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Sample records for synchronous impulse reconstruction

  1. Recent MTI experiments using ARL's synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Martone, Anthony; Nguyen, Lam; Stanton, Brian; Ressler, Marc; Wong, David; Koenig, Francois; Tran, Chi; Kirose, Getachew; Smith, Greg; Kappra, Karl; Sichina, Jeffrey

    2008-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has recently developed the ground-based synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar - a low-frequency radar capable of exploiting both a real antenna array and along-track integration techniques to increase the quality of processed imagery. We have already demonstrated the system's utility by imaging static scenes. In this paper we address the moving target indication (MTI) problem, and we demonstrate the impulse-based system's ability to both detect and locate slowly moving targets. We begin by briefly describing the SIRE system itself as well as the system configuration utilized in collecting the MTI data. Next we discuss the signal processing techniques employed to create the final MTI image. Finally, we present processed imagery illustrating the utility of the proposed method.

  2. Change detection using the synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth; Nguyen, Lam; Ressler, Marc; Stanton, Brian; Wong, David; Koenig, Francois; Tran, Chi; Kirose, Getachew; Martone, Anthony; Smith, Greg; Sichina, Jeff; Kappra, Karl

    2008-04-01

    Change detection provides a powerful tool for detecting the introduction of weapons or hazardous materials into an area under surveillance, as demonstrated in past work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory (ARL). This earlier work demonstrated the potential for detecting recently emplaced surface landmines using an X-Band, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor. Recent experiments conducted at ARL have extended these change detection results to imagery collected by the synthetic impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar - a lower-frequency system developed at ARL. In this paper we describe the algorithms adopted for this change detection experiment and present results obtained by applying these algorithms to the SIRE data set. Results indicate the potential for utilizing systems such as the SIRE as surveillance tools.

  3. Suppression of radio frequency inteference (RFI) for synchronous impulse reconstruction ultra-wideband radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2005-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the issues associated with the suppression of radio frequency interference (RFI) for a synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that is currently being designed and built at the Army Research Laboratory. In this effort, we are developing the next version of the UWB radar that can employ inexpensive A/D converters to digitize wideband signals using the equivalent time sampling technique. In this presentation, we provide an analytical model for the signature of the RFI sources that are measured via an equivalent time sampling scheme. This formulation reveals spectral as well as temporal properties of the measured RFI signals that would aid a user in developing sniff (passive) data collection strategies for constructing adaptive digital signal processing methods for suppressing RFI sources.

  4. Real-time imaging implementation of the Army Research Laboratory synchronous impulse reconstruction radar on a graphics processing unit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Song Jun; Nguyen, Lam H.; Shires, Dale R.; Henz, Brian J.

    2009-05-01

    High computing requirements for the synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) radar algorithm present a challenge for near real-time processing, particularly the calculations involved in output image formation. Forming an image requires a large number of parallel and independent floating-point computations. To reduce the processing time and exploit the abundant parallelism of image processing, a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture is considered for the imaging algorithm. Widely available off the shelf, high-end GPUs offer inexpensive technology that exhibits great capacity of computing power in one card. To address the parallel nature of graphics processing, the GPU architecture is designed for high computational throughput realized through multiple computing resources to target data parallel applications. Due to a leveled or in some cases reduced clock frequency in mainstream single and multi-core general-purpose central processing units (CPUs), GPU computing is becoming a competitive option for compute-intensive radar imaging algorithm prototyping. We describe the translation and implementation of the SIRE radar backprojection image formation algorithm on a GPU platform. The programming model for GPU's parallel computing and hardware-specific memory optimizations are discussed in the paper. A considerable level of speedup is available from the GPU implementation resulting in processing at real-time acquisition speeds.

  5. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) forward-looking radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, Marc; Nguyen, Lam; Koenig, Francois; Wong, David; Smith, Gregory

    2007-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has designed and fabricated a forward-looking, impulse-based, ultra-wideband (UWB) imaging radar for detection of concealed targets. This system employs a physical array of 16 receive antennas to provide the necessary aperture for sufficient cross-range resolution in the forward-looking geometry. Each antenna feeds a base-band receiver/digitizer that integrates the data from a number of radar pulses before passing it on to the personal computer (PC) based operator's console and display. The innovative ARL receiver design uses commercially available integrated circuits to provide a low-cost, lightweight digitizing scheme with an effective sampling rate of approximately 8 GHz. The design is extensible to allow for growth in the number of channels used and improvements in integrated circuit performance to eventually meet the expected unmanned ground vehicle combat pace. Down-range resolution is provided by the bandwidth of the transmitted pulse which occupies 300-3000 MHz. Range coverage is designed to be 25 meters with an adjustable start point forward of the vehicle. Modeling studies have shown that a pair of transmitters situated at the two ends of the receive array provides best performance in cross-range resolution. Radar data is continuously collected so that a horizontal two-dimensional synthetic aperture is formed for 3-D image formation. This allows focusing of the data to yield estimates of target height as well as position to tag potential obstacles as being negative (e.g. holes, ditches) or positive (e.g. tree stumps). The forward motion also improves the cross range resolution to targets as their aspect changes.

  6. Impulsive synchronization of networked nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Haibo; Bi, Qinsheng

    2010-06-01

    In this Letter, we investigate the problem of impulsive synchronization of networked multi-agent systems, where each agent can be modeled as an identical nonlinear dynamical system. Firstly, an impulsive control protocol is designed for network with fixed topology based on the local information of agents. Then sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the synchronization of the networked nonlinear dynamical system by using algebraic graph theory and impulsive control theory. Furthermore, how to select the discrete instants and impulsive constants is discussed. The case that the topologies of the networks are switching is also considered. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  7. Interdependencies of Neural Impulse Pattern and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Hans; Postnova, Svetlana; Schneider, Horst

    2008-03-01

    Neuronal synchronization plays a crucial role in many physiological functions such as information binding and wake-sleep transitions as well as in pathophysiological processes like Parkinson's disease and epileptic seizures. The occurrence of synchronized activity is often associated with significant alterations of the neuronal impulse pattern, mostly with a transition from tonic firing to burst discharges. We have used Hodgkin-Huxley type simulations to study how alterations of individual neurons' dynamics influence the synchronization in electrotonic coupled networks. The individual neurons have been tuned from tonic firing to bursting with chaotic dynamics in between. Our results demonstrate that these transitions have significant impact on the neurons' synchronization. Vice versa, the synchronization state can essentially modify the impulse pattern. The most remarkably effects appear when the individual neurons operate in a periodically tonic firing regime close to the transition to chaos.

  8. Obstacle avoidance and concealed target detection using the Army Research Lab ultra-wideband synchronous impulse reconstruction (UWB SIRE) forward imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Wong, David; Ressler, Marc; Koenig, Francois; Stanton, Brian; Smith, Gregory; Sichina, Jeffrey; Kappra, Karl

    2007-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a mission and customer funded exploratory program, has developed a new low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for forward imaging to support the Army's vision of an autonomous navigation system for robotic ground vehicles. These unmanned vehicles, equipped with an array of imaging sensors, will be tasked to help detect man-made obstacles such as concealed targets, enemy minefields, and booby traps, as well as other natural obstacles such as ditches, and bodies of water. The ability of UWB radar technology to help detect concealed objects has been documented in the past and could provide an important obstacle avoidance capability for autonomous navigation systems, which would improve the speed and maneuverability of these vehicles and consequently increase the survivability of the U. S. forces on the battlefield. One of the primary features of the radar is the ability to collect and process data at combat pace in an affordable, compact, and lightweight package. To achieve this, the radar is based on the synchronous impulse reconstruction (SIRE) technique where several relatively slow and inexpensive analog-to-digital (A/D) converters are used to sample the wide bandwidth of the radar signals. We conducted an experiment this winter at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) to support the phenomenological studies of the backscatter from positive and negative obstacles for autonomous robotic vehicle navigation, as well as the detection of concealed targets of interest to the Army. In this paper, we briefly describe the UWB SIRE radar and the test setup in the experiment. We will also describe the signal processing and the forward imaging techniques used in the experiment. Finally, we will present imagery of man-made obstacles such as barriers, concertina wires, and mines.

  9. Adaptive impulsive cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoli; Gan, Luyining; Wu, Zhaoyan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, cluster synchronization in community network with nonidentical nodes is investigated. Through introducing proper adaptive strategy into impulsive control scheme, adaptive impulsive controllers are designed for achieving the cluster synchronization. In this adaptive impulsive control scheme, for any given networks, the impulsive gains can adjust themselves to proper values according to the proposed adaptive strategy when the impulsive intervals are fixed. The impulsive instants can be estimated by solving a sequence of maximum value problems when the impulsive gains are fixed. Both community networks without and with coupling delay are considered. Based on the Lyapunov function method and mathematical analysis technique, two synchronization criteria are derived. Several numerical examples are performed to verify the effectiveness of the derived theoretical results.

  10. Impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyuan; Li, Changpin; Wu, Yujiang

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on impulsive synchronization of fractional Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy complex networks. A novel comparison principle is built for the fractional impulsive system. Then a synchronization criterion is established for the fractional T-S fuzzy complex networks by utilizing the comparison principle. The method is also illustrated by applying the fractional T-S fuzzy Rössler's complex networks. PMID:27586628

  11. Exponential synchronization of coupled switched neural networks with mode-dependent impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Wenbing Zhang; Yang Tang; Qingying Miao; Wei Du

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the synchronization problem of coupled switched neural networks (SNNs) with mode-dependent impulsive effects and time delays. The main feature of mode-dependent impulsive effects is that impulsive effects can exist not only at the instants coinciding with mode switching but also at the instants when there is no system switching. The impulses considered here include those that suppress synchronization or enhance synchronization. Based on switching analysis techniques and the comparison principle, the exponential synchronization criteria are derived for coupled delayed SNNs with mode-dependent impulsive effects. Finally, simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the results. PMID:24808570

  12. Synchronization of Memristor-Based Coupling Recurrent Neural Networks With Time-Varying Delays and Impulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; He, Xing

    2015-12-01

    Synchronization of an array of linearly coupled memristor-based recurrent neural networks with impulses and time-varying delays is investigated in this brief. Based on the Lyapunov function method, an extended Halanay differential inequality and a new delay impulsive differential inequality, some sufficient conditions are derived, which depend on impulsive and coupling delays to guarantee the exponential synchronization of the memristor-based recurrent neural networks. Impulses with and without delay and time-varying delay are considered for modeling the coupled neural networks simultaneously, which renders more practical significance of our current research. Finally, numerical simulations are given to verify the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26054076

  13. Impulsive practical tracking synchronization of networked uncertain Lagrangian systems without and with time-delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mihua; Zhou, Jin; Cai, Jianping

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a procedure for studying tracking synchronization of networked Lagrangian systems via impulsive control, where each agent is allowed to be nonidentical, even uncertain dynamics. Some algebraic criteria for tracking synchronization without and with time-delays are established respectively. It turns out that these criteria can provide a novel impulsive control strategy to synchronize globally networked Lagrangian systems to a given time-varying target trajectory with a desired tracking error bound (called as practical tracking synchronization). A distinctive feature of the developed control strategy is fully to take into account the effects of impulsive constraints, and thereby to yield impulsive synchronization motion of networked Lagrangian systems, provided that each agent instantaneously interacts with its neighbors only at some discrete moments. As a direct application of the theoretical results, practical tracking synchronization of nonidentical 3-DOF mobile robots without and with time-delays is discussed in detail. Simulation results illustrate and visualize the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed control technique.

  14. pth moment exponential stochastic synchronization of coupled memristor-based neural networks with mixed delays via delayed impulsive control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinsong; Cao, Jinde; Qiu, Jianlong

    2015-05-01

    This paper concerns the pth moment synchronization in an array of generally coupled memristor-based neural networks with time-varying discrete delays, unbounded distributed delays, as well as stochastic perturbations. Hybrid controllers are designed to cope with the uncertainties caused by the state-dependent parameters: (a) state feedback controllers combined with delayed impulsive controller; (b) adaptive controller combined with delayed impulsive controller. Based on an impulsive differential inequality, the properties of random variables, the framework of Filippov solution, and Lyapunov functional method, sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee that the considered coupled memristor-based neural networks can be pth moment globally exponentially synchronized onto an isolated node under both of the two classes of hybrid impulsive controllers. Finally, numerical simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:25703512

  15. Impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, A; Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach. The array of neural networks are coupled in a random fashion which is governed by Bernoulli random variable. The aim of this paper is to obtain the synchronization criteria, which is suitable for both exactly known and partly unknown transition probabilities such that the coupled neural network is synchronized with mixed time-delay. The considered impulsive effects can be synchronized at partly unknown transition probabilities. Besides, a multiple integral approach is also proposed to strengthen the Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities. By making use of Kronecker product and some useful integral inequalities, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was designed for handling the coupled neural network with mixed delay and then impulsive synchronization criteria are solvable in a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the theoretical results. PMID:26210982

  16. Exponential Synchronization of Coupled Stochastic Memristor-Based Neural Networks With Time-Varying Probabilistic Delay Coupling and Impulsive Delay.

    PubMed

    Bao, Haibo; Park, Ju H; Cao, Jinde

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the exponential synchronization of coupled stochastic memristor-based neural networks with probabilistic time-varying delay coupling and time-varying impulsive delay. There is one probabilistic transmittal delay in the delayed coupling that is translated by a Bernoulli stochastic variable satisfying a conditional probability distribution. The disturbance is described by a Wiener process. Based on Lyapunov functions, Halanay inequality, and linear matrix inequalities, sufficient conditions that depend on the probability distribution of the delay coupling and the impulsive delay were obtained. Numerical simulations are used to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results. PMID:26485723

  17. Tomographic reconstruction of indoor spatial temperature distributions using room impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleisteiner, M.; Barth, M.; Raabe, A.

    2016-03-01

    Temperature can be estimated by acoustic travel time measurements along known sound paths. By using a multitude of known sound paths in combination with a tomographic reconstruction technique a spatial and temporal resolution of the temperature field can be achieved. Based on it, this article focuses on an experimental method in order to determine the spatially differentiated development of room temperature with only one loudspeaker and one microphone. The theory of geometrical room acoustics is being used to identify sound paths under consideration of reflections. The travel time along a specific sound path is derived from the room impulse response. Temporal variances in room impulse response can be attributed primarily to a change in air temperature and airflow. It is shown that in the absence of airflow a 3D acoustic monitoring of the room temperature can be realized with a fairly limited use of hardware.

  18. Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikovsky, Arkady; Rosenblum, Michael; Kurths, Jürgen

    2003-04-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. Synchronization Without Formulae: 2. Basic notions: the self-sustained oscillator and its phase; 3. Synchronization of a periodic oscillator by external force; 4. Synchronization of two and many oscillators; 5. Synchronization of chaotic systems; 6. Detecting synchronization in experiments; Part II. Phase Locking and Frequency Entrainment: 7. Synchronization of periodic oscillators by periodic external action; 8. Mutual synchronization of two interacting periodic oscillators; 9. Synchronization in the presence of noise; 10. Phase synchronization of chaotic systems; 11. Synchronization in oscillatory media; 12. Populations of globally coupled oscillators; Part III. Synchronization of Chaotic Systems: 13. Complete synchronization I: basic concepts; 14. Complete synchronization II: generalizations and complex systems; 15. Synchronization of complex dynamics by external forces; Appendix 1. Discovery of synchronization by Christiaan Huygens; Appendix 2. Instantaneous phase and frequency of a signal; References; Index.

  19. Where the ocean influences the impulse response and its effect on synchronous changes of acoustic travel time.

    PubMed

    Spiesberger, John L

    2011-12-01

    In 1983, sounds at 133 Hz, 0.06 s resolution were transmitted in the Pacific for five days at 2 min intervals over 3709 km between bottom-mounted instruments maintained with atomic clocks. In 1989, a technique was developed to measure changes in acoustic travel time with an accuracy of 135 microseconds at 2 min intervals for selected windows of travel time within the impulse response. The data have short-lived 1 to 10 ms oscillations of travel time with periods less than a few days. Excluding tidal effects, different windows exhibited significant synchronized changes in travel time for periods shorter than 10 h. In the 1980s, this phenomenon was not understood because internal waves have correlation lengths of a few kilometers which are smaller than the way sound was thought to sample the ocean along well-separated and distinct rays corresponding to different windows. The paradox's resolution comes from modern theories that replace the ray-picture with finite wavelength representations that predict sound can be influenced in the upper ocean over horizontal scales such as 20 km or more. Thus, different windows are influenced by the same short-scale fluctuations of sound speed. This conclusion is supported by the data and numerical simulations of the impulse response. PMID:22225021

  20. Application of damage detection methods using passive reconstruction of impulse response functions.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, J D; Zhu, X; Lanza di Scalea, F

    2015-02-28

    In structural health monitoring (SHM), using only the existing noise has long been an attractive goal. The advances in understanding cross-correlations in ambient noise in the past decade, as well as new understanding in damage indication and other advanced signal processing methods, have continued to drive new research into passive SHM systems. Because passive systems take advantage of the existing noise mechanisms in a structure, offshore wind turbines are a particularly attractive application due to the noise created from the various aerodynamic and wave loading conditions. Two damage detection methods using a passively reconstructed impulse response function, or Green's function, are presented. Damage detection is first studied using the reciprocity of the impulse response functions, where damage introduces new nonlinearities that break down the similarity in the causal and anticausal wave components. Damage detection and localization are then studied using a matched-field processing technique that aims to spatially locate sources that identify a change in the structure. Results from experiments conducted on an aluminium plate and wind turbine blade with simulated damage are also presented. PMID:25583863

  1. Impulse response characterization of breast tomosynthesis reconstruction with parallel imaging configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balla, Apuroop; Zhou, Weihua; Chen, Ying

    2010-04-01

    Early detection, diagnosis, and suitable treatment are known to significantly improve the chance of survival for breast cancer (BC) patients. To date, the most cost effective method for screening and early detection is mammography, which is also the tool that has demonstrated its ability to reduce BC mortality. Tomosynthesis is an emerging technology that offers an alternative to conventional two-dimensional mammography. Tomosynthesis produces three-dimensional (volumetric) images of the breast that may be superior to planar imaging due to improved visualization. In this paper we examined the effect of varying the number of projections (N) and total view angle (VA) on the shift-and-add (SAA), back projection (BP) and filtered back projection (FBP) image reconstruction response characterized by impulse response (IR) simulations. IR data were generated by simulating the projection images of a very thin wire, using various combinations of VA and N. Results suggested that BP and FBP performed better for in-plane performance than that of SAA. With bigger number of projection images, the investigated reconstruction algorithms performed the best by obtaining sharper in-focus IR with simulated parallel imaging configurations.

  2. Are executive function and impulsivity antipodes? A conceptual reconstruction with special reference to addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Mueller, E. Terry; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although there is considerable interest in how either executive function (EF) or impulsivity relate to addiction, there is little apparent overlap between these research areas. Objectives The present paper aims to determine if components of these two constructs are conceptual antipodes—widely separated on a shared continuum. Methods EFs and impulsivities were compared and contrasted. Specifically, the definitions of the components of EF and impulsivity, the methods used to measure the various components, the populations of drug users that show deficits in these components, and the neural substrates of these components were compared and contrasted. Results Each component of impulsivity had an antipode in EF. EF, however, covered a wider range of phenomena, including compulsivity. Conclusions Impulsivity functions as an antipode of certain components of EF. Recognition of the relationship between EF and impulsivity may inform the scientific inquiry of behavioral problems such as addiction. Other theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:22441659

  3. Sensing through the wall imaging using the Army Research Lab ultra-wideband synchronous impulse reconstruction (UWB SIRE) radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Lam; Ressler, Marc; Sichina, Jeffrey

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), as part of a mission and customer funded exploratory program, has developed a new low-frequency, ultra-wideband (UWB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The radar is capable of penetrating enclosed areas (buildings) and generating SAR imagery. This supports the U.S. Army's need for intelligence on the configuration, content, and human presence inside these enclosed areas. The radar system is mounted on a ground based vehicle traveling along the road and is configured with an array of antennas pointing toward the enclosed areas of interest. This paper will describe an experiment conducted recently at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. In this paper we briefly describe the UWB SIRE radar and the test setup in the experiment. We will also describe the signal processing and the image techniques used to produce the SAR imagery. Finally, we will present SAR imagery of the building and its internal structure from different viewing directions.

  4. Reconstruction of complex networks with delays and noise perturbation based on generalized outer synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiang; Chen, Shihua; Lu, Jun-an; Ning, Di

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes an approach to identify the topological structure and unknown system parameters of a weighted complex dynamical network with delay and noise perturbation. Based on the Barbalat-type invariance principle for stochastic differential equations, an effective adaptive feedback technique with an updated law is developed to realize generalized outer synchronization. The unknown topological structure and parameters are identified simultaneously through the established technique. The weight configuration matrix was found to be unnecessarily symmetric. Numerical examples are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results.

  5. Instantaneous Impulses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    2000-01-01

    Describes an experiment that extends Newton's instantaneous-impulse method of orbital analysis to a graphical method of orbit determination. Discusses the experiment's usefulness for teaching both horizontal projectile motion and instantaneous impulse. (WRM)

  6. Synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON): A statistical model based iterative image reconstruction method to eliminate limited-view artifacts and to mitigate the temporal-average artifacts in time-resolved CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Yinsheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In x-ray computed tomography (CT), a violation of the Tuy data sufficiency condition leads to limited-view artifacts. In some applications, it is desirable to use data corresponding to a narrow temporal window to reconstruct images with reduced temporal-average artifacts. However, the need to reduce temporal-average artifacts in practice may result in a violation of the Tuy condition and thus undesirable limited-view artifacts. In this paper, the authors present a new iterative reconstruction method, synchronized multiartifact reduction with tomographic reconstruction (SMART-RECON), to eliminate limited-view artifacts using data acquired within an ultranarrow temporal window that severely violates the Tuy condition. Methods: In time-resolved contrast enhanced CT acquisitions, image contrast dynamically changes during data acquisition. Each image reconstructed from data acquired in a given temporal window represents one time frame and can be denoted as an image vector. Conventionally, each individual time frame is reconstructed independently. In this paper, all image frames are grouped into a spatial–temporal image matrix and are reconstructed together. Rather than the spatial and/or temporal smoothing regularizers commonly used in iterative image reconstruction, the nuclear norm of the spatial–temporal image matrix is used in SMART-RECON to regularize the reconstruction of all image time frames. This regularizer exploits the low-dimensional structure of the spatial–temporal image matrix to mitigate limited-view artifacts when an ultranarrow temporal window is desired in some applications to reduce temporal-average artifacts. Both numerical simulations in two dimensional image slices with known ground truth and in vivo human subject data acquired in a contrast enhanced cone beam CT exam have been used to validate the proposed SMART-RECON algorithm and to demonstrate the initial performance of the algorithm. Reconstruction errors and temporal fidelity

  7. Synchronization tracking in pulse position modulation receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    1987-01-01

    A clock pulse generator for decoding pulse position modulation in an optical communication receiver is synchronized by a delay tracking loop which multiplies impulses of a data pulse by the square wave clock pulses from the generator to produce positive impulses when the clock pulse is of one level, and negative impulses when the clock pulse is of another level. A delay tracking loop integrates the impulses and produces an error signal that adjusts the delay so the clock pulses will be synchronized with data pulses. A dead-time tau sub d is provided between data pulses of an interval tau sub p in the data pulse period tau. When synchronized, the average number of positive impulses integrated will equal the average number of negative impulses over the continuous stream of data pulses.

  8. A novel method for the line-of-response and time-of-flight reconstruction in TOF-PET detectors based on a library of synchronized model signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskal, P.; Zoń, N.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Gajos, A.; Kamińska, D.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kowalski, P.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Rundel, O.; Salabura, P.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Zieliński, M.

    2015-03-01

    A novel method of hit time and hit position reconstruction in scintillator detectors is described. The method is based on comparison of detector signals with results stored in a library of synchronized model signals registered for a set of well-defined positions of scintillation points. The hit position is reconstructed as the one corresponding to the signal from the library which is most similar to the measurement signal. The time of the interaction is determined as a relative time between the measured signal and the most similar one in the library. A degree of similarity of measured and model signals is defined as the distance between points representing the measurement- and model-signal in the multi-dimensional measurement space. Novelty of the method lies also in the proposed way of synchronization of model signals enabling direct determination of the difference between time-of-flights (TOF) of annihilation quanta from the annihilation point to the detectors. The introduced method was validated using experimental data obtained by means of the double strip prototype of the J-PET detector and 22Na sodium isotope as a source of annihilation gamma quanta. The detector was built out from plastic scintillator strips with dimensions of 5 mm×19 mm×300 mm, optically connected at both sides to photomultipliers, from which signals were sampled by means of the Serial Data Analyzer. Using the introduced method, the spatial and TOF resolution of about 1.3 cm (σ) and 125 ps (σ) were established, respectively.

  9. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind and matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.

  10. Synchronicity from synchronized chaos

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Duane, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related events mysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical) correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind andmore » matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1) synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2) the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable) interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.« less

  11. Origin of the sinus impulse.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, R B; Boineau, J P; Bromberg, B I

    1996-03-01

    It was generally accepted that the site of normal impulse origin within the atria was a single static focus within the sinus node. This review will examine how this model of impulse origin came about and has evolved. Early on, conflicting data suggested that the sinus node focus was not static and changed with interventions that changed heart rate, such as vagal stimulation. Furthermore, even with removal of the sinus node, a normal atrial rhythm was generated. High-resolution mapping in humans and dogs showed that the initiation of the impulse was dynamic and could be multicentric, with more than one focus initiating a single beat. Shifts in the site of origin correlated with changes in rate and were consistent with P wave changes routinely observed in the standard ECG. These studies suggested multiple pacemakers were responsible for impulse initiation. However, it was not clear how these widespread pacemakers were coordinated to function synchronously. Recent canine data suggest that the node may be partially insulated from the surrounding atrium, resulting in multicentric origin starting from a single site within the node. What has evolved is a model of impulse origin with a sinus node having discrete exit sites and a dominant pacemaker within the node that can shift to other nodal sites. Complex and changing conduction out of the node, coupled with extranodal pacemakers, which can assume dominance over the node, combine with the autonomic nervous system to control heart rate and the pattern of impulse origin within the atria. PMID:8867301

  12. Attenuation of front-end reflections in an impulse radar using high-speed switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ressler, Marc A.; Smith, Gregory D.

    2011-06-01

    Pulse reflection between front-end components is a common problem for impulse radar systems. Such reflections arise because radio frequency components are rarely impedance-matched over an ultra-wide bandwidth. Any mismatch between components causes a portion of the impulse to reflect within the radar front-end. If the reflection couples into the transmit antenna, the radar emits an unintended, delayed and distorted replica of the intended radar transmission. These undesired transmissions reflect from the radar environment, produce echoes in the radar image, and generate false alarms in the vicinity of actual targets. The proposed solution for eliminating these echoes, without redesigning the transmit antenna, is to dissipate pulse reflections in a matched load before they are emitted. A high-speed switch directs the desired pulse to the antenna and redirects the undesired reflection from the antenna to a matched load. The Synchronous Impulse Reconstruction (SIRE) radar developed by the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is the case-study. This paper reviews the current front-end design, provides a recent radar image which displays the aforementioned echoes, and describes the switch-cable-load circuit solution for eliminating the echoes. The consequences of inserting each portion of the new hardware into the radar front-end are explained. Measurements on the front-end with the high-speed switch show an attenuation of the undesired pulse transmissions of more than 18 dB and an attenuation in the desired pulse transmission of less than 3 dB.

  13. Behavioral components of impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Christoph; Voss, Andreas; Schmitz, Florian; Nuszbaum, Mandy; Tüscher, Oliver; Lieb, Klaus; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Acting in accord with long-term goals requires control of interfering impulses, the success of which depends on several different processes. Using a structural-equation modeling approach, we investigated 5 behavioral components of impulsivity: the control of stimulus interference, proactive interference, and response interference, as well as decisional and motivational impulsivity. Results support the existence of 5 correlated but separable components of impulsive behavior. The present study is the 1st to demonstrate the separability of stimulus and response interference. It also supports the notion that control of response-related interference is not a unitary construct: Response-selection demands were separable from those of withholding or stopping. Relations between behavioral impulsivity components and self-report measures of impulsivity were largely absent. We conclude that as the construct of impulsivity has been extended to describe an increasingly diverse set of phenomena and processes, it has become too broad to be helpful in guiding future research. PMID:23957282

  14. Genetics of impulsive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity, defined as the tendency to act without foresight, comprises a multitude of constructs and is associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Dissecting different aspects of impulsive behaviour and relating these to specific neurobiological circuits would improve our understanding of the etiology of complex behaviours for which impulsivity is key, and advance genetic studies in this behavioural domain. In this review, we will discuss the heritability of some impulsivity constructs and their possible use as endophenotypes (heritable, disease-associated intermediate phenotypes). Several functional genetic variants associated with impulsive behaviour have been identified by the candidate gene approach and re-sequencing, and whole genome strategies can be implemented for discovery of novel rare and common alleles influencing impulsivity. Via deep sequencing an uncommon HTR2B stop codon, common in one population, was discovered, with implications for understanding impulsive behaviour in both humans and rodents and for future gene discovery. PMID:23440466

  15. Impulsive action: emotional impulses and their control

    PubMed Central

    Frijda, Nico H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel theoretical view on impulsive action, integrating thus far separate perspectives on non-reflective action, motivation, emotion regulation, and impulse control. We frame impulsive action in terms of directedness of the individual organism toward, away, or against other givens – toward future states and away from one’s present state. First, appraisal of a perceived or thought-of event or object on occasion, rapidly and without premonition or conscious deliberation, triggers a motive to modify one’s relation to that event or object. Situational specifics of the event as perceived and appraised motivate and guide selection of readiness for a particular kind of purposive action. Second, perception of complex situations can give rise to multiple appraisals, multiple motives, and multiple simultaneous changes in action readiness. Multiple states of action readiness may interact in generating action, by reinforcing or attenuating each other, thereby yielding impulse control. We show how emotion control can itself result from a motive state or state of action readiness. Our view links impulsive action mechanistically to states of action readiness, which is the central feature of what distinguishes one kind of emotion from another. It thus provides a novel theoretical perspective to the somewhat fragmented literature on impulsive action. PMID:24917835

  16. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment. PMID:8997803

  17. Dealing with Impulsivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neidhardt, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A mother recounts her neurologically impaired son's struggles and progress in combating impulsivity in his work and social habits. Now 23 years old, employed full-time, and off medication, the son is still impulsive, has problems with social skills, but has improved his self-image through a photography hobby. (CB)

  18. Impulsiveness in professional fighters.

    PubMed

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Here, the authors investigate the relationship between impulsiveness and exposure to head trauma in a large group of active professional fighters. Fighters tended to report less impulsiveness than did non-fighting control respondents. Overall, greater fight exposure was associated with higher levels of a specific form of impulsiveness, although there were differences between mixed martial arts fighters and boxers. Fight exposure was associated with reduction in volume of certain brain structures, and these changes were also associated with impulsiveness patterns. Longitudinal studies of professional fighters are important to understand the risk for neuropsychiatric problems. PMID:24515676

  19. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario.

  20. Impulse-induced localized control of chaos in starlike networks.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Ricardo; Palmero, Faustino; Cuevas-Maraver, Jesús

    2016-06-01

    Locally decreasing the impulse transmitted by periodic pulses is shown to be a reliable method of taming chaos in starlike networks of dissipative nonlinear oscillators, leading to both synchronous periodic states and equilibria (oscillation death). Specifically, the paradigmatic model of damped kicked rotators is studied in which it is assumed that when the rotators are driven synchronously, i.e., all driving pulses transmit the same impulse, the networks display chaotic dynamics. It is found that the taming effect of decreasing the impulse transmitted by the pulses acting on particular nodes strongly depends on their number and degree of connectivity. A theoretical analysis is given explaining the basic physical mechanism as well as the main features of the chaos-control scenario. PMID:27415258

  1. Pinning impulsive control algorithms for complex network

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wen; Lü, Jinhu; Chen, Shihua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we further investigate the synchronization of complex dynamical network via pinning control in which a selection of nodes are controlled at discrete times. Different from most existing work, the pinning control algorithms utilize only the impulsive signals at discrete time instants, which may greatly improve the communication channel efficiency and reduce control cost. Two classes of algorithms are designed, one for strongly connected complex network and another for non-strongly connected complex network. It is suggested that in the strongly connected network with suitable coupling strength, a single controller at any one of the network's nodes can always pin the network to its homogeneous solution. In the non-strongly connected case, the location and minimum number of nodes needed to pin the network are determined by the Frobenius normal form of the coupling matrix. In addition, the coupling matrix is not necessarily symmetric or irreducible. Illustrative examples are then given to validate the proposed pinning impulsive control algorithms.

  2. Synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A synchronous demodulator includes a switch which is operated in synchronism with an incoming periodic signal and both divides and applies that signal to two signal channels. The two channels each include a network for computing and holding, for a predetermined length of time, the average signal value on that channel and applies those valves, in the form of two other signals, to the inputs of a differential amplifier. The networks may be R-C networks. The output of the differential amplifier may or may not form the output of the synchronous detector and may or may not be filtered. The output will not include a periodic signal due to the presence of a dc offset. Additionally, the output will not contain any substantial ripple due to periodic components in the input signal. In a somewhat more complex version, containing twice the structural components of the above synchronous demodulator with a more complex switching mechanism, essentially all ripple due to periodic components in the input signal are eliminated.

  3. Synchronizing Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ying; Gall, Walter; Nabb, Karen Mayumi

    2006-01-01

    "Imagine a tenth of a mile of river front with an unbroken line of trees with fireflies on ever leaf flashing in synchronism. ... Then, if one's imagination is sufficiently vivid, he may form some conception of this amazing spectacle." So wrote the naturalist Hugh Smith. In this article we consider how one might model mathematically the…

  4. Impulsivity and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Zians, Jim; Grant, Igor; Patterson, Thomas L

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between methamphetamine (meth) use and impulsivity in a sample of 385 HIV-negative heterosexually identified meth users. Participants who scored highest on a self-report measure of impulsivity were compared with those who scored lower in terms of background characteristics, meth use patterns, use of alcohol and other illicit drugs, sexual risk behavior, and psychiatric health variables. Methamphetamine users in the high impulsivity group were younger, less educated, used larger quantities of meth, were more likely to be binge users, had a larger number of sexual partners, engaged in more unprotected vaginal and oral sex, and scored higher on the Beck Depression Inventory as compared with those in the low impulsivity group. In a logistic regression analysis, Beck depression was the factor that best distinguished between meth users who scored high and those who scored low on impulsivity. Neurophysiological pathways that may underlie the relationship between impulsivity and meth use are discussed. PMID:16135337

  5. Channel Modeling and Time Delay Estimation for Clock Synchronization Among Seaweb Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, P; Rice, J; Clark, G A

    2012-07-08

    From simulations, tracking of the impulse response is feasible. Potential to benefit other functions such as ranging between two nodes. Potential to combine the features of different protocols to create a new and more realistic clock-synchronization protocol.

  6. Optically measured explosive impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew M.; McNesby, Kevin L.

    2014-06-01

    An experimental technique is investigated to optically measure the explosive impulse produced by laboratory-scale spherical charges detonated in air. Explosive impulse has historically been calculated from temporal pressure measurements obtained via piezoelectric transducers. The presented technique instead combines schlieren flow visualization and high-speed digital imaging to optically measure explosive impulse. Prior to an explosive event, schlieren system calibration is performed using known light-ray refractions and resulting digital image intensities. Explosive charges are detonated in the test section of a schlieren system and imaged by a high-speed digital camera in pseudo-streak mode. Spatiotemporal schlieren intensity maps are converted using an Abel deconvolution, Rankine-Hugoniot jump equations, ideal gas law, triangular temperature decay profile, and Schardin's standard photometric technique to yield spatiotemporal pressure maps. Temporal integration of individual pixel pressure profiles over the positive pressure duration of the shock wave yields the explosive impulse generated for a given radial standoff. Calculated explosive impulses are shown to exhibit good agreement between optically derived values and pencil gage pressure transducers.

  7. Impulse-Momentum Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengrant, David

    2011-01-01

    Multiple representations are a valuable tool to help students learn and understand physics concepts. Furthermore, representations help students learn how to think and act like real scientists.2 These representations include: pictures, free-body diagrams,3 energy bar charts,4 electrical circuits, and, more recently, computer simulations and animations.5 However, instructors have limited choices when they want to help their students understand impulse and momentum. One of the only available options is the impulse-momentum bar chart.6 The bar charts can effectively show the magnitude of the momentum as well as help students understand conservation of momentum, but they do not easily show the actual direction. This paper highlights a new representation instructors can use to help their students with momentum and impulse—the impulse-momentum diagram (IMD).

  8. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Stanley K.

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  9. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOEpatents

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  10. Relativistic impulse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Stanley M

    2011-08-01

    Classical electrodynamics has some annoying rough edges. The self-energy of charges is infinite without a cutoff. The calculation of relativistic trajectories is difficult because of retardation and an average radiation reaction term. By reconceptuallizing electrodynamics in terms of exchanges of impulses rather than describing it by forces and potentials, we eliminate these problems. A fully relativistic theory using photonlike null impulses is developed. Numerical calculations for a two-body, one-impulse-in-transit model are discussed. A simple relationship between center-of-mass scattering angle and angular momentum was found. It reproduces the Rutherford cross section at low velocities and agrees with the leading term of relativistic distinguishable-particle quantum cross sections (Møller, Mott) when the distance of closest approach is larger than the Compton wavelength of the particle. Magnetism emerges as a consequence of viewing retarded and advanced interactions from the vantage point of an instantaneous radius vector. Radiation reaction becomes the local conservation of energy-momentum between the radiating particle and the emitted impulse. A net action is defined that could be used in developing quantum dynamics without potentials. A reinterpretation of Newton's laws extends them to relativistic motion. PMID:21929132

  11. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-10-10

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes. 9 figs.

  12. Impulse radar studfinder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    An impulse radar studfinder propagates electromagnetic pulses and detects reflected pulses from a fixed range. Unmodulated pulses, about 200 ps wide, are emitted. A large number of reflected pulses are sampled and averaged. Background reflections are subtracted. Reflections from wall studs or other hidden objects are detected and displayed using light emitting diodes.

  13. Annoyance of helicopter impulsive noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dambra, F.; Damongeot, A.

    1978-01-01

    Psychoacoustic studies of helicopter impulsive noise were conducted in order to qualify additional annoyance due to this feature and to develop physical impulsiveness descriptors to develop impulsivity correction methods. The currently proposed descriptors and methods of impulsiveness correction are compared using a multilinear regression analysis technique. It is shown that the presently recommended descriptor and correction method provides the best correlation with the subjective evaluations of real helicopter impulsive noises. The equipment necessary for data processing in order to apply the correction method is discussed.

  14. Impact of corrosive mediums on mechanical properties of amorphous alloys under influence of impulse current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluzhnikova, Tatyana; Fedorov, Victor; Sidorov, Sergey; Gubanova, Victoria; Pluzhnikov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Impact of corrosion mediums (solutions of NACE and H2SO4, HCl) on σ - ɛ graphs for alloys has been studied at synchronous passage of electrical current impulses accompanying momentary dropping of mechanical stress. Relations between dropping of mechanical stress and density of impulse electrical current have been established in studied materials. Structural and morphological condition of surface has been researched after influence of corrosive mediums with different concentration in studied alloys.

  15. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  16. Development of Network Synchronization Predicts Language Abilities.

    PubMed

    Doesburg, Sam M; Tingling, Keriann; MacDonald, Matt J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations among brain areas is understood to mediate network communication supporting cognition, perception, and language. How task-dependent synchronization during word production develops throughout childhood and adolescence, as well as how such network coherence is related to the development of language abilities, remains poorly understood. To address this, we recorded magnetoencephalography while 73 participants aged 4-18 years performed a verb generation task. Atlas-guided source reconstruction was performed, and phase synchronization among regions was calculated. Task-dependent increases in synchronization were observed in the theta, alpha, and beta frequency ranges, and network synchronization differences were observed between age groups. Task-dependent synchronization was strongest in the theta band, as were differences between age groups. Network topologies were calculated for brain regions associated with verb generation and were significantly associated with both age and language abilities. These findings establish the maturational trajectory of network synchronization underlying expressive language abilities throughout childhood and adolescence and provide the first evidence for an association between large-scale neurophysiological network synchronization and individual differences in the development of language abilities. PMID:26401810

  17. Dissociated neural substrates underlying impulsive choice and impulsive action.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Chen, Chunhui; Cai, Ying; Li, Siyao; Zhao, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Zhang, Hanqi; Liu, Jing; Chen, Chuansheng; Xue, Gui

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing consensus that impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that comprises several components such as impulsive choice and impulsive action. Although impulsive choice and impulsive action have been shown to be the common characteristics of some impulsivity-related psychiatric disorders, surprisingly few studies have directly compared their neural correlates and addressed the question whether they involve common or distinct neural correlates. We addressed this important empirical gap using an individual differences approach that could characterize the functional relevance of neural networks in behaviors. A large sample (n=227) of college students was tested with the delay discounting and stop-signal tasks, and their performances were correlated with the neuroanatomical (gray matter volume, GMV) and functional (resting-state functional connectivity, RSFC) measures, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and 10-fold cross-validation. Behavioral results showed no significant correlation between impulsive choice measured by discounting rate (k) and impulsive action measured by stop signal reaction time (SSRT). The GMVs in the right frontal pole (FP) and left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) were predictive of k, but not SSRT. In contrast, the GMVs in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), supplementary motor area (SMA), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) could predict individuals' SSRT, but not k. RSFC analysis using the FP and right IFG as seed regions revealed two distinct networks that correspond well to the "waiting" and "stopping" systems, respectively. Furthermore, the RSFC between the FP and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) was predictive of k, whereas the RSFC between the IFG and pre-SMA was predictive of SSRT. These results demonstrate clearly neural dissociations between impulsive choice and impulsive action, provide new insights into the nature of impulsivity, and have implications for impulsivity-related disorders. PMID:27083527

  18. Impulsive Action but Not Impulsive Choice Determines Problem Gambling Severity

    PubMed Central

    Brevers, Damien; Cleeremans, Axel; Verbruggen, Frederick; Bechara, Antoine; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul; Noël, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is a hallmark of problem gambling. However, impulsivity is not a unitary construct and this study investigated the relationship between problem gambling severity and two facets of impulsivity: impulsive action (impaired ability to withhold a motor response) and impulsive choice (abnormal aversion for the delay of reward). Methods The recruitment includes 65 problem gamblers and 35 normal control participants. On the basis of DSM-IV-TR criteria, two groups of gamblers were distinguished: problem gamblers (n = 38) and pathological gamblers (n = 27) with similar durations of gambling practice. Impulsive action was assessed using a response inhibition task (the stop-signal task). Impulsive choice was estimated with the delay-discounting task. Possible confounds (e.g., IQ, mood, ADHD symptoms) were recorded. Results Both problem and pathological gamblers discounted reward at a higher rate than their controls, but only pathological gamblers showed abnormally low performance on the most demanding condition of the stop-signal task. None of the potential confounds covaried with these results. Conclusions These results suggest that, whereas abnormal impulsive choice characterizes all problem gamblers, pathological gamblers' impairments in impulsive action may represent an important developmental pathway of pathological gambling. PMID:23209796

  19. Impulse variability in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Carlton, L G; Kim, K H; Liu, Y T; Newell, K M

    1993-03-01

    An isometric elbow flexion task was used in two experiments that examined the influence of force-production characteristics on impulse variability. Impulse size was held constant while peak force, time to peak force, rate of force, and, hence, the shape of the criterion force-time curve were manipulated. The results indicated that changes in the force-time curve under conditions of equal impulse bring about systematic changes in impulse variability, and this effect is more pronounced for larger impulse conditions. The inability of existing functions to account for the peak force variability findings led to the generation of a new predicted force variability function. The proposed function accounts for changes in the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of peak force, impulse, and rate of force over a range of force-time conditions. PMID:12730039

  20. Impulse Control of Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menaldi, Jose-Luis; Sritharan, S. S.

    2000-11-01

    Impulse control corresponds to forcing the fluid at strategic times where the optimal instances of time as well as the strengths of the control are to be determined by control theory of Navier-Stokes equation. This subject can also be exactly rephrased as an optimal weather prediction problem where the initial data is updated at strategic times (in current variational data assimilation literature in meteorology one obtains the optimal initial data just once). The underlying mathematical structure is precisely resolved with very elegant explanations using infinite dimensional free boundary problems where the boundaries of the free boundary correspond to optimal instances.

  1. Impulsive phase transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Bely-Dubau, Francoise; Brown, John C.; Dulk, George A.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Enome, Shinzo; Gabriel, Alan H.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Melrose, Donald; Neidig, Donald F.

    1986-01-01

    The transport of nonthermal electrons is explored. The thick-target electron beam model, in which electrons are presumed to be accelerated in the corona and typically thermalized primarily in the chromosphere and photosphere, is supported by observations throughout the electromagnetic spectrum. At the highest energies, the anisotropy of gamma-ray emission above 10 MeV clearly indicates that these photons are emitted by anisotropically-directed particles. The timing of this high-energy gamma-radiation with respect to lower-energy hard X-radiation implies that the energetic particles have short life-times. For collisional energy loss, this means that they are stopped in the chromosphere or below. Stereoscopic (two-spacecraft) observations at hard X-ray energies (up to 350 keV) imply that these lower-energy (but certainly nonthermal) electrons are also stopped deep in the chromosphere. Hard X-ray images show that, in spatially resolved flares whose radiation consists of impulsive bursts, the impulsive phase starts with X-radiation that comes mostly from the foot-points of coronal loops whose coronal component is outlined by microwaves.

  2. Teaching about Impulse and Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Bill

    2004-01-01

    This American Association of Physics Teachers/Physics Teaching Resource Agents (APPT/PTRA) spiral-bound manual features labs and demos physics teachers can use to give students hands-on opportunities to learn about impulse and momentum. "Make-and-take activities" include AAPT Apparatus Contest winners "An Air Impulse Rocket," "A Fan Driven…

  3. Nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Khodachenko, G. V.; Mozgrin, D. V.; Fetisov, I. K.; Stepanova, T. V.

    2012-01-15

    Experiments with quasi-steady high-current discharges in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields in various gases (Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and SF{sub 6}) and gas mixtures (Ar/SF{sub 6} and Ar/O{sub 2}) at pressures from 10{sup -3} to 5 Torr in discharge systems with different configurations of electric and magnetic fields revealed a specific type of stable low-voltage discharge that does not transform into an arc. This type of discharge came to be known as a high-current diffuse discharge and, later, a nonsputtering impulse magnetron discharge. This paper presents results from experimental studies of the plasma parameters (the electron temperature, the plasma density, and the temperature of ions and atoms of the plasma-forming gas) of a high-current low-pressure diffuse discharge in crossed E Multiplication-Sign B fields.

  4. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  5. Synchronizing redundant power oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenson, K. J.

    1969-01-01

    Outputs of oscillators are synchronized by summing the power transformer phase voltages, the summed voltages are applied to the frequency determining inductors of the individual voltage-controlled power oscillators. The beat frequency is eliminated when synchronization is achieved.

  6. Dynamics of Time Delay-Induced Multiple Synchronous Behaviors in Inhibitory Coupled Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huaguang; Zhao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory synapse can induce synchronous behaviors different from the anti-phase synchronous behaviors, which have been reported in recent studies. In the present paper, synchronous behaviors are investigated in the motif model composed of reciprocal inhibitory coupled neurons with endogenous bursting and time delay. When coupling strength is weak, synchronous behavior appears at a single interval of time delay within a bursting period. When coupling strength is strong, multiple synchronous behaviors appear at different intervals of time delay within a bursting period. The different bursting patterns of synchronous behaviors, and time delays and coupling strengths that can induce the synchronous bursting patterns can be well interpreted by the dynamics of the endogenous bursting pattern of isolated neuron, which is acquired by the fast-slow dissection method, combined with the inhibitory coupling current. For an isolated neuron, when a negative impulsive current with suitable strength is applied at different phases of the bursting, multiple different bursting patterns can be induced. For a neuron in the motif, the inhibitory coupling current, of which the application time and strength is modulated by time delay and coupling strength, can cause single or multiple synchronous firing patterns like the negative impulsive current when time delay and coupling strength is suitable. The difference compared to the previously reported multiple synchronous behaviors that appear at time delays wider than a period of the endogenous firing is discussed. The results present novel examples of synchronous behaviors in the neuronal network with inhibitory synapses and provide a reasonable explanation. PMID:26394224

  7. The Recovery of Weak Impulsive Signals Based on Stochastic Resonance and Moving Least Squares Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kuosheng.; Xu, Guanghua.; Liang, Lin.; Tao, Tangfei.; Gu, Fengshou.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test. PMID:25076220

  8. A new automatic synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Malm, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    A phase lock loop automatic synchronizer, PLLS, matches generator speed starting from dead stop to bus frequency, and then locks the phase difference at zero, thereby maintaining zero slip frequency while the generator breaker is being closed to the bus. The significant difference between the PLLS and a conventional automatic synchronizer is that there is no slip frequency difference between generator and bus. The PLL synchronizer is most advantageous when the penstock pressure fluctuates the grid frequency fluctuates, or both. The PLL synchronizer is relatively inexpensive. Hydroplants with multiple units can economically be equipped with a synchronizer for each unit.

  9. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-09-15

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  10. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators.

  11. Comparative Lightcraft Impulse Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Larson, C. W.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2001-11-01

    The impulse coupling coefficients, cm, of two radically different laser propulsion thruster concepts (lightcrafts), each 10 cm in diameter, have been measured under equal conditions using two different test stands. Lightcraft one is of toroidal shape and was provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). A lightcraft of this shape and size has been used in free flight experiments at White Sands Missile Range, NM. Lightcraft two is bell (e.g., a paraboloid) shaped. With this type of lightcraft, the DLR previously conducted preliminary performance experiments, including vertical wire-bound flights in the laboratory. Both test stands were of the pendulum type. Test stand one was provided by the AFRL, and was a "rigid" pendulum, allowing motion in only one degree of freedom. The second test stand, a DLR design, suspended the lightcraft by thin wires and corresponded to a nearly perfect pendulum in the mathematical sense. All experiments employed the DLR electric-beam sustained, pulsed, CO(2) laser with pulse energies up to 400 J. The laser was operated with two configurations: 1) a stable resonator (flat beam profile); and, 2) an unstable resonator (ring shaped beam profile). All experiments were carried out in the open laboratory environment. Propellant, therefore, was either the surrounding air alone, or Delrin as an added solid propellant. For lightcraft one the cm value increased by a factor of three (450 N/MW) by adding Delrin. With lightcraft two, a comparable cm value of 590 N/MW was obtained. This corresponded to a Delrin loss of 60-SO ug/J. Results of cm as a function of the laser pulse energy for the various experimental conditions will be presented.

  12. Dopamine-agonists and impulsivity in Parkinson's disease: impulsive choices vs. impulsive actions.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-06-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 ((15)) O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. PMID:24038587

  13. Synchronizing large systolic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A.L.; Kung, H.T.

    1982-04-01

    Parallel computing structures consist of many processors operating simultaneously. If a concurrent structure is regular, as in the case of systolic array, it may be convenient to think of all processors as operating in lock step. Totally synchronized systems controlled by central clocks are difficult to implement because of the inevitable problem of clock skews and delays. An alternate means of enforcing necessary synchronization is the use of self-timed, asynchronous schemes, at the cost of increased design complexity and hardware cost. Realizing that different circumstances call for different synchronization methods, this paper provides a spectrum of synchronization models; based on the assumptions made for each model, theoretical lower bounds on clock skew are derived, and appropriate or best-possible synchronization schemes for systolic arrays are proposed. This paper represents a first step towards a systematic study of synchronization problems for large systolic arrays.

  14. Synchronization via Hydrodynamic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendelbacher, Franziska; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    An object moving in a viscous fluid creates a flow field that influences the motion of neighboring objects. We review examples from nature in the microscopic world where such hydrodynamic interactions synchronize beating or rotating filaments. Bacteria propel themselves using a bundle of rotating helical filaments called flagella which have to be synchronized in phase. Other micro-organisms are covered with a carpet of smaller filaments called cilia on their surfaces. They beat highly synchronized so that metachronal waves propagate along the cell surfaces. We explore both examples with the help of simple model systems and identify generic properties for observing synchronization by hydrodynamic interactions.

  15. Synchronization of genetic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tianshou; Zhang, Jiajun; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Chen, Luonan

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization of genetic or cellular oscillators is a central topic in understanding the rhythmicity of living organisms at both molecular and cellular levels. Here, we show how a collective rhythm across a population of genetic oscillators through synchronization-induced intercellular communication is achieved, and how an ensemble of independent genetic oscillators is synchronized by a common noisy signaling molecule. Our main purpose is to elucidate various synchronization mechanisms from the viewpoint of dynamics, by investigating the effects of various biologically plausible couplings, several kinds of noise, and external stimuli. To have a comprehensive understanding on the synchronization of genetic oscillators, we consider three classes of genetic oscillators: smooth oscillators (exhibiting sine-like oscillations), relaxation oscillators (displaying jump dynamics), and stochastic oscillators (noise-induced oscillation). For every class, we further study two cases: with intercellular communication (including phase-attractive and repulsive coupling) and without communication between cells. We find that an ensemble of smooth oscillators has different synchronization phenomena from those in the case of relaxation oscillators, where noise plays a different but key role in synchronization. To show differences in synchronization between them, we make comparisons in many aspects. We also show that a population of genetic stochastic oscillators have their own synchronization mechanisms. In addition, we present interesting phenomena, e.g., for relaxation-type stochastic oscillators coupled to a quorum-sensing mechanism, different noise intensities can induce different periodic motions (i.e., inhomogeneous limit cycles).

  16. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-31

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously. PMID:26274420

  17. Transient Uncoupling Induces Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Malte; Mannattil, Manu; Dutta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Sagar; Timme, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Finding conditions that support synchronization is a fertile and active area of research with applications across multiple disciplines. Here we present and analyze a scheme for synchronizing chaotic dynamical systems by transiently uncoupling them. Specifically, systems coupled only in a fraction of their state space may synchronize even if fully coupled they do not. While for many standard systems coupling strengths need to be bounded to ensure synchrony, transient uncoupling removes this bound and thus enables synchronization in an infinite range of effective coupling strengths. The presented coupling scheme therefore opens up the possibility to induce synchrony in (biological or technical) systems whose parameters are fixed and cannot be modified continuously.

  18. Synchronous Energy Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The synchronous technology requirements for large space power systems are summarized. A variety of technology areas including photovoltaics, thermal management, and energy storage, and power management are addressed.

  19. Event-Synchronous Analysis for Connected-Speech Recognition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David Peter

    The motivation for event-synchronous speech analysis originates from linear system theory where the speech-source transfer function is excited by an impulse-like driving function. In speech processing, the impulse response obtained from this linear system contains both semantic information and the vocal tract transfer function. Typically, an estimate of the transfer function is obtained via the spectrum by assuming a short-time stationary signal within some analysis window. However, this spectrum is often distorted by the periodic effects which occur when multiple (pitch) impulses are included in the analysis window. One method to remove these effects would be to deconvolve the excitation function from the speech signal to obtain the transfer function. The more attractive approach is to locate and identify the excitation function and synchronize the analysis frame with it. Event-synchronous analysis differs from pitch -synchronous analysis in that there are many events useful for speech recognition which are not pitch excited. In addition, event-synchronous analysis locates the important boundaries between speech events, such as voiced to unvoiced and silence to burst transitions. In asynchronous processing, an analysis frame which contains portions of two adjacent but dissimilar speech events is often so ambiguous as to distort or mask the important "phonetic" features of both events. Thus event-syncronous processing is employed to obtain an accurate spectral estimate and in turn enhance the estimate of the vocal-tract transfer function. Among the issues which have been addressed in implementing an event-synchronous recognition system are those of developing robust event (pitch, burst, etc.) detectors, synchronous-analysis methodologies, more meaningful feature sets, and dynamic programming algorithms for nonlinear time alignment. An advantage of event-synchronous processing is that the improved representation of the transfer function creates an opportunity for

  20. EEG synchronization and migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Angelini, Leonardo; Pellicoro, Mario; Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2004-03-01

    We investigate phase synchronization in EEG recordings from migraine patients. We use the analytic signal technique, based on the Hilbert transform, and find that migraine brains are characterized by enhanced alpha band phase synchronization in presence of visual stimuli. Our findings show that migraine patients have an overactive regulatory mechanism that renders them more sensitive to external stimuli.

  1. SONET synchronization: What's happening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubbage, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Almost everyone that has heard of SONET knows that the acronym stands for Synchronous Optical NETwork. There has been a host of magazine articles on SONET rings, SONET features, even SONET compatibility with digital radio. What has not been highly publicized is the critical relationship between SONET, network synchronization, and payload jitter. This topic is addressed.

  2. SONET synchronization: What's happening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubbage, Robert W.

    1993-06-01

    Almost everyone that has heard of SONET knows that the acronym stands for Synchronous Optical NETwork. There has been a host of magazine articles on SONET rings, SONET features, even SONET compatibility with digital radio. What has not been highly publicized is the critical relationship between SONET, network synchronization, and payload jitter. This topic is addressed.

  3. Clock recovering characteristics of adaptive finite-impulse-response filters in digital coherent optical receivers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2011-03-14

    We analyze the clock-recovery process based on adaptive finite-impulse-response (FIR) filtering in digital coherent optical receivers. When the clock frequency is synchronized between the transmitter and the receiver, only five taps in half-symbol-spaced FIR filters can adjust the sampling phase of analog-to-digital conversion optimally, enabling bit-error rate performance independent of the initial sampling phase. Even if the clock frequency is not synchronized between them, the clock-frequency misalignment can be adjusted within an appropriate block interval; thus, we can achieve an asynchronous clock mode of operation of digital coherent receivers with block processing of the symbol sequence. PMID:21445201

  4. Children's Help Seeking and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puustinen, Minna; Kokkonen, Marja; Tolvanen, Asko; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between students' (100 children aged 8 to 12) help-seeking behavior and impulsivity. Help-seeking behavior was evaluated using a naturalistic experimental paradigm in which children were placed in a problem-solving situation and had the opportunity to seek help from the experimenter, if…

  5. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  6. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  7. A STUDY OF METHODS OF CONTROLLING IMPULSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WHITESIDE, RAY

    THE PERSON LESS ABLE TO CONTROL HIS IMPULSES IS ALSO APT TO EXHIBIT SOCIALLY DISVALUED BEHAVIOR. VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC FAILURE IS A PARTIAL CONSEQUENCE OF IMPULSIVENESS AND LACK OF SELF-CONTROL. TO INVESTIGATE IMPULSE CONTROL, TWO INSTRUMENTS BELIEVED TO MEASURE ATTRIBUTES OF OPPOSITE POLES OF THIS CONCEPT (SEQUENTIAL TESTS OF EDUCATIONAL…

  8. Characteristics of Impulsive Suicide Attempts and Attempters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Thomas R.; Swann, Alan C.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Examined impulsive suicide attempts within a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts among adolescents and young adults. Impulsive attempts were more likely among those who had been in a physical fight and less likely among those who were depressed. Findings suggest inadequate control of aggressive impulses as a…

  9. Adolescent Impulsivity: Findings from a Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2005-01-01

    Impulsivity is central to several psychopathological states in adolescence. However, there is little consensus concerning the definition of impulsivity and its core dimensions. In response to this lack of consensus, Whiteside and Lynam (2001, "Pers. Individ. Differ." 30, 669-689) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, which is able to…

  10. Carrier synchronization and detection of polyphase signals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Simon, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    Digital communication networks used for the distribution of high-speed digital information are currently the subject of design studies for many civil and military applications. This paper presents results that are useful in such studies as well as in network planning. In particular, the paper is concerned with the problems of carrier synchronization and noisy reference detection of polyphase signals. Reconstruction of coherent references for the detection of polyphase signals is considered and analyzed for three carrier reconstruction loops, namely, Nth power (multiply-and-divide) loops, generalized Costas (I-Q) loops, and extensions of data-aided (modulation wipeoff) loops. General expressions for the error probability are developed when the reconstructed reference signals are noisy.

  11. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  12. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  13. Binary synchronous simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R., III

    1980-01-01

    Flexible simulator for trouble-shooting data transmission system uses binary synchronous communications protocol to produce error-free transmission of data between two points. Protocol may be used to replace display generator or be directly fed to display generator.

  14. Synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Alex; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Kurths, Jurgen; Moreno, Yamir; Zhou, Changsong

    2008-12-01

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understanding synchronization phenomena in natural systems now take advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also take an overview of the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying patterns of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  15. Photoacoustic image reconstruction from ultrasound post-beamformed B-mode image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    A requirement to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) image is to have a synchronized channel data acquisition with laser firing. Unfortunately, most clinical ultrasound (US) systems don't offer an interface to obtain synchronized channel data. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, we propose a PA image reconstruction algorithm utilizing US B-mode image, which is readily available from clinical scanners. US B-mode image involves a series of signal processing including beamforming, followed by envelope detection, and end with log compression. Yet, it will be defocused when PA signals are input due to incorrect delay function. Our approach is to reverse the order of image processing steps and recover the original US post-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data, in which a synthetic aperture based PA rebeamforming algorithm can be further applied. Taking B-mode image as the input, we firstly recovered US postbeamformed RF data by applying log decompression and convoluting an acoustic impulse response to combine carrier frequency information. Then, the US post-beamformed RF data is utilized as pre-beamformed RF data for the adaptive PA beamforming algorithm, and the new delay function is applied by taking into account that the focus depth in US beamforming is at the half depth of the PA case. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated through simulation, and was experimentally demonstrated using an acoustic point source. The point source was successfully beamformed from a US B-mode image, and the full with at the half maximum of the point improved 3.97 times. Comparing this result to the ground-truth reconstruction using channel data, the FWHM was slightly degraded with 1.28 times caused by information loss during envelope detection and convolution of the RF information.

  16. Avoided Crossing and Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekii, T.; Shibahashi, H.

    2013-12-01

    We examine avoided crossing of stellar pulsations in the nonlinear regime, where synchronization may occur, based on a simple model of weakly coupled van der Pol oscillators with close frequencies. For this simple case, avoided crossing is unaffected in the sense that there is a frequency difference between the symmetric and antisymmetric modes, but as a result of synchronization, unlike the linear oscillations case, the system can vibrate in only one of the modes.

  17. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  18. A Neurogenetic Approach to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Congdon, Eliza; Canli, Turhan

    2008-01-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and multidimensional trait that is of interest to both personality psychologists and to clinicians. For investigators seeking the biological basis of personality traits, the use of neuroimaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revolutionized personality psychology in less than a decade. Now, another revolution is under way, and it originates from molecular biology. Specifically, new findings in molecular genetics, the detailed mapping and the study of the function of genes, have shown that individual differences in personality traits can be related to individual differences within specific genes. In this article, we will review the current state of the field with respect to the neural and genetic basis of trait impulsivity. PMID:19012655

  19. Angular Synchronization by Eigenvectors and Semidefinite Programming

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The angular synchronization problem is to obtain an accurate estimation (up to a constant additive phase) for a set of unknown angles θ1, …, θn from m noisy measurements of their offsets θi − θj mod 2π. Of particular interest is angle recovery in the presence of many outlier measurements that are uniformly distributed in [0, 2π) and carry no information on the true offsets. We introduce an efficient recovery algorithm for the unknown angles from the top eigenvector of a specially designed Hermitian matrix. The eigenvector method is extremely stable and succeeds even when the number of outliers is exceedingly large. For example, we successfully estimate n = 400 angles from a full set of m=(4002) offset measurements of which 90% are outliers in less than a second on a commercial laptop. The performance of the method is analyzed using random matrix theory and information theory. We discuss the relation of the synchronization problem to the combinatorial optimization problem Max-2-Lin mod L and present a semidefinite relaxation for angle recovery, drawing similarities with the Goemans-Williamson algorithm for finding the maximum cut in a weighted graph. We present extensions of the eigenvector method to other synchronization problems that involve different group structures and their applications, such as the time synchronization problem in distributed networks and the surface reconstruction problems in computer vision and optics. PMID:21179593

  20. Fast Burst Synchronization for Power Line Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumiller, Gerd; Lampe, Lutz

    2007-12-01

    Fast burst synchronization is an important requirement in asynchronous communication networks, where devices transmit short data packets in an unscheduled fashion. Such a synchronization is typically achieved by means of a preamble sent in front of the data packet. In this paper, we study fast burst synchronization for power line communication (PLC) systems operating below 500 kHz and transmitting data rates of up to about 500 kbps as it is typical in various PLC network applications. In particular, we are concerned with the receiver processing of the preamble signal and the actual design of preambles suitable for fast burst synchronization in such PLC systems. Our approach is comprehensive in that it takes into account the most distinctive characteristics of the power line channel, which are multipath propagation, highly varying path loss, and disturbance by impulse noise, as well as important practical constraints, especially the need for spectral shaping of the preamble signal and fast adjustment of the automatic gain control (AGC). In fact, we regard the explicit incorporation of these various requirements into the preamble design as the main contribution of this work. We devise an optimization criterion and a stochastic algorithm to search for suitable preamble sequences. A comprehensive performance comparison of a designed and two conventional preambles shows that the designed sequence is superior in terms of (a) fast burst synchronization in various transmission environments, (b) fast AGC adjustment, and (c) compliance of its spectrum with the spectral mask applied to the data transmit signal.

  1. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  2. Synchronization in Superradiant Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Kevin; Weiner, Joshua; Bohnet, Justin; Thompson, James

    2015-05-01

    Superradiant (or bad-cavity) lasers based on highly forbidden transitions in cold atoms are expected to produce light with coherence properties exceeding the state-of-the-art, finding applications in optical atomic clocks and other precision measurements. We study experimentally and theoretically the response of a superradiant Raman laser to an applied coherent drive. We observe two forms of synchronization (injection locking) between the superradiant ensemble and the applied drive: one attractive and one repulsive in nature, in which the atomic spin degrees of freedom play a crucial role in determining the dynamics. Additionally, we present time dynamics and steady state behavior of two interacting superradiant lasers. Understanding the synchronization physics of superradiant lasers could inform future implementations with technologically relevant phase noise properties and explorations for understanding synchronization in a quantum regime.

  3. Multiple Modes of Impulsivity in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nombela, Cristina; Rittman, Timothy; Robbins, Trevor W.; Rowe, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive problems are a major factor determining quality of life of patients with Parkinson's disease. These include deficits in inhibitory control, ranging from subclinical alterations in decision-making to severe impulse control disorders. Based on preclinical studies, we proposed that Parkinson's disease does not cause a unified disorder of inhibitory control, but rather a set of impulsivity factors with distinct psychological profiles, anatomy and pharmacology. We assessed a broad set of measures of the cognitive, behavioural and temperamental/trait aspects of impulsivity. Sixty adults, including 30 idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (Hoehn and Yahr stage I–III) and 30 healthy controls, completed a neuropsychological battery, objective behavioural measures and self-report questionnaires. Univariate analyses of variance confirmed group differences in nine out of eleven metrics. We then used factor analysis (principal components method) to identify the structure of impulsivity in Parkinson's disease. Four principal factors were identified, consistent with four different mechanisms of impulsivity, explaining 60% of variance. The factors were related to (1) tests of response conflict, interference and self assessment of impulsive behaviours on the Barrett Impulsivity Scale, (2) tests of motor inhibitory control, and the self-report behavioural approach system, (3) time estimation and delay aversion, and (4) reflection in hypothetical scenarios including temporal discounting. The different test profiles of these four factors were consistent with human and comparative studies of the pharmacology and functional anatomy of impulsivity. Relationships between each factor and clinical and demographic features were examined by regression against factor loadings. Levodopa dose equivalent was associated only with factors (2) and (3). The results confirm that impulsivity is common in Parkinson's disease, even in the absence of impulse control disorders, and that it is

  4. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  5. Cotton buds, momentum, and impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Ed; Nuñez, Jover; Guirit, Alfredo; van Huis, Cor

    2000-01-01

    Here is a simple experiment demonstrating impulse and momentum that was picked up from a Japanese presenter at a physics teacher conference held in Cebu City. We have not been able to trace the experiment farther and have never seen it in print. After student-author Nuñez demonstrated it during an exam on conducting demonstrations, we converted the qualitative idea into a quanitative experiment and even discovered some possibilities for student research. The lab is also suitable as homework, since it uses universally available "equipment" — cotton buds (swabs), drinking straws, and a ruler.

  6. Effect of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on the spinal reflex apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarotskiy, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    In view of the fact that the convergence effect of vestibular impulsation may both stimulate and inhibit intra and intersystemic coordination of physiological processes, an attempt was made to define the physiological effect on the spinal reflex apparatus of the convergence of cervicolabyrinthine impulsation on a model of the unconditioned motor reflex as a mechanism of the common final pathway conditioning the formation and realization of a focused beneficial result of human motor activities. More than 100 persons subjected to rolling effect and angular acceleration during complexly coordinated muscular loading were divided according to typical variants of the functional structure of the patella reflex in an experiment requiring 30 rapid counterclockwise head revolutions at 2/sec with synchronous recording of a 20 item series of patella reflex acts. A knee jerk coefficient was used in calculations. In 85 percent of the cases 2 patellar reflexograms show typical braking and release of knee reflex and 1 shows an extreme local variant. The diagnostic and prognostic value of these tests is suggested for determining adaptive possibilities of functional systems in respect to acceleration and proprioceptive stimuli.

  7. Impaired Decisional Impulsivity in Pathological Videogamers

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Michael A.; Worbe, Yulia; Bolton, Sorcha; Harrison, Neil A.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Voon, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort. Methods Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice), and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task). We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment. Results In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time. Conclusions We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management. PMID:24146789

  8. The annoyance of impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    A total of 96 impulsive and non-impulsive sounds were rated for annoyance by 10 subjects. The signals had the same amplitude spectrum with a maximum frequency of 4.75 kHz. By changing the phase of the spectral components different levels of impulsivity were obtained. The signals had coefficients of impulsivity of 10,8, 7,9, and -0.2 respectively. Further, signals had intensity levels 89 and 95 dBA, pulse repetition rates 10 and 20 Hz, and half the signals had pink noise added at a level 12 dBA lower than the level of the sound. The significant results were: The four females and six male subjects rated the impulsive sounds respectively 3.7 dB less annoying and 2.6 dB more annoying than the non-impulsive sounds. Overall, impulsivity had no effect. The hish pulse repetition rate increased annoyance by 2.2 dB. Addition of pink noise increased annoyance of the non-impulsive sounds 1.2 dB, but decreased the annoyance of the impulsive sounds 0.5 dB.

  9. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1997-02-04

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition. 14 figs.

  10. Implementing the Synchronous Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    This commentary describes an action research project conducted by selected staff at the Northern Valley Regional High School District in New Jersey. The project focused on the idea of developing a synchronous classroom to provide world language learning opportunities to students. Relevant research is provided as are ideas regarding logistics and…

  11. Synchronized time stamp support

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalkowski, J.

    1994-02-16

    New software has been added to IOC core to maintain time stamps. The new software has the ability to maintain time stamps over all IOCs on a network. The purpose of this paper is to explain how EPICS will synchronize the time stamps. In addition, this paper will explain how to configure and use the new EPICS time stamp support software.

  12. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  13. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  14. Reliability and validity of measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action in smokers trying to quit.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Danielle E; Bold, Krysten W; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G; Chapman, Gretchen B

    2016-04-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are nonsmokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to postquit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from prequit to 3 weeks' postquit was moderated by achievement of 7-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least 1 day in the first 2 weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified 7-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks' postquit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of intercorrelation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26751623

  15. Reliability and Validity of Measures of Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action in Smokers Trying to Quit

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Danielle E.; Bold, Krysten W.; Minami, Haruka; Yeh, Vivian M.; Rutten, Emily; Nadkarni, Shruti G.; Chapman, Gretchen B.

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional research suggests that smokers are more impulsive than are non-smokers, but few studies have examined relations between impulsiveness and later success in quitting smoking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and predictive validity of facets of impulsiveness in adult smokers trying to quit. Baseline behavioral measures of impulsive choice (assessed with a delay discounting task) and impulsive action (assessed with a measure of behavioral disinhibition) were used as predictors of smoking cessation success over 12 weeks. The sample included 116 adult (18 years old or older) daily smokers from central New Jersey. Impulsive choice, impulsive action, and self-reported impulsiveness were not significantly related to one another at baseline. Impulsive choice had high test-retest reliability from pre- to post-quit, whereas impulsive action was less stable. Test-retest reliability from pre-quit to three weeks post-quit was moderated by achievement of seven-day abstinence. Baseline impulsive action was significantly negatively related to quitting for at least one day in the first two weeks of a quit attempt and of prolonged abstinence (no relapse over the next 10 weeks). Baseline impulsive choice was robustly associated with biochemically verified seven-day point-prevalence abstinence 12 weeks post-quit, such that those with lower delay discounting were more likely to achieve abstinence. Facets of impulsiveness appear to function largely independently in adult smokers, as indicated by their lack of inter-correlation, differential stability, and differential relations with abstinence. Impulsive action may impede initial quitting, whereas impulsive choice may be an obstacle to maintaining lasting abstinence. PMID:26751623

  16. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1989-05-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip where one of the rolls is heated to a very high temperature. Steam generated by contact with the hot roll expands and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is much lower than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Tests have been completed that elucidate the unique displacement mechanism of water removal in the impulse drying process. A pilot roll press has been designed, installed and used to examine impulse drying under conditions that simulate commercial press conditions. The results of this earlier work have been reported in three previous reports. During this report period October, 1987 to September, 1988, the pilot press was equipped with a second impulse drying roll to facilitate studies of surface uniformity in impulse dried paper. Studies have also been completed which examine the origins of sheet delamination that has been been encountered during impulse drying of certain heavyweight paper grades, and which investigate approaches to prevent delamination in these grades. Finally, an experimental plan has been formalized to examine impulse drying of lightweight grades which are candidates for early commercialization. 7 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Impulsivity and Psychoeducational Intervention in Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ronald T.

    1980-01-01

    Two psychoeducational procedures were investigated for their effects on impulsivity in 120 hyperactive children in two groups: those receiving stimulant drug therapy and those not receiving stimulant drug therapy. Results indicated that the use of psychoeducational treatment approaches are of value in altering the impulsive responses of…

  18. Covert Suicidal Impulses in Maternally Deprived Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Gilbert; Lubin, Harriet

    This paper discusses the development of suicidal impulses in children who have lost their mothers due to abandonment or death. The paper is based on two psychoanalytic case studies, in which the children were in therapy when the first suicidal impulses emerged. A pattern is described in which bereaved children's intense wishes to have their…

  19. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  20. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  1. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2014-01-07

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  2. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  3. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  4. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  5. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  6. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  7. Helicopter impulsive noise - Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanisms is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanisms of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory/experiment are suggested.

  8. Helicopter impulsive noise: Theoretical and experimental status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental status of helicopter impulsive noise is reviewed. The two major source mechanisms of helicopter impulsive noise are addressed: high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction impulsive noise. A thorough physical explanation of both generating mechanism is presented together with model and full-scale measurements of the phenomena. Current theoretical prediction methods are compared with experimental findings of isolated rotor tests. The noise generating mechanism of high speed impulsive noise are fairly well understood - theory and experiment compare nicely over Mach number ranges typical of today's helicopters. For the case of blade-vortex interaction noise, understanding of noise generating mechanisms and theoretical comparison with experiment are less satisfactory. Several methods for improving theory-experiment are suggested.

  9. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  10. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  11. Synchronization and hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Thomas; Qian, Bian; Breuer, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Cilia and flagella commonly beat in a coordinated manner. Examples include the flagella that Volvox colonies use to move, the cilia that sweep foreign particles up out of the human airway, and the nodal cilia that set up the flow that determines the left-right axis in developing vertebrate embryos. In this talk we present an experimental study of how hydrodynamic interactions can lead to coordination in a simple idealized system: two nearby paddles driven with fixed torques in a highly viscous fluid. The paddles attain a synchronized state in which they rotate together with a phase difference of 90 degrees. We discuss how synchronization depends on system parameters and present numerical calculations using the method of regularized stokeslets.

  12. Synchronously deployable truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor); Mikulas, M., Jr. (Inventor); Wallsom, E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A collapsible-expandable truss structure, including first and second spaced surface truss layers having an attached core layer is described. The surface truss layers are composed of a plurality of linear struts arranged in multiple triangular configurations. Each linear strut is hinged at the center and hinge connected at each end to a nodular joint. A passive spring serves as the expansion force to move the folded struts from a stowed collapsed position to a deployed operative final truss configuration. A damper controls the rate of spring expansion for the synchronized deployment of the truss as the folded configuration is released for deployment by the restrain belts. The truss is synchronously extended under the control of motor driven spools.

  13. Synchronous manifestations of 160-min pulsations of the ground pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V.; Miroshnichenko, L.; Samsonov, S.; Skryabin, N.

    The oscillations of ground pressure with a period of sim 160 min in December 2003 and March 2004 relatively to the zero meridian are studied using 5-min data of 4 stations Moskow Yakutsk Apatity and Tixie separated in longitude The choice of time is caused by the fact that in December the territory of Russia is the nearest to the direction to the Galaxy center under such a choice of the reper point through the Earth The most removal of the zero meridian from this direction is realized in March If we suppose that 160-min pulsations arrive from the Galaxy center then they synchronously manifest themselves most of all on the territory of Russia only in December As the analysis has shown really in December the mentioned oscillations are synchronously manifested in Moscow Yakutsk Apatity and Tixie mainly in the form of packets quanta in 2-5 impulses The mean amplitude of synchronous ground pressure variations on the territory of Russia is approx 0 0115 mb During other seasons the synchronism is observed considerably worse The manifestation of oscillations in the form of packets is also observed worse The authors suppose that 160-min pulsations of the ground pressure are not related to pulsations of the Sun s brightness The the most favorable time for their observations coincides with the moments of appearance of the stations near the direction to the Galaxy center

  14. Solar impulsive energetic electron events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linghua

    The Sun is capable of accelerating ions from ~ tens of keV up to tens of GeV and electrons from ~ tens of eV up to hundreds of MeVs in transient events such as flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The energized particles escaping into the interplanetary medium are referred to as Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events. The great majority of SEP events are impulsive SEP events that are dominated by ~1-100 keV electrons and ~MeV/nucleon ion emissions, with enhanced 3 He/ 4 He ratios up to 10 4 times the coronal values (also called electron/ 3 He-rich SEP events). This thesis is focused on solar impulsive energetic electron events, the electron part of impulsive SEP events, using electron observations from the 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument (3DP) on the WIND spacecraft near the Earth. First, I present the first comprehensive statistical study of solar energetic electron events over almost one solar cycle. I find that the occurrence rate of solar electron events shows a strong solar-cycle variation; after correction for the background effect, the estimated occurrence frequency exhibits a good power-law distribution, and the estimated occurrence rate near the Earth is ~1000/year at solar maximum and ~30/year at solar minimum for the instrumental sensitivity (~2.9×10^-4 (cm 2 s str eV) -1 for the 40 keV channel) of WIND/3DP, about one order of magnitude larger than the observed occurrence rate. Solar energetic electron events have a one-to-one association with type III radio bursts and a poor association with flares, but a close association with 3 He- rich ion emissions. These 3 He-rich electron events also have a poor association with flares but a close (~ 60%) association with west-limb CMEs. Then I present two case studies: one investigating the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and type III radio emissions, and the second studying the temporal relationship between solar impulsive electrons and 3 He- rich ions. For both

  15. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-11-01

    From unicellular organisms as small as a few microns to the largest vertebrates on earth we find groups of beating flagella or cilia that exhibit striking spatio-temporal organization. This may take the form of precise frequency and phase locking as frequently found in the swimming of green algae, or beating with long-wavelength phase modulations known as metachronal waves, seen in ciliates and in our respiratory systems. The remarkable similarity in the underlying molecular structure of flagella across the whole eukaryotic world leads naturally to the hypothesis that a similarly universal mechanism might be responsible for synchronization. Although this mechanism is poorly understood, one appealing hypothesis is that it results from hydrodynamic interactions between flagella. In this talk I will describe a synthesis of recent experimental and theoretical studies of this issue that have provided the strongest evidence to date for the hydrodynamic origin of flagellar synchronization. At the unicellular level this includes studies of the beating of the two flagella of the wild type unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in their native state and under conditions of regrowth following autotomy, and of the flagellar dominance mutant ptx1, which displays unusual anti-phase synchronization. Analysis of the related multicellular organism Volvox carteri shows it to be an ideal model organism for the study of metachronal waves. Supported by BBSRC, EPSRC, ERC, and The Wellcome Trust.

  16. Superinsulator and quantum synchronization.

    SciTech Connect

    Vinokur, V. M.; Baturina, T. I.; Fistul, M. V.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Baklanov, M. R.; Strunk, C.; Materials Science Division; Inst. Semiconductor Physics; Univ. Regensburg; Ruhr-Univ. Bochum; IMEC

    2008-04-01

    Synchronized oscillators are ubiquitous in nature, and synchronization plays a key part in various classical and quantum phenomena. Several experiments have shown that in thin superconducting films, disorder enforces the droplet-like electronic texture 'superconducting islands immersed into a normal matrix' and that tuning disorder drives the system from superconducting to insulating behavior. In the vicinity of the transition, a distinct state forms: a Cooper-pair insulator, with thermally activated conductivity. It results from synchronization of the phase of the superconducting order parameter at the islands across the whole system. Here we show that at a certain finite temperature, a Cooper-pair insulator undergoes a transition to a superinsulating state with infinite resistance. We present experimental evidence of this transition in titanium nitride films and show that the superinsulating state is dual to the superconducting state: it is destroyed by a sufficiently strong critical magnetic field, and breaks down at some critical voltage that is analogous to the critical current in superconductors.

  17. Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-06-01

    An emergency response to a disaster is complex, requiring the rapid integration, coordination, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and non-governmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions into a unified community response. For example, a community’s response actions to a fixed site hazardous materials incident could occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Response actions are directed and controlled by local governments and agencies situated withinmore » the response area, as well as by state and federal operaticns centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protective action decision-making process is greatly compressed. The response community must carefully plan and coordinate response operations in order to have confidence that they will be effectively implemented when faced with the potentially catastrophic nature of such releases. A graphical depiction of the entire response process via an emergency response synchronization matrix is an effective tool in optimizing the planning, exercising, and implementation of emergency plans. This system—based approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time in relation to hazard actions. It provides the opportunity to make real—time adjustments as necessary for maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. A response must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization.« less

  18. Digital Synchronizer without Metastability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simle, Robert M.; Cavazos, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed design for a digital synchronizing circuit would eliminate metastability that plagues flip-flop circuits in digital input/output interfaces. This metastability is associated with sampling, by use of flip-flops, of an external signal that is asynchronous with a clock signal that drives the flip-flops: it is a temporary flip-flop failure that can occur when a rising or falling edge of an asynchronous signal occurs during the setup and/or hold time of a flip-flop. The proposed design calls for (1) use of a clock frequency greater than the frequency of the asynchronous signal, (2) use of flip-flop asynchronous preset or clear signals for the asynchronous input, (3) use of a clock asynchronous recovery delay with pulse width discriminator, and (4) tying the data inputs to constant logic levels to obtain (5) two half-rate synchronous partial signals - one for the falling and one for the rising edge. Inasmuch as the flip-flop data inputs would be permanently tied to constant logic levels, setup and hold times would not be violated. The half-rate partial signals would be recombined to construct a signal that would replicate the original asynchronous signal at its original rate but would be synchronous with the clock signal.

  19. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D.; Levine, Joel D.; Schwartz, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian ‘clock’). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day–night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the ‘group’ level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature. PMID:23825203

  20. Phase synchronization of instrumental music signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2014-06-01

    Signal analysis is one of the finest scientific techniques in communication theory. Some quantitative and qualitative measures describe the pattern of a music signal, vary from one to another. Same musical recital, when played by different instrumentalists, generates different types of music patterns. The reason behind various patterns is the psycho-acoustic measures - Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm, varies in each time. However, the psycho-acoustic study of the music signals does not reveal any idea about the similarity between the signals. For such cases, study of synchronization of long-term nonlinear dynamics may provide effective results. In this context, phase synchronization (PS) is one of the measures to show synchronization between two non-identical signals. In fact, it is very critical to investigate any other kind of synchronization for experimental condition, because those are completely non identical signals. Also, there exists equivalence between the phases and the distances of the diagonal line in Recurrence plot (RP) of the signals, which is quantifiable by the recurrence quantification measure τ-recurrence rate. This paper considers two nonlinear music signals based on same raga played by two eminent sitar instrumentalists as two non-identical sources. The psycho-acoustic study shows how the Dynamics, Timber, Tonality and Rhythm vary for the two music signals. Then, long term analysis in the form of phase space reconstruction is performed, which reveals the chaotic phase spaces for both the signals. From the RP of both the phase spaces, τ-recurrence rate is calculated. Finally by the correlation of normalized tau-recurrence rate of their 3D phase spaces and the PS of the two music signals has been established. The numerical results well support the analysis.

  1. An underwater chaotic lidar sensor based on synchronized blue laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.; Dunn, Kaitlin J.; Bollt, Erik M.; Cochenour, Brandon; Jemison, William D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel chaotic lidar system designed for underwater impulse response measurements. The system uses two recently introduced, low-cost, commercially available 462 nm multimode InGaN laser diodes, which are synchronized by a bi-directional optical link. This synchronization results in a noise-like chaotic intensity modulation with over 1 GHz bandwidth and strong modulation depth. An advantage of this approach is its simple transmitter architecture, which uses no electrical signal generator, electro-optic modulator, or optical frequency doubler.

  2. Optimal phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Shigefumi; Arai, Kensuke; Galán, Roberto F.; Nakao, Hiroya

    2011-07-01

    We consider optimization of phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of noninteracting limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson impulsive signals. The optimal functional shape for sufficiently weak signals is sinusoidal, but can differ for stronger signals. By solving the Euler-Lagrange equation associated with the minimization of the Lyapunov exponent characterizing synchronization efficiency, the optimal phase response curve is obtained. We show that the optimal shape mutates from a sinusoid to a sawtooth as the constraint on its squared amplitude is varied.

  3. Noise-Induced Synchronization among Sub-RF CMOS Analog Oscillators for Skew-Free Clock Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utagawa, Akira; Asai, Tetsuya; Hirose, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    We present on-chip oscillator arrays synchronized by random noises, aiming at skew-free clock distribution on synchronous digital systems. Nakao et al. recently reported that independent neural oscillators can be synchronized by applying temporal random impulses to the oscillators [1], [2]. We regard neural oscillators as independent clock sources on LSIs; i. e., clock sources are distributed on LSIs, and they are forced to synchronize through the use of random noises. We designed neuron-based clock generators operating at sub-RF region (<1GHz) by modifying the original neuron model to a new model that is suitable for CMOS implementation with 0.25-μm CMOS parameters. Through circuit simulations, we demonstrate that i) the clock generators are certainly synchronized by pseudo-random noises and ii) clock generators exhibited phase-locked oscillations even if they had small device mismatches.

  4. Religiosity and Impulsivity in Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Caribé, André C.; Rocha, Marlos Fernando Vasconcelos; Junior, Davi Félix Martins; Studart, Paula; Quarantini, Lucas C.; Guerreiro, Nicolau; Miranda-Scippa, Ângela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between religiosity and impulsivity in patients with mental illness who had attempted suicide and in healthy individuals. This is a cross-sectional study that included 61 healthy individuals and 93 patients. The instruments used were a sociodemographic data questionnaire, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the Duke University Religion Index. The healthy individuals presented higher scores in the religiosity domains (organizational, p = 0.028; non-organizational, p = 0.000; intrinsic, p = 0.000). The patients presented higher scores in the impulsivity dimensions (attentional, p = 0.000; motor, p = 0.000; absence of planning, p = 0.000). In the patient group, intrinsic religiosity had a significant inverse relationship with total impulsivity (p = 0.023), attentional (p = 0.010), and absence of planning (p = 0.007), even after controlling for sociodemographic variables. Healthy individuals were more religious and less impulsive than patients. The relationship between religiosity, impulsiveness, and mental illness could be bidirectional; that is, just as mental illness might impair religious involvement, religiosity could diminish the expression of mental illness and impulsive behaviors. PMID:26020819

  5. Impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts in patients treated for alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar, Marcin; Ilgen, Mark A.; Czyz, Ewa; Strobbe, Stephen; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Glass, Jennifer; Brower, Kirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Suicidal behavior has been recognized as an increasing problem among alcohol-dependent subjects. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of impulsive and non-impulsive suicide attempts among a treated population of alcohol-dependent patients. Methods A total of 154 patients with alcohol dependence consecutively admitted for addiction treatment participated in the study. Suicidal behavior was assessed together with severity of alcohol dependence, childhood abuse, impulsivity, and family history. A stop-signal procedure was used as a behavioral measure of impulsivity. Results and conclusions Lifetime suicide attempts were reported by 43% of patients in alcohol treatment; of which 62% were impulsive. Compared to patients without a suicide attempt, those with a non-impulsive attempt were more likely to have a history of sexual abuse (OR = 7.17), a family history of suicide (OR = 4.09), and higher scores on a personality measure of impulsiveness (OR = 2.27). The only significant factor that distinguished patients with impulsive suicide attempts from patients without a suicide attempt and from patients with a non-impulsive suicide attempt was a higher level of behavioral impulsivity (OR = 1.84 – 2.42). Limitations Retrospective self-report of suicide attempts and family history. Lack of diagnostic measure. PMID:18835498

  6. Norepinephrine and impulsivity: Effects of acute yohimbine

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Alan C.; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D.; Cox, Blake; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rapid-response impulsivity, characterized by inability to withhold response to a stimulus until it is adequately appraised, is associated with risky behavior and may be increased in a state-dependent manner by norepinephrine. Objective We assessed effects of yohimbine, which increases norepinephrine release by blocking alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors, on plasma catecholamine metabolites, blood pressure, subjective symptoms, and laboratory-measured rapid-response impulsivity. Methods Subjects were twenty-three healthy controls recruited from the community, with normal physical examination and ECG, and negative history for hypertension, cardiovascular illness, and Axis I or II disorder. Blood pressure, pulse, and behavioral measures were obtained before and periodically after 0.4 mg/kg oral yohimbine or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolites of norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MHPG; vanillylmandelic acid, VMA) and dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Rapid-response impulsivity was measured by commission errors and reaction times on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT), a continuous performance test designed to measure impulsivity and attention. Results Yohimbine increased plasma MHPG and VMA but not HVA. Yohimbine increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. On the IMT, yohimbine increased impulsive errors and impulsive response bias and accelerated reaction times. Yohimbine-associated increase in plasma MHPG correlated with increased impulsive response rates. Time courses varied; effects on blood pressure generally preceded those on metabolites and test performance. Conclusions These effects are consistent with increased rapid-response impulsivity after pharmacological noradrenergic stimulation in healthy controls. Labile noradrenergic responses, or increased sensitivity to norepinephrine, may increase risk for impulsive

  7. Psychosocial predictors of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, Andrzej; Klimkiewicz, Anna; Mika, Katarzyna; Bugaj, Marcin; Konopa, Aleksandra; Podgórska, Anna; Brower, Kirk J; Wojnar, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is an important risk factor of severe course of alcohol dependence. However, the significance of environmental determinants of impulsivity has been underestimated. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors increasing the level of impulsivity in alcoholics. Levels of impulsivity were measured in 304 alcohol-dependent patients. The stop-signal task was used to assess behavioral impulsivity, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, to measure global and cognitive impulsivity. Correlations between impulsivity and psychosocial variables were examined. A significant association between level of impulsivity and severity of psychopathological symptoms was observed. Patients who reported childhood sexual or physical abuse, lower social support, and more severe course of alcohol dependence were more impulsive, especially in the cognitive domain. When entered into a linear regression analysis model, severity of alcohol dependence, psychopathology, and childhood physical abuse remained significant. These results suggest that psychosocial variables are important factors associated with high levels of impulsivity in alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:23274294

  8. Penile Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Christopher J.; Chim, Harvey; Tang, Jennifer C.; Monstrey, Stan J.; Mardini, Samir

    2011-01-01

    A variety of surgical options exists for penile reconstruction. The key to success of therapy is holistic management of the patient, with attention to the psychological aspects of treatment. In this article, we review reconstructive modalities for various types of penile defects inclusive of partial and total defects as well as the buried penis, and also describe recent basic science advances, which may promise new options for penile reconstruction. PMID:22851914

  9. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Joutsa, Juho; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2013-01-01

    Of the patients having Parkinson's disease, up to third encounters some degree of impulse control problems and one out of seven suffers from true impulse control disorders such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Dopaminergic drugs used in anti-Parkinson therapy, especially dopamine agonists, increase the risk of these disorders. Impulse control disorders are associated with a relatively more active dopamine-mediated neurotransmission of the mesolimbic and mesocortical system. Discontinuation of dopamine agonist medication can thus be considered as the first line treatment of these disorders. PMID:24397147

  10. Two-impulse reorientation of asymmetric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of a two impulse coning method of reorientation is reported. Maneuver cost, proportional to the product of fuel consumed (total impulse) and time expended during a maneuver is discussed. Assumptions included external impulsive control torques, rigid body spacecraft rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Results are presented in terms of average cost and standard deviation for various maneuver ranges. Costs of individual reorientations are calculated with the computer program included.

  11. Breathing synchronization in interconnected networks

    PubMed Central

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Global synchronization in a complex network of oscillators emerges from the interplay between its topology and the dynamics of the pairwise interactions among its numerous components. When oscillators are spatially separated, however, a time delay appears in the interaction which might obstruct synchronization. Here we study the synchronization properties of interconnected networks of oscillators with a time delay between networks and analyze the dynamics as a function of the couplings and communication lag. We discover a new breathing synchronization regime, where two groups appear in each network synchronized at different frequencies. Each group has a counterpart in the opposite network, one group is in phase and the other in anti-phase with their counterpart. For strong couplings, instead, networks are internally synchronized but a phase shift between them might occur. The implications of our findings on several socio-technical and biological systems are discussed. PMID:24256765

  12. Speed of complex network synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabow, C.; Grosskinsky, S.; Timme, M.

    2011-12-01

    Synchrony is one of the most common dynamical states emerging on networks. The speed of convergence towards synchrony provides a fundamental collective time scale for synchronizing systems. Here we study the asymptotic synchronization times for directed networks with topologies ranging from completely ordered, grid-like, to completely disordered, random, including intermediate, partially disordered topologies. We extend the approach of master stability functions to quantify synchronization times. We find that the synchronization times strongly and systematically depend on the network topology. In particular, at fixed in-degree, stronger topological randomness induces faster synchronization, whereas at fixed path length, synchronization is slowest for intermediate randomness in the small-world regime. Randomly rewiring real-world neural, social and transport networks confirms this picture.

  13. Sun synchronous solar refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The primary goal of this project was to prototype a complete Sun Synchronous Solar Powered Refrigerator. The key element to the technology is the development of the hermetic motor compressor assembly. The prototype was to be developed to either the stage where Polar Products could receive additional venture capital or to the point whereby Polar could use their own capital to manufacture the systems. Our goal was to construct a prototype which would be the next step to a proven and market ready product. To demonstrate the technology under laboratory conditions was a very minimal goal.

  14. Huygens synchronization of two clocks

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Henrique M.; Melo, Luís V.

    2015-01-01

    The synchronization of two pendulum clocks hanging from a wall was first observed by Huygens during the XVII century. This type of synchronization is observed in other areas, and is fundamentally different from the problem of two clocks hanging from a moveable base. We present a model explaining the phase opposition synchronization of two pendulum clocks in those conditions. The predicted behaviour is observed experimentally, validating the model. PMID:26204557

  15. Huygens synchronization of two clocks.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Henrique M; Melo, Luís V

    2015-01-01

    The synchronization of two pendulum clocks hanging from a wall was first observed by Huygens during the XVII century. This type of synchronization is observed in other areas, and is fundamentally different from the problem of two clocks hanging from a moveable base. We present a model explaining the phase opposition synchronization of two pendulum clocks in those conditions. The predicted behaviour is observed experimentally, validating the model. PMID:26204557

  16. Impulsively generated fast coronal pulsations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwin, P. M.; Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid oscillations in the corona are discussed from a theoretical standpoint, developing some previous work on ducted, fast magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium. In the theory, impulsively (e.g., flare) generated mhd (magnetohydrodynamic) waves are ducted by regions of low Alfven speed (high density) such as coronal loops. Wave propagation in such ducts is strongly dispersive and closely akin to the behavior of Love waves in seismology, Pekeris waves in oceanography and guided waves in fiber optics. Such flare-generated magnetoacoustic waves possess distinctive temporal signatures consisting of periodic, quasi-periodic and decay phases. The quasi-periodic phase possesses the strongest amplitudes and the shortest time scales. Time scales are typically of the order of a second for inhomogeneities (coronal loop width) of 1000 km and Alfven speeds of 1000/kms, and pulse duration times are of tens of seconds. Quasi-periodic signatures have been observed in radio wavelengths for over a decade and more recently by SMM. It is hoped that the theoretical ideas outlined may be successfully related to these observations and thus aid the interpretation of oscillatory signatures recorded by SMM. Such signatures may also provide a diagnostic of coronal conditions. New aspects of the ducted mhd waves, for example their behavior in smoothly varying as opposed to tube-like inhomogeneities, are currently under investigation. The theory is not restricted to loops but applied equally to open field regions.

  17. Specific Impulse Definition for Ablative Laser Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Kenneth A.; Gregory, Don A.

    2004-01-01

    The term "specific impulse" is so ingrained in the field of rocket propulsion that it is unlikely that any fundamental argument would be taken seriously for its removal. It is not an ideal measure but it does give an indication of the amount of mass flow (mass loss/time), as in fuel rate, required to produce a measured thrust over some time period This investigation explores the implications of being able to accurately measure the ablation rate and how the language used to describe the specific impulse results may have to change slightly, and recasts the specific impulse as something that is not a time average. It is not currently possible to measure the ablation rate accurately in real time so it is generally just assumed that a constant amount of material will be removed for each laser pulse delivered The specific impulse dependence on the ablation rate is determined here as a correction to the classical textbook definition.

  18. Penile reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Garaffa, Giulio; Sansalone, Salvatore; Ralph, David J

    2013-01-01

    During the most recent years, a variety of new techniques of penile reconstruction have been described in the literature. This paper focuses on the most recent advances in male genital reconstruction after trauma, excision of benign and malignant disease, in gender reassignment surgery and aphallia with emphasis on surgical technique, cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:22426595

  19. Image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2006-04-05

    We give an overview of the role of Physics in Medicine andBiology in development of tomographic reconstruction algorithms. We focuson imaging modalities involving ionizing radiation, CT, PET and SPECT,and cover a wide spectrum of reconstruction problems, starting withclassical 2D tomogra tomography in the 1970s up to 4D and 5D problemsinvolving dynamic imaging of moving organs.

  20. Multi-impulsivity of Japanese patients with eating disorders: primary and secondary impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Nagata, T; Kawarada, Y; Kiriike, N; Iketani, T

    2000-07-17

    Several studies have noted that multi-impulsive bulimia nervosa tends to be refractory to treatment. However, it is not known whether these impulsivities are an expression of more fundamental psychopathology or simply the consequence of chaotic eating behaviors. Studies of the temporal relationship between the onset of eating disorder and the occurrence of impulsive behaviors will facilitate a better understanding of these issues. Subjects consisted of 60 patients with anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R), 62 patients with anorexia nervosa binge-eating/purging type (AN-BP), 114 patients with bulimia nervosa purging type (BN) and 66 control subjects. Impulsive behaviors and childhood traumatic experiences were assessed by self-report questionnaire. Multi-impulsivity (defined by at least three of the following: heavy regular alcohol drinking; suicide attempt; self-mutilation; repeated shoplifting of items other than food; sexual relationships with persons not well known to the subject) was found in 2% of AN-R, 11% of AN-BP, 18% of BN and 2% of control subjects. Eighty percent of BN patients with multi-impulsivity had a history of suicide attempts or self-mutilation history prior to the onset of bulimia nervosa. In BN patients, there tended to be a relationship between childhood parental loss or borderline personality disorder and multi-impulsivity. In conclusion, primary impulsivity (chronological prior occurrence of impulsive behaviors) does exist even in a very different culture, although the number of patients of this type is very limited. PMID:10889288

  1. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Jodi M.; Curran, Max T.; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E.; Evins, A. Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18–25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence. PMID:24988440

  2. Specific Impulse and Mass Flow Rate Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Specific impulse is defined in words in many ways. Very early in any text on rocket propulsion a phrase similar to .specific impulse is the thrust force per unit propellant weight flow per second. will be found.(2) It is only after seeing the mathematics written down does the definition mean something physically to scientists and engineers responsible for either measuring it or using someone.s value for it.

  3. Numerical vorticity creation based on impulse conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, D M; Chorin, A J

    1996-01-01

    The problem of creating solenoidal vortex elements to satisfy no-slip boundary conditions in Lagrangian numerical vortex methods is solved through the use of impulse elements at walls and their subsequent conversion to vortex loops. The algorithm is not uniquely defined, due to the gauge freedom in the definition of impulse; the numerically optimal choice of gauge remains to be determined. Two different choices are discussed, and an application to flow past a sphere is sketched. PMID:11607636

  4. FPGA based fast synchronous serial multi-wire links synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2013-10-01

    The paper debates synchronization method of multi-wire, serial link of constant latency, by means of pseudo-random numbers generators. The solution was designed for various families of FPGA circuits. There were debated synchronization algorithm and functional structure of parameterized transmitter and receiver modules. The modules were realized in VHDL language in a behavioral form.

  5. Enhanced awakening probability of repetitive impulse sounds.

    PubMed

    Vos, Joos; Houben, Mark M J

    2013-09-01

    In the present study relations between the level of impulse sounds and the observed proportion of behaviorally confirmed awakening reactions were determined. The sounds (shooting sounds, bangs produced by door slamming or by container transshipment, aircraft landings) were presented by means of loudspeakers in the bedrooms of 50 volunteers. The fragments for the impulse sounds consisted of single or multiple events. The sounds were presented during a 6-h period that started 75 min after the subjects wanted to sleep. In order to take account of habituation, each subject participated during 18 nights. At equal indoor A-weighted sound exposure levels, the proportion of awakening for the single impulse sounds was equal to that for the aircraft sounds. The proportion of awakening induced by the multiple impulse sounds, however, was significantly higher. For obtaining the same rate of awakening, the sound level of each of the successive impulses in a fragment had to be about 15-25 dB lower than the level of one single impulse. This level difference was largely independent of the degree of habituation. Various explanations for the enhanced awakening probability are discussed. PMID:23967934

  6. Impulse noise generator--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H

    1991-01-01

    In the seventies PFANDER (Pfander, 1975) proposed a screening test with an impulse noise simulator to check the particular responsivity of soldiers on vulnerability of the inner ear concerning the impulse noise-induced hearing loss. According to a system developed at the University of Oldenburg (Germany) (Klug & Radek, 1987), we have constructed an impulse noise generator designed for our specific requirements that will be presented. The simulator consists of an electrical ignited impulse noise spark gap which is supplied by a 3.5 kV high voltage source. At a distance of 1.10 m from the center of the impulse noise spark gap a peak pressure level of 155 dB with a C-Duration (Pfander, 1975) of .2 msec and with the main energy in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 2 kHz was good reproducible. It would be preferable to shift the impulse noise spectrum to lower frequencies but experimental effort has failed so far. PMID:1842469

  7. Digital synchronization and communication techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Information on digital synchronization and communication techniques is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include phase shift keying, modems, characteristics of open loop digital synchronizers, an open loop phase and frequency estimator, and a digital receiver structure using an open loop estimator in a decision directed architecture.

  8. Robust Sliding Window Synchronizer Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, Kue S.; Xiong, Fuqin; Pinchak, Stanley

    2004-01-01

    The development of an advanced robust timing synchronization scheme is crucial for the support of two NASA programs--Advanced Air Transportation Technologies and Aviation Safety. A mobile aeronautical channel is a dynamic channel where various adverse effects--such as Doppler shift, multipath fading, and shadowing due to precipitation, landscape, foliage, and buildings--cause the loss of symbol timing synchronization.

  9. Asynchronous & Synchronous E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    An ongoing debate addresses the usefulness of asynchronous versus synchronous e-learning. "Asynchronous e-learning," commonly facilitated by media such as e-mail and discussion boards, supports work relations among learners and with teachers, even when participants cannot be online at the same time. "Synchronous e-learning," commonly supported by…

  10. "Impulsive" suicide attempts: What do we really mean?

    PubMed

    May, Alexis M; Klonsky, E David

    2016-07-01

    Suicide attempts are often regarded as impulsive acts. However, there is little consensus regarding the definition or clinical characteristics of an "impulsive" attempt. To clarify this issue, we examined 3 indicators of the impulsivity of an attempt: (a) preparation, (b) time contemplating the attempt, and (c) self-report that impulsivity motivated the attempt. We examined relationships among the indicators and their relationship to trait impulsivity and characteristics of the suicide attempt. Adult participants (N = 205) with a history of suicide attempts were administered validated interviews and questionnaires. In general, the 3 attempt impulsivity indicators correlated only moderately with each other and not at all with trait impulsivity or with important characteristics of the attempt (e.g., lethality, preattempt communication, motivations). However, there were 2 exceptions. First, intent to die was inversely related to the 3 attempt impulsivity indicators (rs ranged from -.17 to .45) such that more impulsive attempts were associated with lower intent. Second, self-report that the attempt was motivated by impulsivity was related to 3 facets of trait impulsivity (rs ranged from .16 to .41). These findings suggest that individuals endorsing trait impulsivity are likely to describe their attempts as motivated by impulsivity, regardless of the presence of preparation or prolonged contemplation. Overall, study results suggest that the common conception of a unidimensional impulsive attempt may be inaccurate and that the emphasis on general impulsivity in prevention guidelines should be tempered. Implications for suicide risk assessment and prevention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26653582

  11. Breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    DellaCroce, Frank J; Wolfe, Emily T

    2013-04-01

    As diagnostic technology has progressed and the understanding of the disease process has evolved, the number of mastectomies performed in the United States has increased. Breast reconstructive techniques have commensurately become more sophisticated along the same timeline. The result is that those facing mastectomy have the potential to simultaneously retain physical beauty and wholeness. Only 33% of women who are otherwise candidates for immediate reconstruction at the time of mastectomy choose reconstruction. Patients generally have a high level of satisfaction with the option they choose, contributing to a feeling of overall recovery and physical and emotional wholeness. PMID:23464695

  12. Explosive synchronization is discontinuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, Vladimir; Zou, Yong; Pereira, Tiago

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous explosive is an abrupt transition to collective behavior taking place in heterogeneous networks when the frequencies of the nodes are positively correlated with the node degree. This explosive transition was conjectured to be discontinuous. Indeed, numerical investigations reveal a hysteresis behavior associated with the transition. Here, we analyze explosive synchronization in star graphs. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the transition to (and out of) collective behavior is indeed discontinuous. The discontinuous nature of the transition is related to the nonlinear behavior of the order parameter, which in the thermodynamic limit exhibits multiple fixed points. Moreover, we unravel the hysteresis behavior in terms of the graph parameters. Our numerical results show that finite-size graphs are well described by our predictions.

  13. Twin engine synchronizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobus, J.R.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes an apparatus for synchronizing the speeds of two engines, each having its own throttle level connected by an associated cable to a respective hand throttle lever, comprising moving means carried by the throttle lever of one of the engines for moving the throttle lever of the one engine independently of its associated cable and its respective hand throttle lever to increase or decrease the speed of the one engine until the speed of the one engine matches the speed of the other engine. The moving means moves the throttle lever of the one engine without moving its associated cable or its respective hand throttle lever, and actuating means mounted remote from the throttle lever of the one engine for actuating the moving means.

  14. Synchronization in neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, Jacques J.; Haggerty, John

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents an artificial neural network concept (the Synchronizable Oscillator Networks) where the instants of individual firings in the form of point processes constitute the only form of information transmitted between joining neurons. In the model, neurons fire spontaneously and regularly in the absence of perturbation. When interaction is present, the scheduled firings are advanced or delayed by the firing of neighboring neurons. Networks of such neurons become global oscillators which exhibit multiple synchronizing attractors. From arbitrary initial states, energy minimization learning procedures can make the network converge to oscillatory modes that satisfy multi-dimensional constraints. Such networks can directly represent routing and scheduling problems that consist of ordering sequences of events.

  15. Synchronous anorectal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Balicevic, Drinko; Tomic, Karla; Bekavac-Beslin, Miroslav; Kovacevic, Igor; Mijic, August; Belicza, Mladen; Kruslin, Bozo

    2006-01-01

    Anorectal melanoma is a very rare tumor with poor prognosis. Rectal bleeding is the most frequent symptom and surgical treatment ranges from local excision to radical abdominoperineal resection. We report a case of a 75-years-old male patient who presented with a history of recurrent rectal bleeding, and whose histopathological diagnosis was melanoma. Macroscopically, we found two distinct tumors in anorectal region, 0.5 cm and 1.5 cm from dentate line. The first one was pedunculated, on a thin stalk, measuring 1 cm in greatest diameter, and the second one was sessile and nodular measuring up to 2.8 cm in largest diameter. Microscopic examination and immunohistochemical analysis of both tumors confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma. This case represents multiple synchronous primary melanoma of the anorectal region, with a possibility that one of the lesions is primary melanoma and the second one is a satellite lesion. PMID:16733870

  16. Relations between Reflection-Impulsivity and Behavioral Impulsivity in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victor, James B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Reflection-impulsivity was studied in preschoolers to clarify underlying behavioral dimensions, sex differences, and contribution of activity level, mental age, and socioeconomic status. Analyses replicate a previous finding that dimension of behavioral impulsivity characterizes children with long response latency and high error scores, not…

  17. Impulsive corporal punishment by mothers and antisocial behavior and impulsiveness of children.

    PubMed

    Straus, M A; Mouradian, V E

    1998-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that corporal punishment (CP), such as spanking or slapping a child for purposes of correcting misbehavior, is associated with antisocial behavior (ASB) and impulsiveness by the child. The data were obtained through interviews with a probability sample of 933 mothers of children age 2-14 in two small American cities. Analyses of variance found that the more CP experienced by the child, the greater the tendency for the child to engage in ASB and to act impulsively. These relationships hold even after controlling for family socioeconomic status, the age and sex of the child, nurturance by the mother, and the level of noncorporal interventions by the mother. There were also significant interaction effects of CP with impulsiveness by the mother. When CP was carried out impulsively, it was most strongly related to child impulsiveness and ASB; when CP was done when the mother was under control, the relationship to child behavior problems was reduced but still present. In view of the fact that there is a high risk of losing control when engaged in CP, even by parents who are not usually impulsive, and the fact that impulsive CP is so strongly associated with child behavior problems, the results of this study suggest that CP is an important risk factor for children developing a pattern of impulsive and antisocial behavior which, in turn, may contribute to the level of violence and other crime in society. PMID:9768466

  18. Synchronized flutter of two slender flags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougel, Jérôme; Doaré, Olivier; Michelin, Sébastien

    2016-08-01

    The interactions and synchronization of two parallel and slender flags in a uniform axial flow are studied in the present paper by generalizing Lighthill's Elongated Body Theory (EBT) and Lighthill's Large Amplitude Elongated Body Theory (LAEBT) to account for the hydrodynamic coupling between flags. The proposed method consists in two successive steps, namely the reconstruction of the flow created by a flapping flag within the LAEBT framework and the computation of the fluid force generated by this nonuniform flow on the second flag. In the limit of slender flags in close proximity, we show that the effect of the wakes have little influence on the long time coupled-dynamics and can be neglected in the modeling. This provides a simplified framework extending LAEBT to the coupled dynamics of two flags. Using this simplified model, both linear and large amplitude results are reported to explore the selection of the flapping regime as well as the dynamical properties of two side-by-side slender flags. Hydrodynamic coupling of the two flags is observed to destabilize the flags for most parameters, and to induce a long-term synchronization of the flags, either in-phase or out-of-phase.

  19. ACL reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tissue taken from a donor is called an allograft. The procedure is usually performed with the help ... This increases the chance you may have a meniscus tear. ACL reconstruction may be used for these ...

  20. [Eyebrow reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Baraër, F; Darsonval, V; Lejeune, F; Bochot-Hermouet, B; Rousseau, P

    2013-10-01

    The eyebrow is an essential anatomical area, from a social point of view, so its reconstruction, in case of skin defect, must be as meticulous as possible, with the less residual sequela. Capillary density extremely varies from one person to another and the different methods of restoration of this area should absolutely take this into consideration. We are going to review the various techniques of reconstruction, according to the sex and the surface to cover. PMID:23896574

  1. Impulsivity, Frontal Lobes and Risk for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal cortical areas of brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits in attention, lack of reflection and/or insensitivity to consequences, all of which occur in addiction (Evenden, 1999; (de Wit, 2009). Binge drinking models indicate chronic alcohol damages corticolimbic brain regions (Crews et al., 2000) causing reversal learning deficits indicative of loss of executive function (Obernier et al., 2002b). Genetics and adolescent age are risk factors for alcoholism that coincide with sensitivity to alcohol induced neurotoxicity. Cortical degeneration from alcohol abuse may increase impulsivity contributing to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. Interestingly, abstinence results in bursts of neurogenesis and brain regrowth (Crews and Nixon, 2009). Treatments for alcoholism, including naltrexone pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy may work through improving executive functions. This review will examine the relationships between impulsivity and executive function behaviors to changes in cortical structure during alcohol dependence and recovery. PMID:19410598

  2. Synchronized defibrillation for ventricular fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Ganesh; Navarro, Cesar; Walsh, Simon J; Allen, John D; Anderson, John McC; Adgey, AA Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Optimization of defibrillation success is important to improve efficacy and minimize post-shock sequelae. Previous work has suggested an improvement in shock success when an intracardiac shock is delivered synchronized to the upslope of a VF wave. We investigated the efficacy of transthoracic defibrillation success using a novel external biphasic defibrillator which delivers shocks synchronized to the upslope of the surface ECG. Methods: A prospective, controlled, randomized study in a research institute laboratory of male and female pigs (54.2±1.8 kg). Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced in 10 anaesthetized and ventilated pigs. Shocks were delivered randomly from a biphasic defibrillator in synchronized or non-synchronized mode via self-adhesive electrode pads following 30 s of VF. Energy settings at 50, 70, 80, and 100J were randomly tested. VF amplitude, impedance, and shock outcome were recorded and analysed digitally. Results: A total of 300 shocks were delivered. Synchronized shocks were delivered on the upslope of the VF wave in 99% of cases. There was no significant difference in shock success between shocks delivered in synchronized or non-synchronized modes (p=0.695). There was no significant difference in the amplitude of VF between successful and unsuccessful shocks (p=0.163). Furthermore, there was no association between shock success and transthoracic impedance. Conclusion: The novel defibrillator used in this study was able to consistently deliver shocks on the upslope portion of the VF wave but did not show an improvement in shock success. PMID:24062919

  3. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers. PMID:24667278

  4. Optimal waveforms design for ultra-wideband impulse radio sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  5. Optimal Waveforms Design for Ultra-Wideband Impulse Radio Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Zhou, Zheng; Zou, Weixia; Li, Dejian; Zhao, Chong

    2010-01-01

    Ultra-wideband impulse radio (UWB-IR) sensors should comply entirely with the regulatory spectral limits for elegant coexistence. Under this premise, it is desirable for UWB pulses to improve frequency utilization to guarantee the transmission reliability. Meanwhile, orthogonal waveform division multiple-access (WDMA) is significant to mitigate mutual interferences in UWB sensor networks. Motivated by the considerations, we suggest in this paper a low complexity pulse forming technique, and its efficient implementation on DSP is investigated. The UWB pulse is derived preliminarily with the objective of minimizing the mean square error (MSE) between designed power spectrum density (PSD) and the emission mask. Subsequently, this pulse is iteratively modified until its PSD completely conforms to spectral constraints. The orthogonal restriction is then analyzed and different algorithms have been presented. Simulation demonstrates that our technique can produce UWB waveforms with frequency utilization far surpassing the other existing signals under arbitrary spectral mask conditions. Compared to other orthogonality design schemes, the designed pulses can maintain mutual orthogonality without any penalty on frequency utilization, and hence, are much superior in a WDMA network, especially with synchronization deviations. PMID:22163511

  6. Synchronization in an evolving network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Bagarti, Trilochan

    2015-09-01

    In this work we study the dynamics of Kuramoto oscillators on a stochastically evolving network whose evolution is governed by the phases of the individual oscillators and degree distribution. Synchronization is achieved after a threshold connection density is reached. This cumulative effect of topology and dynamics has many real-world implications, where synchronization in a system emerges as a collective property of its components in a self-organizing manner. The synchronous state remains stable as long as the connection density remains above the threshold value, with additional links providing resilience against network fluctuations.

  7. [Impulse galvanization in postoperative urination disorders].

    PubMed

    Kölbl, H; Riss, P

    1988-03-01

    In this study we examined the therapeutic effect of impulse-galvanization in patients with voiding difficulties after anterior vaginal repair. Patients (n = 56/79) revealing residual urine until the sixth postoperative day were studied. Considering the onset of the first spontaneous micturition and the lack of residual urine no significant difference was found in the group undergoing impulse-galvanization (n = 19) compared to a group without therapy (n = 37). By adjuvant treatment with alpha-sympathicolytics, spasmolytics or tranquilizers patients with impulse-galvanization and the comparative group were found to be without residual urine 11.2 and 13 days after surgery, respectively (p less than 0.001). PMID:3259522

  8. Auto-programmable impulse neural circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watula, D.; Meador, J.

    1990-01-01

    Impulse neural networks use pulse trains to communicate neuron activation levels. Impulse neural circuits emulate natural neurons at a more detailed level than that typically employed by contemporary neural network implementation methods. An impulse neural circuit which realizes short term memory dynamics is presented. The operation of that circuit is then characterized in terms of pulse frequency modulated signals. Both fixed and programmable synapse circuits for realizing long term memory are also described. The implementation of a simple and useful unsupervised learning law is then presented. The implementation of a differential Hebbian learning rule for a specific mean-frequency signal interpretation is shown to have a straightforward implementation using digital combinational logic with a variation of a previously developed programmable synapse circuit. This circuit is expected to be exploited for simple and straightforward implementation of future auto-adaptive neural circuits.

  9. Ion acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinacker, Jurgen; Jaekel, Uwe; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    1993-01-01

    Nonrelativistic spectra of protons and ions accelerated in impulsive solar flares are derived using more realistic turbulence power spectra. The calculation is based on a particle transport equation extracted from a second step acceleration model containing stochastic acceleration. The turbulence model is generalized to waves with a small angle to the magnetic field vector and to turbulence power spectra with spectral indices s smaller than 2. Due to the occurrence of impulsive flares at low coronal heights, Coulomb losses at the dense coronal plasma and diffusive particle escape are taken into account. The ion spectra show deviations from long-duration spectra near the Coulomb barrier, where the losses become maximal. The Z-squared/A-dependence of the Coulomb losses leads to spectral variations for different ions. We present a method to estimate the turbulence parameters and injection conditions of the flare particles using ion ratios like Fe/O of impulsive flares.

  10. Using Dual Process Models to Examine Impulsivity Throughout Neural Maturation.

    PubMed

    Leshem, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    The multivariate construct of impulsivity is examined through neural systems and connections that comprise the executive functioning system. It is proposed that cognitive and behavioral components of impulsivity can be divided into two distinct groups, mediated by (1) the cognitive control system: deficits in top-down cognitive control processes referred to as action/cognitive impulsivity and (2) the socioemotional system: related to bottom-up affective/motivational processes referred to as affective impulsivity. Examination of impulsivity from a developmental viewpoint can guide future research, potentially enabling the selection of more effective interventions for impulsive individuals, based on the cognitive components requiring improvement. PMID:27186976

  11. Intensity impulse response of SDM links.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Antonio; Antonelli, Cristian; Shtaif, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We study the response of space-division multiplexed fiber links to an excitation by a short impulse of the optical intensity. We show that, in the presence of full mixing, the intensity impulse response is Gaussian, confirming recently reported experimental observations, and relate its variance to the mean square of the mode dispersion vector of the link τ(->). The good agreement between our theory and the previously published experiments provides solid foundations to the random coupling model of SDM fiber links, and provides a tool for efficient design of MIMO-DSP receivers. PMID:25836803

  12. Time synchronized video systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The idea of synchronizing multiple video recordings to some type of 'range' time has been tried to varying degrees of success in the past. Combining this requirement with existing time code standards (SMPTE) and the new innovations in desktop multimedia however, have afforded an opportunity to increase the flexibility and usefulness of such efforts without adding costs over the traditional data recording and reduction systems. The concept described can use IRIG, GPS or a battery backed internal clock as the master time source. By converting that time source to Vertical Interval Time Code or Longitudinal Time Code, both in accordance with the SMPTE standards, the user will obtain a tape that contains machine/computer readable time code suitable for use with editing equipment that is available off-the-shelf. Accuracy on playback is then determined by the playback system chosen by the user. Accuracies of +/- 2 frames are common among inexpensive systems and complete frame accuracy is more a matter of the users' budget than the capability of the recording system.

  13. Optimistic barrier synchronization. Contractor report

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, D.M.

    1992-07-01

    Barrier synchronization is a fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that is has already processed all work required of it prior to the synchronization. This paper treats the alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all necessary pre-synchronization computation. The proble marises when the number of pre-synchronization messages to be received by a processor is unknown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. The authors describe an optimistic O(log2P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions, as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  14. Generic Conditions for Hydrodynamic Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Nariya; Golestanian, Ramin

    2011-02-01

    Synchronization of actively oscillating organelles such as cilia and flagella facilitates self-propulsion of cells and pumping fluid in low Reynolds number environments. To understand the key mechanism behind synchronization induced by hydrodynamic interaction, we study a model of rigid-body rotors making fixed trajectories of arbitrary shape under driving forces that are arbitrary functions of the phase. For a wide class of geometries, we obtain the necessary and sufficient conditions for synchronization of a pair of rotors. We also find a novel synchronized pattern with an oscillating phase shift. Our results shed light on the role of hydrodynamic interactions in biological systems, and could help in developing efficient mixing and transport strategies in microfluidic devices.

  15. Synchronous motion modulates animacy perception.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    Visual motion serves as a cue for high-level percepts. The present study reports novel modulation of animacy perception through synchronous motion. A target dot moving along a random trajectory was presented. The trajectory was generated based on a variant of 1/f noise; hence, the dot could be perceived as animate. Participants were asked to rate the strength of perceived animacy and perceived intention from the target dot. Several task-irrelevant dots surrounding the target were also presented. Results indicated that perceived animacy and intention were drastically weakened when surrounding dots created synchronous motion with the target dot as compared to when surrounding dots did not create synchronous motion. A series of follow-up experiments replicated these results and revealed specific characteristics of this modulation. The present findings suggest synchronous visual motion serves as a strong modulator of animacy perception. PMID:26114680

  16. Synchronous identification of friendly targets

    DOEpatents

    Telle, John M.; Roger, Stutz A.

    1998-01-01

    A synchronous communication targeting system for use in battle. The present invention includes a transceiver having a stabilizing oscillator, a synchronous amplifier and an omnidirectional receiver, all in electrical communication with each other. A remotely located beacon is attached to a blackbody radiation source and has an amplitude modulator in electrical communication with a optical source. The beacon's amplitude modulator is set so that the optical source transmits radiation frequency at approximately the same or lower amplitude than that of the blackbody radiation source to which the beacon is attached. The receiver from the transceiver is adapted to receive frequencies approximately at or below blackbody radiation signals and sends such signals to the synchronous amplifier. The synchronous amplifier then rectifies and amplifies those signals which correspond to the predetermined frequency to therefore identify whether the blackbody radiation source is friendly or not.

  17. Synchronization by small time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruessner, G.; Cheang, S.; Jensen, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    Synchronization is a phenomenon observed in all of the living and in much of the non-living world, for example in the heart beat, Huygens' clocks, the flashing of fireflies and the clapping of audiences. Depending on the number of degrees of freedom involved, different mathematical approaches have been used to describe it, most prominently integrate-and-fire oscillators and the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators. In the present work, we study a very simple and general system of smoothly evolving oscillators, which continue to interact even in the synchronized state. We find that under very general circumstances, synchronization generically occurs in the presence of a (small) time delay. Strikingly, the synchronization time is inversely proportional to the time delay.

  18. Lewis rats have greater response impulsivity than Fischer rats.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Potenza, Marc N; Grunberg, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    Impulsivity, a tendency toward immediate action without consideration of future consequences, is associated with a wide array of problematic behaviors. Response impulsivity, a type of behaviorally-assessed impulsivity characterized by behavioral disinhibition, is also associated with health risk behaviors. Response impulsivity is distinct from choice impulsivity, which is characterized by intolerance for delay. Lewis rats have higher levels of choice impulsivity than Fischer rats (Anderson & Woolverton, 2005; Madden et al., 2008; Stein et al., 2012). However, no studies have examined whether Lewis and Fischer rats have different levels of response impulsivity. The present research examined response impulsivity in the two rat strains. Subjects were 16 male Lewis and Fischer rats. Rats' response impulsivity was measured using the Five Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (5-CSRTT). In addition, their locomotor activity was measured in locomotor activity chambers. Lewis rats had more premature responses than Fischer rats during the 5-CSRTT assessment [F(1, 14)=5.34, p<0.05], indicating higher levels of response impulsivity. Locomotor activity did not differ between rat strain groups [F(1, 14)=3.05, p=.10], suggesting that overall movement did not account for group differences in response impulsivity on the 5-CSRTT. It can be concluded from this research that Lewis rats have higher levels of response impulsivity than Fischer rats, and therefore provide a valid rat model of individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:24613059

  19. Synchronous Photodiode-Signal Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Howard K.

    1988-01-01

    Synchronous sampling circuit increases signal-to-noise ratio of measurements of chopped signal of known phase and frequency in presence of low-frequency or dc background noise. Used with linear array of photoelectric sensors for locating edge of metal plate. Multiplexing circuit cycles through 16 light-emitting-diode/photodiode pairs, under computer control. Synchronized with multiplexer so edge detector makes one background-subtracted signal measurement per emitter/detector pair in turn.

  20. Synchronizing Rotation Of A Heavy Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratliff, Roger

    1991-01-01

    Drive system rotates large-inertia load at constant low speed. Simple setup of motors, pulleys, and belts provides both torque and synchronism. Induction motor drives two loads: rotating instrument and slightly lagging synchronous motor. Provides ample torque to start and maintain rotation, and synchronous motor ensures rotation synchronized with ac power supply.

  1. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  2. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches.

    PubMed

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  3. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J.; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  4. Recognition Memory in Reflective and Impulsive Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Alexander W.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Eight reflective and eight impulsive preschool children were tested in a forced-choice recognition memory task. Reflective children made more correct recognition choices than did impulsive children under all experimental conditions. (ST)

  5. Recent Translational Findings on Impulsivity in Relation to Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Weafer, Jessica; Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive behavior is strongly implicated in drug abuse, as both a cause and a consequence of drug use. To understand how impulsive behaviors lead to and result from drug use, translational evidence from both human and non-human animal studies is needed. Here, we review recent (2009 or later) studies that have investigated two major components of impulsive behavior, inhibitory control and impulsive choice, across preclinical and clinical studies. We concentrate on the stop-signal task as the measure of inhibitory control and delay discounting as the measure of impulsive choice. Consistent with previous reports, recent studies show greater impulsive behavior in drug users compared with non-users. Additionally, new evidence supports the prospective role of impulsive behavior in drug abuse, and has begun to identify the neurobiological mechanisms underlying impulsive behavior. We focus on the commonalities and differences in findings between preclinical and clinical studies, and suggest future directions for translational research. PMID:25678985

  6. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  7. Impulse Control Disorders - The Continuum Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The group Parkinson Inside Out is composed of health professionals and academic researchers who have been diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. In our discussions we try to make use of both our inside perspective as patients, and our outside perspective as professionals. In this paper, we apply the two perspectives to the Impulse Control Disorders. These impulsive behaviour patterns are thought to be relatively uncommon side effects of some of the medication used in dopamine replacement therapy. The phenomenon is usually described as relatively rare (<15%), and mainly confined to patients with special vulnerabilities. In contrast, we propose that having some problems with controlling impulses is a very common experience for patients undergoing dopamine replacement therapy. They result from difficulties in decision making engendered by variations in dopamine accessibility in the reward centre of the brain. Only in a minority do the consequences grow to the damaging proportions of a disorder, but most patients are probably affected to some degree. Seeing, and measuring, decision difficulties as a continuous dimension, rather than as a discrete category, brings increased possibilities for early detection and continuous monitoring. With reliable measures of the propensity for impulsive decision making, it may become possible to both reap the benefits and avoid the dangers of the dopamine agonists. We point to ways of empirically testing our continuity hypothesis. PMID:27031861

  8. Fluctuations of a spherical gravitational impulsive wave.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortaçsu, M.

    1993-02-01

    It is shown that quantum fluctuations, in particular vacuum polarization, vanish in the background of a spherical impulsive wave solution of the Einstein field equations, recently found by Nutku and Penrose. The calculation is done in first-order perturbation theory but arguments are given why it should persist to all orders.

  9. GABRA2 Genotype, Impulsivity, and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Lance O.; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Houston, Rebecca J.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to test a hypothesis associating impulsivity with an elevated body mass index (BMI). Methods To this end, we examined associations of BMI with putative genetic, neurophysiological, psychiatric, and psychological indicators of impulsivity in 78 women and 74 men formerly dependent on alcohol or drugs. A second analysis was designed to test the replicability of the genetic findings in an independent sample of 109 women and 111 men with a similar history of substance dependence. Results The results of the first analysis showed that BMI was positively correlated with Total and Nonplanning Scale Scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the number of childhood symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in women. It was also positively correlated, in women, with a GABRA2 variant previously implicated as a risk factor for substance dependence and an objective electroencephalographic feature previously associated with GABRA2 and relapse risk. The second analysis confirmed that the correlation between BMI and the substance-dependence-associated GABRA2 genotype was reliable and sex-specific. Conclusions We conclude that an elevated BMI is associated with genetic, neurophysiological, psychiatric, and psychological indicators of impulsivity. The sex difference may be explained by greater opportunities to eat and overeat, a preference for higher calorie foods, a longer duration of alcohol/drug abstinence, or previous pregnancies in women. PMID:22882390

  10. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1990-09-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Hence, it has been projected that wide commercialization of impulse drying would result in at least a 10% industry-wide energy saving. This report covers work completed between October, 1988 and September, 1989. During this period, pilot press trails demonstrated that newsprint as well as linerboard experience delamination. Hence, the major focus of the research was the resolution of the delamination problem. In order to document potential process improvements, measurement methods were developed to quantify sheet delamination. Using these methods, low thermal diffusivity ceramic roll surfaces were shown to extend the range of impulse drying operating conditions while avoiding sheet delamination. As compared to steel surfaces, ceramics were found to provide significantly higher water volume without inducing sheet delamination. 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Impulse noise trauma during army weapon firing.

    PubMed

    Munjal, K R; Singh, V P

    1997-04-01

    A 100 infanty personnel firing modern weapons such as the Anti Tank Guided Missile, 106mm Recoiless Gun (RCL), 84mm Rocket Launcher (RL) and 81mm Mortar were studied for the effect of impulse noise on the ear and the evolution of the Temporary Threshold Shift (TTS), Recovery Time (RT) and Permanent Threshold Shift (PTS) was traced. PMID:23119288

  12. Signal processing in impulsive electromagnetic interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabin, Serena M.

    1993-06-01

    Statistical signal processing functions such as signal detection, estimation, and identification play a key role in the development of effective communications, radar, and sonar systems. For example, advanced statistical methods are emerging as being particularly important in digital communications systems operating in channels corrupted by interference from such phenomena as multiple-access noise, intentional jamming, and impulsive noise sources. Conventional demodulation methods, such as coherent matched filtering, often suffer serious performance degradation when subject to interference of these types; however, this degradation can frequently be eliminated through the use of more sophisticated signal processing techniques. During this reporting period, the focus of our work has been on the problem of obtaining optimum and efficient identification and detection procedures for impulsive channels. Of particular interest is the Middleton Class A noise model, which is a widely-accepted statistical-physical model for impulsive interference superimposed on a Gaussian background. The model has two basic parameters that can be adjusted to fit a wide variety of impulsive noise phenomena occurring in practice.

  13. Arbitration between controlled and impulsive choices

    PubMed Central

    Economides, M.; Guitart-Masip, M.; Kurth-Nelson, Z.; Dolan, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    The impulse to act for immediate reward often conflicts with more deliberate evaluations that support long-term benefit. The neural architecture that negotiates this conflict remains unclear. One account proposes a single neural circuit that evaluates both immediate and delayed outcomes, while another outlines separate impulsive and patient systems that compete for behavioral control. Here we designed a task in which a complex payout structure divorces the immediate value of acting from the overall long-term value, within the same outcome modality. Using model-based fMRI in humans, we demonstrate separate neural representations of immediate and long-term values, with the former tracked in the anterior caudate (AC) and the latter in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Crucially, when subjects' choices were compatible with long-run consequences, value signals in AC were down-weighted and those in vmPFC were enhanced, while the opposite occurred when choice was impulsive. Thus, our data implicate a trade-off in value representation between AC and vmPFC as underlying controlled versus impulsive choice. PMID:25573670

  14. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account)…

  15. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  16. Impulse Plasma In Surface Engineering - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdunek, K.; Nowakowska-Langier, K.; Chodun, R.; Okrasa, S.; Rabinski, M.; Dora, J.; Domanowski, P.; Halarowicz, J.

    2014-11-01

    The article describes the view of the plasma surface engineering, assuming the role of non-thermal energy effects in the synthesis of materials and coatings deposition. In the following study it was underlined that the vapor excitation through the application of an electric field during coatings deposition gives new possibilities for coatings formation. As an example the IPD method was chosen. During the IPD (Impulse Plasma Deposition) the impulse plasma is generated in the coaxial accelerator by strong periodic electrical pulses. The impulse plasma is distributed in the form of energetic plasma pockets. Due to the almost completely ionization of gas, the nucleation of new phases takes place on ions directly in the plasma itself. As a result the coatings of metastable materials with nano-amorphous structure and excellent adhesion to the non-heated intentionally substrates could be deposited. Recently the novel way of impulse plasma generation during the coatings deposition was proposed and developed by our group. An efficient tool for plasma process control, the plasma forming gas injection to the interelectrode space was used. Periodic changing the gas pressure results in increasing both the degree of dispersion and the dynamics of the plasma pulses. The advantage of the new technique in deposition of coatings with exceptionally good properties has been demonstrated in the industrial scale not only in the case of the IPD method but also in the case of very well known magnetron sputtering method.

  17. Synchronization configurations of two coupled double pendula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koluda, Piotr; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2014-04-01

    We consider the synchronization of two self-excited double pendula hanging from a horizontal beam which can roll on the parallel surface. We show that such pendula can obtain four different robust synchronous configurations. Our approximate analytical analysis allows to derive the synchronization conditions and explains the observed types of synchronizations. We consider the energy balance in the system and show how the energy is transferred between the pendula via the oscillating beam allowing the pendula' synchronization.

  18. Reconstructing Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    In response to Lissitz and Samuelsen (2007), the author reconstructs the historical arguments for the more comprehensive unitary concept of validity and the principles of scientific inquiry underlying it. Her response is organized in terms of four questions: (a) How did validity in educational measurement come to be conceptualized as unitary, and…

  19. Vaginal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  20. Project Reconstruct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  1. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ayati, Moosa; Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi; Khaloozadeh, Hamid

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  2. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  3. ACL reconstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction - discharge; ACL reconstruction - discharge ... had surgery to reconstruct your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The surgeon drilled holes in the bones of ...

  4. Noncoherent DTTLs for Symbol Synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin; Tkacenko, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Noncoherent data-transition tracking loops (DTTLs) have been proposed for use as symbol synchronizers in digital communication receivers. [Communication- receiver subsystems that can perform their assigned functions in the absence of synchronization with the phases of their carrier signals ( carrier synchronization ) are denoted by the term noncoherent, while receiver subsystems that cannot function without carrier synchronization are said to be coherent. ] The proposal applies, more specifically, to receivers of binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals generated by directly phase-modulating binary non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data streams onto carrier signals having known frequencies but unknown phases. The proposed noncoherent DTTLs would be modified versions of traditional DTTLs, which are coherent. The symbol-synchronization problem is essentially the problem of recovering symbol timing from a received signal. In the traditional, coherent approach to symbol synchronization, it is necessary to establish carrier synchronization in order to recover symbol timing. A traditional DTTL effects an iterative process in which it first generates an estimate of the carrier phase in the absence of symbol-synchronization information, then uses the carrier-phase estimate to obtain an estimate of the symbol-synchronization information, then feeds the symbol-synchronization estimate back to the carrier-phase-estimation subprocess. In a noncoherent symbol-synchronization process, there is no need for carrier synchronization and, hence, no need for iteration between carrier-synchronization and symbol- synchronization subprocesses. The proposed noncoherent symbolsynchronization process is justified theoretically by a mathematical derivation that starts from a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method of estimation of symbol timing utilized in traditional, coherent DTTLs. In that MAP method, one chooses the value of a variable of interest (in this case, the offset in the estimated symbol

  5. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  6. Sample controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuorui; Sun, Jitao

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the controllability of impulsive differential systems with random coefficients. Impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are a different stochastic model from stochastic differential equations. Sufficient conditions of sample controllability for impulsive differential systems with random coefficients are obtained by using random Sadovskii's fixed-point theorem. Finally, an example is given to illustrate our results.

  7. Teaching Emotional Intelligence to Impulsive-Aggressive Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Martin; Long, Nicholas J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes complex issues involved in helping impulsive-aggressive youth who are devoid of emotional intelligence. Reviews anatomy of impulsivity and the irrational beliefs used as defense mechanisms by impulsive-aggressive students. Discusses two alternative intervention strategies, Life Space Crisis Intervention techniques and the Self Control…

  8. Stability analysis of impulsive functional systems of fractional order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a class of impulsive fractional functional differential systems is investigated. Sufficient conditions for stability of the zero solution are proved, extending the corresponding theory of impulsive functional differential equations. The investigations are carried out by using the comparison principle, coupled with the Lyapunov function method. We apply our results to an impulsive single species model of Lotka-Volterra type.

  9. Synchronous Bilateral Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Annapurneswari; Radhakrishna, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bilateral breast cancer (BBC) is not an uncommon entity in contemporary breast clinics. Improved life expectancy after breast cancer treatment and routine use of contra-lateral breast mammography has led to increased incidence of BBC. Our study objective was to define the epidemiological and tumour characteristics of BBC in India. Materials and Methods A total of 1251 breast cancer patients were treated during the period January 2007 to March 2015 and 30 patients were found to have BBC who constituted the study population (60 tumour samples). Synchronous bilateral breast cancers (SBC) was defined as two tumours diagnosed within an interval of 6 months and a second cancer diagnosed after 6 months was labelled as metachronous breast cancer (MBC). Analyses of patient and tumour characteristics were done in this prospective data base of BBC patients. Results Median patient age was 66 years (range 39-85). Majority of the patients had SBC (n=28) and in 12 patients the second tumour was clinically occult and detected only by mammography of the contra-lateral breast. The second tumour was found at lower tumour size compared to the first in 73% of cases and was negative for axillary metastasis in 80% of cases (24/30). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the commonest histological type (n=51) and majority of the tumours were ER/PR positive (50/60). Her2 was overexpressed in 13 tumours (21%). Over 70% (22/30) of patients had similar histology in both breasts and amongst them grade concordance was present in about 69% (15/22) of patients. Concordance rates of ER, PR and Her2 statuses were 83%, 80% and 90% respectively. Bilateral mastectomy was the commonest surgery performed in 80% of the patients followed by bilateral breast conservation in 13%. At the end of study period, 26 patients were alive and disease free. Median survival was 29 months (range 3-86 months). Conclusion In most patients with BBC, the second tumour is identified at an early stage than index

  10. Is impulsivity a common trait in bipolar and unipolar disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Henna, Elaine; Hatch, John P; Nicoletti, Mark; Swann, Alan C; Zunta-Soares, Giovana; Soares, Jair C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Impulsivity is increased in bipolar and unipolar disorders during episodes and is associated with substance abuse disorders and suicide risk. Impulsivity between episodes predisposes to relapses and poor therapeutic compliance. However, there is little information about impulsivity during euthymia in mood disorders. We sought to investigate trait impulsivity in euthymic bipolar and unipolar disorder patients, comparing them to healthy individuals and unaffected relatives of bipolar disorder patients. Methods Impulsivity was evaluated by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11A) in 54 bipolar disorder patients, 25 unipolar disorder patients, 136 healthy volunteers, and 14 unaffected relatives. The BIS-11A mean scores for all four groups were compared through the Games–Howell test for all possible pairwise combinations. Additionally, we compared impulsivity in bipolar and unipolar disorder patients with and without history of suicide attempt and substance abuse disorder. Results Bipolar and unipolar disorder patients scored significantly higher than the healthy controls and unaffected relatives on all measures of the BIS-11A except for attentional impulsivity. On the attentional impulsivity measures there were no differences among the unaffected relatives and the bipolar and unipolar disorder groups, but all three of these groups scored higher than the healthy participant group. There was no difference in impulsivity between bipolar and unipolar disorder subjects with and without suicide attempt. However, impulsivity was higher among bipolar and unipolar disorder subjects with past substance use disorder compared to patients without such a history. Conclusions Questionnaire-measured impulsivity appears to be relatively independent of mood state in bipolar and unipolar disorder patients; it remains elevated in euthymia and is higher in individuals with past substance abuse. Elevated attentional and lower non-planning impulsivity in unaffected relatives of

  11. The Stomach-Derived Hormone Ghrelin Increases Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderberg, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Fenander, Maya; Richard, Jennifer E; Dickson, Suzanne L; Nissbrandt, Hans; Bergquist, Filip; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2016-04-01

    Impulsivity, defined as impaired decision making, is associated with many psychiatric and behavioral disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder as well as eating disorders. Recent data indicate that there is a strong positive correlation between food reward behavior and impulsivity, but the mechanisms behind this relationship remain unknown. Here we hypothesize that ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach and known to increase food reward behavior, also increases impulsivity. In order to assess the impact of ghrelin on impulsivity, rats were trained in three complementary tests of impulsive behavior and choice: differential reinforcement of low rate (DRL), go/no-go, and delay discounting. Ghrelin injection into the lateral ventricle increased impulsive behavior, as indicated by reduced efficiency of performance in the DRL test, and increased lever pressing during the no-go periods of the go/no-go test. Central ghrelin stimulation also increased impulsive choice, as evidenced by the reduced choice for large rewards when delivered with a delay in the delay discounting test. In order to determine whether signaling at the central ghrelin receptors is necessary for maintenance of normal levels of impulsive behavior, DRL performance was assessed following ghrelin receptor blockade with central infusion of a ghrelin receptor antagonist. Central ghrelin receptor blockade reduced impulsive behavior, as reflected by increased efficiency of performance in the DRL task. To further investigate the neurobiological substrate underlying the impulsivity effect of ghrelin, we microinjected ghrelin into the ventral tegmental area, an area harboring dopaminergic cell bodies. Ghrelin receptor stimulation within the VTA was sufficient to increase impulsive behavior. We further evaluated the impact of ghrelin on dopamine-related gene expression and dopamine turnover in brain areas key in impulsive behavior control. This study provides the first

  12. Bodily synchronization underlying joke telling

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, R. C.; Nie, Lin; Franco, Alison; Richardson, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock–knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily “dance” occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this “dance” is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction. PMID:25177287

  13. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... around the cancer removed (lumpectomy or breast-conserving surgery) might not need reconstruction, but sometimes they do. Breast reconstruction is done by a plastic surgeon. Should I have breast reconstruction? Breast reconstruction ...

  14. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-10-18

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility.

  15. Digital data detection and synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noack, T. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The primary accomplishments have been in the analysis and simulation of receivers and bit synchronizers. It has been discovered that tracking rate effects play, a rather fundamental role in both receiver and synchronizer performance, but that data relating to recorder time-base-error, for the proper characterization of this phenomenon, is in rather short supply. It is possible to obtain operationally useful tape recorder time-base-error data from high signal-to-noise ratio tapes using synchronizers with relatively wideband tracking loops. Low signal-to-noise ratio tapes examined in the same way would not be synchronizable. Additional areas of interest covered are receiver false lock, cycle slipping, and other unusual phenomena, which have been described to some extent in this and earlier reports and simulated during the study.

  16. Chaotic synchronization system and electrocardiogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Liuqing; Dai, Xinlai; Li, Baodong

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical model of chaotic synchronization of the heart-blood flow coupling dynamics is proposed, which is based on a seven dimension nonlinear dynamical system constructed by three subsystems of the sinoatrial node natural pacemaker, the cardiac relaxation oscillator and the dynamics of blood-fluid in heart chambers. The existence and robustness of the self-chaotic synchronization of the system are demonstrated by both methods of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. The spectrum of Lyapunov exponent, the Lyapunov dimension and the Kolmogorov entropy are estimated when the system was undergoing the state of self-chaotic synchronization evolution. The time waveform of the dynamical variable, which represents the membrane potential of the cardiac integrative cell, shows a shape which is similar to that of the normal electrocardiogram (ECG) of human, thus implies that the model possesses physiological significance functionally.

  17. Remote synchronization in star networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, A.; Frasca, M.; Sciuto, G.; Buscarino, A.; Ngamga, E. J.; Fortuna, L.; Kurths, J.

    2012-02-01

    We study phase synchronization in a network motif with a starlike structure in which the central node's (the hub's) frequency is strongly detuned against the other peripheral nodes. We find numerically and experimentally a regime of remote synchronization (RS), where the peripheral nodes form a phase synchronized cluster, while the hub remains free with its own dynamics and serves just as a transmitter for the other nodes. We explain the mechanism for this RS by the existence of a free amplitude and also show that systems with a fixed or constant amplitude, such as the classic Kuramoto phase oscillator, are not able to generate this phenomenon. Further, we derive an analytic expression which supports our explanation of the mechanism.

  18. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  19. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  20. Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Hu, Jianping; Wu, Po-Lun; Chao, Herta H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association. Methods We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity. Results Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women. Conclusions Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control. PMID:26079873

  1. Impulsive Choice Predicts Poor Working Memory in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Renda, C. Renee; Stein, Jeffrey S.; Madden, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of maladaptive behaviors and poor health outcomes (e.g., substance abuse, obesity) correlate with impulsive choice, which describes the tendency to prefer smaller, immediate rewards in lieu of larger, delayed rewards. Working memory deficits are often reported in those diagnosed with the same maladaptive behaviors. Human studies suggest that impulsive choice is associated with working memory ability but, to date, only one study has explored the association between working memory and impulsive choice in rats and no relation was reported. The current study reevaluated the association between working memory and impulsive choice in 19 male Long-Evans rats. Psychophysical adjusting procedures were used to quantify working memory (titrating-delay match-to-position procedure) and impulsive choice (adjusting delay procedure). Rats were partitioned into low- and high-impulsive groups based on performance in the impulsive choice task. Low-impulsive rats performed significantly better in the working memory assessment. Across all rats, impulsive choice was negatively correlated with working memory performance. These findings support the hypothesis that prefrontal cortex function, specifically, working memory, is related to impulsive choice. Future research might profitably examine the experimental variables designed to influence working memory to evaluate the effects of these variables on impulsive choice and maladaptive behaviors with which it is correlated. PMID:24732895

  2. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive noises.

    PubMed

    Fidell, Sanford; Silvati, Laura; Pearsons, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-nine people judged the relative annoyance of five variable level signals and 29 impulsive and non-impulsive fixed-level signals in an adaptive paired comparison study. Signals were presented for judgment as heard indoors in a facility capable of accurately reproducing the very low-frequency content of sonic booms. When the annoyance of sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle was compared with that of sounds containing more higher-frequency energy (an aircraft flyover and an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz), the relative rate of growth of annoyance, as expressed in C-weighted SEL units, was nearly 2:1. In other words, to maintain subjective equality of annoyance, each increase in level of sonic booms had to be matched by nearly twice the increase in level of an aircraft flyover or an octave band of noise centered at 1 kHz. Relative rates of growth of annoyance of sonic booms accompanied by rattle and of non-impulsive sounds, including both low- (63-Hz octave band of noise) and high-frequency energy (1-kHz octave band of noise and an aircraft flyover), were closer to 1:1. Relative rates of growth of annoyance for sonic booms unaccompanied by rattle and low-frequency sounds (63 Hz) were also about 1:1. These differences in relative rates of growth of annoyance of impulsive and non-impulsive sounds are as plausibly attributed to their relative low-frequency content as to impulsiveness per se. It may therefore be more useful for some purposes to express the annoyance of impulsive signals and other environmental noises containing substantial low-frequency energy in terms of effective (duration-corrected) loudness level rather than commonplace ASEL or CSEL. PMID:11837963

  3. [Anti-impulsivity drugs and their mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Higher impulsivity could be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Moreover, poor inhibitory control is observed in several psychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Thus it is preferred that clinical drugs have anti-impulsive effects in addition to the therapeutic effects on the primary disease. At least it is better to use clinical drugs that do not increase impulsivity. We have developed a 3-choice serial reaction time task and examined the effects of clinical drugs on impulsivity in rats using the task. We have found several anti-impulsive drugs (lithium, tandospirone, and milnacipran) and elucidated the mechanism of action in some of these drugs. For example, we demonstrated that milnacipran enhanced the control of impulsive action by activating D1-like receptors in the infralimbic cortex. In this review, we introduce recent advances in this field and suggest future directions to develop anti-impulsive drugs. PMID:25080806

  4. Multidimensional Examination of Impulsivity in Relation to Disordered Gambling

    PubMed Central

    MacKillop, James; Miller, Joshua D.; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E.; Campbell, W. Keith; Goodie, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly-used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, four latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All four latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal four generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  5. Subjective field study of response to impulsive helicopter noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects, located outdoors and indoors, judged the noisiness and other subjective noise characteristics of flyovers of two helicopters and a propeller driven airplane as part of a study of the effects of impulsiveness on the subjective response to helicopter noise. In the first experiment, the impulsive characteristics of one helicopter was controlled by varying the main rotor speed while maintaining a constant airspeed in level flight. The second experiment which utilized only the helicopters, included descent and level flight operations. The more impulsive helicopter was consistently judged less noisy than the less impulsive helicopter at equal effective perceived noise levels (EPNL). The ability of EPNL to predict noisiness was not improved by the addition of either of two proposed impulse corrections. A subjective measure of impulsiveness, however, which was not significantly related to the proposed impulse corrections, was found to improve the predictive ability of EPNL.

  6. Multidimensional examination of impulsivity in relation to disordered gambling.

    PubMed

    Mackillop, James; Miller, Joshua D; Fortune, Erica; Maples, Jessica; Lance, Charles E; Campbell, W Keith; Goodie, Adam S

    2014-04-01

    Impulsivity has been consistently associated with pathological gambling (PG), but the diversity of definitions and measures of impulsivity has led to ambiguity with regard to which indices are independently relevant. Toward clarifying this relationship, the current study examined indices from an array of commonly used impulsivity measures in relation to PG severity in an adult community sample of frequent gamblers (N = 353). These included both survey assessments and behavioral tasks. Using a factor analytic approach, 4 latent factors were identified among 19 indices and were designated reward sensitivity, punishment sensitivity, delay discounting, and cognitive impulsivity. All 4 latent variables were positively and independently related to PG severity, albeit at a trend level for cognitive impulsivity in a combined model. These findings reveal 4 generally independent domains of impulsivity that are related to PG severity, clarify which assessment measures aggregate in each domain, and illustrate the importance of measurement specificity in studying impulsivity in relation to PG and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:24708148

  7. Global Synchronization of a New Chua's System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guopeng; Liu, Di; Huang, Jinhua; Liao, Xiaoxin

    The problem of global synchronization control for a class of new Chua's system is studied in this paper. Several linear controllers are proposed to realize the global exponential synchronization of two Chua's systems. Decoupling feedback control method is used to make Chua's system global exponential synchronized. Global exponential synchronization with respect to (w.r.t) partial state variables is studied when one of the error variables is zero. Finally, an adaptive synchronization controller is designed to make the response and the driven systems synchronized. Moreover, the estimate errors of the uncertain parameters converge to zero since the persistent excitation condition holds. Additionally, numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed controllers.

  8. A Class of Solvable Impulse Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Luis H. R.

    2004-05-15

    We consider a class of stochastic impulse control problems where the controlled process evolves according to a linear, regular, and time homogeneous diffusion. We state a set of easily verifiable sufficient conditions under which the problem is explicitly solvable. We also state an algebraic equation from which the optimal impulse boundary can be determined and, given this threshold, we present the value of the optimal policy interms of the minimal increasing r-excessive mapping for the controlled diffusion. We also consider the comparative static properties of the optimal policy and state a set of typically satisfied conditions under which increased volatility unambiguously increases the value of the optimal policy and expands the continuation region where exercising the irreversible policy is suboptimal. We also illustrate our results explicitly in two models based on geometric Brownian motion.

  9. Thin film eddy current impulse deicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samuel O.; Zieve, Peter B.

    1990-01-01

    Two new styles of electrical impulse deicers has been developed and tested in NASA's Icing Research Tunnel. With the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing Boot (EDB), a thin and flexible spiral coil is encapsulated between two thicknesses of elastomer. The coil, made by an industrial printed circuit board manufacturer, is bonded to the aluminum aircraft leading edge. A capacitor bank is discharged through the coil. Induced eddy currents repel the coil from the aluminum aircraft structure and shed accumulated ice. A second configuration, the Eddy Current Repulsion Deicing-Strip (EDS) uses an outer metal erosion strip fastened over the coil. Opposite flowing eddy currents repel the strip and create the impulse deicing force. The outer strip serves as a surface for the collection and shedding of ice and does not require any structural properties. The EDS is suitable for composite aircraft structures. Both systems successfully dispelled over 95 percent of the accumulated ice from airfoils over the range of the FAA icing envelope.

  10. Elegant impulser developed for flat beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M. J., LLNL

    1998-05-26

    The following report describes the design, construction, and checkout of a high-voltage (HV) impulser built for the heavy ion fusion (HIF) project [1]. The purpose of this impulser is to provide an adjustable diode voltage source of sufficient quality and level to allow the optimization of beam transport and accelerator sections of HIF [2, 3]. An elegant, low-impedance, high-energy storage capacitor circuit has been selected for this application. Circuit parameters of the retrofit to the diode region [4] have been included to provide the controlled rise time. The critical part of this circuit that is common to all candidates is the impedance matching component. The following report provides a description of the implemented circuit, the basic circuit variables for wave shaping, screening techniques revealing the weakest circuit component, and the resulting output of the injector.