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Sample records for syncytial virus pneumonia

  1. Role of bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza-3 virus in bighorn sheep pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS) have been found to be culture- and/or sero-positive for Bibersteinia trehalosi, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI-3). The objective of this study was to determine whether these pathogens can cause fatal pneumonia in BHS. In the first study...

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Pneumonia Treated with Lower-Dose Palivizumab in a Heart Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Grodin, J. L.; Wu, K. S.; Kitchell, E. E.; Le, J.; Mishkin, J. D.; Drazner, M. H.; Markham, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community-acquired pathogen that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients who have compromised pulmonary function, are elderly, or are immunosuppressed. This paper describes a 70-year-old man with a remote history of heart transplantation who presented with signs and symptoms of pneumonia. Chest computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated new patchy ground glass infiltrates throughout the upper and lower lobes of the left lung, and the RSV direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) was positive. The patient received aerosolized ribavirin, one dose of intravenous immunoglobulin, and one dose of palivizumab. After two months of followup, the patient had improved infiltrates on chest CT, improved pulmonary function testing, and no evidence of graft rejection or dysfunction. There are few data on RSV infections in heart transplant patients, but this case highlights the importance of considering this potentially serious infection and introduces a novel method of treatment. PMID:24826271

  3. Respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia treated with lower-dose palivizumab in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Grodin, J L; Wu, K S; Kitchell, E E; Le, J; Mishkin, J D; Drazner, M H; Markham, D W

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important community-acquired pathogen that can cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients who have compromised pulmonary function, are elderly, or are immunosuppressed. This paper describes a 70-year-old man with a remote history of heart transplantation who presented with signs and symptoms of pneumonia. Chest computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated new patchy ground glass infiltrates throughout the upper and lower lobes of the left lung, and the RSV direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) was positive. The patient received aerosolized ribavirin, one dose of intravenous immunoglobulin, and one dose of palivizumab. After two months of followup, the patient had improved infiltrates on chest CT, improved pulmonary function testing, and no evidence of graft rejection or dysfunction. There are few data on RSV infections in heart transplant patients, but this case highlights the importance of considering this potentially serious infection and introduces a novel method of treatment. PMID:24826271

  4. Pneumonia associated with infection with pneumocystis, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and cytomegalovirus in children in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Shann, F; Walters, S; Pifer, L L; Graham, D M; Jack, I; Uren, E; Birch, D; Stallman, N D

    1986-01-01

    Paired serum samples were collected from 94 children with pneumonia admitted to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea. All but three of the children were aged 1-24 months. Only nine children were malnourished, with weight for age less than 70% of the Harvard median (three had weight for age less than 60% of the Harvard median). Pneumocystis carinii antigen was detected in the serum of 23 children. Twenty two children had serological evidence of recent infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Five children were probably infected with Chlamydia trachomatis at the time of the study, and there was less convincing serological evidence of current infection in a further 11 children. Five children showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Although only one child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to cytomegalovirus, 86 children had this antibody. No child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Ureaplasma urealyticum or Legionella pneumophila. P carinii, respiratory syncytial virus, C trachomatis, M pneumoniae, and cytomegalovirus may be important causes of pneumonia in children in developing countries. PMID:3002538

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Palsy: Shannon's Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Respiratory Syncytial Virus KidsHealth > For Parents > Respiratory Syncytial Virus Print A ... often get it when older kids carry the virus home from school and pass it to ... often happen in epidemics that last from late fall through early spring. ...

  6. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes mild, cold-like symptoms in adults and older healthy children. It can cause serious problems in ... tests can tell if your child has the virus. There is no specific treatment. You should give ...

  7. A comparison of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus WHO-defined severe pneumonia in Moroccan children.

    PubMed

    Jroundi, I; Mahraoui, C; Benmessaoud, R; Moraleda, C; Tligui, H; Seffar, M; El Kettani, S E C; Benjelloun, B S; Chaacho, S; Muñoz-Almagro, C; Ruiz, J; Alonso, P L; Bassat, Q

    2016-02-01

    Acute respiratory infections remain the principal cause of morbidity and mortality in Moroccan children. Besides bacterial infections, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are prominent among other viruses due to their high prevalence and association with severe clinical episodes. We aimed to describe and compare RSV- and hMPV-associated cases of WHO-defined severe pneumonia in a paediatric population admitted to Morocco's reference hospital. Children aged 2-59 months admitted to the Hôpital d'Enfants de Rabat, Morocco meeting WHO-defined severe pneumonia criteria were recruited during 14 months and thoroughly investigated to ascertain a definitive diagnosis. Viral prevalence of RSV, hMPV and other viruses causing respiratory symptoms was investigated in nasopharyngeal aspirate samples through the use of molecular methods. Of the 683 children recruited and included in the final analysis, 61/683 (8·9%) and 124/683 (18·2%) were infected with hMPV and RSV, respectively. Besides a borderline significant tendency for higher age in hMPV cases, patients infected with either of the viruses behaved similarly in terms of demographics, patient history, past morbidity and comorbidity, vaccination history, socioeconomic background and family environment. Clinical presentation on arrival was also similar for both viruses, but hMPV cases were associated with more severity than RSV cases, had a higher risk of intensive care need, and received antibiotic treatment more frequently. RSV and hMPV are common and potentially life-threatening causes of WHO-defined pneumonia in Moroccan children. Both viruses show indistinctive clinical symptomatology, but in Moroccan children, hMPV was associated with a more severe evolution. PMID:26143933

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (bRSV) is a cause of respiratory disease in cattle world-wide. It has an integral role in enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bRSV infection can predispose calves to secondary bacterial infection by org...

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander K. C.; Kellner, James D.; Davies, H. Dele

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus, the most common cause of bronchiolitis, is the leading cause of infant hospitalization in developed countries and accounts for substantial mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Children at increased risk of developing severe bronchiolitis are those <6 weeks of age, those born prematurely and those with an underlying cardiopulmonary disorder or immunodeficiency. Approximately 80% of cases occur in the first year of life. By two years of age, virtually all children have been infected by at least one strain of the virus. Classically, respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis manifests as cough, wheezing and respiratory distress. The mainstay of treatment is supportive care, consisting of adequate fluid intake, antipyretics to control fever and use of supplemental oxygen if necessary. Frequent and meticulous hand-washing is the best measure to prevent secondary spread. Treatment of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis beyond supportive care should be individualized. Palivizumab has been shown to be effective in preventing severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in high-risk children when given prophylactically. In the majority of cases, the disease is usually self-limited. The mortality rate is <1% and occurs predominantly in children at high risk for severe disease. PMID:16396064

  10. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil). Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1%) children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, p<0.001) whereas gender distribution was similar. The RSV-positive group showed lower means of C-reactive protein (CRP) in comparison to the RSV-negative group (15.3 vs 24.0 mg/dL, p<0.05). Radiological findings showed that 54.2% of RSV-positive group and 50.3% of RSV-negative group had interstitial infiltrate. Bacterial infection was identified predominantly in the RSV-positive group (10% vs 4.5%, p<0.05). Rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction were predominantly observed in the RSV-positive group. A co-circulation of RSV Groups A and B was identified, with a predominance of Group B (209/227). Multivariate analysis revealed that age under 1 year (p<0.015), CRP levels under 48 mg/dL (p<0.001) and bacterial co-infection (p<0.032) were independently associated with the presence of RSV and, in the analyze of symptoms, nasal obstruction

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Increases the Virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae by Binding to Penicillin Binding Protein 1a. A New Paradigm in Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Sandrini, Sara; Datta, Sumit; Freestone, Primrose; Shafeeq, Sulman; Radhakrishnan, Priya; Williams, Gwyneth; Glenn, Sarah M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Hirst, Robert A.; Easton, Andrew J.; Andrew, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are major respiratory pathogens. Coinfection with RSV and S. pneumoniae is associated with severe and often fatal pneumonia but the molecular basis for this remains unclear. Objectives: To determine if interaction between RSV and pneumococci enhances pneumococcal virulence. Methods: We used confocal microscopy and Western blot to identify the receptors involved in direct binding of RSV and pneumococci, the effects of which were studied in both in vivo and in vitro models of infection. Human ciliated respiratory epithelial cell cultures were infected with RSV for 72 hours and then challenged with pneumococci. Pneumococci were collected after 2 hours exposure and changes in gene expression determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Measurements and Main Results: Following incubation with RSV or purified G protein, pneumococci demonstrated a significant increase in the inflammatory response and bacterial adherence to human ciliated epithelial cultures and markedly increased virulence in a pneumonia model in mice. This was associated with extensive changes in the pneumococcal transcriptome and significant up-regulation in the expression of key pneumococcal virulence genes, including the gene for the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin. We show that mechanistically this is caused by RSV G glycoprotein binding penicillin binding protein 1a. Conclusions: The direct interaction between a respiratory virus protein and the pneumococcus resulting in increased bacterial virulence and worsening disease outcome is a new paradigm in respiratory infection. PMID:24941423

  12. Characterization of the Resistance of SJL/J Mice to Pneumonia Virus of Mice, a Model for Infantile Bronchiolitis Due to a Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Glineur, Stephanie; Tran Anh, Dao Bui; Sarlet, Michaël; Michaux, Charles; Desmecht, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a prominent cause of airway morbidity in children, maintains an excessive hospitalization rate despite decades of research. Host factors are assumed to influence the disease severity. As a first step toward identifying the underlying resistance mechanisms, we recently showed that inbred mouse strains differ dramatically as regards their susceptibility to pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), the murine counterpart of RSV. PVM infection in mice has been shown to faithfully mimic the severe RSV disease in human infants. This study aimed at dissecting the remarkable PVM-resistance shown by the SJL/J strain. To characterize its genetic component, we assessed clinical, physiopathological, and virological resistance/susceptibility traits in large first (F1) and second (F2) generations obtained by crossing the SJL/J (resistant) and 129/Sv (susceptible) strains. Then, to acquire conclusive in vivo evidence in support of the hypothesis that certain radiosensitive hematopoietic cells might play a significant role in PVM-resistance, we monitored the same resistance/susceptibility traits in mock- and γ-irradiated SJL/J mice. Segregation analysis showed that (i) PVM-resistance is polygenic, (ii) the resistance alleles are recessive, and (iii) all resistance-encoding alleles are concentrated in SJL/J. Furthermore, there was no alteration of SJL/J PVM-resistance after immunosuppression by γ-irradiation, which suggests that adaptive immunity is not involved. We conclude that host resistance to pneumoviruses should be amenable to genetic dissection in this mouse model and that radioresistant lung epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages may control the clinical severity of pneumovirus-associated lung disease. PMID:23077483

  13. Gold nanorod vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, John W.; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Blum, David L.; Kuhn, Sam J.; Wright, David W.; Crowe, James E., Jr.

    2013-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and wheezing in infants and the elderly, but to date there is no licensed vaccine. We developed a gold nanorod construct that displayed the major protective antigen of the virus, the fusion protein (F). Nanorods conjugated to RSV F were formulated as a candidate vaccine preparation by covalent attachment of viral protein using a layer-by-layer approach. In vitro studies using ELISA, electron microscopy and circular dichroism revealed that conformation-dependent epitopes were maintained during conjugation, and transmission electron microscopy studies showed that a dispersed population of particles could be achieved. Human dendritic cells treated with the vaccine induced immune responses in primary human T cells. These results suggest that this vaccine approach may be a potent method for immunizing against viruses such as RSV with surface glycoproteins that are targets for the human immune response.

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... RSV often spreads quickly in crowded households and day care centers. The virus can live for a half ... The following increase the risk for RSV: Attending day care Being near tobacco smoke Having school-aged brothers ...

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Falsey, Ann R.; Walsh, Edward E.

    2000-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is now recognized as a significant problem in certain adult populations. These include the elderly, persons with cardiopulmonary diseases, and immunocompromised hosts. Epidemiological evidence indicates that the impact of RSV in older adults may be similar to that of nonpandemic influenza. In addition, RSV has been found to cause 2 to 5% of adult community-acquired pneumonias. Attack rates in nursing homes are approximately 5 to 10% per year, with significant rates of pneumonia (10 to 20%) and death (2 to 5%). Clinical features may be difficult to distinguish from those of influenza but include nasal congestion, cough, wheezing, and low-grade fever. Bone marrow transplant patients prior to marrow engraftment are at highest risk for pneumonia and death. Diagnosis of RSV infection in adults is difficult because viral culture and antigen detection are insensitive, presumably due to low viral titers in nasal secretions, but early bronchoscopy is valuable in immunosuppressed patients. Treatment of RSV in the elderly is largely supportive, whereas early therapy with ribavirin and intravenous gamma globulin is associated with improved survival in immunocompromised persons. An effective RSV vaccine has not yet been developed, and thus prevention of RSV infection is limited to standard infection control practices such as hand washing and the use of gowns and gloves. PMID:10885982

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Julia L

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract viral disease in infants and young children. Presently, there are no explicit recommendations for RSV treatment apart from supportive care. The virus is therefore responsible for an estimated 160,000 deaths per year worldwide. Despite half a century of dedicated research, there remains no licensed vaccine product. Herein are described past and current efforts to harness innate and adaptive immune potentials to combat RSV. A plethora of candidate vaccine products and strategies are reviewed. The development of a successful RSV vaccine may ultimately stem from attention to historical lessons, in concert with an integral partnering of immunology and virology research fields. PMID:21988307

  17. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in...

  18. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia ...

  19. Reverse Genetics of Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Stobart, Christopher C; Hotard, Anne L; Meng, Jia; Moore, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a negative-strand RNA virus that is associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections in young infants and the elderly. RSV remains a leading cause worldwide of infant mortality, and despite the high clinical and economic burden of the virus there are currently no available vaccines. Here, we describe the methods for recovery of recombinant RSV viruses using a bacterial artificial chromosome and methods related to procurement and expansion of stocks of RSV mutants. PMID:27464692

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Falsey, Ann R; Walsh, Edward E

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is now recognised as a significant problem in elderly adults. Epidemiological evidence indicates the impact of RSV in older adults may be similar to non-pandemic influenza, both in the community and in long-term care facilities. Attack rates in nursing homes are approximately 5-10% per year with significant rates of pneumonia (10-20%) and death (2-5%). Estimates using US health care databases and viral surveillance results over a 9-year period indicate that RSV infection causes approximately 10,000 all-cause deaths annually among persons >64 years of age. In contrast, influenza A accounted for approximately 37,000 yearly deaths in the same age group. The clinical features of RSV infection may be difficult to distinguish from those of influenza but include nasal congestion, cough, wheezing and low-grade fever. Older persons with underlying heart and lung disease and immunocompromised patients are at highest risk for RSV infection-related pneumonia and death. Diagnosis of RSV infection in adults is difficult because viral culture and antigen detection are insensitive, presumably because of low viral titres. The combination of serology and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay offers the best sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of RSV but unfortunately these techniques are not widely available; consequently, most adult RSV disease goes unrecognised. Although treatment of RSV infection in the elderly is largely supportive, early therapy with ribavirin and intravenous gamma-globulin improves survival in immunocompromised persons. An effective RSV vaccine has not yet been developed. Therefore, prevention of RSV is limited to standard infection control practices, such as hand washing and the use of gowns and gloves. PMID:16038573

  1. Diagnosing and treating respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria B

    2016-09-22

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the major causes of respiratory tract illness in children and can lead to significant infection and death. This article discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, diagnosis, current treatment, and prevention options to successfully diagnose and treat infections caused by RSV. PMID:27552683

  2. Preventing hospitalizations for respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Joan L; Le Saux, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus infection is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in young children. Palivizumab has minimal impact on RSV hospitilization rates as it is only practical to offer it to the highest risk groups. The present statement reviews the published literature and provides updated recommendations regarding palivizumab use in children in Canada. PMID:26435673

  3. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION OF HUMAN PRIMARY NASAL AND BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELL CULTURES AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In adult clinical symptoms caused by respiratory syncytial virus RSV are confined to the upper respiratory tract, while RSV infection in infants frequently causes bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The preferential localization of RSV infection to the Upper airways may be due partially...

  4. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors. PMID:26641933

  5. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors. PMID:26641933

  6. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for novel therapies and preventative strategies. Present animal models include several target species for hRSV, including chimpanzees, cattle, sheep, cotton rats, and mice, as well as alternative animal pneumovirus models, such as bovine RSV and pneumonia virus of mice. These diverse animal models reproduce different features of hRSV disease, and their utilization should therefore be based on the scientific hypothesis under investigation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the strengths and limitations of each of these animal models. Our intent is to provide a resource for investigators and an impetus for future research. PMID:21571908

  7. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Transmission and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... school or childcare. They can then transmit the virus to other members of the family. RSV can ...

  8. Atypical Presentations of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Nawal; Mohsin, Jalila; Al-Maani, Amal; Al-Macki, Nabil; Al-Ismaili, Suad

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) usually causes a lower respiratory tract infection in affected patients. RSV has also been infrequently linked to extrapulmonary diseases in children. We report four children who had unusually severe clinical manifestations of RSV infections requiring critical care admission. These patients presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in December 2013 with acute necrotising encephalopathy (ANE), acute fulminant hepatic failure with encephalopathy, pneumatoceles and croup. A unique presentation of ANE has not previously been reported in association with an RSV infection. All patients had a positive outcome and recovered fully with supportive management. PMID:26909220

  9. The changing landscape of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Polack, Fernando P

    2015-11-25

    Recognition of the acute and chronic burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) sparked a wave of initiatives to develop preventive and therapeutic products against the pathogen in recent years. RSV is a leading cause of hospitalization in infants in industrialized and developing countries, has been causally linked to recurrent wheezing during childhood, associated with pediatric asthma, and is an important cause of mortality in the first months of life in the developing world. Significant changes in the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and severe consequences of LRTI may emerge in the next decade with the advent of novel preventive strategies against RSV. This manuscript outlines some of these changes and discusses potential scenarios based on the current literature and experiences with other pathogens. PMID:26247900

  10. Clinical experience with respiratory syncytial virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A

    2003-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is at times associated with life-threatening lower respiratory tract illness in infancy. Severe infection during the first year of life may be an important risk factor or indicator for the development of asthma in early childhood. Severe infections primarily occur in healthy infants, and young infants and children with specific risk factors. However, RSV causes respiratory infections in all age groups. Indeed it is now recognized that RSV disease is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality in the geriatric population. RSV infection remains difficult to treat, and prevention is a worldwide goal. For this reason there has been an intensive effort to develop an effective and safe RSV vaccine. Initial infection with RSV affords limited protection to reinfection, yet repeated episodes decrease the risk for lower respiratory tract illness. In the 20 years from 1960 to 1980, trials of several candidate RSV vaccines failed to attain the desired safety and protection against natural infection. Some vaccine types either failed to elicit immunogenicity, as with the live subcutaneous vaccine, or resulted in exaggerated disease on natural exposure to the virus, as with the formalin-inactivated (FI) type. Currently vaccine candidates are being developed based on the molecular virology of RSV. Recent formulations of candidate RSV vaccines have focused on subunit vaccines [such as purified fusion protein (PFP)], subunit vaccines combined with nonspecific immune activating adjuvants, live attenuated vaccines (including cold passaged, temperature-sensitive or cpts mutants), genetically engineered live attenuated vaccines and polypeptide vaccines. PMID:12671459

  11. Phosphatidylinositol inhibits respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Mari; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Nagashima, Yoji; Fickes, Rachel; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nearly all children under age 2, and reinfection occurs throughout life, seriously impacting adults with chronic pulmonary diseases. Recent data demonstrate that the anionic pulmonary surfactant lipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) exerts a potent antiviral effect against RSV in vitro and in vivo. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) is also an anionic pulmonary surfactant phospholipid, and we tested its antiviral activity. PI liposomes completely suppress interleukin-8 production from BEAS2B epithelial cells challenged with RSV. The presence of PI during viral challenge in vitro reduces infection by a factor of >103. PI binds RSV with high affinity, preventing virus attachment to epithelial cells. Intranasal inoculation with PI along with RSV in mice reduces the viral burden 30-fold, eliminates the influx of inflammatory cells, and reduces tissue histopathology. Pharmacological doses of PI persist for >6 h in mouse lung. Pretreatment of mice with PI at 2 h prior to viral infection effectively suppresses inflammation and reduces the viral burden by 85%. These data demonstrate that PI has potent antiviral properties, a long residence time in the extracellular bronchoalveolar compartment, and a significant prophylaxis window. The findings demonstrate PG and PI have complementary roles as intrinsic, innate immune antiviral mediators in the lung. PMID:25561461

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus, infants and intensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Ieda Aparecida Correa; Riccetto, Adriana Gut Lopes; Morcillo, André Moreno; Arns, Clarice Weis; Baracat, Emílio Carlos Elias

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the presence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and to assess the clinical features of the disease in infants with acute low respiratory tract infection hospitalized at pediatric intensive care units (PICU) of two university teaching hospitals in São Paulo State, Brazil. Nasopharyngeal secretions were tested for the RSV by the polymerase chain reaction. Positive and negative groups for the virus were compared in terms of evolution under intensive care (mechanical pulmonary ventilation, medications, invasive procedures, complications and case fatality). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann Whitney and Fisher's exact tests. A total of 21 infants were assessed, 8 (38.1%) of whom were positive for RSV. The majority of patients were previously healthy while 85.7% required mechanical pulmonary ventilation, 20/21 patients presented with at least one complication, and the fatality rate was 14.3%. RSV positive and negative groups did not differ for the variables studied. Patients involved in this study were critically ill and needed multiple PICU resources, independently of the presence of RSV. Further studies involving larger cohorts are needed to assess the magnitude of the impact of RSV on the clinical evolution of infants admitted to the PICU in our settings. PMID:22358363

  13. Animal models of respiratory syncytial virus infection and disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of human respiratory syncytial virus pathogenesis and immunity has been hampered by its exquisite host specificity, and the difficulties encountered in adapting this virus to a murine host. The reasons for this obstacle are not well understood, but appear to reflect, at least in part, the ...

  14. Assessing Uncertainty in A2 Respiratory Syncytial Virus Viral Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    González-Parra, Gilberto; Dobrovolny, Hana M.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children younger than 1 year of age in the United States. Moreover, RSV is being recognized more often as a significant cause of respiratory illness in older adults. Although RSV has been studied both clinically and in vitro, a quantitative understanding of the infection dynamics is still lacking. In this paper, we study the effect of uncertainty in the main parameters of a viral kinetics model of RSV. We first characterize the RSV replication cycle and extract parameter values by fitting the mathematical model to in vivo data from eight human subjects. We then use Monte Carlo numerical simulations to determine how uncertainty in the parameter values will affect model predictions. We find that uncertainty in the infection rate, eclipse phase duration, and infectious lifespan most affect the predicted dynamics of RSV. This study provides the first estimate of in vivo RSV infection parameters, helping to quantify RSV dynamics. Our assessment of the effect of uncertainty will help guide future experimental design to obtain more precise parameter values. PMID:26451163

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus epidemiology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kanra, Güler; Tezcan, Sabahat; Yilmaz, Gülden

    2005-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of RSV among high-risk children admitted with respiratory symptoms in a developing country. This is a multicenter study conducted among children less than 24 months of age and admitted to the hospital with respiratory symptoms. The inclusion criteria included: lower respiratory tract symptoms on admission, gestational age less than 35 weeks, and admission age less than six months, or children less than 24 months of age with a diagnosis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia requiring medical treatment or intervention during the last six months or with an uncorrected congenital heart disease (other than patent ductus arteriosus). Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained with one of the three standard methods: nasopharyngeal aspirate, nasopharyngeal wash or nasopharyngeal swab. RSV antigen was determined by enzyme immunoassay using Abbott TESTPACK RSV (No. 8100/2027-16). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test and chi-square test. In this study, 332 children (135 females, 40.7%; 197 males, 59.3%) were included, and the nasopharyngeal specimens of 98 (29.5%) children were determined to be RSV-positive. There were no differences in sex, age of gestation, age of admission, family education, number of siblings and smoking at home for RSV-positive and -negative cases. Furthermore, underlying disease and duration of hospital and intensive care unit stay were similar among groups. Only otitis media was more common among RSV-positive cases. No fatality at hospital was recorded. Frozen samples revealed more negative results. Most cases presented during winter and the number of RSV-positive cases was higher in cold and economically poor areas. Premature children and children with underlying medical condition acquire RSV irrespective of other sociodemographic risk factors, and most of them

  16. Bronchiectasis exacerbations: The role of atypical bacteria and respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, Eugenios I; Balis, Evangelos; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Spanakis, Nicholas E; Tatsis, Georgios; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aside from the known role of common bacteria, there is a paucity of data regarding the possible role of atypical bacteria and viruses in exacerbations of non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. OBJECTIVE: To explore the possible role of atypical bacteria (namely, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as causative agents of bronchiectasis exacerbations. METHODS: A cohort of 33 patients was studied over a two-year period (one year follow-up for each patient). Polymerase chain reaction for the detection of M pneumoniae, C pneumoniae and RSV in bronchoalveolar lavage samples were performed during all visits. Antibody titres (immunoglobulin [Ig]M and IgG) against the aforementioned pathogens were also measured. In addition, cultures for common bacteria and mycobacteria were performed from the bronchoalveolar lavage samples. RESULTS: Fifteen patients experienced a total of 19 exacerbations during the study period. Although RSV was detected by polymerase chain reaction during stable visits in four patients, it was never detected during an exacerbation. M pneumoniae and C pneumoniae were never detected at stable visits or during exacerbations. IgM antibody titres for these three pathogens were negative in all patient visits. CONCLUSIONS: Atypical pathogens and RSV did not appear to be causative agents of bronchiectasis exacerbations. PMID:25874735

  17. Benzimidazole analogs inhibit respiratory syncytial virus G protein function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carrie W; Atkins, Colm; Pathak, Ashish; Gilbert, Brian E; Noah, James W

    2015-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a highly contagious Paramyxovirus that infects most children by age two, generating an estimated 75,000-125,000 hospitalizations in the U.S. annually. hRSV is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia among infants and children under 1year of age, with significant mortality among high-risk groups. A regulatory agency-approved vaccine is not available, and existing prophylaxis and therapies are limited to use in high-risk pediatric patients; thus additional therapies are sorely needed. Here, we identify a series of benzimidazole analogs that inhibit hRSV infection in vitro with high potency, using a previously-reported high-throughput screening assay. The lead compound, SRI 29365 (1-[6-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-3-yl]methyl-1H-benzimidazole), has an EC50 of 66μM and a selectivity >50. We identified additional compounds with varying potencies by testing commercially-available chemical analogs. Time-of-addition experiments indicated that SRI 29365 effectively inhibits viral replication only if present during the early stages of viral infection. We isolated a virus with resistance to SRI 29365 and identified mutations in the transmembrane domain of the viral G protein genomic sequence that suggested that the compound inhibits G-protein mediated attachment of hRSV to cells. Additional experiments with multiple cell types indicated that SRI 29365 antiviral activity correlates with the binding of cell surface heparin by full-length G protein. Lastly, SRI 29365 did not reduce hRSV titers or morbidity/mortality in efficacy studies using a cotton rat model. Although SRI 29365 and analogs inhibit hRSV replication in vitro, this work suggests that the G-protein may not be a valid drug target in vivo. PMID:26116756

  18. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. 866.3480 Section 866.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. Hot topics in the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Maximillian S; Patel, Sanjay; Openshaw, Peter

    2011-03-01

    The 7th International Respiratory Syncytial Virus Symposium took place in Hotel Blijdorp, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. The series has been running since 1996; this meeting took place after a 3-year gap, and was attended by approximately 200 clinicians, scientists and industry representatives from all over the world. The conference covered all aspects of respiratory syncytial virus disease, including virology, cell biology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, immunology, vaccines, antivirals and other therapeutic approaches. Reviews by invited keynote speakers were accompanied by oral and poster presentations, with ample opportunity for discussion of unpublished work. This article summarizes a small selection of hot topics from the meeting, focused on pathogenesis, therapeutics and vaccine development. PMID:21434796

  4. Structural basis of respiratory syncytial virus neutralization by motavizumab

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Kim, Albert; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-04-13

    Motavizumab is {approx}tenfold more potent than its predecessor, palivizumab (Synagis), the FDA-approved monoclonal antibody used to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The structure of motavizumab in complex with a 24-residue peptide corresponding to its epitope on the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein reveals the structural basis for this greater potency. Modeling suggests that motavizumab recognizes a different quaternary configuration of the F glycoprotein than that observed in a homologous structure.

  5. Dimerization of Matrix Protein Is Required for Budding of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Andreas; Maertens, Goedele N.; Farrell, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children and the elderly. The virus assembles and buds through the plasma membrane, forming elongated membrane filaments, but details of how this happens remain obscure. Oligomerization of the matrix protein (M) is a key step in the process of assembly and infectious virus production. In addition, it was suggested to affect the conformation of the fusion protein, the major current target for RSV antivirals, in the mature virus. The structure and assembly of M are thus key parameters in the RSV antiviral development strategy. The structure of RSV M was previously published as a monomer. Other paramyxovirus M proteins have been shown to dimerize, and biochemical data suggest that RSV M also dimerizes. Here, using size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering, we show that the protein is dimeric in solution. We also crystallized M in two crystal forms and show that it assembles into equivalent dimers in both lattices. Dimerization interface mutations destabilize the M dimer in vitro. To assess the biological relevance of dimerization, we used confocal imaging to show that dimerization interface mutants of M fail to assemble into viral filaments on the plasma membrane. Additionally, budding and release of virus-like particles are prevented in M mutants that fail to form filaments. Importantly, we show that M is biologically active as a dimer and that the switch from M dimers to higher-order oligomers triggers viral filament assembly and virus production. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of infantile bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The enormous burden of RSV makes it a major unmet target for a vaccine and antiviral drug therapy. Oligomerization of the matrix protein is a key step in the process of assembly and production of infectious virus, but the molecular

  6. [Infections with respiratory syncytial virus in North Lebanon--prevalence during winter 2008].

    PubMed

    Hamzé, M; Hlais, S; Rachkidi, J; Mallat, H; Lichaa, E; Zahab, N

    2010-05-01

    Between 1 December 2007 and 31 May 2008, we analysed 120 nasopharyngeal swabs for the presence respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in 120 children aged 15 days to 6 years, hospitalized in 2 hospitals in North Lebanon. Of the 120 samples, 32 were positive (26.7%) for RSV. There was a peak in January which progressively disappeared from February to May. Being positive for RSV was significantly associated with the presence of rhinorrhoea and dyspnoea as clinical symptoms and the absence of pneumonia signs on chest X-ray and the diagnosis of bronchitises or bronchiolitis. Testing for RSV is important in cases of respiratory infections in children as it may limit unnecessary prescription of antibiotics. PMID:20799555

  7. In Hot Pursuit of the First Vaccine Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Chang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection, such as bronchiolitis, bronchitis, or pneumonia, in both infants and the elderly. Despite the global burden of diseases attributable to RSV infection, no clinically approved vaccine is available, and a humanized monoclonal antibody for prophylaxis is not readily affordable in developing countries. There are several hurdles to the successful development of RSV vaccines: immune-vulnerable target populations such as premature infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people; safety concerns associated with vaccine-enhanced diseases; repeated infection; and waning memory. To develop successful strategies for the prevention of RSV infection, it is necessary to understand the protective and pathologic roles of host immune responses to RSV infection. In this review, we will summarize the positive and negative relationship between RSV infection and host immunity and discuss strategies for the development of the first successful RSV vaccine. PMID:27189271

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus receptor expression in the mouse and viral tropism.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, Aria; Mastrangelo, Peter; Griffin, Jennifer K; Moraes, Theo J; Hegele, Richard G

    2015-04-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects airway epithelium and can cause serious illnesses such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. With the discovery of cell-surface nucleolin as a fusion receptor for RSV, the question arose as to whether nucleolin could explain RSV tropism in vivo. Here, we report the distribution of cell-surface nucleolin expression in tissues of normal mice and how this distribution of expression relates to what is known about RSV tropism and its clinical manifestations. Our results show evidence of cell-surface nucleolin expression in the respiratory tract. In addition, cell-surface nucleolin is expressed in tissues outside of the respiratory tract, many of which correspond to previous reports of tissue-specific RSV infection, and others that may allude to additional potential sites for RSV infection in vivo. Furthermore, our work provides a foundation for the investigation of nucleolin's physiological function in various healthy mammalian tissues. PMID:25374027

  9. In Hot Pursuit of the First Vaccine Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection, such as bronchiolitis, bronchitis, or pneumonia, in both infants and the elderly. Despite the global burden of diseases attributable to RSV infection, no clinically approved vaccine is available, and a humanized monoclonal antibody for prophylaxis is not readily affordable in developing countries. There are several hurdles to the successful development of RSV vaccines: immune-vulnerable target populations such as premature infants, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people; safety concerns associated with vaccine-enhanced diseases; repeated infection; and waning memory. To develop successful strategies for the prevention of RSV infection, it is necessary to understand the protective and pathologic roles of host immune responses to RSV infection. In this review, we will summarize the positive and negative relationship between RSV infection and host immunity and discuss strategies for the development of the first successful RSV vaccine. PMID:27189271

  10. Pulmonary immunity and immunopathology: lessons from respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Matthew R; Varga, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and is an important source of morbidity and mortality in the elderly and immunocompromised. This review will discuss the humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses to RSV infection and how these responses are shaped in the immature immune system of the infant and the aged environment of the elderly. Furthermore, we will provide an overview of our current understanding of the role the various arms of the adaptive immune response play in mediating the delicate balance between the successful elimination of the virus from the host and the induction of immunopathology. Efficacious immunization against RSV remains a high priority within the field and we will highlight recent advances made in vaccine design. PMID:18844597

  11. Blocking Respiratory Syncytial Virus Entry: A Story with Twists.

    PubMed

    Weisshaar, Marco; Cox, Robert; Plemper, Richard K

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for majority of infant hospitalizations due to viral infections. Despite its clinical importance, no vaccine against RSV or effective antiviral therapy is available. Several structural classes of small-molecule RSV entry inhibitor have been described and one compound has advanced to clinical testing. Mutations in either one of two resistance hot spots in the F protein mediate unusual pan-resistance to all of these inhibitor classes. Based on the biochemical characterization of resistant viruses and structural insight into the RSV F trimer, we propose a kinetic escape model as the origin of pan-resistance. Since a resistant RSV remained pathogenic in the mouse model, pan-resistance mutations could emerge rapidly in circulating RSV strains. We evaluate clinical implications and discuss consequences for the design of future RSV drug discovery campaigns. PMID:25961744

  12. Vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus: The time has finally come.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2016-06-24

    Respiratory syncytial virus causes a significant public health burden, particularly in very young infants and the frail elderly. The legacy of enhanced RSV disease (ERD) from a whole formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine, and the complex biology of the virus and the neonate have delayed the development of effective vaccines. However, new insights into factors associated with ERD and breakthroughs in understanding the antigenic structure of the fusion (F) glycoprotein have increased optimism that vaccine development is possible. This has led to investment of time and resources by industry, regulatory authorities, governments, and nonprofit organizations to develop the infrastructure needed to make the advanced clinical development of RSV vaccine candidates a reality. PMID:27182820

  13. Peptide-based candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim; Mett, Valentina; Davidson, Carley; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Gilliam, Suzan; Farese, Ann; Macvittie, Thomas; Mann, Dean

    2005-03-18

    We engineered a 21-mer peptide representing amino acids 170-190 of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) G protein as a fusion with the Alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) coat protein (CP), produced recombinant AlMV particles presenting this peptide (VMR-RSV) on their surfaces and tested the immunogenicity in vitro in human dendritic cells and in vivo in non-human primates. Significant pathogen-specific immune responses were generated in both systems: (i) human dendritic cells armed with VMR-RSV generated vigorous CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses; (ii) non-human primates that received these particles responded by mounting strong cellular and humoral immune responses. This approach may validate the use of a novel RSV vaccine delivery vehicle in humans. PMID:15755607

  14. Neonatal Calf Infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Drawing Parallels to the Disease in Human Infants

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Randy E.; McGill, Jodi L.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Lippolis, John D.; Reinhardt, Timothy A.; Nonnecke, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children, such as an age-dependent susceptibility. In addition, comparable microscopic lesions consisting of bronchiolar neutrophilic infiltrates, epithelial cell necrosis, and syncytial cell formation are observed. Further, our studies have shown an upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in RSV-infected calves, including IL-12p40 and CXCL8 (IL-8). This finding is consistent with increased levels of IL-8 observed in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Since rodents lack IL-8, neonatal calves can be useful for studies of IL-8 regulation in response to RSV infection. We have recently found that vitamin D in milk replacer diets can be manipulated to produce calves differing in circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The results to date indicate that although the vitamin D intracrine pathway is activated during RSV infection, pro-inflammatory mediators frequently inhibited by the vitamin D intacrine pathway in vitro are, in fact, upregulated or unaffected in lungs of infected calves. This review will summarize available data that provide parallels between bovine RSV infection in neonatal calves and human RSV in infants. PMID:23342375

  15. Neonatal calf infection with respiratory syncytial virus: drawing parallels to the disease in human infants.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Randy E; McGill, Jodi L; Palmer, Mitchell V; Lippolis, John D; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Nonnecke, Brian J

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common viral cause of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infections. It is estimated that RSV infections result in more than 100,000 deaths annually worldwide. Bovine RSV is a cause of enzootic pneumonia in young dairy calves and summer pneumonia in nursing beef calves. Furthermore, bovine RSV plays a significant role in bovine respiratory disease complex, the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among feedlot cattle. Infection of calves with bovine RSV shares features in common with RSV infection in children, such as an age-dependent susceptibility. In addition, comparable microscopic lesions consisting of bronchiolar neutrophilic infiltrates, epithelial cell necrosis, and syncytial cell formation are observed. Further, our studies have shown an upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in RSV-infected calves, including IL-12p40 and CXCL8 (IL-8). This finding is consistent with increased levels of IL-8 observed in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Since rodents lack IL-8, neonatal calves can be useful for studies of IL-8 regulation in response to RSV infection. We have recently found that vitamin D in milk replacer diets can be manipulated to produce calves differing in circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. The results to date indicate that although the vitamin D intracrine pathway is activated during RSV infection, pro-inflammatory mediators frequently inhibited by the vitamin D intacrine pathway in vitro are, in fact, upregulated or unaffected in lungs of infected calves. This review will summarize available data that provide parallels between bovine RSV infection in neonatal calves and human RSV in infants. PMID:23342375

  16. [Serological studies of the role of the respiratory syncytial virus in acute respiratory diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Vancea, D; Saşcă, C; Matinca, D; Ivanof, A

    1975-01-01

    The presence of the syncytial respiratory virus was determined by CF in 281 children admitted with acute respiratory diseases between 15 Sept. 1971 and 30 Dec. 1973, using the Long antigen prepared in the "St. Nicolau" Institute of Virology, Bucharest. In 38 children (13.5%) a serologic diagnosis of infection with the syncytial virus was established; in the other cases of respiratory infection of different etiology, antibodies to the syncytial virus were found in low but constant titers in both serum samples. The presence of these antibodies in a high proportion of the children points to the wide circulation of the syncytial virus in the infantile population, with all its clinico-epidemiologic implications. PMID:173009

  17. GS-5806 Inhibits Pre- to Postfusion Conformational Changes of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Weimei; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Wong, Jinny S.; Hung, Magdeleine; Brendza, Katherine M.; Perron, Michel; Jordan, Robert; Sperandio, David; Liu, Xiaohong; Mackman, Richard; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-01-01

    GS-5806 is a small-molecule inhibitor of human respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein-mediated viral entry. During viral entry, the fusion protein undergoes major conformational changes, resulting in fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. This process is reproduced in vitro using a purified, truncated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein. GS-5806 blocked these conformational changes, suggesting a possible mechanism for antiviral activity. PMID:26324264

  18. GS-5806 inhibits pre- to postfusion conformational changes of the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Dharmaraj; Xing, Weimei; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Wong, Jinny S; Hung, Magdeleine; Brendza, Katherine M; Perron, Michel; Jordan, Robert; Sperandio, David; Liu, Xiaohong; Mackman, Richard; Sakowicz, Roman

    2015-11-01

    GS-5806 is a small-molecule inhibitor of human respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein-mediated viral entry. During viral entry, the fusion protein undergoes major conformational changes, resulting in fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. This process is reproduced in vitro using a purified, truncated respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein. GS-5806 blocked these conformational changes, suggesting a possible mechanism for antiviral activity. PMID:26324264

  19. RSV604, a Novel Inhibitor of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Joanna; Abbott, Elizabeth; Alber, Dagmar G.; Baxter, Robert C.; Bithell, Sian K.; Henderson, Elisa A.; Carter, Malcolm C.; Chambers, Phil; Chubb, Ann; Cockerill, G. Stuart; Collins, Peter L.; Dowdell, Verity C. L.; Keegan, Sally J.; Kelsey, Richard D.; Lockyer, Michael J.; Luongo, Cindy; Najarro, Pilar; Pickles, Raymond J.; Simmonds, Mark; Taylor, Debbie; Tyms, Stan; Wilson, Lara J.; Powell, Kenneth L.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of lower respiratory tract infections worldwide, yet no effective vaccine or antiviral treatment is available. Here we report the discovery and initial development of RSV604, a novel benzodiazepine with submicromolar anti-RSV activity. It proved to be equipotent against all clinical isolates tested of both the A and B subtypes of the virus. The compound has a low rate of in vitro resistance development. Sequencing revealed that the resistant virus had mutations within the nucleocapsid protein. This is a novel mechanism of action for anti-RSV compounds. In a three-dimensional human airway epithelial cell model, RSV604 was able to pass from the basolateral side of the epithelium effectively to inhibit virus replication after mucosal inoculation. RSV604, which is currently in phase II clinical trials, represents the first in a new class of RSV inhibitors and may have significant potential for the effective treatment of RSV disease. PMID:17576833

  20. [Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis following adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus infection].

    PubMed

    de Suremain, A; Somrani, R; Bourdat-Michel, G; Pinel, N; Morel-Baccard, C; Payen, V

    2015-05-01

    Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) is responsible for nearly 10% of acute renal failure (ARF) cases in children. It is mostly drug-induced, but in a few cases viruses are involved, probably by an indirect mechanism. An immune-competent 13-month-old boy was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe ARF with anuria in a context of fever, cough, and rhinorrhea lasting 1 week. The kidney biopsy performed early brought out tubulointerstitial damage with mild infiltrate of lymphocytes, without any signs of necrosis. There were no virus inclusion bodies, no interstitial hemorrhage, and no glomerular or vascular damage. Other causes of TIN were excluded: there was no biological argument for an immunological, immune, or drug-induced cause. Adenovirus (ADV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) were positive in respiratory multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in nasal aspirate but not in blood, urine, and renal tissue. The patient underwent dialysis for 10 days but the response to corticosteroid therapy was quickly observed within 48 h. The mechanism of TIN associated with virus infection is unknown. However, it may be immune-mediated to be able to link severe renal dysfunction and ADV and/or RSV invasion of the respiratory tract. PMID:25842199

  1. Revised recommendations concerning palivizumab prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

    PubMed

    Bollani, Lina; Baraldi, Eugenio; Chirico, Gaetano; Dotta, Andrea; Lanari, Marcello; Del Vecchio, Antonello; Manzoni, Paolo; Boldrini, Antonio; Paolillo, Piermichele; Di Fabio, Sandra; Orfeo, Luigi; Stronati, Mauro; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus infections are one of the leading causes of severe respiratory diseases that require hospitalization and, in some cases, intensive care. Once resolved, there may be respiratory sequelae of varying severity. The lack of effective treatments for bronchiolitis and the lack of vaccines for RSV accentuate the role of prevention in decreasing the impact of this disease. Prevention of bronchiolitis strongly relies on the adoption of environment and the hygienic behavior measures; an additional prophylactic effect may be offered, in selected cases, by Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody produced by recombinant DNA technology, able to prevent RSV infection by blocking viral replication.After many years the Italian Society of Neonatology, on the basis of the most recent scientific knowledge, has decided to revise recommendations for the use of palivizumab in the prevention of RSV infection. PMID:26670908

  2. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Role of Innate Immunity in Clearance and Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infections have worldwide records. The virus is responsible for bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma in humans of different age groups. Premature infants, young children, and immunocompromised individuals are prone to severe HRSV infection that may lead to death. Based on worldwide estimations, millions of cases were reported in both developed and developing countries. In fact, HRSV symptoms develop mainly as a result of host immune response. Due to inability to establish long lasting adaptive immunity, HRSV infection is recurrent and hence impairs vaccine development. Once HRSV attached to the airway epithelia, interaction with the host innate immune components starts. HRSV interaction with pulmonary innate defenses is crucial in determining the disease outcome. Infection of alveolar epithelial cells triggers a cascade of events that lead to recruitment and activation of leukocyte populations. HRSV clearance is mediated by a number of innate leukocytes, including macrophages, natural killer cells, eosinophils, dendritic cells, and neutrophils. Regulation of these cells is mediated by cytokines, chemokines, and other immune mediators. Although the innate immune system helps to clear HRSV infection, it participates in disease progression such as bronchiolitis and asthma. Resolving the mechanisms by which HRSV induces pathogenesis, different possible interactions between the virus and immune components, and immune cells interplay are essential for developing new effective vaccines. Therefore, the current review focuses on how the pulmonary innate defenses mediate HRSV clearance and to what extent they participate in disease progression. In addition, immune responses associated with HRSV vaccines will be discussed. PMID:26679242

  3. Ameliorating Effect of Dietary Xylitol on Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (hRSV) Infection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mei Ling; Wi, Ga Ram; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. The lack of proper prophylactics and therapeutics for controlling hRSV infection has been of great concern worldwide. Xylitol is a well-known sugar substitute and its effect against bacteria in the oral cavity is well known. However, little is known of its effect on viral infections. In this study, the effect of dietary xylitol on hRSV infection was investigated in a mouse model for the first time. Mice received xylitol for 14 d prior to virus challenge and for a further 3 d post challenge. Significantly larger reductions in lung virus titers were observed in the mice receiving xylitol than in the controls receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In addition, fewer CD3(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) lymphocytes, whose numbers reflect inflammatory status, were recruited in the mice receiving xylitol. These results indicate that dietary xylitol can ameliorate hRSV infections and reduce inflammation-associated immune responses to hRSV infection. PMID:27040626

  4. A recombinant influenza virus vaccine expressing the F protein of respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Wendy; Ozawa, Makoto; Hatta, Masato; Orozco, Esther; Martínez, Máximo B; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Infections with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) rank high among the most common human respiratory diseases worldwide. Previously, we developed a replication-incompetent influenza virus by replacing the coding sequence of the PB2 gene, which encodes one of the viral RNA polymerase subunits, with that of a reporter gene. Here, we generated a PB2-knockout recombinant influenza virus expressing the F protein of RSV (PB2-RSVF virus) and tested its potential as a bivalent vaccine. In mice intranasally immunized with the PB2-RSVF virus, we detected high levels of antibodies against influenza virus, but not RSV. PB2-RSVF virus-immunized mice were protected from a lethal challenge with influenza virus but experienced severe body weight loss when challenged with RSV, indicating that PB2-RSVF vaccination enhanced RSV-associated disease. These results highlight one of the difficulties of developing an effective bivalent vaccine against influenza virus and RSV infections. PMID:24292020

  5. Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muggeridge, Martin I. . E-mail: mmugge@lsuhsc.edu; Grantham, Michael L.; Johnson, F. Brent

    2004-10-25

    Small polykaryocytes resulting from cell fusion are found in herpes simplex virus (HSV) lesions in patients, but their significance for viral spread and pathogenesis is unclear. Although syncytial variants causing extensive fusion in tissue culture can be readily isolated from laboratory strains, they are rarely found in clinical isolates, suggesting that extensive cell fusion may be deleterious in vivo. Syncytial mutations have previously been identified for several laboratory strains, but not for clinical isolates of HSV type 2. To address this deficiency, we studied a recent syncytial clinical isolate, finding it to be a mixture of two syncytial and one nonsyncytial strain. The two syncytial strains have novel mutations in glycoprotein B, and in vitro cell fusion assays confirmed that they are responsible for syncytium formation. This panel of clinical strains may be ideal for examining the effect of increased cell fusion on pathogenesis.

  6. Immunology of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in calves.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Efrain; Taylor, Geraldine

    2015-07-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease in young calves. The virus is genetically and antigenically closely related to human (H)RSV, which is a major cause of respiratory disease in young infants. As a natural pathogen of calves, BRSV infection recapitulates the pathogenesis of respiratory disease in man more faithfully than semi-permissive, animal models of HRSV infection. With the increasing availability of immunological reagents, the calf can be used to dissect the pathogenesis of and mechanisms of immunity to RSV infection, to analyse the ways in which the virus proteins interact with components of the innate response, and to evaluate RSV vaccine strategies. Passively transferred, neutralising bovine monoclonal antibodies, which recognise the same epitopes in the HRSV and BRSV fusion (F) protein, can protect calves against BRSV infection, and depletion of different T cells subsets in calves has highlighted the importance of CD8(+) T cells in viral clearance. Calves can be used to model maternal-antibody mediated suppression of RSV vaccine efficacy, and to increase understanding of the mechanisms responsible for RSV vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease. PMID:25553595

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis--the story so far.

    PubMed

    Simoes, E A F; Groothuis, J R

    2002-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common and highly contagious pathogen that infects nearly all children by the age of 2 years. It is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide among certain high-risk paediatric populations. Therapy is sub-optimal for RSV, thus treatment focuses on ameliorating symptoms. Since discovery of the virus in the 1950s, efforts have been ongoing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. These efforts have met with serious obstacles. Passive immunoprophylaxis presents a viable alternative to active immunization. In 1998, the genetically engineered humanized monoclonal antibody (palivizumab) was granted FDA (Food and Drug Administration) approval for prophylaxis of high-risk children in the United States; EMEA (European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products) approval followed in 1999 for Europe. It is now approved in over 45 countries worldwide. Palivizumab was shown to significantly reduce RSV-related hospitalizations in North America and Europe with few adverse effects. Clinical trial and outcomes data documenting experience with palivizumab to date continue to extend the initial safety and efficacy observations. PMID:11996400

  8. Hepatitis during respiratory syncytial virus infection – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kirin, Branka Kristić; Topić, Renata Zrinski; Dodig, Slavica

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the most common cause of hospitalization in infants and small children. The aim was to present a 13-months old boy diagnosed with acute airway infection, acute otitis media (AOM) and hepatitis during the RSV-infection. Material and methods: Serum catalytic activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotranspherase (AST), alanine aminotranspherase (ALT), gamma glutamyl transpherase (GGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), and concentrations of bilirubin were monitored during hospitalization and at control examination. Results: The child had clinical signs and symptoms of respiratory failure, AOM, and laboratory findings of virus infection and liver disease. On admission, catalytic activities of enzymes were markedly increased, especially the activity of ALP (10333 U/L, i.e. 24-fold increase in comparison with the upper reference limit). The highest increased in AST (339 U/L, 4.5-fold), ALT (475 U/L, 10.3-fold) and LD (545 U/L, 1.5-fold) were registered on the 3rd day, and the highest increase in GGT (68 U/L, 3.1-fold) occurred on the 11th day. Seven weeks after discharge AST, ALT, GGT and LD decreased into reference range, and ALP remain mildly increased (478 U/L, 1.1 fold increase). RSV was confirmed in nasal lavage fluid. Conclusion: Laboratory results in patient with RSV infection needs to be interpreted in the light of both, respiratory and extrapulmonary manifestations of the infection, respectively. PMID:23457772

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus: its transmission in the hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Hall, C B

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) over the past two decades has been recognized as the most important cause of lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children. Recently, it has also been identified as a major nosocomial hazard on pediatric wards. The potential for RSV to spread on such wards is underlined by several singular characteristics of RSV. It arrives in yearly epidemics and is highly contagious in all age groups. Immunity is of short duration, allowing repeated infections to occur. Thus, during an epidemic 20--40 percent of infants admitted for other conditions may acquire nosocomial RSV infection, as well as 50 percent of the ward personnel. The usual infection control procedures for respiratory illnesses have had limited success in controlling the spread of RSV. This may be due in part to the modes of transmission of RSV. Inoculation occurs mainly through the eye and nose, rather than the mouth. This may be via large-particle aerosols or droplets, requiring close contact. The virus, however, does not seem capable of traversing distances by small-particle aerosols. Nevertheless, it is able to remain infectious on various environmental surfaces, suggesting fomites as a source of spread. Indeed, inoculation after touching such contaminated surfaces can occur, and may be a major second means of spread, in hospitals as well as in families. PMID:6758370

  10. Functional correlations of respiratory syncytial virus proteins to intrinsic disorder.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jillian N; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N; Teng, Michael N

    2016-04-26

    Protein intrinsic disorder is an important characteristic demonstrated by the absence of higher order structure, and is commonly detected in multifunctional proteins encoded by RNA viruses. Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins exhibit high flexibility and solvent accessibility, which permit several distinct protein functions, including but not limited to binding of multiple partners and accessibility for post-translational modifications. IDR-containing viral proteins can therefore execute various functional roles to enable productive viral replication. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a globally circulating, non-segmented, negative sense (NNS) RNA virus that causes severe lower respiratory infections. In this study, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of predicted intrinsic disorder of the RSV proteome to better understand the functional role of RSV protein IDRs. We included 27 RSV strains to sample major RSV subtypes and genotypes, as well as geographic and temporal isolate differences. Several types of disorder predictions were applied to the RSV proteome, including per-residue (PONDR®-FIT and PONDR® VL-XT), binary (CH, CDF, CH-CDF), and disorder-based interactions (ANCHOR and MoRFpred). We classified RSV IDRs by size, frequency and function. Finally, we determined the functional implications of RSV IDRs by mapping predicted IDRs to known functional domains of each protein. Identification of RSV IDRs within functional domains improves our understanding of RSV pathogenesis in addition to providing potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to other NNS viruses that encode essential multifunctional proteins for the elucidation of viral protein regions that can be manipulated for attenuation of viral replication. PMID:27062995

  11. Enhancement of mucosal and cellular immune response in mice by vaccination with respiratory syncytial virus DNA encapsulated with transfersome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Ding, Yunzhen; Yang, Yi

    2008-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the principal causes of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in young children, and currently there is no safe and effective vaccine. DNA vaccines encoding RSV surface glycoproteins are one option being examined. We evaluated the topical delivery of transfersome encapsulated DNA vaccine for its ability to confer protection against RSV challenge in mice and to determine whether such delivery could induce strong and specific immunity against RSV. After topical vaccination with a transfersome encapsulated RSV-F DNA, both RSV-specific mucosal antibody response and IFN-gamma-producing cells were detected. Intramuscular vaccination of naked RSV-F DNA only induced a significant anti-RSV IgG antibody response but no remarkable sIgA antibody and virus-specific cellular activity. Lungs from mice receiving topical vaccination had fewer histopathologic anomalies after RSV challenge than did mice receiving intramuscular vaccination or controls. Immunization with transfersome encapsulated F gene encoding DNA induces mucosal and cellular immune responses in mice that appear to produce protective immunity against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:19115938

  12. Evaluation of immunoglobulin E-specific antibodies and viral antigens in nasopharyngeal secretions of children with respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Russi, J C; Delfraro, A; Borthagaray, M D; Velazquez, B; García-Barreno, B; Hortal, M

    1993-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassays were developed to detect the presence of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and respiratory syncytial (RS) virus structural proteins in nasopharyngeal secretions in order to improve the knowledge on some aspects of the pathogenesis of severe acute lower respiratory tract infections caused by RS virus. These assays were used to analyze clinical specimens from children with RS virus-associated infections (bronchiolitis and pneumonia), and the findings were correlated with the patients' clinical symptoms. The results indicate the presence of specific IgE against the two external glycoproteins (G and F) and the absence of detectable IgE levels for the internal viral antigens. There was a correlation between the levels of IgE-specific antibodies and the amount of viral protein F in the secretions, indicating that the IgE response against the viral glycoproteins might be related to the antigen load. In addition, a correlation was found between higher levels of both viral protein F-specific IgE and F antigen with higher respiratory rates in children with pneumonia. These findings may be relevant because they suggest an association between the virus load and the immune response in the pathogenesis of RS virus infections. PMID:8463392

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection: a decade of contributions.

    PubMed

    Blanco del Val, Alfredo; Eiros Bouza, José María; Mayo Iscar, Agustín; Bachillar Luque, M Rosario; Blanco del Val, Beatriz; Sánchez Porto, Antonio; Ortiz de Lejarzu, Raúl

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the main cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children under 2 years, its distribution is worldwide and even in very different climatic conditions, it appears to have similar features, certainly knowing it will produce a significant amount of infections each year. We present the results of a retrospective review of positive cases for RSV detected in the Microbiology Laboratory of the Hospital Clinico Universitario of Valladolid in the period between 1990 and 2000, dealing with its presentation at the given time with the weather variables of temperature and humidity. Every year, we have observed as the clustering of cases was associated with two outbreaks, one at the beginning and the other at the end of the year, coinciding with the coldest and wettest months. This pattern has been repeated every revised year, according to an annual rate, with the onset of the first insulation between the months of October and February, and of the last ending between March and June, showing the highest peaks of isolation during the month of February. Therefore, every year we observe a break or seasonal slip matching the months with higher temperatures and lower humidity. PMID:22992556

  14. Epidemiology of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Bernhard; Kurath, Stefan; Manzoni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in preterm infants with and without chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia, BPD). The year-to-year and seasonal variations in RSV activity are key aspects of RSV epidemiology, and knowledge/monitoring of local RSV activity is mandatory for guidance of prophylaxis with the monoclonal antibodies palivizumab and in the near future motavizumab. Morbidity expressed in rates of hospitalizations attributable to RSV illness revealed a mean of 10 percent in preterm infants without and 19 percent (p=0.016) with BPD. Mortality rates diverged widely, and case fatality rates have been reported to range from 0 to 12 percent. The typical clinical picture of lower respiratory tract infection is not different in term and preterm infants, but rates of apnoeas are significantly increased in preterms, ranging from 4.9 to 37.5 percent with decreasing rates observed in more recent studies. Until a RSV vaccine is developed and will be available, prophylaxis with palivizumab is the only preventative strategy other than hand hygiene and contact measures that significantly reduces RSV hospitalization rates in preterm infants both with and without BPD. PMID:22262986

  15. Challenges and opportunities in developing respiratory syncytial virus therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Simões, Eric A F; DeVincenzo, John P; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, Louis; Crowe, James E; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G; Hodinka, Richard L; Smyth, Rosalind L; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E; Whitley, Richard J

    2015-03-15

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. The practicalities of clinical trials and establishing reliable outcome measures in different target groups were discussed in the context of the regulatory pathways that could accelerate the translation of promising compounds into licensed agents. RSV drug development is hampered by the perceptions of a relatively small and fragmented market that may discourage major pharmaceutical company investment. Conversely, the public health need is far too large for RSV to be designated an orphan or neglected disease. Recent advances in understanding RSV epidemiology, improved point-of-care diagnostics, and identification of candidate antiviral drugs argue that the major obstacles to drug development can and will be overcome. Further progress will depend on studies of disease pathogenesis and knowledge provided from controlled clinical trials of these new therapeutic agents. The use of combinations of inhibitors that have different mechanisms of action may be necessary to increase antiviral potency and reduce the risk of resistance emergence. PMID:25713060

  16. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Infants Affected by Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Capretti, Maria Grazia; Lazzarotto, Tiziana; Faldella, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare inherited disorders that may lead to frequent and often severe acute respiratory infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most frequent pathogens during early infancy and the infection is more severe in immunocompromised infants than in healthy infants, as a result of impaired T- and B-cell immune response unable to efficaciously neutralize viral replication, with subsequent increased viral shedding and potentially lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Several authors have reported a severe clinical course after RSV infections in infants and children with primary and acquired immunodeficiencies. Environmental prophylaxis is essential in order to reduce the infection during the epidemic season in hospitalized immunocompromised infants. Prophylaxis with palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the RSV F protein, is currently recommended in high-risk infants born prematurely, with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease. Currently however the prophylaxis is not routinely recommended in infants with primary immunodeficiency, although some authors propose the extension of prophylaxis to this high risk population. PMID:25089282

  17. Impaired learning resulting from respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Janyra A; Bohmwald, Karen; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Riquelme, Sebastián A; Cortés, Claudia M; Valenzuela, Javier A; Sandoval, Rodrigo A; Pancetti, Floria C; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2013-05-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of respiratory illness in infants worldwide. Neurologic alterations, such as seizures and ataxia, have been associated with RSV infection. We demonstrate the presence of RSV proteins and RNA in zones of the brain--such as the hippocampus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and brainstem--of infected mice. One month after disease resolution, rodents showed behavioral and cognitive impairment in marble burying (MB) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Our data indicate that the learning impairment caused by RSV is a result of a deficient induction of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus of infected animals. In addition, immunization with recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) expressing RSV nucleoprotein prevented behavioral disorders, corroborating the specific effect of RSV infection over the central nervous system. Our findings provide evidence that RSV can spread from the airways to the central nervous system and cause functional alterations to the brain, both of which can be prevented by proper immunization against RSV. PMID:23650398

  18. Prevalence of human respiratory syncytial virus circulating in Iran.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Vahid; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Yavarian, Jila; Bont, Louis; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory infection during early childhood and is associated with a great burden on patients, parents, and society. While no treatment is yet available, results from recent phase 2 clinical trials of cell-entry inhibitors and RSV vaccines are promising. To prepare for introduction of these novel therapeutics, good understanding of its molecular epidemiology and continuous RSV surveillance data are necessary. This paper provides an overview of RSV prevalence and genotype distribution in Iran from 1996 to 2013. This meta-analysis includes 21 published studies. In total, 775 (18.7%) of 4140 respiratory specimens were positive for RSV infection. The male-female ratio of RSV-positive patients was 1.5:1. Significant peaks of RSV infection were detected during the cold season (November-March). RSV infection was mainly observed in patients <2 years of age. Phylogenetic studies showed that genotypes GA1, GA2, GA5, and BA co-circulated in Iran in 2007-2013. This review highlights the necessity of introducing standard molecular surveillance programs to inform the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological characteristics of various RSV genotypes. Improved understanding of the molecular epidemiology will be useful for development of novel RSV therapeutics. PMID:26143136

  19. Gene-based vaccine approaches for respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Loomis, Rebecca J; Johnson, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    A respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine has remained elusive for decades, largely due to the failure of a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine in the 1960s that resulted in enhanced disease upon RSV exposure in the immunized individuals. Vaccine development has also been hindered by the incomplete immunity conferred by natural infection allowing for re-infection at any time, and the immature immune system and circulating maternal antibodies present in the neonate, the primary target for a vaccine. This chapter will review the use of gene delivery, both nonviral and viral, as a potential vaccine approach for human RSV. Many of these gene-based vaccines vectors elicit protective immune responses in animal models. None of the RSV gene-based platforms have progressed into clinical trials, mostly due to uncertainty regarding the direct translation of animal model results to humans and the hesitancy to invest in costly clinical trials with the potential for unclear and complicated immune responses. The continued development of RSV vaccine gene-based approaches is warranted because of their inherent flexibility with regard to composition and administration. It is likely that multiple candidate vaccines will reach human testing in the next few years. PMID:24362696

  20. Protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection by DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Sambhara, S; Li, C X; Ewasyshyn, M; Parrington, M; Caterini, J; James, O; Cates, G; Du, R P; Klein, M

    1998-08-17

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly and is a continuing challenge for vaccine development. A murine T helper cell (Th) type 2 response associates with enhanced lung pathology, which has been observed in past infant trials using formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In this study, we have engineered an optimized plasmid DNA vector expressing the RSV fusion (F) protein (DNA-F). DNA-F was as effective as live RSV in mice at inducing neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, protection against infection, and high mRNA expression of lung interferon gamma after viral challenge. Furthermore, a DNA-F boost could switch a preestablished anti-RSV Th2 response towards a Th1 response. Critical elements for the optimization of the plasmid constructs included expression of a secretory form of the F protein and the presence of the rabbit beta-globin intron II sequence upstream of the F-encoding sequence. In addition, anti-F systemic immune response profile could be modulated by the route of DNA-F delivery: intramuscular immunization resulted in balanced responses, whereas intradermal immunization resulted in a Th2 type of response. Thus, DNA-F immunization may provide a novel and promising RSV vaccination strategy. PMID:9705950

  1. Challenges and Opportunities in Developing Respiratory Syncytial Virus Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Eric A. F.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, Louis; Crowe, James E.; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G.; Hodinka, Richard L.; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E.; Whitley, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. The practicalities of clinical trials and establishing reliable outcome measures in different target groups were discussed in the context of the regulatory pathways that could accelerate the translation of promising compounds into licensed agents. RSV drug development is hampered by the perceptions of a relatively small and fragmented market that may discourage major pharmaceutical company investment. Conversely, the public health need is far too large for RSV to be designated an orphan or neglected disease. Recent advances in understanding RSV epidemiology, improved point-of-care diagnostics, and identification of candidate antiviral drugs argue that the major obstacles to drug development can and will be overcome. Further progress will depend on studies of disease pathogenesis and knowledge provided from controlled clinical trials of these new therapeutic agents. The use of combinations of inhibitors that have different mechanisms of action may be necessary to increase antiviral potency and reduce the risk of resistance emergence. PMID:25713060

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9’s role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR. PMID:26284919

  3. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  4. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.Air samplers were placed at a short (60-80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients' rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens.All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients' rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects.The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  5. Respiratory viruses from hospitalized children with severe pneumonia in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pneumonia remains a leading cause of child death in developing countries. The viruses in severe pneumonia remain poorly defined. Methods The study was conducted at the Eastern Visayas Regional Medical Center in Tacloban City, Philippines from May 2008 to May 2009. Patients aged 8 days to 13 years old who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics with severe pneumonia were enrolled for the study. Upon admission, polymerase chain reaction was performed using nasopharyngeal swabs and blood cultures to detect respiratory viruses and bacteria, respectively. Result Among the 819 patients enrolled, at least one virus was detected in 501 cases (61.2%). In addition, 423 cases were positive for a single virus while bacteria were detected in the blood culture sample of 31 cases. The most commonly detected viruses were human rhinoviruses (n = 189), including types A (n = 103), B (n = 17), and C (n = 69), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 165). Novel viruses such as human metapneumovirus, human coronavirus NL63, human bocavirus, and human polyomaviruses WU and KI were also detected. There were 70 deaths, and one or more viruses were detected in 35 (50%) of these cases. Positivity only for influenza A virus (OR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.3-14.6) was significantly associated with fatal outcome. From the blood culture, Burkholderia cepacia group (n = 9), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 4), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 4), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 1), and Salmonella C1 (n = 1) were also isolated. Conclusion Viruses were commonly detected in children with severe pneumonia in the Philippines. Hence, viral etiologies should be considered while developing better effective strategies to reduce child pneumonia-related deaths in developing countries. PMID:23092190

  6. Antiviral activity of carnosic acid against respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory infection and a major public health threat worldwide. To date, no vaccine or effective therapeutic agent has been developed. In a screen for potential therapeutic agents against hRSV, we discovered that an extract of Rosmarinus officinalis exerted a strong inhibitory effect against hRSV infection. Subsequent studies identified carnosic acid as a bioactive constituent responsible for anti-hRSV activity. Carnosic acid has been shown to exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-cancer activities. Anti-RSV activity of carnosic acid was further investigated in this study. Methods Effects of extracts from various plants and subfractions from R. officinalis on hRSV replication were determined by microneutralization assay and plaque assay. Several constituents were isolated from ethyl acetate fraction of R. officinalis and their anti-RSV activities were assessed by plaque assay as well as reverse-transcription quantitative PCR to determine the synthesis of viral RNAs. Results Among the tested bioactive constituents of R. officinalis, carnosic acid displayed the most potent anti-hRSV activity and was effective against both A- and B-type viruses. Carnosic acid efficiently suppressed the replication of hRSV in a concentration-dependent manner. Carnosic acid effectively suppressed viral gene expression without inducing type-I interferon production or affecting cell viability, suggesting that it may directly affect viral factors. A time course analysis showed that addition of carnosic acid 8 hours after infection still effectively blocked the expression of hRSV genes, further suggesting that carnosic acid directly inhibited the replication of hRSV. Conclusions The current study demonstrates that carnosic acid, a natural compound that has already been shown to be safe for human consumption, has anti-viral activity against hRSV, efficiently blocking the replication of this virus. Carnosic

  7. Atomic force microscopic investigation of respiratory syncytial virus infection in HEp-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    TIWARI, P. M.; EROGLU, E.; BOYOGLU-BARNUM, S.; HE, Q.; WILLING, G. A.; VIG, K.; DENNIS, V. A.; SINGH, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) primarily causes bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants. In spite of intense research, no safe and effective vaccine has been developed yet. For understanding its pathogenesis and development of anti-RSV drugs/therapeutics, it is indispensable to study the RSV–host interaction. Although, there are limited studies using electron microscopy to elucidate the infection process of RSV, to our knowledge, no study has reported the morphological impact of RSV infection using atomic force microscopy. We report the cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in human epidermoid cell line type 2 using atomic force microscopy. Human epidermoid cell line type 2 cells, grown on cover slips, were infected with RSV and fixed after various time periods, processed and observed for morphological changes using atomic force microscopy. RSV infected cells showed loss of membrane integrity, with degeneration in the cellular content and cytoskeleton. Nuclear membrane was disintegrated and nuclear volume was decreased. The chromatin of the RSV infected cells was condensed, progressing towards degeneration via pyknosis and apoptosis. Membrane protrusions of ~150–200 nm diameter were observed on RSV infected cells after 6 h, suggestive of prospective RSV budding sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study of RSV infection process using atomic force microscopy. Such morphological studies could help explore viral infection process aiding the development of anti-RSV therapies. PMID:24251370

  8. Shift in the timing of respiratory syncytial virus circulation in a subtropical megalopolis: implications for immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Terezinha M; Ishida, Maria A; Benega, Margarete A; Constantino, Clóvis R A; Silva, Daniela B B; Santos, Kátia C O; Oliveira, Maria I; Barbosa, Helena A; Carvalhanas, Telma R M P; Schuck-Paim, Cynthia; Alonso, Wladimir J

    2012-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of severe respiratory infections worldwide, and an important cause of childhood bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and mortality. Although prevention of RSV infection by immunoprophylaxis with palivizumab has proved effective, a precise understanding of the timing of RSV outbreaks is necessary to ensure that infants are protected when RSV is circulating. In this study a consistent shift in the seasonal patterns of RSV circulation in southeast Brazil (São Paulo) is reported based on the analysis of 15 years of viral surveillance. Surveillance was conducted from 1996 to 2010 and involved the collection of samples from children with symptoms of acute respiratory infection. Putative changes in school terms, in the proportion of RSV genotypes infecting children and in the seasonal dynamics of several climatic parameters during the period were also investigated. The results revealed a progression in the timing of RSV seasons, with a shift in the onset and peak of RSV epidemics from 2007 onwards. Although lower rainfall and temperatures were associated with the onset of outbreaks, there was no evidence of changes in climate, school terms or in the relative proportion of genotypes in the period analyzed. These findings have direct implications for improving the prophylactic use of palivizumab, and stress the importance of fine tuning prophylaxis with recent surveillance data. In the case of São Paulo, palivizumab prophylaxis should be initiated earlier than suggested currently. Similar adjustments may be necessary in other regions. PMID:22997087

  9. Respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in Brazil: implications for the immunisation policy for at-risk populations

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, André Ricardo Ribas; Donalisio, Maria Rita

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of hospitalisation for respiratory diseases among children under 5 years old. The aim of this study was to analyse RSV seasonality in the five distinct regions of Brazil using time series analysis (wavelet and Fourier series) of the following indicators: monthly positivity of the immunofluorescence reaction for RSV identified by virologic surveillance system, and rate of hospitalisations per bronchiolitis and pneumonia due to RSV in children under 5 years old (codes CID-10 J12.1, J20.5, J21.0 and J21.9). A total of 12,501 samples with 11.6% positivity for RSV (95% confidence interval 11 - 12.2), varying between 7.1 and 21.4% in the five Brazilian regions, was analysed. A strong trend for annual cycles with a stable stationary pattern in the five regions was identified through wavelet analysis of the indicators. The timing of RSV activity by Fourier analysis was similar between the two indicators analysed and showed regional differences. This study reinforces the importance of adjusting the immunisation period for high risk population with the monoclonal antibody palivizumab taking into account regional differences in seasonality of RSV. PMID:27120006

  10. The Use of Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies for the Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Santo; Galletti, Silvia; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used both in infants and in adults for several indications. Humanized monoclonal antibodies (palivizumab) have been used for many years for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric populations (preterm infants, infants with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease) at high risk of severe and potentially lethal course of the infection. This drug was reported to be safe, well tolerated and effective to decrease the hospitalization rate and mortality in these groups of infants by several clinical trials. In the present paper we report the development and the current use of monoclonal antibodies for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:23840240

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalizations in Healthy Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Andrea V.; Samuel, Miny; Lohr, Kathleen N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have explored the risk for and impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection requiring hospitalization among healthy preterm infants born at 29–35 weeks of gestational age not given RSV immunoprophylaxis. We performed a systematic review and qualitative synthesis of these studies. Methods: Two experienced reviewers used prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria to screen titles/abstracts and full-text studies using MEDLINE, Embase, BIOSIS and Cochrane Library (January 1, 1985, to November 6, 2014). We abstracted data on risk factors for RSV hospitalization, incidence and short- and long-term outcomes of RSV hospitalization. Using standard procedures, we assessed study risk of bias and graded strength of evidence (SOE). Results: We identified 4754 records and reviewed 27. Important risk factors for RSV hospitalization included young age during the RSV season, having school-age siblings and day-care attendance, with odds ratios >2.5 in at least one study (high SOE). Incidence rates for RSV hospitalizations ranged from 2.3% to 10% (low SOE). Length of hospital stays ranged from 3.8 to 6.1 days (low SOE). Recurrent wheezing rates ranged from 20.7% to 42.8% 1 to 2 years after RSV hospitalization (low SOE). Conclusions: Young chronological age and some environmental risk factors are important clinical indicators of an increased risk of RSV hospitalization in healthy preterm infants 32 to 35 weeks of gestational age. SOE was low for estimates of incidence of RSV hospitalizations, in-hospital resource use and recurrent wheezing in this population. Studies were inconsistent in study characteristics, including weeks of gestational age, age during RSV season and control for confounding factors. PMID:27093166

  12. Best practice in the prevention and management of paediatric respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Simon B; Green, Christopher A; Sande, Charles J

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is ubiquitous with almost all infants having been infected by 2 years of age and lifelong repeated infections common. It is the second largest cause of mortality, after malaria, in infants outside the neonatal period and causes up to 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. RSV results in clinical syndromes that include upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, bronchiolitis (up to 80% of cases) and lower respiratory tract disease including pneumonia and exacerbations of asthma or viral-induced wheeze. For the purposes of this review we will focus on RSV bronchiolitis in infants in whom the greatest disease burden lies. For infants requiring hospital admission, the identification of the causative respiratory virus is used to direct cohorting or isolation and infection control procedures to minimize nosocomial transmission. Nosocomial RSV infections are associated with poorer clinical outcomes, including increased mortality, the need for mechanical ventilation and longer length of hospital stay. Numerous clinical guidelines for the management of infants with bronchiolitis have been published, although none are specific for RSV bronchiolitis. Ribavirin is the only licensed drug for the specific treatment of RSV infection but due to drug toxicity and minimal clinical benefit it has not been recommended for routine clinical use. There is currently no licensed vaccine to prevent RSV infection but passive immunoprophylaxis using a monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, reduces the risk of hospitalization due to RSV infection by 39-78% in various high-risk infants predisposed to developing severe RSV disease. The current management of RSV bronchiolitis is purely supportive, with feeding support and oxygen supplementation until the infant immune system mounts a response capable of controlling the disease. The development of a successful treatment or prophylactic agent has the potential to revolutionize the care and outcome for

  13. Best practice in the prevention and management of paediatric respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Green, Christopher A.; Sande, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is ubiquitous with almost all infants having been infected by 2 years of age and lifelong repeated infections common. It is the second largest cause of mortality, after malaria, in infants outside the neonatal period and causes up to 200,000 deaths per year worldwide. RSV results in clinical syndromes that include upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, bronchiolitis (up to 80% of cases) and lower respiratory tract disease including pneumonia and exacerbations of asthma or viral-induced wheeze. For the purposes of this review we will focus on RSV bronchiolitis in infants in whom the greatest disease burden lies. For infants requiring hospital admission, the identification of the causative respiratory virus is used to direct cohorting or isolation and infection control procedures to minimize nosocomial transmission. Nosocomial RSV infections are associated with poorer clinical outcomes, including increased mortality, the need for mechanical ventilation and longer length of hospital stay. Numerous clinical guidelines for the management of infants with bronchiolitis have been published, although none are specific for RSV bronchiolitis. Ribavirin is the only licensed drug for the specific treatment of RSV infection but due to drug toxicity and minimal clinical benefit it has not been recommended for routine clinical use. There is currently no licensed vaccine to prevent RSV infection but passive immunoprophylaxis using a monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, reduces the risk of hospitalization due to RSV infection by 39–78% in various high-risk infants predisposed to developing severe RSV disease. The current management of RSV bronchiolitis is purely supportive, with feeding support and oxygen supplementation until the infant immune system mounts a response capable of controlling the disease. The development of a successful treatment or prophylactic agent has the potential to revolutionize the care and outcome for

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Isolated in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Medina, J. E.; Monroy-Muñoz, I. E.; Santos Coy-Arechavaleta, A.; Meza-Chávez, A.; Ángeles-Martínez, J.; Anguiano-Hernández, Y. M.; Santacruz-Tinoco, C. E.; González-Ibarra, J.; Martínez-Miguel, B.; Alvarado-Yaah, J. E.; Palomec-Nava, I. D.; Ortiz-Alcántara, J. M.; Garcés-Ayala, F.; Díaz-Quiñonez, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, which causes lower respiratory tract infections in neonates and children younger than 5 years. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of HRSV, isolated from a nasopharyngeal swab of a pregnant woman with cardiac complications. PMID:26769933

  15. Clinical Presentation and Birth Outcomes Associated with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Katz, Joanne; Tielsch, James; Khatry, Subarna K.; Shrestha, Laxman; LeClerq, Steven C.; Magaret, Amalia; Kuypers, Jane; Steinhoff, Mark C.; Englund, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral pneumonia in children worldwide. A maternal vaccine may protect both the mother and infant from RSV illness. The epidemiology and clinical presentation of RSV in pregnant and postpartum women is not well-described. Methods Data were collected from a prospective, randomized trial of influenza immunization in pregnant women in rural southern Nepal. Women were enrolled in their second trimester of pregnancy and followed until six months postpartum. Active weekly home-based surveillance for febrile respiratory illness was performed. Mid-nasal swabs collected with episodes of respiratory illness were tested for RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results RSV was detected in 14 (0.4%) illness episodes in 3693 women over 3554 person-years of surveillance from 2011–2014. RSV incidence was 3.9/1000 person-years overall, and 11.8/1000 person-years between September and December. Seven (50%) women sought care for RSV illness; none died. Of the 7 (50%) illness episodes during pregnancy, all had live births with 2 (29%) preterm births and a median birthweight of 3060 grams. This compares to 469 (13%) preterm births and a median birthweight of 2790 grams in women without RSV during pregnancy. Of the 7 mothers with postpartum RSV infection, RSV was detected in 4 (57%) of their infants. Conclusions RSV was an uncommon cause of febrile respiratory illness in mothers during pregnancy in Nepal. These data will inform prevention and therapeutic strategies against RSV in resource-limited settings. PMID:27031702

  16. Molecular Characterization of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the Philippines, 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Malasao, Rungnapa; Okamoto, Michiko; Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Imamura, Tadatsugu; Tohma, Kentaro; Dapat, Isolde; Dapat, Clyde; Suzuki, Akira; Saito, Mayuko; Saito, Mariko; Tamaki, Raita; Pedrera-Rico, Gay Anne Granada; Aniceto, Rapunzel; Quicho, Reynaldo Frederick Negosa; Segubre-Mercado, Edelwisa; Lupisan, Socorro; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children worldwide. We performed molecular analysis of HRSV among infants and children with clinical diagnosis of severe pneumonia in four study sites in the Philippines, including Biliran, Leyte, Palawan, and Metro Manila from June 2012 to July 2013. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected and screened for HRSV using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive samples were tested by conventional PCR and sequenced for the second hypervariable region (2nd HVR) of the G gene. Among a total of 1,505 samples, 423 samples were positive for HRSV (28.1%), of which 305 (72.1%) and 118 (27.9%) were identified as HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively. Two genotypes of HRSV-A, NA1 and ON1, were identified during the study period. The novel ON1 genotype with a 72-nucleotide duplication in 2nd HVR of the G gene increased rapidly and finally became the predominant genotype in 2013 with an evolutionary rate higher than the NA1 genotype. Moreover, in the ON1 genotype, we found positive selection at amino acid position 274 (p<0.05) and massive O- and N-glycosylation in the 2nd HVR of the G gene. Among HRSV-B, BA9 was the predominant genotype circulating in the Philippines. However, two sporadic cases of GB2 genotype were found, which might share a common ancestor with other Asian strains. These findings suggest that HRSV is an important cause of severe acute respiratory infection among children in the Philippines and revealed the emergence and subsequent predominance of the ON1 genotype and the sporadic detection of the GB2 genotype. Both genotypes were detected for the first time in the Philippines. PMID:26540236

  17. Investigation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Deaths Among US Children Aged <2 Years, 2004-2007.

    PubMed

    Prill, Mila M; Iwane, Marika K; Little, Delmar; Gerber, Susan I

    2016-09-01

    We validated the respiratory syncytial virus-coded deaths of children aged <2 years in 2004-2007 using national/state death data and medical records. There were 48 deaths in 4 states, and hospital records for 32 of them were available; 26 of those 32 (81%) had a laboratory finding of respiratory syncytial virus, and 21 of those 26 (81%) had a potential high-risk condition, most commonly preterm birth (35%). PMID:27534673

  18. Crawling with Virus: Translational Insights from a Neonatal Mouse Model on the Pathogenesis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Infants.

    PubMed

    You, Dahui; Saravia, Jordy; Siefker, David; Shrestha, Bishwas; Cormier, Stephania A

    2016-01-01

    The infant immune response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains incompletely understood. Here we review the use of a neonatal mouse model of RSV infection to mimic severe infection in human infants. We describe numerous age-specific responses, organized by cell type, observed in RSV-infected neonatal mice and draw comparisons (when possible) to human infants. PMID:26446604

  19. Immunological, Viral, Environmental, and Individual Factors Modulating Lung Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bottau, Paolo; Faldella, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus is a worldwide pathogen agent responsible for frequent respiratory tract infections that may become severe and potentially lethal in high risk infants and adults. Several studies have been performed to investigate the immune response that determines the clinical course of the infection. In the present paper, we review the literature on viral, environmental, and host factors influencing virus response; the mechanisms of the immune response; and the action of nonimmunological factors. These mechanisms have often been studied in animal models and in the present review we also summarize the main findings obtained from animal models as well as the limits of each of these models. Understanding the lung response involved in the pathogenesis of these respiratory infections could be useful in improving the preventive strategies against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:26064963

  20. Potential siRNA Molecules for Nucleoprotein and M2/L Overlapping Region of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: In Silico Design

    PubMed Central

    Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Arefian, Ehsan; Salimi, Vahid; Mokhtari Azad, Talat; Yavarian, Jila

    2016-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in the pediatric population, elderly and in immunosuppressed individuals. Respiratory syncytial virus is also responsible for bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary infections in all age groups. With this high disease burden and the lack of an effective RSV treatment and vaccine, there is a clear need for discovery and development of novel, effective and safe drugs to prevent and treat RSV disease. The most innovative approach is the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which represent a revolutionary new concept in human therapeutics. The nucleoprotein gene of RSV which is known as the most conserved gene and the M2/L mRNA, which encompass sixty-eight overlapping nucleotides, were selected as suitable targets for siRNA design. Objectives The present study is aimed to design potential siRNAs for silencing nucleoprotein and an overlapping region of M2-L coding mRNAs by computational analysis. Materials and Methods Various computational methods (target alignment, similarity search, secondary structure prediction, and RNA interaction calculation) have been used for siRNA designing against different strains of RSV. Results In this study, seven siRNA molecules were rationally designed against the nucleoprotein gene and validated using various computational methods for silencing different strains of RSV. Additionally, three effective siRNA molecules targeting the overlapping region of M2/L mRNA were designed. Conclusions This approach provides insight and a validated strategy for chemical synthesis of an antiviral RNA molecule which meets many sequence features for efficient silencing and treatment at the genomic level. PMID:27303618

  1. Clinical characteristics of respiratory syncytial virus infection in hospitalized healthy infants and young children in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Wahab, A A; Dawod, S T; Raman, H M

    2001-12-01

    To evaluate seasonal trends, clinical profile, and outcome of disease in previously healthy infants and young children hospitalized for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection at Hamad Medical Corporation in the state of Qatar, we reviewed the records of 257 children admitted between 1 January 1996 and 31 December 1998. RSV epidemics occurred yearly during the winter months with peak hospitalizations occuring between November and February. Of the 257 admissions, 160 (62.3 per cent) were male and 97 (37.7 per cent) female. The mean age of all children was 5.7 months (range, 10 days to 32 months). The most common admitting diagnoses were bronchiolitis (59.9 per cent), pneumonia (17.5 per cent), bronchiolitis with pneumonia (8.9 per cent), possible sepsis (7.8 per cent), asthma (4.7 per cent) and apnea (1.2 per cent). A family history of asthma was quite common (63.8 per cent), although no statistical significant difference was noted in complication or length of stay. Treatment was supportive, the majority of the patients received oxygen therapy in 77.8 per cent of cases, bronchodilators in 85.4 per cent, and antibiotics therapy in 49.4 per cent. The median duration of hospital stay was 6 days (range, 1 to 29 days). Of the 14 (5.4 per cent) patients requiring intensive care, four (1.6 per cent) needed mechanical ventilation. No deaths were reported, but subjects aged < or = 12 months had a significantly higher oxygen requirement, intensive care unit admission, bronchodilators and antibiotics therapy than those > 12 months old. Within 1-2 years after admission with RSV infection, 63 of the 257 patients attended for recurrent episodes of wheezy chest. These results indicate that, during the season of infection, RSV is an important pathogen in infants and young children in the state of Qatar, highlighting the need for development of effective vaccines to ameliorate the impact of annual RSV epidemics in infants and young children. PMID:11827306

  2. RECOMBINANT SIMIAN VARICELLA VIRUSES EXPRESSING RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS ANTIGENS ARE IMMUNOGENIC

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Toby M.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Davis, Kara A.; Gray, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Recombinant simian varicella viruses (rSVVs) were engineered to express respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigens. The RSV surface glycoprotein G and second matrix protein M2 (22k) genes were cloned into the SVV genome, and recombinant viruses were characterized in vitro and in vivo. rSVVs were also engineered to express the membrane-anchored or secreted forms of the RSV G protein as well as an RSV G lacking its chemokine mimicry motif (CX3C), which may have different effects on priming the host immune response. The RSV genes were efficiently expressed in rSVV/RSV infected Vero cells as RSV G and M2 transcripts were detected by RT-PCR and RSV antigens were detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays. The rSVVs replicated efficiently in Vero cell culture. Rhesus macaques immunized with rSVV/RSV-G and rSVV/RSV-M2 vaccines produced antibody responses to SVV and RSV antigens. The results demonstrate that recombinant varicella viruses are suitable vectors for expression of RSV antigens and may represent a novel vaccine strategy for immunization against both pathogens. PMID:18272766

  3. A respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine based on parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5)

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Shannon I.; Chen, Zhenhai; Xu, Pei; Li, Zhuo; Gao, Xiudan; Foster, Stephanie L.; Teng, Michael N.; Tripp, Ralph A.; Sakamoto, Kaori; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of severe respiratory disease and hospitalizations in infants and young children. It also causes significant morbidity and mortality in elderly and immune compromised individuals. No licensed vaccine currently exists. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a paramyxovirus that causes no known human illness and has been used as a platform for vector-based vaccine development. To evaluate the efficacy of PIV5 as a RSV vaccine vector, we generated two recombinant PIV5 viruses - one expressing the fusion (F) protein and the other expressing the attachment glycoprotein (G) of RSV strain A2 (RSV A2). The vaccine strains were used separately for single-dose vaccinations in BALB/c mice. The results showed that both vaccines induced RSV antigen-specific antibody responses, with IgG2a/IgG1 ratios similar to those seen in wild-type RSV A2 infection. After challenging the vaccinated mice with RSV A2, histopathology of lung sections showed that the vaccines did not exacerbate lung lesions relative to RSV A2-immunized mice. Importantly, both F and G vaccines induced protective immunity. Therefore, PIV5 presents an attractive platform for vector-based vaccines against RSV infection. PMID:24717150

  4. Identification and Functional Characterization of tRNA-derived RNA Fragments (tRFs) in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingrong; Lee, Inhan; Ren, Junping; Ajay, Subramanian Shankar; Lee, Yong Sun; Bao, Xiaoyong

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) with regulatory functions is a recent breakthrough in biology. Among sncRNAs, microRNA (miRNA), derived from host or virus, has emerged as elements with high importance in control of viral replication and host responses. However, the expression pattern and functional aspects of other types of sncRNAs, following viral infection, are unexplored. In order to define expression patterns of sncRNAs, as well as to discover novel regulatory sncRNAs in response to viral infection, we applied deep sequencing to cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in babies. RSV infection leads to abundant production of transfer RNA (tRNA)-derived RNA Fragments (tRFs) that are ~30 nucleotides (nts) long and correspond to the 5′-half of mature tRNAs. At least one tRF, which is derived from tRNA-Glu-CTC, represses target mRNA in the cytoplasm and promotes RSV replication. This demonstrates that this tRF is not a random by-product of tRNA degradation but a functional molecule. The biogenesis of this tRF is also specific, as it is mediated by the endonuclease angiogenin (ANG), not by other nucleases. In summary, our study presents novel information on the induction of a functional tRF by viral infection. PMID:23183536

  5. Structure of a Major Antigenic Site on the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in Complex with Neutralizing Antibody 101F

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Chen, Man; Chang, Jung-San; Yang, Yongping; Kim, Albert; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-19

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and elderly people. Currently there is no effective vaccine against RSV, but passive prophylaxis with neutralizing antibodies reduces hospitalizations. To investigate the mechanism of antibody-mediated RSV neutralization, we undertook structure-function studies of monoclonal antibody 101F, which binds a linear epitope in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Crystal structures of the 101F antigen-binding fragment in complex with peptides from the fusion glycoprotein defined both the extent of the linear epitope and the interactions of residues that are mutated in antibody escape variants. The structure allowed for modeling of 101F in complex with trimers of the fusion glycoprotein, and the resulting models suggested that 101F may contact additional surfaces located outside the linear epitope. This hypothesis was supported by surface plasmon resonance experiments that demonstrated 101F bound the peptide epitope {approx}16,000-fold more weakly than the fusion glycoprotein. The modeling also showed no substantial clashes between 101F and the fusion glycoprotein in either the pre- or postfusion state, and cell-based assays indicated that 101F neutralization was not associated with blocking virus attachment. Collectively, these results provide a structural basis for RSV neutralization by antibodies that target a major antigenic site on the fusion glycoprotein.

  6. Secretory Expression and Purification of Respiratory Syncytial Virus G and F Proteins in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Jadhao, Samadhan J; Anderson, Larry J

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of range of symptoms from mild upper to serious lower respiratory virus infections in infants, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite many decades of research and development, a licensed RSV vaccine is not available for use in human. Since the RSV F and G proteins induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protection from infection, they are important for understanding disease and for developing vaccines and access to purified, expressed proteins is important to RSV research and diagnostics. We describe methods to produce recombinant RSV F and G proteins in human cells and purify these proteins using Ni Sepharose affinity chromatography. PMID:27464687

  7. The Viral Transcription Group Determines the HLA Class I Cellular Immune Response Against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Carolina; Lorente, Elena; Barriga, Alejandro; Barnea, Eilon; Infantes, Susana; Lemonnier, François A.; David, Chella S.; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of virus-infected cells requires previous recognition of short viral antigenic peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen class I molecules that are exposed on the surface of infected cells. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response is critical for the clearance of human respiratory syncytial virus infection. In this study, naturally processed viral human leukocyte antigen class I ligands were identified with mass spectrometry analysis of complex human leukocyte antigen-bound peptide pools isolated from large amounts of human respiratory syncytial virus-infected cells. Acute antiviral T-cell response characterization showed that viral transcription determines both the immunoprevalence and immunodominance of the human leukocyte antigen class I response to human respiratory syncytial virus. These findings have clear implications for antiviral vaccine design. PMID:25635267

  8. Enhanced Neutralizing Antibody Response Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Prefusion F Protein Expressed by a Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bo; Surman, Sonja; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Kabatova, Barbora; Mackow, Natalie; Lingemann, Matthias; Yang, Lijuan; McLellan, Jason S.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Collins, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) are the first and second leading viral agents of severe respiratory tract disease in infants and young children worldwide. Vaccines are not available, and an RSV vaccine is particularly needed. A live attenuated chimeric recombinant bovine/human PIV3 (rB/HPIV3) vector expressing the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein from an added gene has been under development as a bivalent vaccine against RSV and HPIV3. Previous clinical evaluation of this vaccine candidate suggested that increased genetic stability and immunogenicity of the RSV F insert were needed. This was investigated in the present study. RSV F expression was enhanced 5-fold by codon optimization and by modifying the amino acid sequence to be identical to that of an early passage of the original clinical isolate. This conferred a hypofusogenic phenotype that presumably reflects the original isolate. We then compared vectors expressing stabilized prefusion and postfusion versions of RSV F. In a hamster model, prefusion F induced increased quantity and quality of RSV-neutralizing serum antibodies and increased protection against wild-type (wt) RSV challenge. In contrast, a vector expressing the postfusion F was less immunogenic and protective. The genetic stability of the RSV F insert was high and was not affected by enhanced expression or the prefusion or postfusion conformation of RSV F. These studies provide an improved version of the previously well-tolerated rB/HPIV3-RSV F vaccine candidate that induces a superior RSV-neutralizing serum antibody response. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) are two major causes of pediatric pneumonia and bronchiolitis. The rB/HPIV3 vector expressing RSV F protein is a candidate bivalent live vaccine against HPIV3 and RSV. Previous clinical evaluation indicated the need to increase the immunogenicity and genetic stability of the RSV F

  9. CT findings in viral lower respiratory tract infections caused by parainfluenza virus, influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Chul; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Sung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Viral lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) can present with a variety of computed tomography (CT) findings. However, identifying the contribution of a particular virus to CT findings is challenging due to concomitant infections and the limited data on the CT findings in viral LRTIs. We therefore investigate the CT findings in different pure viral LRTIs. All patients who underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and were diagnosed with LRTIs caused by parainfluenza virus (PIV), influenza virus, or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) between 1998 and 2014 were enrolled in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, South Korea. A pure viral LRTI was defined as a positive viral culture from BAL without any positive evidence from respiratory or blood cultures, or from polymerase chain reaction (PCR), or from serologic tests for bacteria, fungi, mycobacteria, or other viruses. CT images of 40 patients with viral LRTIs were analyzed: 14 with PIV, 14 with influenza virus, and 12 with RSV. Patch consolidation (≥1 cm or more than 1 segmental level) was found only in PIV (29%) (P = 0.03), by which CT findings caused by PIV could resemble those seen in bacterial LRTIs. Ground-glass opacities were seen in all cases of influenza virus and were more frequent than in PIV (71%) and RSV (67%) (P = 0.05). Bronchial wall thickening was more common in influenza virus (71%) and RSV (67%) LRTIs than PIV LRTIs (21%) (P = 0.02). With respect to anatomical distribution, PIV infections generally affected the lower lobes (69%), while influenza virus mostly caused diffuse changes throughout the lungs (57%), and RSV frequently formed localized patterns in the upper and mid lobes (44%). The CT findings in LRTIs of PIV, influenza virus, and RSV can be distinguished by certain characteristics. These differences could be useful for early differentiation of these viral LRTIs, and empirical use of appropriate antiviral agents. PMID:27368011

  10. Minimum intravenous infectious dose of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The minimum intravenous infectious dose for ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) WLC1 was determined using twenty-four 6 month-old lambs. Twelve groups of two 6 month-old lambs were inoculated intravenously with tissue culture fluid containing ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) WLC1 titer...

  11. Age-specific epidemic waves of influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in a subtropical city.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Chan, Kwok Hung; Suen, Lorna K P; Chan, King Pan; Wang, Xiling; Cao, Peihua; He, Daihai; Peiris, J S Malik; Wong, Chit Ming

    2015-01-01

    Both influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are active throughout the year in subtropical or tropical regions, but few studies have reported on age-specific seasonal patterns of these viruses. We examined the age-specific epidemic curves of laboratory-confirmed cases of influenza A (subtyped into seasonal A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and pandemic virus A(H1N1)pdm09), influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), in subtropical city Hong Kong from 2004 to 2013. We found that different types and subtypes of influenza showed similar two-peak patterns across age groups, with one peak in winter and another in spring/summer. Age differences were found in epidemic onset time and duration, but none could reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). Age synchrony was found in epidemic peak time for both cool and warm seasons. RSV showed less clear seasonal patterns and non-synchronized epidemic curves across age. In conclusion, age synchrony was found in influenza seasonal epidemics and the 2009 pandemic, but not in RSV. None of the age groups consistently appear as the driving force for seasonal epidemics of influenza and RSV in Hong Kong. PMID:25981824

  12. Respiratory syncytial virus, an ongoing medical dilemma: an expert commentary on respiratory syncytial virus prophylactic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals currently in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Lindsay; Groves, Helen; Shields, Michael D; Power, Ultan F

    2015-01-01

    As the most important viral cause of severe respiratory disease in infants and increasing recognition as important in the elderly and immunocompromised, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is responsible for a massive health burden worldwide. Prophylactic antibodies were successfully developed against RSV. However, their use is restricted to a small group of infants considered at high risk of severe RSV disease. There is still no specific therapeutics or vaccines to combat RSV. As such, it remains a major unmet medical need for most individuals. The World Health Organisations International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and PubMed were used to identify and review all RSV vaccine, prophylactic and therapeutic candidates currently in clinical trials. This review presents an expert commentary on all RSV-specific prophylactic and therapeutic candidates that have entered clinical trials since 2008. PMID:25847510

  13. Efficacy of a virus-vectored vaccine against human and bovine respiratory syncytial virus infections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Geraldine; Thom, Michelle; Capone, Stefania; Pierantoni, Angiolo; Guzman, Efrain; Herbert, Rebecca; Scarselli, Elisa; Napolitano, Federico; Giuliani, Alessandro; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo; Vitelli, Alessandra

    2015-08-12

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract disease in children and the elderly for which there is still no effective vaccine. We have previously shown that PanAd3-RSV, which is a chimpanzee adenovirus-vectored vaccine candidate that expresses a secreted form of the HRSV F protein together with the N and M2-1 proteins of HRSV, is immunogenic in rodents and nonhuman primates, and protects mice and cotton rats from HRSV challenge. Because the extent to which protection demonstrated in rodent models will translate to humans is unclear, we have exploited the calf model of bovine RSV (BRSV) infection, which mimics HRSV disease in children more closely than do experimental models of unnatural laboratory hosts, to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the PanAd3-RSV vaccine. We show that PanAd3-RSV alone and in combination with a modified vaccinia Ankara expressing the same HRSV antigens (MVA-RSV) induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immunity in young seronegative calves and protected against upper and lower respiratory tract infection and pulmonary disease induced by heterologous BRSV challenge. There was no evidence either of enhanced pulmonary pathology or of enhanced respiratory disease in vaccinated calves after BRSV challenge. These findings support the continued evaluation of the vectored RSV vaccines in man. PMID:26268314

  14. Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus using Direct Fluorescent Antibody Assay in Paediatric Patients with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Boloor, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) pulmonary disease manifesting as bronchiolitis and pneumonia continues to play a major role in the childhood mortality and morbidity. Hence the present study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of RSV among hospitalized children presenting with Acute Respiratory Tract Infection (ARTI) and its correlation with risk factors. Aim To determine the occurrence of RSV related respiratory tract infection in paediatric patients and to access the risk factors and clinical features associated. Materials and Methods RSV antigen detection was performed by Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA) staining on 100 nasopharyngeal aspirate collected from hospitalized children below 5 years of age with a diagnosis of ARTI. Results Out of the 100 samples tested for RSV with DFA, 22 (22%) were found RSV positive with a mean age of 12 months and a male to female ratio of (1.75:1). Clinical features significantly associated with RSV were wheezing and breathlessness. Congenital heart disease (CHD) and prematurity were the risk factors significantly associated with RSV infection. Conclusion RSV infection is a significant cause of morbidity among children presenting with ARTI. In resource limited countries DFA can be used as an important tool for rapid detection of RSV and can potentially eliminate prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  15. Vaccination against respiratory syncytial virus in pregnancy: a suitable tool to combat global infant morbidity and mortality?

    PubMed

    Saso, Anja; Kampmann, Beate

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important viral cause of pneumonia in early childhood (ie, younger than 2 years), responsible for high infant morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is widely accepted that an effective vaccine against RSV would have a major impact on child health globally. Despite the setbacks of the clinical trials in the 1960s, there has been a recent and significant revival of interest in vaccines against RSV, with several promising candidates undergoing evaluation. In this Review, we describe the epidemiological and immunological background to RSV infection and subsequently focus on the promising pipeline of RSV vaccine development. We discuss the potential for implementation of a safe and immunogenic RSV vaccine within the context of global health and with regards to a range of strategies, including vaccination of women during pregnancy, which is likely to emerge as a beneficial and feasible public health tool. This approach would provide interim protection to vulnerable, RSV-naive infants and other high risk groups, in which the burden of admission to hospital and death is greatest. Extending research and implementation from resource-rich to resource-poor settings is required to enhance our understanding of RSV immunity and inform vaccine development and delivery strategies for all settings. We summarise key outstanding issues for researchers and policy makers to understand the interplay of biological and non-biological factors affecting design and distribution of a successful RSV vaccine globally. PMID:27317449

  16. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  17. Animal Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: CD8+ T Cells Cause a Cytokine Storm That Is Chemically Tractable by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate 1 Receptor Agonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kevin B.; Teijaro, John R.; Brock, Linda G.; Fremgen, Daniel M.; Collins, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine storm is an intensified, dysregulated, tissue-injurious inflammatory response driven by cytokine and immune cell components. The cytokine storm during influenza virus infection, whereby the amplified innate immune response is primarily responsible for pulmonary damage, has been well characterized. Now we describe a novel event where virus-specific T cells induce a cytokine storm. The paramyxovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a model of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Unexpectedly, when C57BL/6 mice were infected with PVM, the innate inflammatory response was undetectable until day 5 postinfection, at which time CD8+ T cells infiltrated into the lung, initiating a cytokine storm by their production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Administration of an immunomodulatory sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P1R) agonist significantly inhibited PVM-elicited cytokine storm by blunting the PVM-specific CD8+ T cell response, resulting in diminished pulmonary disease and enhanced survival. IMPORTANCE A dysregulated overly exuberant immune response, termed a “cytokine storm,” accompanies virus-induced acute respiratory diseases (VARV), is primarily responsible for the accompanying high morbidity and mortality, and can be controlled therapeutically in influenza virus infection of mice and ferrets by administration of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor (S1P1R) agonists. Here, two novel findings are recorded. First, in contrast to influenza infection, where the cytokine storm is initiated early by the innate immune system, for pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a model of RSV, the cytokine storm is initiated late in infection by the adaptive immune response: specifically, by virus-specific CD8 T cells via their release of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Blockading these cytokines with neutralizing antibodies blunts the cytokine storm and protects the host. Second, PVM infection is controlled by administration

  18. Pathogen recognition receptors crosstalk in respiratory syncytial virus sensing: host and cell type perspective

    PubMed Central

    Marr, Nico; Turvey, Stuart E.

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infection in young children, immunocompromized adults and the elderly. The innate immune response plays a pivotal role in host defense against RSV, but whether severe outcomes following RSV infection result from excessive or poor innate immune recognition remains unclear. Recent research suggests a situation in which crosstalk between families of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) occurs in a cell type-dependent manner. The current challenge to empower novel therapeutic approaches and vaccine development is to confirm the role of the individual receptors in RSV pathogenesis in humans. PMID:24119913

  19. Experiences of Alaskan parents with children hospitalized for respiratory syncytial virus treatment.

    PubMed

    Yael Kopacz, Nicole; Predeger, Elizabeth; Kelley, Colleen M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of Alaskan parents with children hospitalized for the treatment of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Six parents participated in a qualitative descriptive study composed of individual interviews. Using content analysis, three major themes emerged: "RSV is scary," "Lots of stress; little rest" and "At what point does it become a Bingo? He's going to the hospital." Findings provided further insight into the educational needs of the participants. Advanced practice registered nurses can translate insights provided by the participants into crucial knowledge needed for the care of families at heightened risk and currently experiencing RSV. PMID:23531460

  20. Visualizing the replication of respiratory syncytial virus in cells and in living mice.

    PubMed

    Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Le Goffic, Ronan; Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Sourimant, Julien; Rémot, Aude; Riffault, Sabine; Yu, Qin; Galloux, Marie; Gault, Elyanne; Eléouët, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower-respiratory tract disease in calves and young children, yet no human vaccine nor efficient curative treatments are available. Here we describe a recombinant human RSV reverse genetics system in which the red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or the firefly luciferase (Luc) genes are inserted into the RSV genome. Expression of mCherry and Luc are correlated with infection rate, allowing the monitoring of RSV multiplication in cell culture. Replication of the Luc-encoding virus in living mice can be visualized by bioluminescent imaging, bioluminescence being detected in the snout and lungs of infected mice after nasal inoculation. We propose that these recombinant viruses are convenient and valuable tools for screening of compounds active against RSV, and can be used as an extremely sensitive readout for studying effects of antiviral therapeutics in living mice. PMID:25277263

  1. Simultaneous influenza and respiratory syncytial virus infection in human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinky, Lubna Jahan Rashid; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Studies have shown that simultaneous infection of the respiratory tract with at least two viruses is not uncommon in hospitalized patients, although it is not clear whether these infections are more or less severe than single infections. We use mathematical models to study the dynamics of simultaneous influenza (flu) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, two of the more common respiratory viruses, in an effort to understand simultaneous infections. We examine the roles of initial viral inoculum, relative starting time, and cell regeneration on the severity of the infection. We also study the effect of antiviral treatment on the course of the infection. This study shows that, unless treated with antivirals, flu always takes over the infection no matter how small the initial dose and how delayed it starts with respect to RSV.

  2. Prevalence of Rhinovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Among Patients With Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Abshirini, Hassan; Makvandi, Manochher; Seyyed Ashrafi, Meghdad; Hamidifard, Mojtaba; Saki, Nader

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common chronic illnesses, but the etiology and pathogenesis of CRS are not well understood. Few studies have been carried out on the role of viruses in patients with chronic sinusitis so far. Objectives: Regarding the high number of patients, we intended to evaluate the prevalence of rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus in patients with CRS. Doing so, we may pave the way for definitely achieving the causes and factors of the disease and consequently definite treatment of this debilitating disease in future studies. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on 76 patients. Sample of the study consisted of patients with CRS who were candidates for functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). The specimens were collected during FESS between February 2013 and December 2013. For this purpose, after entering into sinuses, the specimens were collected from their mucus. They were then placed in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's viral transport medium (DMEM). They were transferred to the virology lab of the university in a cold chain. The specimens were maintained in -70°C before examination. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was applied to explore the presence of rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus. Results: In this study, 76 patients with rhinosinusitis underwent FESS as qualified candidates. The sample of the study consisted of 48 males (63.2%) and 28 females (36.8%) with the mean age of 44.3 years and an age range of 19-76 years. Among the 76 patients, 53 were with polyps and 23 without polyps. Among the patients, 66 were candidates of FESS for the first time. Other 11 patients had previously undergone the surgery. The results from PCR indicated that 22 (28.94%) patients had rhinovirus and 9 (11.84%) had respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). A total of 25 patients (32.89%) had one of the two viruses. In 6 (7.89%) specimens, both viruses were reported

  3. Analysis of respiratory syncytial virus genetic variability with amplified cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Sullender, W M; Sun, L; Anderson, L J

    1993-01-01

    Antigenic and genetic heterogeneities exist within the two major antigenic groups of respiratory syncytial (RS) virus. We developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay that not only differentiates the two RS virus groups but allows distinctions within groups on the basis of changes in the nucleotide sequences, as revealed by restriction fragment analysis. In this assay, viral RNA served as a template for cDNA synthesis with extension from a synthetic oligonucleotide primer complementary to bases 164 to 186 in the F protein mRNA. For PCR amplification, two group-specific 5' primers were added. The two primers corresponded to the G protein mRNA sequence of group B (bases 10 to 30) or group A (bases 247 to 267) RS virus. Agarose gel electrophoresis readily discriminated the 1.1-kb group B and the 0.9-kb group A virus amplification products. All 47 viruses tested were assigned to the same group by both PCR and monoclonal antibody reaction pattern analysis. Restriction fragment analysis of the amplified DNAs revealed 12 restriction patterns for group A viruses and 7 restriction patterns for group B viruses, while the monoclonal antibody reaction patterns revealed seven patterns for group A viruses and 3 patterns for group B viruses. Most viruses with the same monoclonal antibody reaction patterns had different restriction patterns, and some viruses with the same restriction patterns had different monoclonal antibody reaction patterns. Thus, the results of the PCR assay concurred with the monoclonal antibody reaction pattern analysis for group classification of RS viruses, while the restriction fragment analysis identified greater diversity within groups than was seen with the monoclonal antibody analysis. Images PMID:8099086

  4. Effects of tetrabromobisphenol A, a brominated flame retardant, on the immune response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Wataru; Shimizu, Tomomi; Sawamura, Rie; Hino, Akane; Konno, Katsuhiko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kurokawa, Masahiko

    2010-04-01

    Effects of the brominated flame retardants (BFRs), decabrominated diphenyl ether (DBDE), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), on host immunity of mice were evaluated using respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Five-week-old female mice were fed a diet containing 1% BFRs for 28days, and subsequently infected with RSV. No toxicological sign was observed in BFR-treated mice before infection. TBBPA significantly increased the pulmonary viral titer in the infected mice on day 5 post-infection, but DBDE and HBCD did not. Slight histological changes were observed in lung tissues of TBBPA-treated mice with mock infection. These changes due to TBBPA were much exacerbated by RSV infection. Cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from RSV-infected mice treated with or without TBBPA revealed that TBBPA significantly increased the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon (IFN)-gamma at each time point after virus infection, but no change was observed for IL-1beta and IL-12. The levels of IL-4 and IL-10, Th2 cytokines, significantly decreased. Thus, TBBPA caused unusual production of the various cytokines in RSV-infected mice. Flow cytometry revealed that the percentage of double-positive CD4+CD8+ cells, immature T lymphocytes, in the cell populations in BALF from RSV-infected mice increased due to TBBPA treatment. The change was not observed in spleen cells of TBBPA-treated mice. The response to RSV infection verified that TBBPA treatment affected the host immunity of mice. Irregular changes in cytokine production and immune cell populations due to TBBPA treatment were suggested to cause exacerbation of pneumonia in RSV-infected mice. PMID:20074668

  5. Comparison of rapid immunofluorescence procedure with TestPack RSV and Directigen FLU-A for diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, S J; Minnich, L; Waner, J L

    1995-01-01

    A rapid immunofluorescence format requiring 20 min for completion was as effective as conventional indirect and direct immunofluorescence procedures for detecting respiratory syncytial virus and influenza A virus antigens in clinical specimens. Rapid immunofluorescence was more sensitive than TestPack RSV and comparable to Directigen FLU-A immunosorbent assays, which require 20 min for completion. PMID:7650206

  6. Association of Respiratory Viruses with Outcomes of Severe Childhood Pneumonia in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Matthew S.; Smieja, Marek; Luinstra, Kathy; Wirth, Kathleen E.; Goldfarb, David M.; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Arscott-Mills, Tonya; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Boiditswe, Sefelani; Sethomo, Warona; Shah, Samir S.; Finalle, Rodney; Feemster, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of childhood acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) is in low- and middle-income countries. Few studies examined whether detection of respiratory viruses predicts ALRI outcomes in these settings. Methods We conducted prospective cohort and case-control studies of children 1-23 months of age in Botswana. Cases met clinical criteria for pneumonia and were recruited within six hours of presentation to a referral hospital. Controls were children without pneumonia matched to cases by primary care clinic and date of enrollment. Nasopharyngeal specimens were tested for respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction. We compared detection rates of specific viruses in matched case-control pairs. We examined the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and other respiratory viruses on pneumonia outcomes. Results Between April 2012 and August 2014, we enrolled 310 cases, of which 133 had matched controls. Median ages of cases and controls were 6.1 and 6.4 months, respectively. One or more viruses were detected from 75% of cases and 34% of controls. RSV and human metapneumovirus were more frequent among cases than controls, but only enterovirus/rhinovirus was detected from asymptomatic controls. Compared with non-RSV viruses, RSV was associated with an increased risk of treatment failure at 48 hours [risk ratio (RR): 1.85; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 2.84], more days of respiratory support [mean difference (MD): 1.26 days; 95% CI: 0.30, 2.22 days], and longer duration of hospitalization [MD: 1.35 days; 95% CI: 0.20, 2.50 days], but lower in-hospital mortality [RR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.80] in children with pneumonia. Conclusions Respiratory viruses were detected from most children hospitalized with ALRI in Botswana, but only RSV and human metapneumovirus were more frequent than among children without ALRI. Detection of RSV from children with ALRI predicted a protracted illness course but lower mortality compared with non

  7. INHIBITION OF RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS (RSV)-INDUCED INFLAMMATION BY 3-NITROTYROSINE IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhibition of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)-Induced Inflammation by 3-Nitrotyrosine in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells. J. M. Soukup, MPH 1, ZW. Li, MD 2 and YC. T. Huang, MD 1. 1 NHEERL, US Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC and 2 CEMALB, University of North Carolina,...

  8. Global gene expression profiling in infants with acute respiratory syncytial virus broncholitis demonstrates systemic activation of interferon signaling networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections and has a high impact on pediatric emergency department utilization. Variation in host response may influence the pathogenesis and disease severity. We evaluated global gene expression profiles to be...

  9. Differential Expression of Ovine Innate Immune Genes by Preterm and Neonatal Lung Epithelia Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preterm infants have increased susceptibility to severe manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The cause(s) for this age-dependent vulnerability is/are not well-defined, but alterations in innate immune products have been implicated. In sheep, RSV disease severity has simil...

  10. Evaluation of a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Zampiero, Alberto; Bianchini, Sonia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal swabs from 424 children were used to compare the performances of the new multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) RIDA®GENE Flu & RSV kit and monospecific RT-PCR assays in detecting respiratory syncytial and influenza viruses. The easy-to-use kit was highly sensitive and specific and is recommended for routine practice. PMID:26458277

  11. Mucosal IgG Levels Correlate Better with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Load and Inflammation than Plasma IgG Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Marloes; Ahout, Inge M. L.; de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal vaccination is currently considered a strategy against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. In RSV-infected infants, high mucosal IgG levels correlated better with reduced RSV load and lower mucosal CXCL10 levels than plasma IgG levels. For future vaccination strategies against RSV, more focus should be on the mucosal humoral immune response. PMID:26656116

  12. Differential Expression of Ovine Innate Immune Genes by Preterm and Neonatal Lung Epithelia Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Preterm infants have increased susceptibility to severe manifestations of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. The cause(s) for this age-dependent vulnerability is/are not well-defined, but alterations in innate immune products have been implicated. In sheep, RSV disease severity has similar...

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants and correlation with meteorological factors and air pollutants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe respiratory infections in infants with seasonal epidemics. Environmental factors (temperature, humidity, air pollution) could influence RSV epidemics through their effects on virus activity and diffusion. Methods We conducted a retrospective study on a paediatric population who referred to our Paediatric Emergency Unit in order to analyze the correlation between weekly incidence of RSV positive cases during winter season in Bologna and meteorological factors and air pollutants concentration. Results We observed a significant correlation between the incidence of RSV infections and the mean minimum temperature registered during the same week and the previous weeks. The weekly number of RSV positive cases was also correlated to the mean PM10 concentration of the week before. Conclusions RSV epidemic trend in Bologna (Italy) is related to the mean minimum temperature, and the mean PM10 concentration. PMID:23311474

  14. Engineering and expression of a RhoA peptide against respiratory syncytial virus infection in plants.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Berlanga, Benita; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Shoji, Yoko; Chichester, Jessica A; Yusibov, Vidadi; Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Noyola, Daniel E; Alpuche-Solís, Ángel G

    2016-02-01

    MAIN CONCLUSION : A RhoA-derived peptide fused to carrier molecules from plants showed enhanced biological activity of in vitro assays against respiratory syncytial virus compared to the RhoA peptide alone or the synthetic RhoA peptide. A RhoA-derived peptide has been reported for over a decade as a potential inhibitor of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection both in vitro and in vivo and is anticipated to be a promising alternative to monoclonal antibody-based therapy against RSV infection. However, there are several challenges to furthering development of this antiviral peptide, including improvement in the peptide’s bioavailability, development of an efficient delivery system and identification of a cost-effective production platform. In this study, we have engineered a RhoA peptide as a genetic fusion to two carrier molecules, either lichenase (LicKM) or the coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus. These constructs were introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a tobacco mosaic virus-based expression vector and targets purified. The results demonstrated that the RhoA peptide fusion proteins were efficiently expressed in N. benthamiana plants, and that two of the resulting fusion proteins, RhoA-LicKM and RhoA2-FL-d25CP, inhibited RSV growth in vitro by 50 and 80 %, respectively. These data indicate the feasibility of transient expression of this biologically active antiviral RhoA peptide in plants and the advantage of using a carrier molecule to enhance target expression and efficacy. PMID:26474991

  15. A recombinant varicella vaccine harboring a respiratory syncytial virus gene induces humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kouki; Matsuura, Masaaki; Ota, Megumi; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2015-11-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) Oka vaccine strain (vOka) is highly efficient and causes few adverse events; therefore, it is used worldwide. We previously constructed recombinant vOka (rvOka) harboring the mumps virus gene. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka induced the production of neutralizing antibodies against the mumps virus and VZV. Here, we constructed recombinant vOka viruses containing either the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A fusion glycoprotein (RSV A-F) gene or RSV subgroup B fusion glycoprotein (RSV B-F) gene (rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F). Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses confirmed the expression of each recombinant RSV protein in virus-infected cells. Immunizing guinea pigs with rvOka-RSV A-F or rvOka-RSV B-F led to the induction of antibodies against RSV proteins. These results suggest that the current varicella vaccine genome can be used to generate custom-made vaccine vectors to develop the next generation of live vaccines. PMID:26116253

  16. A Novel Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion Protein Subunit Vaccine against Influenza and RSV

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tiffany M.; Jones, Les P.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cause substantial morbidity and mortality afflicting the ends of the age spectrum during the autumn through winter months in the United States. The benefit of vaccination against RSV and influenza using a subunit vaccine to enhance immunity and neutralizing antibody was investigated. Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and RSV fusion (F) protein were tested as vaccine components alone and in combination to explore the adjuvant properties of RSV F protein on HA immunity. Mice vaccinated with HA and F exhibited robust immunity that, when challenged, had reduced viral burden for both influenza and RSV. These studies show an enhancing and cross-protective benefit of F protein for anti-HA immunity. PMID:23903841

  17. Influence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain Differences on Pathogenesis and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Melero, José A.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular epidemiology studies have provided convincing evidence of antigenic and sequence variability among respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) isolates. Circulating viruses have been classified into two antigenic groups (A and B) that correlate with well-delineated genetic groups. Most sequence and antigenic differences (both inter- and intra-groups) accumulate in two hypervariable segments of the G protein gene. Sequences of the G gene have been used for phylogenetic analyses. These studies have shown a worldwide distribution of RSV strains with both local and global replacement of dominant viruses with time. Although data are still limited, there is evidence that strain variation may contribute to differences in pathogenicity. In addition, there is some but limited evidence that RSV variation may be, at least partially, immune (antibody) driven. However, there is the paradox in RSV that, in contrast to other viruses (e.g., influenza viruses) the epitopes recognized by the most effective RSV-neutralizing antibodies are highly conserved. In contrast, antibodies that recognize strain-specific epitopes are poorly neutralizing. It is likely that this apparent contradiction is due to the lack of a comprehensive knowledge of the duration and specificities of the human antibody response against RSV antigens. Since there are some data supporting a group- (or clade-) specific antibody response after a primary infection in humans, it may be wise to consider the incorporation of strains representative of groups A and B (or their antigens) in future RSV vaccine development. PMID:24362684

  18. Viruslike Particle Vaccine Induces Protection Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Kim, Yonghwan; Lee, Sujin; Yi, Hong; Kang, Sang-Moo; Bozja, Jadranka; Moore, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and viral death in infants. Despite decades of research with traditional or subunit vaccine approaches, there are no approved RSV vaccines. New approaches are therefore urgently needed to develop effective RSV vaccines. Methods. We developed viruslike particles (VLPs) consisting of an influenza virus matrix (M1) protein core and RSV-F or -G on the surface. We tested the immunogenicity and vaccine efficacy of these VLPs (RSV-F, RSV-G) in a mouse model. Results. Intramuscular vaccination with RSV-F or RSV-G VLPs elicited IgG2a dominant RSV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses against RSV-A2 viruses in both serum and lung extract. Mice immunized with VLPs (RSV-F or RSV-G) showed higher viral neutralizing antibodies in vitro and significantly decreased lung virus loads in vivo after live RSV-A2 challenge. RSV-G VLPs showed better protective efficacy than RSV-F VLPs as determined by the levels of lung virus loads and morbidity postchallenge. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that VLP vaccination provides effective protection against RSV infection. VLPs containing RSV-F and/or RSV-G are potential vaccine candidates against RSV. PMID:21881112

  19. Long-Term Shedding of Influenza Virus, Parainfluenza Virus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Nosocomial Epidemiology in Patients with Hematological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prifert, Christiane; Wedde, Marianne; Puthenparambil, Joe; Weissbrich, Benedikt; Biere, Barbara; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Egerer, Gerlinde; Schnitzler, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are a cause of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), but can be associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in immunocompromised patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the duration of viral shedding in hematological patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs from hematological patients were screened for influenza, parainfluenza and RSV on admission as well as on development of respiratory symptoms. Consecutive swabs were collected until viral clearance. Out of 672 tested patients, a total of 111 patients (17%) were infected with one of the investigated viral agents: 40 with influenza, 13 with parainfluenza and 64 with RSV; six patients had influenza/RSV or parainfluenza/RSV co-infections. The majority of infected patients (n = 75/111) underwent stem cell transplantation (42 autologous, 48 allogeneic, 15 autologous and allogeneic). LRTI was observed in 48 patients, of whom 15 patients developed severe LRTI, and 13 patients with respiratory tract infection died. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a variety of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), influenza B, parainfluenza 3 and RSV A, B viruses. RSV A was detected in 54 patients, RSV B in ten patients. The newly emerging RSV A genotype ON1 predominated in the study cohort and was found in 48 (75%) of 64 RSV-infected patients. Furthermore, two distinct clusters were detected for RSV A genotype ON1, identical RSV G gene sequences in these patients are consistent with nosocomial transmission. Long-term viral shedding for more than 30 days was significantly associated with prior allogeneic transplantation (p = 0.01) and was most pronounced in patients with RSV infection (n = 16) with a median duration of viral shedding for 80 days (range 35–334 days). Long-term shedding of respiratory viruses might be a catalyzer of nosocomial transmission and must be considered for

  20. Curcumin modified silver nanoparticles for highly efficient inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao Xi; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition effect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, giving a decrease of viral titers about two orders of magnitude at the concentration of cAgNPs under which no toxicity was found to the host cells. Mechanism investigations showed that cAgNPs could prevent RSV from infecting the host cells by inactivating the virus directly, indicating that cAgNPs are a novel promising efficient virucide for RSV.Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition

  1. Analysis of Immune Epitopes of Respiratory Syncytial Virus for Designing of Vectored Vaccines Based on Influenza Virus Platform.

    PubMed

    Isakova-Sivak, I N; Korenkov, D A; Fedorova, E A; Tretiak, T S; Matyushenko, V A; Smolonogina, T A; Rudenko, L G

    2016-08-01

    The immunoepitope database was used for analysis of experimentally detected epitopes of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) proteins and for selection of the epitope combinations for subsequent designing of recombinant vectored anti-RSV vaccines based on attenuated influenza viruses. Three cassettes containing the most promising B- and T-cell RSV epitopes were selected: peptide F (243-294) supporting the formation of humoral immunity in animals; fragment M2-1 (70-101+114-146) containing two MHC I epitopes (82-90 and 127-135); and MHC II-epitope (51-66). The selected constructions contained no neoepitopes causing undesirable effects of vaccination, such as immunotolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27590768

  2. Development of Acquired Immunity following Repeated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Cotton Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Yasui, Yosuke; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections occur every year worldwide. Most infants are infected with RSV by one year of age and are reinfected because immune responses after the first infection are too weak to protect against subsequent infections. In the present study, immune responses against RSV were investigated in order to obtain a better understanding of repetitive RSV infections in cotton rats. No detectable neutralizing antibody (NT) was developed after the first infection, and the second infection was not prevented. The results of histological examinations revealed severe inflammation, viral antigens were detected around bronchial epithelial cells, and infectious viruses were recovered from lung homogenates. Following the second infection neutralizing antibodies were significantly elevated, and CD8+ cells were activated in response to RSV-F253-265. No viral antigens was detected thereafter in lung tissues and infectious viruses were not recovered. Similar results were obtained in the present study using the subgroups A and B. These results support the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses following repetitive infections with RSV; however, these responses were insufficient to eliminate viruses in the first and second infections. PMID:27224021

  3. Reliable Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children for Adequate Hospital Infection Control Management

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Susanne; Nadal, David; Stroehle, Angelika; Bossart, Walter

    2001-01-01

    By using a rapid test for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection (Abbott TestPack RSV), a number of patients were observed, showing repeatedly positive results over a period of up to 10 weeks. A prospective study was initiated to compare the rapid test with an antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) protocol for detection of RSV serotypes A and B. Only respiratory samples from children exhibiting the prolonged presence of RSV (≥5 days) as determined by the rapid test were considered. A total of 134 specimens from 24 children was investigated by antigen capture EIA and nested RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as the reference method, we determined the RSV rapid test to have a specificity of 63% and a sensitivity of 66% and the antigen capture EIA to have a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 69% for acute-phase samples and the homologous virus serotype A. In 7 (29%) of 24 patients, the positive results of the RSV rapid test could not be confirmed by either nested RT-PCR or antigen capture EIA. In these seven patients a variety of other respiratory viruses were detected. For general screening the RSV rapid test was found to be a reasonable tool to get quick results. However, its lack of specificity in some patients requires confirmation by additional tests to rule out false-positive results and/or detection of other respiratory viruses. PMID:11526141

  4. Recent Advances in Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bawage, Swapnil Subhash; Tiwari, Pooja Munnilal; Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of respiratory infection in infants and the elderly, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The interdisciplinary fields, especially biotechnology and nanotechnology, have facilitated the development of modern detection systems for RSV. Many anti-RSV compounds like fusion inhibitors and RNAi molecules have been successful in laboratory and clinical trials. But, currently, there are no effective drugs for RSV infection even after decades of research. Effective diagnosis can result in effective treatment, but the progress in both of these facets must be concurrent. The development in prevention and treatment measures for RSV is at appreciable pace, but the implementation into clinical practice still seems a challenge. This review attempts to present the promising diverse research approaches and advancements in the area of diagnosis, prevention, and treatment that contribute to RSV management. PMID:24382964

  5. Discovery of Piperazinylquinoline Derivatives as Novel Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiufang; Wang, Lisha; Wang, Baoxia; Miao, Kun; Xiang, Kunlun; Feng, Song; Gao, Lu; Shen, Hong C; Yun, Hongying

    2016-06-01

    A novel series of piperazinylquinoline derivatives were discovered as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion inhibitors by the ligand-based screening approach. Among 3,000 hits, 1-amino-3-[[2-(4-phenyl-1-piperidyl)-4-quinolyl]amino]propan-2-ol (7) was proven to be active against the RSV long (A) strain. The anti-RSV activity was improved by converting piperidine to benzylcarbonyl substituted piperazine. The basic side chain was also found to be crucial for anti-RSV activity. The selected analogues, 45 and 50, demonstrated anti-RSV activities up to EC50 = 0.028 μM and 0.033 μM, respectively. A direct anti-RSV effect was confirmed by a plaque reduction assay and a fusion inhibition assay. Both 45 and 50 showed promising DMPK properties with good oral bioavailability, and could potentially lead to novel therapeutic agents targeting the RSV fusion process. PMID:27326326

  6. The influence of diurnal temperature range on the incidence of respiratory syncytial virus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, D

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been reported to exhibit seasonal variation. However, the impact of diurnal temperature range (DTR) on RSV has not been investigated. After acquiring data related to cases of RSV and weather parameters of DTR in Fukuoka, Japan, between 2006 and 2012, we used negative binomial generalized linear models and distributed lag nonlinear models to assess the possible relationship between DTR and RSV cases, adjusting for confounding factors. Our analysis revealed that the weekly number of RSV cases increased with a relative risk of 3·30 (95% confidence interval 1·65-6·60) for every 1°C increase in DTR. Our study provides quantitative evidence that the number of RSV cases increased significantly with increasing DTR. We suggest that preventive measures for limiting the spread of RSV should be considered during extended periods of high DTR. PMID:25092407

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 inhibits lung injury induced by respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongjing; Xie, Zhengde; Li, Tieling; Zhang, Shaogeng; Lai, Chengcai; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Keyu; Han, Lina; Duan, Yueqiang; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Yang, Xiaolan; Xing, Li; Zhang, Peirui; Wang, Zhouhai; Li, Ruisheng; Yu, Jane J.; Wang, Xiliang; Yang, Penghui

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a major cause of severe lower respiratory illness in infants and young children, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for viral pathogenesis have not been fully elucidated. To date, no drugs or vaccines have been employed to improve clinical outcomes for RSV-infected patients. In this paper, we report that angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) protected against severe lung injury induced by RSV infection in an experimental mouse model and in pediatric patients. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency aggravated RSV-associated disease pathogenesis, mainly by its action on the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Furthermore, administration of a recombinant ACE2 protein alleviated the severity of RSV-induced lung injury. These findings demonstrate that ACE2 plays a critical role in preventing RSV-induced lung injury, and suggest that ACE2 is a promising potential therapeutic target in the management of RSV-induced lung disease. PMID:26813885

  8. Spontaneous Pneumothorax With Subcutaneous Emphysema: A Rare Complication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Carmen; Almeida, Ana Filipe; Ferraz, Catarina; Nunes, Teresa; Guedes Vaz, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children under the age of 2. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the infecting agent in more than 50% of the cases. Usually the clinical course is uneventful and complications are uncommon. Secondary air leaks are a recognized rare complication of bronchiolitis, although the real incidence remains unknown. We report a case of a 21-month-old female that developed a spontaneous pneumothorax (PNO) with subcutaneous emphysema (SE) late in the course of RSV acute bronchiolitis. Additional investigation ruled out any underlying disease predisposing to spontaneous PNO. Physicians, especially those who work with small children, must be aware of this uncommon complication of bronchiolitis that may appear late in the course of the disease despite an initial clinical improvement. PMID:26858803

  9. Outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in immunocompromised adults on a hematology ward.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Tomas Ostergaard; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Willenborg, Christiana; Cheung, Carol; Andresen, David; Rawlinson, William; Clezy, Kate

    2016-10-01

    We describe an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection on a hematology ward without allogeneic stem cell transplant patients. Twelve patients and one staff member infected with RSV were identified from the laboratory database. Five patients had lower respiratory tract infection, seven had upper respiratory tract infection, one was asymptomatic, and there were two (15.4%) deaths. Most patients had overlapping periods of potential infectiousness on the ward. Sequencing was possible on eight specimens and five of these had identical sequences. Results were consistent with transmission occurring both on the ward and by introduction of RSV from the community. J. Med. Virol. 88:1827-1831, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990584

  10. Spontaneous Pneumothorax With Subcutaneous Emphysema: A Rare Complication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Carmen; Almeida, Ana Filipe; Ferraz, Catarina; Nunes, Teresa; Guedes Vaz, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and children under the age of 2. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the infecting agent in more than 50% of the cases. Usually the clinical course is uneventful and complications are uncommon. Secondary air leaks are a recognized rare complication of bronchiolitis, although the real incidence remains unknown. We report a case of a 21-month-old female that developed a spontaneous pneumothorax (PNO) with subcutaneous emphysema (SE) late in the course of RSV acute bronchiolitis. Additional investigation ruled out any underlying disease predisposing to spontaneous PNO. Physicians, especially those who work with small children, must be aware of this uncommon complication of bronchiolitis that may appear late in the course of the disease despite an initial clinical improvement. PMID:26858803

  11. Lower respiratory tract infection caused by respiratory syncytial virus: current management and new therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Natalie I; Martinón-Torres, Federico; Baraldi, Eugenio; Fauroux, Brigitte; Greenough, Anne; Heikkinen, Terho; Manzoni, Paolo; Mejias, Asuncion; Nair, Harish; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Polack, Fernando P; Ramilo, Octavio; Sharland, Mike; Stein, Renato; Madhi, Shabir A; Bont, Louis

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age. Evidence-based management guidelines suggest that there is no effective treatment for RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and that supportive care, ie, hydration and oxygenation, remains the cornerstone of clinical management. However, RSV treatments in development in the past decade include 10 vaccines and 11 therapeutic agents in active clinical trials. Maternal vaccination is particularly relevant because the most severe disease occurs within the first 6 months of life, when children are unlikely to benefit from active immunisation. We must optimise the implementation of novel RSV therapeutics by understanding the target populations, showing safety, and striving for acceptable pricing in the context of this worldwide health problem. In this Review, we outline the limitations of RSV LRTI management, the drugs in development, and the remaining challenges related to study design, regulatory approval, and implementation. PMID:26411809

  12. Perceived Risk of Severe Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease and Immunoprophylaxis Use Among US Pediatric Specialists.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Deborah M; Domachowske, Joseph B; Wong, Pierre C; Parimi, Prabhu S; Garcia, Daniel F; Marcus, Michael G; La Via, William V; Syed, Iqra A; Szabo, Shelagh M; McLaurin, Kimmie K; Kumar, Veena R

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the perception of US pediatric specialists of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease risk and determine their clinical practices regarding immunoprophylaxis for high-risk children. Separate surveys were sent to neonatologists, pediatricians, pediatric pulmonologists, and pediatric cardiologists. Data were collected using structured questions requiring quantitative responses. Most neonatologists and pediatricians (>82.7%) reported a high clinical need for RSV immunoprophylaxis in preterm infants <32 weeks' gestational age. Pediatric pulmonologists and pediatric cardiologists suggested that health conditions indicative of chronic lung disease of prematurity and hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease, respectively, confer eligibility for RSV immunoprophylaxis. Agreement with the changes in the 2014 American Academy of Pediatrics guidance for RSV immunoprophylaxis was mixed among respondents from the 4 specialties. Survey findings may provide a basis to improve education about risk for severe RSV disease and evaluate changes in physician use of RSV immunoprophylaxis based on the 2014 guidance. PMID:26400767

  13. La prévention des infections par le virus respiratoire syncytial

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, JL

    2011-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ L’infection par le virus respiratoire syncytial (VRS) est la principale cause d’infections des voies respiratoires inférieures chez les jeunes enfants. Le palivizumab, un anticorps monoclonal anti-VRS, réduit le taux d’hospitalisation des enfants à haut risque mais est très coûteux. Le présent document de principes remplace les trois précédents documents de principes de la Société canadienne de pédiatrie sur le sujet et est mis à jour principalement pour traiter des récentes modifications aux lignes directrices de l’American Academy of Pediatrics dans le contexte canadien. Il contient une analyse des publications ainsi que des recommandations au sujet de l’utilisation du palivizumab chez les enfants à haut risque

  14. New Host Factors Important for Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Replication Revealed by a Novel Microfluidics Screen for Interactors of Matrix (M) Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Kipper, Sarit; Hamad, Samar; Caly, Leon; Avrahami, Dorit; Bacharach, Eran; Jans, David A.; Gerber, Doron; Bajorek, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Although human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and elderly worldwide, there is no licensed RSV vaccine or effective drug treatment available. The RSV Matrix protein plays key roles in virus life cycle, being found in the nucleus early in infection in a transcriptional inhibitory role, and later localizing in viral inclusion bodies before coordinating viral assembly and budding at the plasma membrane. In this study, we used a novel, high throughput microfluidics platform and custom human open reading frame library to identify novel host cell binding partners of RSV matrix. Novel interactors identified included proteins involved in host transcription regulation, the innate immunity response, cytoskeletal regulation, membrane remodeling, and cellular trafficking. A number of these interactions were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and cellular colocalization approaches. Importantly, the physiological significance of matrix interaction with the actin-binding protein cofilin 1, caveolae protein Caveolin 2, and the zinc finger protein ZNF502 was confirmed. siRNA knockdown of the host protein levels resulted in reduced RSV virus production in infected cells. These results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of RSV matrix in the host cell. PMID:25556234

  15. A Recombinant G Protein Plus Cyclosporine A-Based Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Elicits Humoral and Regulatory T Cell Responses against Infection without Vaccine-Enhanced Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaofan; Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Yiwei; Li, Changgui; Dong, Aihua; He, Zhonghuai; Zhang, Shuren; Wang, Bin

    2016-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection can cause severe disease in the lower respiratory tract of infants and older people. Vaccination with a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine (FI-RSV) and subsequent RSV infection has led to mild to severe pneumonia with two deaths among vaccinees. The vaccine-enhanced disease (VED) was recently demonstrated to be due to an elevated level of Th2 cell responses following loss of regulatory T (Treg) cells from the lungs. To induce high levels of neutralizing Abs and minimize pathogenic T cell responses, we developed a novel strategy of immunizing animals with a recombinant RSV G protein together with cyclosporine A. This novel vaccine induced not only a higher level of neutralizing Abs against RSV infection, but, most importantly, also significantly higher levels of Treg cells that suppressed VED in the lung after RSV infection. The induced responses provided protection against RSV challenge with no sign of pneumonia or bronchitis. Treg cell production of IL-10 was one of the key factors to suppress VED. These finding indicate that G protein plus cyclosporine A could be a promising vaccine against RSV infection in children and older people. PMID:26792805

  16. Human respiratory syncytial virus Memphis 37 grown in HEp-2 cells causes more severe disease in lambs than virus grown in vero cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis in infants and young children. A small percentage of these individuals develop severe and even fatal disease. To better understand the pathogenesis of severe disease and develop therapies unique to the less-developed infan...

  17. Serologic Cross-Reactions between Nucleocapsid Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yange; Pohl, Jan; Brooks, W. Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) share virologic and epidemiologic features and cause clinically similar respiratory illness predominantly in young children. In a previous study of acute febrile respiratory illness in Bangladesh, we tested paired serum specimens from 852 children presenting fever and cough for diagnostic increases in titers of antibody to hRSV and hMPV by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Unexpectedly, of 93 serum pairs that showed a ≥4-fold increase in titers of antibody to hRSV, 24 (25.8%) showed a concurrent increase in titers of antibody to hMPV; of 91 pairs showing an increase to hMPV, 13 (14.3%) showed a concurrent increase to hRSV. We speculated that common antigens shared by these viruses explain this finding. Since the nucleocapsid (N) proteins of these viruses show the greatest sequence homology, we tested hyperimmune antisera prepared for each virus against baculovirus-expressed recombinant N (recN) proteins for potential cross-reactivity. The antisera were reciprocally reactive with both proteins. To localize common antigenic regions, we first expressed the carboxy domain of the hMPV N protein that was the most highly conserved region within the hRSV N protein. Although reciprocally reactive with antisera by Western blotting, this truncated protein did not react with hMPV IgG-positive human sera by EIA. Using 5 synthetic peptides that spanned the amino-terminal portion of the hMPV N protein, we identified a single peptide that was cross-reactive with human sera positive for either virus. Antiserum prepared for this peptide was reactive with recN proteins of both viruses, indicating that a common immunoreactive site exists in this region. PMID:25740767

  18. Secretion of the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein from insect cells using the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boon-Huan; Brown, Gaie; Sugrue, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    Sequences derived from the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein were expressed in insect cells as recombinant glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged proteins. The sequence covering the F2 subunit (GST-F2), and a truncated form of the F protein in which the transmembrane domain was removed (GST-F2/F1), were cloned into the baculovirus pAcSecG2T secretory vector. These virus sequences also had the endogenous virus signal sequence removed and replaced with a signal sequence derived from the baculovirus gp67 glycoprotein, which was present in pAcSecG2T. The recombinant RSV glycoproteins were successfully detected in expressing cells by immunofluorescence assay and in the tissue culture medium by western blot analysis. The secreted recombinant GST-F2/F1 protein was further analysed using glycosidases. Our results showed that the GST-F2/F1 protein were sensitive to peptide:N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) treatment, but not to Endoglycosidase H (EndoH) treatment. This indicates that the secreted recombinant proteins were modified by the addition of mature N-linked glycan chains. PMID:17502677

  19. Does the viral subtype influence the biennial cycle of respiratory syncytial virus?

    PubMed Central

    Mlinaric-Galinovic, Gordana; Vojnovic, Gordana; Cepin-Bogovic, Jasna; Bace, Ana; Bozikov, Jadranka; Welliver, Robert C; Wahn, Ulrich; Cebalo, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Background The epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is quite different in regions of Europe (biennial epidemics in alternating cycles of approximately 9 and 15 months) than in the Western Hemisphere (annual epidemics). In order to determine if these differences are accounted for by the circulation of different RSV subtypes, we studied the prevalence of RSV subtype A and B strains in Zagreb County from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2007. Results RSV was identified in the nasopharyngeal secretions of 368 inpatients using direct fluorescence assays and/or by virus isolation in cell culture. The subtype of recovered strains was determined by real-time PCR. Of 368 RSV infections identified in children during this interval, subtype A virus caused 94 infections, and subtype B 270. Four patients had a dual RSV infection (subtypes A and B). The period of study was characterized by two epidemic waves of RSV infections-one, smaller, in the spring of 2006 (peaking in March), the second, larger, in December 2006/January 2007 (peaking in January). The predominant subtype in both outbreaks was RSV subtype B. Not until November 2007 did RSV subtype A predominate, while initiating a new outbreak continuing into the following calendar year. Conclusion Though only two calendar years were monitored, we believe that the biennial RSV cycle in Croatia occurs independently of the dominant viral subtype. PMID:19735540

  20. Curcumin modified silver nanoparticles for highly efficient inhibition of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao Xi; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-02-01

    Interactions between nanoparticles and viruses have attracted increasing attention due to the antiviral activity of nanoparticles and the resulting possibility to be employed as biomedical interventions. In this contribution, we developed a very simple route to prepare uniform and stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with antiviral properties by using curcumin, which is a member of the ginger family isolated from rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa and has a wide range of biological activities like antioxidant, antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects, and acts as reducing and capping agents in this synthetic route. The tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) assay showed that the curcumin modified silver nanoparticles (cAgNPs) have a highly efficient inhibition effect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, giving a decrease of viral titers about two orders of magnitude at the concentration of cAgNPs under which no toxicity was found to the host cells. Mechanism investigations showed that cAgNPs could prevent RSV from infecting the host cells by inactivating the virus directly, indicating that cAgNPs are a novel promising efficient virucide for RSV. PMID:26781043

  1. Phosphorylation of human respiratory syncytial virus P protein at serine 54 regulates viral uncoating

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Ana; Gonzalez-Armas, Juan C.; Villanueva, Nieves

    2008-10-10

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) structural P protein, phosphorylated at serine (S) and threonine (T) residues, is a co-factor of viral RNA polymerase. The phosphorylation of S54 is controlled by the coordinated action of two cellular enzymes: a lithium-sensitive kinase, probably glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3) {beta} and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of lithium-sensitive kinase, soon after infection, blocks the viral growth cycle by inhibiting synthesis and/or accumulation of viral RNAs, proteins and extracellular particles. P protein phosphorylation at S54 is required to liberate viral ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) from M protein, during the uncoating process. Kinase inhibition, late in infection, produces a decrease in genomic RNA and infectious viral particles. LiCl, intranasally applied to mice infected with HRSV A2 strain, reduces the number of mice with virus in their lungs and the virus titre. Administration of LiCl to humans via aerosol should prevent HRSV infection, without secondary effects.

  2. Temporal association between the influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): RSV as a predictor of seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Míguez, A; Iftimi, A; Montes, F

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiologists agree that there is a prevailing seasonality in the presentation of epidemic waves of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections and influenza. The aim of this study is to quantify the potential relationship between the activity of RSV, with respect to the influenza virus, in order to use the RSV seasonal curve as a predictor of the evolution of an influenza virus epidemic wave. Two statistical tools, logistic regression and time series, are used for predicting the evolution of influenza. Both logistic models and time series of influenza consider RSV information from previous weeks. Data consist of influenza and confirmed RSV cases reported in Comunitat Valenciana (Spain) during the period from week 40 (2010) to week 8 (2014). Binomial logistic regression models used to predict the two states of influenza wave, basal or peak, result in a rate of correct classification higher than 92% with the validation set. When a finer three-states categorization is established, basal, increasing peak and decreasing peak, the multinomial logistic model performs well in 88% of cases of the validation set. The ARMAX model fits well for influenza waves and shows good performance for short-term forecasts up to 3 weeks. The seasonal evolution of influenza virus can be predicted a minimum of 4 weeks in advance using logistic models based on RSV. It would be necessary to study more inter-pandemic seasons to establish a stronger relationship between the epidemic waves of both viruses. PMID:27165946

  3. Reduced innate immune response, apoptosis, and virus release in cells cured of respiratory syncytial virus persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Cristina; Melero, José A; Martínez, Isidoro

    2011-02-01

    It has been reported that cell clones isolated at different passages from a culture of HEp-2 cells infected persistently with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) were cured of the virus. Further studies on one of these clones (31C1) are reported here, showing that 31C1 cells can still be infected by HRSV but release low amounts of virus to the culture supernatant, develop smaller and less numerous syncytia than the original HEp-2 cells, and display only a weak innate immune response to the infection. Accordingly, uninfected 31C1 cells, but not clones derived from uninfected HEp-2 cells, express low levels of TLR3 and RIG-I. In addition, 31C1 cells are partly resistant to apoptosis. These results indicate that persistent infection of HEp-2 cells by HRSV has selected cell variants, with changes affecting cell survival, virus growth and the innate immune response that may be valuable for studies of virus-cell interaction. PMID:21093006

  4. The ovine respiratory syncytial virus F gene sequence and its diagnostic application.

    PubMed

    Eleraky, N Z; Kania, S A; Potgieter, L N

    2001-11-01

    Ruminant respiratory syncytial viruses (RSVs) are classified into 2 subgroups, ovine RSV and bovine RSV. Although ovine RSV infects cattle, its contribution to bovine respiratory tract disease has not been established, which is an important issue for vaccine development in cattle. Diagnosis by virus isolation or serology has low or variable sensitivity and/or specificity and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been recommended as a rapid and sensitive technique for RSV detection. A simple procedure has been developed to detect and identify bovine and ovine RSVs. First, the nucleotide sequence of the ovine RSV fusion (F) gene was determined and compared with representative strains of bovine RSV and human RSV subgroups A and B. The ovine RSV F gene has 85 and 72-73% nucleotide identity with those of bovine RSV and human RSV, respectively. The predicted amino acid sequence of the ovine RSV F gene has 94 and 83-84% amino acid identity with those of bovine RSV and human RSV, respectively. Then PCR primers targeting a specific F gene fragment of bovine and ovine RSV were designed. The primers represented bases 85-103 and the complementary sequence to bases 510-493 of the ovine RSV F gene. A similar PCR product (426 bp) was obtained on agarose gel electrophoresis from bovine RSV and from ovine RSV. The products, however, were unique to the parent virus and could be distinguished by EcoRI or MspI restriction endonuclease cleavage. EcoRI cleaved the ovine product into 2 bands (285 and 141 bp) but failed to affect the bovine RSV PCR product. However, MspI cleaved the bovine product into 2 bands (229 and 197 bp) but had no effect on the ovine product. Also, this assay did not amplify any PCR product with human RSV. The reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) followed by restriction enzyme digestion is a useful and practical approach for detection and differentiation of ruminant respiratory syncytial viruses. PMID:11724134

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins uptake occurs through clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a human epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Sánchez-Hernández, Carla; Gómez-García, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Cell-surface viral proteins most frequently enter the cell through clathrin or caveolae endocytosis. Respiratory syncytial virus antigen internalization by immune cells is via caveolin, however, uptake of paramyxovirus cell membrane proteins by non-immune cells is done through clathrin-coated pits. In this work, the uptake of respiratory syncytial virus cell surface glycoproteins by non-immune human epithelial cells was investigated through indirect immunofluorescence with polyclonal anti-RSV antibody and confocal lasser-scanner microscopy. Clathrin and caveolae internalization pathways were monitored through specific inhibitors monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD), respectively. Internalization of RSV antigens was inhibited by MDC but not by MBCD, implying that clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the major uptake route of RSV antigens by an epithelial human cell line. PMID:18950517

  6. Lamb model of respiratory syncytial virus-associated lung disease: insights to pathogenesis and novel treatments.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a risk factor for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and hospitalization. The pathogenesis underlying this is not fully understood, and in vivo studies are needed to better clarify essential cellular features and molecular mechanisms. Such studies include analysis of lung tissue from affected human infants and various animal models. The preterm and newborn lamb lung has developmental, structural, cellular, physiologic, and immunologic features similar to that of human infants. Also, the lamb lung is susceptible to various strains of RSV that infect infants and cause similar bronchiolar lesions. Studies in lambs suggest that viral replication in airways (especially bronchioles) is extensive by 4 days after infection, along with bronchiolitis characterized by degeneration and necrosis of epithelial cells, syncytial cell formation, neutrophil infiltration, epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and innate and adaptive immune responses. RSV bronchiolitis greatly affects airflow and gaseous exchange. RSV disease severity is increased in preterm lambs compared with full-term lambs; similar to human infants. The lamb is conducive to experimental assessment of novel, mechanistic therapeutic interventions such as delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and enhancement of airway epithelial oxidative responses, Club (Clara) cell protein 10, and synthesized compounds such as nanobodies. In contrast, exposure of the fetal ovine lung in vivo to ethanol, a risk factor for preterm birth, reduces pulmonary alveolar development and surfactant protein A expression. Because the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination enhances some inflammatory responses to RSV infection in lambs, this model has the potential to assess mechanisms of formalin-inactivated RSV enhanced disease as well as newly developed vaccines. PMID:24936027

  7. CX3CR1 is an important surface molecule for respiratory syncytial virus infection in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chirkova, Tatiana; Lin, Songbai; Oomens, Antonius G. P.; Gaston, Kelsey A.; Boyoglu-Barnum, Seyhan; Meng, Jia; Stobart, Christopher C.; Cotton, Calvin U.; Hartert, Tina V.; Moore, Martin L.; Ziady, Assem G.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and young children, and causes disease throughout life. Understanding the biology of infection, including virus binding to the cell surface, should help develop antiviral drugs or vaccines. The RSV F and G glycoproteins bind cell surface heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) through heparin-binding domains. The G protein also has a CX3C chemokine motif which binds to the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1. G protein binding to CX3CR1 is not important for infection of immortalized cell lines, but reportedly is so for primary human airway epithelial cells (HAECs), the primary site for human infection. We studied the role of CX3CR1 in RSV infection with CX3CR1-transfected cell lines and HAECs with variable percentages of CX3CR1-expressing cells, and the effect of anti-CX3CR1 antibodies or a mutation in the RSV CX3C motif. Immortalized cells lacking HSPGs had low RSV binding and infection, which was increased markedly by CX3CR1 transfection. CX3CR1 was expressed primarily on ciliated cells, and ∼50 % of RSV-infected cells in HAECs were CX3CR1+. HAECs with more CX3CR1-expressing cells had a proportional increase in RSV infection. Blocking G binding to CX3CR1 with anti-CX3CR1 antibody or a mutation in the CX3C motif significantly decreased RSV infection in HAECs. The kinetics of cytokine production suggested that the RSV/CX3CR1 interaction induced RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein), IL-8 and fractalkine production, whilst it downregulated IL-15, IL1-RA and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Thus, the RSV G protein/CX3CR1 interaction is likely important in infection and infection-induced responses of the airway epithelium, the primary site of human infection. PMID:26297201

  8. Genetic Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Provides Protection Without Disease Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Teresa R; Rangel, David; Graham, Barney S; Brough, Douglas E; Gall, Jason G

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of infectious lower respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. As there is no vaccine for RSV, we developed a genetic vaccine approach that induced protection of the entire respiratory tract from a single parenteral administration. The approach was based on adenovirus vectors derived from newly isolated nonhuman primate viruses with low seroprevalence. We show for the first time that a single intramuscular (IM) injection of the replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the RSV fusion (F0) glycoprotein induced immune responses that protected both the lungs and noses of cotton rats and mice even at low doses and for several months postimmunization. The immune response included high titers of neutralizing antibody that were maintained ≥24 weeks and RSV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The vectors were as potently immunogenic as a human adenovirus 5 vector in these two key respiratory pathogen animal models. Importantly, there was minimal alveolitis and granulocytic infiltrates in the lung, and type 2 cytokines were not produced after RSV challenge even under conditions of partial protection. Overall, this genetic vaccine is highly effective without potentiating immunopathology, and the results support development of the vaccine candidate for human testing. PMID:23752342

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Cellular Stress Responses: Impact on Replication and Physiopathology

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Ortiz, Sandra L.; Zamorano Cuervo, Natalia; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a major cause of severe acute lower respiratory tract infection in infants, elderly and immunocompromised adults. Despite decades of research, a complete integrated picture of RSV-host interaction is still missing. Several cellular responses to stress are involved in the host-response to many virus infections. The endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by altered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function leads to activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) to restore homeostasis. Formation of cytoplasmic stress granules containing translationally stalled mRNAs is a means to control protein translation. Production of reactive oxygen species is balanced by an antioxidant response to prevent oxidative stress and the resulting damages. In recent years, ongoing research has started to unveil specific regulatory interactions of RSV with these host cellular stress responses. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding the mechanisms evolved by RSV to induce, subvert or manipulate the ER stress, the stress granule and oxidative stress responses. We summarize the evidence linking these stress responses with the regulation of RSV replication and the associated pathogenesis. PMID:27187445

  10. Phosphatidylglycerol provides short-term prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Mari; Nagashima, Yoji; Moore, Martin L.; Berry, Karin Z.; Chan, Mallory; Kandasamy, Pitchaimani; Peebles, R. Stokes; Murphy, Robert C.; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory tract infections in young children, and significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly, immunosuppressed, and immunocompromised patients and in patients with chronic lung diseases. Recently, we reported that the pulmonary surfactant phospholipid palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) inhibited RSV infection in vitro and in vivo by blocking viral attachment to epithelial cells. Simultaneous application of POPG along with an RSV challenge to mice markedly attenuated infection and associated inflammatory responses. Based on these findings, we expanded our studies to determine whether POPG is effective for prophylaxis and postinfection treatment for RSV infection. In vitro application of POPG at concentrations of 0.2–1.0 mg/ml at 24 h after RSV infection of HEp-2 cells suppressed interleukin-8 production up to 80% and reduced viral plaque formation by 2–6 log units. In vivo, the turnover of POPG in mice is relatively rapid, making postinfection application impractical. Intranasal administration of POPG (0.8–3.0 mg), 45 min before RSV inoculation in mice reduced viral infection by 1 log unit, suppressed inflammatory cell appearance in the lung, and suppressed virus-elicited interferon-γ production. These findings demonstrate that POPG is effective for short-term protection of mice against subsequent RSV infection and that it has potential for application in humans. PMID:23749985

  11. Identification of nucleolin as a cellular receptor for human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Tayyari, Farnoosh; Marchant, David; Moraes, Theo J; Duan, Wenming; Mastrangelo, Peter; Hegele, Richard G

    2011-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes a large burden of disease worldwide. There is no effective vaccine or therapy, and the use of passive immunoprophylaxis with RSV-specific antibodies is limited to high-risk patients. The cellular receptor (or receptors) required for viral entry and replication has yet to be described; its identification will improve understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and provide a target for the development of novel antiviral interventions. Here we show that RSV interacts with host-cell nucleolin via the viral fusion envelope glycoprotein and binds specifically to nucleolin at the apical cell surface in vitro. We observed decreased RSV infection in vitro in neutralization experiments using nucleolin-specific antibodies before viral inoculation, in competition experiments in which virus was incubated with soluble nucleolin before inoculation of cells, and upon RNA interference (RNAi) to silence cellular nucleolin expression. Transfection of nonpermissive Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells with human nucleolin conferred susceptibility to RSV infection. RNAi-mediated knockdown of lung nucleolin was associated with a significant reduction in RSV infection in mice (P = 0.0004), confirming that nucleolin is a functional RSV receptor in vivo. PMID:21841784

  12. Epidemiological and antigenic analysis of respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalised Tunisian children, from 2000 to 2002.

    PubMed

    Fodha, I; Vabret, A; Trabelsi, A; Freymuth, F

    2004-04-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major viral cause of lower respiratory tract disease in children. Infections with the virus occur as annual winter epidemics in temperate climates, placing considerable pressure on the provision of hospital beds. Most molecular epidemiological studies have, until now, focused on isolates from infants in industrialised countries. No data have been available with regard to RSV strains from northern Africa. In this report, a recent RSV outbreak in Tunisia was studied and results showed that 176 of 815 (21.6%) nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from hospitalised children were RSV-positive by immunofluorescence assay. This RSV outbreak showed a temperature-dependent pattern (P=0.026) but no significant association with rainfall. A total of 73 RSV-positive samples were tested by two reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays (RT-PCR): RT-PCR-1, which amplifies the RNA of all RSV strains, and RT-PCR-2, which allows subgroup classification of RSV. Analysis by hybridisation assay of RT-PCR-2-amplified 1B protein gene products showed a higher prevalence of group B RSV than that of group A (82.5% vs. 17.5% among the typed strains). Knowledge of the variants is important in terms of both diagnosis and definition of a vaccine composition. PMID:14981774

  13. A Cross-Study Biomarker Signature of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children, elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. Despite of advances in diagnosis and treatment, biomarkers of RSV infection are still unclear. To understand the host response and propose signatures of RSV infection, previous studies evaluated the transcriptional profile of the human bronchial epithelial cell line—BEAS-2B—infected with different strains of this virus. However, the evolution of statistical methods and functional analysis together with the large amount of expression data provide opportunities to uncover novel biomarkers of inflammation and infections. In view of those facts publicly available microarray datasets from RSV-infected BEAS-2B cells were analyzed with linear model-based statistics and the platform for functional analysis InnateDB. The results from those analyses argue for the reevaluation of previously reported transcription patterns and biological pathways in BEAS-2B cell lines infected with RSV. Importantly, this study revealed a biosignature constituted by genes such as ABCC4, ARMC8, BCLAF1, EZH1, FAM118A, FAM208B, FUS, HSPH1, KAZN, MAP3K2, N6AMT1, PRMT2, S100PBP, SERPINA1, TLK2, ZNF322, and ZNF337 which should be considered in the development of new molecular diagnosis tools. PMID:27274726

  14. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C.; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C.; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor that is constitutively highly expressed by type I alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we report that RAGE protected HEK cells from RSV-induced cell death and reduced viral titres in vitro. RAGE appeared to interact directly with the F protein, but, rather than inhibiting RSV entry into host cells, virus replication and budding, membrane-expressed RAGE or soluble RAGE blocked F-protein-mediated syncytium formation and sloughing. These data indicate that RAGE may contribute to protecting the lower airways from RSV by inhibiting the formation of syncytia, viral spread, epithelial damage and airway obstruction. PMID:23559480

  15. A sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering enzyme-catalyzed immunoassay of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lei; Zhen, Shu Jun; Wan, Xiao Yan; Gao, Peng Fei; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory viruses have become a major global health challenge which would benefit from advances in screening methods for early diagnosis. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important pathogen causing severe lower respiratory tract infections. Here we present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enzyme-catalyzed immunoassay of RSV by employing peroxidase substrate 3, 3'-5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as Raman molecule. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) attached to the detection antibody in a novel sandwich immunoassay catalyzes the oxidation of TMB by H2O2 to give a radical cation (TMB(+)), which could be easily adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through electrostatic interaction, inducing the aggregation of AgNPs and thus giving a strong SERS signal. A linear relationship was obtained between the Raman intensity and the amount of RSV in the range from 0.5 to 20 pg/mL, and the minimum detectable concentration of this SERS-based enzyme immunoassay was 0.05 pg/mL, which was 20 times lower than that found in the colorimetric method. PMID:26653454

  16. Gene Sequence Variability of the Three Surface Proteins of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (HRSV) in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Lorena I.; Shaw, Chad A.; Aideyan, Letisha O.; Jewell, Alan M.; Dawson, Brian C.; Haq, Taha R.; Piedra, Pedro A.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has three surface glycoproteins: small hydrophobic (SH), attachment (G) and fusion (F), encoded by three consecutive genes (SH-G-F). A 270-nt fragment of the G gene is used to genotype HRSV isolates. This study genotyped and investigated the variability of the gene and amino acid sequences of the three surface proteins of HRSV strains collected from 1987 to 2005 from one center. Sixty original clinical isolates and 5 prototype strains were analyzed. Sequences containing SH, F and G genes were generated, and multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees were analyzed. Genetic variability by protein domains comparing virus genotypes was assessed. Complete sequences of the SH-G-F genes were obtained for all 65 samples: HRSV-A = 35; HRSV-B = 30. In group A strains, genotypes GA5 and GA2 were predominant. For HRSV-B strains, the genotype GB4 was predominant from 1992 to 1994 and only genotype BA viruses were detected in 2004–2005. Different genetic variability at nucleotide level was detected between the genes, with G gene being the most variable and the highest variability detected in the 270-nt G fragment that is frequently used to genotype the virus. High variability (>10%) was also detected in the signal peptide and transmembrane domains of the F gene of HRSV A strains. Variability among the HRSV strains resulting in non-synonymous changes was detected in hypervariable domains of G protein, the signal peptide of the F protein, a not previously defined domain in the F protein, and the antigenic site Ø in the pre-fusion F. Divergent trends were observed between HRSV -A and -B groups for some functional domains. A diverse population of HRSV -A and -B genotypes circulated in Houston during an 18 year period. We hypothesize that diverse sequence variation of the surface protein genes provide HRSV strains a survival advantage in a partially immune-protected community. PMID:24625544

  17. Progress in understanding and controlling respiratory syncytial virus: still crazy after all these years

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Peter L.; Melero, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects everyone worldwide early in life and is a leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease in the pediatric population as well as in the elderly and in profoundly immunosuppressed individuals. RSV is an enveloped, nonsegmented negative-sense RNA virus that is classified in Family Paramyxoviridae and is one of its more complex members. Although the replicative cycle of RSV follows the general pattern of the Paramyxoviridae, it encodes additional proteins. Two of these (NS1 and NS2) inhibit the host type I and type III interferon (IFN) responses, among other functions, and another gene encodes two novel RNA synthesis factors (M2-1 and M2-2). The attachment (G) glycoprotein also exhibits unusual features, such as high sequence variability, extensive glycosylation, cytokine mimicry, and a shed form that helps the virus evade neutralizing antibodies. RSV is notable for being able to efficiently infect early in life, with the peak of hospitalization at 2–3 months of age. It also is notable for the ability to reinfect symptomatically throughout life without need for significant antigenic change, although immunity from prior infection reduces disease. It is widely thought that re-infection is due to an ability of RSV to inhibit or subvert the host immune response. Mechanisms of viral pathogenesis remain controversial. RSV is notable for a historic, tragic pediatric vaccine failure involving a formalin-inactivated virus preparation that was evaluated in the 1960’s and that was poorly protective and paradoxically primed for enhanced RSV disease. RSV also is notable for the development of a successful strategy for passive immunoprophylaxis of high-risk infants using RSV-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccines and new antiviral drugs are in pre-clinical and clinical development, but controlling RSV remains a formidable challenge. PMID:21963675

  18. Identification of cellular proteins that interact with Newcastle Disease Virus and human Respiratory Syncytial Virus by a two-dimensional virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA).

    PubMed

    Holguera, Javier; Villar, Enrique; Muñoz-Barroso, Isabel

    2014-10-13

    Although it is well documented that the initial attachment receptors for Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) are sialic acid-containing molecules and glycosaminoglycans respectively, the exact nature of the receptors for both viruses remains to be deciphered. Moreover, additional molecules at the host cell surface might be involved in the entry mechanism. With the aim of identifying the cellular proteins that interact with NDV and RSV at the cell surface, we performed a virus overlay protein binding assay (VOPBA). Cell membrane lysates were separated by two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and electrotransferred to PVDF membranes, after which they were probed with high viral concentrations. NDV interacted with a Protein Disulfide Isomerase from chicken fibroblasts. In the case of RSV, we detected 15 reactive spots, which were identified as six different proteins, of which nucleolin was outstanding. We discuss the possible role of PDI and nucleolin in NDV and RSV entry, respectively. PMID:25109545

  19. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Upregulates NLRC5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Expression through RIG-I Induction in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xuancheng; Liu, Taixiang; Shi, Hengfei; Wang, Jingjing; Ji, Ping; Wang, Hongwei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute respiratory tract viral infection in infants, causing bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The host antiviral response to RSV acts via retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). We show here that RSV infection upregulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) expression through the induction of NLRC5, a NOD-like, CARD domain-containing intracellular protein that has recently been identified as a class I MHC transactivator (CITA). RSV infection of A549 cells promotes upregulation of NLRC5 via beta interferon (IFN-β) production, since the NLRC5-inducing activity in a conditioned medium from RSV-infected A549 cells was removed by antibody to IFN-β, but not by antibody to IFN-γ. RSV infection resulted in RIG-I upregulation and induction of NLRC5 and MHC-I. Suppression of RIG-I induction significantly blocked NLRC5, as well as MHC-I, upregulation and diminished IRF3 activation. Importantly, Vero cells deficient in interferon production still upregulated MHC-I following introduction of the RSV genome by infection or transfection, further supporting a key role for RIG-I. A model is therefore proposed in which the host upregulates MHC-I expression during RSV infection directly via the induction of RIG-I and NLRC5 expression. Since elevated expression of MHC-I molecules can sensitize host cells to T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity or immunopathologic damage, the results have significant implications for the modification of immunity in RSV disease. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and young children worldwide. Infection early in life is linked to persistent wheezing and allergic asthma in later life, possibly related to upregulation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) on the cell surface, which facilitates cytotoxic T cell activation and antiviral immunity. Here, we show that RSV infection of lung epithelial

  20. A Druggable Pocket at the Nucleocapsid/Phosphoprotein Interaction Site of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ouizougun-Oubari, Mohamed; Pereira, Nelson; Tarus, Bogdan; Galloux, Marie; Lassoued, Safa; Fix, Jenna; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Hoos, Sylviane; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick; Bontems, François; Rey, Félix A.; Eléouët, Jean-François; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the main cause of severe respiratory infections in infants, cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals. However, its RNA-dependent polymerase complex offers potential targets for RSV-specific drugs. This includes the recognition of its template, the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP), consisting of genomic RNA encapsidated by the RSV nucleoprotein, N. This recognition proceeds via interaction between the phosphoprotein P, which is the main polymerase cofactor, and N. The determinant role of the C terminus of P, and more particularly of the last residue, F241, in RNP binding and viral RNA synthesis has been assessed previously. Here, we provide detailed structural insight into this crucial interaction for RSV polymerase activity. We solved the crystallographic structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of N (N-NTD) and C-terminal peptides of P and characterized binding by biophysical approaches. Our results provide a rationale for the pivotal role of F241, which inserts into a well-defined N-NTD pocket. This primary binding site is completed by transient contacts with upstream P residues outside the pocket. Based on the structural information of the N-NTD:P complex, we identified inhibitors of this interaction, selected by in silico screening of small compounds, that efficiently bind to N and compete with P in vitro. One of the compounds displayed inhibitory activity on RSV replication, thereby strengthening the relevance of N-NTD for structure-based design of RSV-specific antivirals. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a widespread pathogen that is a leading cause of acute lower respiratory infections in infants worldwide. RSV cannot be treated efficiently with antivirals, and no vaccine is presently available, with the development of pediatric vaccines being particularly challenging. Therefore, there is a need for new therapeutic strategies that specifically target RSV. The interaction

  1. Novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors identified via a high throughput replicon-based screen.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Jeremy R; VerPlank, Lynn; Ludeke, Barbara; McLeod, Sarah M; Lee, Maurice D; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Mulrooney, Carol A; Le Quement, Sebastian; Yu, Qin; Palmer, Michelle A; Fleming, Paul; Fearns, Rachel; Foley, Michael A; Scherer, Christina A

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections affect millions of children and adults every year. Despite the significant disease burden, there are currently no safe and effective vaccines or therapeutics. We employed a replicon-based high throughput screen combined with live-virus triaging assays to identify three novel diversity-oriented synthesis-derived scaffolds with activity against RSV. One of these small molecules is shown to target the RSV polymerase (L protein) to inhibit viral replication and transcription; the mechanisms of action of the other small molecules are currently unknown. The compounds described herein may provide attractive inhibitors for lead optimization campaigns. PMID:27059228

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus replication is prolonged by a concomitant allergic response

    PubMed Central

    Hassantoufighi, A; Oglesbee, M; Richter, B W M; Prince, G A; Hemming, V; Niewiesk, S; Eichelberger, M C

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show an association between early exposure to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the development or exacerbation of asthma. This idea is supported by studies in mice that demonstrate worsened airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) when RSV-infected animals are exposed to allergen. The effect of allergen on RSV disease, however, has not been reported. Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) that have been used as a model to study RSV pathogenesis were sensitized to extracts of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af), a common household mould. The allergic response to Af included eosinophilia, formation of granulomas and induction of Th2 type cytokines. RSV infection prior to allergen challenge resulted in exacerbation of the inflammatory response as well as increased airway responsiveness to methacholine. The exacerbated response was indeed dependent on virus replication. Virus replication in turn was influenced by the allergic response, with persistence in the noses for 2 days longer in animals challenged with allergen. This diminished clearance corresponded to decreased induction of mRNA for IFN-γ, a Th1-type cytokine that is characteristic of viral infection. Treatment of RSV-infected Af-challenged animals with recombinant IFN-γ reduced the allergic inflammatory response as well as the relative levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA. However, this treatment did not reduce airway reactivity, showing that these pathologic and physiologic measures of exacerbated disease are independent. We speculate that the reciprocal effect of the allergic response on viral immunity may benefit the host by limiting exacerbation of physiologic responses that are IFN-γ-dependent. PMID:17335559

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  4. Complete protection of mice from respiratory syncytial virus infection following mucosal delivery of synthetic peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bastien, N; Trudel, M; Simard, C

    1999-02-26

    We have previously shown that intraperitoneal immunization of BALB/c mice with the 14 amino-acid long synthetic peptides G/174-187 and BG/174-187, representing the region 174-187 of the G-glycoprotein from human (H) and bovine (B) respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), respectively, completely protects animals from infection with the corresponding virus. A current goal in vaccine development being the delivery of noninvasive protective antigens via mucosal surfaces, we have evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the two peptides when administered to mice by the intranasal (i.n.) route in the presence or absence of the cholera toxin (CT) as a mucosal adjuvant. The two peptides given alone induced the production of RSV-specific circulating IgG, as revealed by ELISA titers of immune sera. When the peptides were administered intranasally with CT, the higher IgG antibody titer which was induced was within the same order of magnitude as that obtained following i.n. immunization with live RSV or intraperitoneal injection with the peptides, thus demonstrating the stimulatory effect of the CT adjuvant. Moreover, although the peptides fail to induce a detectable level of secretory IgA, all animals immunized i.n. with peptide BG/174-187 (plus or minus CT) and all those immunized with peptide G/174-187 mixed with CT were completely resistant to infection by the corresponding virus. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting that complete protection against a natural pathogen can be elicited by mucosally delivered synthetic peptides. This supports the usefulness of synthetic peptides in prophylactic vaccination. PMID:10067688

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  6. Functional Analysis of the 60-Nucleotide Duplication in the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Buenos Aires Strain Attachment Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hotard, Anne L.; Laikhter, Elizabeth; Brooks, Kelsie; Hartert, Tina V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are two subgroups of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), A and B, and within each subgroup, isolates are further divided into clades. Several years ago, multiple subgroup B isolates which contained a duplication of 60 nucleotides in the glycoprotein (G) gene were described. These isolates were given a new clade designation of BA based on the site of isolation, Buenos Aires, Argentina. BA RSV strains have since become the predominant circulating clade of RSV B viruses. We hypothesized that the duplicated region in G serves to enhance the function of G in the virus life cycle. We generated recombinant viruses that express a consensus BA G gene or a consensus BA G gene lacking the duplication (GΔdup). We determined that the duplicated region functions during virus attachment to cells. Additionally, we showed that in vitro, the virus containing the duplication has a fitness advantage compared to the virus without the duplication. Our data demonstrate that the duplicated region in the BA strain G protein augments virus attachment and fitness. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important pathogen for infants for which there is no vaccine. Different strains of RSV circulate from year to year, and the predominating strains change over time. Subgroup B RSV strains with a duplication in the attachment glycoprotein (G) emerged and then became the dominant B genotype. We found that a recombinant virus harboring the duplication bound more efficiently to cells and was more fit than a recombinant strain lacking the duplication. Our work advances a mechanism for an important natural RSV mutation. PMID:26018171

  7. Estimating the hospitalization burden associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in New York City, 2003–2011

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Edward; Greene, Sharon K; Olson, Donald R; Hanage, William P; Lipsitch, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospitalization burden associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is uncertain due to ambiguity in the inference methodologies employed for its estimation. Objectives Utilization of a new method to quantitate the above burden. Methods Weekly hospitalization rates for several principal diagnoses from 2003 to 2011 in New York City by age group were regressed linearly against incidence proxies for the major influenza subtypes and RSV adjusting for temporal trends and seasonal baselines. Results Average annual rates of influenza-associated respiratory hospitalizations per 100 000 were estimated to be 129 [95% CI (79, 179)] for age <1, 36·3 (21·6, 51·4) for ages 1–4, 10·6 (7·5, 13·7) for ages 5–17, 25·6 (21·3, 29·8) for ages 18–49, 65·5 (54·0, 76·9) for ages 50–64, 125 (105, 147) for ages 65–74, and 288 (244, 331) for ages ≥75. Additionally, influenza had a significant contribution to hospitalization rates with a principal diagnosis of septicemia for ages 5–17 [0·76 (0·1, 1·4)], 18–49 [1·02 (0·3, 1·7)], 50–64 [4·0 (1·7, 6·3)], 65–74 [8·8 (2·2, 15·6)], and ≥75 [38·7 (25·7, 52·9)]. RSV had a significant contribution to the rates of respiratory hospitalizations for age <1 [1900 (1740, 2060)], ages 1–4 [117 (70, 167)], and ≥75 [175 (44, 312)] [including chronic lower respiratory disease, 90 (43, 140)] as well as pneumonia & influenza hospitalizations for ages 18–49 [6·2 (1·1, 11·3)] and circulatory hospitalizations for ages ≥75 [199 (13, 375)]. Conclusions The high burden of RSV hospitalizations among young children and seniors age ≥75 suggests the need for additional control measures such as vaccination to mitigate the impact of annual RSV epidemics. Our estimates for influenza-associated hospitalizations provide further evidence of the burden of morbidity associated with influenza, supporting current guidelines regarding influenza vaccination and antiviral treatment. PMID

  8. Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Hospitalizations in Pre-Mature Infants in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Theresa J.; Bautista, Rossana; Dávila, Carmen; Salazar, José Antonio; Bazán, Carlos; Guerra, Oscar; Llanos, Jean Pierre; López, Luis; Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ecker, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study in four hospitals in Lima, Peru in infants with a birth weight ≤ 1,500 g followed from birth hospital discharge up to 1 year of age to determine the incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalizations. We enrolled 222 infants from March of 2009 to March of 2010: 48 infants with a birth weight < 1,000 g and 174 infants with a birth weight of 1,000–1,500 g (birth weight = 1,197 ± 224 g; gestational age = 30.1 ± 2.6 weeks). There were 936 episodes of respiratory infections; the incidence of respiratory infections during the first 1 year of life was 5.7 episodes/child-years. The incidence of RSV respiratory infections that required emergency room management was 103.9 per 1,000 child-years, and the incidence of RSV hospitalizations was 116.2 per 1,000 child-years (244.9 in infants with a birth weight < 1,000 g and 88.9 in infants 1,000–1,500 g; P < 0.05). The incidence of RSV respiratory infections that required emergency management or hospitalization is high among pre-mature infants in Lima. PMID:25294617

  9. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Tanaka, Ryota; Ishii, Haruyuki; Shimojo, Naoki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-09-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in the human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (HRSV-A). We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also conducted genetic distance (p-distance), positive/negative selection, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. Furthermore, we mapped the amino acid substitutions of the protein. The MCMC-constructed tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine RSV (BRSV) gene approximately 550years ago and had a relatively low substitution rate (7.59×10(-4) substitutions/site/year). Moreover, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 280years ago, which has since formed four distinct clusters. The present HRSV-A strains were assigned six genotypes based on F gene sequences and attachment glycoprotein gene sequences. The present strains exhibited high F gene sequence similarity values and low genetic divergence. No positive selection sites were identified; however, 50 negative selection sites were identified. F protein amino acid substitutions at 17 sites were distributed in the F protein. The effective population size of the gene has remained relatively constant, but the population size of the prevalent genotype (GA2) has increased in the last 10years. These results suggest that the HRSV-AF gene has evolved independently and formed some genotypes. PMID:27291709

  10. Extrapulmonary manifestations of severe respiratory syncytial virus infection – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis is the most important cause for admission to the paediatric intensive care unit in infants with lower respiratory tract infection. In recent years the importance of extrapulmonary manifestations of RSV infection has become evident. This systematic review aimed at summarizing the available evidence on manifestations of RSV infection outside the respiratory tract, their causes and the changes in clinical management required. Methods Databases searched were Medline (1950 to present), EMBASE (1974 to present), PubMed and reference lists of relevant articles. Summarized were the findings of articles reporting on manifestations of RSV infection outside the respiratory tract in patients of all age groups. Results Extrapulmonary manifestations reported in previous observational studies included cardiovascular failure with hypotension and inotrope requirements associated with myocardial damage as evident from elevated cardiac troponin levels (35–54% of ventilated infants), cardiac arrhythmias like supraventricular tachycardias and ventricular tachycardias, central apnoeas (16–21% of admissions), focal and generalized seizures, focal neurological abnormalities, hyponatraemia (33%) associated with increased antidiuretic hormone secretion, and hepatitis (46–49% of ventilated infants). RSV or its genetic material have been isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, myocardium, liver and peripheral blood. Conclusion The data summarized indicate a systemic dissemination of RSV during severe disease. Cerebral and myocardial involvement may explain the association of RSV with some cases of sudden infant death. In infants with severe RSV infection cardiac rhythm, blood pressure and serum sodium need to be monitored and supportive treatment including fluid management adjusted accordingly. PMID:16859512

  11. The Source of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection In Infants: A Household Cohort Study In Rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Munywoki, Patrick K.; Koech, Dorothy C.; Agoti, Charles N.; Lewa, Clement; Cane, Patricia A.; Medley, Graham F.; Nokes, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine development for direct protection of young infants faces substantial obstacles. Assessing the potential of indirect protection using different strategies, such as targeting older children or mothers, requires knowledge of the source of infection to the infants. Methods. We undertook a prospective study in rural Kenya. Households with a child born after the preceding RSV epidemic and ≥1 elder sibling were recruited. Nasopharyngeal swab samples were collected every 3–4 days irrespective of symptoms from all household members throughout the RSV season of 2009–2010 and tested for RSV using molecular techniques. Results. From 451 participants in 44 households a total of 15 396 nasopharyngeal swab samples were samples were collected, representing 86% of planned sampling. RSV was detected in 37 households (84%) and 173 participants (38%) and 28 study infants (64%). The infants acquired infection from within (15 infants; 54%) or outside (9 infants; 32%) the household; in 4 households the source of infant infection was inconclusive. Older children were index case patients for 11 (73%) of the within-household infant infections, and 10 of these 11 children were attending school. Conclusion. We demonstrate that school-going siblings frequently introduce RSV into households, leading to infection in infants. PMID:24367040

  12. Human CD8(+) T Cells Target Multiple Epitopes in Respiratory Syncytial Virus Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Burbulla, Daniel; Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Jahn, Gerhard; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2016-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is a serious health problem in young children, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The development of novel prevention strategies, such as a vaccine to RSV, is a high priority. One strategy is to design a peptide-based vaccine that activates appropriate CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, this approach is limited by the low number of RSV peptide epitopes defined to date that activate CD8(+) T cells. We aimed to identify peptide epitopes that are presented by common human leukocyte antigen types (HLA-A*01, -A*02, and -B*07). We identify one novel HLA-A*02-restricted and two novel HLA-A*01-restricted peptide epitopes from RSV polymerase. Peptide-HLA multimer staining of specific T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cell, the memory phenotype of such peptide-specific T cells ex vivo, and functional IFNγ responses in short-term stimulation assays suggest that these peptides are recognized during RSV infection. Such peptides are candidates for inclusion into a peptide-based RSV vaccine designed to stimulate defined CD8(+) T-cell responses. PMID:27070377

  13. Aerosolized ribavirin treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants hospitalized during an epidemic.

    PubMed

    Conrad, D A; Christenson, J C; Waner, J L; Marks, M I

    1987-02-01

    Thirty-three infants with predisposing conditions and/or severely symptomatic with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection were treated with aerosolized ribavirin during a 12-week period at Oklahoma Children's Memorial Hospital. These patients were compared with 97 untreated patients with RSV infection hospitalized during the same epidemic. Despite preconditions which selected for a more seriously ill treatment group, patients who received ribavirin showed prompter resolution of the illness than did untreated controls. Greatest clinical improvement in treated patients occurred between the first and second days of ribavirin therapy; mean ribavirin treatment duration was 4.5 days. Ten of 22 ribavirin-treated patients continued to excrete RSV after conclusion of antiviral therapy. No adverse hematologic, renal or metabolic effects occurred with ribavirin therapy. Our experience with ribavirin therapy during a major epidemic confirms and extends the results of previous controlled evaluations demonstrating this treatment safe and effective in high risk and seriously ill infants with RSV bronchiolitis and bronchopneumonia. PMID:3562136

  14. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  15. Performance evaluation of four rapid antigen tests for the detection of Respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bo Kyeung; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Lee, Jong Han; Lee, JungHwa; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Rapid identification of Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is important in the management of infected patients. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are widely used for this purpose. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical performance of four RSV antigen tests including the BinaxNow RSV Card test, SD Bioline RSV test, BD Veritor RSV test, and Humasis RSV antigen test in comparison with real-time RT-PCR as the reference method. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 280 patients with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and stored at -80°C. All swabs were tested for RSV using four rapid antigen tests and real time RT-PCR. The sensitivity of the BinaxNow RSV Card test, SD Bioline RSV test, BD Veritor RSV test, and Humasis RSV Antigen tests were 62.5%, 61.3%, 65.0%, and 67.5% for RSV A, and 61.3%, 65.0%, 61.3%, and 67.5% for RSV B compared to real time RT-PCR, respectively. The specificity of BD Veritor RSV test was 95.8% and those of the other three RDTs was 100%. Commercial RSV antigen detection assays are useful tools for the rapid diagnosis of RSV infection. However, confirmatory testing is always recommended. J. Med. Virol. 88:1720-1724, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990654

  16. The importance of the local environment in the transmission of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Paynter, Stuart; Sly, Peter D; Ware, Robert S; Williams, Gail; Weinstein, Philip

    2014-09-15

    The role of the environment in the spread of respiratory infections is poorly understood, and consequently probably underappreciated. To improve our understanding of the environmental drivers of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) transmission, we examined RSV seasonality in two settings with unusual seasonal patterns: The Gambia (where RSV epidemics occur at different times of the year) and Southeast Florida (where RSV seasonality differs from the rest of mainland USA). We used published data to correlate the seasonality of RSV with rainfall and child nutrition in the Gambia, and with rainfall and temperature in Florida. In the Gambia, RSV incidence was more strongly and more consistently correlated with child nutrition (r = -0.73 [95%CI -0.90 to -0.38]) than with rainfall (r = 0.37 [95%CI 0.20 to 0.52]). In Southeast Florida RSV incidence was strongly correlated with rainfall two months previously (r = 0.65 [95%CI 0.40 to 0.81]) compared to North Florida where RSV incidence was strongly correlated with temperature (r = -0.75 [95%CI -0.87 to -0.56]). We propose that nutrition is the dominant environmental driver of RSV seasonality in the Gambia, while rainfall is the dominant driver of RSV seasonality in Southeast Florida. This reinforces the importance of an ecological scale understanding of disease transmission: only with such an evidence base can setting-specific recommendations be made for public health interventions that are targeted for maximum efficacy. PMID:24973721

  17. Respiratory syncytial virus infection: denominator-based studies in Indonesia, Mozambique, Nigeria and South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Susan E.; Roca, Anna; Alonso, Pedro; Simoes, Eric A. F.; Kartasasmita, Cissy B.; Olaleye, David O.; Odaibo, Georgina N.; Collinson, Mark; Venter, Marietjie; Zhu, Yuwei; Wright, Peter F.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the burden of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated lower respiratory infections (LRI) in children in four developing countries. METHODS: A WHO protocol for prospective population-based surveillance of acute respiratory infections in children aged less than 5 years was used at sites in Indonesia, Mozambique, Nigeria and South Africa. RSV antigen was identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay performed on nasopharyngeal specimens from children meeting clinical case definitions. FINDINGS: Among children aged < 5 years, the incidence of RSV-associated LRI per 1000 child-years was 34 in Indonesia and 94 in Nigeria. The incidence of RSV-associated severe LRI per 1000 child-years was 5 in Mozambique, 10 in Indonesia, and 9 in South Africa. At all study sites, the majority of RSV cases occurred in infants. CONCLUSION: These studies demonstrate that RSV contributes to a substantial but quite variable burden of LRI in children aged < 5 years in four developing countries. The possible explanations for this variation include social factors, such as family size and patterns of seeking health care; the proportion of children infected by human immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV); and differences in clinical definitions used for obtaining samples. The age distribution of cases indicates the need for an RSV vaccine that can protect children early in life. PMID:15654405

  18. Ginseng Protects Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Modulating Multiple Immune Cells and Inhibiting Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years but its effects on viral infection have not been well understood. We investigated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. RGE partially protected human epithelial (HEp2) cells from RSV-induced cell death and viral replication. In addition, RGE significantly inhibited the production of RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) in murine dendritic and macrophage-like cells. More importantly, RGE intranasal pre-treatment prevented loss of mouse body weight after RSV infection. RGE treatment improved lung viral clearance and enhanced the production of interferon (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells upon RSV infection of mice. Analysis of cellular phenotypes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids showed that RGE treatment increased the populations of CD8+ T cells and CD11c+ dendritic cells upon RSV infection of mice. Taken together, these results provide evidence that ginseng has protective effects against RSV infection through multiple mechanisms, which include improving cell survival, partial inhibition of viral replication and modulation of cytokine production and types of immune cells migrating into the lung. PMID:25658239

  19. Relationship between meteorological conditions and respiratory syncytial virus in a tropical country.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Martinez, C E; Sossa-Briceño, M P; Acuña-Cordero, R

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to determine which meteorological conditions are associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) isolates in a population of children hospitalized with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) in Bogota, Colombia. In an analytical cross-sectional study, links were examined between the number of monthly RSV infections and monthly average climatic variation (temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, wind speed, solar radiation) between 1 January 2010 and 30 April 2011 in a population of hospitalized children aged <3 years with ALRI caused by RSV. Out of a total of 1548 children included in the study (mean age 9·2 ± 8·5 months), 1194 (77·1%) presented RSV infection during the 3-month period from March to May. In the multivariate analysis, after controlling for wind speed, relative humidity, and solar radiation, monthly average temperature [incident rate ratio (IRR) 3·14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·56-6·30, P = 0·001] and rainfall (IRR 1·008, 95% CI 1·00-1·01, P = 0·048) were independently associated with the monthly number of RSV infections. In conclusion, in Bogota, a tropical Latin American city, average temperature and rainfall are the meteorological variables most strongly associated with RSV isolation in children hospitalized with ALRI in the city. PMID:25591796

  20. Induction of DNA double-strand breaks and cellular senescence by human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Isidoro; García-Carpizo, Verónica; Guijarro, Trinidad; García-Gomez, Ana; Navarro, Diego; Aranda, Ana; Zambrano, Alberto

    2016-05-18

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) accounts for the majority of lower respiratory tract infections during infancy and childhood and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. HRSV provokes a proliferation arrest and characteristic syncytia in cellular systems such as immortalized epithelial cells. We show here that HRSV induces the expression of DNA damage markers and proliferation arrest such as P-TP53, P-ATM, CDKN1A and γH2AFX in cultured cells secondary to the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). The DNA damage foci contained γH2AFX and TP53BP1, indicative of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and could be reversed by antioxidant treatments such as N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) or reduced glutathione ethyl ester (GSHee). The damage observed is associated with the accumulation of senescent cells, displaying a canonical senescent phenotype in both mononuclear cells and syncytia. In addition, we show signs of DNA damage and aging such as γH2AFX and CDKN2A expression in the respiratory epithelia of infected mice long after viral clearance. Altogether, these results show that HRSV triggers a DNA damage-mediated cellular senescence program probably mediated by oxidative stress. The results also suggest that this program might contribute to the physiopathology of the infection, tissue remodeling and aging, and might be associated to long-term consequences of HRSV infections. PMID:26809688

  1. Preventing severe respiratory syncytial virus disease: passive, active immunisation and new antivirals.

    PubMed

    Murray, Joanna; Saxena, Sonia; Sharland, Mike

    2014-05-01

    In most high-income countries palivizumab prophylaxis is considered safe, efficacious and cost-effective for preventing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospital admissions among specific subgroups of infants born preterm, with chronic lung disease or with congenital heart disease. Virtually all babies acquire RSV during infancy and previously healthy babies are not eligible to receive palivizumab. Emerging evidence suggests some benefit of palivizumab use in reducing recurrent wheeze among infants born preterm. Better longitudinal studies are needed to examine its clinical and cost-effectiveness on recurrent and chronic respiratory illness and associated healthcare burden on resources in the community and hospitals. Since 99% of child deaths attributed to RSV occur in resource poor countries where expensive prophylaxis is not available or affordable, palivizumab has limited potential to impact on the current global burden of RSV lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A range of candidate vaccines for active immunisation against RSV are now in clinical trials. Two promising new antivirals are also currently in phase I/II trials to test their effectiveness in preventing severe RSV LRTI. These agents may be effective in preventing severe disease and phase III studies are in development. In the absence of effective active immunisation against RSV infection, population level approaches to prevent severe RSV LRTI should continue to focus on reducing prenatal and environmental risk factors including prematurity, smoking and improving hygiene practices. PMID:24464977

  2. Development of Electrochemiluminescent Serology Assays to Measure the Humoral Response to Antigens of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maifeld, Sarah V.; Ro, Bodrey; Mok, Hoyin; Chu, Marla; Yu, Li; Yamagata, Ryan; Leonardson, Tansy; Chio, Vera; Parhy, Bandita; Park, Samuel; Carlson, Marcia; Machhi, Shushil; Ulbrandt, Nancy; Falsey, Ann R.; Walsh, Edward E.; Wang, C. Kathy; Esser, Mark T.; Zuo, Fengrong

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and precise serology assays are needed to measure the humoral response to antigens of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) following natural infection or vaccination. We developed and evaluated a collection of electrochemiluminescent (ECL) serology assays using four RSV antigens (F, N, Ga and Gb). To assess the merits of ECL technology, the four ECL serology assays were evaluated using a well-characterized “gold standard” panel of acute and convalescent serum samples from fifty-nine RSV-positive and thirty RSV-negative elderly subjects (≥65 years old). The combined results from the four ECL assays demonstrated good concordance to the “gold standard” diagnosis, reaching 95% diagnostic sensitivity and 100% diagnostic specificity. Additionally, a combination of ECL assays provided higher diagnostic sensitivity than a commercially available diagnostic ELISA or cell-based microneutralization assay. In summary, these data demonstrate the advantages of using ECL-based serology assays and highlight their use as a sensitive diagnostic approach to detect recent RSV infection in an elderly population. PMID:27070145

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease Is Mediated by Age-Variable IL-33

    PubMed Central

    Saravia, Jordy; You, Dahui; Shrestha, Bishwas; Jaligama, Sridhar; Siefker, David; Lee, Greg I.; Harding, Jeffrey N.; Jones, Tamekia L.; Rovnaghi, Cynthia; Bagga, Bindiya; DeVincenzo, John P.; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of infant hospitalizations and severe RSV infections are a significant risk factor for childhood asthma. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for RSV induced immunopathophysiology remain elusive. Using an age-appropriate mouse model of RSV, we show that IL-33 plays a critical role in the immunopathogenesis of severe RSV, which is associated with higher group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) specifically in neonates. Infection with RSV induced rapid IL-33 expression and an increase in ILC2 numbers in the lungs of neonatal mice; this was not observed in adult mice. Blocking IL-33 with antibodies or using an IL-33 receptor knockout mouse during infection was sufficient to inhibit RSV immunopathogenesis (i.e., airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 inflammation, eosinophilia, and mucus hyperproduction); whereas administration of IL-33 to adult mice during RSV infection was sufficient to induce RSV disease. Additionally, elevated IL-33 and IL-13 were observed in nasal aspirates from infants hospitalized with RSV; these cytokines declined during convalescence. In summary, IL-33 is necessary, either directly or indirectly, to induce ILC2s and the Th2 biased immunopathophysiology observed following neonatal RSV infection. This study provides a mechanism involving IL-33 and ILC2s in RSV mediated human asthma. PMID:26473724

  4. Respiratory syncytial virus is present in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Homaira, Nusrat; Sheils, Joanne; Stelzer-Braid, Sacha; Lui, Kei; Oie, Ju-Lee; Snelling, Tom; Jaffe, Adam; Rawlinson, William

    2016-02-01

    Nosocomial transmission of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) occurs in children within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). During peak community RSV transmission, three swabs were collected from the nose, hand and personal clothing of visitors and health care workers (HCW) in NICU once every week for eight weeks. Nasal swabs were collected from every third neonate and from any neonate clinically suspected of having a respiratory infection. Environmental sampling of high touch areas was done once during the study period. All swabs were tested for RSV using real time RT-PCR. There were 173 (519 total) and 109 (327 total) swabs, each of nose, hand and dress from 84 HCWs and 80 visitors respectively and 81 nasal swabs from 55 neonates collected. Thirty five environmental swabs from surfaces of the beds, side tables, counter tops, chairs, tables and computers were collected. Overall 1% of nasal swabs from each of HCWs, visitors and neonates, 4% of dress specimens from visitors and 9% of environmental swabs were positive for RSV-RNA. The results suggest that though the risk for RSV in the NICU remains low, personnel clothing are contaminated with RSV-RNA and may have a role in transmission. PMID:26174559

  5. Exploring the dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) transmission in children.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Alexandra B; Glass, Kathryn; Moore, Hannah C; Anderssen, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Whilst highly seasonal, RSV dynamics can have either one-year (annual) or two-year (biennial) cycles. Furthermore, some countries show a 'delayed biennial' pattern, where the epidemic peak in low incidence years is delayed. We develop a compartmental model for RSV infection, driven by a seasonal forcing function, and conduct parameter space and bifurcation analyses to document parameter ranges that give rise to these different seasonal patterns. The model is sensitive to the birth rate, transmission rate, and seasonality parameters, and can replicate RSV dynamics observed in different countries. The seasonality parameter must exceed a threshold for the model to produce biennial cycles. Intermediate values of the birth rate produce the greatest delay in these biennial cycles, while the model reverts to annual cycles if the duration of immunity is too short. Finally, the existence of period doubling and period halving bifurcations suggests robust model dynamics, in agreement with the known regularity of RSV outbreaks. These findings help explain observed RSV data, such as regular biennial dynamics in Western Australia, and delayed biennial dynamics in Finland. From a public health perspective, our findings provide insight into the drivers of RSV transmission, and a foundation for exploring RSV interventions. PMID:27155294

  6. Morbidity and mortality among patients with respiratory syncytial virus infection: a 2-year retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Neil W; Binnicker, Matthew J; Harris, Dana M; Chirila, Razvan M; Brumble, Lisa; Mandrekar, Jay; Hata, D Jane

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated high morbidity and mortality for adult patients with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. We performed a retrospective, multicenter, two-year chart review of all patients (n = 334) testing positive for RSV by the ProFlu + (®) Influenza A/B and RSV assay (Hologic, Bedford, MA). We analyzed indicators of morbidity and mortality in children <6 years old, immunocompetent and immunosuppressed adults, and transplant patients. Significant morbidity and mortality was observed among hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients (7.3%, 60-day mortality), solid organ transplant patients (13.3%, 60-day mortality), and COPD patients (12.8%, 60-day mortality). Of the patients positive for RSV, 144 (43.1%) of 334 received antibacterials or antifungals following diagnosis. Of these patients, a bacterial or fungal pathogen was not recovered from 60% of cases. Despite advances in RSV treatment, certain populations appear to be inadequately treated, while others appear to be inappropriately treated with unnecessary antimicrobials. PMID:27179369

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus increases lung cellular bioenergetics in neonatal C57BL/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Alsuwaidi, Ahmed R.; Albawardi, Alia; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Benedict, Sheela; Othman, Aws R.; Hartwig, Stacey M.; Varga, Steven M.; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-04-15

    We have previously reported that lung cellular bioenergetics (cellular respiration and ATP) increased in 4–10 week-old BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study examined the kinetics and changes in cellular bioenergetics in ≤2-week-old C57BL/6 mice following RSV infection. Mice (5–14 days old) were inoculated intranasally with RSV and the lungs were examined on days 1–10 post-infection. Histopathology and electron microscopy revealed preserved pneumocyte architectures and organelles. Increased lung cellular bioenergetics was noted from days 1–10 post-infection. Cellular GSH remained unchanged. These results indicate that the increased lung cellular respiration (measured by mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption) and ATP following RSV infection is independent of either age or genetic background of the host. - Highlights: • RSV infection increases lung cellular respiration and ATP in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. • Increased lung cellular bioenergetics is a biomarker of RSV infection. • Lung cellular glutathione remains unchanged in RSV infection.

  8. Surfactant protein C-deficient mice are susceptible to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Witt, Teah L; Senft, Albert P; Baatz, John E; Folger, Dusti; Maxfield, Melissa D; Akinbi, Henry T; Newton, Danforth A; Prows, Daniel R; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2009-07-01

    Patients with mutations in the pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene develop interstitial lung disease and pulmonary exacerbations associated with viral infections including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Pulmonary infection with RSV caused more severe interstitial thickening, air space consolidation, and goblet cell hyperplasia in SP-C-deficient (Sftpc(-/-)) mice compared with SP-C replete mice. The RSV-induced pathology resolved more slowly in Sftpc(-/-) mice with lung inflammation persistent up to 30 days postinfection. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage counts were increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Sftpc(-/-) mice. Viral titers and viral F and G protein mRNA were significantly increased in both Sftpc(-/-) and heterozygous Sftpc(+/-) mice compared with controls. Expression of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) mRNA was increased in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice relative to Sftpc(+/+) mice before and after RSV infection. Consistent with the increased TLR3 expression, BAL inflammatory cells were increased in the Sftpc(-/-) mice after exposure to a TLR3-specific ligand, poly(I:C). Preparations of purified SP-C and synthetic phospholipids blocked poly(I:C)-induced TLR3 signaling in vitro. SP-C deficiency increases the severity of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation through regulation of TLR3 signaling. PMID:19304906

  9. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M.; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  10. Development of two salmonella-based oral vaccines against human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Azizi Jalilian, F; Yusoff, K; Suhaimi, S; Amini, R; Sekawi, Z; Jahanshiri, F

    2015-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and other respiratory infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. We have developed two new oral vaccines using Salmonella typhi TY21a to carry and express the immunogenic epitopes of RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins on its surface, separately. To evaluate the efficacy of the designed vaccines, BALB/c mice were orally immunized and then infected with RSV. Immune response analyses showed that cellmediated, mucosal and humoral immunity in the vaccinated mice were significantly enhanced compared to the control group. Both vaccines generated a balanced Th1/Th2 immune response which is crucial for efficiency of vaccines against RSV. Furthermore, histopathological examination proved that these vaccines were safe as they did not cause any Th2-associated adverse effects in the lungs of RSV-infected mice. The findings of this research suggest that Salmonella-F and Salmonella-G vaccine candidates may have strong potential to prevent RSV infection. PMID:25864737

  11. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection: Mechanisms of Redox Control and Novel Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Roberto P.; Kolli, Deepthi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most important causes of upper and lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children, for which no effective treatment is currently available. Although the mechanisms of RSV-induced airway disease remain incompletely defined, the lung inflammatory response is thought to play a central pathogenetic role. In the past few years, we and others have provided increasing evidence of a role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as important regulators of RSV-induced cellular signaling leading to the expression of key proinflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines. In addition, RSV-induced oxidative stress, which results from an imbalance between ROS production and airway antioxidant defenses, due to a widespread inhibition of antioxidant enzyme expression, is likely to play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of RSV-associated lung inflammatory disease, as demonstrated by a significant increase in markers of oxidative injury, which correlate with the severity of clinical illness, in children with RSV infection. Modulation of ROS production and oxidative stress therefore represents a potential novel pharmacological approach to ameliorate RSV-induced lung inflammation and its long-term consequences. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 186–217. PMID:22799599

  12. La prévention de l’infection par le virus respiratoire syncytial

    PubMed Central

    Samson, L

    2009-01-01

    L’infection par le virus respiratoire syncytial (VRS) est la principale cause d’infection des voies respiratoires inférieures chez les jeunes enfants et pour cette raison, bon nombre des prématurés et des enfants présentant d’autres facteurs de risque doivent être hospitalisés chaque année au Canada. Le palivizumab, un anticorps monoclonal anti-VRS, peut réduire le taux d’hospitalisation et la gravité de la maladie d’un petit groupe de prématurés ou de nourrissons à haut risque pendant leur première saison de VRS. Le présent document de principes contient une analyse des publications ainsi que des recommandations à l’intention des médecins canadiens au sujet de son utilisation chez les prématurés et les autres nourrissons à risque.

  13. NK cell immunophenotypic and genotypic analysis of infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Juárez-Vega, Guillermo; Monjarás-Ávila, César; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco; Rangel-Ramírez, Verónica; Cadena-Mota, Sandra; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Reduced numbers of NK cells have been reported in infants with severe RSV infection; however, the precise role of NK cells during acute RSV infection is unclear. In this study the NK and T cell phenotypes, LILRB1 gene polymorphisms and KIR genotypes of infants hospitalized with RSV infection were analyzed. Compared to controls, infants with acute RSV infection showed a higher proportion of LILRB1+ T cells; in addition, a subgroup of infants with RSV infection showed an increase in LILRB1+ NK cells. No differences in NKG2C, NKG2A, or CD161 expression between RSV infected infants and controls were observed. LILRB1 genotype distribution of the rs3760860 A>G, and rs3760861 A>G single nucleotide polymorphisms differed between infants with RSV infection and healthy donors, whereas no differences in any of the KIR genes were observed. Our results suggest that LILRB1 participates in the pathogenesis of RSV infection. Further studies are needed to define the role of LILRB1+ NK in response to RSV and to confirm an association between LILRB1 polymorphisms and the risk of severe RSV infection. PMID:25988502

  14. Molecular Evolutionary Dynamics of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Group A in Recurrent Epidemics in Coastal Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Agoti, Charles N.; Gitahi, Caroline W.; Bett, Ann; Ngama, Mwanajuma; Medley, Graham F.; Cane, Patricia A.; Nokes, D. James

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic recurrent epidemics of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) within communities may result from the genetic variability of the virus and associated evolutionary adaptation, reducing the efficiency of preexisting immune responses. We analyzed the molecular evolutionary changes in the attachment (G) glycoprotein of RSV-A viruses collected over 13 epidemic seasons (2000 to 2012) in Kilifi (n = 649), Kenya, and contemporaneous sequences (n = 1,131) collected elsewhere within Kenya and 28 other countries. Genetic diversity in the G gene in Kilifi was dynamic both within and between epidemics, characterized by frequent new variant introductions and limited variant persistence between consecutive epidemics. Four RSV-A genotypes were detected in Kilifi: ON1 (11.9%), GA2 (75.5%), GA5 (12.3%), and GA3 (0.3%), with predominant genotype replacement of GA5 by GA2 and then GA2 by ON1. Within these genotypes, there was considerable variation in potential N-glycosylation sites, with GA2 and ON1 viruses showing up to 15 different patterns involving eight possible sites. Further, we identified 15 positively selected and 34 genotype-distinguishing codon sites, with six of these sites exhibiting both characteristics. The mean substitution rate of the G ectodomain for the Kilifi data set was estimated at 3.58 × 10−3 (95% highest posterior density interval = 3.04 to 4.16) nucleotide substitutions/site/year. Kilifi viruses were interspersed in the global phylogenetic tree, clustering mostly with Kenyan and European sequences. Our findings highlight ongoing genetic evolution and high diversity of circulating RSV-A strains, locally and globally, with potential antigenic differences. Taken together, these provide a possible explanation on the nature of recurrent local RSV epidemics. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms underlying recurrent epidemics of RSV are poorly understood. We observe high genetic diversity in circulating strains within and between epidemics in

  15. Development of nested PCR assays for detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Vilcek, S; Elvander, M; Ballagi-Pordány, A; Belák, S

    1994-01-01

    Two nested PCR assays were developed for the detection of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Primers were selected from the gene encoding the F fusion protein (PCR-F) and the gene encoding the G attachment protein (PCR-G). Biotinylated oligonucleotide probes, termed F and G, were selected for the hybridization of the respective PCR products. The sensitivities of the PCR-F and PCR-G assays were similar, both detecting 0.1 tissue culture infective dose of the virus. The PCR-F assay amplified all bovine strains and one human strain (RS32) tested. No cross-reactions were observed with nine heterologous respiratory viruses. PCR-F products of bovine and human RSV strains were discriminated by using endonuclease restriction enzyme ScaI, which specifically cleaved, products of BRSV. Oligonucleotide probe F was also specific for products of BRSV. The PCR-G assay detected all bovine strains and none of the human strains tested. A faint electrophoretic band was also observed with products of Sendai virus. However, probe G did not hybridize with this product, only with products of BRSV. Nasal swabs collected from cattle with no symptoms and cattle in the acute stage of respiratory disease were analyzed for BRSV by the immunofluorescence (IF) method and by the PCR-F and PCR-G assays. The virus was detected by the PCR assays in 31 of 35 (89%) samples tested. Only 23 samples (66%) were positive by the IF method, and these samples were also positive by both the PCR-F and PCR-G assays. The 31 samples detected as positive by PCR originated from cattle presenting clinical signs of acute respiratory disease; the four PCR-negative samples originated from clinically asymptomatic neighboring cattle. All sampled animals subsequently seroconverted and became reactive to BRSV. Thus, the detection of BRSV by PCR correlated with clinical observations and was considerably more sensitive (66 versus 89%) than IF. These results indicate that both nested PCR assays provide rapid and

  16. Biological challenges and technological opportunities for respiratory syncytial virus vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Graham, Barney S

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease causing high rates of hospitalizations in infants, significant morbidity in children and adults, and excess mortality in the elderly. Major barriers to vaccine development include early age of RSV infection, capacity of RSV to evade innate immunity, failure of RSV-induced adaptive immunity to prevent reinfection, history of RSV vaccine-enhanced disease, and lack of an animal model fully permissive to human RSV infection. These biological challenges, safety concerns, and practical issues have significantly prolonged the RSV vaccine development process. One great advantage compared to other difficult viral vaccine targets is that passively administered neutralizing monoclonal antibody is known to protect infants from severe RSV disease. Therefore, the immunological goals for vaccine development are to induce effective neutralizing antibody to prevent infection and to avoid inducing T-cell response patterns associated with enhanced disease. Live-attenuated RSV and replication-competent chimeric viruses are in advanced clinical trials. Gene-based strategies, which can control the specificity and phenotypic properties of RSV-specific T-cell responses utilizing replication-defective vectors and which may improve on immunity from natural infection, are progressing through preclinical testing. Atomic level structural information on RSV envelope glycoproteins in complex with neutralizing antibodies is guiding design of new vaccine antigens that may be able to elicit RSV-specific antibody responses without induction of RSV-specific T-cell responses. These new technologies may allow development of vaccines that can protect against RSV-mediated disease in infants and establish a new immunological paradigm in the host to achieve more durable protection against reinfection. PMID:21198670

  17. Antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus infection in children <18 months old.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scarselli, Elisa; Lelii, Mara; Scala, Alessia; Vitelli, Alessandra; Capone, Stefania; Fornili, Marco; Biganzoli, Elia; Orenti, Annalisa; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Principi, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    The development of a safe and effective respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine might be facilitated by knowledge of the natural immune response to this virus. The aims of this study were to evaluate the neutralizing antibody response of a cohort of healthy children <18 months old to RSV infection. During the RSV season, 89 healthy children <18 months old were enrolled and followed up weekly for 12 weeks. At each visit, a nasopharyngeal swab was obtained for RSV detection by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). During the study period, 2 blood samples were drawn and they were used to determine RSV geometric mean neutralizing antibody titres (GMT) against RSV. A total of 35 (39.3%) children had RSV detected during the study period. Among RSV-positive patients, children ≥7 months showed a significantly higher increase in antibody response (p<0.001). A significantly higher number of patients with a ≥4 -fold increase in GMT were ≥7 months old (p = 0.02) and presented lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) during the study period (p = 0.01). Viral shedding was longer among children aged ≥7 months (p = 0.06), those with viral load ≥10(6) copies/mL (p = 0.03), and those with LRTIs during the study period (p = 0.03), but it was not associated with the immune response (p = 0.41). In conclusion, natural RSV infection seems to evoke a low immune response in younger children. To be effective in this infant population, which is at highest risk of developing severe LRTIs, vaccines must be able to induce in the first months of life a stronger immune response than that produced by the natural infection. PMID:26901128

  18. A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial of Ibuprofen for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in a Bovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Paul; Behrens, Nicole; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R.; McEligot, Heather; Agrawal, Karan; Newman, John W.; Anderson, Mark; Gershwin, Laurel J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and hospital admission in infants. An analogous disease occurs in cattle and costs US agriculture a billion dollars a year. RSV causes much of its morbidity indirectly via adverse effects of the host response to the virus. RSV is accompanied by elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) which is followed by neutrophil led inflammation in the lung. Ibuprofen is a prototypical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that decreases PGE2 levels by inhibiting cyclooxygenase. Hypotheses We hypothesized that treatment of RSV with ibuprofen would decrease PGE2 levels, modulate the immune response, decrease clinical illness, and decrease the histopathological lung changes in a bovine model of RSV. We further hypothesized that viral replication would be unaffected. Methods We performed a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen in 16 outbred Holstein calves that we infected with RSV. We measured clinical scores, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase and endocannabinoid products in plasma and mediastinal lymph nodes and interleukin (Il)-4, Il-13, Il-17 and interferon-γ in mediastinal lymph nodes. RSV shedding was measured daily and nasal Il-6, Il-8 and Il-17 every other day. The calves were necropsied on Day 10 post inoculation and histology performed. Results One calf in the ibuprofen group required euthanasia on Day 8 of infection for respiratory distress. Clinical scores (p<0.01) and weight gain (p = 0.08) seemed better in the ibuprofen group. Ibuprofen decreased cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and cytochrome P450 products, and increased monoacylglycerols in lung lymph nodes. Ibuprofen modulated the immune response as measured by narrowed range of observed Il-13, Il-17 and IFN-γ gene expression in mediastinal lymph nodes. Lung histology was not different between groups, and viral shedding was increased in calves randomized to ibuprofen. Conclusions Ibuprofen decreased PGE2, modulated the immune

  19. Roflumilast Inhibits Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Human Differentiated Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Manuel; Martinez, Isidoro; Melero, Jose A.; Tenor, Herman; Cortijo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes acute exacerbations in COPD and asthma. RSV infects bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) that trigger RSV associated lung pathology. This study explores whether the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor Roflumilast N-oxide (RNO), alters RSV infection of well-differentiated HBE (WD-HBE) in vitro. WD-HBE were RSV infected in the presence or absence of RNO (0.1-100 nM). Viral infection (staining of F and G proteins, nucleoprotein RNA level), mRNA of ICAM-1, ciliated cell markers (digital high speed videomicroscopy, β-tubulin immunofluorescence, Foxj1 and Dnai2 mRNA), Goblet cells (PAS), mRNA of MUC5AC and CLCA1, mRNA and protein level of IL-13, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, formation of H2O2 and the anti-oxidative armamentarium (mRNA of Nrf2, HO-1, GPx; total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were measured at day 10 or 15 post infection. RNO inhibited RSV infection of WD-HBE, prevented the loss of ciliated cells and markers, reduced the increase of MUC5AC and CLCA1 and inhibited the increase of IL-13, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and ICAM-1. Additionally RNO reversed the reduction of Nrf2, HO-1 and GPx mRNA levels and consequently restored the TAC and reduced the H2O2 formation. RNO inhibits RSV infection of WD-HBE cultures and mitigates the cytopathological changes associated to this virus. PMID:23936072

  20. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Coinfections With Rhinovirus and Human Bocavirus in Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Cristina; García-García, María Luz; Pozo, Francisco; Paula, Gallardo; Molinero, Mar; Calderón, Ana; González-Esguevillas, Mónica; Casas, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Abstract It is not clearly established if coinfections are more severe than single viral respiratory infections. The aim of the study was to study and to compare simple infections and viral coinfections of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in hospitalized children. From September 2005 to August 2013, a prospective study was conducted on children younger than 14 years of age, admitted with respiratory infection to the Pediatric Department of the Severo Ochoa Hospital, in Spain. Specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate were taken for virological study by using polymerase chain reaction, and clinical data were recorded. Simple RSV infections were selected and compared with double infections of RSV with rhinovirus (RV) or with human bocavirus (HBoV). In this study, 2993 episodes corresponding to 2525 children were analyzed. At least 1 virus was detected in 77% (2312) of the episodes. Single infections (599 RSV, 513 RV, and 81 HBoV) were compared with 120 RSV-RV and 60 RSV-HBoV double infections. The RSV-RV coinfections had fever (63% vs 43%; P < 0.001) and hypoxia (70% vs 43%; P < 0.001) more often than RV infections. Hypoxia was similar between single or dual infections (71%). Bronchiolitis was more frequent in the RSV simple group (P < 0.001). Pediatric intensive care unit admission was more common in RSV simple or RSV-RV groups than in the RV monoinfection (P = 0.042). Hospitalization was longer for both RSV simple group and RSV-HBoV coinfection, lasting about 1 day (4.7 vs 3.8 days; P < 0.001) longer than in simple HBoV infections. There were no differences in PICU admission. RSV single group was of a younger age than the other groups. Coinfections between RSV-RV and RSV-HBoV are frequent. Overall viral coinfections do not present greater severity, but have mixed clinical features. PMID:26496310

  1. Molecular epidemiology and disease severity of human respiratory syncytial virus in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Pham, Thi Minh Hong; Ha, Manh Tuan; Tran, Thi Thu Loan; Dang, Thi Kim Huyen; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Okitsu, Shoko; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of acute respiratory infections (ARIs) in children worldwide and can cause high mortality, especially in developing countries. However, information on the clinical and molecular characteristics of RSV infection in developing countries is limited. From April 2010 to May 2011, 1,082 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from children with ARI admitted to the Children's Hospital 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Samples were screened for RSV and genotyped by reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing. Demographic and clinical data was also recorded. RSV was found in 23.8% (257/1,082) of samples. RSV A was the dominant subgroup, accounting for 91.4% (235/257), followed by RSV B, 5.1% (13/257), and 9 cases (3.5%) were mixed infection of these subgroups. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that all group A strains belonged to the GA2 genotype. All group B strains belonged to the recently identified BA genotype, and further clustered into 2 recently described subgenotypes BA9 and BA10. One GA2 genotype strain had a premature stop codon which shortened the G protein length. RSV infection was significantly associated with younger age and higher severity score than those without. Co-infection with other viruses did not affect disease severity. RSV A caused more severe disease than RSV B. The results from this study will not only contribute to the growing database on the molecular diversity of RSV circulating worldwide but may be also useful in clinical management and vaccine development. PMID:23349659

  2. Chimpanzee adenovirus- and MVA-vectored respiratory syncytial virus vaccine is safe and immunogenic in adults.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher A; Scarselli, Elisa; Sande, Charles J; Thompson, Amber J; de Lara, Catherine M; Taylor, Kathryn S; Haworth, Kathryn; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Angus, Brian; Siani, Loredana; Di Marco, Stefania; Traboni, Cinzia; Folgori, Antonella; Colloca, Stefano; Capone, Stefania; Vitelli, Alessandra; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Nicosia, Alfredo; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-08-12

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes respiratory infection in annual epidemics, with infants and the elderly at particular risk of developing severe disease and death. However, despite its importance, no vaccine exists. The chimpanzee adenovirus, PanAd3-RSV, and modified vaccinia virus Ankara, MVA-RSV, are replication-defective viral vectors encoding the RSV fusion (F), nucleocapsid (N), and matrix (M2-1) proteins for the induction of humoral and cellular responses. We performed an open-label, dose escalation, phase 1 clinical trial in 42 healthy adults in which four different combinations of prime/boost vaccinations were investigated for safety and immunogenicity, including both intramuscular (IM) and intranasal (IN) administration of the adenovirus-vectored vaccine. The vaccines were safe and well tolerated, with the most common reported adverse events being mild injection site reactions. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. RSV neutralizing antibody titers rose in response to IM prime with PanAd3-RSV and after IM boost for individuals primed by the IN route. Circulating anti-F immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) were observed after the IM prime and IM boost. RSV-specific T cell responses were increased after the IM PanAd3-RSV prime and were most efficiently boosted by IM MVA-RSV. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion after boost was from both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, without detectable T helper cell 2 (TH2) cytokines that have been previously associated with immune pathogenesis following exposure to RSV after the formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In conclusion, PanAd3-RSV and MVA-RSV are safe and immunogenic in healthy adults. These vaccine candidates warrant further clinical evaluation of efficacy to assess their potential to reduce the burden of RSV disease. PMID:26268313

  3. Real-Time Light Scattering Tracking of Gold Nanoparticles- bioconjugated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infecting HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Lin-Ling; Gao, Peng-Fei; Yang, Xiao-Xi; Li, Chun-Mei; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Real-time tracking of virus invasion is crucial for understanding viral infection mechanism, which, however, needs simple and efficient labeling chemistry with improved signal-to-noise ratio. For that purpose, herein we investigated the invasion dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) through dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique by using Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) as light scattering labels. RSV, a ubiquitous, non-segmented, pleiomorphic and negative-sense RNA virus, is an important human pathogen in infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. In order to label the enveloped virus of paramyxoviridae family, an efficient streptavidin (SA)-biotin binding chemistry was employed, wherein AuNPs and RSV particles modified with SA and biotin, respectively, allowing the AuNP-modified RSVs to maintain their virulence without affecting the native activities of RSV, making the long dynamic visualization successful for the RSV infections into human epidermis larynx carcinoma cells. PMID:24681709

  4. Real-Time Light Scattering Tracking of Gold Nanoparticles- bioconjugated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infecting HEp-2 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Lin-Ling; Gao, Peng-Fei; Yang, Xiao-Xi; Li, Chun-Mei; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-03-01

    Real-time tracking of virus invasion is crucial for understanding viral infection mechanism, which, however, needs simple and efficient labeling chemistry with improved signal-to-noise ratio. For that purpose, herein we investigated the invasion dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) through dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique by using Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) as light scattering labels. RSV, a ubiquitous, non-segmented, pleiomorphic and negative-sense RNA virus, is an important human pathogen in infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. In order to label the enveloped virus of paramyxoviridae family, an efficient streptavidin (SA)-biotin binding chemistry was employed, wherein AuNPs and RSV particles modified with SA and biotin, respectively, allowing the AuNP-modified RSVs to maintain their virulence without affecting the native activities of RSV, making the long dynamic visualization successful for the RSV infections into human epidermis larynx carcinoma cells.

  5. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB Pathway, Reactive Oxygen Species, Potassium Efflux Activates NLRP3/ASC Inflammasome during Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mgbemena, Victoria; Tsai, Su-Yu; Chang, Te-Hung; Berton, Michael T.; Morris, Ian R.; Allen, Irving C.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Bose, Santanu

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) constitute highly pathogenic virus that cause severe respiratory diseases in newborn, children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals. Airway inflammation is a critical regulator of disease outcome in RSV infected hosts. Although “controlled” inflammation is required for virus clearance, aberrant and exaggerated inflammation during RSV infection results in development of inflammatory diseases like pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays an important role in inflammation by orchestrating the pro-inflammatory response. IL-1β is synthesized as an immature pro-IL-1β form. It is cleaved by activated caspase-1 to yield mature IL-1β that is secreted extracellularly. Activation of caspase-1 is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the inflammasome. Although RSV infection results in IL-1β release, the mechanism is unknown. Here in, we have characterized the mechanism of IL-1β secretion following RSV infection. Our study revealed that NLRP3/ASC inflammasome activation is crucial for IL-1β production during RSV infection. Further studies illustrated that prior to inflammasome formation; the “first signal” constitutes activation of toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2)/MyD88/NF-κB pathway. TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling is required for pro-IL-1β and NLRP3 gene expression during RSV infection. Following expression of these genes, two “second signals” are essential for triggering inflammasome activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and potassium (K+) efflux due to stimulation of ATP-sensitive ion channel promote inflammasome activation following RSV infection. Thus, our studies have underscored the requirement of TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway (first signal) and ROS/potassium efflux (second signal) for NLRP3/ASC inflammasome formation, leading to caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1β release during RSV infection. PMID:22295065

  6. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age. PMID:20381643

  7. Sequencing and Analysis of Globally Obtained Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus A and B Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Michael E.; He, Jie; Shrivastava, Susmita; Nelson, Martha I.; Bera, Jayati; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Town, Christopher D.; Lorenzi, Hernan A.; Noyola, Daniel E.; Falcone, Valeria; Gerna, Giuseppe; De Beenhouwer, Hans; Videla, Cristina; Kok, Tuckweng; Venter, Marietjie; Williams, John V.; Henrickson, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of respiratory tract infections in children globally, with nearly all children experiencing at least one infection by the age of two. Partial sequencing of the attachment glycoprotein gene is conducted routinely for genotyping, but relatively few whole genome sequences are available for RSV. The goal of our study was to sequence the genomes of RSV strains collected from multiple countries to further understand the global diversity of RSV at a whole-genome level. Methods We collected RSV samples and isolates from Mexico, Argentina, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Australia, South Africa, and the USA from the years 1998-2010. Both Sanger and next-generation sequencing with the Illumina and 454 platforms were used to sequence the whole genomes of RSV A and B. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods of phylogenetic inference. Results We sequenced the genomes of 34 RSVA and 23 RSVB viruses. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the RSVA genome evolves at an estimated rate of 6.72 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year (95% HPD 5.61 × 10-4 to 7.6 × 10-4) and for RSVB the evolutionary rate was 7.69 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year (95% HPD 6.81 × 10-4 to 8.62 × 10-4). We found multiple clades co-circulating globally for both RSV A and B. The predominant clades were GA2 and GA5 for RSVA and BA for RSVB. Conclusions Our analyses showed that RSV circulates on a global scale with the same predominant clades of viruses being found in countries around the world. However, the distribution of clades can change rapidly as new strains emerge. We did not observe a strong spatial structure in our trees, with the same three main clades of RSV co-circulating globally, suggesting that the evolution of RSV is not strongly regionalized. PMID:25793751

  8. Induction of protective effector immunity to prevent pathogenesis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus. Implications on therapy and vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Janyra A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the leading cause of respiratory illness in infants and young children around the globe. This pathogen, which was discovered in 1956, continues to cause a huge number of hospitalizations due to respiratory disease and it is considered a health and economic burden worldwide, especially in developing countries. The immune response elicited by hRSV infection leads to lung and systemic inflammation, which results in lung damage but is not efficient at preventing viral replication. Indeed, natural hRSV infection induces a poor immune memory that allows recurrent infections. Here, we review the most recent knowledge about the lifecycle of hRSV, the immune response elicited by this virus and the subsequent pathology induced in response to infection in the airways. Novel findings about the alterations that this virus causes in the central nervous system and potential therapies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent hRSV infection are discussed. PMID:24801878

  9. Novel insights into human respiratory syncytial virus-host factor interactions through integrated proteomics and transcriptomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dapat, Clyde; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of vaccine and limited antiviral options against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) highlights the need for novel therapeutic strategies. One alternative is to develop drugs that target host factors required for viral replication. Several microarray and proteomics studies had been published to identify possible host factors that are affected during RSV replication. In order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of RSV-host interaction, we integrated available proteome and transcriptome datasets and used it to construct a virus-host interaction network. Then, we interrogated the network to identify host factors that are targeted by the virus and we searched for drugs from the DrugBank database that interact with these host factors, which may have potential applications in repositioning for future treatment options of RSV infection. PMID:26760927

  10. Specific Dietary Oligosaccharides Increase Th1 Responses in a Mouse Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Schijf, Marcel A.; Kruijsen, Debby; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Coenjaerts, Frank E. J.; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in infants. In addition to maternal antibodies, other immune-modulating factors in human milk contribute to this protection. Specific dietary prebiotic oligosaccharides, similar to oligosaccharides present in human milk, were evaluated in a C57BL/6 mouse RSV infection model. During primary RSV infection, increased numbers of RSV-specific CD4+ T cells producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were found in the lungs at days 8 to 10 postinfection in mice receiving diet containing short-chain galactooligosacharides, long-chain fructooligosaccharides, and pectin-derived acidic oligosaccharides (termed scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS). In a Th2-skewed formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV vaccination model, the prebiotic diet reduced RSV-specific Th2 cytokine (interleukin-4 [IL-4], IL-5, and IL-13)-producing CD4+ T cells in the lung and the magnitude of airway eosinophilia at day 4 and 6 after infection. This was accompanied by a decreased influx of inflammatory dendritic cells (CD11b+/CD11c+) and increased numbers of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at day 8 after viral challenge. These findings suggest that specific dietary oligosaccharides can influence trafficking and/or effector functions of innate immune, CD4+, and CD8+ T cell subsets in the lungs of RSV-infected mice. In our models, scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS had no effect on weight but increased viral clearance in FI-RSV-vaccinated mice 8 days after infection. The increased systemic Th1 responses potentiated by scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS might contribute to an accelerated Th1/Th2 shift of the neonatal immune system, which might favor protective immunity against viral infections with a high attack rate in early infancy, such as RSV. PMID:22896622

  11. Specific dietary oligosaccharides increase Th1 responses in a mouse respiratory syncytial virus infection model.

    PubMed

    Schijf, Marcel A; Kruijsen, Debby; Bastiaans, Jacqueline; Coenjaerts, Frank E J; Garssen, Johan; van Bleek, Grada M; van't Land, Belinda

    2012-11-01

    Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in infants. In addition to maternal antibodies, other immune-modulating factors in human milk contribute to this protection. Specific dietary prebiotic oligosaccharides, similar to oligosaccharides present in human milk, were evaluated in a C57BL/6 mouse RSV infection model. During primary RSV infection, increased numbers of RSV-specific CD4(+) T cells producing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were found in the lungs at days 8 to 10 postinfection in mice receiving diet containing short-chain galactooligosacharides, long-chain fructooligosaccharides, and pectin-derived acidic oligosaccharides (termed scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS). In a Th2-skewed formalin-inactivated (FI)-RSV vaccination model, the prebiotic diet reduced RSV-specific Th2 cytokine (interleukin-4 [IL-4], IL-5, and IL-13)-producing CD4(+) T cells in the lung and the magnitude of airway eosinophilia at day 4 and 6 after infection. This was accompanied by a decreased influx of inflammatory dendritic cells (CD11b(+)/CD11c(+)) and increased numbers of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells at day 8 after viral challenge. These findings suggest that specific dietary oligosaccharides can influence trafficking and/or effector functions of innate immune, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cell subsets in the lungs of RSV-infected mice. In our models, scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS had no effect on weight but increased viral clearance in FI-RSV-vaccinated mice 8 days after infection. The increased systemic Th1 responses potentiated by scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS might contribute to an accelerated Th1/Th2 shift of the neonatal immune system, which might favor protective immunity against viral infections with a high attack rate in early infancy, such as RSV. PMID:22896622

  12. Environmental Drivers of the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pitzer, Virginia E.; Viboud, Cécile; Alonso, Wladimir J.; Wilcox, Tanya; Metcalf, C. Jessica; Steiner, Claudia A.; Haynes, Amber K.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are known to occur in wintertime in temperate countries including the United States, but there is a limited understanding of the importance of climatic drivers in determining the seasonality of RSV. In the United States, RSV activity is highly spatially structured, with seasonal peaks beginning in Florida in November through December and ending in the upper Midwest in February-March, and prolonged disease activity in the southeastern US. Using data on both age-specific hospitalizations and laboratory reports of RSV in the US, and employing a combination of statistical and mechanistic epidemic modeling, we examined the association between environmental variables and state-specific measures of RSV seasonality. Temperature, vapor pressure, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration (PET) were significantly associated with the timing of RSV activity across states in univariate exploratory analyses. The amplitude and timing of seasonality in the transmission rate was significantly correlated with seasonal fluctuations in PET, and negatively correlated with mean vapor pressure, minimum temperature, and precipitation. States with low mean vapor pressure and the largest seasonal variation in PET tended to experience biennial patterns of RSV activity, with alternating years of “early-big” and “late-small” epidemics. Our model for the transmission dynamics of RSV was able to replicate these biennial transitions at higher amplitudes of seasonality in the transmission rate. This successfully connects environmental drivers to the epidemic dynamics of RSV; however, it does not fully explain why RSV activity begins in Florida, one of the warmest states, when RSV is a winter-seasonal pathogen. Understanding and predicting the seasonality of RSV is essential in determining the optimal timing of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:25569275

  13. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Thomas, Paul V; Chen, Man; Druz, Aliaksandr; Joyce, M Gordon; Kong, Wing-Pui; Sastry, Mallika; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S; McLellan, Jason S; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26098893

  14. Efficacy of Oral Ribavirin in Lung Transplant Patients With Respiratory Syncytial Virus Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pelaez, Andres; Lyon, G. Marshall; Force, Seth D.; Ramirez, Allan M.; Neujahr, David C.; Foster, Marianne; Naik, Priyumvada M.; Gal, Anthony A.; Mitchell, Patrick O.; Lawrence, E. Clinton

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause severe lower respiratory tract infection (LRI) and is a risk factor for the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation (LTx). Currently, the most widely used therapy for RSV is inhaled ribavirin. However, this therapy is costly and cumbersome. We investigated the utility of using oral ribavirin for the treatment of RSV infection after LTx. Methods RSV was identified in nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) using direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) in 5 symptomatic LTx patients diagnosed with LRI. Data were collected from December 2005 and August 2007 and included: age; gender; type of LTx; underlying disease; date of RSV; pulmonary function prior to, during and up to 565 days post-RSV infection; need for mechanical ventilation; concurrent infections; and radiographic features. Patients received oral ribavirin for 10 days with solumedrol (10 to 15 mg/kg/day intravenously) for 3 days, until repeat NPS were negative. Results Five patients had their RSV–LRI diagnosis made at a median of 300 days post-LTx. Mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) fell 21% (p < 0.012) during infection. After treatment, FEV1 returned to baseline and was maintained at follow-up of 565 days. There were no complications and no deaths with oral therapy. A 10-day course of oral ribavirin cost $700 compared with $14,000 for nebulized ribavirin at 6 g/day. Conclusions Treatment of RSV after LTx with oral ribavirin and corticosteroids is well tolerated, effective and less costly than inhaled ribavirin. Further studies are needed to directly compare the long-term efficacy of oral vs nebulized therapy for RSV. PMID:19134533

  15. Epidemic activity of respiratory syncytial virus is related to temperature and rainfall in equatorial tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Gamba-Sanchez, N; Rodriguez-Martinez, C E; Sossa-Briceño, M P

    2016-07-01

    Although viral acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) are a major public health problem in tropical low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and there is growing evidence showing their relationship with meteorological parameters, studies performed in these countries are scarce. In an analytical cross-sectional study, we determined which of the main meteorological parameters (temperature, absolute humidity, rainfall, wind speed, and solar radiation) predicted respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity in a population of hospitalized children with ALRI during a 5-year period, from January 2009 to December 2013. Out of a total of 4559 children included in the study (mean age 9·2 ± 8·5 months), 2953 (64·8%) presented RSV infection during the 3-month period from March to May. In the multivariate analysis, after controlling for absolute humidity, wind speed, and solar radiation, temperature [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2·25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·11-4·53, P = 0·024], and rainfall (IRR 1·01, 95% CI 1·00-1·02, P = 0·044) were independently associated with the monthly number of RSV infections. In conclusion, in Bogota, the capital of a tropical LMIC lying slightly above the equator, RSV activity peaks in the 3-month period from March to May, the main rainy period of the year in the city. In addition, rainfall and temperature are the two most important meteorological parameters that are independently associated with RSV activity in hospitalized children with ALRI in the city. PMID:26888544

  16. Burden of respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized infants and young children in Amman, Jordan

    PubMed Central

    KHURI-BULOS, NAJWA; WILLIAMS, JOHN V.; SHEHABI, ASEM A.; FAOURI, SAMIR; JUNDI, EHSAN AL; ABUSHARIAH, OMAR; CHEN, QINGXIA; ALI, S. ASAD; VERMUND, STEN; HALASA, NATASHA B.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) play a major role in hospitalizations in the Middle East, but the specific viral causes are unknown. We conducted prospective viral surveillance in children <5 y of age admitted with ARI and/or fever at 2 dissimilar hospitals in Amman, Jordan during peak respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) season. We collected prospective clinical and demographic data and obtained nose/throat swabs for testing for RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We obtained clinical and laboratory data for 728/743 (98%) subjects enrolled. The children’s median age was 4.3 months, 58.4% were males, 87% were breastfed, 4% attended day care, 67% were exposed to smokers, 7% were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 0.7% died (n = 5). Out of 728 subjects, 467 (64%) tested positive by RT-PCR for RSV. Comparing RSV-positive with RSV-negative subjects, the RSV-positive subjects had lower median age (3.6 vs 6.4 months, p < 0.001) and fewer males (55% vs 64%, p = 0.02). RSV-positive children had higher rates of oxygen use (72% vs 42%, p < 0.001), a longer hospital stay (5 vs 4 days, p = 0.001), and higher hospital charges (US$538 vs US$431, p < 0.001) than RSV-negative children. In young hospitalized Jordanian infants, the medical and financial burden of RSV was found to be high. Effective preventive measures, such as an RSV vaccine, would have a significant beneficial impact. PMID:20100116

  17. Burden of respiratory syncytial virus in hospitalized infants and young children in Amman, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Khuri-Bulos, Najwa; Williams, John V; Shehabi, Asem A; Faouri, Samir; Al Jundi, Ehsan; Abushariah, Omar; Chen, Qingxia; Ali, S Asad; Vermund, Sten; Halasa, Natasha B

    2010-05-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) play a major role in hospitalizations in the Middle East, but the specific viral causes are unknown. We conducted prospective viral surveillance in children <5 y of age admitted with ARI and/or fever at 2 dissimilar hospitals in Amman, Jordan during peak respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) season. We collected prospective clinical and demographic data and obtained nose/throat swabs for testing for RSV by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We obtained clinical and laboratory data for 728/743 (98%) subjects enrolled. The children's median age was 4.3 months, 58.4% were males, 87% were breastfed, 4% attended day care, 67% were exposed to smokers, 7% were admitted to the intensive care unit, and 0.7% died (n = 5). Out of 728 subjects, 467 (64%) tested positive by RT-PCR for RSV. Comparing RSV-positive with RSV-negative subjects, the RSV-positive subjects had lower median age (3.6 vs 6.4 months, p < 0.001) and fewer males (55% vs 64%, p = 0.02). RSV-positive children had higher rates of oxygen use (72% vs 42%, p < 0.001), a longer hospital stay (5 vs 4 days, p = 0.001), and higher hospital charges (US$538 vs US$431, p < 0.001) than RSV-negative children. In young hospitalized Jordanian infants, the medical and financial burden of RSV was found to be high. Effective preventive measures, such as an RSV vaccine, would have a significant beneficial impact. PMID:20100116

  18. Increased Risk of Wheeze and Decreased Lung Function after Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zomer-Kooijker, Kim; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Ermers, Marieke J. J.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Bont, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background A relationship between hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and asthma development has been suggested in case-control studies. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the risk of current wheeze, asthma, and lung function at school age in infants previously hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis compared to non-hospitalized children. Methods For this study, data from a prospective birth cohort of unselected, term-born infants (n = 553), of whom 4 (0.7%) were hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis, and a prospective patient cohort of 155 term infants hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis were used. Respiratory outcomes at age 6 in children hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis were compared to non-hospitalized children. Results The risk of current wheeze was higher in hospitalized patients (n = 159) compared to non-hospitalized children (n = 549) (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.2 (95% CI 1.2–8.1). Similarly, the risk of current asthma, defined as a doctor’s diagnosis of asthma plus current symptoms or medication use, was higher in hospitalized patients (adjusted OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.3–7.5). Compared to non-hospitalized children, RSV bronchiolitis hospitalization was associated with lower lung function (mean difference FEV1% predicted −6.8 l (95% CI (−10.2 to −3.4). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This is the first study showing that hospitalization for RSV bronchiolitis during infancy is associated with increased risk of wheezing, current asthma, and impaired lung function as compared to an unselected birth cohort at age 6. PMID:24498037

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus activity and climate parameters during a 12-year period.

    PubMed

    Sirimi, Natalia; Miligkos, Michael; Koutouzi, Foteini; Petridou, Evi; Siahanidou, Tania; Michos, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    The epidemic pattern of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection during long periods and the factors that determine seasonality are not well studied. In order to correlate the RSV epidemic activity with climate parameters, we conducted a retrospective study of children (0-14 year) who were hospitalized because of respiratory tract infection and had an RSV test performed in the major tertiary pediatric hospital of Greece during a 12-year period (2002-2013). Daily data regarding temperature and humidity were obtained from the Hellenic National Meteorological Service. A total of 2030/7516 (27%) children were tested positive for RSV infection. Among RSV positive children 1945/2030 (95.8%) were infants <1 year. A peak of RSV activity was measured in years 2002, 2003, and 2006 (>35% positive). The RSV season in our area spanned from December to April, with higher incidence during January through March. The peak monthly RSV incidence was observed during February with mean temperature 10.34 °C and mean relative humidity 69.16%. Regarding climate conditions, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between monthly RSV activity and mean monthly relative humidity (rho = 0.66, P-value = 0.02), whereas a negative correlation was found with mean monthly temperature (rho = -0.81, P-value = 0.002). However, in the multivariable analysis, only the effect of mean monthly temperature remained statistically significant (IRR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.68, 0.80). Further understanding of RSV seasonality in different geographic areas would be important in order to timely implement preventing strategies with immunoprophylaxis or future RSV vaccines. PMID:26575521

  20. Predicting the start week of respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks using real time weather variables

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV), a major cause of bronchiolitis, has a large impact on the census of pediatric hospitals during outbreak seasons. Reliable prediction of the week these outbreaks will start, based on readily available data, could help pediatric hospitals better prepare for large outbreaks. Methods Naïve Bayes (NB) classifier models were constructed using weather data from 1985-2008 considering only variables that are available in real time and that could be used to forecast the week in which an RSV outbreak will occur in Salt Lake County, Utah. Outbreak start dates were determined by a panel of experts using 32,509 records with ICD-9 coded RSV and bronchiolitis diagnoses from Intermountain Healthcare hospitals and clinics for the RSV seasons from 1985 to 2008. Results NB models predicted RSV outbreaks up to 3 weeks in advance with an estimated sensitivity of up to 67% and estimated specificities as high as 94% to 100%. Temperature and wind speed were the best overall predictors, but other weather variables also showed relevance depending on how far in advance the predictions were made. The weather conditions predictive of an RSV outbreak in our study were similar to those that lead to temperature inversions in the Salt Lake Valley. Conclusions We demonstrate that Naïve Bayes (NB) classifier models based on weather data available in real time have the potential to be used as effective predictive models. These models may be able to predict the week that an RSV outbreak will occur with clinical relevance. Their clinical usefulness will be field tested during the next five years. PMID:21044325

  1. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Thomas, Paul V.; Chen, Lei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; McLellan, Jason S.; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhou, Tongqing; Baxa, Ulrich; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which comprised the fusion (F) glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or “foldon” from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide “rings”, with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen. PMID:26098893

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps cause airway obstruction during respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Cortjens, Bart; de Boer, Onno J; de Jong, Rineke; Antonis, Adriaan Fg; Sabogal Piñeros, Yanaika S; Lutter, René; van Woensel, Job Bm; Bem, Reinout A

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) in young children worldwide. Extensive neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and occlusion of small airways by DNA-rich mucus plugs are characteristic features of severe RSV-LRTD. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), extracellular networks of DNA covered with antimicrobial proteins, as part of the first-line defence against pathogens. NETs can trap and eliminate microbes; however, abundant NET formation may also contribute to airway occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether NETs are induced by RSV and explored their potential anti-viral effect in vitro. Second, we studied NET formation in vivo during severe RSV-LRTD in infants and bovine RSV-LRTD in calves, by examining bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue sections, respectively. NETs were visualized in lung cytology and tissue samples by DNA and immunostaining, using antibodies against citrullinated histone H3, elastase and myeloperoxidase. RSV was able to induce NET formation by human neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, NETs were able to capture RSV, thereby precluding binding of viral particles to target cells and preventing infection. Evidence for the formation of NETs in the airways and lungs was confirmed in children with severe RSV-LRTD. Detailed histopathological examination of calves with RSV-LRTD showed extensive NET formation in dense plugs occluding the airways, either with or without captured viral antigen. Together, these results suggest that, although NETs trap viral particles, their exaggerated formation during severe RSV-LRTD contributes to airway obstruction. PMID:26468056

  3. Modelling the Seasonal Epidemics of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Hannah C.; Jacoby, Peter; Hogan, Alexandra B.; Blyth, Christopher C.; Mercer, Geoffry N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of paediatric morbidity. Mathematical models can be used to characterise annual RSV seasonal epidemics and are a valuable tool to assess the impact of future vaccines. Objectives Construct a mathematical model of seasonal epidemics of RSV and by fitting to a population-level RSV dataset, obtain a better understanding of RSV transmission dynamics. Methods We obtained an extensive dataset of weekly RSV testing data in children aged less than 2 years, 2000–2005, for a birth cohort of 245,249 children through linkage of laboratory and birth record datasets. We constructed a seasonally forced compartmental age-structured Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS) mathematical model to fit to the seasonal curves of positive RSV detections using the Nelder-Mead method. Results From 15,830 specimens, 3,394 were positive for RSV. RSV detections exhibited a distinct biennial seasonal pattern with alternating sized peaks in winter months. Our SEIRS model accurately mimicked the observed data with alternating sized peaks using disease parameter values that remained constant across the 6 years of data. Variations in the duration of immunity and recovery periods were explored. The best fit to the data minimising the residual sum of errors was a model using estimates based on previous models in the literature for the infectious period and a slightly lower estimate for the immunity period. Conclusions Our age-structured model based on routinely collected population laboratory data accurately captures the observed seasonal epidemic curves. The compartmental SEIRS model, based on several assumptions, now provides a validated base model. Ranges for the disease parameters in the model that could replicate the patterns in the data were identified. Areas for future model developments include fitting climatic variables to the seasonal parameter, allowing parameters to vary according to age and implementing

  4. Environmental drivers of the spatiotemporal dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Virginia E; Viboud, Cécile; Alonso, Wladimir J; Wilcox, Tanya; Metcalf, C Jessica; Steiner, Claudia A; Haynes, Amber K; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are known to occur in wintertime in temperate countries including the United States, but there is a limited understanding of the importance of climatic drivers in determining the seasonality of RSV. In the United States, RSV activity is highly spatially structured, with seasonal peaks beginning in Florida in November through December and ending in the upper Midwest in February-March, and prolonged disease activity in the southeastern US. Using data on both age-specific hospitalizations and laboratory reports of RSV in the US, and employing a combination of statistical and mechanistic epidemic modeling, we examined the association between environmental variables and state-specific measures of RSV seasonality. Temperature, vapor pressure, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration (PET) were significantly associated with the timing of RSV activity across states in univariate exploratory analyses. The amplitude and timing of seasonality in the transmission rate was significantly correlated with seasonal fluctuations in PET, and negatively correlated with mean vapor pressure, minimum temperature, and precipitation. States with low mean vapor pressure and the largest seasonal variation in PET tended to experience biennial patterns of RSV activity, with alternating years of "early-big" and "late-small" epidemics. Our model for the transmission dynamics of RSV was able to replicate these biennial transitions at higher amplitudes of seasonality in the transmission rate. This successfully connects environmental drivers to the epidemic dynamics of RSV; however, it does not fully explain why RSV activity begins in Florida, one of the warmest states, when RSV is a winter-seasonal pathogen. Understanding and predicting the seasonality of RSV is essential in determining the optimal timing of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:25569275

  5. Revealing the binding mode between respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein and benzimidazole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dingjue; Ye, Wei; Chen, HaiFeng

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major respiratory pathogen in newborn infants and young children and can also be a threat to some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. The RSV fusion (RSVF) protein has been an attractive target for vaccine and drug development. Experimental results indicate a series of benzimidazole-based inhibitors which target RSVF protein to inhibit the viral entry of RSV. To reveal the binding mode between these inhibitors and RSVF protein, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the interactions between the inhibitors and the core domain of RSVF protein. MD results suggest that the active molecules have stronger π-π stacking, cation-π, and other interactions than less active inhibitors. The binding free energy between the active inhibitor and RSVF protein is also found to be significantly lower than that of the less active one using MM/GBSA. Then, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) methods were used to construct three dimensional quantitative structure-activity (3D-QSAR) models. The cross-validated q(2) values are found to be 0.821 and 0.795 for CoMFA and CoMSIA, respectively. And the non-cross-validated r(2) values are 0.973 and 0.961. Ninety-two test set compounds validated these models. The results suggest that these models are robust with good prediction abilities. Furthermore, these models reveal possible methods to improve the bioactivity of inhibitors. PMID:25872614

  6. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Kneyber, Martin CJ; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos WR; Plötz, Frans B; Markhors, Dick G

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conventional gas on respiratory system resistance, air-trapping and CO2 removal. Methods Mechanically ventilated, sedated and paralyzed infants with proven RSV were enrolled within 24 hours after paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)admission. At T = 0, respiratory system mechanics including respiratory system compliance and resistance, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured with the AVEA ventilator. The measurements were repeated at each interval (after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox, after 30 minutes of ventilation with nitrox and again after 30 minutes of ventilation with heliox). Indices of gas exchange (ventilation and oxygenation index) were calculated at each interval. Air-trapping (defined by relative change in end-expiratory lung volume) was determined by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at each interval. Results Thirteen infants were enrolled. In nine, EIT measurements were performed. Mechanical ventilation with heliox significantly decreased respiratory system resistance. This was not accompanied by an improved CO2 elimination, decreased peak expiratory flow rate or decreased end-expiratory lung volume. Importantly, oxygenation remained unaltered throughout the experimental protocol. Conclusions Respiratory system resistance is significantly decreased by mechanical ventilation with heliox (ISCRTN98152468). PMID:19450268

  7. RNA viruses in community-acquired childhood pneumonia in semi-urban Nepal; a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mathisen, Maria; Strand, Tor A; Sharma, Biswa N; Chandyo, Ram K; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Basnet, Sudha; Adhikari, Ramesh K; Hvidsten, Dag; Shrestha, Prakash S; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2009-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is among the main causes of illness and death in children <5 years of age. There is a need to better describe the epidemiology of viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in developing countries. Methods From July 2004 to June 2007, we examined nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) from 2,230 cases of pneumonia (World Health Organization criteria) in children 2 to 35 months old recruited in a randomized trial of zinc supplementation at a field clinic in Bhaktapur, Nepal. The specimens were examined for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza virus type A (InfA) and B (InfB), parainfluenza virus types 1, 2 and 3 (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV3), and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) using a multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Results We identified 919 virus isolates in 887 (40.0%) of the 2,219 NPA specimens with a valid PCR result, of which 334 (15.1%) yielded RSV, 164 (7.4%) InfA, 129 (5.8%) PIV3, 98 (4.4%) PIV1, 93 (4.2%) hMPV, 84 (3.8%) InfB, and 17 (0.8%) PIV2. CAP occurred in an epidemic pattern with substantial temporal variation during the three years of study. The largest peaks of pneumonia occurrence coincided with peaks of RSV infection, which occurred in epidemics during the rainy season and in winter. The monthly number of RSV infections was positively correlated with relative humidity (rs = 0.40, P = 0.01), but not with temperature or rainfall. An hMPV epidemic occurred during one of the three winter seasons and the monthly number of hMPV cases was also associated with relative humidity (rs = 0.55, P = 0.0005). Conclusion Respiratory RNA viruses were detected from NPA in 40% of CAP cases in our study. The most commonly isolated viruses were RSV, InfA, and PIV3. RSV infections contributed substantially to the observed CAP epidemics. The occurrence of viral CAP in this community seemed to reflect more or less overlapping micro-epidemics with several respiratory viruses, highlighting the challenges of developing and

  8. Resistance to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection Induced by Immunization of Cotton Rats with a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing the RSV G Glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, Narayanasamy; Prince, Gregory A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Venkatesan, Sundararajan; Chanock, Robert M.; Moss, Bernard

    1986-03-01

    A cDNA copy of the G glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was placed under control of a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the thymidine kinase locus of the vaccinia virus genome. The recombinant vaccinia virus retained infectivity and expressed a 93-kDa protein that migrated with the authentic RSV G glycoprotein upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Glycosylation of the expressed protein and transport to the cell surface were demonstrated in the absence of other RSV proteins. Cotton rats that were inoculated intradermally with the infectious recombinant virus produced serum antibody to the G glycoprotein that neutralized RSV in vitro. Furthermore, the vaccinated animals were resistant to lower respiratory tract infection upon intranasal inoculation with RSV and had reduced titers of RSV in the nose.

  9. Direct Inhibition of Cellular Fatty Acid Synthase Impairs Replication of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Other Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ohol, Yamini M.; Wang, Zhaoti; Kemble, George; Duke, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) catalyzes the de novo synthesis of palmitate, a fatty acid utilized for synthesis of more complex fatty acids, plasma membrane structure, and post-translational palmitoylation of host and viral proteins. We have developed a potent inhibitor of FASN (TVB-3166) that reduces the production of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) progeny in vitro from infected human lung epithelial cells (A549) and in vivo from mice challenged intranasally with RSV. Addition of TVB-3166 to the culture medium of RSV-infected A549 cells reduces viral spread without inducing cytopathic effects. The antiviral effect of the FASN inhibitor is a direct consequence of reducing de novo palmitate synthesis; similar doses are required for both antiviral activity and inhibition of palmitate production, and the addition of exogenous palmitate to TVB-3166-treated cells restores RSV production. TVB-3166 has minimal effect on RSV entry but significantly reduces viral RNA replication, protein levels, viral particle formation and infectivity of released viral particles. TVB-3166 substantially impacts viral replication, reducing production of infectious progeny 250-fold. In vivo, oral administration of TVB-3166 to RSV-A (Long)-infected BALB/c mice on normal chow, starting either on the day of infection or one day post-infection, reduces RSV lung titers 21-fold and 9-fold respectively. Further, TVB-3166 also inhibits the production of RSV B, human parainfluenza 3 (PIV3), and human rhinovirus 16 (HRV16) progeny from A549, HEp2 and HeLa cells respectively. Thus, inhibition of FASN and palmitate synthesis by TVB-3166 significantly reduces RSV progeny both in vitro and in vivo and has broad-spectrum activity against other respiratory viruses. FASN inhibition may alter the composition of regions of the host cell membrane where RSV assembly or replication occurs, or change the membrane composition of RSV progeny particles, decreasing their infectivity. PMID:26659560

  10. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T.; Salzwedel, Karl

    2010-01-20

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of