 1.52; 95% CI 1.05-2.22), maternal depressive symptoms (AOR 5.77; 95% CI 4.18-7.95), living with a child with special health care needs (AOR 1.42, 95% CI 1.04-1.94), poor paternal physical health (AOR 3.31; 95% CI 2.50-4.38) and paternal unemployment (AOR 6.49; 95% CI 4.12-10.22) were independently associated with increased rates of paternal depressive symptoms. These are the first data that demonstrate that poverty, paternal physical health problems, having a child with special health care needs, maternal depressive symptoms, and paternal unemployment are independently associated with paternal depressive symptoms, with paternal unemployment associated with the highest rates of such problems. PMID:22362259

  18. Neuroborreliosis with extrapyramidal symptoms: a case report.

    PubMed

    Biesiada, Grazyna; Czapiel, Jacek; Sobczyk-Krupiarz, Iwona; Garlicki, Aleksander; Mach, Tomasz

    2008-05-01

    The disease of Lyme is a tick-borne infection. It involves skin, the nervous system, joints and the heart. Spirochaeta Borrelia burgdorferi is the etiologic agent of the disease. In the majority of cases, clinical symptoms, like migrating erythema, occur from 3 to 30 days, sometimes to 3 months after a bite from a tick. The early disseminated infection involves multiple migrating erythema, neuroborreliosis, arthritis, myocarditis and other organ-related symptoms. The late stage of chronic infection involves chronic atrophic leg dermatitis, neurological and rheumatological symptoms, and other organ-related symptoms which persist for above 12 months. The diagnosis of the disease of Lyme is based upon specific clinical symptoms confirmed by serologic tests. The two-step diagnostic protocol including the ELISA method, confirmed by the Western-blot test, is optimal. The present article describes a case of a 59-year-old man, a computer specialist, who often spends his free time walking in woods for recreation, and who was bitten by a tick 3 years before hospitalization. The bite resulted in migrating erythema that subsided without antimicrobial treatment. In spite of this, the man had not changed his hobby exposing himself to bites from ticks. One year later, multiple migrating erythema and extrapyramidalis symptoms appeared without any other organ malfunctions. In the current year, the patient was admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital, and received antibiotics (ceftriaxon) with following neurological improvement. Several months later, extrapyramidal symptoms increased. On the day of admission to the hospital, the neurologic examination showed abnormalities of upper and lower limbs movements (propulsive walking and the right lower leg traction), the right hand tremor, pouts of the face, and sleepiness. PMID:18619183

  19. Symptom onset in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Baena, Natalia; Aisen, Paul S.; Bird, Thomas; Danek, Adrian; Fox, Nick C.; Goate, Alison; Frommelt, Peter; Ghetti, Bernardino; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Lopera, Francisco; Martins, Ralph; Masters, Colin L.; Mayeux, Richard P.; McDade, Eric; Moreno, Sonia; Reiman, Eric M.; Ringman, John M.; Salloway, Steve; Schofield, Peter R.; Sperling, Reisa; Tariot, Pierre N.; Xiong, Chengjie; Morris, John C.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify factors influencing age at symptom onset and disease course in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (ADAD), and develop evidence-based criteria for predicting symptom onset in ADAD. Methods: We have collected individual-level data on ages at symptom onset and death from 387 ADAD pedigrees, compiled from 137 peer-reviewed publications, the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) database, and 2 large kindreds of Colombian (PSEN1 E280A) and Volga German (PSEN2 N141I) ancestry. Our combined dataset includes 3,275 individuals, of whom 1,307 were affected by ADAD with known age at symptom onset. We assessed the relative contributions of several factors in influencing age at onset, including parental age at onset, age at onset by mutation type and family, and APOE genotype and sex. We additionally performed survival analysis using data on symptom onset collected from 183 ADAD mutation carriers followed longitudinally in the DIAN Study. Results: We report summary statistics on age at onset and disease course for 174 ADAD mutations, and discover strong and highly significant (p < 10?16, r2 > 0.38) correlations between individual age at symptom onset and predicted values based on parental age at onset and mean ages at onset by mutation type and family, which persist after controlling for APOE genotype and sex. Conclusions: Significant proportions of the observed variance in age at symptom onset in ADAD can be explained by family history and mutation type, providing empirical support for use of these data to estimate onset in clinical research. PMID:24928124

  20. Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms Mediate Motivation to Reinstate Smoking During Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Claudia; Madrid, Jillian; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Withdrawal-based theories of addiction hypothesize that motivation to reinstate drug use following acute abstinence is mediated by withdrawal symptoms. Experimental tests of this hypothesis in the tobacco literature are scant and may be subject to methodological limitations. This study utilized a robust within-subject laboratory experimental design to investigate the extent to which composite tobacco withdrawal symptomatology level and three unique withdrawal components (i.e., low positive affect, negative affect, and urge to smoke) mediated the effect of smoking abstinence on motivation to reinstate smoking. Smokers (10?cig/day; N=286) attended two counterbalanced sessions at which abstinence duration was differentially manipulated (1-hour vs. 17-hours). At both sessions, participants reported current withdrawal symptoms and subsequently completed a task in which they were monetarily rewarded proportional to the length of time they delayed initiating smoking, with shorter latency reflecting stronger motivation to reinstate smoking. Abstinence reduced latency to smoking initiation and positive affect and increased composite withdrawal symptom level, urge, and negative affect. Abstinence-induced reductions in latency to initiating smoking were mediated by each withdrawal component, with stronger effects operating through urge. Combined analyses suggested that urge, negative affect, and low positive affect operate through empirically-unique mediational pathways. Secondary analyses suggested similar effects on smoking quantity, few differences among specific urge and affect subtypes, and that dependence amplifies some abstinence effects. This study provides the first experimental evidence that within-person variation in abstinence impacts motivation to reinstate drug use through withdrawal. Urge, negative affect, and low positive affect may reflect unique withdrawal-mediated mechanisms underlying tobacco addiction. PMID:25961814

  1. Activation of defense response pathways by OGs and Flg22 elicitors in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Denoux, Carine; Galletti, Roberta; Mammarella, Nicole; Gopalan, Suresh; Werck, Danièle; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M; Dewdney, Julia

    2008-05-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10-d-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Flg22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Flg22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose-dependent, but, even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of amino-cyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response. PMID:19825551

  2. Activation of defense response pathways by OGs and Flg22 elicitors in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Denoux, Carine; Galletti, Roberta; Mammarella, Nicole; Gopalan, Suresh; Werck, Danièle; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Dewdney, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10 day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Flg22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Flg22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose dependent, but even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of aminocyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response. PMID:19825551

  3. Mirabegron for male lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Oscar; Osborn, David; Kaufman, Melissa; Reynolds, W Stuart; Dmochowski, Roger

    2013-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men. Patients with BPH often present with a combination of obstructive and overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. It is postulated that bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) from BPH results in concomitant OAB symptoms through ischemic induced variations in the response to neurotransmitters of both the detrusor and the urothelium. This altered response leads to the pathologic activation of the micturition reflex, generating sensory dysfunction and involuntary bladder contractions. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonists (alpha-blockers) and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) are commonly used to treat the BOO caused by BPH. Anticholinergic agents are frequently used to treat concurrently OAB symptoms caused by the BOO. Unfortunately, anticholinergic medications demonstrate bothersome side effects and a theoretical risk of urinary retention. Basic science and clinical research has led to the development of a new class of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of overactive bladder with diminished risk of urinary retention and lacking many anticholinergic side effects. This novel compound, mirabegron (Mybertriq, Astellas Pharma US, Inc.), is a ??-adrenoceptor agonist and represents a promising new class of oral agents designed for the treatment of OAB symptoms, with minimal effect on voiding. PMID:23913200

  4. Normative Data for the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory.

    PubMed

    Meyers, John E; English, James; Miller, Ronald M; Lee, Amy Junghyun

    2015-01-01

    The demographically diverse populations served by large health care systems (Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense, Medicare, Medicaid) are routinely screened with the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI). The extent to which a patient's report of symptoms either initially and/or across time is affected by demographic variables-gender, ethnicity, age, or education-has not been investigated despite widespread use of the NSI. In practice, the effectiveness of this tool might be improved with demographically based norms. A large data set of normal community-dwelling individuals was collected using the NSI. Emphasis was made to collect data from individuals of diverse ethnic backgrounds. It was hypothesized that ethnic/cultural backgrounds would have an impact on NSI scores. The results provide normative data for the NSI applicable to a wide variety of individuals of various ages and ethnic backgrounds. An analysis of variance indicated there was no significant difference in NSI responses based on ethnic/cultural background; however, age and gender were found to contribute significantly to the variance associated with symptom endorsement. The NSI appears to be a reliable measure of self-report postconcussive symptoms. Age is a variable associated with differential symptom endorsement on the NSI. Follow-up studies are needed to provide a measure of the sensitivity and specificity of this measure. PMID:25874907

  5. Attribution of somatic symptoms in hypochondriasis.

    PubMed

    Neng, Julia M B; Weck, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The misinterpretation of bodily symptoms as an indicator of a serious illness is a key feature of the criteria and the cognitive-behavioural models of hypochondriasis. Previous research suggests that individuals suffering from health anxiety endorse attributions of physical disease, whereas persons with elevated general anxiety have the tendency to attribute psychological causes to their symptoms. However, whether a somatic attribution style is specific to patients with hypochondriasis, as opposed to those with anxiety disorders, has not yet been investigated and is therefore part of the present study. Fifty patients with hypochondriasis, 50 patients with a primary anxiety disorder and 50 healthy participants were presented with nine common bodily sensations and had to spontaneously attribute possible causes to the symptoms. Patients with hypochondriasis differed from patients with anxiety disorders and healthy controls in giving significantly fewer normalizing explanations, but attributing more often in terms of moderate or serious diseases. Patients with anxiety disorders also made significantly fewer normalizing attributions and more somatic attributions to a severe illness than healthy controls. There were no differences between the groups in the frequency of psychological attributions and somatic attributions concerning mild diseases. The present study demonstrates that hypochondriasis is associated with a disorder-specific attribution style connecting somatic symptoms primarily with moderate and serious diseases. By contrast, normalizing attributions are largely omitted from consideration by patients with hypochondriasis. The findings conform with the cognitive conception of hypochondriasis and support the strategy of modifying symptom attributions, as practiced in cognitive-behavioural therapy. PMID:24123559

  6. Predicting Difficulties in Youth's Friendships: Are Anxiety Symptoms as Damaging as Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amanda J.; Carlson, Wendy; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Schwartz-Mette, Rebecca A.; Smith, Rhiannon R.; Swenson, Lance P.

    2011-01-01

    Youth's friendships serve important functions in development; however, internalizing symptoms may undermine these relationships. Two studies are presented that examine the association of depressive and anxiety symptoms with friendship adjustment. Study 1 tested concurrent effects and Study 2 tested prospective effects over 6 months. Like past…

  7. Associations between Sleep Characteristics, Seasonal Depressive Symptoms, Lifestyle, and ADHD Symptoms in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bijlenga, Denise; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Breuk, Minda; van Someren, Eus J. W.; Lie, Maria E. H.; Boonstra, A. Marije; Swaab, Hanna J. T.; Kooij, J. J. Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The authors explored associations between ADHD symptoms, seasonal depressive symptoms, lifestyle, and health. Method: Adult ADHD patients ("n" = 202) and controls ("n" = 189) completed the ASESA questionnaire involving lifestyle, eating pattern, and physical and psychological health, and validated measures on ADHD…

  8. Dynamic Associations between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Adolescents' Depressive and Externalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Garber, Judy

    2010-01-01

    The current prospective study investigated transactional relations between maternal depressive symptoms and children's depressive and externalizing symptoms. Participants included 240 children (M age = 11.86 years, SD = 0.56; 53.9% female) and their mothers who were part of a 6-year longitudinal study. Measures of maternal depression (Beck…

  9. Do Symptoms of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Children with ADHD Symptoms Represent Comorbid Internalizing Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Annie A.; Mrug, Sylvie; Hodgens, Bart; Patterson, Cryshelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Symptoms of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) are correlated with inattention and internalizing difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether symptoms of SCT reflect comorbid internalizing disorder with ADHD or a separate syndrome. Method: Using a clinical sample of youth evaluated for behavioral and learning…

  10. Otalgia and aversive symptoms in temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bush, F M; Harkins, S W; Harrington, W G

    1999-09-01

    The term Costen's syndrome has been used in the dentomedical literature to describe a constellation of craniofacial symptoms. Since some of the same complaints have been reported in patients with "generalized" psychological distress, symptoms associated with the syndrome may not be useful in differential diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. The present study investigated whether some somatic complaints, particularly tinnitus and dizziness, were pathognomonic in patients with chronic temporomandibular pain. Illness behavior and personality factors were studied for possible interrelationships with these symptoms. Factor analysis revealed that tinnitus and dizziness loaded on separate factors. Tinnitus loaded with nasal stuffiness, tearing, and itching of the eyelids and nose, while dizziness loaded with complaints of altered taste and smell and blurred vision. Neither was consistently related to measures of pain or to indices of illness behavior or somatic focus. PMID:10527281

  11. Influence of aeroionotherapy on some psychiatric symptoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleanu, M.; Stamatiu, C.

    1985-03-01

    Negative aeroionotherapy (daily 15 50 min sittings, for 10 30 days) was applied in 112 patients with various psychiatric disorders, especially neuroses, with the aim of ameliorating certain symptoms (target symptoms). Corona and water air ion generators, as well as electro-aerosol generators, were used. The aeroionization (small air ion concentration), at the patient's respiration level, was moderate: n-=10,000 15,000/ml air; n+s?1,000/ml air; q=n+/n-?0.1. In most treated patients a diminution or even the disappearance of the target symptoms was obtained. Those obviously ameliorated under the influence of aeroionotherapy were: asthenia, depressive reactions, anxiety, irascibility, cephalea, insomnia, and general indisposition.

  12. Perimenopausal migraine in women with vasomotor symptoms.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2012-01-01

    Migraine is affected by fluctuating estrogen levels so it is not surprising that the perimenopause is a time of peak rate of change of migraine prevalence in women. Evidence supports estrogen 'withdrawal' as one of the important triggers of menstrual attacks of migraine without aura, while high levels are associated with migraine aura. This mini review addresses the issues of diagnosing migraine, treating the symptoms of migraine, and controlling co-morbid migraine and hot flushes with hormonal and non-hormonal options. Maintaining a stable estrogen environment is the most effective treatment for vasomotor symptoms and can also benefit estrogen-withdrawal migraine. Using only the lowest doses necessary to control symptoms minimizes the risk of unwanted side effects. Non-hormonal options for both conditions are limited but there is evidence of efficacy for fluoxetine and venflaxine, with less evidence for gabapentin. PMID:22115567

  13. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Shin, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung; Oh, Boung-Jun; Jung, Ho Won; Chung, Young Soo

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  14. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  15. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  16. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  17. 20 CFR 220.114 - Evaluation of symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Evaluation of symptoms, including pain. 220... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.114 Evaluation of symptoms, including pain...'s symptoms, including pain, and the extent to which the claimant's symptoms can reasonably...

  18. Dynamic temporal relations between anxious and depressive symptoms across adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kouros, Chrystyna D; Quasem, Susanna; Garber, Judy

    2013-08-01

    Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent among adolescents and associated with impairment in multiple domains of functioning. Moreover, anxiety and depression frequently co-occur, with estimated comorbidity rates as high as 75%. Whereas previous research has shown that anxiety symptoms predict increased depressive symptoms over time, the relation between depressive symptoms and later anxiety symptoms has been inconsistent. The present study examined dynamic relations between anxiety and depressive symptoms across adolescence and explored whether these longitudinal relations were moderated by maternal history of anxiety, family relationship quality, or children's attributional style. Participants included 240 children (M age = 11.86 years; 53.9% female) and their mothers, who were assessed annually for 6 years. Children reported on their depressive symptoms and mothers reported on their child's anxiety symptoms. Dynamic latent change score models indicated that anxiety symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in depressive symptoms over time. Depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in anxiety symptoms among children who had mothers with a history of anxiety, reported low family relationship quality, or had high levels of negative attributions. Thus, whereas anxiety symptoms were a robust predictor of later depressive symptoms during adolescence, contextual and individual factors may be important to consider when examining relations between depressive symptoms and subsequent change in anxiety symptoms. PMID:23880385

  19. Dynamic Temporal Relations between Anxious and Depressive Symptoms across Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Quasem, Susanna; Garber, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent among adolescents and associated with impairment in multiple domains of functioning. Moreover, anxiety and depression frequently co-occur, with estimated comorbidity rates as high as 75%. Whereas previous research has shown that anxiety symptoms predict increased depressive symptoms over time, the relation between depressive symptoms and later anxiety symptoms has been inconsistent. The present study examined dynamic relations between anxiety and depressive symptoms across adolescence, and explored whether these longitudinal relations were moderated by maternal history of anxiety, family relationship quality, or children’s attributional style. Participants included 240 children (M age = 11.86 years; 53.9% female) and their mothers who were assessed annually for six years. Children reported on their depressive symptoms and mothers reported on their child’s anxiety symptoms. Dynamic latent change score models indicated that anxiety symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in depressive symptoms over time. Depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in anxiety symptoms among children who had mothers with a history of anxiety, reported low family relationship quality, or had high levels of negative attributions. Thus, whereas anxiety symptoms were a robust predictor of later depressive symptoms during adolescence, contextual and individual factors may be important to consider when examining relations between depressive symptoms and subsequent change in anxiety symptoms. PMID:23880385

  20. The Autonomic Symptom Profile: a new instrument to assess autonomic symptoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G. A.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Offord, K. P.; Atkinson, E. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Low, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a new specific instrument called the Autonomic Symptom Profile to measure autonomic symptoms and test its validity. BACKGROUND: Measuring symptoms is important in the evaluation of quality of life outcomes. There is no validated, self-completed questionnaire on the symptoms of patients with autonomic disorders. METHODS: The questionnaire is 169 items concerning different aspects of autonomic symptoms. The Composite Autonomic Symptom Scale (COMPASS) with item-weighting was established; higher scores indicate more or worse symptoms. Autonomic function tests were performed to generate the Composite Autonomic Scoring Scale (CASS) and to quantify autonomic deficits. We compared the results of the COMPASS with the CASS derived from the Autonomic Reflex Screen to evaluate validity. RESULTS: The instrument was tested in 41 healthy controls (mean age 46.6 years), 33 patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies (mean age 59.5 years), and 39 patients with autonomic failure (mean age 61.1 years). COMPASS scores correlated well with the CASS, demonstrating an acceptable level of content and criterion validity. The mean (+/-SD) overall COMPASS score was 9.8 (+/-9) in controls, 25.9 (+/-17.9) in the patients with nonautonomic peripheral neuropathies, and 52.3 (+/-24.2) in the autonomic failure group. Scores of symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and secretomotor dysfunction best predicted the CASS on multiple stepwise regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a questionnaire that measures autonomic symptoms and present evidence for its validity. The instrument shows promise in assessing autonomic symptoms in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies.

  1. Longitudinal modelling of respiratory symptoms in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlink, Uwe; Fritz, Gisela; Herbarth, Olf; Richter, Matthias

    2002-08-01

    A panel of 277 children, aged 3-7 years, was used to study the association between air pollution (O3, SO2, NO2, and total suspended particles), meteorological factors (global radiation, maximum daytime temperature, daily averages of vapour pressure and air humidity) and respiratory symptoms. For 759 days the symptoms were recorded in a diary and modelling was based on a modification of the method proposed by Korn and Whittemore (Biometrics 35: 795-798, 1979). This approach (1) comprises an extension using environmental parameters at different time scales, (2) addresses the suitability of using the daily fraction of symptomatic individuals to account for inter-individual interactions and (3) enables the most significant weather effects to be identified. The resulting model consisted of (1) an individual specific intercept that takes account of the population's heterogeneity, (2) the individual's health status the day before, (3) a long-term meteorological effect, which may be either the squared temperature or global radiation in interaction with temperature, (4) the short-term effect of sulfur dioxide, and (5) the short-term effect of an 8-h ozone concentration above 60 µg/m3. Using the estimated parameters as input to a simulation study, we checked the quality of the model and demonstrate that the annual cycle of the prevalence of respiratory symptoms is associated to atmospheric covariates. Individuals suffering from allergy have been identified as a group of a particular susceptibility to ozone. The duration of respiratory symptoms appears to be free of scale and follows an exponential distribution function, which confirms that the symptom record of each individual follows a Poisson point-process. This supports the assumption that not only respiratory diseases, but also respiratory symptoms can be considered an independent measure for the health status of a population sample. Since a point process is described by only one parameter (namely the intensity of the point process), it is appropriate for records of respiratory symptoms to identify only one model which covers both the occurrence and duration of symptoms.

  2. Symptoms and signs of chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komaroff, A L; Buchwald, D

    1991-01-01

    This review summarizes the symptoms and signs seen in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). It is based on the authors' experience with two cohorts of approximately 510 patients with chronic debilitating fatigue and on the reported experience of other investigators with similar patients. The most characteristic symptoms of CFS are the sudden onset of an infectious-type illness, the subsequent chronic and debilitating fatigue, and postexertional malaise; many patients also have recurrent fevers, pharyngitis, adenopathy, myalgias, sleep disorders, and cognitive impairment. PMID:2020806

  3. Forgiveness and the appraisal-coping process in response to relationship conflicts: implications for depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ysseldyk, Renate; Matheson, Kimberly; Anisman, Hymie

    2009-03-01

    The present investigation assessed the mediating role of appraisal-coping processes in the relation between forgiveness and depressive symptoms associated with intimate relationship conflicts. Study 1 assessed the role of forgiveness in the context of a severe relationship stressor, namely women experiencing dating abuse, along with the appraisal-coping responses and depressive symptoms associated with such a stressor. Study 2 evaluated the function served by forgiveness among men and women in response to non-abusive relationship stressors, including the dissolution of the relationship, and also assessed the relations among forgiveness, appraisal-coping processes, and depressive symptoms. Women who encountered dating abuse were less likely to forgive their partners, and this was linked to higher levels of depressive symptoms. The relation between forgiveness and lower depressive symptoms was partially mediated by lower threat appraisals, secondary appraisals of the effectiveness of emotion-focused coping, and the reduced endorsements of this coping strategy (Study 1). Appraisal-coping processes similarly mediated the relation between forgiveness and depressive symptoms among men and women reporting conflict in an ongoing (non-abusive) relationship or a relationship break-up (Study 2). It is suggested that the relation between forgiveness and diminished distress operates primarily by guiding individuals' appraisals of the conflict and by diminishing the reliance on emotion-focused coping. PMID:19096986

  4. Experimental investigation of the effects of naturalistic dieting on bulimic symptoms: moderating effects of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Presnell, Katherine; Stice, Eric; Tristan, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Prospective studies suggest that dieting increases risk for bulimic symptoms, but experimental trials indicate dieting reduces bulimic symptoms. However, these experiments may be unrepresentative of real-world weight loss dieting. In addition, the fact that most dieters do not develop eating disorders suggests moderating factors may be important. Accordingly, we randomly assigned 157 female intermittent dieters to either diet as they usually do for weight loss or eat as they normally do when not dieting for 4 weeks. Naturalistic dieting halted the weight gain shown by controls, but did not result in significant weight loss. Although there was no main effect of the dieting manipulation on bulimic symptoms, moderation analyses indicated that naturalistic dieting decreased bulimic symptoms among participants with initially low depressive symptoms. Results suggest that self-initiated weight loss dieting is not particularly effective, which appears to explain several discrepancies in the literature. Additionally, depressive symptoms may be an important determinant of bulimic symptoms that eclipses the effects of naturalistic dieting on this outcome. PMID:17662503

  5. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice. PMID:26432501

  6. Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

  7. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  8. PUZZLING SYMPTOMS: EATING DISORDERS AND THE BRAIN

    E-print Network

    Squire, Larry R.

    PUZZLING SYMPTOMS: EATING DISORDERS AND THE BRAIN A FAMILY GUIDE TO THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF EATING DISORDERS F.E.A.S.T. FAMILY GUIDE SERIES FALL 2012 OUR LOVED ONE HAS AN EATING DISORDER.WHAT DOES THIS HAVE TO DO WITH THE BRAIN? Although people with eating disorders struggle to eat normally, this is only

  9. Relaxation Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Techniques to Manage IBS Symptoms Jump to Topic Psychological Treatments Understanding Stress Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Relaxation Techniques for IBS You’ve been to the doctor and you’ve had all of the tests. The diagnosis you’ve been given is irritable ...

  10. Research report Elevated depressive symptoms enhance reflexive

    E-print Network

    Maddox, W. Todd

    Research report Elevated depressive symptoms enhance reflexive but not reflective auditory category system Reflexive system a b s t r a c t In vision an extensive literature supports the existence to develop and test rules for classifying in an explicit fashion. The reflexive system is striatally

  11. Body Image Change and Adolescent Depressive Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Judith M.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the temporal association between body image and depressive symptoms in African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and white adolescents. Found that girls were more influenced by body image change than boys. Compared to other ethnic groups, African American girls experienced a greater increase in psychological distress as body…

  12. Autism and ADHD: Overlapping and Discriminating Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Mayes, Rebecca D.; Molitoris, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Children with ADHD and autism have some similar features, complicating a differential diagnosis. The purpose of our study was to determine the degree to which core ADHD and autistic symptoms overlap in and discriminate between children 2-16 years of age with autism and ADHD. Our study demonstrated that 847 children with autism were easily…

  13. Programmed symptoms: disparate effects united by purpose.

    PubMed

    Gracely, Richard H; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) share features of similar multiple symptoms, virtually unknown mechanisms and lack of effective treatments. The CSS nomenclature was chosen over alternatives because it focused on a putative physiological mechanism of central sensitization common to disorders such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia and temporomandibular disorder. Increasing evidence from multiple biological systems suggests a further development. In this new model central sensitization is part of a ensemble that includes also the symptoms of widespread pain, fatigue, unrefreshing sleep and dyscognition. The main feature is an intrinsic program that produces this ensemble to guide behavior to restore normal function in conditions that threaten survival. The well known "illness response" is a classic example that is triggered in response to the specific threat of viral infection. The major leap for this model in the context of CSS is that the symptom complex is not a reactive result of pathology, but a purposeful feeling state enlisted to combat pathology. Once triggered, this state is produced by potential mechanisms that likely include contributions of the peripheral and central immune systems, as well as stress response systems such as the autonomic system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These act in concert to alter behavior in a beneficial direction. This concept explains similar symptoms for many triggering conditions, the poorly understood pathology, and the resistance to treatment. PMID:26088212

  14. Psychiatric Symptoms in Children with Primary Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Pirjo; Sourander, Andre; Metsahonkala, Liisa; Aromaa, Minna; Helenius, Hans; Sillanpaa, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of psychiatric symptoms with migraine and tension-type headache in children. Method: A questionnaire completed by 1,135 Finnish children in the sixth grade identified 154 children with migraine, 138 with tension-type headache, and 407 children who were headache-free. Seventy children were randomly selected…

  15. Political Ideology and Psychological Symptoms Following Terror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Avital; Solomon, Zahava

    2010-01-01

    The article examines the associations between political ideology and level of psychological symptoms in youth exposed to terror attacks. The study included 2,999 7th to 10th graders from various parts of Israel. Political ideology was examined in two ways: (a) as a content dimension: "political stand"--holding right, centrist, or left wing views…

  16. Does Early Adolescent Sex Cause Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabia, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    A recent study by the Heritage Foundation (Rector, Johnson, & Noyes, 2003) found evidence of a positive relationship between early sexual intercourse and depressive symptoms. This finding has been used to bolster support for funding abstinence only sex education. However, promoting abstinence will only yield mental health benefits if there is a…

  17. Anorexia Nervosa: Its Symptoms and Possible Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingaman, David E.

    This document presents a definition and description of anorexia nervosa as a disorder that occurs predominantly in girls and that can affect 1 out of every 250 girls between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The existence of a distorted mental body image among anorexics is discussed and symptoms of the disorder are described, including amenorrhea…

  18. Nets Information Security Risikoanalyse og testing: med perspektiv fra frontlinjen

    E-print Network

    Stølen, Ketil

    Operational management 2nd Line of Defence Control, policy and framework 3rd Line of Defence Audit 1 2 3 1 2 3 Security, BUs/GUs & Management Control Activities 1 2 Orientation Compliance Business Risk #12;C l i c k t s t y l e s 3 Nets #12;C l i c k t o e d i t M a s t e r t e x t s t y l e s Three lines of defence Risk

  19. On Orbit ISS Oxygen Generation System Operation Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diderich, Greg S.; Polis, Pete; VanKeuren, Steven P.; Erickson, Robert; Mason, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) has accumulated almost a year of operation at varied oxygen production rates within the US Laboratory Module (LAB) since it was first activated in July 2007. It was operated intermittently through 2009 and 2010, due to filter clogging and acid accumulation in the recirculation loop. Since the installation of a deionizing bed in the recirculation loop in May of 2011 the OGA has been operated continuously. Filters in the recirculation loop have clogged and have been replaced. Hydrogen sensors have drifted apart, and a power failure may have condensed water on a hydrogen sensor. A pump delta pressure sensor failed, and a replacement new spare pump failed to start. Finally, the voltage across the cell stack increased out of tolerance due to cation contamination, and the cell stack was replaced. This paper will discuss the operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  20. Diagnostic criteria for psychosomatic research and somatic symptom disorders.

    PubMed

    Sirri, Laura; Fava, Giovanni A

    2013-02-01

    The Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) were introduced in 1995 by an international group of investigators to expand the traditional domains of the disease model. The DCPR are a set of 12 'psychosomatic syndromes' which provide operational tools for psychosocial variables with prognostic and therapeutic implications in clinical settings. Eight syndromes concern the main manifestations of abnormal illness behaviour: somatization, hypochondriacal fears and beliefs, and illness denial. The other four syndromes (alexithymia, type A behaviour, demoralization and irritable mood) refer to the domain of psychological factors affecting medical conditions. This review describes the conceptual bases of the DCPR and the main findings concerning their application, with particular reference to the incremental information they added to the customary psychiatric classification. The DCPR were also compared with the provisional DSM-5 somatic symptom disorders. The DCPR were found to be more sensitive than DSM-IV in identifying subthreshold psychological distress and characterizing patients' psychological response to medical illness. DSM-5 somatic symptom disorders seem to neglect important clinical phenomena, such as illness denial, resulting in a narrow view of patients' functioning. The additional information provided by the DCPR may enhance the decision-making process. PMID:23383664

  1. Differences in Mortality in Acute Coronary Syndrome Symptom Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Barbara; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; McKinley, Sharon; Moser, Debra K.; Meischke, Hendrika; Doering, Lynn V.; Davidson, Patricia; Pelter, Michele M.; Dracup, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Background The timely and accurate identification of symptoms of ACS is a challenge for patients and clinicians. It is unknown whether response times and clinical outcomes differ with specific symptoms. We sought to identify which acute coronary syndrome (ACS) symptoms are related—symptom clusters—and to determine if sample characteristics, response times, and outcomes differ among symptom cluster groups. Methods In a multisite randomized clinical trial, 3522 patients with known cardiovascular disease were followed for two years. During follow-up, 331 (11%) had a confirmed ACS event. In this group, eight presenting symptoms were analyzed using cluster analysis. Differences in symptom cluster group characteristics, delay times, and outcomes were examined. Results The sample was predominately male (67%), older (mean 67.8, S.D. 11.6 years), and white (90%). Four symptom clusters were identified: Classic ACS characterized by chest pain; Pain Symptoms (neck, throat, jaw, back, shoulder, arm pain); Stress Symptoms (shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, indigestion, dread, anxiety), and Diffuse Symptoms, with a low frequency of most symptoms. Those in the Diffuse Symptoms cluster tended to be older (p=.08) and the Pain Symptoms group was most likely to have a history of angina (p=.01). After adjusting for differences, the Diffuse Symptoms cluster demonstrated higher mortality at two years (17%) than the other three clusters (2–5%, p<.001), even though prehospital delay time did not differ significantly. Conclusion Most ACS symptoms occur in groups or clusters. Uncharacteristic symptom patterns may delay diagnosis and treatment by clinicians even when patients seek care rapidly. Knowledge of common symptom patterns may facilitate rapid identification of ACS. PMID:20211300

  2. Symptom appraisal and healthcare-seeking for symptoms suggestive of colorectal cancer: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, N; Birt, L; Banks, J; Emery, J; Mills, K; Johnson, M; Rubin, G P; Hamilton, W; Walter, F M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Timely diagnosis of colorectal cancer is important to improve survival. This study explored symptom appraisal and help-seeking among patients referred to specialist services with symptoms of colorectal cancer. Design Qualitative in-depth interview study. Setting and participants Participants were recruited on referral to gastroenterology clinics (North East and East of England); interviews were conducted soon after referral. We purposively sampled participants to ensure a range of accounts in terms of age, sex, diagnosis and geographical location. Methods Data collection and analysis were underpinned by the Model of Pathways to Treatment. Framework analysis was used to explore the data within and across cases, focusing on patient beliefs and experiences, disease factors and healthcare influences. Results 40 participants were interviewed (aged 43–87?years, 17 women, 18 diagnosed with colorectal cancer). Patients diagnosed with and without colorectal cancer had similar symptom pathways. We found a range of interacting and often competing biopsychosocial, contextual and cultural influences on the way in which people recognised, interpreted and acted on their symptoms. People attempted to ‘maintain normality’ through finding benign explanations for their symptoms. Bodily changes were appraised within the context of usual bowel patterns, comorbidities and life events, and decisions to seek help were made in relation to expectations about the course of symptoms. The ‘private nature’ of colorectal cancer symptoms could affect both their identification and discussions with others including healthcare professionals. Within the context of the National Health Service, people needed to legitimise appropriate use of healthcare services and avoid being thought of as wasting doctors’ time. Conclusions Findings provide guidance for awareness campaigns on reducing stigma around appraising and discussing bowel movements, and the importance of intermittent and non-specific symptoms. Altering perceptions about the appropriate use of health services could have a beneficial effect on time to presentation. PMID:26453591

  3. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16?mm (70?mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3?m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30?sec (24 steps in 38?sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD. PMID:25628905

  4. Somatic symptoms in traumatized children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Brittany B; Bloom, Marlene; Kaercher, Lauren B; Truax, Tatyana V; Storch, Eric A

    2012-10-01

    Childhood exposure to trauma has been associated with increased rates of somatic symptoms (SS), which may contribute to diminished daily functioning. One hundred and sixty-one children residing at a residential treatment home who had experienced neglect and/or abuse were administered the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC), the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Primary caregivers completed the Child Behavior Checklist. Two composite measures of SS were formed to represent both child- and caregiver-rated SS. Over 95% of children endorsed at least one SS on the child-rated measure. Children who had experienced sexual abuse had higher rates of SS relative to children who had not. Child-rated SS were highly correlated with the CDI total score and the TSCC subscales of anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, dissociation, and anger. The TSCC anxiety subscale mediated the relationship between sexual abuse and child-rated SS. PMID:22395849

  5. Metabolomic change precedes apple superficial scald symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rudell, David R; Mattheis, James P; Hertog, Maarten L A T M

    2009-09-23

    Untargeted metabolic profiling was employed to characterize metabolomic changes associated with 'Granny Smith' apple superficial scald development following 1-MCP or DPA treatment. Partial least-squares discriminant analyses were used to link metabolites with scald, postharvest treatments, and storage duration. Models revealed metabolomic differentiation between untreated controls and fruit treated with DPA or 1-MCP within 1 week following storage initiation. Metabolic divergence between controls and DPA-treated fruit after 4 weeks of storage preceded scald symptom development by 2 months. alpha-Farnesene oxidation products with known associations to scald, including conjugated trienols, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol, were associated with presymptomatic as well as scalded control fruit. Likewise, a large group of putative triterpenoids with mass spectral features similar to those of ursolic acid and beta-sitosterol were associated with control fruit and scald. Results demonstrate that extensive metabolomic changes associated with scald precede actual symptom development. PMID:19715334

  6. Asthma and other symptoms in cinnamon workers.

    PubMed Central

    Uragoda, C G

    1984-01-01

    Cinnamon, which is the bark of the Cinnamomum zeylanicum tree, contains cinnamic aldehyde, which is an irritant. Workers processing cinnamon before export are exposed to much cinnamon dust. Forty such workers with an average of four years' service in the industry were examined. Thirty five workers (87.5%) had symptoms, nine having had asthma (22.5%). Other symptoms, probably related to the irritant nature of cinnamon dust, were irritation of skin (50%), loss of hair (37.5%), and smarting of eyes while at work (22.5%). Loss of weight (65%) was the commonest finding. Contact dermatitis which has previously been described was not found in any of the workers. PMID:6232942

  7. Non-hormonal management of vasomotor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sassarini, J; Lumsden, M A

    2013-08-01

    Vasomotor symptoms are the most common indication for the prescription of hormone replacement therapy since it is effective in over 80% of cases. In 1995, 37% of American women took hormone replacement therapy, principally for this purpose. However, following the publication of results from the Women's Health Initiative, as many as half of these women in the US and in the UK and New Zealand discontinued hormone therapy. Discontinuation of estrogen is often accompanied by a return of vasomotor symptoms; however, only a small number (18%) of women report restarting hormone therapy. Alternatives are available, but limited knowledge on etiology and mechanisms of hot flushing represents a major obstacle for the development of new, targeted, non-hormonal treatments, and no current alternatives are as effective as estrogen. PMID:23848489

  8. The signs and symptoms of secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Chapel, T A

    1980-01-01

    The signs and symptoms of 105 patients with secondary syphilis were evaluated in a clinic for treatment of sexually transmissible diseases. The symptoms were, in order of decreasing frequency, pruritus, 44 patients; sore throat, 16; headache, nine; muscle aches, nine; fever, five; meningismus, three; loss of scalp hair, three; loss of appetite, two; loss of weight, two; and visual disturbances, one. The dominant morphologic characteristics of the lesions, in order of decreasing frequency, were maculopapular, 73 patients; papular, 13; macular, 10; annular papular, six; papulopustular, two; and psoriasiform papular, one. Almost a fourth of the patients were not aware that they had mucocutaneous lesions, and > 20% of patients had inconspicuous lesions. The distributions and morphologic features of the lesions of eight patients (7.6%) suggested other dermatoses. PMID:7455863

  9. [A case of malignant hyperthermia with evident symptoms in the postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Hari, Junko; Takenami, Tamie; Hayashi, Tsunehito; Ueno, Tetsuo; Yamada, Yukari; Okamoto, Hirotsugu

    2013-03-01

    A 36-year-old man (185 cm tall, weighing 85 kg) was scheduled for fixation of a right carpal bone fracture. He had no operative history, and his preoperative laboratory data were normal. A laryngeal mask was inserted after intravenous propofol and fentanyl administration without a muscle relaxant. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane in a mixture of air and oxygen. A tourniquet was placed on the right upper arm. One hour after the operation, his heart rate increased to 90-100 beats x min(-1) from 70-80 beats x min(-1) at the start of the operation, and tachycardic continued, even after release of the tourniquet. Although end-tidal CO2 was 50-60 mmHg, his body temperature remained 37.6 degrees C, and neither muscle stiffness nor brown urine was observed. The duration of the operation and the duration of anesthesia were 2 hours 40 min and 4 hours, respectively. The patient went back to the ward without myalgia after removal of the laryngeal mask. On the postoperative day one, the patient had brown urine. On the postoperative day 2, he experienced myalgia of the upper and lower extremities and masseter muscle. On the postoperative day 3, myoglobinuria was detected. As in this case, although evident symptoms of malignant hyperthermia are not always observed during operations, some cases show obvious symptoms during the postoperative period. Thus, it is important to be aware of the symptoms of malignant hyperthermia postoperatively for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23544344

  10. Signs, symptoms and treatment of penile fracture.

    PubMed

    Bhoil, Rohit; Sood, Dinesh

    2015-10-01

    Penile fracture is an uncommon injury and requires urgent treatment, therefore emergency nurses should be aware of the signs and symptoms and understand the importance of immediate surgical referral. This article describes the anatomy and physiology of penile erection and the ways in which penile fracture can occur. It also outlines the management of patients and includes a case study of a fracture caused by vigorous masturbation. PMID:26451939

  11. Symptoms: Menopause, Infertility, and Sexual Health.

    PubMed

    Barton, Debra L; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    By 2022, the number of survivors is expected to grow to nearly 18 million. Therefore, addressing acute and chronic negative sequelae of a cancer diagnosis and its treatments becomes a health imperative. For women with a history of breast cancer, one of the common goals of treatment and prevention of recurrence is to reduce circulating concentrations of estradiol, especially in women with hormone receptor positive breast cancer. Hormone deprivation after a diagnosis of breast cancer impacts physiological targets other than in the breast tissue and can result in unwanted side effects, all of which can negatively impact quality of life and function and cause distress. Symptoms that are most strongly linked by evidence to hormone changes after cancer diagnosis and treatment include hot flashes, night sweats, sleep changes, fatigue, mood changes, and diminishing sexual function, including vaginal atrophy (decreased arousal, dryness and dyspareunia), infertility, decreased desire and negative self-image. Weight gain and resulting body image changes are often concomitants of the abrupt onset of treatment-induced menopause. The purpose of this chapter is to briefly review what is known about the advent of premature menopause in women treated for breast cancer, menopausal symptoms that are exacerbated by endocrine treatments for breast cancer, and the associated concerns of hot flashes and related menopausal symptoms, sexual health and fertility issues. We will discuss limitations in the current research and propose strategies that address current limitations in order to move the science forward. PMID:26059933

  12. Elevated Depressive Symptoms Enhance Reflexive but not Reflective Auditory Category Learning

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, W. Todd; Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Smayda, Kirsten; Yi, Han-Gyol; Koslov, Seth; Beevers, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    In vision an extensive literature supports the existence of competitive dual-processing systems of category learning that are grounded in neuroscience and are partially-dissociable. The reflective system is prefrontally-mediated and uses working memory and executive attention to develop and test rules for classifying in an explicit fashion. The reflexive system is striatally-mediated and operates by implicitly associating perception with actions that lead to reinforcement. Although categorization is fundamental to auditory processing, little is known about the learning systems that mediate auditory categorization and even less is known about the effects of individual difference in the relative efficiency of the two learning systems. Previous studies have shown that individuals with elevated depressive symptoms show deficits in reflective processing. We exploit this finding to test critical predictions of the dual-learning systems model in audition. Specifically, we examine the extent to which the two systems are dissociable and competitive. We predicted that elevated depressive symptoms would lead to reflective-optimal learning deficits but reflexive-optimal learning advantages. Because natural speech category learning is reflexive in nature, we made the prediction that elevated depressive symptoms would lead to superior speech learning. In support of our predictions, individuals with elevated depressive symptoms showed a deficit in reflective-optimal auditory category learning, but an advantage in reflexive-optimal auditory category learning. In addition, individuals with elevated depressive symptoms showed an advantage in learning a non-native speech category structure. Computational modeling suggested that the elevated depressive symptom advantage was due to faster, more accurate, and more frequent use of reflexive category learning strategies in individuals with elevated depressive symptoms. The implications of this work for dual-process approach to auditory learning and depression are discussed. PMID:25041936

  13. The Association between Cholecystectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms: A Prospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Otto S.; Kozarek, Richard A.; Arai, Andrew; Gan, S. Ian; Gluck, Michael; Jiranek, Geoffrey C.; Kowdley, Kris V.; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective A large controlled prospective observational study to compare pre- and post-surgery changes in reflux symptoms between cholecystectomy and hernia repair surgery patients. Summary Background Data Six studies have suggested that gastroesophageal reflux worsens after cholecystectomy. However, these studies all had design limitations. Methods We recruited 302 patients scheduled to undergo elective cholecystectomy (study group) or hernia repair (controls) at two hospitals. Both groups filled out the validated Reflux Symptom Score (RSS) and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires 1–15 days prior to and 4–12 weeks after the operation. Changes in symptom scores between the pre and post-surgery assessments were measured, and compared between the two groups. Results Baseline RSS and GSRS reflux subscores were higher in the study group than controls (1.44 vs. 1.02 and 1.91 vs. 1.43 respectively; p<0.05). There were no significant differences in any of the symptom score changes between the two groups except for the GSRS pain subscore, which decreased more in the study group than the control group (?0.59 vs. ?0.10; p<0.001). With regard to reflux, the RSS decreased by ?0.34 in the study group and ?0.14 in controls (p=0.27), while the GSRS reflux subscore decreased by ?0.32 in the study group and ?0.05 in controls (p=0.12). GSRS diarrhea and constipation subscores decreased slightly after surgery, to the same extent in both groups. Conclusions This large prospective controlled study, the only one using validated reflux symptom questionnaires, shows that cholecystectomy does not lead to an increase in reflux symptoms. As expected, GSRS pain subscores were decreased in the cholecystectomy group but not the controls. PMID:19858706

  14. Risk factors for work-related symptoms in northern California office workers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, M.J.

    1991-10-01

    In most episodes of health complaints reported in office buildings in the last-twenty years, causal factors have not been identified. In order to assess risk factors for work-related symptoms in office workers, a reanalysis was performed of previous studies, and an epidemiologic study was conducted. The reanalysis of data, showed remarkable agreement among studies. Air-conditioned buildings were consistently associated with higher prevalence of headache, lethargy, and eye, nose, or throat problems. Humidification was not a necessary factor for this higher prevalence. Mechanical ventilation without air-conditioning was not associated with higher symptom prevalence. A study was conducted among 880 office workers, within 12 office buildings selected without regard to worker complaints, in northern California. A number of factors were found associated with prevalence of work-related symptoms, after adjustment in a logistic regression model for personal, psychosocial, job, workspace, and building factors. Two different ventilation types were associated with increases Ln symptom prevalence, relative to workers in naturally ventilated buildings: mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation, without air conditioning and with operable windows; and air-conditioning with sealed windows. No study buildings were humidified. In both these ventilation types, the highest odds ratios (ORs) found were for skin symptoms (ORs-5.0, 5.6) and for tight chest or difficulty breathing (ORs-3.6, 4.3). Use of carbonless copies or photocopiers, sharing a workspace, carpets, new carpets, new walls, and distance from a window were associated with symptom increases. Cloth partitions and new paint were associated with symptom decreases.

  15. Neuroanatomical Dissections of Unilateral Visual Neglect Symptoms: ALE Meta-Analysis of Lesion-Symptom Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chechlacz, Magdalena; Rotshtein, Pia; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2012-01-01

    Unilateral visual neglect is commonly defined as impaired ability to attend to stimuli presented on the side of visual space contralateral to the brain lesion. However, behavioral analyses indicate that different neglect symptoms can dissociate. The neuroanatomy of the syndrome has been hotly debated. Some groups have argued that the syndrome is linked to posterior parietal cortex lesions, while others report damage within regions including the superior temporal gyrus, insula, and basal ganglia. Several recent neuroimaging studies provide evidence that heterogeneity in the behavioral symptoms of neglect can be matched by variations in the brain lesions, and that some of the discrepancies across earlier findings might have resulted from the use of different neuropsychological tests and/or varied measures within the same task for diagnosing neglect. In this paper, we review the evidence for dissociations between both the symptoms and the neural substrates of unilateral visual neglect, drawing on ALE (anatomic likelihood estimation) meta-analyses of lesion-symptom mapping studies. Specifically, we examine dissociations between neglect symptoms associated with impaired control of attention across space (in an egocentric frame of reference) and within objects (in an allocentric frame of reference). Results of ALE meta-analyses indicated that, while egocentric symptoms are associated with damage within perisylvian network (pre- and postcentral, supramarginal, and superior temporal gyri) and damage within sub-cortical structures, more posterior lesions including the angular, middle temporal, and middle occipital gyri are associated with allocentric symptoms. Furthermore, there was high concurrence in deficits associated with white matter lesions within long association (superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and inferior longitudinal fasciculi) and projection (corona radiata and thalamic radiation) pathways, supporting a disconnection account of the syndrome. Using this evidence we argue that different forms of neglect link to both distinct and common patterns of gray and white matter lesions. The findings are discussed in terms of functional accounts of neglect and theoretical models based on computational studies of both normal and impaired attention functions. PMID:22907997

  16. Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and healthier life for yourself. Download our symptom tracker and make an appointment with yourself every six ... Patient Guide: Understanding Your Heart Valve Problem Symptom Tracker Pre-surgery Checklist How Can I Prepare For ...

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Deep Vein Thrombosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Deep Vein Thrombosis? The signs and symptoms of deep ... serious, possibly life-threatening problems if not treated. Deep Vein Thrombosis Only about half of the people ...

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF) ... digestive, or reproductive systems of the body. Cystic Fibrosis Figure A shows the organs that cystic fibrosis ...

  19. Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Symptoms and Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Is it ADHD? Symptoms Checklist Fill out the symptoms checklist and ... diagnose or treat ADHD. DSM-5 Criteria for ADHD People with ADHD show a persistent pattern of ...

  20. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... likely to have general symptoms first, such as fatigue (tiredness). In men, complications such as diabetes or ... signs and symptoms of hemochromatosis include joint pain, fatigue, general weakness, weight loss, and stomach pain. Not ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts Red Blood Cells The most common symptom of a low red ... an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . White Blood Cells White blood cells help fight infections. Signs and ...

  2. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pneumonia? The signs and symptoms of pneumonia vary from ... have sudden changes in mental awareness. Complications of Pneumonia Often, people who have pneumonia can be successfully ...

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocytopenia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocytopenia? Mild to serious bleeding causes the main signs and symptoms of thrombocytopenia. Bleeding can occur inside your body (internal bleeding) ...

  4. What Are the Symptoms of Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content When the adrenal glands produce too many hormones, the symptoms vary depending ...

  5. Transactional Relations Between Marital Functioning and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Cummings, E. Mark

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated dynamic, longitudinal associations between depressive symptoms and marital processes. Two hundred ninety-six couples reported on marital satisfaction, marital conflict, and depressive symptoms yearly for three years. Observational measures of marital conflict were also collected. Results suggested that different domains of marital functioning related to husbands’ versus wives’ symptoms. For husbands, transactional relations between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms were identified: high levels of depressive symptoms predicted subsequent decreases in marital satisfaction, and decreased marital satisfaction predicted subsequent elevations in symptoms over time. For wives, high levels of marital conflict predicted subsequent elevations in symptoms over time. Cross-partner results indicated that husbands’ depressive symptoms were also related to subsequent declines in wives’ marital satisfaction. Results are discussed with regard to theoretical perspectives on the marital functioning-depression link and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:21219284

  6. Transactional relations between marital functioning and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kouros, Chrystyna D; Cummings, E Mark

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated dynamic, longitudinal associations between depressive symptoms and marital processes. Two hundred and ninety-six couples reported on marital satisfaction, marital conflict, and depressive symptoms annually for 3 years. Observational measures of marital conflict were also collected. Results suggested that different domains of marital functioning related to husbands' versus wives' symptoms. For husbands, transactional relations between marital satisfaction and depressive symptoms were identified: High levels of depressive symptoms predicted subsequent decreases in marital satisfaction, and decreased marital satisfaction predicted subsequent elevations in depressive symptoms over time. For wives, high levels of marital conflict predicted subsequent elevations in depressive symptoms over time. Cross-partner results indicated that husbands' depressive symptoms were also related to subsequent declines in wives' marital satisfaction. Results are discussed with regard to theoretical perspectives on the marital functioning-depression link and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:21219284

  7. Defining and measuring negative symptoms of schizophrenia in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Marder, Stephen R; Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Recent attention has focused on negative symptoms as a target for new therapeutic approaches including pharmacological agents, medical devices, and psychosocial treatments. Each of these approaches requires an instrument for measuring the severity of negative symptoms as well as changes in severity over time. The instrument selected should provide coverage for the domains of negative symptoms; it should be sensitive to change; it should be reliable and relatively brief; and it should be useful for large international trials. These criteria were used to evaluate a number of older instruments including the Schedule for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment Scale (NSA). Two newer scales, the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS) and the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) were developed following a National Institute of Mental Health consensus meeting and addressed some of the shortcomings of earlier instruments. PMID:24275698

  8. Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Symptoms Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... might be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or stroke. ...

  9. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  10. Memory indexing of sequential symptom processing in diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Georg; Braatz, Janina

    2014-02-01

    In diagnostic reasoning, knowledge about symptoms and their likely causes is retrieved to generate and update diagnostic hypotheses in memory. By letting participants learn about causes and symptoms in a spatial array, we could apply eye tracking during diagnostic reasoning to trace the activation level of hypotheses across a sequence of symptoms and to evaluate process models of diagnostic reasoning directly. Gaze allocation on former locations of symptom classes and possible causes reflected the diagnostic value of initial symptoms, the set of contending hypotheses, consistency checking, biased symptom processing in favor of the leading hypothesis, symptom rehearsal, and hypothesis change. Gaze behavior mapped the reasoning process and was not dominated by auditorily presented symptoms. Thus, memory indexing proved applicable for studying reasoning tasks involving linguistic input. Looking at nothing revealed memory activation because of a close link between conceptual and motor representations and was stable even after one week. PMID:24316414

  11. Screening Analogs of ?-OG Pocket Binder as Fusion Inhibitor of Dengue Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Tambunan, Usman SF; Zahroh, Hilyatuz; Parikesit, Arli A; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) and transmitted between human hosts by mosquitoes. Recently, Indonesia was listed as a country with the highest cases of dengue by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. The current treatment for dengue disease is supportive therapy; there is no antiviral drug available in the market against dengue. Therefore, a research on antiviral drug against dengue is very important, especially to prevent outbreak explosion. In this research, the development of dengue antiviral is performed through the inhibition of n-octyl-?-D-glucoside (?-OG) binding pocket on envelope protein of DENV by using analogs of ?-OG pocket binder. There are 828 compounds used in this study, and all of them were screened based on the analysis of molecular docking, pharmacological character prediction of the compounds, and molecular dynamics simulation. The result of these analyses revealed that the compound that can be used as an antiviral candidate against DENV is 5-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-N-[2-(p-tolyl) benzotriazol-5-yl]furan-2-carboxamide. PMID:26617459

  12. Physical Symptom Reporting in Type A and Type B Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiken, Lewis; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined developmental origins of one coronary-prone component of Type A pattern, tendency to suppress attention to physical symptoms. Studied symptom-reporting behavior of 85 children between ages of 5 and 14. Type A children underreported variety of symptoms, independent of gender and age; missed less school following surgery; and were…

  13. Trajectories of Postpartum Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children's Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yelena P.; Selig, James P.; Roberts, Michael C.; Steele, Ric G.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of new mothers experience at least some depressive symptoms. Postpartum maternal depressive symptoms can greatly influence children's outcomes (e.g., emotional, cognitive, language, and social development). However, there have been relatively few longitudinal studies of how maternal depressive symptoms may influence children's…

  14. Pathways from Depressive Symptoms to Low Social Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined two pathways through which depressive symptoms contribute to low social status (i.e., neglect and rejection) within the peer group over time: (a) depressive symptoms promote socially helpless behavior and consequent neglect by peers; and (b) depressive symptoms promote aggressive behavior and consequent rejection by peers.…

  15. Psychology and Aging Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Old Age

    E-print Network

    Zharkova, Valentina V.

    in depressive symptoms reduced from young-old to old-old and reversed in very old age when men showed morePsychology and Aging Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Old Age: Integrating Age-, Pathology., Hoppmann, C. A., & Luszcz, M. A. (2015, October 26). Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms in Old Age

  16. Fibromyalgia Syndrome Symptoms and Effects: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Alice; Bernard, Amy L.; Edsall, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed fibromyalgia syndrome support group members about characteristics of the disease and how it affected their lives. Respondents had symptoms for many years before being diagnosed. Symptoms varied tremendously on a daily and yearly basis, so disease management was in a constant state of flux. Most symptoms significantly impacted quality of…

  17. Students' Decision Steps in Meta-Cognitive Learning in Free Online Groups (MetaL-FrOG): A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen Fa, Kinsley Ng; Hussin, Firuz Hussin

    2011-01-01

    What prompts the students to respond in online dialogic discussion? Why some students chose to fall out? This case study through the lens of phenomenography observation attempts to explain the five decision steps of students to respond in Meta-cognitive Learning in Free Online Groups (MetaL-FrOG) discussion. It presents a part of a research…

  18. An Examination of Family Adjustment among Operation Desert Storm Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Casey T.; Schumm, Jeremiah A.; Panuzio, Jillian; Proctor, Susan P.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined interrelationships among combat exposure, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and family adjustment in a sample of male and female Operation Desert Storm veterans (N = 1,512). In structural equation models for both male and female veterans, higher combat exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms, which in…

  19. Posttraumatic and depressive symptoms in ?-endorphin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Savic, Danka; Knezevic, Goran; Matic, Gordana; Damjanovic, Svetozar; Spiric, Zeljko

    2015-08-01

    A disturbed beta-endorphin system can be a part of the post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression allostasis. Study subjects (N=392) included those with PTSD and/or (stress-induced) depression, and healthy controls with and without traumas. The aim of the study was to examine the network of relations centered around plasma beta-endorphin. The network included anxiety (as a personality trait), traumatic events, pain, aggressiveness, depressive symptoms, and three clusters of PTSD symptoms: intrusions, avoidance, and hyperarousal. Beta-endorphin was represented by individual mean from 13 time points (BEmean), reflecting the total amount of the peripherally secreted hormone, and the coefficient of variation (BEvar), calculated as the ratio of standard deviation to the mean, reflecting the hormone?s dynamics. BEvar correlated with all other variables, BEmean had no correlations. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine all interrelations (including their directions) of BEvar and the state/trait variables in the context of their entirety. The model revealed that hyperarousal and anxiety were the only direct agents of peripheral beta-endorphin fluctuations, mediating the effects of other variables. Traumatic events and intrusions act on BEvar via hyperarousal, while depressive symptoms, avoidance, and pain act via anxiety. Hyperarousal should be emphasized as the main agent not only because its effect on BEvar is larger than that of anxiety, but also because it increases anxiety itself (via avoidance and pain). All influences on BEvar are positive and they indicate long-term (sensitizing) effects (as opposed to direct stimulation, for example, by acute pain, anger, etc.). Relations apart from beta-endorphin are also discussed. PMID:25917294

  20. Personality and risk for postpartum depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iliadis, S I; Koulouris, P; Gingnell, M; Sylvén, S M; Sundström-Poromaa, I; Ekselius, L; Papadopoulos, F C; Skalkidou, A

    2015-06-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common childbirth complication, affecting 10-15 % of newly delivered mothers. This study aims to assess the association between personality factors and PPD. All pregnant women during the period September 2009 to September 2010, undergoing a routine ultrasound at Uppsala University Hospital, were invited to participate in the BASIC study, a prospective study designed to investigate maternal well-being. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) while the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) was used as a diagnostic tool for major depression. Personality traits were evaluated using the Swedish Universities Scale of Personality (SSP). One thousand thirty-seven non-depressed pregnant women were included in the study. Non-depressed women reporting high levels of neuroticism in late pregnancy were at high risk of developing postpartum depressive symptoms (PPDSs) at 6 weeks and 6 months after delivery, even after adjustment for confounders (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)?=?3.4, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.8-6.5 and adjusted odds ratio (aOR)?=?3.9, 95 % CI 1.9-7.9). The same was true for a DSRS-based diagnosis of major depression at 6 months postpartum. Somatic trait anxiety and psychic trait anxiety were associated with increased risk for PPDS at 6 weeks (aOR?=?2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.5 and aOR?=?1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.1), while high scores of mistrust were associated with a twofold increased risk for PPDS at 6 months postpartum (aOR 1.9, 95 % CI 1.1-3.4). Non-depressed pregnant women with high neuroticism scores have an almost fourfold increased risk to develop depressive symptoms postpartum, and the association remains robust even after controlling for most known confounders. Clinically, this could be of importance for health care professionals working with pregnant and newly delivered women. PMID:25369905

  1. Reduced Adverse Symptoms Once BP is Controlled

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Cynthia A.; Leloux, Megan R.; Carter, Barry L.; Farris, Karen B.; Xu, Yinghui

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives To describe trends in adverse drug reaction (ADR) scores as blood pressure (BP) came under control during a study of physician-pharmacist collaboration in the management of hypertension. Design Secondary analysis from a randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Five primary care clinics affiliated with the University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA. Subjects One hundred seventy-nine patients with uncontrolled primary hypertension aged 21-85 years taking 0-3 antihypertensive medications at baseline. Intervention Patient-reported symptoms suggestive of ADRs were recorded at each study visit using a structured ADR questionnaire. Social support (SS) and self-efficacy (SE) questionnaires were also administered at each study visit. Measurements and Main Results ADR scores decreased significantly from baseline to the end of the study (p<0.0001) in both the control (26.5 to 18.4) and intervention (29.9 to 22.7) groups although there were no differences between groups. Antihypertensive medication use increased for both intervention (1.5±1.0 to 2.4±0.9) and control (1.4±1.0 to 1.9±1.0) groups. We performed additional analyses on SE and SS to determine a potential reason for the reduction in adverse symptom scores despite an increase in medication use. Improvements in SE and SS scores were significantly and independently associated with improvement in ADR score (p<0.05). Conclusions ADR scores improved despite an increase in antihypertensive medication use. Improvements in SS and, to a lesser extent, SE are associated with improvements in ADR scores. Patients should not expect an increase in distressful symptoms as their BP becomes controlled with antihypertensive medications, especially when adequate social support is available. PMID:18752381

  2. French version validation of the psychotic symptom rating scales (PSYRATS) for outpatients with persistent psychotic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most scales that assess the presence and severity of psychotic symptoms often measure a broad range of experiences and behaviours, something that restricts the detailed measurement of specific symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations. The Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS) is a clinical assessment tool that focuses on the detailed measurement of these core symptoms. The goal of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the French version of the PSYRATS. Methods A sample of 103 outpatients suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders and presenting persistent psychotic symptoms over the previous three months was assessed using the PSYRATS. Seventy-five sample participants were also assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results ICCs were superior to .90 for all items of the PSYRATS. Factor analysis replicated the factorial structure of the original version of the delusions scale. Similar to previous replications, the factor structure of the hallucinations scale was partially replicated. Convergent validity indicated that some specific PSYRATS items do not correlate with the PANSS delusions or hallucinations. The distress items of the PSYRATS are negatively correlated with the grandiosity scale of the PANSS. Conclusions The results of this study are limited by the relatively small sample size as well as the selection of participants with persistent symptoms. The French version of the PSYRATS partially replicates previously published results. Differences in factor structure of the hallucinations scale might be explained by greater variability of its elements. The future development of the scale should take into account the presence of grandiosity in order to better capture details of the psychotic experience. PMID:23020603

  3. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Structure in Injured Children: Functional Impairment and Depression Symptoms in a Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Marsac, Meghan L.; Cirilli, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in children and adolescents who have experienced an acute single-incident trauma, associations between PTSD symptom clusters and functional impairment, and the specificity of PTSD symptoms in relation to depression and general distress. Method: Examined…

  4. Hormonal and nonhormonal treatment of vasomotor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Krause, Miriam S; Nakajima, Steven T

    2015-03-01

    This article focuses on the cause, pathophysiology, differential diagnosis of, and treatment options for vasomotor symptoms. In addition, it summarizes important points for health care providers caring for perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with regard to health maintenance, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and vaginal atrophy. Treatment options for hot flashes with variable effectiveness include systemic hormone therapy (estrogen/progestogen), nonhormonal pharmacologic therapies (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, clonidine, gabapentin), and nonpharmacologic therapy options (behavioral changes, acupuncture). Risks and benefits as well as contraindications for hormone therapy are further discussed. PMID:25681847

  5. Symptoms of schizophrenia: normal adaptations to inability.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Mary V

    2007-01-01

    The usual thinking about schizophrenia is that symptoms arise from altered gene products, irregularities in brain development, or interruptions of brain circuitry due to more fundamental causes still unknown. It is possible, however, that some of the diagnostic symptoms of this illness result from attempts at healing the primary unknown lesion, that they are, to use a metaphor, consequences of scab formation rather than of wound. Because too little is known at this time about basic intracellular flaws in schizophrenia, this paper, while hypothesizing precisely such a sequence (from damage to attempt at healing to symptom formation) uses examples from the more accessible psychological level. For instance, it is known that individuals suffering from schizophrenia struggle with interpersonal demands because they find them, on the whole, ambiguous and complex. Given these interpersonal inabilities, it is understandable that they protect themselves from the experience of failure through avoidance of social conduct and through relative isolation. Another example comes from the domain of cognition where a number of deficits have been shown to exist in people with schizophrenia. Aware of these difficulties, individuals with schizophrenia narrow their field of activities and compensate for deficiency by repetitive rituals and over-rehearsal. Side-lined and disregarded because of illness, it makes psychological sense that they draw attention to themselves in ways (eccentric clothes, unusual phraseology and tone of voice) that are judged by others as socially inappropriate. Unsuccessful in the customary pursuit of happiness (worldly success, material possessions, intimate relationships), it also makes sense that individuals with schizophrenia adopt habits and routines that are considered by others as impractical, illogical, and unfathomable. Adoption of this compensatory view of the origin of schizophrenia symptoms by clinical scientists does not markedly change treatment approaches and does not immediately lead to new discoveries. What it does is to situate the actions of those with schizophrenia clearly within the normal range of human behaviors and, as a consequence, it diminishes the stigma that attaches to severe mental illness. It evens the playing field between patient and therapist, making the psychiatrist less a zoo keeper and more a fellow traveler along a road that inevitably leads, for everyone, to physical and cognitive decline with attempts, some more successful than others, at compensation in the face of a difficult reality. PMID:17303346

  6. Perceived discrimination and children's mental health symptoms.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Cheryl L; Bowie, Bonnie H; Carrère, Sybil

    2014-01-01

    Perceived discrimination has been shown to be strongly associated with mental health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, chronic stress, post traumatic stress disorder, and low self-esteem. This study (N = 88) examined the effects of perceived discrimination and its association with child mental health symptoms. African American children had a significantly stronger association between social stress and a sense of exclusion/rejection than Multiracial or European American children. Nurses need to assess and counsel families of color about their experiences with perceived discriminatory acts. PMID:25365283

  7. Symptoms experienced by law enforcement personnel during methamphetamine lab investigations.

    PubMed

    Witter, Roxana Z; Martyny, John W; Mueller, Kathryn; Gottschall, Bibi; Newman, Lee S

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine if law enforcement personnel experience symptoms associated with methamphetamine lab investigation and to assess those factors that may result in more symptoms. A total of 258 standardized, self-administered surveys were distributed to law enforcement personnel attending national/regional training classes, between June 2004-February 2005. Ninety-three percent of the surveys were returned and used to determine symptoms experienced while investigating clandestine methamphetamine labs, as well as the job duties of the respondent and the personal protective equipment used. More than 70% of respondents reported headaches, central nervous system symptoms, respiratory symptoms, sore throat, and other symptoms. Unadjusted and adjusted risk of symptoms was higher for those who investigated more than 30 labs. Other significant risk factors included time spent in the lab, phase of investigation, presence of active chemical processes, and coexistent disease. Respirator use was not independently associated with the likelihood of reporting symptoms. It was concluded that methamphetamine lab investigation is positively associated with symptom reporting in a high percentage of law enforcement personnel involved in these tasks. For most individuals, the reported symptoms were transitory and diminished in a short time, but some individuals reported needing to seek medical attention with symptoms that persisted. PMID:17943587

  8. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 141: management of menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Vasomotor and vaginal symptoms are cardinal symptoms of menopause. Vasomotor symptoms can be particularly troubling to women and are the most commonly reported menopausal symptoms, with a reported prevalence of 50-82% among U.S. women who experience natural menopause (1, 2). The occurrence of vasomotor symptoms increases during the transition to menopause and peaks approximately 1 year after the final menstrual period (3-5). The purpose of this document is to provide evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of vasomotor and vaginal symptoms related to natural and surgical menopause. (Treatment of menopausal symptoms in cancer survivors is discussed in the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Practice Bulletin Number 126, Management of Gynecologic Issues in Women With Breast Cancer.). PMID:24463691

  9. Sensory and motor secondary symptoms as indicators of brain vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the primary symptoms that distinguish one disorder from the next, clinicians have identified, yet largely overlooked, another set of symptoms that appear across many disorders, termed secondary symptoms. In the emerging era of systems neuroscience, which highlights that many disorders share common deficits in global network features, the nonspecific nature of secondary symptoms should attract attention. Herein we provide a scholarly review of the literature on a subset of secondary symptoms––sensory and motor. We demonstrate that their pattern of appearance––across a wide range of psychopathologies, much before the full-blown disorder appears, and in healthy individuals who display a variety of negative symptoms––resembles the pattern of appearance of network abnormalities. We propose that sensory and motor secondary symptoms can be important indicators of underlying network aberrations and thus of vulnerable brain states putting individuals at risk for psychopathology following extreme circumstances. PMID:24063566

  10. Psychological correlates of HIV-related symptom distress.

    PubMed

    Jaggers, Jason R; Dudgeon, Wesley D; Burgess, Stephanie; Phillips, Kenneth D; Blair, Steven N; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    This investigation sought to determine the association of symptom distress with selected psychological factors in HIV-infected persons. Data from a randomized controlled trial were used; all subjects who completed baseline data collection were included (N = 99). Data packets included these questionnaires: the Perceived Stress Scale, HIV-related Symptom Distress Scale, and Profile of Mood State. Significant correlations were included in a final regression model. The Perceived Stress Scale, total mood disturbance (including the Profile of Mood State subscales), self-rated current health, and HIV status were independently associated with both frequency of symptoms and symptom distress. Symptom frequency, depression, anger, and fatigue retained significance in the final regression model. Findings from this study indicated significant associations of multiple psychological correlates, suggesting that symptom distress is a complex outcome with a multifactorial etiology. Psychological factors such as depression, anger, and fatigue contribute to the level of distress experienced with HIV-related symptoms. PMID:24103740

  11. Trajectories of BMI and internalizing symptoms: Associations across adolescence.

    PubMed

    Ames, Megan E; Wintre, Maxine G; Flora, David B

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined the longitudinal relations between body mass index (BMI) and internalizing symptoms among youth ages 10-17. Adolescents were selected from Statistics Canada's National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). Latent growth curve modeling was used to investigate: 1) whether initial level (at age 10) or change in BMI were associated with changes in internalizing symptoms; and, 2) whether initial level or change in internalizing symptoms were associated with changes in BMI across adolescence. Associations between trajectories differed for boys and girls. Boys who started out with higher BMI experienced more internalizing symptoms across early- to mid-adolescence, but not more depressive symptoms at ages 16 and 17. For girls, there was a bidirectional relation between BMI and internalizing symptoms which persisted into later adolescence. Results suggest the bidirectional relation between BMI and internalizing symptoms is more salient for girls than for boys. PMID:26397879

  12. Daytime intrusive thoughts and subjective insomnia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Baker, Louise D; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2015-10-30

    Insomnia is increasingly recognised as a 24h complaint that is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders. However, the effects of insomnia symptoms on maladaptive daytime patterns of thinking are poorly understood. We examined the relationship between subjective insomnia symptoms, attentional control and negative thought intrusions during daytime in a large sample of undergraduates experiencing poor sleep. A total of 109 participants completed self-report measures of sleep quality, current sleepiness, anxiety and attentional control. A behavioural measure of intrusive thought required participants to control their attention during two focus periods separated by a 5min period of self-referential worry. Thought intrusions were sampled throughout the pre- and post-worry periods. Perceived insomnia severity was associated with the reduced ability to focus attention and uniquely associated with increased negative thought intrusions in the pre-worry period. These results support suggestions that acute episodes of poor sleep can dysregulate key networks involved in attentional control and emotion regulation, and that promote negative cognitive activity. PMID:26279126

  13. Dimensions of depressive symptoms and smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Ramsey, Susan E.; Brown, Richard A.; LaChance, Heather R.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2009-01-01

    Because different psychopathologic components of depressive symptoms may have distinct etiologies, examining their differential effects on smoking cessation may elucidate mechanisms underlying the smoking-depression relationship. Negative affect (NA), somatic features (SF), low positive affect/anhedonia (PA), and interpersonal disturbance (IP) have been identified as unique dimensions of depression that can be measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD). This study examined common and unique associations between CESD subscales and baseline smoking characteristics, nicotine withdrawal, and relapse in 157 participants enrolled in a smoking cessation trial for heavy social drinkers. Each dimension was univariately associated with negative and positive reinforcement smoking motives. Only SF had unique relations with tolerance smoking motives and univariate associations with nicotine dependence severity. Only PA predicted cessation-related changes in withdrawal symptoms on quit day. Analyses predicting abstinence at 8, 16, and 26 weeks post quit date showed that NA, SF, and PA each univariately predicted relapse, ps?.0083. Only low PA predicted poorer outcomes incrementally to the other dimensions, even when controlling for level of nicotine dependence, smoking frequency, and history of major depression, p=.0018. Interventions targeting anhedonia and low positive affect may be useful for smokers trying to quit. PMID:18324570

  14. Factors influencing postconcussion and posttraumatic stress symptom reporting following military-related concurrent polytrauma and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Brickell, Tracey A; Kennedy, Jan E; Bailie, Jason M; Sills, Cheryl; Asmussen, Sarah; Amador, Ricardo; Dilay, Angelica; Ivins, Brian; French, Louis M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that are predictive of, or associated with, high endorsement of postconcussion and posttraumatic stress symptoms following military-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 1,600 U.S. service members (age: M = 27.1, SD = 7.1; 95.4% male) who had sustained a mild-to-moderate TBI and who had been evaluated by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center at one of six military medical centers. Twenty-two factors were examined that included demographic, injury circumstances/severity, treatment/evaluation, and psychological/physical variables. Four factors were statistically and meaningfully associated with clinically elevated postconcussion symptoms: (i) low bodily injury severity, (ii) posttraumatic stress, (iii) depression, and (iv) military operation where wounded (p < .001, 43.2% variance). The combination of depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms accounted for the vast majority of unique variance (41.5%) and were strongly associated with, and predictive of, clinically elevated postconcussion symptoms [range: odds ratios (OR) = 4.24-7.75; relative risk (RR) = 2.28-2.51]. Five factors were statistically and meaningfully associated with clinically elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms: (i) low bodily injury severity, (ii) depression, (iii) a longer time from injury to evaluation, (iv) military operation where wounded, and (v) current auditory deficits (p < .001; 65.6% variance accounted for). Depression alone accounted for the vast majority of unique variance (60.0%) and was strongly associated with, and predictive of, clinically elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms (OR = 38.78; RR = 4.63). There was a very clear, strong, and clinically meaningful association between depression, posttraumatic stress, and postconcussion symptoms in this sample. Brain injury severity, however, was not associated with symptom reporting following TBI. PMID:24723461

  15. Deficits in Agency in Schizophrenia, and Additional Deficits in Body Image, Body Schema, and Internal Timing, in Passivity Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kyran T.; Martin-Iverson, Mathew T.; Holmes, Nicholas P.; Jablensky, Assen; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia, particularly those with passivity symptoms, may not feel in control of their actions, believing them to be controlled by external agents. Cognitive operations that contribute to these symptoms may include abnormal processing in agency as well as body representations that deal with body schema and body image. However, these operations in schizophrenia are not fully understood, and the questions of general versus specific deficits in individuals with different symptom profiles remain unanswered. Using the projected-hand illusion (a digital video version of the rubber-hand illusion) with synchronous and asynchronous stroking (500?ms delay), and a hand laterality judgment task, we assessed sense of agency, body image, and body schema in 53 people with clinically stable schizophrenia (with a current, past, and no history of passivity symptoms) and 48 healthy controls. The results revealed a stable trait in schizophrenia with no difference between clinical subgroups (sense of agency) and some quantitative (specific) differences depending on the passivity symptom profile (body image and body schema). Specifically, a reduced sense of self-agency was a common feature of all clinical subgroups. However, subgroup comparisons showed that individuals with passivity symptoms (both current and past) had significantly greater deficits on tasks assessing body image and body schema, relative to the other groups. In addition, patients with current passivity symptoms failed to demonstrate the normal reduction in body illusion typically seen with a 500?ms delay in visual feedback (asynchronous condition), suggesting internal timing problems. Altogether, the results underscore self-abnormalities in schizophrenia, provide evidence for both trait abnormalities and state changes specific to passivity symptoms, and point to a role for internal timing deficits as a mechanistic explanation for external cues becoming a possible source of self-body input. PMID:25309460

  16. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms and the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Maulik P.; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Zafonte, Ross D.; Davis, Roger B.; Phillips, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by U.S. adults reporting neuropsychiatric symptoms and whether this prevalence changes based on the number of symptoms reported. Additional objectives include identifying patterns of CAM use, reasons for use, and disclosure of use with conventional providers in U.S. adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Design Secondary database analysis of a prospective survey. Participants A total of 23,393 U.S. adults from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Methods We compared CAM use between adults with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Symptoms included self-reported anxiety, depression, insomnia, headaches, memory deficits, attention deficits, and excessive sleepiness. CAM use was defined as use of mind—body therapies (eg, meditation), biological therapies (eg, herbs), or manipulation therapies (eg, massage) or alternative medical systems (eg, Ayurveda). Statistical analysis included bivariable comparisons and multivariable logistical regression analyses. Main Outcome Measures The prevalence of CAM use among adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms within the previous 12 months and the comparison of CAM use between those with and without neuropsychiatric symptoms. Results Adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms had a greater prevalence of CAM use compared with adults who did not have neuropsychiatric symptoms (43.8% versus 29.7%, P < .001); this prevalence increased with an increasing number of symptoms (trend, P < .001). Differences in the likelihood of CAM use as determined by the number of symptoms persisted after we adjusted for covariates. Twenty percent of patients used CAM because standard treatments were either too expensive or ineffective, and 25% used CAM because it was recommended by a conventional provider. Adults with at least one neuropsychiatric symptom were more likely to disclose the use of CAM to a conventional provider (47.9% versus 39.0%, P < .001). Conclusion More than 40% of adults with neuropsychiatric symptoms commonly observed in many diagnoses use CAM; an increasing number of symptoms was associated with an increased likelihood of CAM use. PMID:23098832

  17. Reactive transport modeling in the subsurface environment with OGS-IPhreeqc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenkui; Beyer, Christof; Fleckenstein, Jan; Jang, Eunseon; Kalbacher, Thomas; Naumov, Dimitri; Shao, Haibing; Wang, Wenqing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Worldwide, sustainable water resource management becomes an increasingly challenging task due to the growth of population and extensive applications of fertilizer in agriculture. Moreover, climate change causes further stresses to both water quantity and quality. Reactive transport modeling in the coupled soil-aquifer system is a viable approach to assess the impacts of different land use and groundwater exploitation scenarios on the water resources. However, the application of this approach is usually limited in spatial scale and to simplified geochemical systems due to the huge computational expense involved. Such computational expense is not only caused by solving the high non-linearity of the initial boundary value problems of water flow in the unsaturated zone numerically with rather fine spatial and temporal discretization for the correct mass balance and numerical stability, but also by the intensive computational task of quantifying geochemical reactions. In the present study, a flexible and efficient tool for large scale reactive transport modeling in variably saturated porous media and its applications are presented. The open source scientific software OpenGeoSys (OGS) is coupled with the IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The new coupling approach makes full use of advantages from both codes: OGS provides a flexible choice of different numerical approaches for simulation of water flow in the vadose zone such as the pressure-based or mixed forms of Richards equation; whereas the IPhreeqc module leads to a simplification of data storage and its communication with OGS, which greatly facilitates the coupling and code updating. Moreover, a parallelization scheme with MPI (Message Passing Interface) is applied, in which the computational task of water flow and mass transport is partitioned through domain decomposition, whereas the efficient parallelization of geochemical reactions is achieved by smart allocation of computational workload over multiple compute nodes. The plausibility of the new coupling is verified by several benchmark tests. In addition, the efficiency of the new coupling approach is demonstrated by its application in a large scale scenario, in which the environmental fate of pesticides in a complex soil-aquifer system is studied.

  18. Developmental Pathways Linking Externalizing Symptoms, Internalizing Symptoms, and Academic Competence to Adolescent Substance Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Michelle M.; Siebenbruner, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This study extends previous research investigating the developmental pathways predicting adolescent alcohol and marijuana use by examining the cascading effects of externalizing and internalizing symptoms and academic competence in the prediction of use and level of use of these substances in adolescence. Participants (N = 191) were drawn from a…

  19. Mindfulness based stress reduction in post-treatment breast cancer patients: an examination of symptoms and symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Lengacher, Cecile A; Reich, Richard R; Post-White, Janice; Moscoso, Manolete; Shelton, Melissa M; Barta, Michelle; Le, Nancy; Budhrani, Pinky

    2012-02-01

    To investigate prevalence and severity of symptoms and symptom clustering in breast cancer survivors who attended MBSR(BC). Women were randomly assigned into MBSR(BC) or Usual Care (UC). Eligible women were ? 21 years, had been diagnosed with breast cancer and completed treatment within 18 months of enrollment. Symptoms and interference with daily living were measured pre- and post-MBSR(BC) using the M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory. Symptoms were reported as highly prevalent but severity was low. Fatigue was the most frequently reported and severe symptom among groups. Symptoms clustered into 3 groups and improved in both groups. At baseline, both MBSR(BC) and the control groups showed similar mean symptom severity and interference; however, after the 6-week post-intervention, the MBSR(BC) group showed statistically-significant reduction for fatigue and disturbed sleep (P < 0.01) and improved symptom interference items, compared to the control group. For the between-group comparisons, 11 of 13 symptoms and 5 of 6 interference items had lower means in the MBSR(BC) condition than the control condition. These results suggest that MBSR(BC) modestly decreases fatigue and sleep disturbances, but has a greater effect on the degree to which symptoms interfere with many facets of life. Although these results are preliminary, MBSR intervention post-treatment may effectively reduce fatigue and related interference in QOL of breast cancer survivors. PMID:21506018

  20. Genetic Association of Daytime Sleepiness and Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N.; Bliwise, Donald L.; Krasnow, Ruth E.; Swan, Gary E.; Reed, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Clinical rating scales, self-reports, and diagnostic instruments measuring depression often inquire about daytime fatigue and tiredness. Excessive daytime sleepiness refers specifically to the tendency to feel drowsy or fall asleep during waking hours and is considered conceptually and operationally independent from the fatigue, tiredness, and sleeping difficulties that characterize depression. The objective of this study was to examine whether daytime sleepiness assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and depressive symptoms assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale are genetically related. Design/Setting: Cross-sectional data were collected via questionnaire in 1998–2000. Participants: Population-based sample of more than 5,000 male elderly twins aged 69–82 years old at the time of survey. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: There was evidence for moderate heritability for daytime sleepiness (36.9%) and depressive symptoms (30.7%). There was evidence for a significant genetic correlation (0.40) between the 2 measures, suggesting that both daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms have some genes in common. The genetic correlation was reduced to 0.21 after adjustment for several covariates. Conclusions: The results showed that the often reported phenotypic correlation between daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms is due, in part, to modest overlap in genetic factors, at least in elderly men. However, the majority of individual variation in daytime sleepiness and depressive symptoms, in particular after covariate adjustment, was attributable to individual-specific environmental factors. Citation: Lessov-Schlaggar CN; Bliwise DL; Krasnow RE; Swan GE; Reed TR. Genetic Association of Daytime Sleepiness and Depressive Symptoms in Elderly Men. SLEEP 2008;31(8):1111-1117. PMID:18714783

  1. A Clinical Investigation of Contralateral Neurological Symptom after Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF)

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yapeng; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze treatment outcomes and morbidity of contralateral neurological symptom in patients after TLIF surgery and to explore its possible causes. Material/Methods A retrospective study was conducted involving a total of 476 patients who underwent TILF from 2009 to 2012 in our hospital. These cases were divided into a symptomatic group (Group S) and a non-symptomatic group. The differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery were compared between Group S and a random sample of 40 cases of non-symptomatic group patients (group N). In addition, according to whether the patient underwent second surgery, Group S patients were further divided into a transient neurologic symptoms group (Group T) and an operations exploration group (Group O). The time of symptom appearance, duration, and symptomatic severity (JOA VAS score) were compared between Group T and O. Results Among the 476 patients, 18 had postoperative contralateral neurological symptoms; thus, the morbidity was 3.7815%. The indicators in Group S were lower than in Group N in the differences in contralateral foramen area and disc-height index(DHI) before and after surgery (p<0.05). Five patients (Group O) in Group S had second surgery because of invalid conservative treatment. The surgical exploration rate was 1.0504%. Compared with Group T, the symptoms of Group O patients appeared earlier, persisted longer, and were more serious (p<0.05). Conclusions Contralateral neurological symptom is a potential complication after TLIF, and its causes are diverse. Surgical explorations should be conducted early for those patients with the complication who present with obvious nerve damage. PMID:26109143

  2. The incremental validity of passive-aggressive personality symptoms rivals or exceeds that of other personality symptoms in suicidal outpatients.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Thomas E; Rudd, M David

    2002-08-01

    We examined the incremental validity of passive-aggressive and other personality symptoms, by determining personality syndromes' ability to account for unique variance in distress and impairment as indexed by several Axis I-related symptoms. Two hundred fifty young adults, referred for suicidal behavior or ideation, completed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (Millon, 1983) as well as several other symptom measures. The personality syndromes varied considerably in their ability to account for unique variance in Axis I-related symptoms. Several syndromes, including schizoid, schizotypal, and compulsive symptoms, showed relatively low incremental validity, whereas the incremental validity of passive-aggressive symptoms exceeded all others. The criterion of incremental validity represents an inclusive and persuasive means to evaluate personality disorder validity. On this criterion, passive-aggressive symptoms display high validity, and passive-aggressive personality disorder, in some form, may deserve inclusion on Axis II of future editions of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association). PMID:12227665

  3. Should Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms be Considered within the Spectrum of Depressive Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jihyung; Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Aguado, Jaume; Dueñas, Héctor; Peng, Xiaomei; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether painful physical symptoms (PPS) can be considered within the spectrum of depressive symptoms. Methods: Data for this post-hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month observational study mostly conducted in East Asia, Mexico, and the Middle East of 1,549 depressed patients without sexual dysfunction at baseline. Both explanatory and confirmatory factor analyses (EFA and CFA) were performed on the combined items of the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report and the Somatic Symptom Inventory (seven pain-related items only). An additional second-order CFA was also conducted to examine an association between retained factors and the overall “depressive symptoms” factor. In addition, Spearman’s correlation was used to assess levels of correlation between retained factors and depression severity as well as quality of life. Results: Both EFA and CFA suggested and validated a four-factor solution, which included a pain factor. The other three factors identified were a mood/cognitive factor, a sleep disturbance factor, and an appetite/weight disturbance factor. All four factors were significantly associated with the overall factor of depression. They were also highly correlated to depression severity and quality of life (p<0.001 for all). The levels of correlations with the pain factor were generally greater than those with the appetite/weight factor and similar to those with the sleep factor. Conclusion: It may be reasonable to consider PPS within a broad spectrum of depressive symptoms. At least, they should be routinely assessed in patients with depression. Further research is warranted to validate these preliminary findings. PMID:25870649

  4. Stroke survivor and informal caregiver perceptions of poststroke depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Dunbar, Sandra B; Clark, Patricia C

    2012-04-01

    Poststroke depression is common but remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. One explanation for this is that depressive symptoms go unrecognized by stroke survivors and their family caregivers and thus go unreported to the stroke survivor's healthcare provider. Forty-four stroke survivor-informal caregiver dyads were interviewed using a depression knowledge scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and an adapted version of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire to determine their lay knowledge of depressive symptoms, recognition of poststroke depressive symptoms, and perception of the recognized symptoms. Caregivers and stroke survivors had moderate knowledge of depressive symptoms but had some misconceptions. The most commonly recognized poststroke depressive symptoms by stroke survivors were "feeling like everything was an effort," "restless sleep," "difficulty concentrating," and "talking less than usual." Caregivers identified that the stroke survivor was "feeling like everything was an effort," had "restless sleep," "felt sad," and "felt depressed." Three quarters of stroke survivors with high levels of depressive symptoms identified the cluster of symptoms as potentially being depression. Neuroscience nurses are in the unique position to educate stroke survivors and their caregivers about poststroke depressive symptoms, treatment options, and the importance of discussing depressive symptoms with their healthcare provider. PMID:22367269

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Rebecca L.; Moser, Debra K.; Tovar, Elizabeth G.; Chung, Misook L.; Heo, Seongkum; Wu, Jia Rong; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Pressler, Susan J.; Lennie, Terry A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammation may be a link between depressive symptoms and outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). It is not clear whether inflammatory markers are independently related to depressive symptoms in this population. Aim To determine which inflammatory biomarkers are independently associated with depressive symptoms in HF. Methods and Results We analyzed data from 428 outpatients enrolled in a HF registry (32% female, 61 ± 12 years, 48% NYHA Class III/IV). Depressive symptoms were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokines (interleukin [IL] 1RA, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10), tumor necrosis alpha, and soluble receptors sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 were measured with enzyme immunoassay. Multiple regressions were used to determine which biomarkers were associated with depressive symptoms controlling for demographics, HF severity, and clinical variables. Twenty-seven percent (n = 119) had depressive symptoms. CRP was related to depressive symptoms after controlling for age and gender, but no inflammatory biomarkers were associated with depressive symptoms after controlling for all variables in the model. Conclusions There was no relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and depressive symptoms. Our findings, in combination with prior researchers, suggest there is not a robust relationship between depressive symptoms and individual biomarkers of inflammation in HF. PMID:24062026

  6. MsFLASH participants' priorities for alleviating menopausal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, J S; Woods, N F; Otte, J L; Guthrie, K A; Hohensee, C; Newton, K M; Joffe, H; Cohen, L; Sternfeld, B; Lau, R J; Reed, S D; LaCroix, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe self-reported menopausal symptom priorities and their association with demographics and other symptoms among participants in an intervention trial for vasomotor symptoms (VMS). Methods Cross-sectional study embedded in the MsFLASH 02 trial, a three-by-two factorial design of yoga vs. exercise vs. usual activity and omega-3-fatty acid vs. placebo. At baseline, women (n?=?354) completed hot flush diaries, a card sort task to prioritize symptoms they would most like to alleviate, and standardized questionnaires. Results The most common symptom priorities were: VMS (n?=?322), sleep (n?=?191), concentration (n?=?140), and fatigue (n?=?116). In multivariate models, women who chose VMS as their top priority symptom (n?=?210) reported significantly greater VMS severity (p?=?0.004) and never smoking (p?=?0.012), and women who chose sleep as their top priority symptom (n?=?100) were more educated (p???0.001) and had worse sleep quality (p?symptom. Conclusions Among women entering an intervention trial for VMS and with relatively low prevalence of depression and anxiety, VMS was the priority symptom for treatment. A card sort may be a valid tool for quickly assessing symptom priorities in clinical practice and research. PMID:26517583

  7. Understanding medical symptoms: a conceptual review and analysis.

    PubMed

    Malterud, Kirsti; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Reventlow, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to present a conceptual review and analysis of symptom understanding. Subjective bodily sensations occur abundantly in the normal population and dialogues about symptoms take place in a broad range of contexts, not only in the doctor's office. Our review of symptom understanding proceeds from an initial subliminal awareness by way of attribution of meaning and subsequent management, with and without professional involvement. We introduce theoretical perspectives from phenomenology, semiotics, social interactionism, and discourse analysis. Drew Leder's phenomenological perspectives deal with how symptom perception occurs when any kind of altered balance brings forward a bodily attention. Corporeality is brought to explicit awareness and perceived as sensations. Jesper Hoffmeyer's biosemiotic perspectives provide access to how signs are interpreted to attribute meaning to the bodily messages. Symptom management is then determined by the meaning of a symptom. Dorte E. Gannik's concept "situational disease" explains how situations can be reviewed not just in terms of their potential to produce signs or symptoms, but also in terms of their capacity to contain symptoms. Disease is a social and relational phenomenon of containment, and regulating the situation where the symptoms originate implies adjusting containment. Discourse analysis, as presented by Jonathan Potter and Margaret Wetherell, provides a tool to notice the subtle ways in which language orders perceptions and how language constructs social interaction. Symptoms are situated in culture and context, and trends in modern everyday life modify symptom understanding continuously. Our analysis suggests that a symptom can only be understood by attention to the social context in which the symptom emerges and the dialogue through which it is negotiated. PMID:26597868

  8. Bilastine for the relief of allergy symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sádaba Díaz de Rada, B; Azanza Perea, J R; Gomez-Guiu Hormigos, A

    2011-04-01

    Bilastine is a potent inhibitor of the histamine H1 receptor. It was recently approved in 28 countries of the European Union for the symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria in adults and children older than 12 years. Data from preclinical studies confirmed its selectivity for the histamine H1 receptor over other receptors, and demonstrated antihistaminic and antiallergic properties in vivo. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients have shown that bilastine does not affect driving ability, cardiac conduction or alertness. Bilastine has demonstrated a good safety profile, without serious adverse effects or antimuscarinic effects in clinical trials. There were no significant changes in laboratory tests, electrocardiograms or vital signs. In clinical studies, oral treatment with bilastine 20 mg once daily improved allergic rhinitis with greater efficacy than placebo and comparable to cetirizine and desloratadine. Bilastine 20 mg was more effective than placebo and equivalent to levocetirizine in chronic urticaria, relieving symptoms, improving quality of life and controlling sleep disorders. PMID:21573249

  9. Abstinence symptoms following smoked marijuana in humans.

    PubMed

    Haney, M; Ward, A S; Comer, S D; Foltin, R W; Fischman, M W

    1999-02-01

    Symptoms of withdrawal after oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) administration have been reported, yet little is known about the development of dependence on smoked marijuana in humans. In a 21-day residential study, marijuana smokers (n = 12) worked on five psychomotor tasks during the day (0915-1700 hours), and in the evening engaged in recreational activities (1700-2330 hours); subjective-effects measures were completed 10 times/day. Food and beverages were available ad libitum from 0830 to 2330 hours. Marijuana cigarettes (0.0, 1.8, 3.1% THC) were smoked at 1000, 1400, 1800, and 2200 hours. Placebo marijuana was administered on days 1-4 . One of the active marijuana doses was administered on days 5-8, followed by 4 days of placebo marijuana (days 9-12). The other concentration of active marijuana cigarettes was administered on days 13-16, followed by 4 days of placebo marijuana (days 17-20); the order in which the high and low THC-concentration marijuana cigarettes were administered was counter-balanced between groups. Both active doses of marijuana increased ratings of "High," and "Good Drug Effect," and increased food intake, while decreasing verbal interaction compared to the placebo baseline (days 1-4). Abstinence from active marijuana increased ratings such as "Anxious," "Irritable," and "Stomach pain," and significantly decreased food intake compared to baseline. This empirical demonstration of withdrawal from smoked marijuana may suggest that daily marijuana use may be maintained, at least in part, by the alleviation of abstinence symptoms. PMID:10090647

  10. Multiple perspectives on symptom interpretation in primary care research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessment and management of symptoms is a main task in primary care. Symptoms may be defined as 'any subjective evidence of a health problem as perceived by the patient’. In other words, symptoms do not appear as such; symptoms are rather the result of an interpretation process. We aim to discuss different perspectives on symptom interpretation as presented in the disciplines of biomedicine, psychology and anthropology and the possible implications for our understanding of research on symptoms in relation to prevalence and diagnosis in the general population and in primary care. Discussion Symptom experiences are embedded in a complex interplay between biological, psychological and cultural factors. From a biomedical perspective, symptoms are seen as possible indicators of disease and are characterized by parameters related to seriousness (e.g. appearance, severity, impact and temporal aspects). However, such symptom characteristics are rarely unambiguous, but merely indicate disease probability. In addition, the GP’s interpretation of presenting symptoms will also be influenced by other factors. From a psychological perspective, factors affecting interpretation are in focus (e.g. internal frame of reference, attention to sensations, illness perception and susceptibility to suggestion). These individual factors cannot stand alone either, but are influenced by the surroundings. Anthropological research suggests that personal experiences and culture form a continuous feedback relationship which influence when and how sensations are understood as symptoms of disease and acted upon. Summary The different approaches to symptom interpretation imply that we need to be cautious and conscious when interpreting survey findings that are based on symptom prevalence in the general population or in primary care. These findings will reflect a variety of interpretations of sensations, which are not equivalent to expressions of underlying disease. Furthermore, if diagnosis of disease is based exclusively on the presence of specific symptom characteristics, we may risk reinforcing a dualistic approach, including medicalisation of normal phenomena and devaluation of medically unexplained symptoms. Future research in primary care could gain from exploring symptoms as a generic phenomenon and raised awareness of symptom complexity. PMID:24188544

  11. Depressive Symptoms, Social Support, and Walking Among Hispanic Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Perrino, Tatiana; Brown, Scott C.; Huang, Shi; Brown, C. Hendricks; Gómez, Gianna Pérez; Pantin, Hilda; Szapocznik, José

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Depressive symptoms and physical inactivity are health risks among minority older adults. This study examined whether social support moderated the relationship of depressive symptoms to walking behavior among 217 community-dwelling, Hispanic older adults. Method Cross-sectional analyses were used to test whether different forms of social support interacted with depressive symptoms to affect both likelihood and amount of walking. Results Analyses showed a significant interaction between depressive symptoms and instrumental support related to the likelihood of walking and a marginally significant interaction between depressive symptoms and instrumental social support related to the amount of walking. Depressive symptoms were associated with a lower likelihood and lower amount of walking among participants receiving high levels of instrumental social support (e.g., help with chores) but not low instrumental support. Emotional and informational support did not moderate the depression to walking relationship. Conclusion Receiving too much instrumental support was related to sedentary behavior among depressed older adults. PMID:21508305

  12. Cannabis use in HIV for pain and other medical symptoms.

    PubMed

    Woolridge, Emily; Barton, Simon; Samuel, Jonathon; Osorio, Jess; Dougherty, Andrew; Holdcroft, Anita

    2005-04-01

    Despite the major benefits of antiretroviral therapy on survival during HIV infection, there is an increasing need to manage symptoms and side effects during long-term drug therapy. Cannabis has been reported anecdotally as being beneficial for a number of common symptoms and complications in HIV infections, for example, poor appetite and neuropathy. This study aimed to investigate symptom management with cannabis. Following Ethics Committee approval, HIV-positive individuals attending a large clinic were recruited into an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire study. Up to one-third (27%, 143/523) reported using cannabis for treating symptoms. Patients reported improved appetite (97%), muscle pain (94%), nausea (93%), anxiety (93%), nerve pain (90%), depression (86%), and paresthesia (85%). Many cannabis users (47%) reported associated memory deterioration. Symptom control using cannabis is widespread in HIV outpatients. A large number of patients reported that cannabis improved symptom control. PMID:15857739

  13. Acute symptoms following exposure to grain dust in farming.

    PubMed

    Manfreda, J; Holford-Strevens, V; Cheang, M; Warren, C P

    1986-04-01

    History of acute symptoms (cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, fever, stuffy nose, and skin itching/rash) following exposure to grain dust was obtained from 661 male and 535 female current and former farmers. These symptoms were relatively common: 60% of male and 25% of female farmers reported at least one such symptom on exposure to grain dust. Association of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and stuffy nose with skin reactivity and capacity to form IgE is consistent with an allergic nature of these symptoms. Barley and oats dust were perceived as dust most often producing symptoms. On the other hand, grain fever showed a different pattern, i.e., it was not associated with either skin reactivity or total IgE. Smoking might modify the susceptibility to react to grain dust with symptoms. Only those who reported wheezing on exposure to grain dust may have an increased risk to develop chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:3709486

  14. Core OCD Symptoms: Exploration of Specificity and Relations with Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Stasik, Sara M.; Naragon-Gainey, Kristin; Chmielewski, Michael; Watson, David

    2012-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous condition, comprised of multiple symptom domains. This study used aggregate composite scales representing three core OCD dimensions (Checking, Cleaning, Rituals), as well as Hoarding, to examine the discriminant validity, diagnostic specificity, and predictive ability of OCD symptom scales. The core OCD scales demonstrated strong patterns of convergent and discriminant validity – suggesting that these dimensions are distinct from other self-reported symptoms – whereas hoarding symptoms correlated just as strongly with OCD and non-OCD symptoms in most analyses. Across analyses, our results indicated that Checking is a particularly strong, specific marker of OCD diagnosis, whereas the specificity of Cleaning and Hoarding to OCD was less strong. Finally, the OCD Checking scale was the only significant predictor of OCD diagnosis in logistic regression analyses. Results are discussed with regard to the importance of assessing OCD symptom dimensions separately and implications for classification. PMID:23026094

  15. Acute symptoms following exposure to grain dust in farming.

    PubMed Central

    Manfreda, J; Holford-Strevens, V; Cheang, M; Warren, C P

    1986-01-01

    History of acute symptoms (cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, fever, stuffy nose, and skin itching/rash) following exposure to grain dust was obtained from 661 male and 535 female current and former farmers. These symptoms were relatively common: 60% of male and 25% of female farmers reported at least one such symptom on exposure to grain dust. Association of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and stuffy nose with skin reactivity and capacity to form IgE is consistent with an allergic nature of these symptoms. Barley and oats dust were perceived as dust most often producing symptoms. On the other hand, grain fever showed a different pattern, i.e., it was not associated with either skin reactivity or total IgE. Smoking might modify the susceptibility to react to grain dust with symptoms. Only those who reported wheezing on exposure to grain dust may have an increased risk to develop chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:3709486

  16. Symptoms and physical activity behavior in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; Snook, Erin M; Schapiro, Randall T

    2008-10-01

    We examined overall and specific symptoms as correlates of physical activity in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants (N = 133) completed questionnaires that measured overall symptoms; and specific symptoms of depression, pain, and fatigue; difficulty walking; and physical activity. Initial analyses indicated that higher levels of overall symptoms (r = -.50), fatigue (r = -.26), and difficulty walking (r = -.46) were associated with lower levels of physical activity. Path analysis demonstrated that higher levels of overall symptoms were directly and indirectly associated with lower levels of physical activity; the indirect pathway involved difficulty walking (gamma beta = -.17). Such findings indicate that walking difficulty may partially explain the negative relationship between overall symptoms and physical activity behavior in MS. PMID:18286635

  17. Dissociative Symptoms and Mother's Marital Status in Young Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Bob, Petr; Selesova, Petra; Raboch, Jiri; Kukla, Lubomir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current findings suggest that mother's marital status indicating father's absence or conflicting relationship to father may be specifically related to dissociation and other stress-related symptoms. We have assessed relationships of mother's marital status, dissociative symptoms, and other psychopathological manifestations in a sample of 19 years’ old young adults (N?=?364) participating in European longitudinal study (European Longitudinal Study of Parenthood and Childhood). The results show clinically significant manifestations of dissociative symptoms in young adult men whose mothers were fatherless and in women whose mothers were re-married. Other psychopathological symptoms did not reach clinically significant manifestations. The results suggest that significant factor related to high level of dissociative symptoms in men growing in fatherless families might be linked with disturbed and conflicting attachment to a father's figure and pathological dependent attachment to mother. In women dissociative symptoms likely are linked to conflicting relationship between mother and daughter associated with stepfather’ presence in the family. PMID:25590849

  18. Risk factors for DSM 5 PTSD symptoms in Israeli civilians during the Gaza war

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Sharon; Weinberg, Michael; Or-Chen, Keren; Harel, Hila

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current modifications presented in the diagnostic criteria of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the DSM 5, this study aimed at revalidating well-known PTSD risk factors, including gender, peritraumatic dissociation, social support, level of threat, and trait tendency for forgiveness. Method Five hundred and one Israeli civilians were assessed during real-time exposure to missile and rocket fire at the eruption of the Gaza war. Assessments took place approximately one to 2 weeks after the beginning of this military operation, relying on web administration of the study, which allowed simultaneous data collection from respondents in the three regions in Israel that were under attack. Results A structural equation model design revealed that higher levels of forgiveness toward situations were associated with fewer PTSD symptoms, whereas peritraumatic dissociation and high levels of objective and subjective threat were positively associated with PTSD symptoms. Additionally, females were at higher risk for PTSD symptoms than males. Conclusions The findings of this study provide further evidence for the importance of directing preventive attention to those vulnerable to the development of elevated levels of PTSD symptoms. Theoretical and clinical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25905028

  19. Stress, sense of coherence and emotional symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moksnes, Unni K; Espnes, Geir A; Haugan, Gørill

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the association between the domains of stress, sense of coherence (SOC) and emotional symptoms (depression and anxiety) in adolescents, as well as the potential moderating role of SOC on the relationship between stress and emotional symptoms. The study is based on a cross-sectional sample of 1183 adolescents aged 13-18 who attend public elementary and secondary schools in Mid-Norway. The results showed that girls scored higher than boys on stress related to peer pressure, home life, school performance, school/leisure conflict and emotional symptoms. Conversely, boys reported higher SOC than girls. Results from multiple hierarchical regression analyses showed that for boys, stress related to school performance was positively associated with symptoms of both depression and anxiety, whereas stress from peer pressure was associated with depressive symptoms. For girls, stress from peer pressure, romantic relationships and school was associated with more depressive symptoms. SOC was strongly and inversely associated with emotional symptoms, especially anxiety in girls. SOC also moderated the association between stress related to peer pressure and depressive symptoms in both genders. The study provides evidence of the association of SOC with stress and emotional symptoms during adolescence. PMID:23906224

  20. Introduction Osteoporosis can be a devastating secondary symptom of both

    E-print Network

    215 Introduction Osteoporosis can be a devastating secondary symptom of both acute and congenital compartment. Keywords: Osteoporosis, Neuromuscular Disease, Bone, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), Spinal

  1. Correlates of Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jones, LaRita C; Clay, Olivio J; Ovalle, Fernando; Cherrington, Andrea; Crowe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Investigators examined correlates of depressive symptoms within a sample of older adults with diabetes. Participants completed a structured telephone interview with measures including depressive symptoms, health conditions, cognitive function, and diabetes distress. Correlations and hierarchical linear regression models were utilized to examine bivariate and covariate-adjusted correlates of depressive symptoms. The sample included 246 community-dwelling adults with diabetes (?65 years old). In bivariate analyses, African Americans, individuals with specific health issues (neuropathy, stroke, respiratory issues, arthritis, and cardiac issues), and those with higher levels of diabetes distress reported more depressive symptoms. Older age, higher education, more income, and better cognitive function were inversely associated with depressive symptoms. In the final covariate-adjusted regression model, stroke (B = .22, p < .001), cognitive function (B = -.14, p < .01), and higher levels of diabetes-related distress (B = .49, p < .001) each were uniquely associated with more depressive symptoms. Diabetes distress partially mediated the associations between cardiac issues and depressive symptoms and between cognitive function and depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that interventions targeted at helping older adults manage their diabetes-related distress and reducing the likelihood of experiencing additional health complications may reduce depressive symptoms within this population. PMID:26682235

  2. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective?The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods?We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results?Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion?There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  3. Reflux Laryngitis: Correlation between the Symptoms Findings and Indirect Laryngoscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carlos Eduardo Dilen da; Niedermeier, Bruno Taccola; Portinho, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Introduction?The indirect laryngoscopy has an important role in the characterization of reflux laryngitis. Although many findings are nonspecific, some strongly suggest that the inflammation is the cause of reflux. Objective?The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between reflux symptoms and the findings of indirect laryngoscopy. Methods?We evaluated 27 patients with symptoms of pharyngolaryngeal reflux disease. Results?Laryngoscopy demonstrated in all patients the presence of hypertrophy of the posterior commissure and laryngeal edema. The most frequent symptoms were the presence of dry cough and foreign body sensation. Conclusion?There was a correlation between the findings at laryngoscopy and symptoms of reflux. PMID:26157498

  4. Unexplained symptoms after terrorism and war: an expert consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Clauw, Daniel J; Engel, Charles C; Aronowitz, Robert; Jones, Edgar; Kipen, Howard M; Kroenke, Kurt; Ratzan, Scott; Sharpe, Michael; Wessely, Simon

    2003-10-01

    Twelve years of concern regarding a possible "Gulf War syndrome" has now given way to societal concerns of a "World Trade Center syndrome" and efforts to prevent unexplained symptoms following the most recent war in Iraq. These events serve to remind us that unexplained symptoms frequently occur after war and are likely after terrorist attacks. An important social priority is to recognize, define, prevent, and care for individuals with unexplained symptoms after war and related events (eg, terrorism, natural or industrial disasters). An international, multidisciplinary, and multiinstitutional consensus project was completed to summarize current knowledge on unexplained symptoms after terrorism and war. PMID:14534444

  5. Longitudinal Associations between Smoking and Depressive Symptoms among Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Sarah J.; Negriff, Sonya; Dorn, Lorah D.; Pabst, Stephanie; Schulenberg, John

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important period for initiation of smoking and manifestation of depression, which are often comorbid. Researchers have examined associations between depressive symptoms and smoking to elucidate whether those with increased depressive symptoms smoke more to self-medicate, whether those who smoke experience increased subsequent depressive symptoms, or both. Collectively, there have been mixed findings; however, studies have been limited by a) cross-sectional or short-term longitudinal data, or b) the use of methods that test associations, or only one direction in the associations, rather than a fully-reciprocal model to examine directionality. This study examined the associations between smoking and depressive symptoms in a sample of adolescent girls using latent dual change scores to model 1) the effect of smoking on change in depressive symptoms, and simultaneously, 2) the effect of depressive symptoms on change in smoking across ages 11 to 20. Data were from a cohort-sequential prospective longitudinal study (N = 262). Girls were enrolled by age cohort (11, 13, 15, and 17 years) and were primarily White (61%) or African American (31%). Data were restructured by age. Every 6 months, girls reported depressive symptoms and cigarette use. Results indicated that, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, higher levels of smoking predicted a greater increase in depressive symptoms across adolescence. These findings suggest that a higher level of cigarette smoking does contribute to more depressive symptoms, which has implications for prevention of depression and for intervention and future research. PMID:23689842

  6. Symptom Dimensions in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Obsessive Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Trinette; Sharma, Mahendra P.; Thennarasu, Kandavel; Reddy, Y. C. Janardhan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous condition with a few major symptom dimensions. These symptom dimensions are thought to have unique clinical and neurobiological correlates. There seems to be a specific relation between OCD symptom dimensions and obsessive beliefs, but the findings are not consistent across studies. There is also a paucity of literature from culturally diverse settings. One of the reasons for the varied findings could be due to the method employed in measuring OCD symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this study, we examined the relation between symptom dimensions and obsessive beliefs using the Dimensional Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale and the Obsessive Beliefs Questionnaire respectively in 75 patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition OCD. Results: Perfectionism predicted both aggressive and symmetry dimensions whereas responsibility beliefs predicted sexual and religious dimensions. Conclusions: The findings suggest that certain obsessive beliefs predicted certain OCD symptom dimensions, but results are not entirely consistent with the published literature suggesting the possibility of cross-cultural variations. That the symptom dimensions have unique belief domains support the argument that symptom dimensions could be targeted to reduce the heterogeneity in etiological and treatment studies of OCD. Therapeutic interventions may have to aim at modifying unique belief domains underlying certain symptom dimensions rather than having generic cognitive-behavioral strategies.

  7. Beyond frequency: who is most bothered by vasomotor symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Joffe, Hadine; Avis, Nancy E.; Hess, Rachel; Crandall, Carolyn J.; Chang, Yuefang; Green, Robin; Matthews, Karen A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Most menopausal women report vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats). However, not all women with vasomotor symptoms, including frequent symptoms, are bothered by them. The primary aim was to identify correlates of vasomotor symptom bother beyond symptom frequency. Design The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation participants reporting vasomotor symptoms at annual visit 7 comprised the sample (N = 1,042). Assessments included hot flash and night sweats frequency (number per week) and bother (1, not at all– 4, very much). Negative affect (index of depressive symptoms, anxiety, perceived stress, negative mood), symptom sensitivity, sleep problems, and vasomotor symptom duration (number of years) were examined cross-sectionally in relation to bother in ordinal logistic regression models with symptom frequency and covariates. Hot flashes and night sweats were considered separately. Results In multivariable models controlling for hot flash frequency, negative affect (odds ratio [OR] = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.08–1.51), symptom sensitivity (OR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03–1.37), sleep problems (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.04–1.85), poorer health (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.03–1.48), duration of hot flashes (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.06–1.23), younger age (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89–0.99), and African American race (vs white, OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.12–2.26) were associated with hot flash bother. After controlling for night sweats frequency and covariates, sleep problems (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.33–2.55) and night sweats duration (OR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02–1.20) were associated with night sweats bother. Conclusions Beyond frequency, factors associated with bothersome hot flashes include mood, symptom sensitivity, symptom duration, sleep problems, age, and race. Correlates of bothersome night sweats include sleep problems and symptom duration. In addition to reducing frequency, interventions for vasomotor symptoms might consider addressing modifiable factors related to symptom bother. PMID:18521049

  8. Toward the next generation of negative symptom assessments: the collaboration to advance negative symptom assessment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Jack J; Kring, Ann M; Horan, William P; Gur, Raquel

    2011-03-01

    Negative symptoms in schizophrenia are related to poor functional outcome, persistent over time, a source of burden for caregivers, and only minimally responsive to currently available medications. A major challenge to developing efficacious interventions concerns the valid and reliable assessment of negative symptoms. In a recent consensus statement on negative symptoms, a central recommendation was the need to develop new assessment approaches that address the limitations of existing instruments. In the current report, we summarize the background and rationale for the Collaboration to Advance Negative Symptom Assessment in Schizophrenia (CANSAS). The CANSAS project is an National Institute of Mental Health-funded multisite study that is constructing a next-generation negative symptom scale, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS). The CAINS is being developed within a data-driven iterative process that seeks to ensure the measure's reliability, validity, and utility for both basic psychopathology and treatment development research. PMID:20861151

  9. Fear conditioned responses and PTSD symptoms in children: Sex differences in fear-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gamwell, Kaitlyn; Nylocks, Maria; Cross, Dorthie; Bradley, Bekh; Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2015-11-01

    Fear conditioning studies in adults have found that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with heightened fear responses and impaired discrimination. The objective of the current study was to examine the association between PTSD symptoms and fear conditioned responses in children from a highly traumatized urban population. Children between 8 and 13 years old participated in a fear conditioning study in addition to providing information about their trauma history and PTSD symptoms. Results showed that females showed less discrimination between danger and safety signals during conditioning compared to age-matched males. In boys, intrusive symptoms were predictive of fear responses, even after controlling for trauma exposure. However, in girls, conditioned fear to the danger cue was predictive of self-blame and fear of repeated trauma. This study suggests there are early sex differences in the patterns of fear conditioning and that these sex differences may translate to differential risk for trauma-related psychopathology. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 57: 799-808, 2015. PMID:26011240

  10. Psychotic symptoms in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Chatziioannidis, S; Charatsidou, I; Nikolaidis, N; Garyfallos, G; Giouzepas, I

    2013-01-01

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus due to idiopathic aqueductal stenosis is a chronic abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid in the cerebral ventricles caused by an obstruction in the Sylvian aqueduct. This leads to a dilatation of the ventricular system and to subsequent damage of the adjacent parenchyma. Although NPH typically presents with the progressive 'triad' of cognitive impairment, gait disturbance and urinary incontinence, it has been described that it rarely manifests in the form of predominant psychotic symptoms. It has been suggested that thought and perceptual disorders could develop secondary to the damage caused by NPH. Although precise anatomical correlates have not yet been established, certain cerebral regions -primarily the frontal cortex, mesencephalic and diencephalic structures of the brain- have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hydrocephalic psychosis. Because frontal lobe lesions are traditionally known to facilitate one's inability to integrate and correct perceptual distortions in the face of contradictory evidence, frontal lobe dysfunction may be integral in delineating the etiology of delusions in NPH. We present the case of a 30-year-old female, admitted involuntarily to our acute psychiatric department because she exhibited aggressive behavior while being in an agitated state with delusions of persecution. Her neurological examination disclosed subtle bradykinesia. Neuropsychological batteries and intelligence testing revealed mild cognitive impairment and a CT scan showed considerable dilatation of the ventricular system due to idiopathic aqueductal stenosis. While a conservative approach was chosen for the treatment of NPH, our patient was initiated on 2nd generation antipsychotics showing marked improvement of her psychiatric symptomatology. The atypical presentation of hydrocephalus in the aforementioned case underlines the necessity to thoroughly investigate the possible presence of an underlying organic factor in those patients who present with predominant psychotic symptoms in association with soft non-localising neurological signs and mild cognitive deficits. Furthermore, our patient's marked improvement indicates that, in cases where the primary cause is treated conservatively, hydrocephalic psychosis could respond to 2nd generation antipsychotics. In light of this case report, we reviewed past and present literature on the matter. PMID:24185090

  11. ARBEJDSDAG FOR 2G FRA LANGK R GYMNASIUM MATEMATIKKEN BAG KRYPTERING OG SIGNERING V.HJ.A. RSA

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Johan P.

    tal 1 3. Regning med rester 2 4. Kryptering og signering ved hj#26;lp af et o#11;entligt n#28;gle;sning, afsnit 4 #15; 13:15-14 #31;velser 2. Indbyrdes primiske hele tal De#12;nition 1. To hele tal m; n #30;(m) betegner vi antallet af positive hele tal mindre end m, der er indbyrdes primiske med m (Euler

  12. Relationships among post-concussive symptoms and symptoms of PTSD in children following mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    HAJEK, CHRISTINE A.; YEATES, KEITH OWEN; TAYLOR, H. GERRY; BANGERT, BARBARA; DIETRICH, ANN; NUSS, KATHRYN E.; RUSIN, JEROME; WRIGHT, MARTHA

    2010-01-01

    Primary objective To investigate the occurrence of post-concussive symptoms (PCS) and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children following mild traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Research design Longitudinal study comparing the outcomes of mild TBI and orthopaedic injuries (OI) in children aged 8–15. Methods and procedures One hundred and eighty-six children with mild TBI and 99 with OI were recruited prospectively. Parents rated children's PCS and symptoms of PTSD at 2 weeks, 3 months and 12 months post-injury. One hundred and sixty-seven with mild TBI and 84 with OI completed all assessments. Main outcomes and results Controlling for symptoms of PTSD, the mild TBI group demonstrated more PCS than the OI group, although the magnitude of group differences diminished with time. Controlling for PCS, the OI group displayed more symptoms of PTSD than the mild TBI group at baseline, but not thereafter. Symptoms of PTSD and PCS were correlated significantly, but more highly in the OI group than the mild TBI group. Conclusions Although PCS and symptoms of PTSD are correlated, children with mild TBI are more distinguishable from children with OI based on PCS than on symptoms of PTSD. The latter symptoms, moreover, do not account for increased PCS following mild TBI in children. PMID:20085447

  13. Obsessive compulsive symptoms in individuals at clinical risk for psychosis: association with depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation.

    PubMed

    DeVylder, Jordan E; Oh, Amy J; Ben-David, Shelly; Azimov, Neyra; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M; Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2012-09-01

    Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, particularly aggressive obsessions, are prevalent in schizophrenia patients and associated with other symptom severity, suicidal ideation and functional impairment. In a psychosis-risk cohort, obsessive-compulsive diagnosis and symptoms were assessed in terms of prevalence and content, and for associations with clinical measures. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms were prevalent in the CHR cohort, as was suicidal ideation. The presence and severity of aggressive obsessions were associated with depression, suicidal ideation and social impairment. The high prevalence of aggressive obsessions and associated suicidal ideation in a clinical high risk cohort, and their relationship to depression, is relevant for risk assessment and treatment strategies. PMID:22846651

  14. Comparing Changes in Late-life Depressive Symptoms across Aging, Disablement, and Mortality Processes

    PubMed Central

    Fauth, Elizabeth B.; Gerstorf, Denis; Ram, Nilam; Malmberg, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Developmental processes are inherently time-related, with various time metrics and transition points being used to proxy how change is organized with respect to the theoretically underlying mechanisms. Using data from four Swedish studies of individuals aged 70–100+ (N = 453) who were measured every two years for up to five waves, we test whether depressive symptoms (CES-D) are primarily driven by aging-, disablement-, or mortality-related processes, as operationally defined by time-from-birth, time-to/from-disability onset (first reported impairment in Activities of Daily Living), and time-to-death metrics. Using an approach based on Akaike weights, we tested whether developmental trajectories (for each time metric) of depressive symptoms in late life are more efficiently described as a single continuous process or as a two-phase process. Comparing fits of linear and multi-phase growth models, we found that two-phase models demonstrated better fit than single-phase models across all time metrics. Time-to-death and time-to/from-disability-onset models provided more efficient descriptions of changes in depressive symptoms than did time-from-birth models, with time-to-death models representing the best overall fit. Our findings support prior research that late-life changes in depressive symptoms are driven by disablement and, particularly, mortality processes, rather than advancing chronological age. From a practical standpoint, time-to/from-disability-onset and particularly, time-to-death metrics may provide better “base” models from which to examine changes in late-life depressive symptoms and determine modifiable risk and protective factors. Developmental researchers across content areas can compare age with other relevant time metrics to determine if chronological age or other processes drive the underlying developmental change in their construct of interest. PMID:24491214

  15. Gender Role Orientation and Anxiety Symptoms among African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palapattu, Anuradha G.; Kingery, Julie Newman; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2006-01-01

    The present study evaluated gender role theory as an explanation for the observed gender differences in anxiety symptoms among adolescents. Specifically, the relation between gender, gender role orientation (i.e., masculinity and femininity), self-esteem, and anxiety symptoms was examined in a community sample of 114 African Americans aged 14 to…

  16. Benefits of Expressive Writing in Lowering Rumination and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gortner, Eva-Marie; Rude, Stephanie S.; Pennebaker, James W.

    2006-01-01

    Depression-vulnerable college students (with both elevated prior depressive symptoms and low current depressive symptoms) wrote on 3 consecutive days in either an expressive writing or a control condition. As predicted, participants scoring above the median on the suppression scale of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (Gross & John, 2003)…

  17. Structure of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Pediatric OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mataix-Cols, David; Nakatani, Eriko; Micali, Nadia; Heyman, Isobel

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the structure of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) symptoms observed in adults is similar to those observed in children is presented. This investigation indicates the structure of OCD symptoms is the same across the entire lifespan as compared to pediatric OCD and adulthood OCD.

  18. Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorder Symptoms in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Mariaskin, Amy; Storch, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs) and associated symptomology in college students. Participants: Participants included 358 undergraduate students. Results: Results suggest that clinically significant levels of OCSD symptoms are relatively common. Additionally, OCSD symptoms

  19. Depressive Symptoms, Coping Strategies, and Disordered Eating among College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBoven, Amy M.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2006-01-01

    In a 2-phase study with a total of 392 participants, depressive symptoms mediated the association between disordered eating and lower problem-solving confidence and an avoidance problem-solving style. Depressive symptoms did not mediate the association between the ability to generate competent solutions to hypothetical stressful situations and…

  20. Changes in Parental Depression Symptoms during Family Preservation Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffin, Mark; Bard, David

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Parental depression symptoms often change over the course of child welfare family preservation and parenting services. This raises the question of whether certain processes in family preservation services might be associated with depression symptom change. This study tests three correlational models of change among family preservation…

  1. Relationships of Ethnicity, Ethnic Identity, and Trauma Symptoms to Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Elizabeth J.; Waelde, Lynn C.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has found that delinquency is related to higher levels of trauma symptoms and poorer ethnic identity. The present study used a California Bay Area school-based sample of 307 adolescents to examine whether the relationship of trauma symptoms to delinquency is buffered by higher ethnic identity and whether this buffering effect is…

  2. Assessing Secondary Control and Its Association with Youth Depression Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, John R.; Francis, Sarah E.; Bearman, Sarah Kate

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research has linked youth depression symptoms to low levels of perceived control, using measures that reflect "primary control" (i.e., influencing objective conditions to make them fit one's wishes). We hypothesized that depressive symptoms are also linked to low levels of "secondary control" (i.e., influencing the psychological impact…

  3. The Differential Impact of Unique Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms

    E-print Network

    : How and Why Do Patients' Individual Symptom Clusters Impact Caregiver Depressive Symptoms? Katherine, Minneapolis, MN (JEG). Send correspondence and reprint requests to Katherine Ornstein, PhD, MPH, Department-mail: Katherine.ornstein@mssm.edu. C 2012 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry DOI: 10.1097/JGP.0b013e

  4. Genetic and Environmental Effects on Vocal Symptoms and Their Intercorrelations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nybacka, Ida; Simberg, Susanna; Santtila, Pekka; Sala, Eeva; Sandnabba, N. Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, Simberg et al. (2009) found genetic effects on a composite variable consisting of 6 vocal symptom items measuring dysphonia. The purpose of the present study was to determine genetic and environmental effects on the individual vocal symptoms in a population-based sample of Finnish twins. Method: The sample comprised 1,728 twins…

  5. Perceived attachment: relations to anxiety sensitivity, worry, and GAD symptoms.

    PubMed

    Viana, Andres G; Rabian, Brian

    2008-06-01

    This investigation examined the relation between perceived alienation from parents and peers, anxiety sensitivity (AS), and current worry and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms with the goal of expanding the knowledge base on factors that may contribute to the development of AS and its role in worry. The mediating role of AS between perceptions of alienation and current worry and GAD symptoms was also examined. Ninety-four non-clinical worriers completed self-report questionnaires assessing their perceptions of attachment, AS levels, and worry and GAD symptoms. Even after controlling for worry and GAD symptoms, greater perceptions of alienation from mothers and peers were significantly associated with higher AS symptoms. AS as a unitary construct mediated the relation between perceptions of alienation from mothers and peers and worry and GAD symptoms. The facets fear of publicly observable symptoms and fear of cognitive dyscontrol also mediated this relation. The role of alienation in relation to AS, worry, and GAD symptoms is discussed along with directions for future research. PMID:18471800

  6. Impact of Inflammation on Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Symptom Development

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Holly L.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Scherber, Robyn M.; Mesa, Ruben A.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (essential thrombocythemia, ET; polycythemia vera, PV; myelofibrosis, MF) are monoclonal malignancies associated with genomic instability, dysregulated signaling pathways, and subsequent overproduction of inflammatory markers. Acknowledged for their debilitating symptom profiles, recent investigations have aimed to determine the identity of these markers, the upstream sources stimulating their development, their prevalence within the MPN population, and the role they play in symptom development. Creation of dedicated Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) tools, in combination with expanded access to cytokine analysis technology, has resulted in a surge of investigations evaluating the potential associations between symptoms and inflammation. Emerging data demonstrates clear relationships between individual MPN symptoms (fatigue, abdominal complaints, microvascular symptoms, and constitutional symptoms) and cytokines, particularly IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?. Information is also compiling on the role symptoms paradoxically play in the development of cytokines, as in the case of fatigue-driven sedentary lifestyles. In this paper, we explore the symptoms inherent to the MPN disorders and the potential role inflammation plays in their development. PMID:26538823

  7. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  8. Emotional reactivity, coping style and cancer trauma symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Laskowska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This article studies the relationship between emotional reactivity and coping style on the one hand and intensity of symptoms of trauma in adult patients with cancer on the other hand. Material and methods The study was conducted on 150 patients, 55 women and 95 men, hospitalized for diagnosed cancer. Temperament was assessed with the Formal Characteristics of Behaviour – Temperament Inventory (FCB-TI). Coping style was assessed with the Polish version of the Mental Adjustment to Cancer Scale (Mini-MAC). Intensity of intrusion/hyperarousal and avoidance/numbing was assessed with the Factorial Version Inventory (PTSD), a quantitative measure of trauma-related symptoms. Results The outcomes of this study suggest that individual coping style is what determines the intensity of trauma-related symptoms most strongly. Destructive coping style accounts for 49% of the variance of symptom intensity and emotional reactivity accounts for 6%. Combined, destructive coping style and emotional reactivity account for 55% of the variance of general post-traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusions Destructive coping style (more important determinant of trauma symptoms) and high emotional reactivity as one of temperament traits are conducive to intensification of cancer trauma symptoms in adult patients. Our findings suggest that constructive coping style and low emotional reactivity may act as a specific protector against cancer trauma symptoms in adults. PMID:24701223

  9. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  10. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  11. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  12. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  13. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  14. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  15. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  16. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  17. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  18. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  19. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  20. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  1. 20 CFR 416.928 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 416.928 Section 416.928 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 416.928 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  2. 20 CFR 404.1528 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 404.1528 Section 404.1528 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Medical Considerations § 404.1528 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings....

  3. 20 CFR 220.113 - Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 220.113 Section 220.113 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Medical Considerations § 220.113 Symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. Medical findings consist of...

  4. Psychiatric Symptoms in Adults with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urv, Tiina K.; Zigman, Warren B.; Silverman, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Changes in psychiatric symptoms related to specific stages of dementia were investigated in 224 adults 45 years of age or older with Down syndrome. Findings indicate that psychiatric symptoms are a prevalent feature of dementia in the population with Down syndrome and that clinical presentation is qualitatively similar to that seen in Alzheimer's…

  5. Physical Symptoms and Psychological Distress among Inhalant Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, George W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Among 110 Mexican-American adolescents with varying drug use histories, self-reported physical health problems were not related to inhalant use history, but blood analyses indicated a relationship between extensive inhalant use and liver problems. Psychological distress symptoms were related to inhalant use and physical symptoms. Contains 23…

  6. Ethnic Differences in Symptom Presentation of Sexually Abused Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clear, Paul J.; Vincent, John P.; Harris, Gerald E.

    2006-01-01

    Although researchers have begun to examine the issue of ethnic and cultural factors in childhood sexual abuse (CSA), relatively little has been done to look at possible ethnic and cultural differences in psychological symptoms related to CSA. This study investigated the relationship between ethnicity and symptom presentation among Hispanic,…

  7. Respiratory symptoms in arable farmworkers: role of storage mites.

    PubMed Central

    Blainey, A D; Topping, M D; Ollier, S; Davies, R J

    1988-01-01

    Storage mites (acarid mites) are related to the house dust mite but are usually found in agricultural environments. They have been shown to cause allergic symptoms in Scottish farmworkers exposed to stored hay, but whether farmworkers who grow and store grain are also at risk is unknown. One hundred and one farmworkers on 22 Essex farms with grain storage facilities (88% of the available workforce) participated in a survey of respiratory symptoms, with skin tests and determination of serum levels of IgE specific for mite species, including storage mites. Of the 101 workers, 21 reported attacks of cough, wheeze, or breathlessness after exposure to stored grain and 15 reported nasal symptoms after grain exposure. Storage mite specific IgE was found in 59% of farmworkers with work related respiratory symptoms, in 60% with work related nasal symptoms, and in only 9% of symptomless farmworkers. Work related respiratory and nasal symptoms were also significantly associated with atopy, and with positive skin test responses and serum IgE specific for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Storage mites were found in grain samples from 16 farms in which grain was sampled, whereas D pteronyssinus was not found in any. The close association between serum storage mite specific IgE and occupational respiratory symptoms suggests that storage mites may be responsible for respiratory symptoms in these Essex farmworkers exposed to grain. PMID:3194876

  8. Causality in Psychiatry: A Hybrid Symptom Network Construct Model

    PubMed Central

    Young, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Causality or etiology in psychiatry is marked by standard biomedical, reductionistic models (symptoms reflect the construct involved) that inform approaches to nosology, or classification, such as in the DSM-5 [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition; (1)]. However, network approaches to symptom interaction [i.e., symptoms are formative of the construct; e.g., (2), for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)] are being developed that speak to bottom-up processes in mental disorder, in contrast to the typical top-down psychological construct approach. The present article presents a hybrid top-down, bottom-up model of the relationship between symptoms and mental disorder, viewing symptom expression and their causal complex as a reciprocally dynamic system with multiple levels, from lower-order symptoms in interaction to higher-order constructs affecting them. The hybrid model hinges on good understanding of systems theory in which it is embedded, so that the article reviews in depth non-linear dynamical systems theory (NLDST). The article applies the concept of emergent circular causality (3) to symptom development, as well. Conclusions consider that symptoms vary over several dimensions, including: subjectivity; objectivity; conscious motivation effort; and unconscious influences, and the degree to which individual (e.g., meaning) and universal (e.g., causal) processes are involved. The opposition between science and skepticism is a complex one that the article addresses in final comments. PMID:26635639

  9. Missed Opportunities To Impact Fast Response to AMI Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapka, Jane G.; Oakes, J. Michael; Simons-Morton, Denise G.; Mann, N. Clay; Goldberg, Robert; Sellers, Deborah E.; Estabrook, Barbara; Gilliland, Janice; Linares, Adriana C.; Benjamin-Garner, Ruby; McGovern, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Examines factors that influence the prompt seeking of care for symptoms of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Survey of adults in 20 communities in 10 states confirmed the importance of attrition and perceived self-confidence in symptom recognition in care seeking. Concludes that the lack of a significant role of health history and clinician…

  10. Internet Use for Prediagnosis Symptom Appraisal by Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Longo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored the characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who accessed Internet-based health information as part of their symptom appraisal process prior to consulting a health care provider. Method: Newly diagnosed CRC patients who experienced symptoms prior to diagnosis were interviewed. Brief COPE was used to…

  11. Conceptualization and treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sonali; Hillner, Kiley; Velligan, Dawn I

    2015-01-01

    Negative symptoms of schizophrenia including social withdrawal, diminished affective response, lack of interest, poor social drive, and decreased sense of purpose or goal directed activity predict poor functional outcomes for patients with schizophrenia. They may develop and be maintained as a result of structural and functional brain abnormalities, particularly associated with dopamine reward pathways and by environmental and psychosocial factors such as self-defeating cognitions and the relief from overstimulation that accompanies withdrawal from social and role functioning. Negative symptoms are more difficult to treat than the positive symptoms of schizophrenia and represent an unmet therapeutic need for large numbers of patients with schizophrenia. While antipsychotic medications to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia have been around for decades, they have done little to address the significant functional impairments in the disorder that are associated with negative symptoms. Negative symptoms and the resulting loss in productivity are responsible for much of the world-wide personal and economic burden of schizophrenia. Pharmacologic treatments may be somewhat successful in treating secondary causes of negative symptoms, such as antipsychotic side effects and depression. However, in the United States there are no currently approved treatments for severe and persistent negative symptoms (PNS) that are not responsive to treatments for secondary causes. Pharmacotherapy and psychosocial treatments are currently being developed and tested with severe and PNS as their primary targets. Academia, clinicians, the pharmaceutical industry, research funders, payers and regulators will need to work together to pursue novel treatments to address this major public health issue.

  12. Development and Pilot Investigation of Behavioral Activation for Negative Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mairs, Hilary; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Keeley, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Negative symptoms cause functional impairment and impede recovery from psychosis, not least, because of limited developments in empirically validated treatments. This article details a pilot evaluation of a behavioral activation (BA) treatment with eight people presenting with psychosis and marked negative symptoms. The rationale for this…

  13. Symptoms of ADHD and Close Friendships in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Kerrie; Flory, Kate; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship of ADHD symptoms to different aspects of close friendship quality as rated by both adolescents (target adolescent and a close friend) within a friendship dyad. Method: Participants were 41 same-sex friendship dyads who completed questionnaires about their friendship. Separate symptom dimensions of…

  14. Predictors of Trauma-Related Symptoms among Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Michael D.; Thompson, Sanna J.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about trauma-related symptoms among runaway adolescents. Precocious departure from familial homes often exposes youth to traumatic victimization. This study examined the extent to which runaway adolescents present trauma symptomotology and assessed factors that predict trauma symptoms. Participants (N = 350) were 12-18 years of age…

  15. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal symptoms without a demonstrable physical cause. In a subgroup of patients, irritable bowel syndrome may be part of a cluster of psychosomatic symptoms related to childhood sexual abuse. To investigate this possibility, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the…

  16. Gender Differences in Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipes, Megan; Matson, Johnny L.; Worley, Julie A.; Kozlowski, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences in symptoms representing the triad of impairments of Autism Spectrum Disorders remain unclear. To date, the majority of research conducted on this topic has utilized samples of older children. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to utilize a sample of toddlers to investigate gender differences in symptom endorsements of…

  17. Disasters and Depressive Symptoms in Children: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Betty S.; Auslander, Beth A.; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Podkowirow, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disasters are destructive, potentially traumatic events that affect millions of youth each year. Objective: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature on depressive symptoms among youth after disasters. Specifically, we examined the prevalence of depression, risk factors associated with depressive symptoms, and theories…

  18. Causality in Psychiatry: A Hybrid Symptom Network Construct Model.

    PubMed

    Young, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Causality or etiology in psychiatry is marked by standard biomedical, reductionistic models (symptoms reflect the construct involved) that inform approaches to nosology, or classification, such as in the DSM-5 [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition; (1)]. However, network approaches to symptom interaction [i.e., symptoms are formative of the construct; e.g., (2), for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)] are being developed that speak to bottom-up processes in mental disorder, in contrast to the typical top-down psychological construct approach. The present article presents a hybrid top-down, bottom-up model of the relationship between symptoms and mental disorder, viewing symptom expression and their causal complex as a reciprocally dynamic system with multiple levels, from lower-order symptoms in interaction to higher-order constructs affecting them. The hybrid model hinges on good understanding of systems theory in which it is embedded, so that the article reviews in depth non-linear dynamical systems theory (NLDST). The article applies the concept of emergent circular causality (3) to symptom development, as well. Conclusions consider that symptoms vary over several dimensions, including: subjectivity; objectivity; conscious motivation effort; and unconscious influences, and the degree to which individual (e.g., meaning) and universal (e.g., causal) processes are involved. The opposition between science and skepticism is a complex one that the article addresses in final comments. PMID:26635639

  19. Somatic Symptoms in Children from Three Ethnic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canino, Glorisa; Gonzalez, Gloria; Ramirez, Rafael

    A study compared the rates of somatic symptoms associated with anxiety disorder in African Americans, Hispanics residing in Puerto Rico, and European American children. A total of 1,285 children were interviewed, along with their primary caretakers. Headaches were the most frequently endorsed somatic symptom, with half of the total sample…

  20. Issues in selection of instruments to measure negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Daniel, David Gordon

    2013-11-01

    Guidance for selection of instruments for measurement of negative symptoms is rapidly evolving. As there are continuing advances in the description of negative symptoms, new instruments are under development, and new data on the performance of instruments emerge from clinical trials. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Marder Negative Factor and the Negative Symptom Assessment-16 (NSA-16) are considered to be reliable and valid measures for negative symptom trials but differ with respect to their domain coverage, use of informants, integration of global scores, administration time and comprehensiveness of their structured interviews. In response to the 2005 NIMH-MATRICS consensus statement, work groups are field testing and refining two new measures, the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS) and the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (BNSS). Both address the five currently recognized domains of negative symptoms, differentiate appetitive from consummatory aspects of anhedonia and address desire for social relationships. Thus far, both have exhibited promising psychometric properties. PMID:23899996

  1. Facial cues to depressive symptoms and their associated personality attributions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Naomi Jane; Kramer, Robin Stewart Samuel; Jones, Alex Lee; Ward, Robert

    2013-06-30

    Depression is a common mental health disorder, with 12% of the UK population diagnosed at any one time. We assessed whether there are cues to depressive symptoms within the static, non-expressive face, and if other socially relevant impressions might be made by these cues. Composite "average" face images were created from students scoring high and low on self-report measures of depressive symptoms, capturing potential correlations between facial appearance and symptoms of depression. These were then used in a warping procedure, creating two versions of individual faces, one warped towards the high symptom composite, and the other towards the low. In Experiment 1, we first found observers were able to identify images representing high and low symptom occurrence at levels significantly greater than chance. Secondly, we collected observer impressions of the two versions of each face. The faces reflecting high levels of depressive symptoms were picked as less socially desirable over a broad range of personality trait estimates compared to low symptom images. In Experiment 2, we replicated the key finding that the static face contains cues to levels of depression symptoms, using composites created from a new database of student photos and depression inventory scores. PMID:23521901

  2. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in bus drivers and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, E; Mustajbegovic, J; Schachter, E N

    1994-12-01

    Acute and chronic respiratory symptoms as well as ventilatory capacity were studied in 116 bus drivers and 119 mechanics. Bus drivers and mechanics demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence of most chronic respiratory symptoms when compared to control workers. In particular, lower airway symptoms of chest tightness and dyspnea and upper airway symptoms of nasal catarrh were significantly more prevalent among drivers and mechanics than among controls. Bus drivers and mechanics who were smokers had significantly higher prevalences of respiratory symptoms than nonsmoking bus drivers. Bus drivers and mechanics employed for more than 10 years also exhibited higher frequencies of respiratory symptoms than those exposed for 10 years or less. Many of the workers complained of acute symptoms during the work shift. The ventilatory capacity data demonstrated lower values for all parameters, particularly FEF25, compared to control worker values as well as to predicted normal values, for bus drivers and mechanics who were smokers. Our data indicate that long-term employment in the transport industry of bus drivers and mechanics, particularly in combination with smoking, may be associated with the development of chronic respiratory symptoms and lung function impairment. PMID:7892828

  3. Depressive Symptoms and Cigarette Smoking in a College Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Brent A.; Holahan, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined (1) the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking in a college sample and (2) the role of smoking self-efficacy (one's perceived ability to abstain from smoking) in explaining the relationship between depressive symptoms and cigarette smoking. Methods: Predominantly first-year…

  4. ANALYSIS OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SYMPTOMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS OVER TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Weekly respiratory symptom information was obtained on a random population of 3800 whites in Tucson. The authors asked weekly about 14 symptoms representing acute respiratory illnesses (ARI), rhinitis (Rh), and other conditions. The denominator for each week was about 80 randomly...

  5. Trauma Symptoms and Life Skill Needs of Domestic Violence Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorde, Mrugaya W.; Helfrich, Christine A.; Finlayson, Marcia L.

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the trauma symptoms and life skill needs of 84 domestic violence victims from three domestic violence programs. Women completed two self-report tools: Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) and Occupational Self Assessment (OSA). Staff members participated in focus groups regarding their perceptions of the womens needs. Women scored…

  6. Trauma and PTSD Symptoms: Does Spiritual Struggle Mediate the Link?

    PubMed Central

    Wortmann, Jennifer H.; Park, Crystal L.; Edmondson, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Because exposure to potentially traumatic events is common (Kessler, Sonnega, Bromet, & Hughes, 1995), the mechanisms through which post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms develop is a critical area of investigation (Ozer, Best, Lipsey, & Weiss, 2003). Among the mechanisms that may predict PTSD symptoms is spiritual struggle, a set of negative religious cognitions related to understanding or responding to stressful events. Although prominent theories emphasize cognitive factors in the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms, they have not explicitly addressed spiritual struggle. The present prospective study tested the role of spiritual struggle in the development and maintenance of PTSD symptoms following trauma. We assessed exposure to trauma and non-trauma events during the first year of college, spiritual struggle due to the most stressful event, and PTSD symptoms resulting from the index event. Spiritual struggle partially mediated the relationship between trauma and PTSD symptoms. Interestingly, some individual subscales of spiritual struggle (specifically, Punishing God Reappraisal, Reappraisal of God’s Powers, and Spiritual Discontent) partially mediated the relationship between trauma and PTSD symptoms; however, reappraisal of the event to evil forces did not relate to PTSD symptoms. These results suggest that spiritual struggle is an important cognitive mechanism for many trauma victims and may have relevance for cognitive therapy for PTSD. PMID:22308201

  7. Sleep Deprivation, Allergy Symptoms, and Negatively Reinforced Problem Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Craig H.; Meyer, Kim A.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the relationship between presence or absence of sleep deprivation, allergy symptoms, and the rate and function of problem behavior in three adolescents with moderate to profound mental retardation found that problem behavior was negatively reinforced by escape from instruction, and both allergy symptoms and sleep deprivation influenced…

  8. Stretching the indications: high tibial osteotomy used successfully to treat isolated ankle symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Elson, David W; Paweleck, James E; Shields, David W; Dawson, Matthew J; Ferrier, Gail M

    2013-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is successful in treating symptomatic varus arthritis of the knee. We present a case where ankle pain and instability were attributed to varus ankle malalignment. This was found to be secondary to constitutional varus of the proximal tibia but the patient's knee was asymptomatic. The decision to operate on an asymptomatic knee in the hope of improving ankle symptoms took a period of careful consideration, planning and discussion. HTO was performed without immediate complication and the patient reported an excellent outcome with marked improvement in Mazur's foot and ankle score from 18 to 85. In well selected and planned cases, HTO may be considered as an instrument of deformity correction with improvement in symptoms from joints distant to the surgical site. PMID:24022901

  9. Prevalence of Acute Symptoms among Workers in Printing Factories

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Somsiri

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify socioeconomic situation factors and behavioral factors associated with the prevalence of acute symptoms among 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted by interviewing 150 printing workers in 16 printing factories in Southern Thailand. Results. Acute symptoms comprised dizziness, drowsiness, eye irritation, light-headedness, rhinitis, shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, nausea/vomiting, exacerbation of asthma, allergic skin reaction, and visual disorder. The prevalence of symptoms was consistently higher among workers in the printing process than among other workers. Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol were not associated with an increased prevalence of acute symptoms among these printing-factory workers. Conclusion. The significant associations were found between personal protective equipment and personal hygiene and prevalence of acute symptoms in printing workers. PMID:25386365

  10. Tailoring therapeutic strategies for treating posttraumatic stress disorder symptom clusters.

    PubMed

    Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by three major symptom clusters following an event that elicited fear, helplessness, or horror. This review will examine each symptom cluster of PTSD separately, giving case study examples of patients who exhibit a preponderance of a given symptom domain. We use a translational approach in describing the underlying neurobiology that is relevant to particular symptoms and treatment options, thus showing how clinical practice can benefit from current research. By focusing on symptom clusters, we provide a more specific view of individual patient's clinical presentations, in order to better address treatment needs. Finally, the review will also address potential genetic approaches to treatment as another form of individualized treatment. PMID:20856915

  11. Depressive Symptoms, Antidepressant Medication Use, and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkönen, Antti-Jussi; Räikkönen, Katri; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Eriksson, Johan G.; Groop, Leif; Isomaa, Bo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although insulin resistance (IR) may underlie associations between depressive symptoms and diabetes, previous findings have been contradictory. We examined whether depressive symptoms associate with IR and insulin secretion, and, additionally, whether antidepressant medication use may modulate such associations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 4,419 individuals underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Participants with previously or newly diagnosed diabetes are excluded from this sample. The homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) and corrected insulin response (CIR) were calculated. Depressive symptoms and antidepressant medication use were self-reported. RESULTS After controlling for confounding factors, depressive symptoms were associated with higher fasting and 30-min insulin during the OGTT and higher HOMA-IR but not CIR. Antidepressant medication use failed to modify these associations. CONCLUSIONS Depressive symptoms are associated with IR but not with changes in insulin response when corrected for IR in individuals without previously or newly diagnosed diabetes. PMID:21953801

  12. Discrimination, Mastery, and Depressive Symptoms Among African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Daphne C.; Hudson, Darrell L.; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Siefert, Kristine; Jackson, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study examines the influence of discrimination and mastery on depressive symptoms for African American men at young (18–34), middle (35–54), and late (55+) adulthood. Method Analyses are based on responses from 1,271 African American men from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Results Discrimination was significantly related to depressive symptoms for men ages 35 to 54 and mastery was found to be protective against depressive symptoms for all men. Compared to African American men in the young and late adult groups, discrimination remained a statistically significant predictor of depressive symptoms for men in the middle group once mastery was included. Implications Findings demonstrate the distinct differences in the influence of discrimination on depressive symptoms among adult African American males and the need for future research that explores the correlates of mental health across age groups. Implications for social work research and practice with African American men are discussed. PMID:24436576

  13. Tailoring therapeutic strategies for treating posttraumatic stress disorder symptom clusters

    PubMed Central

    Norrholm, Seth D; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by three major symptom clusters following an event that elicited fear, helplessness, or horror. This review will examine each symptom cluster of PTSD separately, giving case study examples of patients who exhibit a preponderance of a given symptom domain. We use a translational approach in describing the underlying neurobiology that is relevant to particular symptoms and treatment options, thus showing how clinical practice can benefit from current research. By focusing on symptom clusters, we provide a more specific view of individual patient’s clinical presentations, in order to better address treatment needs. Finally, the review will also address potential genetic approaches to treatment as another form of individualized treatment. PMID:20856915

  14. Anxiety Changes Depersonalization and Derealization Symptoms in Vestibular Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, Ognyan I.; Georgieva-Zhostova, Spaska O.; Berthoz, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Background. Depersonalization and derealization are common symptoms reported in the general population. Objective. The aim of the present study was to establish the relationship between anxiety and depersonalization and derealization symptoms in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Methods. Twenty-four vestibular patients with anxiety and 18 vestibular patients without anxiety were examined for depersonalization and derealization symptoms. They were also compared to healthy controls. Results. The results revealed that anxiety consistently changes depersonalization and derealization symptoms in vestibular patients. They are more frequent, more severe, and qualitatively different in vestibular patients with anxiety than in those without anxiety. Conclusion. Anxiety has an effect on depersonalization and derealization symptoms in vestibular patients. The various hypotheses about the underlying mechanism of this effect were discussed. PMID:24803735

  15. Longitudinal Associations Between Husbands’ and Wives’ Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Cummings, E. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Although concordance between husbands’ and wives’ mental health problems is often reported, questions remain about the nature of these relations. Extending research in this area, this study examined dynamic-longitudinal pathways among husbands’ and wives’ depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction as a moderator of associations. Participants were 296 heterosexual couples. Husbands and wives reported on their depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction. Results from dynamic bivariate latent difference score analyses indicated unidirectional longitudinal coupling such that higher levels of husbands’ depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in wives’ depressive symptoms over time. This relation was stronger among couples reporting marital distress as compared to couples reporting higher marital satisfaction. The findings underscore the importance of considering one’s spouses’ depressive symptoms in treatment efforts. PMID:21603113

  16. Longitudinal Associations Between Husbands' and Wives' Depressive Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kouros, Chrystyna D; Cummings, E Mark

    2010-02-01

    Although concordance between husbands' and wives' mental health problems is often reported, questions remain about the nature of these relations. Extending research in this area, this study examined dynamic-longitudinal pathways among husbands' and wives' depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction as a moderator of associations. Participants were 296 heterosexual couples. Husbands and wives reported on their depressive symptoms and marital satisfaction. Results from dynamic bivariate latent difference score analyses indicated unidirectional longitudinal coupling such that higher levels of husbands' depressive symptoms predicted subsequent elevations in wives' depressive symptoms over time. This relation was stronger among couples reporting marital distress as compared to couples reporting higher marital satisfaction. The findings underscore the importance of considering one's spouses' depressive symptoms in treatment efforts. PMID:21603113

  17. The role of trauma symptoms in nonsuicidal self-injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Noelle B; Kouros, Chrystyna D; Meuret, Alicia E

    2014-01-01

    Reports of traumatic events by individuals who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) are common; yet, evidence for the relation between traumatic events and NSSI is inconclusive. This review explores the thesis that trauma symptoms, rather than the experience of a traumatic event per se, underlie this relation, specifically suggesting that trauma symptoms might serve as a mediator. The literature indicates that self-injury plays an important functional role in coping with trauma symptoms such that self-injury can provide an escape from intrusive thoughts and aversive emotional states, as well as end dissociation and periods of numbness through the generation of feelings. Additionally, trauma symptoms have been shown to mediate the relation between the occurrence of traumatic events and NSSI. Taken together, trauma symptoms may play an important role in the development and maintenance of NSSI. The review concludes with treatment implications and future directions for research. PMID:23878145

  18. Symptom definitions for SBS (sick building syndrome) in residential dwellings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing-Ling; Takigawa, Tomoko; Yamasaki, Yukie; Sakano, Noriko; Wang, Da-Hong; Ogino, Keiki

    2008-03-01

    The potential risk factors for sick building syndrome (SBS) in newly built dwellings were investigated. Two different definitions for SBS were used, a narrow definition (symptoms related to home environment and continuously occurring in the last 3 months were regarded as positive) and another relatively broad definition (symptoms related to home environment and either continuously or sporadically occurring in the last 3 months were regarded as positive). With both definitions indoor air chemicals, especially TVOC, and high stress during work were found to be significantly associated with SBS symptoms. Allergic history was more associated with narrow-sense symptoms and odor perception with broad-sense symptoms. The results indicate that the broad definition be preferred to find more potential risk factors. PMID:17574916

  19. Sleep Duration and Depressive Symptoms: A Gene-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Harden, Kathryn Paige; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Pack, Allan I.; Strachan, Eric; Goldberg, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used quantitative genetic models to assess whether sleep duration modifies genetic and environmental influences on depressive symptoms. Method: Participants were 1,788 adult twins from 894 same-sex twin pairs (192 male and 412 female monozygotic [MZ] pairs, and 81 male and 209 female dizygotic [DZ] pairs] from the University of Washington Twin Registry. Participants self-reported habitual sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed using quantitative genetic interaction models, which allowed the magnitude of additive genetic, shared environmental, and non-shared environmental influences on depressive symptoms to vary with sleep duration. Results: Within MZ twin pairs, the twin who reported longer sleep duration reported fewer depressive symptoms (ec = -0.17, SE = 0.06, P < 0.05). There was a significant gene × sleep duration interaction effect on depressive symptoms (a'c = 0.23, SE = 0.08, P < 0.05), with the interaction occurring on genetic influences that are common to both sleep duration and depressive symptoms. Among individuals with sleep duration within the normal range (7-8.9 h/night), the total heritability (h2) of depressive symptoms was approximately 27%. However, among individuals with sleep duration within the low (< 7 h/night) or high (? 9 h/night) range, increased genetic influence on depressive symptoms was observed, particularly at sleep duration extremes (5 h/night: h2 = 53%; 10 h/night: h2 = 49%). Conclusion: Genetic contributions to depressive symptoms increase at both short and long sleep durations. Citation: Watson NF; Harden KP; Buchwald D; Vitiello MV; Pack AI; Stachan E; Goldberg J. Sleep duration and depressive symptoms: a gene-environment interaction. SLEEP 2014;37(2):351-358. PMID:24497663

  20. Early symptom burden predicts recovery after sport-related concussion

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Monuteaux, Michael C.; Stein, Cynthia J.; Bachur, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify independent predictors of and use recursive partitioning to develop a multivariate regression tree predicting symptom duration greater than 28 days after a sport-related concussion. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients in a sports concussion clinic. Participants completed questionnaires that included the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS). Participants were asked to record the date on which they last experienced symptoms. Potential predictor variables included age, sex, score on symptom inventories, history of prior concussions, performance on computerized neurocognitive assessments, loss of consciousness and amnesia at the time of injury, history of prior medical treatment for headaches, history of migraines, and family history of concussion. We used recursive partitioning analysis to develop a multivariate prediction model for identifying athletes at risk for a prolonged recovery from concussion. Results: A total of 531 patients ranged in age from 7 to 26 years (mean 14.6 ± 2.9 years). The mean PCSS score at the initial visit was 26 ± 26; mean time to presentation was 12 ± 5 days. Only total score on symptom inventory was independently associated with symptoms lasting longer than 28 days (adjusted odds ratio 1.044; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.034, 1.054 for PCSS). No other potential predictor variables were independently associated with symptom duration or useful in developing the optimal regression decision tree. Most participants (86%; 95% CI 80%, 90%) with an initial PCSS score of <13 had resolution of their symptoms within 28 days of injury. Conclusions: The only independent predictor of prolonged symptoms after sport-related concussion is overall symptom burden. PMID:25381296

  1. Reducing Incapacitating Symptoms during Space Flight: is Postural Deficiency Syndrome an Applicable Model?

    PubMed Central

    Souvestre, P A; Landrock, C K; Blaber, A P

    2008-01-01

    Severe and prolonged unmitigated SAS and SMS related symptoms have been thoroughly described in Astronauts during adaptation periods for orbital flight and post orbital flight. It has recently been shown that there is a strong correlation between these symptoms most often suffered by astronauts to that of the symptoms of patients suffering from Postural Deficiency Syndrome (PDS) on Earth that have been successfully assessed, diagnosed and treated. International peer-reviewed literature identifies PDS as a trauma induced medical condition which originates from central neural dysregulation of sensory-motor and cognitive controls; these dysfunctions can be accurately identified, measured, and monitored via a specific ocular-vestibular-postural monitoring system along with relevant clinical data. This higher level of understanding is necessary in order to reach the next stage of success for humans living and working in Space. Central sensory-motor and cognitive controls dysfunction underlie symptoms that can adversely impact and reflect alteration of eye-hand coordination, fine tuned dexterity, body positioning in space, space projection and trajectory control, perception of environment/obstacles, orientation in space and time, sensory motor and cognitive aspects of decision making, sensory-motor/cognitive error proneness. All of these factors are necessary for Astronaut's mission capabilities, while both carrying out operations in Space and performing the tasks required during and after re-entry. The objective of this paper is to elucidate how PDS related medical conditions are currently assessed, identified and monitored, and how these methodologies and technologies translate into a potential for better understanding of astronauts' potential incapacitation during space flight operations. PMID:19048092

  2. Perspectives on migraine: prevalence and visual symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, Ian F; Cole, Barry L

    2001-03-01

    About 20 per cent of women and 10 per cent of men experience migraine at some time in their lives, of whom about one half to two thirds will have had a migraine attack in the previous 12 months. Prevalences of this order have been found in a survey of patients in an Australian optometric practice. Between one third and one half of migraineurs experience sensory or motor aura. Visual aura are by far the most common of the aura. A high proportion (more than 40 per cent) of migraineurs presenting for routine optometric examination will not have had their headache or aura formally diagnosed. Optometrists can give reassurance by providing a formal diagnosis and, when appropriate, they can refer their migraine patients to sources of advice on how the frequency and severity of their attacks might be ameliorated. The diagnosis of migraine is straightforward when the migrainous episode and any associated aura follow a classical pattern. However, diagnosis is often challenging, especially for aura occurring without headache, when the aura are atypical, when the first attack of migraine occurs after the age of 50 years, when there are persistent visual field losses or when there are pupillary anomalies or extra-ocular muscle palsy and diplopia associated with the migraine. Unusual presentations must be approached with care, using a good knowledge of the diversity of migraine, careful history taking and a thorough ocular and visual examination. As visual field losses can be associated with migraine and migraine may be a risk factor for low-tension glaucoma, visual field examination is often indicated for patients with a history of migraine. In some cases of migraine, referral for neurological work-up will be necessary before concluding that the headache and visual symptoms can be attributed to migraine. PMID:12366332

  3. Cyclic phosphatidic acid relieves osteoarthritis symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator with a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. Natural cPA and its chemically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA (2ccPA), inhibit chronic and acute inflammation, and 2ccPA attenuates neuropathic pain. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease frequently associated with symptoms such as inflammation and joint pain. Because 2ccPA has obvious antinociceptive activity, we hypothesized that 2ccPA might relieve the pain caused by OA. We aimed to characterize the effects of 2ccPA on the pathogenesis of OA induced by total meniscectomy in the rabbit knee joint. Results Intra-articular injection of 2ccPA (twice a week for 42 days) significantly reduced pain and articular swelling. Histopathology showed that 2ccPA suppressed cartilage degeneration in OA. We also examined the effects of 2ccPA on the inflammatory and catabolic responses of human OA synoviocytes and chondrosarcoma SW1353 cells in vitro. 2ccPA stimulated synthesis of hyaluronic acid and suppressed production of the metalloproteinases MMP-1, -3, and -13. However, it had no effect on the production of interleukin (IL)-6, an inflammatory cytokine. The suppressive effect of 2ccPA on MMP-1 and -3 production in synoviocytes and on MMP-13 production in SW1353 cells was not mediated by the lysophosphatidic acid receptor, LPA1 receptor (LPA1R). Conclusions Our results suggest that 2ccPA significantly reduces the pain response to OA by inducing hyaluronic acid production and suppressing MMP-1, -3, and -13 production in synoviocytes and chondrocytes. PMID:25123228

  4. Hiccups as a myocardial ischemia symptom.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Waldemar; Szabowski, S?awomir; Stepie?, Marta; Krzywkowska, Katarzyna; Krzywkowski, Artur; Marciniak, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    A hiccup is involuntary, paroxysmal inspiratory movements of the chest wall associated with diaphragm and accessory respiratory muscle contractions, with the synchronized closure of glottis. The mechanism underlying this common primitive reflex plays an important role in protecting airways against esophageal aspiration. The hiccup reflex mechanism is based on the afferent pathway (vagus and phrenic nerve and sympathetic fibers innervating chest organs, the abdomen, the ear, the nose and the throat stimulation, and the stimulation of hiccup center in the central nervous system, mainly reflecting psychogenic or metabolic disorders) and the efferent pathway (phrenic nerves). An incidental hiccup is a common problem, usually resolves spontaneously and does not present a clinical issue. The clinical issue arises in the case of pathologic persistent hiccups or symptomatic secondary hiccups which may lead to significant fatigue, insomnia or depression. Generally, pathologic hiccups are associated with considerable discomfort concerning both the "stigmatized" person and his or her personal surroundings in which it evokes different emotions, from amusement through impatience to uneasiness and the suggestion of a medical visit as an expression of concern for a given person. The most common causes of pathologic symptomatic hiccups are nervous system diseases, either the central nervous system (proliferative, angiogenic, inflammatory disorders), or the peripheral nervous system: the irritation of the phrenic nerve (proliferative disorders, goitre) and the vagus nerve (otolaryngologic diseases, meningitis, esophageal, stomach and duodenal diseases, hepatitis, pancreatitis, enteritis). The vagus nerve irritation with subsequent hiccups may be caused by chest disorders (injury, surgery) and heart diseases (myocardial infarction). In the present paper we describe the case of a 62-year-old male with recurrent hiccups associated with exertion as a secondary symptom of myocardial ischemia. PMID:18476462

  5. Trajectories of Children's Internalizing Symptoms: The Role of Maternal Internalizing Symptoms, Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia and Child Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetter, Emily K.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Background: We assessed trajectories of children's internalizing symptoms as predicted by interactions among maternal internalizing symptoms, respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and child sex. Method: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of children (n = 251) participated during three study waves. Children's mean ages were 8.23 years…

  6. Depressive Symptoms and Co-occurring Depressive Symptoms, Substance Abuse, and Conduct Problems among Runaway and Homeless Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Danny R.; Bao, Wa-Ning

    2000-01-01

    Examined factors contributing to depressive symptoms and co-occurring depressions, substance abuse, and conduct problems among runaway and homeless adolescents. Found that although family-of-origin factors contributed to depressive symptoms and comorbidity, experiences and behaviors when adolescents were on their own also had powerful effects.…

  7. The Developmental Association between Eating Disorders Symptoms and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety in Juvenile Twin Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberg, Judy L.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the role of genetic and environmental factors in the developmental association among symptoms of eating disorders, depression, and anxiety syndromes in 8-13-year-old and 14-17-year-old twin girls. Methods: Multivariate genetic models were fitted to child-reported longitudinal symptom data gathered from clinical interview…

  8. Longitudinal course of physical and psychological symptoms after a natural disaster

    PubMed Central

    Wahlström, Lars; Michélsen, Hans; Schulman, Abbe; Backheden, Hans; Keskinen-Rosenqvist, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Background After disaster, physical symptoms are common although seldom recognized due to lack of knowledge of the course of symptoms and relation to more studied psychological symptoms. Objective This study aimed to investigate the change in the reporting of different physical symptoms after a disaster, including possible factors for change, and whether psychological symptoms predict physical symptoms reporting at a later point in time. Method A longitudinal study of citizens of Stockholm who survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. A total of 1,101 participants completed questionnaires on somatic symptoms, general distress, posttraumatic stress, exposure, and demographic details 14 months and 3 years after the disaster. Physical symptoms occurring daily or weekly during the last year were investigated in four symptom indices: neurological, cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis to determine odds ratios for a change in symptoms, and pathway analysis to predict the influence of psychological symptoms on physical symptoms. Results There was a general decrease of reporting in all physical symptom indices except the musculoskeletal symptom index. The change in the neurological symptom index showed the strongest association with exposure, and for women. General distress and posttraumatic stress at 14 months postdisaster predicted physical symptoms at 3 years. Conclusion Physical symptoms were predicted by psychological symptoms at an earlier time point, but in a considerable proportion of respondents, physical symptoms existed independently from psychological symptoms. Physicians should be observant on the possible connection of particular pseudoneurological symptoms with prior adversities. PMID:24379941

  9. Non-motor extranigral signs and symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Erik Ch

    2009-12-01

    Clinical symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) comprise both motor and non-motor symptoms. In this disease, synucleinopathic-induced, nigral dopamine deficiency-related dysfunction of the basal ganglia is held responsible for the characteristic levodopa-responsive motor signs and symptoms (bradykinesia, hypokinesia, rigidity), known as parkinsonism and essential for clinical diagnosis in PD, as well as subtle motivational and cognitive dysfunctions. Some motor symptoms, such as tremor and postural instability, and most non-motor symptoms, however, are not fully levodopa-responsive, and suggested to manifest extranigral pathology. These symptoms include autonomic, sleep, sensory and neuropsychiatric symptoms, which in some cases may precede the first signs of motor parkinsonism, closely correlating with the progression of Lewy body pathology in PD. The recognition and treatment of these mostly under-recognized and under-treated symptoms is important, as these symptoms might have more impact on the quality of life in PD patients as compared to motor parkinsonism. On top of this, recognition of these manifestations in the prodromal phase of motor PD is critical to early diagnosis and treatment, as disease-modifying drugs, once identified, should be initiated as soon as possible, preferably in this premotor phase of the disease. On top of this, (non)motor extranigral symptoms in PD might also be of iatrogenic origin, whether directly as indirectly. During conventional, oral, dopaminomimetic treatment, the progressive loss of striatal dopaminergic nerve endings with the loss of cerebral dopamine storage capacity, renders the cerebral dopamine level fully dependent of the plasma levodopa levels, thus changing dopaminergic receptor stimulation from continuous to a more pulsatile pattern. Supposedly due to this process, neuroplastic changes in (sub)cortical dopaminergic pathways might cause therapeutic response fluctuations: motor and nonmotor fluctuations with anxiety- and panic-attacks and/or mood swings, dyskinesias and punding. Finally, dopaminomimetic pharmacotherapy may also induce extranigral non-motor drug-related direct adverse effects, such as impulse control disorders. In this article, non-motor signs and symptoms of extranigral PD-related pathology will be discussed, as well as the (suggested) criteria for diagnosis and treatment. Of course, also the recognition of the signs and symptoms of the prodromal (premotor) phase, suggestive for the presence of the PD, will be discussed. Iatrogenic non-motor symptoms, though, will not be further discussed. PMID:20083010

  10. Challenging neurological symptoms in paediatric palliative care: An approach to symptom evaluation and management in children with neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Lisa Ann; Grégoire, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Neurological symptoms are very common in children with life-limiting conditions and are challenging in terms of burden of illness. Moreover, neurological symptoms can significantly impact the child’s quality of life and contribute to distress among parents, families, caregivers and health care providers. Knowing how to manage and alleviated these symptoms is essential for providing good palliative care. In the present article, the more common neurological symptoms of agitation/irritability, spasticity and dystonia will be reviewed. The aim of the present brief review is to provide a basic approach to both the identification and treatment of these neurological symptoms. A medication table is provided for quick reference. A brief commentary and guidance for the management of pain are also incorporated, with reference to further literature sources. PMID:25914579

  11. Changes in ADHD symptom endorsement: preschool to school age.

    PubMed

    Curchack-Lichtin, Jocelyn T; Chacko, Anil; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2014-08-01

    To investigate endorsement patterns among the 18 DSM-IV symptoms of ADHD in a longitudinal sample of children with and without ADHD (n?=?144), as assessed at ages 4-5, 5-6, and 6-7 years. Symptom endorsements and diagnoses were determined at all time-points via K-SADS-PL interview administered to parents and supplemented by teacher questionnaires and clinician observations. Changes in endorsement patterns over time for each of the 18 DSM-IV symptoms were ascertained. Several symptoms, particularly those of inattention, were infrequently endorsed and of apparently limited diagnostic utility at ages 4-5; hyperactive/impulsive symptoms were more frequently endorsed among young children with ADHD than were inattentive symptoms. However, by ages 6-7, inattention items were somewhat superior at discriminating ADHD from Non-ADHD children. Several DSM-IV and now DSM-V symptoms provide limited diagnostic differentiation prior to school-age, particularly those most commonly observed in the context of formal schooling. Consideration should be made in future iterations of the DSM that account for such developmental and contextual differences. PMID:24343794

  12. Extravehicular Mobility Unit Training Suit Symptom Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the symptoms and injuries experienced by NASA astronauts during extravehicular activity (space walk) spacesuit training at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at Ellington Field, Houston, Texas. We identified the frequency and incidence rates of symptoms by each general body location and characterized mechanisms of injury and effective countermeasures. Based on these findings a comprehensive list of recommendations was made to improve training, test preparation, and current spacesuit components, and to design the next -generation spacesuit. At completion of each test event a comprehensive questionnaire was produced that documented suit symptom comments, identified mechanisms of injury, and recommended countermeasures. As we completed our study we found that most extravehicular mobility unit suit symptoms were mild, self-limited, and controlled by available countermeasures. Some symptoms represented the potential for significant injury with short- and long-term consequences regarding astronaut health and interference with mission objectives. The location of symptoms and injuries that were most clinically significant was in the hands, shoulders, and feet. Correction of suit symptoms issues will require a multidisciplinary approach to improve prevention, early medical intervention, astronaut training, test planning, and suit engineering.

  13. Effects of abstinence from tobacco: valid symptoms and time course.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2007-03-01

    This article updates a 1990 review of the effects of tobacco abstinence by reviewing (a) which symptoms are valid indicators of tobacco abstinence and (b) the time course of tobacco abstinence symptoms. The author searched several databases to locate more than 3,500 citations on tobacco abstinence effects between 1990 and 2004; 120 of these were used in this review. Data collection and interpretation were based solely on the author's subjective judgments. For brevity, the review does not evaluate craving, hunger, performance, and several other possible outcomes as withdrawal symptoms. Anger, anxiety, depression, difficulty concentrating, impatience, insomnia, and restlessness are valid withdrawal symptoms that peak within the first week and last 2-4 weeks. Constipation, cough, dizziness, increased dreaming, and mouth ulcers may be abstinence effects. Drowsiness, fatigue, and several physical symptoms are not abstinence effects. In conclusion, no major changes are suggested for DSM-IV criteria for tobacco/nicotine withdrawal, but some deletions are suggested for ICD-10 criteria. Future studies need to investigate several possible new symptoms of withdrawal and to define more clearly the time course of symptoms. PMID:17365764

  14. Childhood psychological maltreatment subtypes and adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Paul, Elise; Eckenrode, John

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how subtypes and the timing of psychological maltreatment contribute to adolescent depressive symptoms at age 14. The sample included 638 youth from the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN). At age 12, youth reported experiences of psychological maltreatment (degradation, isolating, and terrorizing), physical abuse (endangerment and physical injury), and sexual abuse that occurred before and during elementary school/last year. Multivariable regression models were conducted separately for females and males at each of the two time periods and accounted for demographics, primary caregiver depressive symptoms, other maltreatment subtypes, and youth-reported age 12 depressive symptoms. For girls, caregiver degradation was the only maltreatment subtype that contributed unique variance to depressive symptoms. Degradation before elementary school and chronic degradation had a stronger impact on depression symptoms. Only caregiver isolating behaviors during elementary school/last year and chronic isolation predicted depressive symptoms in boys. These results suggest that childhood psychological maltreatment is multi-dimensional and is implicated in the etiology of adolescent depressive symptoms. Future prevention efforts should consider parental psychological maltreatment in reducing risk for adolescent depression. PMID:26105164

  15. The Effect of Wheat Germ Extract on Premenstrual Syndrome Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ataollahi, Maryam; Akbari, Sedigheh Amir Ali; Mojab, Faraz; Alavi Majd, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Pre-menstrual syndrome is one of the most common disorders in women and impairs work and social relationships. Several treatment modalities have been proposed including herbal medicines. Considering the properties of wheat germ, this study aimed to determine the effects of wheat germ extract on the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 84 women working in hospitals affiliated to Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Subjects completed daily symptom record form for two consecutive months. After definitive diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome, they were randomly divided into two groups of 50 people. Then, for two consecutive months, 400 mg capsules of wheat germ extract or placebo were used three times a day, from day 16 until day 5 of the next menstrual cycle. Wheat germ significantly reduced physical symptoms (63.56%), psychological symptoms (66.30%), and the general score (64.99%). Although the severity of symptoms decreased in both groups, this reduction was more significant in the wheat germ extract group (p < 0.001). On the other hand, physical symptoms decreased only in the wheat germ extract (p < 0.001) and there was no statistically significant difference in the placebo group. No complications were observed in any of the groups. It seems that using wheat germ extract reduces general, psychological and physical symptoms. PMID:25561922

  16. A rare symptom in posttraumatic stress disorder: Spontaneous ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Öznur, Taner; Akarsu, Süleyman; Karaahmeto?lu, Bülent; Doruk, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms: Insomnia • nightmares • spontaneous ejaculation Medication: Paroxentine Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Psychiatry Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Sexual dysfunction is reported to occur more frequently in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients than in the general population. Herein, we present the case of a patient with spontaneous ejaculation that developed when severity of PTSD symptoms increased. Case Report: Our patient was a 25-year-old single man admitted to a psychiatric polyclinic because of PTSD symptoms and concurrent spontaneous ejaculations. He was diagnosed with PTSD after clinical interviews. Organic pathology to explain spontaneous ejaculations was not detected. Paroxetine treatment was initiated and PTSD symptoms and frequency of spontaneous ejaculations were decreased at the clinical follow-up. Conclusions: Assessment of the presented case in the light of the literature indicates that his re-experiencing (flashbacks, nightmare) and hyperarousal (symptoms of anxiety specific to PTSD) led to an increase in adrenergic system activation and, consequently, spontaneous ejaculation without sexual stimulus. The effect of Paroxetine in decreasing the frequency of spontaneous erection and ejaculation in the presented case is thought to have occurred via control of PTSD symptoms and their adverse effects on ejaculation. Treatment based on a consideration of PTSD symptoms and autonomic instability might increase the positive outcome rate in such patients. PMID:24587852

  17. A Study on Correlation between Anxiety Symptoms and Suicidal Ideation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee-Yeon; Yun, Kyu Wol; Kim, Young Chul; Lim, Weon-Jeong; Kim, Eui-Jung; Ryoo, Jae-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Objective In South Korea, the number of deaths from suicide has increased in the last two decades, and suicide has become both a social and political problem. In this study, after controlling the variables influencing suicidal ideation, it was expected that it would be determined if anxiety symptoms are independently related to suicidal ideation. Methods Data were obtained from 327 psychiatric outpatients accomplished a self-reported questionnaire that included sociodemographic characteristics and clinical variables as well as self-rating scales for measuring the severity of one's anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation. Logistic-regression analyses were used to determine the correlation between anxiety symptoms and significant suicidal ideation, adjusting for covariates. Results The patients with significant suicidal ideation were shown to be less educated, unemployed, never married, divorced, or separated by death, or living alone, and were shown to have a lower income, a drinking habit, a higher number of past suicide attempts, and more family members who committed suicide, than the patients without significant suicidal ideation. After adjusting the covariates influencing significant suicidal ideation, anxiety symptoms were associated with significant suicidal ideation. However, after adjusting for depressive symptoms, only the trait anxiety was associated with significant suicidal ideation. Conclusion These findings suggest that anxiety symptoms are an independent risk factor for suicidal ideation. Clinicians may thus use anxiety symptoms for the screening examination when evaluating suicidal ideation and risk, and will have to actively evaluate and treat the anxiety symptoms of patients with suicidal tendencies. PMID:22216041

  18. Endometriosis - A Chameleon: Patients' Perception of Clinical Symptoms, Treatment Strategies and Their Impact on Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wimberger, P; Grübling, N; Riehn, A; Furch, M; Klengel, J; Goeckenjan, M

    2014-10-01

    Introduction: Endometriosis is a chronic disease with differing clinical presentations. Treatment strategies depend mainly on clinical presentation and patient lifestyle. In women newly diagnosed with endometriosis, it is often difficult to understand the pathophysiologic origin, the potential individual impairment due to disease and the different treatment options. Compliance with the selected treatment is therefore often not optimal. Material and Methods: In a descriptive study, data of 51 women with endometriosis (mean age 36.2?years ±?11.3) were analyzed according to the predominant clinical presentation: asymptomatic disease, disease with typical symptoms, ovarian cysts or infertility. Results: More than 50?% of patients ascribed a therapeutic benefit to surgical intervention or endocrine treatment, especially women in the subgroup with dysmenorrhea who received combined treatment. It should be noted that in the group of women facing infertility, more than half stated that they could not decide on the value of diagnostic and therapeutic reproductive medicine. Nevertheless, more than half of the women in this group became pregnant within two years after the initial diagnosis. Discussion: When deciding on the best treatment strategy for endometriosis, it is important to take account of potential pain and infertility. Women's perception of endometriosis will vary depending on their symptoms, the time of diagnosis and their lifestyle. Offering continuous information on clinical aspects and manifestations of the disease may improve treatment outcomes. Personalized counseling is an essential part of the clinical management of the disease. PMID:25364034

  19. Endometriosis – A Chameleon: Patients? Perception of Clinical Symptoms, Treatment Strategies and Their Impact on Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Wimberger, P.; Grübling, N.; Riehn, A.; Furch, M.; Klengel, J.; Goeckenjan, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Endometriosis is a chronic disease with differing clinical presentations. Treatment strategies depend mainly on clinical presentation and patient lifestyle. In women newly diagnosed with endometriosis, it is often difficult to understand the pathophysiologic origin, the potential individual impairment due to disease and the different treatment options. Compliance with the selected treatment is therefore often not optimal. Material and Methods: In a descriptive study, data of 51 women with endometriosis (mean age 36.2?years ±?11.3) were analyzed according to the predominant clinical presentation: asymptomatic disease, disease with typical symptoms, ovarian cysts or infertility. Results: More than 50?% of patients ascribed a therapeutic benefit to surgical intervention or endocrine treatment, especially women in the subgroup with dysmenorrhea who received combined treatment. It should be noted that in the group of women facing infertility, more than half stated that they could not decide on the value of diagnostic and therapeutic reproductive medicine. Nevertheless, more than half of the women in this group became pregnant within two years after the initial diagnosis. Discussion: When deciding on the best treatment strategy for endometriosis, it is important to take account of potential pain and infertility. Women?s perception of endometriosis will vary depending on their symptoms, the time of diagnosis and their lifestyle. Offering continuous information on clinical aspects and manifestations of the disease may improve treatment outcomes. Personalized counseling is an essential part of the clinical management of the disease. PMID:25364034

  20. Breast Cancer Survivors’ Experiences of Lymphedema-Related Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei Rosemary; Rosedale, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe breast cancer survivors’ lymphedema-related symptom experiences. As a serious chronic condition from breast cancer treatment, lymphedema, or persistent swelling, is caused by chronic accumulation of lymph fluid in the interstitial spaces of the affected limb or surrounding areas. While significant prevalence of ongoing multiple symptoms have been reported, little is known about how survivors with lymphedema perceive and respond to lymphedema-related symptoms in their daily lives. This study employed a descriptive phenomenological method. Thirty-four participants were recruited in the US. Three in-depth interviews were conducted with each participant; a total of 102 interviews were completed, audio-taped, and transcribed. Interview transcripts and field notes were the data sources for this analysis, which was part of three larger studies. Data were analyzed to identify the essential themes within and across cases. Four essential themes were revealed: living with perpetual discomfort; confronting the unexpected; losing pre-lymphedema being; and feeling handicapped. Participants experienced multiple symptoms on a daily basis. Distress was heightened when women expected symptoms to disappear but instead they remained as a “perpetual discomfort.” Moreover, distress was intensified when symptoms evoked unexpected situations or when symptoms elicited emotional responses powerful enough to change perceived personal identity. Findings suggest that symptom distress may encompass temporal, situational and attributive dimensions. Prospective studies are needed to examine lymphedema-related symptom distress in terms of these dimensions so that more specific interventions can be developed to target distress occurring in each dimension. PMID:19819668

  1. Methylomic analysis of monozygotic twins discordant for childhood psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Helen L; Murphy, Therese M; Arseneault, Louise; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E; Viana, Joana; Hannon, Eilis; Pidsley, Ruth; Burrage, Joe; Dempster, Emma L; Wong, Chloe C Y; Pariante, Carmine M; Mill, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Childhood psychotic symptoms are associated with increased rates of schizophrenia, other psychiatric disorders, and suicide attempts in adulthood; thus, elucidating early risk indicators is crucial to target prevention efforts. There is considerable discordance for psychotic symptoms between monozygotic twins, indicating that child-specific non-genetic factors must be involved. Epigenetic processes may constitute one of these factors and have not yet been investigated in relation to childhood psychotic symptoms. Therefore, this study explored whether differences in DNA methylation at age 10 were associated with monozygotic twin discordance for psychotic symptoms at age 12. The Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study cohort of 2,232 children (1,116 twin pairs) was assessed for age-12 psychotic symptoms and 24 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for symptoms were identified for methylomic comparison. Children provided buccal samples at ages 5 and 10. DNA was bisulfite modified and DNA methylation was quantified using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 array. Differentially methylated positions (DMPs) associated with psychotic symptoms were subsequently tested in post-mortem prefrontal cortex tissue from adult schizophrenia patients and age-matched controls. Site-specific DNA methylation differences were observed at age 10 between monozygotic twins discordant for age-12 psychotic symptoms. Similar DMPs were not found at age 5. The top-ranked psychosis-associated DMP (cg23933044), located in the promoter of the C5ORF42 gene, was also hypomethylated in post-mortem prefrontal cortex brain tissue from schizophrenia patients compared to unaffected controls. These data tentatively suggest that epigenetic variation in peripheral tissue is associated with childhood psychotic symptoms and may indicate susceptibility to schizophrenia and other mental health problems. PMID:26479702

  2. Prevalence, Comorbidity and Heritability of Hoarding Symptoms in Adolescence: A Population Based Twin Study in 15-Year Olds

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Volen Z.; Mataix-Cols, David; Serlachius, Eva; Lichtenstein, Paul; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Chang, Zheng; Gumpert, Clara Hellner; Lundström, Sebastian; Långström, Niklas; Rück, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Hoarding Disorder (HD) is often assumed to be an ‘old age’ problem, but many individuals diagnosed with HD retrospectively report first experiencing symptoms in childhood or adolescence. We examined the prevalence, comorbidity and etiology of hoarding symptoms in adolescence. Methods To determine the presence of clinically significant hoarding symptoms, a population-based sample of 15-year old twins (N?=?3,974) completed the Hoarding Rating Scale-Self Report. Co-occurring Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) were estimated from parental report. Model-fitting analyses divided hoarding symptom scores into additive genetic, shared, and non-shared environmental effects. Results The prevalence of clinically significant hoarding symptoms was 2% (95% CI 1.6–2.5%), with a significantly higher prevalence in girls than boys. Exclusion of the clutter criterion (as adolescents do not have control over their environment) increased the prevalence rate to 3.7% (95% CI 3.1–4.3%). Excessive acquisition was reported by 30–40% among those with clinically significant hoarding symptoms. The prevalence of co-occurring OCD (2.9%), ASD (2.9%) and ADHD (10.0%) was comparable in hoarding and non-hoarding teenagers. Model-fitting analyses suggested that, in boys, additive genetic (32%; 95% CI 13–44%) and non-shared environmental effects accounted for most of the variance. In contrast, among girls, shared and non-shared environmental effects explained most of the variance, while additive genetic factors played a negligible role. Conclusions Hoarding symptoms are relatively prevalent in adolescents, particularly in girls, and cause distress and/or impairment. Hoarding was rarely associated with other common neurodevelopmental disorders, supporting its DSM-5 status as an independent diagnosis. The relative importance of genetic and shared environmental factors for hoarding differed across sexes. The findings are suggestive of dynamic developmental genetic and environmental effects operating from adolescence onto adulthood. PMID:23874893

  3. Physical Characteristics of Asteroid-like Comet Nucleus C/2001 OG108 (LONEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, P. A.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Pravec, P.; French, L. M.; Farnham, T. L.; Gaffey, M. J.; Hardersen, P. S.; Kusnirak, P.; Sarounova, L.; Sheppard, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    For many years several investigators have suggested that some portion of the near-Earth asteroid population may actually be extinct cometary nuclei. Evidence used to support these hypotheses was based on: observations of asteroid orbits and associated meteor showers (e.g. 3200 Phaethon and the Geminid meteor shower); low activity of short period comet nuclei, which implied nonvolatile surface crusts (e.g. Neujmin 1, Arend-Rigaux); and detections of transient cometary activity in some near-Earth asteroids (e.g. 4015 Wilson-Harrington). Recent investigations have suggested that approximately 5-10% of the near- Earth asteroid population may be extinct comets. However if members of the near-Earth asteroid population are extinct cometary nuclei, then there should be some objects within this population that are near their final stages of evolution and so should demonstrate only low levels of activity. The recent detections of coma from near-Earth object 2001 OG108 have renewed interest in this possible comet-asteroid connection. This paper presents the first high quality ground-based near-infrared reflectance spectrum of a comet nucleus combined with detailed lightcurve and albedo measurements.

  4. Insomnia Symptoms, Nightmares, and Suicide Risk: Duration of Sleep Disturbance Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Nazem, Sarra; Fiske, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Duration of insomnia symptoms or nightmares was investigated to see if it was related to suicide risk independent of current insomnia symptoms, nightmares, anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic symptoms. The cross-sectional study involved analyses of survey responses from undergraduate students who endorsed either insomnia…

  5. Nonpharmacologic complementary therapies in symptom management for breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Anne H; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Torkelson, Carolyn; Haddad, Tufia

    2011-06-01

    The request and use of nonpharmacologic interventions and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in cancer survivors is increasing. Given the large number of breast cancer survivors and the multiple treatment-related symptoms they endure, it is important for physicians to be aware of the evidence supporting nonpharmacologic therapies. Several studies evaluating such interventions have demonstrated improved overall quality of life (QOL). For other symptoms, the literature is limited but growing. We summarize the evidence to support complementary and alternative therapies for the major symptoms in breast cancer survivors. PMID:21600369

  6. Relief of emotional symptoms in elderly patients with terminal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, T

    1988-07-01

    Effective palliative care is one of the most valuable skills a physician may acquire. It involves not only control of physical symptoms, but relief of emotional symptoms. Relief of emotional symptoms requires truth telling in a context of supportive, skillful communication. Important communication skills include empathy, legitimation, support, partnership, and respect. Using these skills and the development of a limited treatment plan, along with pharmacological intervention, when necessary, to treat anxiety, depression, and confusion, may provide a significant measure of relief for the suffering that often accompanies terminal cancer. PMID:3290059

  7. Pain and Symptom Management in Pediatric Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Komatz, Kelly; Carter, Brian

    2015-12-01

    Pain and symptom management is considered one of the cornerstones of palliative and hospice medicine. However, general clinicians and specialists are not usually comfortable addressing the most common forms of pain seen in the pediatric population. In addition, non-pain symptom management, especially when related to underlying chronic medical conditions, can be managed by the general clinician and specialists. The goal of this article is to educate clinicians about pain categories, taking a detailed pain history, and developing a plan for treatment, including nonpharmacologic methods. Finally, we discuss common symptoms in patients with chronic medical conditions, including first-line treatment options. PMID:26628733

  8. Evaluation and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Psychotic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Algon, Sibel; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E.; Kohler, Christian; Borgmann-Winter, Karin E.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing efforts to develop early detection and prevention strategies for patients at risk of the development of psychotic disorders. These efforts have led to improved recognition and characterization of psychotic symptoms in youth. This review focuses on the evaluation of children and adolescents with psychotic symptoms who are experiencing functional impairment but who do not meet current criteria for schizophrenia. For this article, emphasis is placed on the evaluation of symptoms, differential diagnosis, and consideration of potential interventions. PMID:22350543

  9. Insomnia in relation to depression and somatic symptoms.

    PubMed

    El-Anzi, Freih O

    2006-08-01

    A sample of 358 Kuwaiti volunteer college students responded to the Insomnia Scale, the Somatic Symptoms Inventory, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. The only significant sex difference was in somatic symptoms on which women had a higher mean score than the men. Correlations between scores on the Insomnia Scale and both Depression scales were .51 and .54 and for Somatic Symptoms were .53 and .61 (p < .01) among men and women, respectively. The factor analysis of the intercorrelations yielded a highly loaded general factor for Psychological Disorder in both samples. PMID:17037463

  10. DSM-IV “criterion A” schizophrenia symptoms across ethnically different populations: evidence for differing psychotic symptom content or structural organization?

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Duncan; Thara, Rangaswamy; John, Sujit; Barrett, Robert; Loa, Peter; McGrath, John; Mowry, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    There is significant variation in the expression of schizophrenia across ethnically different populations, and the optimal structural and diagnostic representation of schizophrenia is contested. We contrasted both lifetime frequencies of DSM-IV criterion A (the core symptom criterion of the internationally recognized DSM classification system) symptoms and types/content of delusions and hallucinations in transethnic schizophrenia populations from Australia (n=776), India (n=504) and Sarawak, Malaysia (n=259), to elucidate clinical heterogeneity. Differences in both criterion A symptom composition and symptom content were apparent. Indian individuals with schizophrenia reported negative symptoms more frequently than other sites, whereas individuals from Sarawak reported disorganized symptoms more frequently. Delusions of control and thought broadcast, insertion or withdrawal were less frequent in Sarawak than Australia. Curiously, a subgroup of 20 Indian individuals with schizophrenia reported no lifetime delusions or hallucinations. These findings potentially challenge the long-held view in psychiatry that schizophrenia is fundamentally similar across cultural groups, with differences in only the content of psychotic symptoms, but equivalence in structural form. PMID:24981830

  11. Remission in schizophrenia: the relationship to baseline symptoms and changes in symptom domains during a one-year study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D L; Weiner, E; Ball, M P; McMahon, R P; Carpenter, W T; Buchanan, R W

    2009-06-01

    The concepts of partial recovery and remission have become increasingly important for the evaluation of the effectiveness of schizophrenia therapeutics. The relationship of baseline symptoms and changes in symptoms to remission of psychosis was evaluated. Fifty-six outpatients with residual schizophrenia completed a double-blind trial of olanzapine versus haloperidol and were then enrolled into a one-year open-label trial of olanzapine. Out of these 56 subjects, 13 (23%) met remission criteria at the beginning of the open-label treatment and were excluded. During the one-year study, 7/43 (16%) subjects met remission criteria. These subjects had significantly lower baseline ratings for tardive dyskinesia (TD) than subjects who did not achieve remission (1.8 +/- 1.5 vs. 4.2 +/- 4.6, P = 0.03). As expected, remitted subjects had significantly greater improvements in Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale total scores, positive subscale scores and scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms total scores. Remitted subjects also experienced a significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms (P = 0.001), activation (P = 0.005), and Clinical Global Impressions scores (P < 0.001), as well as greater improvements in extrapyramidal symptoms (P = 0.007) and TD (P < 0.001). These results suggest that the relationship of depressive symptoms and improved side effects to the construct of remission in schizophrenia may deserve special attention. Future studies should aim to relate remission criteria to functional outcomes, cognition, and other important symptom domains. PMID:18583442

  12. Externalizing symptoms moderate associations among interpersonal skills, parenting, and depressive symptoms in adolescents seeking mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Erin M; Donenberg, Geri R; Emerson, Erin; Wilson, Helen W; Javdani, Shabnam

    2015-04-01

    Adolescents' interpersonal skills are associated with fewer teen depressive symptoms and more positive parenting, but little is known about how teens' externalizing problems moderate these relationships. This study examines links among teens' interpersonal skills, parenting, and withdrawn-depressed symptoms in adolescents seeking outpatient psychiatric treatment with elevated or non-elevated externalizing problems. Adolescents (N = 346; 42 % female; 61 % African-American) ages 12-19 years old (M = 14.9; SD = 1.8) and parents completed assessments at baseline and 6 months. At baseline parents and teens reported on teen withdrawn-depressed and externalizing symptoms, and were observed interacting to assess teen interpersonal skills. At 6 months adolescents reported on parenting, and parents and teens reported on teen withdrawn-depressed symptoms. Structural equation modeling tested two models (one with teen reported symptoms and one with parent reported symptoms). Model fit was better for youth with elevated externalizing problems regardless of reporter. For youth with elevated externalizing problems, baseline teen positive interpersonal skills were not directly associated with 6-month withdrawn-depressed symptoms, but more positive parenting was associated with fewer withdrawn-depressed symptoms. In the teen report model, more positive teen interpersonal skills were associated with more positive parenting, and there was a trend for parenting to indirectly account for the relationship between interpersonal skills and withdrawn-depressed symptoms. The findings extend research on the role of externalizing problems in teens' depression risk. Interventions for depression that target interpersonal skills may be particularly effective in youth with elevated externalizing problems. PMID:25698655

  13. Operation of Wastewater Treatment Plants, Manual of Practice No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albertson, Orrie E.; And Others

    This book is intended to be a reference or textbook on the operation of wastewater treatment plants. The book contains thirty-one chapters and three appendices and includes the description, requirements, and latest techniques of conventional unit process operation, as well as the symptoms and corrective measures regarding process problems. Process…

  14. Predicting depressive symptoms from acculturative family distancing: A study of Taiwanese parachute kids in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Hua; Friedlander, Myrna L

    2014-07-01

    We applied Hwang's (2006a) acculturative family distancing (AFD) theory to Taiwanese "parachute kids," who had immigrated to the United States or Canada as unaccompanied minors and remained in North American as adults. It was hypothesized that each dimension of AFD-communication breakdown and cultural value incongruence-would uniquely predict conflict with participants' family members in Taiwan, which would, in turn, predict their depressive symptoms. In a sample of 68 former parachute kids aged 18 to 36 years, the relation between communication breakdown and depressive symptoms was fully mediated by family conflict. On the other hand, the mediation effect was not found for cultural value incongruence. Moreover, a suppression effect occurred, suggesting the likelihood that an additional, unknown variable accounts for the relation between cultural value incongruence and depressive symptoms. We concluded, from these results, that the 2 AFD dimensions operate differently in this population than in previous AFD research. This conclusion was further supported by the finding that participants reported significantly more communication breakdown than cultural value incongruence with family members residing in Taiwan. PMID:25045956

  15. Respiratory symptoms and exposure-response relations in workers exposed to metalworking fluid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lillienberg, Linnéa; Andersson, Eva M; Järvholm, Bengt; Torén, Kjell

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to identify specific health risks and exposure-response relationships associated with exposure to metalworking fluid (MWF) aerosols. In a cross-sectional study of machine workers exposed to MWF aerosols in five companies in Sweden, a self-administered questionnaire about health symptoms, work tasks, and exposure situations was sent out to 2294 employees, 1632 exposed and 662 referents. Referents were office workers and metal workers not working with MWFs. In four of the companies, there were recent measurements of personal exposure to MWF aerosols. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals for different health outcomes in relation to different variables of exposure. The response rate after two reminders was 67% resulting in 1048 (923 male, 125 female) workers exposed to MWF aerosols and 451 (374 male, 77 female) referents. The study indicates that metal workers in Sweden currently exposed to a mean value of MWF aerosols of 0.4 mg m(-3) have a significantly higher prevalence of wheeze, chronic bronchitis, chronic rhinitis, and eye irritation compared to the referents. At a mean exposure of 0.4 mg m(-3), a level below the Swedish 8-h exposure limit value of 1 mg m(-3), machine operators showed increased prevalence of symptoms in eyes and airways. Thus, the current exposure limit value does not seem to protect the workers from such symptoms. PMID:20200090

  16. Warehousing Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on warehousing operations is designed to provide instruction in the procedures used in warehousing operations. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI students and a study guide (guidelines to complete the course). The 22-hour…

  17. Operational Amplifiers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxcroft, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the introduction of low cost equipment into high school and college physical science classes. Examines the properties of an "ideal" operational amplifier and discusses how it might be used under saturated and non-saturated conditions. Notes the action of a "real" operational amplifier. (TW)

  18. GUIDE TO THE REACTIONS TO NATURAL RUBBER LATEX SYMPTOM IRRITATION

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    GUIDE TO THE REACTIONS TO NATURAL RUBBER LATEX SYMPTOM IRRITATION DELAYED TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY braziliensis (rubber tree) Approximate % of population vulnerable: 100% 7-18% general population: 0.8% hospital

  19. Pharmacological management of behavioral symptoms associated with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Madhusoodanan, Subramoniam; Ting, Mark Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome with features of neurocognitive decline. Subtypes of dementia include Alzheimer’s, frontotemporal, Parkinson’s, Lewy body disease, and vascular type. Dementia is associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric symptoms that may include agitation, psychosis, depression, and apathy. These symptoms can lead to dangerousness to self or others and are the main source for caregiver burnout. Treatment of these symptoms consists of nonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions. However, there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. Pharmacological interventions are used off-label. This article reviews the current evidence supporting or negating the use of psychotropic medications along with safety concerns, monitoring, regulations, and recommendations. PMID:25540722

  20. The neurocognitive implications of depressive symptoms in youth 

    E-print Network

    Gsanger, Kristen Marie

    2006-10-30

    Research indicates that cognitive and neuropsychological functions are adversely affected by symptoms of depression (Teeter & Semrud-Clikeman, 1997). In addition to deficits in attention and memory, depressive symptomatology may impact one...

  1. Mind-Body Interactions in Anxiety and Somatic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Bulbena, Antonio; Pailhez, Guillem; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Critchley, Hugo D

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and somatic symptoms have a high prevalence in the general population. A mechanistic understanding of how different factors contribute to the development and maintenance of these symptoms, which are highly associated with anxiety disorders, is crucial to optimize treatments. In this article, we review recent literature on this topic and present a redefined model of mind-body interaction in anxiety and somatic symptoms, with an emphasis on both bottom-up and top-down processes. Consideration is given to the role played in this interaction by predisposing physiological and psychological traits (e.g., interoception, anxiety sensitivity, and trait anxiety) and to the levels at which mindfulness approaches may exert a therapeutic benefit. The proposed model of mind-body interaction in anxiety and somatic symptoms is appraised in the context of joint hypermobility syndrome, a constitutional variant associated with autonomic abnormalities and vulnerability to anxiety disorders. PMID:26713718

  2. Disinhibited reactive attachment disorder symptoms impair social judgements from faces

    E-print Network

    Caldara, Roberto

    of Psychology and Fribourg Center for Cognition, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland b NHS Greater be indiscriminately friendly. Whether children with dRAD symptoms appraise and conform to typical judgements about

  3. The motivation and pleasure dimension of negative symptoms: Neural substrates

    E-print Network

    The motivation and pleasure dimension of negative symptoms: Neural substrates and behavioral Schizophrenia; Motivation; Pleasure; Neural substrates; Effort; Anticipation Abstract A range of emotional and motivation impairments have long been clinically documented in people with schizophrenia, and there has been

  4. Symptoms, Devices, Prevention, Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Tinnitus: A Common Symptom Tinnitus, common in older people, is a ringing, roaring, ... or both ears and be loud or soft. Tinnitus is also common in members of the military ...

  5. Symptom or Signal?: The role of disfluency in dialogue 

    E-print Network

    Finlayson, Ian

    2008-06-29

    Disfluencies are a regular occurrence within spoken speech. While commonly seen as the result of a problem of speech production, there are some who suggest that rather than merely being a symptom of one of these problems ...

  6. Osteoarthritis: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table of Contents ... about possible other causes, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Diagnosis A combination of the following methods are used ...

  7. Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... cause can be found and treated, if needed. Diagnosis Health care providers may suggest one or more ...

  8. Feature: Post Traumatic Stres Disorder PTSD: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD Symptoms, Diagnosis , Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... outbursts Thoughts of hurting one's self or others Diagnosis As with other mental disorders, there are no ...

  9. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  10. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... even begin to fail. Signs and Symptoms of Bleeding In DIC, the increased clotting activity uses up ... DIC can cause internal and external bleeding. Internal Bleeding Internal bleeding can occur in your body's organs, ...

  11. BRIEF REPORTS Depressive Symptoms Precede Memory Decline, but Not Vice

    E-print Network

    Project, a community-based longitudinal study of aging and dementia in northern Manhattan. PARTICIPANTS Columbia Aging Project (WHICAP),3 but because depressive symptoms did not predict greater risk of MCI

  12. Adaptation to vection-induced symptoms of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert M.; Hu, Senqi; Vasey, Michael W.; Koch, Kenneth L.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of repeated exposures to a rotating circular vection drum on the symptoms of motion sickness and tachygastria in humans were investigated. Subjects were sitting in a drum and were exposed to 15 min baseline (no rotation), followed by 15 min drum rotation at 60 deg/s, and, then, by 15 min recovery. Gastric myoelectric activity was continuously recorded with the electrogastrogram. Subjects who were exposed to the drum three times with intervals of 4-24 days all showed symptoms of tachygastria and failed to show an amelioration of motion sickness symptoms. On the other hand subjects who had only 48 h between the three sessions of drum exposure, experienced a reduction in motion-sickness symptoms and in tachygastsria upon repeated exposure to the drum, indicating that training effected a symptomatic and physiological adaptation. It is suggested that preflight adaptation to visual-vestibular sensory mismatch may reduce motion sickness in astronauts.

  13. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes & Transmission Signs & Symptoms ...

  14. Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Menopausal Symptoms and Complementary Health Practices : What the Science Says Share: September 2013 Since the 2005 NIH ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  15. Orthopedic Health: Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Joint Health and Care: Prevention, Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment Past ... Exercise helps bone density, improves muscle strength and joint flexibility, and enhances your balance. Take part in ...

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a link to NHLBI to someone ...

  17. Symptoms In Children | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Symptoms In Children Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table ... hyperactivity, and impulsivity are the key behaviors of ADHD. It is normal for all children to be ...

  18. What Are the Symptoms of a Heart Attack?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Twitter. What Are the Symptoms of a Heart Attack? Not all heart attacks begin with the sudden, ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is a heart attack? 05/22/2014 Describes how a heart attack ...

  19. Psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients: from diagnosis to management

    PubMed Central

    Boele, Florien W; Rooney, Alasdair G; Grant, Robin; Klein, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Patients with primary intrinsic brain tumors can experience neurological, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that greatly affect daily life. In this review, we focus on changes in personality and behavior, mood issues, hallucinations, and psychosis, because these are either difficult to recognize, to treat, or are understudied in scientific literature. Neurobehavioral symptoms are common, often multiple, and causation can be multifactorial. Although different symptoms sometimes require a different treatment approach, we advise a comprehensive treatment approach, including pharmacological treatment and/or psychotherapy where appropriate. Further research is needed to obtain a better estimate of the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients, and the extent to which these affect everyday functioning and family life. PMID:26089669

  20. What Are the Symptoms of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources and Publications What are the symptoms of PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... addition to the three features used to diagnose PCOS (absence of ovulation, high levels of androgens, and ...

  1. Clinical symptoms of bilateral anterior cerebral artery territory infarction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Maki, Toshiyuki; Kunimoto, Masanari

    2011-02-01

    Bilateral anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory infarction is rare and its associated symptoms are still not well understood. We evaluated the clinical symptoms of four patients with bilateral ACA infarction. The common clinical features were various primitive reflexes and parkinsonian symptoms including akinesia, rigidity and hypophonia. Frontal release signs were present in all patients with ACA infarction even without direct involvement of the prefrontal cortex. Enhanced glabellar tap response, previously not reported in patients with ACA infarction, was the most consistent finding, and electrophysiological studies confirmed hyperexcitability of the late component of the blink reflex. The bilateral lesions in the deep white matter may be associated with the observed symptoms, reflecting functional disconnection of the medial prefrontal-subcortical circuitry. PMID:21159512

  2. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thalassemias?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Thalassemias? A lack of oxygen in the bloodstream causes ... especially with bones in the face) Complications of Thalassemias Better treatments now allow people who have moderate ...

  3. Gout: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treament | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Detecting and Treating Gout Gout: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treament Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of Contents What Causes Gout? Risk factors for over-production of uric acid ...

  4. Baclofen and pregnancy: birth defects and withdrawal symptoms.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    A comparison of 134 pregnant women who had taken baclofen in early pregnancy and 400 pregnant controls showed an increased risk of major malformations. Several infants exposed to baclofen until birth exhibited withdrawal symptoms. PMID:26417633

  5. SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Genetics, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatments

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Genetics, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatments Iris Jovel Biochemistry 118Q #12;THE DISEASE: SICKLE CELL ANEMIA (SCA) Most common inherited blood, sickle shape #12;IMPLICATIONS OF SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Misshapen and rigid RBC fail

  6. Characteristics of mothers with depressive symptoms outside the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, David G; Learned, Nicole; Liu, Ying-Hua; Weitzman, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the deleterious effects of maternal depression on child outcomes. Knowledge of characteristics of these mothers is incomplete, as most studies utilize small samples or limit investigation to the postpartum period. Utilizing data from a nationally representative sample of 7,211 fathers and mothers living in households with children aged 5-17 years who participated in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) 2004-2006, the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2) was used to assess parental depressive symptoms, the Short Form-12 (SF-12) was used to examine paternal and maternal physical health, and the Columbia Impairment Scale was used to measure child behavioral or emotional problems. In multivariate analyses, maternal unemployment (AOR 1.76, 95 % CI 1.31-2.35); living with smokers (AOR 1.82, 95 % CI 1.12-2.94); poor maternal physical health (AOR 2.31; 95 % CI 1.81-2.94); living with children with behavioral or emotional problems (AOR 2.95, 95 % CI 2.30-3.96); and paternal depressive symptoms (AOR 5.11, 95 % CI 1.97-13.25) each were independently associated with increased rates of maternal depressive symptoms. This paper is the first we are aware of to use a nationally representative sample to investigate characteristics associated with maternal depressive symptoms and found that maternal unemployment, living with smokers, poor maternal physical health, having children with behavioral or emotional problems, and paternal depressive symptoms are each independently associated with maternal depressive symptoms. In these data, paternal depressive symptoms are associated with the greatest risk of mothers exhibiting depressive symptoms, a finding that we believe has never before been shown. PMID:22878534

  7. Neurological symptoms in individuals with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Kitterman, Joseph A; Strober, Jonathan B; Kan, Lixin; Rocke, David M; Cali, Amanda; Peeper, Jeannie; Snow, Jennifer; Delai, Patricia L R; Morhart, Rolf; Pignolo, Robert J; Shore, Eileen M; Kaplan, Frederick S

    2012-12-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare, disabling condition caused by gain-of-function mutations of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor, leads to episodes of heterotopic ossification and resultant immobility. Neurological problems have not been associated with FOP, but neurological symptoms are commonly reported by FOP patients. To determine the prevalence of neurological symptoms and their characteristics in individuals with FOP, we conducted a survey of the 470 patient members of the International FOP Association (IFOPA) using a questionnaire about neurological symptoms. There were 168 responses (105 females, 63 males; age 1.5-68 years) from 30 countries representing 36 % of IFOPA members. Chronic neurological symptoms were reported by 86 (51 %). Prevalence of neuropathic pain (NP) was significantly increased (P < 0.001) compared to the general population, and tenfold more common in females (15 %) than males (1.6 %). Of those with NP, 94 % reported other sensory abnormalities. Prevalence of recurrent severe headaches (HA) (26 %) was similar to that in the general population, but prevalence in females with FOP (36 %) was almost fourfold greater than in males. Prevalence of NP, HA, and other sensory abnormalities was substantially higher in post-pubertal females; 33 % reported symptoms worsened during menstrual periods. Worsening of neurological symptoms during FOP flare-ups was reported by 23 %. Three patients with FOP (1.8 %) reported myoclonus, a prevalence much greater than reported in the general population (P < 0.001). Our worldwide survey indicates that neurological symptoms are common in FOP. We speculate that these symptoms are related to effects of dysregulated BMP signaling on the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. PMID:22752062

  8. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  9. Characterization of symptoms and edema distribution in premenstrual syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tacani, Pascale Mutti; Ribeiro, Danielle de Oliveira; Barros Guimarães, Barbara Evelyn; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez; Tacani, Rogério Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Background Premenstrual syndrome is a group of symptoms linked to the menstrual cycle, and edema is among these symptoms. Physiotherapy is often sought by many patients for the treatment of edema; however, for an adequate prescription of physiotherapeutic procedures, the distribution of edema throughout the body has yet to be characterized. Objective To determine the most frequent symptoms and body regions that present with edema in women during the premenstrual period. Subjects and methods Sixty women with a mean age of 24.6±4.7 years were evaluated during their premenstrual (between days 21 and 28) and menstrual period (between days 1 and 3), and the collected data included body mass, height, biotype (body-fat distribution), face, breast, limb-circumference measurements, and limb-volume estimate, and an adapted version of the Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and the test for equality of two proportions (P?0.05). Results Premenstrual syndrome was identified in 91.7% of the women, and the most frequent symptoms were irritability (73.33%) and physical symptoms, including swelling (65%), and anxiety (58.3%). Edema was detected in the following areas: facial, epigastric, mammary, umbilical, and pubic, the mid-third of the arms, distal forearm, in both thighs and in the mid-third of the legs determined by circumference measurements, and in both upper and lower limbs, according to the estimated volume. Conclusion In this study population, the most frequent symptoms were irritability, physical symptoms, and anxiety, with distribution of edema in the face, breast, abdomen, pubic area, distal upper limb, and proximal lower limb. PMID:25792857

  10. Latent structure of irritable bowel syndrome symptom severity

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Fabian; Egloff, Boris; Roalfe, Andrea; Witthöft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the latent structure of an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom severity scale in a population of healthy adults. METHODS: The Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire which consists of three symptom specific scales (diarrhea, constipation, pain) was evaluated by means of structural equation modeling. We compared the original 3-factor solution to a general factor model and a bifactor solution in a large internet sample of college students (n = 875). Statistical comparisons of competing models were conducted by means of ?2 difference tests. Regarding the evaluation of model fit, we examined the comparative fit index (CFI) and the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA). RESULTS: Results clearly favored a bifactor model of IBS symptom severity (CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.05) which consisted of a strong general IBS somatization factor and three symptom specific factors (diarrhea, constipation, pain) based on the subscales of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire. The fit indices of the competing one factor model (CFI = 0.85, RMSEA = 0.17) and three factor model (CFI = 0.97, RMSEA = 0.08) were clearly inferior. ?2 difference tests showed that the differences between the models were indeed significant in favor of the bifactor model (P < 0.001). Correlations of the four latent factors with measures of pain sensitivity, somatoform dissociation, fatigue severity, and demographic variables support the validity of our bifactor model of IBS specific symptom severity. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that IBS symptom severity might best be understood as a continuous and multidimensional construct which can be reliably and validly assessed with the B-IBS. PMID:25574104

  11. The 24-month course of manic symptoms in children

    PubMed Central

    Findling, Robert L; Jo, Booil; Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Demeter, Christine A; Fristad, Mary A; Birmaher, Boris; Kowatch, Robert A; Arnold, Eugene; Axelson, David A; Ryan, Neal; Hauser, Jessica C; Brace, Daniel J; Marsh, Linda E; Gill, Mary Kay; Depew, Judith; Rowles, Brieana M; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms (LAMS) study was designed to investigate phenomenology and establish predictors of functional outcomes in children with elevated manic symptoms. The purpose of this series of analyses was to determine whether the participants demonstrated different trajectories of parent-reported manic and biphasic symptoms over the first 24 months of follow-up and to describe the clinical characteristics of the trajectories. Methods The 707 participants were initially aged 6–12 years and ascertained from outpatient clinics associated with the four university-affiliated LAMS sites. There were 621 children whose parents/guardians’ ratings scored ? 12 on the Parent General Behavior Inventory–10-item Mania Form (PGBI-10M) and a matched random sample of 86 children whose parents/guardians’ ratings scored ? 11 on the PGBI-10M. Participants were seen every six months after the baseline and their parents completed the PGBI-10M at each visit. Results For the whole sample, manic symptoms decreased over 24 months (linear effect B = -1.15, standard error = 0.32, t = -3.66, p < 0.001). Growth Mixture Modeling revealed four unique trajectories of manic symptoms. Approximately 85% of the cohort belonged to two classes in which manic symptoms decreased. The remaining ? 15% formed two classes (high and rising and unstable) characterized by the highest rates of diagnostic conversion to a bipolar disorder (all p-values < 0.001). Conclusions Outcomes are not uniform among children with symptoms of mania or high risk for mania. A substantial minority of clinically referred children shows unstable or steadily increasing manic symptoms, and these patterns have distinct clinical correlates. PMID:23799945

  12. Atypical behavioral and psychiatric symptoms: Neurosyphilis should always be considered

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, Marcelo Houat; Lopes, Beatriz Noele Azevedo; de Campos, Fernando Peixoto Ferraz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis still remains a major health concern worldwide because of the possibility of serious medical and psychological consequences, long-term disability, and death. Neurosyphilis (NS) may occur at any stage of infection. Its clinical presentation has been changing over recent years including­ psychiatric and neurocognitive symptoms. Several recent studies have described cases with these symptoms as the principal signs of NS. We present the case of neurosyphilis with a psychiatric presentation characterized by mood disturbance and auditory and visual hallucinations. PMID:26558247

  13. British community norms for the Brief Symptom Inventory.

    PubMed

    Francis, V M; Rajan, P; Turner, N

    1990-02-01

    British community norms (N = 376) for the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis & Spencer, 1982) are presented. Means are significantly higher than previously published US norms for all symptom dimensions, and show variability according to age, sex and work status. The proportion of 'cases' in the sample is similar to other British estimates. It is recommended that culturally relevant norms should be established and used in future work with this instrument. PMID:2310864

  14. The Trajectory of Depressive Symptoms Across the Adult Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Terracciano, Antonio; Milaneschi, Yuri; An, Yang; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B.

    2013-01-01

    Context Long-term longitudinal studies are needed to delineate the trajectory of depressive symptoms across adulthood and to individuate factors that may contribute to increases in depressive symptoms in older adulthood. Objective (1) To estimate the trajectory of depressive symptoms across the adult lifespan, (2) to test whether this trajectory varies by demographic factors (sex, ethnicity, education) and antidepressant medication use, and (3) to test whether disease burden, functional limitations, and proximity to death explain the increase in depressive symptoms in old age. Design Longitudinal study Setting Community Participants 2,320 participants (47% female; mean age at baseline=58.10 years, SD=17.05; range 19–95 years) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging Main Outcome Measure Estimated trajectory of depressive symptoms modeled from 10,982 assessments (M assessments per participant=4.73, SD=3.63, range=1–21) of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale and three subscales (depressed affect, somatic complaints, and interpersonal problems). Results Both the linear (?10=.52, p<.01) and quadratic (?20=.43, p<.01) terms were significant, which indicated that depressive symptoms were highest in young adulthood, decreased across middle adulthood, and increased again in older adulthood. The subscales followed a similar pattern. Women reported more depressed affect at younger ages, but an interaction with age suggested that this gap disappeared in old age. Accounting for comorbidity, functional limitations, and impending death slightly reduced, but did not eliminate, the uptick in depressive symptoms in old age. Conclusions Symptoms of depression follow a U-shaped pattern across adulthood. Older adults experience an increase in distress that is not due solely to declines in physical health or approaching death. PMID:23760442

  15. Investigation of Stress Symptoms among Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Farnam, Aliraza; Rahkar Farshi, Mahni

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Experience of chronic stress in children plays an important role in enhancing future physical, mental and social problems. It is very essential and vital that families, teachers and professional groups possess necessary abilities to diagnose stress symptoms in children. According to the statistics of Education Ministry, there were almost 5.5 million primary school students in Iran in 2008-2009. However, there are very limited studies about stress in 7 to 12-year-old children. The present study aimed to review stress symptoms in school-aged children. Methods: In a descriptive study, 839 third to fifth grade students were selected from five randomly chosen districts of Tabriz using random sampling method in the schools. The data were collected by means of children’s stress symptom scale (CSSS) through interviewing by children. Accuracy of translation was checked and content validity and reliability were confirmed using test retest method. Results: The entire twenty-six items of the questionnaire were reported as stress symptoms. More than half of the study subjects reported worry, fast heart beating, being afraid, chills and feeling sad as their signs of stress. Headache (46.6%) and tiredness (41.8%) were also reported. In examining every stress symptoms, there was a statistically significant correlation between some symptoms with age, grade and type of school. Conclusion: Children showed a wide range of symptoms in facing with stressful events. Accurate identification of symptoms can inform parents, teachers and professional health staff about physical and mental status of school-aged children and result in interventions to reduce their stress. PMID:25276672

  16. 20 CFR 404.1529 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  17. 20 CFR 416.929 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1529 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  19. 20 CFR 416.929 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1529 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  1. 20 CFR 404.1529 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1529 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  3. 20 CFR 416.929 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  4. 20 CFR 416.929 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  5. 20 CFR 416.929 - How we evaluate symptoms, including pain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...frequency, and intensity of your pain or other symptoms; (iii) Precipitating...or have taken to alleviate your pain or other symptoms; (v) Treatment...you receive or have received for relief of your pain or other symptoms; (vi)...

  6. Image-based phenotyping of plant disease symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Mutka, Andrew M.; Bart, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Plant diseases cause significant reductions in agricultural productivity worldwide. Disease symptoms have deleterious effects on the growth and development of crop plants, limiting yields and making agricultural products unfit for consumption. For many plant–pathogen systems, we lack knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that link pathogen infection and the production of disease symptoms in the host. A variety of quantitative high-throughput image-based methods for phenotyping plant growth and development are currently being developed. These methods range from detailed analysis of a single plant over time to broad assessment of the crop canopy for thousands of plants in a field and employ a wide variety of imaging technologies. Application of these methods to the study of plant disease offers the ability to study quantitatively how host physiology is altered by pathogen infection. These approaches have the potential to provide insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying disease symptom development. Furthermore, imaging techniques that detect the electromagnetic spectrum outside of visible light allow us to quantify disease symptoms that are not visible by eye, increasing the range of symptoms we can observe and potentially allowing for earlier and more thorough symptom detection. In this review, we summarize current progress in plant disease phenotyping and suggest future directions that will accelerate the development of resistant crop varieties. PMID:25601871

  7. Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia: Avolition and Occam's Razor

    PubMed Central

    Foussias, George; Remington, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The identification of schizophrenia's negative symptoms dates back to the earliest descriptions of Kraepelin and Bleuler, who each highlighted the central role of avolition in the phenomenology and course of this illness. Since, there have been numerous advances in our understanding of schizophrenia, and the present review tracks the changes that have taken place in our understanding of negative symptoms, their description and measurement. That these symptoms represent a distinct domain of the illness is discussed in the context of their ties to other symptoms and functional outcome. The underlying structure of the negative symptom construct is explored, including several lines of investigation that point towards diminished expression and amotivation as key underlying subdomains. We also discuss findings of intact emotional experience and consummatory pleasure in individuals with schizophrenia, calling into question the presence of anhedonia in this illness. We conclude with a reconceptualization of the negative symptoms, suggesting amotivation (ie, avolition) represents the critical component, particularly in regard to functional outcome. Further exploration and clarification of this core deficit will ultimately enhance our neurobiological understanding of schizophrenia, as well as strategies that may improve outcome. PMID:18644851

  8. Significance of Endorsement of Psychotic Symptoms by US Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, R; Horvitz-Lennon, M; Blanco, C; Guarnaccia, PJ; Cao, Z; Alegría, M

    2009-01-01

    In US regional studies, Latinos frequently endorse psychotic symptoms associated with impairment and mental health service use, yet do not meet criteria for psychotic disorder. Using a nationally representative Latino sample (N=2,554), we examined the prevalence of psychotic symptoms, their relationship to psychotic disorder, their correlates, and their relationship to mental health outcomes. Among US Latinos, 9.5% (SE=0.7) endorsed one or more lifetime psychotic symptoms, yet 93% did not meet SCID criteria for psychotic disorder. Endorsement was associated with physical and emotional distress, particularly lifetime anxiety and current substance use disorder. Acculturation to US society and reliance on spiritual/religious help were also associated with psychotic symptom endorsement. These symptoms have substantial clinical significance, being independently associated with suicidal ideation, mental health-related disability, and outpatient mental health service utilization. Endorsed psychotic symptoms in Latinos may constitute a clinically significant marker of general psychiatric vulnerability rather than a sign of psychotic disorder. PMID:19440107

  9. Sexual Minority Women and Depressive Symptoms Throughout Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Kathleen M.; Wilson, Tracey E.; Cohen, Jennifer; Murchison, Lynn; Goparaju, Lakshmi; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Cohen, Mardge H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the associations between depressive symptoms and sexual identity and behavior among women with or at risk for HIV. Methods. We analyzed longitudinal data from 1811 participants in the Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS) from 1994 to 2013 in Brooklyn and the Bronx, New York; Chicago, Illinois; Washington, DC; and Los Angeles and San Francisco, California, by comparing depressive symptoms by baseline sexual identity and ongoing sexual behavior. We controlled for age, socioeconomic status, violence history, and substance use. Results. In separate analyses, bisexual women and women who reported having sex with both men and women during follow-up had higher unadjusted odds of depressive symptoms compared with heterosexuals and women who reported only having male sexual partners (adjusted odd ratio [AOR]?=?1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] ?=?1.10, 1.69 and AOR?=?1.21; 95% CI?=?1.06, 1.37, respectively). Age was a significant effect modifier in multivariable analysis; sexual minority women had increased odds of depressive symptoms in early adulthood, but they did not have these odds at midlife. Odds of depressive symptoms were lower among some sexual minority women at older ages. Conclusions. Patterns of depressive symptoms over the life course of sexual minority women with or at risk for HIV might differ from heterosexual women and from patterns observed in the general aging population. PMID:25320890

  10. Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress after Intensive Care Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Svenningsen, Helle; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Doris; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine; Frydenberg, Morten; Videbech, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Long-term psychological consequences of critical illness are receiving more attention in recent years. The aim of our study was to assess the correlation of ICU-delirium and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) anxiety and depression after ICU-discharge in a Danish cohort. Methods. A prospective observational cohort study assessing the incidence of delirium in the ICU. Psychometrics were screened by validated tools in structured telephone interviews after 2 months (n = 297) and 6 months (n = 248) after ICU-discharge. Results. Delirium was detected in 54% of patients in the ICU and symptoms of PTSD in 8% (2 months) and 6% (6 months) after ICU-discharge. Recall of ICU stay was present in 93%. Associations between ICU-delirium and post-discharge PTSD-symptoms were weak and insignificant. Memories of delusions were significantly associated with anxiety after two months. Remaining associations between types of ICU-memories and prevalence of post-discharge symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression were insignificant after adjusting for age. Incidence of ICU-delirium was unaffected by preadmission use of psychotropic drugs. Prevalence of PTSD-symptoms was unaffected by use of antipsychotics and sedation in the ICU. Conclusion. ICU-delirium did not increase the risk of PTSD-symptoms at 2 and 6 months after ICU discharge. PMID:26557708

  11. Psychiatric and Addictive Symptoms of Young Adult Female Indoor Tanners

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, Carolyn J.; Cohen-Filipic, Jessye; Darlow, Susan; Kloss, Jacqueline D.; Manne, Sharon L.; Munshi, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Indoor tanning (IT) increases risk for melanoma and is particularly common among young adult women. IT has also been linked with some psychiatric symptoms, and frequent tanning may indicate tanning dependence (addiction) associated with endorphin release during ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. The objective of the current study was to investigate associations between IT, tanning dependence, and psychiatric and substance use symptoms in young adult women. Design Cross-sectional survey and psychiatric interview. Setting Online, except for the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) that was completed over the telephone. Subjects Participants were 306 female university students aged 18–25 years. Measures MINI, Seasonal Scale Index, tanning dependence scales, reporting ever having used a tanning bed or booth with tanning lamps (single item), reporting smoking a cigarette in the last 30 days (single item). Analysis Descriptive statistics, chi square analysis, multivariate logistic regression. Results Forty-six percent of the sample reported a history of IT, and 25% were classified as tanning dependent. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that IT was significantly associated with symptoms of alcohol use disorders, generalized anxiety, and not having social anxiety. Tanning dependence was associated with symptoms of alcohol use disorders. Conclusion Tanning is of concern not only for its association with skin cancer but for its association with psychiatric and substance use symptoms. Young women with certain psychological problems may seek relief from their symptoms by IT. These findings suggest that indoor tanners may benefit from health behavior and other psychosocial interventions. PMID:23621780

  12. [The French version of Symptom Management Theory and its application].

    PubMed

    Eicher, Manuela; Delmas, Philippe; Cohen, Christine; Baeriswyl, Christine; Python, Nataly Viens

    2013-03-01

    Patients with chronic diseases remain a challenge for patient centered care in terms of symptom management. In advancing the nursing profession in this respect, organizing and providing such care in a structured and systematic way benefits from being grounded in a sound theoretical framework. Since 1994, University of California in San Francisco's Symptom Management Theory (SMT) holds promise to provide such theoretical foundation. This paper aims at presenting a French version of the SMT, the "théorie de gestion des symptômes (TGS)" as well as at discussing its application in research and practice. The paper illustrates how different concepts of SMT interrelate for different symptoms or symptom clusters in light of the current state of knowledge. Furthermore, a selection of symptom assessment scales available in French are presented to inform practice, education and research. We believe that providing a French version of the SMT will foster a systematic and structured development of symptom management in nursing practice and research in francophone regions or countries. PMID:23671983

  13. Pathways From Depressive Symptoms to Low Social Status

    PubMed Central

    Agoston, Anna M.; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2012-01-01

    This research examined two pathways through which depressive symptoms contribute to low social status (i.e., neglect and rejection) within the peer group over time: (a) depressive symptoms promote socially helpless behavior and consequent neglect by peers; and (b) depressive symptoms promote aggressive behavior and consequent rejection by peers. These pathways were investigated in independent samples of youth at two developmental stages: middle childhood (2nd – 4th grade) and early adolescence (5th – 7th grade). In both Study 1 (M age = 7.97, SD = .37; 338 girls, 298 boys) and Study 2 (M age = 11.74, SD = .68; 305 girls, 300 boys), youth and their teachers completed questionnaires at three waves. Multi-group comparison path analyses were conducted to examine sex differences in the models. Consistent with expectations, two pathways emerged through which depressive symptoms undermined subsequent social status. Support was not found for the reverse direction of effect nor for developmental or sex differences in the pathways with one exception: In early adolescence, neglect directly predicted depressive symptoms. These findings suggest specificity but also heterogeneity in the effects of depressive symptoms on social status, and identify behaviors that may be targeted for preventing the persistence of depression and its interpersonal consequences. PMID:22945342

  14. Dynamics of positive emotion regulation: associations with youth depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Fussner, Lauren M; Luebbe, Aaron M; Bell, Debora J

    2015-04-01

    Depression is frequently considered a disorder of impaired affect regulation with deficits across both positive and negative affective systems. However, where deficits in emotion regulation occur in youth, specifically regarding regulation of positive emotions, is relatively unknown. The current study tested whether deficits in broad (felt and expressed) and specific (up-regulation and maintenance) positive emotion processes are associated with youth depressive symptoms. Adolescents (n?=?134; 65 girls) in grades 7 to 9 completed a self-report measure of depressive symptoms prior to participating in two parent-child interactions tasks, a rewarding trivia task and a problem-solving conflict task. During the interaction tasks, adolescent's overall self-reported experience and observed expression of positive affect (PA) was examined. Following the reward task, youth's ability to up-regulate PA (PA response) and maintain PA while buffering against NA (PA persistence) was explored observationally. Results suggested that reduced experience and expression of PA was associated with depression symptoms, but only in a context that elicited negative emotions. No association was found between PA response and depression symptoms; however, shorter PA persistence was associated with elevated depressive symptoms. Youth higher in depressive symptoms appear able to respond similarly to rewarding events, but fail to maintain PA and ward off NA when transitioning from a positive to negative task. PMID:25070360

  15. Maternal depressive symptoms are associated with low fearfulness in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Székely, Eszter; Tiemeier, Henning; Jansen, Pauline W; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Herba, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine whether maternal depressive symptoms predict low positive emotionality and high temperamental fearfulness in preschool children. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed prenatally and at 2, 6, and 36 months postnatally. Positive emotionality and temperamental fearfulness were assessed using laboratory observations in a large cohort of typically developing Dutch preschoolers (N = 799; 404 boys) at age 36 months (M = 37.53, SD = 1.50). Children exposed to elevated levels of maternal depressive symptoms in the first 3 years of life behaved less fearfully at age 3 years in a novel context that primarily elicited a startle response (B = -0.08, SE = 0.03, p = .01). The severity rather than timing of or change in maternal depressive symptoms accounted for the observed effect. In the present sample, maternal depressive symptoms were not associated with positive emotionality in the offspring (p > .05). Findings suggest a relation between maternal depressive symptoms and decreased offspring fearfulness in a low-risk community sample of young children. PMID:24400706

  16. Quantitative relationship of sick building syndrome symptoms with ventilation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mirer, Anna G.; Mendell, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Data from published studies were combined and analyzed to develop best-fit equations and curves quantifying the change in sick building syndrome (SBS) symptom prevalence in office workers with ventilation rate. For each study, slopes were calculated, representing the fractional change in SBS symptom prevalence per unit change in ventilation rate per person. Values of ventilation rate, associated with each value of slope, were also calculated. Linear regression equations were fitted to the resulting data points, after weighting by study size. Integration of the slope-ventilation rate equations yielded curves of relative SBS symptom prevalence versus ventilation rate. Based on these analyses, as the ventilation rate drops from 10 to 5 L/s-person, relative SBS symptom prevalence increases approximately 23percent (12percent to 32percent), and as ventilation rate increases from 10 to 25 L/s-person, relative prevalence decreases approximately 29percent (15percent to 42percent). Variations in SBS symptom types, building features, and outdoor air quality may cause the relationship ofSBS symptom prevalence with ventilation rate in specific situations to differ from the average relationship predicted in this paper.

  17. Effect of bilastine upon the ocular symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Bartra, J; Mullol, J; Montoro, J; Jáuregui, I; del Cuvillos, A; Dávila, I; Ferrer, M; Sastre, J; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    Ocular symptoms often accompany allergic rhinitis and can be as or even more bothersome for the patient than the actual nasal symptoms. Ocular manifestations of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis may result from both direct allergen-mediated mast cell stimulation on the surface of the eye and naso-ocular reflexes--histamine being one of the mediators of symptoms onset. An H1 antihistamine would be the first line treatment for allergic conjunctivitis. Since allergic conjunctivitis is always (or almost always) accompanied by nasal symptoms, a second-generation H1 antihistamine administered via oral route is the drug of choice for jointly managing both the nasal and the ocular symptoms--minimizing the impact of the effects inherent to first-generation H, antihistamine, including particularly drowsiness. Bilastine is a new H1 antihistamine with an excellent safety profile, developed for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria, with potency similar to that of cetirizine and desloratadine, and superior to that of fexofenadine. This new drug has been shown to be effective in controlling the ocular symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. PMID:22185047

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms among commercial fishers in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, Hester J; Loomis, Dana; McDonald, Mary Anne; Kucera, Kristen; Marshall, Stephen; Li, Leiming

    2004-09-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms were reported by 215 fishermen followed at 6-month intervals over 18 months. Exposure information was collected through field observation and in-depth ethnographic interviews allowing potential ergonomic stressors to be identified and catalogued by task and stage of work. Symptoms causing work interference in the last 12 months were reported by 38.5% of the cohort at baseline. Low back symptoms were the most common cause of work impairment (17.7%), followed equally by pain in the hands or wrists and shoulders (7%). Symptoms in any body region were more likely to have been reported among individuals who did not fish full-time and those who worked other jobs part or all year had significantly lower symptom prevalence; both likely reflect a healthy worker effect. A number of ergonomic stressors were identified in all stages of fishing with exposure variability dictated by some unpredictable factors such as weather; but also by type of boat, gear, crew size, and level of experience. Reducing ergonomic exposures associated with work among these traditional workers is important, regardless of whether they directly cause or contribute to their musculoskeletal symptoms, or aggravate existing pathology. PMID:15246880

  19. Fertilizer use and self-reported respiratory and dermal symptoms among tree planters.

    PubMed

    Gorman Ng, Melanie; Stjernberg, Ernst; Koehoorn, Mieke; Demers, Paul A; Winters, Meghan; Davies, Hugh W

    2013-01-01

    In British Columbia, some tree planting operations require workers to fertilize planted seedlings with polymer-coated nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (NPK) fertilizers. This study examined respiratory and dermal health associated with fertilizer exposure among tree planters. We interviewed 223 tree planters using an adapted version of the American Thoracic Society questionnaire supplemented with questions on dermal health. Subjects were grouped by categories of increasing duration of exposure, with workers who had not worked with fertilizer as a reference group. The relationship between exposure and reported work-related symptoms was analyzed using logistic regression, adjusting for age, cumulative tobacco cigarettes smoked, marijuana smoking status, sex, and exposure to abrasive spruce needles. An elevated odds ratio was seen for work-related cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, nosebleed, and skin rash in the highest exposure group (>37 days of fertilizer use in the past 2 years) but was significant only for phlegm (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-11.70). Trends of increasing odds ratios with increasing exposure were seen for cough, phlegm, nasal symptoms, and skin rash. The results suggest a weak association between respiratory and dermal irritation and work with fertilizer. Results highlight the need for further exposure monitoring within the tree planting industry, and larger studies to investigate the relationship between work with fertilizer and respiratory and dermal health symptoms. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene for the following free supplemental resource: a PDF file containing a respiratory and dermal health questionnaire.]. PMID:23194098

  20. Tuberculous meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Yagi, Hideki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early-stage TB meningitis has no specific symptoms in patients, potentially leading to delayed diagnosis and consequently worsening prognosis. The authors present the fatal case with a delayed diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. The medical records, operative reports, and radiographical imaging studies of a single patient were retrospectively reviewed. A 77-year-old man who underwent thoracic intramedullary hemangioblastoma resection for 2 times. The postoperative course was uneventful, but 1.5 months after surgery, the patient suffered from dementia with memory loss and diminished motivation and speech in the absence of a fever. No abnormalities were detected on blood test, brain computed tomography and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. A sputum sample was negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) In-Tube Test and the tuberculin skin test was also negative. The patient was diagnosed with senile dementia by a psychiatrist. However, the patient’s symptoms progressively worsened. Despite the absence of TB meningitis findings, we suspected TB meningitis from the patient’s history, and administered a four-drug regimen. However the patient died 29 days after admission, subsequently M. tuberculosis was detected in the CSF sample. This case is a rare case of TB meningitis initially mistaken for dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. Symptoms of dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection should first be suspected as one of TB meningitis, even if the tests for meningitis are negative. We propose that anti-tuberculosis therapy should be immediately initiated in cases of suspected TB meningitis prior to positive identification on culture.