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Sample records for syndrome therapie cellulaire

  1. Directed Therapy for Exfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angelilli, Allison; Ritch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disorder of the extracellular matrix that leads the production of abnormal fibrillar material that leads to elevated intraocular pressure and a relatively severe glaucoma. Exfoliation material is deposited in numerous ocular tissues and extraocular organs. XFS is associated with ocular ischemia, cerebrovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease and cardiovascular disease. Current modalities of treatment include intraocular pressure lowering with topical antihypertensives, laser trabeculoplasty and filtration surgery. The disease paradigm for XFS should be expanded to include directed therapy designed specifically to target the underlying disease process. Potential targets include preventing the formation or promoting the depolymerization of exfoliation material. Novel therapies targeting trabecular meshwork may prove particularly useful in the care of exfoliative glaucoma. The systemic and ocular associations of XFS underscore the need for a comprehensive search for neuroprotective agents in its treatment. PMID:19888433

  2. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  3. Complementary and alternative therapies for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roizen, Nancy J

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy, and a host of other therapies such as massage therapy have been used. There is a lack of well-designed scientific studies on the use of alternative therapies in individuals with Down syndrome. Antioxidants hold theoretical promise for treatment of the cognitive, immune, malignancy, and premature aging problems associated with Down syndrome. Medications for treatment of Alzheimer's disease may also result in benefit for the population of individuals with Down syndrome. PMID:15977315

  4. Emerging Therapies in Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Danieli; Tektonidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a hypercoagulable state characterized by arterial and venous thromboses and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Although warfarin remains the main therapeutic choice in APS, there is still concern about its efficacy, safety, and patient compliance. Patients with refractory APS to conventional therapy as well as patients with non-classical manifestations of APS may have alternative treatment approaches. APS pathogenesis has been further elucidated over the past years identifying new molecules as potential new treatment targets. This review summarizes available data from in vitro and animal models and clinical studies on the role of new potential treatment approaches including new oral anticoagulants and immunoregulatory agents: direct thrombin or factor Xa inhibitors, hydroxychloroquine, statins, B cell inhibition, complement inhibition, peptide therapy, nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated kinase inhibitors, defibrotide, abciximab, mTOR inhibitor, and other potential targets. Large multicenter prospective studies of well-characterized APS patients are needed to assess the efficacy and safety profile of these potential treatment alternatives. PMID:26995745

  5. Antidepressant therapy in the chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, S; Seth, R; Montgomery, S

    1991-01-01

    The chronic fatigue syndrome is a condition receiving increasing recognition. Symptoms of depression are not infrequent and may be persistent and severe enough to warrant treatment. The controversy over the use of antidepressant therapy in this condition may present a dilemma for the general practitioner considering possible treatments. This paper draws on the literature and on the authors' own observations of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome to suggest guidelines for the use of antidepressant therapy. PMID:1822108

  6. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome. PMID:25725225

  7. [Dyserythropoietic syndromes: incidence, diagnosis, therapy].

    PubMed

    Cacciola, E

    1990-10-01

    The nosography of the dyserythropoietic syndromes remains poorly defined in the field of clinical hematology. The prominent pathophysiologic feature lies in the "ineffective erythropoiesis" as expressed by bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia with dysplasia accompanied by a normal or only slightly increased reticulocyte count. Both erythrokinetics and ferrokinetics are impaired, as shown by either slight reduction of the red cell survival or marked increased rate of serum iron transport together with reduced cellular iron utilization. The dyserythropoietic syndromes can be classified as acquired, secondary or congenital. The acquired ones, especially the sideroblastic forms, belonging to the myelodysplastic syndromes, are typical of the elderly whereas the congenital are of childhood. Their treatment is still a matter of controversy. However, the employment of folic acid, Vit. B12, pyridoxine and androgens can be useful in selected cases. In case of severe anemia, blood transfusion are required in association with iron chelating agents. However, some biological molecules, such as erythropoietin, interleukins 3 and 4, hemopoietic growth factors (especially GM-CSF), could represent future prospects of treatment. PMID:2291009

  8. Upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation after reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: a study by the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Damaj, Gandhi; Mohty, Mohammad; Robin, Marie; Michallet, Mauricette; Chevallier, Patrice; Beguin, Yves; Nguyen, Stephanie; Bories, Pierre; Blaise, Didier; Maillard, Natacha; Rubio, Marie Therese; Fegueux, Nathalie; Cornillon, Jerome; Clavert, Aline; Huynh, Anne; Adès, Lionel; Thiébaut-Bertrand, Anne; Hermine, Olivier; Vigouroux, Stephane; Fenaux, Pierre; Duhamel, Alain; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Cytoreduction before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes remains a debatable issue. After excluding patients who had received preconditioning induction chemotherapy, we analyzed 128 consecutive patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who received reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMA) allo-SCT. Among them, 40 received azacitidine (AZA) before transplant (AZA group) and 88 were transplanted up front (best supportive care [BSC] group). At diagnosis, 55 patients had intermediate 2 or high-risk scores per the International Prognostic Scoring System and 33 had a high cytogenetic risk score. Progression to a more advanced disease before allo-SCT was recorded in 22 patients. Source of stem cells were blood (n = 112) or marrow (n = 16) from sibling (n = 78) or HLA-matched unrelated (n = 50) donors. With a median follow-up of 60 months, 3-year overall survival, relapse-free survival, cumulative incidence of relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were, respectively, 53% versus 53% (P = .69), 37% versus 42% (P = .78), 35% versus 36% (P = .99), and 20% versus 23% (P = .74), for the AZA group and BSC group, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed the absence of statistical differences in outcome between the AZA and BSC groups, after adjusting for potential confounders using the propensity score approach. The absence of cytoreduction before RIC/NMA allo-SCT did not seem to alter the outcome. However, our results emphasize the need to perform prospective protocols to delineate the role of debulking strategy and to identify subsets of patients who may benefit from this approach. PMID:24838178

  9. Dual pathway therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stachon, Peter; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 10 % of patients, who suffer an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a major cardiovascular event occurs despite optimal therapy. The occlusion of the vessel is driven by atherothrombosis, which arises from platelet activation and activation of the coagulation cascade. In the last decade the secondary prevention continuously improved by development of dual anti-platelet therapy with new P2Y12-inhibitors such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Until recently, the coagulation cascade was not targeted in secondary prevention. The coagulation factor Xa plays a crucial role in thrombosis and is elevated in patients after acute coronary syndrome, therefore representing an attractive target for novel therapies in ACS. Former studies with vitamin K antagonists showed reduction of cardiovascular events but increased major bleedings. Two phase-3 trials investigated the role of novel oral anticoagulant agents on top of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ACS. The APPRAISE-2 study, which tested the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban was prematurely terminated because of an increase of major bleedings in the absence of an effect on cardiovascular events. In contrast, the ATLAS ACS2 TIMI-51 trial interrogating the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in a low dose regimen showed significant reduction of cardiovascular events as well as total mortality. Thus, add-on treatment with low dose rivaroxaban emerged as a new option for patients with ACS. This review illustrates recent advances in the development of antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes, provides guidance on which patients should receive which therapy for secondary prevention of events, and points out potentially fruitful new strategies for the future of antithrombotic treatment in ACS. PMID:26660521

  10. Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Intervention for Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Kathleen A.

    The paper reviews music therapy, the educational background of music therapists, music therapy's various settings, and its use as an intervention with girls with Rett Syndrome. Sample music therapy programs for three girls (aged 5, 14, and 20 years) with Rett Syndrome are presented. The sample programs provide: student descriptions; the girls'…

  11. Novel biomarkers and therapies in cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Latini, Roberto; Aleksova, Aneta; Masson, Serge

    2016-04-01

    Renal and cardiac diseases frequently co-exist and are associated with adverse outcomes. The clinical management of patients with a cardiorenal syndrome aims at reducing fluid overload and congestion, while improving kidney function. Early diagnosis and prompt therapies are key to better outcome. Biomarkers may help to gain insight on the ongoing pathological processes and since an accurate and early diagnosis of the cardiorenal syndrome based on clinical findings is not always possible. Serum creatinine, the derived eGFR and blood urea nitrogen are the standard tools for recognizing changes in renal function but suffer some limitations. In this review we will discuss the role of emerging biomarkers of renal tubular and glomerular injury, bone-mineral axis, or tubular cell-cycle arrest. PMID:26894469

  12. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  13. Review of pharmacological therapies in fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of drug therapy for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and is based on interdisciplinary FMS management guidelines, meta-analyses of drug trial data, and observational studies. In the absence of a single gold-standard medication, patients are treated with a variety of drugs from different categories, often with limited evidence. Drug therapy is not mandatory for the management of FMS. Pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran, and amitriptyline are the current first-line prescribed agents but have had a mostly modest effect. With only a minority of patients expected to experience substantial benefit, most will discontinue therapy because of either a lack of efficacy or tolerability problems. Many drug treatments have undergone limited study and have had negative results. It is unlikely that these failed pilot trials will undergo future study. However, medications, though imperfect, will continue to be a component of treatment strategy for these patients. Both the potential for medication therapy to relieve symptoms and the potential to cause harm should be carefully considered in their administration. PMID:24433463

  14. Evaluation and therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loy, R; Seibel, M M

    1988-12-01

    The amenorrhea associated with bilateral polycystic ovaries, described by Stein and Leventhal, actually represents a syndrome involving various organs and systems. Clinically, this symptom complex commonly presents as menstrual disturbances, infertility, excessive body weight, and hirsutism. An understanding of the pathophysiology that underlies these symptoms provides a logical basis for evaluation and treatment of the syndrome. The diagnostic approach may involve biochemical determinations (baseline, stimulated, and suppressed) and radiologic testing. Therapy is directed at chronic anovulation, the hyperandrogenism responsible for hirsutism and acne, and the prophylaxis against endometrial and breast carcinomas. Ovulation can be induced with various agents, many of which have a risk of ovarian hyperstimulation in the PCOD patient. The use of GnRH agonists with HMG or FSH for ovulation induction will probably increase in the future. Although classic wedge resection has little place in modern management of PCOD, the recent laparoscopic ovarian cautery remains largely unstudied with respect to long-term postoperative plasma androgen levels and pelvic adhesions. It is too premature to evaluate this new surgical therapy. Hirsutism is effectively treated with estrogen-progestin combinations, medroxyprogesterone acetate, androgen receptor blockers (spironolactone, cimetidine, cyproterone acetate, and cyproheptadine), and glucocorticoids. To date, the available GnRH agonists have not been found selective enough to be used in the treatment of hirsutism, owing to possible long-term complications. Most medical approaches should include electrolysis for permanent hair removal. At present, gynecologic surgery seems to have little place in the management of hirsutism. PMID:3143568

  15. [Optimization of pharmacological therapy for weakness syndrome in incurable patients].

    PubMed

    Ryazankina, A A; Rozengard, S A; Glushchenko, V A; Karitsky, A P; Kvashnin, A V

    2015-01-01

    In this work there is considered the possibility of correction of therapy for weakness syndrome in incurable patients with the use of drugs affecting dopamine and serotonin exchanges. It is showed that the use of 100 mg of ladasten, 16 mg of ondansetron orally per day and 50 mg of agomelatine per night is more effective in therapy for fatigue/weakness syndrome in incurable cancer patients compared to standard therapy. PMID:26087610

  16. Rifaximin therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hoonmo L; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  17. Rifaximin Therapy of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  18. Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy in Central Sensitivity Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a formal therapeutic approach that encourages selfmanagement of illnesses in accordance with the BioPsychoSocial model. CBT is composed of numerous skills grounded in known principles of behavioral and cognitive change. Each skill is designed to influence one of the facets associated with the perception of pain (i.e., sensory factors, emotional factors, or cognitive factors). Across the various Central Sensitivity Syndromes (CSS), CBT is thought to be beneficial to at least a portion of individuals afflicted. This paper provides a description of CBT, some recommendations for integrating CBT into clinical practice, and a brief review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT with various forms of CSS. PMID:26717953

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  1. [Autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndrome: therapy].

    PubMed

    Löhr, H F

    2002-08-21

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent acute and chronic inflammatory liver diseases in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. Only for AIH there is evidence of an autoimmune etiology and humoral and cellular immune reactions are found directed against various liver cell antigens. By diverse autoantibodies several subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis can be distinguished. A very important disease promoting factor seems to be the genetically determined background for autoimmunity characterized by the HLA haplotype A1, B8 and DR3, respectively DR4. Although the histopathology of AIH shows no pathognomonic features distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus induced chronic hepatitis there are some distinct characteristic morphological lesions. If untreated the prognosis of AIH is unfavourable but the benefit from immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprin is well established. In the last years there was increasing evidence for an overlap syndrome between AIH and PBC and rarely AIH and PSC. These patients are characterized by PBC characteristic bileduct lesions and oftenly antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). They also show AIH typical inflammatory hepatic lesions in the periportal areas and portal tracts and oftenly the typical genetical background, the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3 or DR4. Most of these patients respond probably to a combination therapy containing prednisolon, azathioprine and ursodesoxycholic acid that leads to the reduction of the inflammatory activity. PMID:12233265

  2. [Is a gene therapy for diabetic syndromes foreseeable?].

    PubMed

    Assan, R; Clauser, E; Larger, E

    1994-01-01

    The concepts and methods of gene therapy are summarized in order to assess a possible implication in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Gene therapy requires identification of the critical genetic defect and then the preparation and introduction of the therapeutic transgene, with an appropriate targeting and a strong regulated expression. The bases of the different human diabetic syndromes are reviewed in their present state of knowledge: they are mostly clarified in the case of MODY, extreme insulin resistance syndromes, and some mitochondrial diabetic syndromes; but still obscure in the case of Type 2 and Type 1 diabetic syndromes. Substantial contributions to the understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetes have been brought by transgenic animal models. Gene therapy of human diabetic syndromes may become available, in an undetermined future, particularly under the forms of insulin secreting transgenic "organoïds". Such treatments should be proportionate to the intrinsic severity of the candidate diseases and carefully screened for safety. PMID:8001711

  3. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  4. Systemic therapy of Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cushing’s disease (CD) in a stricter sense derives from pathologic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion usually triggered by micro- or macroadenoma of the pituitary gland. It is, thus, a form of secondary hypercortisolism. In contrast, Cushing’s syndrome (CS) describes the complexity of clinical consequences triggered by excessive cortisol blood levels over extended periods of time irrespective of their origin. CS is a rare disease according to the European orphan regulation affecting not more than 5/10,000 persons in Europe. CD most commonly affects adults aged 20–50 years with a marked female preponderance (1:5 ratio of male vs. female). Patient presentation and clinical symptoms substantially vary depending on duration and plasma levels of cortisol. In 80% of cases CS is ACTH-dependent and in 20% of cases it is ACTH-independent, respectively. Endogenous CS usually is a result of a pituitary tumor. Clinical manifestation of CS, apart from corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH-), ACTH-, and cortisol-producing (malign and benign) tumors may also be by exogenous glucocorticoid intake. Diagnosis of hypercortisolism (irrespective of its origin) comprises the following: Complete blood count including serum electrolytes, blood sugar etc., urinary free cortisol (UFC) from 24 h-urine sampling and circadian profile of plasma cortisol, plasma ACTH, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone itself, and urine steroid profile, Low-Dose-Dexamethasone-Test, High-Dose-Dexamethasone-Test, after endocrine diagnostic tests: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultra-sound, computer tomography (CT) and other localization diagnostics. First-line therapy is trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) of the pituitary adenoma (in case of ACTH-producing tumors). In patients not amenable for surgery radiotherapy remains an option. Pharmacological therapy applies when these two options are not amenable or refused. In cases when pharmacological therapy becomes necessary, Pasireotide should be used

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  6. Purple toes syndrome associated with warfarin therapy in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, David B; Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2003-05-01

    Purple toes syndrome is an extremely uncommon, nonhemorrhagic, cutaneous complication associated with warfarin therapy. It is characterized by the sudden appearance of bilateral, painful, purple lesions on the toes and sides of the feet that blanch with pressure. The syndrome usually develops 3-8 weeks after the start of warfarin therapy. A 47-year-old man with a history of purple toes syndrome that resolved after discontinuing warfarin--prescribed for a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in his right lower leg--experienced an acute, proximal DVT in his other leg. Warfarin again was prescribed; 1 week later, purple toes syndrome developed in that extremity. Warfarin therapy again was discontinued, and intravenous unfractionated heparin was started; the patient's clinical picture indicated a possible pulmonary embolism, and laboratory analysis suggested antiphospholipid syndrome. The patient's toe pain resolved, but the purple discoloration persisted. Follow-up laboratory analysis confirmed antiphospholipid syndrome, and warfarin was restarted with close monitoring. No further complications occurred with long-term therapy. Although a rare complication of therapy, clinicians should monitor for the development of purple toes syndrome in patients taking warfarin. PMID:12741443

  7. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: neurofibromatosis type 1, neurofibromatosis type 2, and Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary cancer syndromes are well known in the oncology community, typically affecting children, adolescents, and young adults and thereby resulting in great cumulative morbidity and mortality. These syndromes often lag behind their de novo counterparts in the development of approved novel treatment options due to their rarity in the general population. Recent work has allowed the identification of molecular aberrations and associated targeted therapies that may effectively treat these conditions. In this review, we seek to characterize some of the involved aberrations and associated targeted therapies for several germline malignancies, including neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, and Gorlin syndrome. Though patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may be too rare to effectively include in large clinical trials, by understanding the pathophysiology of these diseases, clinicians can attain insights into the use of targeted therapies in their own practice when treating affected individuals. PMID:25549703

  8. Favre-Racouchot syndrome associated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.J.; Su, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    A 56-year-old woman developed Favre-Racouchot syndrome involving her face and scalp primarily at the sites of x-ray irradiation for therapy of an astrocytoma. The patient had not had comedones prior to radiotherapy and did not have a history of excessive sun exposure. The patient showed an excellent response to topical retinoic acid gel. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of Favre-Racouchot syndrome developing after radiation therapy to be reported in the literature; its pathogenesis is discussed in this paper.

  9. Role of Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Donna-Ann; Maslin, Benjamin; Legler, Aron; Springer, Erin; Asgerally, Abbas; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of chronic pain. This review examines alternative and complimentary therapies, which can be incorporated as part of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. In the present investigation, literature from articles indexed on PubMed was evaluated including topics of alternative therapies, complimentary therapies, pain psychology, biofeedback therapy, physical exercise therapies, acupuncture, natural and herbal supplements, whole-body cryotherapy, and smartphone technologies in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. This review highlights the key role of psychology in the treatment of chronic pain. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be the most impactful while biofeedback therapy has also been shown to be effective for chronic pain. Exercise therapy has been shown to be effective in short-, intermediate-, and long-term pain states. When compared to that in sham controls, acupuncture has shown some benefit for neck pain immediately after the procedure and in the short term and improvement has also been demonstrated in the treatment of headaches. The role of smartphones and whole-body cryotherapy are new modalities and further studies are needed. Recent literature suggests that several alternate therapies could play a role in the treatment of chronic pain, supporting the biopsychosocial model in the treatment of pain states. PMID:27038968

  10. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome: Weighing in on Therapy Options.

    PubMed

    Piper, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is becoming an increasingly encountered condition both in respiratory outpatient clinics and in hospitalized patients. The health consequences and social disadvantages of obesity hypoventilation syndrome are significant. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy is commonly delayed when the syndrome is not recognized or misdiagnosed. Positive airway pressure therapy remains the mainstay of treatment and is effective in controlling sleep-disordered breathing and improving awake blood gases in the majority of individuals. Evidence supporting one mode of therapy over another is limited. Both continuous and bilevel therapy modes can successfully improve daytime gas exchange, with adherence to therapy an important modifiable factor in the response to treatment. Despite adherence to therapy, these individuals continue to experience excess mortality primarily due to cardiovascular events compared with those with eucapnic sleep apnea using CPAP. This difference likely arises from ongoing systemic inflammation secondary to the morbidly obese state. The need for a comprehensive approach to managing nutrition, weight, and physical activity in addition to reversal of sleep-disordered breathing is now widely recognized. Future studies need to evaluate the impact of a more aggressive and comprehensive treatment plan beyond managing sleep-disordered breathing. The impact of early identification and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing on the development and reversal of cardiometabolic dysfunction also requires further attention. PMID:26292036

  11. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  12. Dance Therapy with Physical Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Blanche Burt; Schulmann, Diana

    This study sought to investigate effects of a dance program on bilateral toe-standing balance and single-point static balance skills of a group of children with Down Syndrome. Thirteen experimental and 10 control group students between the ages of 3 and 13 years were assessed on toe-standing balance and single-point standing balance on the right…

  13. Liposteroid (dexamethasone palmitate) therapy for West syndrome: a comparative study with ACTH therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Asoh, M; Murakami, H; Kamiyama, N; Ohta, C

    1998-05-01

    Dexamethasone palmitate (liposteroid) was used for the treatment of West syndrome and compared with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy. A single intravenous injection of liposteroid (0.25 mg/kg) was administered seven times in 3 months (total dosage = 1.75 mg/kg) to five symptomatic patients with West syndrome, aged 4-11 months. ACTH (0.025 mg/kg/day) was administered intramuscularly for 6 weeks according to the conventional therapy in Japan (total dosage = 0.625 mg/kg) to five symptomatic patients with West syndrome, aged 6-10 months. Nodding spasm and hypsarrhythmia on EEG disappeared in all patients in the liposteroid therapy group within four doses; however, partial seizures and focal spikes on EEG reappeared in three patients 2 months after the end of liposteroid therapy. In the ACTH therapy group, nodding spasm and hypsarrhythmia on EEG similarly disappeared during treatment in all patients, but nodding spasm reappeared 2 months after therapy in two patients and partial seizures reappeared in one patient 3 months after therapy. No notable adverse reactions occurred in the liposteroid group, but transient dysfunction of the thyroid and anterior pituitary gland and increased levels of serum cortisol were experienced in the ACTH group. These results suggest that glucocorticoid incorporated in a lipid emulsion is useful for the treatment of West syndrome. PMID:9650682

  14. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    PubMed

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  15. Asperger's syndrome: diagnosis, comorbidity and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, F I; Sahli, Z T; Pleskow, J; Mousa, S A

    2015-03-01

    Asperger's syndrome (AS), a behavioral disorder that is related to autism, is associated with abnormal social functioning and repetitive behaviors but not with a decrease in intelligence or linguistic functionality. This article reviews the clinical diagnosis of AS and discusses the comorbid disorders that may be present with AS, as well as the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pharmacotherapies given to AS patients, as reported in preclinical and clinical studies. AS may be present with several comorbid disorders including: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. The difficulty in distinguishing AS from autism results in treating the comorbid disorder symptoms, rather than treating the symptoms of AS. Accordingly, there is a great need to further understand the psychobiology of AS and its association with other disorders, which should expand the pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic options and improve the quality of life for AS patients. PMID:25655905

  16. Complementary Therapy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, C. I.; Nori, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease. PCOS afflicts 5 to 10 % of women of reproductive age. The symptoms are: amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, hirsutism, obesity, infertility, chronic hyperandrogenic anovulation and acne. Other risk factors aggravate this condition: insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and subclinical cardiovascular disease. Anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life are also common. This review highlights the mechanisms and the beneficial effects of acupuncture, exercise and resveratrol on animal models and on humans affected by PCOS. PMID:24809037

  17. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause and the use of laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson-Colas, Juana; Segal, Saya

    2015-12-01

    Genitourinary syndrome of menopause is a common condition that left untreated can progress and negatively affect quality of life and sexual function. Laser therapy has a therapeutic role for several gynecologic conditions and most recently has gained interest as a non-hormonal treatment for genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). The laser is well tolerated and may increase thickness of the squamous epithelium and improve vascularity of the vagina. These morphological changes presumably alleviate symptoms of dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation. However, the duration of therapeutic effects and safety of repeated applications at this point is not clear. Further research is needed in the form of controlled studies of the laser and other non-hormonal GSM therapies. The objective of this paper is to review the existing literature describing laser therapy for GSM. PMID:26323234

  18. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  19. Pathogenesis of Hepatorenal Syndrome: Implications for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Durand, François; Graupera, Isabel; Ginès, Pere; Olson, Jody C; Nadim, Mitra K

    2016-02-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to develop acute kidney injury (AKI) due to a number of causes, including bacterial infections with or without septic shock, hypovolemia, administration of nephrotoxic drugs, and intrinsic kidney diseases, among others. Most importantly, patients with advanced cirrhosis develop a distinctive cause of AKI, characterized by rapidly progressive glomerular filtration rate loss associated with marked disturbances in circulatory function in the absence of obvious pathologic abnormalities in the kidneys, known as hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Decreased kidney function results from intense renal vasoconstriction secondary to the complex circulatory changes of cirrhosis with splanchnic vasodilatation and effective hypovolemia. Beyond activation of vasoactive systems, factors including impaired renal blood flow autoregulation and systemic inflammation may play a role in the development of HRS. Most patients improve with albumin and vasopressors; however, the prognosis of HRS remains very poor. Novel biomarkers may be helpful in distinguishing HRS from other causes of AKI in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26500178

  20. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome: is there a role for occupational therapy?

    PubMed

    Rubal, Elaine; Iwanenko, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) continues to evolve as a disabling phenomenon characterized by debilitating fatigue and consequential components that limit the functional ability of persons afflicted with the disease. A composite review of the current literature addresses a brief history, etiology, legitimacy, incidence and prevalence, prognosis, diagnosis, impact, and treatment of CFS. The primary focus illustrates available treatment strategies that have been incorporated into occupational therapy practice. As a profession that has made contributions to populations with chronic disease and symptoms similar to those suffering from CFS, the use of effective methods should reinforce the need for occupational therapy intervention with this population. PMID:23927616

  2. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome occurring during continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Shamir; Khademian, Zarir P.; Mistry, Kirtida

    2013-01-01

    The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is characterized by progressive neurological symptoms and signs attributable to cerebral edema that occurs due to fluid shifts into the brain following a relatively rapid decrease in serum osmolality during hemodialysis (HD). Since continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is less efficient at solute clearance than intermittent HD, it seems logical that this mode of therapy is less likely to cause DDS. This entity has not been previously reported to occur with this modality. Here, we report two cases of DDS associated with CRRT that provide insights into its pathophysiological mechanisms and suggest strategies for its prevention. PMID:26120445

  3. Rituximab therapy in nephrotic syndrome due to AH amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Matsuda, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Daigo; Gono, Takahisa; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with AH amyloidosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic leukemia that has remained in a stable state with a nephrotic syndrome for 17 months since the commencement of cyclic rituximab therapy aimed at suppression of pathogenetic gamma heavy chains. Free light chains in serum and CD20-positive cells in peripheral blood were useful as hematological markers in the patient. Rituximab might be a potent therapeutic option for AH amyloidosis associated with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:19590993

  4. Le naevus bleu cellulaire atypique du poignet: à propos d'un cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Boussakri, Hassan; Roux, Jean Luc; Durand, Luc; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Le naevus bleu cellulaire atypique est une entité pathologique rare et sa localisation au niveau du poignet est exceptionnelle. Il est Considéré comme une Variante à des caractéristiques intermédiaires entre le naevus bleu cellulaire typique et le naevus bleu malin, dont l’évolution est incertaine. Le but de notre travail est d'attirer l'attention sur cette variété lésionnelle rare et de discuter les diagnostiques différentiels, ainsi que décrire les aspects histologique et les options thérapeutiques possibles. PMID:25426206

  5. Nutritional therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1989-09-01

    Nutritional factors relative to IBS include diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Etiologically, foods do not cause IBS. A small percentage of patients with childhood allergic diatheses, usually in association with atopic dermatitis and asthma, may be intolerant to one or more of wheat, corn, dairy products, coffee, tea, or citrus fruits. Diagnostically, many patients labeled as IBS subjects are in fact intolerant to the ingestion of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, or combinations of fructose and sorbitol. A precise dietary history will characterize this group. Taken in its broadest context, IBS involves the entire hollow tract inclusive of esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The symptomatic presentation relative to the hollow organ involved allows the selection of dietary manipulations that may help to reduce symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux, a consequence of low LES pressure in some IBS patients, may be treated with the elimination of fatty foods, alcohol, chocolate, and peppermint. Delayed gastric emptying may be helped by the elimination of fatty foods and reduction of soluble fiber. Aberrant small bowel motor function may be ameliorated by reduction of lactose, sorbitol, and fructose and the addition of soluble fiber. Gas syndromes may be improved by reduced intake of beans, cabbage, lentils, legumes, apples, grapes, and raisins. Colonic motor dysfunction may be overcome by the gradual addition of combinations of soluble and insoluble fiber-containing foods and supplements. The selective use of activated charcoal and simethicone may be helpful. PMID:2553606

  6. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Katrina E; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction. PMID:27275457

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wardrope, Katrina E.; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D. O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction.

  9. Iron Chelation Therapy in Thalassemia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cianciulli, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron) the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients. PMID:21415999

  10. The quest for targeted therapy in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Shimriet; Hukema, Renate K; Willemsen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common, monogenetic cause of intellectual disability and autism-spectrum disorders. Although there is no effective therapy, greater understanding of disturbed neuronal pathways has introduced options for targeted therapy. But whereas many FXS phenotypes were improved in preclinical studies with drugs targeting these pathways in the FXS mouse model, attempts to translate these animal-model success stories into treatment of patients in clinical trials have been extremely disappointing. Complicating factors, particularly in animal studies, include mouse inbred strains, variability in functional studies between laboratories, publication bias and lack of reliable and objective primary outcome measures in both mice and patients. Possibly most important, however, is one factor that has been little explored: the complexity of the molecular imbalance in FXS and the need to simultaneously target several different disturbed pathways and different cellular compartments. New, well-conceived animal studies should generate more productive approaches in the quest for targeted therapy for FXS. PMID:26294013

  11. Restless legs syndrome-current therapies and management of augmentation.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Winkelmann, Juliane; Inoue, Yuichi; Paulus, Walter

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS) can severely affect quality of life and disturb sleep, so that pharmacological treatment is necessary, especially for elderly patients. Treatment guidelines recommend initiation of therapy with dopamine agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole or the rotigotine transdermal patch, all approved in most countries) or α-2-δ ligands (gabapentin enacarbil, approved in the USA and Japan), depending on the country and availability. Where approved, opioids (prolonged release oxycodone-naloxone, approved in Europe) are also recommended as a second-line therapy for severe RLS. Several iron formulations can be effective but are not yet approved for RLS therapy, whereas benzodiazepines and other anticonvulsants are not recommended or approved. Less is known about effective management of RLS that is associated with other conditions, such as uraemia or pregnancy. Furthermore, very little data are available on the management of RLS when first-line treatment fails or patients experience augmentation. In this Review, we summarize state-of-the-art therapies for RLS in the context of the diagnostic criteria and available guidelines, based on knowledge ranging from Class I evidence for the treatment of idiopathic RLS to Class IV evidence for the treatment of complications such as augmentation. We consider therapies, including combination therapies, that are used in clinical practice for long-term management of RLS, despite a lack of trials and approval, and highlight the need for practical long-term evaluation of current trials. PMID:26215616

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists. PMID:22457686

  13. Corticosteroid Injections Versus Manual Physical Therapy for Treatment of the Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Summaries for Patients Corticosteroid Injections Versus Manual Physical Therapy for Treatment of the Shoulder Impingement Syndrome The ... Outcome of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection Compared With Manual Physical Therapy for the Management of the Unilateral Shoulder Impingement ...

  14. Application of ozone therapy in the vestibulocochlear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Silvia; Del Cerro, Alejandro; Alvarez, Tania; Hernández, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ozone therapy in the treatment of 50 patients with peripheral vestibulocochlear syndrome. Ozone was injected in the cervical region C2-C3, for 20 sessions. Evaluation criteria was based in the evolution of nystagmus, tinnitus, hearing loss and vertigo. Also, oxidative stress parameters were measured. Results demonstrated that patient improvements, according to vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus and nystagmus, were of 90, 80, 65 and 100%, respectively. These patients were initially under condition of systemic oxidative stress, however, at the end of the study a redox balance was achieved. No side effects were observed. PMID:22963338

  15. Transcatheter therapy for Lutembacher's syndrome: The road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Ramalingam; Chakraborty, Saujatya; Bagga, Shiv

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with Lutembacher's syndrome underwent balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) and device closure of the atrial septal defect (ASD). BMV necessitated technical modification of taking the Inoue balloon over the wire (OTW) into the left ventricle (LV). The procedure was complicated by slippage of ASD device into the right atrium, which was managed successfully by percutaneous retrieval, and deployment of a larger device. The case highlights the challenges associated with the seemingly easy transcatheter therapy for this disease entity. PMID:24701084

  16. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies. PMID:27009539

  17. Cervical Syndrome – the Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kasumovic, Mersija; Gorcevic, Emir; Gorcevic, Semir; Osmanovic, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The cervical syndrome refers to a set of disorders caused by the changes in the cervical spine and the soft-tissue surrounding it, with pain as the predominant symptom. Sore neck has been a common problem among a large section of today`s population. The factors contributing to this issue include the modern lifestyle, prolonged sitting and incorrect, fixed or constrained working postures. The root of these difficulties is found in the mechanical disorders of the cervical spine structures, poor body posture and jerky body movements. In the Scandinavian countries neck pain is considered to be a public health problem. Methods: The study evaluated 25 patients with an established diagnosis of cervical syndrome. The research was conducted at the PI Institute of Occupational and Sports Medicine of Zenica–Doboj Canton. Each patient received twenty physical therapy treatment sessions. Results and conclusions: The study included 25 patients suffering from the cervical syndrome. The statistical analysis of gender distribution indicated that 36% of the patients were male, while 64% were female. The mean age of study participants was 46.76±4,23. The patients ranged in age from 39 to 54 years, with no statistically significant difference in the mean age of male and female patients, p=0.691. Analysing the types of occupational activities performed by the patients, the study found a positive relation between neck pain and prolonged sitting at work. The patients who performed office work made up 76% of the total number. Each method of physical therapy applied in the treatment of neck pain patients proved useful. However, the combination of electrotherapy, kinesiotherapy and manual massage proved to be most effective. Conclusion: The cervical syndrome is a common medical condition primarily affecting adult population, with prevalence being higher among women and office workers. The condition places a considerable socioeconomic burden on the afflicted

  18. Children with Down Syndrome Improved in Motor Functioning and Muscle Tone Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Mora, Dana; Bornstein, Joan; Waldman, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one moderate to high functioning young children (mean age, two years) with Down syndrome receiving early intervention (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy) were randomly assigned to additionally receive two 0.5-hour massage therapy or reading sessions (control group) per week for two months. On the first and last day…

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome: diet and complementary medicine therapies?].

    PubMed

    Gerkens, A

    2012-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent and invalidating functional bowel disorder with entangled mechanisms. Its therapeutic approach is therefore complex. Classical therapies, prescribed alone or in combination in light of the predominant symptom, consist of antispasmodics, fibers, laxatives, antidiarrheals, and psychotropic agents. Other emerging pharmacological therapies, such as prokinetics, prosecretory or serotoninergic agents, bile acid modulators and antibiotics have been recently studied in clinical trials. Dietary measures can include reduction of short-chain poorly absorbed carbohydrates (FODMAPs) and gluten restriction. Assessment of food allergy can be proposed in a subgroup of IBS patients. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies, that are generally low cost and safe, appear to be appreciated by patients. Probiotics have demonstrated action on the gut microbiote modulation, and may be helpful in a subset of patients. Peppermint oil has an established visceral analgesic effect. Hypnotherapy represents an original, global and effective approach. Finally, education, reassurance and listening to the patient, leading to a solid therapeutic relationship, represents an essential backdrop of remedy or diet effectiveness. PMID:23091952

  20. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome; gut microbiota and probiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Tojo González, Rafael; Suarez Gonzalez, Adolfo; Rúas Madiedo, Patricia; Mancebo Mata, Alejo; Pipa Muñiz, María; Barreiro Alonso, Eva; Roman Llorente, Francisco Javier; Moro Villar, María Carmen; Arce González, Marta María; Villegas Diaz, María Francisca; Mosquera Sierra, Eugenia; Ruiz Ruiz, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. This common disorder is managed by varying clinical styles as no dominant therapeutic strategy has emerged. The pathophysiology of IBS remains unknown, but several lines of evidence link this disorder with the gut microbiota. Although controversy exists, gut microbiota is likely contributing to symptoms of IBS, at least in some patients, through an altered fermentation process, an impaired intestinal barrier function, a harmful modulation of enteric sensorimotor function, a promotion of low-grade inflammation without tissue damage, and a harmful modulation of the brain-gut axis. Probiotic therapy has a modest effect on IBS symptomatic relief, but the actual evidence is not strong enough to support a general recommendation of use. The best results are achieved, in children, with Lactobacillus rhamnusus GG, which moderately improves abdominal pain, while in adults the benefit appears to be greatest employing Bifidobacterium species. PMID:25659060

  1. [Multimodal therapy concepts for failed back surgery syndrome].

    PubMed

    Casser, Hans-Raimund

    2016-09-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a frequent complication (15-40 %) of lumbar disc surgery and is rarely successfully treated by surgery with the exception of a re-prolapse associated with radicular pain. Multimodal pain treatment, however, is indicated by a lack of pathoanatomical correlates, unclear cause and psychosocial risk factors.This review describes a standardized non-operative treatment starting with broad interdisciplinary clarification by medical, psychological and physiotherapeutic means (assessment).If the conditions for multimodal pain therapy are met, the OPS 8‑918-procedure can be applied to avoid chronic developing pain. In doing so, the already issued quality standards and guidelines for documentation should be respected. PMID:27514828

  2. More is better: combination therapies for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ornstein, Moshe C; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2015-03-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous collection of clonal hematopoietic malignancies that exist as a subgroup of the myeloid neoplasms as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). They are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, subsequent cytopenias, transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and poor overall survival. There are currently three FDA-approved medications for MDS; lenalidomide, azacitidine, and decitabine. The role of these agents is to diminish the clinical impact of MDS and delay its progression to AML. However, despite known results with these monotherapies, recent clinical trials with a variety of combinations for MDS have demonstrated promising results. These trials include combinations of hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors, growth factors, and chemotherapy among others. In this paper we review the current literature on combination therapies in MDS, analyze on-going and concluded trials, and suggest future possibilities for combination strategies in MDS. PMID:25659727

  3. Testosterone Supplementation Therapy in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clinical complex of risk factors including increased waist circumference, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and insulin resistance whose presence increases the likelihood of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With a quarter of the American adult population affected, MetS has been referred to as the most significant public health threat of the 21st century. While lifestyle modification and weight loss are recommended, no specific pharmacological treatment is known. Given that low levels of testosterone have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MetS and an inverse relationship exists between circulating testosterone and the development of MetS, it is tempting to speculate that men with MetS may benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). As such, this review seeks to examine the role of testosterone and the use of TST as a treatment modality in men with MetS. PMID:25387223

  4. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Malika; Jafri, Kashif; Sharim, Rebecca; Silverman, Susanna; Sindher, Sayantani B; Shahane, Anupama; Kwan, Mildred

    2015-02-01

    The use of biologics in the treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and other immune conditions has revolutionized medical care in these areas. However, there are drawbacks to the use of these medications including increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. One unforeseen risk once opportunistic infection has occurred with biologic use is the onset of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) upon drug withdrawal. Although originally described in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, it has become clear that IRIS may occur when recovery of immune function follows opportunistic infection in the setting of previous immune compromise/suppression. In this review, we draw attention to this potential pitfall on the use of biologic drugs. PMID:25504263

  5. Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qian; Yang, Li; Tan, Li-Ming; Qin, Li-Xia; Wang, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Hai-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, neuroimaging, treatment, and outcome of stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome, and to propose diagnostic criteria for this disorder. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for articles in English published from 1995 to 2015 using the terms of “stroke-like AND migraine AND radiation.” Reference lists of the identified articles and reviews were used to retrieve additional articles. Study Selection: Data and articles related to late-onset effects of cerebral radiation were selected and reviewed. Results: SMART is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic deficits following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. The recovery, which ranges from hours to days to weeks, can be partial or complete. We propose the following diagnostic criteria for SMART: (1) Remote history of therapeutic external beam cranial irradiation for malignancy; (2) prolonged, reversible clinical manifestations mostly years after irradiation, which may include migraine, seizures, hemiparesis, hemisensory deficits, visuospatial defect, aphasia, confusion and so on; (3) reversible, transient, unilateral cortical gadolinium enhancement correlative abnormal T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal of the affected cerebral region; (4) eventual complete or partial recovery, the length of duration of recovery ranging from hours to days to weeks; (5) no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor; (6) not attributable to another disease. To date, no specific treatment has been identified for this syndrome. Conclusions: SMART is an extremely rare delayed complication of brain irradiation. However, improvements in cancer survival rates have resulted in a rise in its frequency. Hence, awareness and recognition of the syndrome is important to make a rapid diagnosis and avoid aggressive interventions such as brain biopsy and cerebral angiography. PMID

  6. [Treatment of nephrotic syndrome: immuno- or rather podocyte therapy?].

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a group of clinical symptoms resulting from massive proteinuria caused by impairment of the glomerular filtration barrier. The filtration barrier comprises glomerular basement membrane with endothelial cells lining its inner side and a podocyte monolayer covering its outer aspect. As well as forming part of the glomerular filter, podocytes also regulate synthesis of other components of the filtration barrier. Therefore, integrity of these cells is crucial for maintaining the normal ultrafiltration function. The pathogenesis of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) was proposed to be associated with autoimmunity and appearance in the circulation of a still unknown protein permeability factor (PF) inducing changes in the glomerular filtration barrier. Several candidate PFs have been identified to date, and current results indicate that podocytes are target cells for all of them. Changes in podocyte structure and functions induced by these factors are typical for changes observed in patients with nephrotic proteinuria. Most pharmacotherapeutic approaches in NS are based on various immunosuppressive agents and are targeted toward minimizing proteinuria. It appears, however, that these drugs not only target the cells of the immune system but also act directly on podocytes. Thus, it can be concluded that detailed studies on mechanisms regulating podocyte functions as well as designing drugs to protect these cells are required for effective therapy of NS. PMID:27180964

  7. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  8. Metabolic Syndromes Associated with HIV: Mitigating the Side Effects of Drug Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, William W.; Sattler, Fred R.

    2001-01-01

    HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are associated with such metabolic disorders as AIDS wasting syndrome, metabolic dysregulation, and abnormalities of serum lipids. Adjunctive therapies (e.g., diet and antilipid therapy); risk factor modification (e.g., smoking cessation and blood pressure control); aerobic exercise;…

  9. Novel nutraceutic therapies for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Méndez-Del Villar, Miriam; Pérez-Rubio, Karina G; Zuñiga, Laura Y; Cortez-Navarrete, Marisol; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Alejandra; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-04-10

    Nutraceutic therapies such as berberine, bitter melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Irvingia gabonensis, resveratrol and ursolic acid have been shown to help control metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effect of berberine on glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension, obesity and MetS has been evaluated in animal models and humans. Most clinical trials involving bitter melon have been conducted to evaluate its effect on glucose metabolism; nevertheless, some studies have reported favorable effects on lipids and blood pressure although there is little information about its effect on body weight. Gymnema sylvestre helps to decrease body weight and blood sugar levels; however, there is limited information on dyslipidemia and hypertension. Clinical trials of Irvingia gabonensis have shown important effects decreasing glucose and cholesterol concentrations as well decreasing body weight. Resveratrol acts through different mechanisms to decrease blood pressure, lipids, glucose and weight, showing its effects on the population with MetS. Finally, there is evidence of positive effects with ursolic acid in in vitro and in vivo studies on glucose and lipid metabolism and on body weight and visceral fat. Therefore, a review of the beneficial effects and limitations of the above-mentioned nutraceutic therapies is presented. PMID:27076875

  10. Novel nutraceutic therapies for the treatment of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Méndez-del Villar, Miriam; Pérez-Rubio, Karina G; Zuñiga, Laura Y; Cortez-Navarrete, Marisol; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Alejandra; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutraceutic therapies such as berberine, bitter melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Irvingia gabonensis, resveratrol and ursolic acid have been shown to help control metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effect of berberine on glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension, obesity and MetS has been evaluated in animal models and humans. Most clinical trials involving bitter melon have been conducted to evaluate its effect on glucose metabolism; nevertheless, some studies have reported favorable effects on lipids and blood pressure although there is little information about its effect on body weight. Gymnema sylvestre helps to decrease body weight and blood sugar levels; however, there is limited information on dyslipidemia and hypertension. Clinical trials of Irvingia gabonensis have shown important effects decreasing glucose and cholesterol concentrations as well decreasing body weight. Resveratrol acts through different mechanisms to decrease blood pressure, lipids, glucose and weight, showing its effects on the population with MetS. Finally, there is evidence of positive effects with ursolic acid in in vitro and in vivo studies on glucose and lipid metabolism and on body weight and visceral fat. Therefore, a review of the beneficial effects and limitations of the above-mentioned nutraceutic therapies is presented. PMID:27076875

  11. New Receptor Targets for Medical Therapy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite setbacks to the approval of new medications for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, interim guidelines on endpoints for IBS trials have enhanced interest as new targets for medical therapy are proposed based on novel mechanisms or chemical entities. Aim To review the approved lubiprostone, two targets that are not meeting expectations (tachykinins and corticotrophin-releasing hormone), the efficacy and safety of new 5-HT4 agonists, intestinal secretagogues (chloride channel activators, and guanylate cyclase-C agonists), bile acid modulation, anti-inflammatory agents and visceral analgesics. Methods Review of selected articles based on PubMed search and clinically relevant information on mechanism of action, safety, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy Conclusions The spectrum of peripheral targets of medical therapy address chiefly the bowel dysfunction of IBS, and these effects are associated with pain relief. There are less clear targets related to the abdominal pain or visceral sensation in IBS. The new 5-HT4 agonists are more specific than older agents, and show cardiovascular safety to date. Secretory agents have high specificity, low bioavailability, and efficacy. The potential risks of agents “borrowed” from other indications (like hyperlipidemia, inflammatory bowel disease or somatic pain) deserve further study. There is reason for optimism in medical treatment of IBS. PMID:19785622

  12. Physical Therapy and Infants with Down's Syndrome: The Effects of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Susan R.

    1981-01-01

    The neuromotor development of Down's syndrome (DS) infants is reviewed, current physical therapy approaches are cited, a neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) approach is described, and a study on the effects of NDT on motor performance in DS infants is reported. (SB)

  13. Iatrogenic diabetes mellitus during ACTH therapy in an infant with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Bottazzi, Andrea; Tzialla, Chrissoula; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Larizza, Daniela

    2011-12-01

    West syndrome is a rare epileptic disease of infancy, typified by an association of characteristic spasms, hypsarrhythmia on electroencephalography and severe psychomotor retardation or deterioration. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is the current first-line therapy for West syndrome despite the fact that ACTH therapy is associated with various adverse effects. We describe a rare case of iatrogenic diabetes mellitus during ACTH therapy in a patient with symptomatic West syndrome. The infant had cushingoid facies, hirsutism and biochemical evidence of diabetes due to excessive glucocorticoid production with hyperplasia of both adrenal glands at ultrasound examination, without mineralocorticoid excess; in addition, he presented also short-term weight gain, marked electrolyte disturbances, hypokalemic alkalosis and infections. When ACTH is used to treat patients with West syndrome, it is necessary to follow glycemic levels until to the end of therapy. PMID:21253781

  14. Regression of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease after anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rahier, J F; Lion, L; Dewit, O; Lambert, M

    2005-01-01

    The association of inflammatory bowel disease and acute febrile neutrophilic dermatitis (Sweet's syndrome) has infrequently been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with ileo- anal Crohn's disease who presented simultaneously an erythema nodosum and a Sweet's syndrome. A dramatic regression of the cutaneous lesions was observed after infliximab treatment, indicating that this therapy might be useful for both Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome. PMID:16268426

  15. [Interference therapy and radon baths in the combined treatment of patients with reflex cervicobrachial syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, F E; Semenistaia, S V

    1998-01-01

    Patients with cervicobrachialgic syndromes on interference therapy, exercise treatment, massage of the cervical collar region received balneotherapy. 42 of them took water baths, 39 took dry air radon baths. These complexes proved effective in cervicobrachialgic syndromes, the effect being slightly dependent on the clinical symptoms of the disease. PMID:9987978

  16. Timing of therapies for Down syndrome: the sooner, the better

    PubMed Central

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Guidi, Sandra; Ciani, Elisabetta; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is the unavoidable hallmark of Down syndrome (DS), with a heavy impact on public health. Accumulating evidence shows that DS is characterized by numerous neurodevelopmental alterations among which the reduction of neurogenesis, dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations appear to play a particularly prominent role. Although the mechanisms whereby gene triplication impairs brain development in DS have not been fully clarified, it is theoretically possible to correct trisomy-dependent defects with targeted pharmacotherapies. This review summarizes what we know about the effects of pharmacotherapies during different life stages in mouse models of DS. Since brain alterations in DS start to be present prenatally, the prenatal period represents an optimum window of opportunity for therapeutic interventions. Importantly, recent studies clearly show that treatment during the prenatal period can rescue overall brain development and behavior and that this effect outlasts treatment cessation. Although late therapies are unlikely to exert drastic changes in the brain, they may have an impact on the hippocampus, a brain region where neurogenesis continues throughout life. Indeed, treatment at adult life stages improves or even rescues hippocampal neurogenesis and connectivity and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, although the duration of these effects still remains, in the majority of cases, a matter of investigation. The exciting discovery that trisomy-linked brain abnormalities can be prevented with early interventions gives us reason to believe that treatments during pregnancy may rescue brain development in fetuses with DS. For this reason we deem it extremely important to expedite the discovery of additional therapies practicable in humans in order to identify the best treatment/s in terms of efficacy and paucity of side effects. Prompt achievement of this goal is the big challenge for the scientific community of researchers

  17. Cognitive behavior therapy for night eating syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allison, Kelly C; Lundgren, Jennifer D; Moore, Reneé H; O'Reardon, John P; Stunkard, Albert J

    2010-01-01

    Because no studies of psychotherapy treatments for night eating syndrome (NES) have been published, we conducted a pilot study of a 10-session cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for NES. Twenty-five patients (19 female, 6 male) were screened and comprehensively assessed before being enrolled. At each visit, patients completed the Night Eating Symptom Scale (NESS), were weighed, and number of awakenings and the number of nocturnal ingestions and daily caloric intake were calculated from weekly food and sleep records. Mixed model regression analyses [of the data] showed significant decreases in caloric intake after dinner (35.0% to 24.9%); number of nocturnal ingestions (8.7 to 2.6 per week); weight (82.5 to 79.4 kg); and NESS score (28.7 to 16.3; all p values <0.0001). Number of awakenings per week, depressed mood, and quality of life also improved significantly (p values <.02). This first clinical trial of CBT for NES shows significant improvements in the core aspects of NES and weight reduction, suggesting the need for a controlled treatment trial. PMID:20405767

  18. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    With the advent of genomics-based treatment in recent years, the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of various malignancies has increased exponentially. Though much data is available regarding the efficacy of targeted therapies for common malignancies, genetic cancer syndromes remain a somewhat unexplored topic with comparatively less published literature. This review seeks to characterize targeted therapy options for the following genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, inherited medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies. By understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as available molecularly targeted therapies, oncologists, in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counsellors, can begin to develop effective clinical management options and therapy regimens for the patients with these genetic syndromes that they may encounter in their practice. PMID:25725224

  19. Complementary/alternative therapies for premenstrual syndrome: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Ernst, E

    2001-07-01

    Complementary/alternative therapies are popular with women who have premenstrual syndrome. This systematic review was designed to determine whether use of such therapies is supported by evidence of effectiveness from rigorous clinical trials. Trials were located through searching 7 databases and checking the reference lists of articles. Randomized controlled trials investigating a complementary/alternative therapy in women with premenstrual syndrome published in the peer-reviewed literature were included in the review. Twenty-seven trials were included investigating herbal medicine (7 trials), homeopathy (1), dietary supplements (13), relaxation (1), massage (1), reflexology (1) chiropractic (1), and biofeedback (2). Despite some positive findings, the evidence was not compelling for any of these therapies, with most trials suffering from various methodological limitations. On the basis of current evidence, no complementary/alternative therapy can be recommended as a treatment for premenstrual syndrome. PMID:11483933

  20. Photodynamic therapy for diffuse choroidal hemangioma in a child with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Ryan; Lee, Lawrence; Kwan, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder involving the leptomeninges, skin of the face, and, in 40% of cases, diffuse choroidal hemangioma. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with Sturge-Weber syndrome and a large diffuse choroidal hemangioma with retinal detachment involving the majority of the retina. The patient underwent photodynamic therapy. The retinal detachment resolved completely within 3 months of treatment. This case represents the youngest patient in the literature to undergo successful treatment with photodynamic therapy for Sturge-Weber syndrome-associated diffuse choroidal hemangioma. PMID:25828818

  1. Endovascular Therapy Is Effective for Leriche Syndrome with Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Tasuku; Shiode, Nobuo; Kawase, Tomoharu; Tamekiyo, Hiromichi; Otsuka, Masaya; Okimoto, Tomokazu; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented to our hospital due to intermittent claudication and swelling in his left leg. He had Leriche syndrome and deep vein thrombosis. We performed endovascular therapy (EVT) for Leriche syndrome, and a temporary filter was inserted in the inferior vena cava. He received anticoagulation therapy for deep vein thrombosis. The stenotic lesion in the terminal aorta was stented with an excellent postprocedural angiographic result and dramatic clinical improvement after EVT. This case suggests that EVT can be a treatment for Leriche syndrome. PMID:26064695

  2. Metabolic syndrome-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated by volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Dawson, L A; Tran, T H; Adeyi, O; Purdie, T; Sherman, M; Brade, A

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (hcc) is a leading cause of cancer mortality, and its incidence is increasing in developed countries. Risk factors include cirrhosis from viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Metabolic syndrome is a newly recognized, but important, risk factor that is likely contributing to the increased incidence of hcc. Surgery is the therapy of choice for hcc, but local therapies are often contraindicated, usually because of advanced disease or comorbid conditions such as cardiac disease (which is associated with metabolic syndrome). Current radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiotherapy allow for treatment plans that highly conform to the target and provide excellent sparing of normal structures. Radiation therapy is emerging as a viable option in patients not eligible for surgery or other locoregional therapies. Here, we report a case of a large hcc presenting in a patient with metabolic syndrome without significant alcohol history or biochemical liver dysfunction. The patient was not a candidate for locoregional therapies because of cardiac and renal comorbidities typical of patients experiencing the long-term sequelae of metabolic syndrome. Treatment using an arc-based volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique allowed for the highest dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumour while the peripheral radiation dose was minimized. A complete local response was confirmed by computed tomography imaging 21 months after treatment completion. PMID:24764717

  3. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  4. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  5. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Women: Can Therapy Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Susan G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents current research on chronic fatigue syndrome, which currently afflicts mostly females between ages of 25 and 55. Notes that, because depression is common symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome, mental health practitioners are often involved with victims and must formulate appropriate treatment strategy that considers physiological,…

  6. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  7. Direct acting antiviral therapy is curative for chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahebjam, Farhad; Hajdu, Cristina H; Nortey, Esther; Sigal, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena are common in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Management of chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis syndrome has until recently been problematic due to the adverse effects of interferon on autoimmune processes and immunosuppression on viral replication. In this report we describe 3 patients with chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome who responded rapidly to direct acting anti-viral therapy. The resolution of the autoimmune process supports a direct viral role in its pathophysiology. PMID:27190580

  8. [Foetal therapy for Down syndrome: a pro-active ethical reflection].

    PubMed

    de Wert, G M W R; Dondorp, W J

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal screening for Down syndrome has to date focused on facilitating the informed choice to continue or not with a pregnancy. The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) for Down syndrome does potentially offer the option to apply foetal neurocognitive therapy for Down syndrome (FTDS). Current research in animal models looks promising and therefore a proactive ethical reflection in relation to clinical trials is urgently needed. This discussion includes an exploration of the ethical aspects of FTDS. There seem to be no convincing a priori objections on the basis of the social model of disability. Arguments in terms of (respect for) autonomy, wellbeing and justice seem to in principle support such therapy. Still, both the conditions for sound clinical trials and the implications of possible effective therapy for current prenatal screening need further scrutiny. PMID:27334087

  9. Speech & Language Therapy for Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Better Speech for Children with Down Syndrome Blueberry Shoes Productions. (2005) Try Reading Again: How to ... Did You Say? A Guide to Speech Intelligibility. Blueberry Shoes Productions. (2006) Resources New & Expectant Parents Where ...

  10. [Evidence-based therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is recognized as the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The heterogeneous endocrinopathy is characterized by clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhoea, anovulatory infertility, and polycystic ovarian morphology. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The symptoms and complaint of the patients vary with age. To maximise health gain of the syndrome, adequate, evidence based effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by studies, meta-analysis and systematic reviews about the therapeutical possibilities for treating obesity, hyperandrogenism, menstrual abnormalities, infertility and psychological problems related to polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:26551444

  11. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: Risk Factors, Diagnosis, and Current Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luckianow, Gina M.; Ellis, Matthew; Governale, Deborah; Kaplan, Lewis J.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome's manifestations are difficult to definitively detect on physical examination alone. Therefore, objective criteria have been articulated that aid the bedside clinician in detecting intra-abdominal hypertension as well as the abdominal compartment syndrome to initiate prompt and potentially life-saving intervention. At-risk patient populations should be routinely monitored and tiered interventions should be undertaken as a team approach to management. PMID:22720147

  12. The Metabolic Syndrome and Mind-Body Therapies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joel G.; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, affecting a substantial and increasing percentage of the worldwide population, is comprised of a cluster of symptoms associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic conditions. Mind-body modalities based on Eastern philosophy, such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, and meditation, have become increasingly popular worldwide. These complementary therapies have many reported benefits for improving symptoms and physiological measures associated with the metabolic syndrome. However, clinical trial data concerning the effectiveness of these practices on the syndrome as a whole have not been evaluated using a systematic and synthesizing approach. A systematic review was conducted to critically evaluate the data from clinical trials examining the efficacy of mind-body therapies as supportive care modalities for management of the metabolic syndrome. Three clinical trials addressing the use of mind-body therapies for management of the metabolic syndrome were identified. Findings from the studies reviewed support the potential clinical effectiveness of mind-body practices in improving indices of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21773016

  13. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological diseases: genes, syndromes, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Urdinguio, Rocio G; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and modifications to histone proteins regulate high-order DNA structure and gene expression. Aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of many diseases, including cancer. The neurological disorder most intensely studied with regard to epigenetic changes is Rett syndrome; patients with Rett syndrome have neurodevelopmental defects associated with mutations in MeCP2, which encodes the methyl CpG binding protein 2, that binds to methylated DNA. Other mental retardation disorders are also linked to the disruption of genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms; such disorders include alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, and Coffin-Lowry syndrome. Moreover, aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification profiles of discrete DNA sequences, and those at a genome-wide level, have just begun to be described for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, and in other neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this Review, we describe epigenetic changes present in neurological diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:19833297

  14. [The role of horse-therapy in improvement of children with Down syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klimberg, Aneta

    2002-01-01

    Many years of experience in horse-therapy show that this is the efficient method of rehabilitation of disabled children, also with Down syndrome. This method improves not only proficiency, but also mental sphere and social functions of children. 3 cases of children with Down syndrome in age 7-8 years rehabilitated by horse-therapy, and other methods (physical exercises, swimming, talking exercises) through 1-3 year have been described. In every case adding horse-therapy to other methods of rehabilitation gave measurable advantages both in physical sphere and also in mental and social spheres. In parents' opinion disabled children are highly motivated to take part in the classes of horse-therapy. It should be emphasized that in every described case we have seen high involvement of parents in rehabilitation process. PMID:17474591

  15. Cotard's syndrome with schizophreniform disorder can be successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Caliyurt, Okan; Vardar, Erdal; Tuglu, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Cotard's syndrome associated with psychotic symptoms. A 27-year-old man was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of schizophreniform disorder. His presenting symptoms, which had started 1 month before hospital admission, were somatic delusions of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular malfunction and the absence of a stomach, which resulted in a decrease in weight from 75 kg to 63 kg in 1 month. Cranial computed tomographic images showed dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed central atrophy and lateral ventricle dilatation. Single- photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left temporal, left frontal and left parietal hypoperfusion. The patient did not respond to antipsychotic therapies, but he was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy. This report emphasizes that Cotard's syndrome may be accompanied by lesions of the left hemisphere and that electroconvulsive therapy could be the first-line therapy in such patients with psychotic disorder. PMID:15069468

  16. [Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Cancer Therapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Yasui, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Kuji, Shiho; Onozawa, Yusuke; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome(PRES)is a subacute neurological syndrome typically manifesting with headache, cortical blindness, and seizures. This syndrome is associated with risk factors such as malignant hypertension, eclampsia, and renal failure. Numerous case reports depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The direct causal mechanisms of PRES in cancer patients have not yet been identified. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause direct endothelial damage, which would impact the blood brain barrier. Angiogenesis inhibitors also cause elevation in blood pressure;this is significant, because PRES onset may be solely related to hypertension. An increased number of case reports involving new molecular targeted agent suggests that incidence of PRES as an oncological emergency may increase in the future. PMID:26965062

  17. Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome After Topical Steroid Therapy for Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Sahıp, Birsen; Celık, Mehmet; Ayturk, Semra; Kucukarda, Ahmet; Mert, Onur; Dıncer, Nejla; Guldıken, Sıbel; Tugrul, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used for the treatment of many diseases, such as inflammatory, allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. They can be used in the form of topical, oral, inhalable, rectal, and intra-articular agents. Many topical steroid-related iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome cases affecting especially children have been reported in the literature. Topical steroid-related Cushing's syndrome is rarely seen in adults. In this report, we present the case of a 32-year-old male patient with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome related to long-term clobetasol propionate treatment for psoriasis. In the context of such treatment, the glucocorticoid withdrawal problem has to be overcome. At present there is no consensus on steroid withdrawal. Patients on long-term glucocorticoid treatment must be evaluated for potential adverse effects and withdrawal symptoms by their physician and their endocrinologist. PMID:26955131

  18. Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome After Topical Steroid Therapy for Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sahıp, Birsen; Celık, Mehmet; Ayturk, Semra; Kucukarda, Ahmet; Mert, Onur; Dıncer, Nejla; Guldıken, Sıbel; Tugrul, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used for the treatment of many diseases, such as inflammatory, allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. They can be used in the form of topical, oral, inhalable, rectal, and intra-articular agents. Many topical steroid-related iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome cases affecting especially children have been reported in the literature. Topical steroid-related Cushing's syndrome is rarely seen in adults. In this report, we present the case of a 32-year-old male patient with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome related to long-term clobetasol propionate treatment for psoriasis. In the context of such treatment, the glucocorticoid withdrawal problem has to be overcome. At present there is no consensus on steroid withdrawal. Patients on long-term glucocorticoid treatment must be evaluated for potential adverse effects and withdrawal symptoms by their physician and their endocrinologist. PMID:26955131

  19. Outcomes of Male Patients with Alport Syndrome Undergoing Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Johanna; Kramer, Anneke; Jager, Kitty J.; Lange, Katharina; Peters, Frederick; Müller, Gerhard-Anton; Kramar, Reinhard; Heaf, James G.; Finne, Patrik; Palsson, Runolfur; Reisæter, Anna V.; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Metcalfe, Wendy; Postorino, Maurizio; Zurriaga, Oscar; Santos, Julio P.; Ravani, Pietro; Jarraya, Faical; Verrina, Enrico; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Patients with the hereditary disease Alport syndrome commonly require renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the second or third decade of life. This study compared age at onset of RRT, renal allograft, and patient survival in men with Alport syndrome receiving various forms of RRT (peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or transplantation) with those of men with other renal diseases. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients with Alport syndrome receiving RRT identified from 14 registries in Europe were matched to patients with other renal diseases. A linear spline model was used to detect changes in the age at start of RRT over time. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to examine patient and graft survival. Results Age at start of RRT among patients with Alport syndrome remained stable during the 1990s but increased by 6 years between 2000–2004 and 2005–2009. Survival of patients with Alport syndrome requiring dialysis or transplantation did not change between 1990 and 2009. However, patients with Alport syndrome had better renal graft and patient survival than matched controls. Numbers of living-donor transplantations were lower in patients with Alport syndrome than in matched controls. Conclusions These data suggest that kidney failure in patients with Alport syndrome is now being delayed compared with previous decades. These patients appear to have superior patient survival while undergoing dialysis and superior patient and graft survival after deceased-donor kidney transplantation compared with patients receiving RRT because of other causes of kidney failure. PMID:22997344

  20. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  1. [Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Successful therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Staubach-Renz, P; von Stebut, E; Bräuninger, W; Maurer, M; Steinbrink, K

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases can initially present as chronic urticaria. We describe the course of a patient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) as well as his successful treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). HUVS was diagnosed clinically and confirmed by histology and laboratory studies. After only one cycle with IVIG (2 g/kg) all HUVS symptoms were significantly decreased. PMID:17453168

  2. Successful Treatment of Olfactory Reference Syndrome with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Pichora, Andrea L.; Antony, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) is characterized by a preoccupation with the belief that one's body emits a foul odor. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was used to treat a woman in her 50s who presented in our outpatient anxiety disorders specialty clinic with ORS, accompanied by embarrassment, shame, distress, avoidance behavior, and social…

  3. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Relatively Active and for Passive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazelmans, Ellen; Prins, Judith; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2006-01-01

    In chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), facilitating, initiating, and perpetuating factors are distinguished. Although somatic factors might have initiated symptoms in CFS, they do not explain the persistence of fatigue. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for CFS focuses on factors that perpetuate and prolong symptoms. Recently it has been shown that,…

  4. Music Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome: Perceptions of Caregivers in a Special School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pienaar, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder resulting from chromosome 21 having three copies (trisomy 21). Cognitive functioning and anatomical features cause speech and language development delay (Kumin, 2003). Children with DS generally enjoy communication (Schoenbrodt, 2004), and respond well to interaction and social scripts. Music therapy has…

  5. Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in a Mental Health Center: A Benchmarking Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeres, Korine; Wensing, Michel; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the success of implementing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in a representative clinical practice setting and compared the patient outcomes with those of previously published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBT for CFS. Method: The implementation interventions were the…

  6. Primary therapy for small cell lung cancer reversing the Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, S.; Dhingra, H.M.; Farha, P.

    1985-02-01

    A case report is presented of a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung associated with the classic Eaton-Lambert syndrome. He received intermittent anticholinesterase therapy, with minimal improvement. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for the primary neoplasm produced considerable improvement, with normal EMG findings after complete remission was achieved. 7 references, 1 table.

  7. Increase in Prefrontal Cortical Volume following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Floris P.; Koers, Anda; Kalkman, Joke S.; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Hagoort, Peter; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Toni, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disabling disorder, characterized by persistent or relapsing fatigue. Recent studies have detected a decrease in cortical grey matter volume in patients with CFS, but it is unclear whether this cerebral atrophy constitutes a cause or a consequence of the disease. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an…

  8. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  9. Outcome after three years of laronidase enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Jacobs, S; Kierstein, J; Van Hove, J

    2006-12-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with laronidase, recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase, for mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) has been clinically available since April 2003. Pre-approval studies were performed on patients with the more attenuated forms of MPS I, Hurler-Scheie and Scheie syndromes. The clinical efficacy of laronidase on the severe form of MPS I, Hurler syndrome, is not well known. We present a patient with Hurler syndrome who has been treated with laronidase for 3 years. Clinically, the patient demonstrated improvement in urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels and hepatomegaly, but continued to experience decline in respiratory status, musculoskeletal and spinal involvement, and developmental skills. Overall, the benefit of ERT with laronidase in advanced Hurler syndrome appeared to be minimal in this patient. PMID:17089217

  10. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-dong; Xu, Wen-dong

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  11. Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk rises sharply with menopause, likely due to the coincident increase in insulin resistance and related atherogenic changes that together comprise the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research suggests that traditional mind-body practices such as yoga, tai chi, and qigong may offer safe and cost-effective strategies for reducing insulin resistance syndrome-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older populations, including postmenopausal women. Current evidence suggests that these practices may reduce insulin resistance and related physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease; improve mood, well-being, and sleep; decrease sympathetic activation; and enhance cardiovagal function. However, additional rigorous studies are needed to confirm existing findings and to examine long-term effects on cardiovascular health. PMID:18779682

  12. Novel risk factors for acute coronary syndromes and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Tong, David C; Wilson, Andrew M; Layland, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Acute coronary syndromes represent not merely disrupted atherosclerotic plaques or luminal stenoses but rather a complex clinical syndrome. The traditional conception of pathogenesis and management of ACS has been challenged by numerous recent landmark ACS trials. Current prognostication models lack clinical precision and can be challenging to the clinicians in tailoring management strategies for individual patients. In this review we summarise the emerging evidence of novel risk factors (plaque phenotype, coronary blood flow, endothelial dysfunction, microvascular dysfunction, and inflammation) in predicting future events and outcomes in ACS population. As the search for miracle cure for ischaemic heart disease continues, one is hopeful that emerging therapeutic approaches targeting these novel risk factors will improve long-term outcomes of ACS. PMID:27394979

  13. Aquaporin gene therapy corrects Sjögren's syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhennan; Yin, Hongen; Cabrera-Pérez, Javier; Guimaro, Maria C; Afione, Sandra; Michael, Drew G; Glenton, Patricia; Patel, Ankur; Swaim, William D; Zheng, Changyu; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Nyberg, Fred; Chiorini, John A

    2016-05-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is estimated to affect 35 million people worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments exist for Sjögren's syndrome, and there is a limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. The present work revealed that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel critical for salivary gland fluid secretion, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 6. Increased expression of this cytokine is strongly associated with the most common symptom of primary Sjögren's syndrome, the loss of salivary gland function. This finding led us to develop a therapy in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome by increasing the water permeability of the gland to restore saliva flow. Our study demonstrates that the targeted increase of gland permeability not only resulted in the restoration of secretory gland function but also resolved the hallmark salivary gland inflammation and systemic inflammation associated with disease. Secretory function also increased in the lacrimal gland, suggesting this local therapy could treat the systemic symptoms associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:27140635

  14. Randomized Multicenter Feasibility Trial of Myofascial Physical Therapy for Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Mary P; Anderson, Rodney U; Potts, Jeannette; Payne, Christopher K; Peters, Kenneth M; Clemens, J Quentin; Kotarinos, Rhonda; Fraser, Laura; Cosby, Annamarie; Fortman, Carole; Neville, Cynthia; Badillo, Suzanne; Odabachian, Lisa; Sanfield, Anna; O’Dougherty, Betsy; Halle-Podell, Rick; Cen, Liyi; Chuai, Shannon; Landis, J Richard; Kusek, John W; Nyberg, Leroy M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial designed to compare two methods of manual therapy (myofascial physical therapy (MPT) and global therapeutic massage (GTM)) among patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Materials and Methods Our goal was to recruit 48 subjects with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome at six clinical centers. Eligible patients were randomized to either MPT or GTM and were scheduled to receive up to 10 weekly treatments, each 1 hour in duration. Criteria to assess feasibility included adherence of therapists to prescribed therapeutic protocol as determined by records of treatment, adverse events which occurred during study treatment, and rate of response to therapy as assessed by the Patient Global Response Assessment (GRA). Primary outcome analysis compared response rates between treatment arms using Mantel-Haenszel methods. Results Twenty-three (49%) men and 24 (51%) women were randomized over a six month period. Twenty-four (51%) patients were randomized to GTM, 23 (49%) to MPT; 44 (94%) patients completed the study. Therapist adherence to the treatment protocols was excellent. The GRA response rate of 57% in the MPT group was significantly higher than the rate of 21% in the GTM treatment group (p=0.03). Conclusions The goals to judge feasibility of conducting a full-scale trial of physical therapy methods were met. The preliminary findings of a beneficial effect of MPT warrants further study. PMID:19535099

  15. Is riluzole a potential therapy for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with autistic features and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in the majority of cases. Besides symptomatic treatment, no therapeutic trials have shown effectiveness for RTT. Some perspectives in the treatment of RTT have been provided by recent works showing a phenotypic reversal by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a RTT mouse model. Glutamate may also play an important role in the primary pathogenesis in Rett syndrome through the excitotoxic neuronal injury in experimental models. Riluzole, an agent currently approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a glutamatergic modulator and BDNF enhancer with neuroprotective properties. For these reasons, riluzole could potentially play an important role in the treatment of RTT symptoms. Several points regarding the use of riluzole in RTT are discussed. Further evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this agent in RTT animal models is needed before clinical trials can begin. PMID:25858436

  16. Home ventilation therapy in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Mangado, Nicolás; Troncoso Acevedo, María Fernanda; Gómez García, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea is a highly prevalent disease that is often underdiagnosed at present. It has a significant economic and social welfare impact, accounting for a large part of the resources assigned to home respiratory therapies. As part of the 2014 SEPAR Year of the Chronic Patient and Domiciliary Respiratory Care sponsored by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, this article reviews the most recent publications on the indications and controversial issues in the treatment of sleep apnea, the latest evidence for indication of various positive pressure devices, and adjustment modes, ranging from the use of empirical formulae or mathematical estimations to modern auto-CPAP equipment, while not forgetting the gold standard of manual titration. Emphasis is placed on the need for monitoring required by patients to ensure treatment adherence and compliance. Finally, other therapies that are not the object of this article are briefly reviewed. PMID:25059585

  17. Surfactant replacement therapy for adult respiratory distress syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Evans, D A; Wilmott, R W; Whitsett, J A

    1996-05-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy may have a role in the treatment of ARDS in children. The current studies suggest that rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant is more effective than slow tracheal instillation or aerosolized delivery. Studies suggest that exogenous surfactant given early in the development of ARDS is more effective than therapy provided late in the course of the disease. Natural surfactants appear to be more effective than artificial surfactants due to the presence of SP-B and SP-C, which prevent inhibition of the exogenous surfactant by the protein leakage into the alveolus that is characteristic of ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy appears to be safe and well tolerated. A surfactant that can be delivered by aerosol would be useful since this is more easily tolerated by the patients, requires less surfactant, and would be more cost effective when compared with tracheal instillation. Aerosolized surfactant could be given to patients who have not yet required mechanical ventilation, thus potentially preventing the progression of the acute lung injury to respiratory failure. The recent failure of a large multi-center trial of aerosolized Exosurf for the treatment of sepsis-related ARDS72 may have been due to the failure of the delivery system as opposed to the surfactant used in the trial; therefore, further research into aerosol delivery systems is needed. There may be different responses to exogenous surfactant therapy by patients with ARDS of different etiologies, such as aspiration pneumonia, sepsis, or trauma. Well-planned placebo-controlled trials will be required to determine these differences. The data supporting the role of surfactant replacement for the treatment of ARDS in children is growing. However, before widespread use of surfactant is considered, a multi-center, placebo-controlled trial will be required to establish the safety and efficacy of surfactant replacement in such patients. PMID:8726159

  18. Down Syndrome: From Understanding the Neurobiology to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Herault, Yann; Lott, Ira T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common example of a neurogenetic aneuploid disorder leading to mental retardation. In most cases, DS results from an extra copy of human chromosome 21 producing deregulated gene expression in brain that gives raise to subnormal intellectual functioning. Understanding the consequences of dosage imbalance attributable to trisomy 21 (T21) has accelerated because of recent advances in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis, functional genome exploration, and the use of model organisms. This has led to new evidence-based therapeutic approaches to prevention or amelioration of T21 effects on brain structure and function (cognition) and has important implications for other areas of research on the neurogenomics of cognition and behavior. PMID:21068296

  19. Passive hyperimmune therapy: a viable treatment option for the patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raven, N C

    1994-01-01

    New drugs and therapies are continually emerging in an effort to delay the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive status to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). One such treatment is passive hyperimmune therapy (PHT), which was first researched and subsequently published in 1988. Passive hyperimmune therapy involves plasmapheresis of an asymptomatic HIV-positive donor with high p24 antibodies, no detectable p24 antigen, and a helper-inducer T-cell count greater than 400. The plasma is then pooled, sterilized, and administered to symptomatic HIV-positive patients as a monthly intravenous infusion in an effort to provide passive immunotherapy. In this article, an overview of PHT is provided, including benefits, adverse reactions, and other similar therapies available, so that the nurse who cares for HIV-positive patients can continue to be a significant source of information to them. PMID:7965365

  20. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-Willi and Down syndromes: a post-modern medical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lantos, J D

    2000-04-01

    Post-modernism means the end of traditional certainties. In this paper, growth hormone (GH) is conceptualized as a post-modern medical therapy. It is used in the treatment of conditions that are not traditional diseases, for indications that are not precisely defined. Down syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome represent two clinical conditions in which GH can possibly be used. It is argued that the difference between the two syndromes instructs us as to the principles that might guide appropriate use of GH in the future. In particular, for children, the more GH treatment can be shown to produce benefits other than increased height, the more justifiable its use will be. PMID:10984261

  1. Remission of refractory pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome using targeted antibiotic therapy in 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Join-Lambert, Olivier; Duchatelet, Sabine; Delage, Maïa; Miskinyte, Snaigune; Coignard, Hélène; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Alemy-Carreau, Murielle; Lortholary, Olivier; Nassif, Xavier; Hovnanian, Alain; Nassif, Aude

    2015-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) syndrome can prove refractory to treatment and is characterized by relapses and recurrences. The combination of antibiotic therapy and surgery can produce success in the management of the syndrome. Acute treatment is required, but maintenance therapy is also necessary to prevent disease relapse. The response to antibiotic therapy is hypothesis generating, raising the issue of a modified host response. To date, anecdotal reports support the use of surgery and medical therapy, but controlled investigations with extended follow-up are necessary to substantiate preliminary data observed with individual cases. PMID:26470620

  2. Emerging Pharmacologic Therapies for Constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Constipation.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Shanti; Guentner, Amanda; Chey, William D

    2014-04-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic functional constipation are common digestive disorders that negatively impact quality of life and account for billions of dollars in health care costs. Related to the heterogeneity of pathogenesis that underlie these disorders and the failure of symptoms to reliably predict underlying pathophysiology, traditional therapies provide relief to only a subset of affected individuals. The evidence surrounding new and emerging pharmacologic treatments, which include both luminally and systemically acting drugs, is discussed here. These include agents such as lubiprostone, bile acid modulations, guanylate cyclase-C receptor agonists, serotonin receptor modulators and herbal therapies. PMID:24840367

  3. Transfert d'énergie linéique et radiosensibilité cellulaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courdi, A.; Pignol, J. P.; Iborra-Brassart, N.; Hérault, J.; Fares, G.; Hachem, A.; Chauvel, P.

    1998-04-01

    ée dans les cellules ayant un rapport α/beta plus faible après exposition aux photons, selon le modèle linéaire-quadratique. Les particules moins efficaces que les photons en terme de mortalité cellulaire moyenne induisent des dégâts individuels importants, révélés par la production de micronoyaux (MN) multiples. Concernant le lien entre l'EBR et la radio-sensibilité intrinsèque, les données récentes utilisant à la fois la technique des colonies et la méthode des MN, montrent que l'EBR est d'autant plus élevée que les cellules sont radiorésistantes aux photons.

  4. An anterior mediastinal lesion in TAFRO syndrome showing complete remission after glucocorticoid and tocilizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Kentaro; Murata, Kengo; Inagaki, Yuji; Oota, Souichi; Takamori, Mikio

    2016-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), myelofibrosis (F), renal dysfunction (R), and organomegaly (O) (TAFRO) syndrome is a variant of multicentric Castleman's disease. We describe here a 57-year-old man who presented with persistent fever, pleural effusion, and ascites. He was negative for human immunodeficiency virus and human herpes virus-8. A computed tomography scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass and small inguinal lymphadenopathy. Although a biopsy of the anterior mediastinum showed fatty tissue infiltrated with CD20 (+) and CD45RO (+) lymphocytes, a biopsy of the left inguinal lymph node revealed a hyaline vascular type of Castleman's disease. He subsequently developed severe thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. In addition, his bone marrow biopsy showed myelofibrosis. TAFRO syndrome was diagnosed based on the lymph node pathology and the characteristic manifestations of the syndrome. Tocilizumab and glucocorticoid therapy achieved complete remission and regression of the mediastinal mass. To our knowledge, this is the first report of TAFRO syndrome accompanied by an anterior mediastinal mass, which responded very well to therapy. PMID:27516889

  5. The syndrome of continuous muscle fibre activity following gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Mamoli, B

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from arthritis received a total dose of 500 mg sodium aurothiomalate during a period of 5 months. His clinical state then deteriorated and he had to be hospitalized. Upon admission he was bedridden, his level of consciousness was slightly impaired, he was confused and respiration was laboured. Continuous muscle activity was noted on all extremities and at first, erroneously, fasciculations were diagnosed. The EMG exhibited continuous muscle fibre activity consisting of duplets, triplets and multiplets. The discharges occurred in an irregular pattern; when various muscles were examined at the same time no synchronicity could be observed between muscle discharges. In the left m. deltoideus an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials was found, whereas mean duration of motor unit potentials was normal. Spontaneous activity remained unchanged during sleep and administration of intravenous diazepam or phenytoin. Blocking of ulnar nerve at either elbow or wrist level did not stop spontaneous activity in m. abductor digiti quinti. Ischaemia increased the amount of discharges after 7 min. Within 4 months after termination of gold therapy the patient's condition improved and he was discharged from hospital. Regular EMG follow-up after 8 months showed complete cessation of abnormal spontaneous activities. Nerve conduction velocities were normal except for markedly reduced compound action potential in peroneal nerves. Continuous muscle fibre activity as a side-effect of gold therapy is described. PMID:6440953

  6. Sequential Combination Therapy Leading to Sustained Remission in a Patient with SAPHO Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huber, C E; Judex, A G; Freyschmidt, J; Feuerbach, S; Schölmerich, J; Müller-Ladner, U

    2009-01-01

    The SAPHO syndrome represents a variety of clinically similar disorders with the key features of hyperostotic bone lesions in combination with chronic pustular skin disease. The respective pathophysiology of bone and joint manifestations in SAPHO syndrome is still a matter of discussion. For example it does not appear to represent reactive arthritis and HLA B27 antigen, with the latter being typically present in patients with spondyloarthopathies. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome is also not well established and consists of various antiinflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. Here, we report a female patient with active SAPHO syndrome suffering from sternal swelling of unknown origin that had been known for 10 years and a 4-year-history of severe lower back pain. Remarkable were also a typical pustulous palmar erythema associated with swelling and decreased motility of both MCP-I joints. Inflammation parameters were high with an ESR 68 mm/1st hour and a CRP of 19.6 mg/l. She was initially treated with rofecoxib and doxycycline, followed by sulfasalazine with only partial clinical response. Thereafter, both articular symptoms as well as cutaneous lesions responded well to a combination therapy with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. Thus, the case illustrates nicely that methotrexate in combination with another DMARD can be successfully applied to patients with long-term active SAPHO syndrome. PMID:19471601

  7. Physical Therapy for Metabolic Syndrome Prevention in Workers: Novel Role of Physical Therapist.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tomonori; Nemoto, Yuki; Utumi, Takako; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, physical therapists have usually been involved in physical therapy for patients with functional disorders associated with cerebrovascular or orthopedic diseases in hospitals. With the aging of Japanese society, the number of diseased people will progressively increase; thus, it is important to pay much more attention to disease prevention. In this regard, physical therapists are expected to play a new role in the field of preventive medicine. Metabolic syndrome or central obesity with multiple cardiometabolic risks is associated with a high risk of type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases and is now a central target for early detection and intervention for disease prevention. The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and men showed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome than women in all generations. We have been involved in the guidance of workers with metabolic syndrome for a long time, and we conducted a multicenter study to establish effective guidance for these worker. In this paper, we will use our evidence to discuss the role of physical therapists in providing guidance for preventing metabolic syndrome. We are now conducting worksite supporting exercise intervention for workers who were resistant to conventional lifestyle guidance. In addition, the unique role of physical therapists in this new trial will be introduced. PMID:27246150

  8. Myofunctional therapy applied to upper airway resistance syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-01-01

    The literature presents publications on the treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by myofunctional therapy, but there are no reports of this approach to patients with upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). The objective was to verify the effect of myofunctional therapy in a case of UARS in relation to morphological and functional aspects of the stomatognathic system, anthropometric data, and quality of sleep. Patient, aged 61 years, diagnosed with UARS, underwent 12 sessions of myofunctional therapy for 3 months with exercises aimed at the suprahyoid, the tongue, and the soft palate muscles. Evaluations were performed before the start of the therapeutic process, right after the end, as well as 1, 2, 4, and 10 months after the completion of the treatment, considering: tonicity and mobility of the suprahyoid muscles, the tongue, and the soft palate; modified Mallampati grade; neck circumference; body mass index; and parameters of sleep quality. After the therapeutic process, there was a decrease in scores related to the tonus of the suprahyoid muscles, mobility, and tonus of the tongue and of the soft palate. The Mallampati grade was IV in the initial evaluation, and III in subsequent assessment. There was a reduction of 2 cm in neck circumference and BMI remained similar over time. In analyzing the three parameters of sleep quality, improvement was observed in all evaluations after discharge. Therefore, the effect of myofunctional therapy in a case of UARS was positive for all parameters. PMID:26691626

  9. The Effect of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) Therapy on Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Results: Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Conclusion: Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy. PMID:25606338

  10. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  11. An occupational therapy approach to persons with chronic fatigue syndrome: part two, assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Renee R; Kielhofner, Gary W

    2003-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a highly disabling condition that significantly interferes with occupational life. Occupational therapy services are very relevant for this population. Yet, information about the assessment and treatment of CFS is almost absent from occupational therapy literature. As a result, few occupational therapists possess expertise in evaluating and providing therapy for this complex condition. This paper describes an approach to evaluating and providing services for individuals with CFS according to the Model of Human Occupation. This model offers an integrative means of understanding the synergistic and evolving relationships between motivation, values, roles, habits, functional capabilities, and the environment as they influence individuals with CFS, and it provides a framework for the types of changes required in these different domains during the rehabilitation process. A case study illustrates recommended assessment and intervention approaches. PMID:23944638

  12. Growth hormone therapy for Prader–willi syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS’ clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype–phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  13. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-willi syndrome: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS' clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype-phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  14. [Panic attacks and panic syndrome--diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Katschnig, H; Nutzinger, D O

    1990-01-01

    Paroxysmal states of anxiety that cannot be traced back to somatic causes have been called panic attacks since the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM III) of the American Psychiatric Association. This term has since been accepted as part of psychiatric everyday language in many countries. The present review discusses initially the diagnostic and differential diagnostic aspects against the background of nosological classifications as practised to date, with particular emphasis on the requirements of the practising psychiatrist. The authors of this review hold the opinion that whereas the phenomenon of panic attack is a valid concept, the conceptualisation of a panic disorder is still largely hypothetical. The often observed "natural history"--after panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety, coupling of attacks to certain situations, avoidance of these situations, as well as agoraphobia, depressivity, self-medication with tranquilisers and alcohol, hypochondriacal fears with increased consultation of doctors, and family conflicts may develop--requires early therapeutic intervention. Hence, the second part of this article presents the pharmacological and psychotherapeutical treatment methods for panic attacks and their complications as developed and successfully tried out during the past few years. The efficacy has been proven of drug therapy on the one hand of prophylactic treatment using tricyclic antidepressives, MAO-inhibitors and alprazolam or clonazepam, and on the other hand also of a non-continuous attack-related treatment strategy. Of the more recent psychotherapeutic methods, relaxation methods and the cognitive treatment of panic attacks are discussed. This direct focus on panic attacks seems to be more promising than the conventional treatment methods centered on secondary symptoms such as anticipatory anxiety or agoraphobia. PMID:2179978

  15. High-dose enzyme replacement therapy in murine Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Herzog, Tyler; Koniar, Brenda L; Gunther, Roland; Whitley, Chester B

    2014-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive disease that is systemic, including progressive neurodegeneration, mental retardation and death before the age of 10 years. MPS I results from deficiency of α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) in lysosomes and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Clinical enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with intravenous laronidase reverses some aspects of MPS I disease (e.g., hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, glycosaminoglycanuria) and ameliorates others (e.g., pulmonary function, cardiac disease, arthropathy, exercise tolerance). However, neurologic benefits are thought to be negligible because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) blocks enzyme from reaching the central nervous system (CNS). We considered the possibility that a very high dose of intravenous laronidase might be able to traverse the BBB in small quantities, and provide some metabolic correction in the brain. To address this question, high-dose laronidase was administered (11.6 mg/kg, once per week, 4 weeks) to adult MPS I mice. IDUA enzyme activity in the cortex of treated mice increased to 97% of that in wild type mice (p<0.01). GAG levels in cortex were reduced by 63% of that from untreated MPS I mice (p<0.05). Further, immunohistochemical analysis showed that treatment reduced secondary GM3-ganglioside accumulation in treated MPS I mice. Water T-maze tests showed that the learning abnormality in MPS I mice was reduced (p<0.0001). In summary, repeated, high-dose ERT facilitated laronidase transit across the BBB, reduced GAG accumulation within the CNS, and rescued cognitive impairment. PMID:24100243

  16. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) ‎

    PubMed Central

    Maddineshat, Maryam; Keyvanloo, Sodabe; Lashkardoost, Hossein; Arki, Mina; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls’ dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences. Method: In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery and residing in the dormitory were selected using the ‎convenience sampling method and were assigned to experimental and control groups. ‎The Standardized Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used as the research ‎tool. Eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy were held for the students Results: There was a significant difference in psychological symptoms before and after ‎cognitive-behavioral therapy (p=0.012). Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral therapy was ‎effective on social interferences caused by PMS symptoms (p=0.012).‎ Conclusion: Group cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively alleviates PMS symptoms in female ‎college students.‎ PMID:27252766

  17. Pharmacologic and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maneerattaporn, Monthira; Saad, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain or discomfort in association with altered bowel habits (diarrhea and/or constipation). Other gastrointestinal symptoms, such as bloating and flatulence, are also common. A variety of factors are believed to play a role in the development of IBS symptoms, including altered bowel motility, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial stressors, altered brain-gut interactions, immune activation/low grade inflammation, alterations in the gut microbiome, and genetic factors. In the absence of biomarkers that can distinguish between IBS subgroups on the basis of pathophysiology, treatment of this condition is predicated upon a patient's most bothersome symptoms. In clinical trials, effective therapies have only offered a therapeutic gain over placebos of 7-15%. Evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) include lubiprostone and tegaserod; evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of diarrhea predominant IBS (IBS-D) include the probiotic Bifidobacter infantis, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin, and alosetron. Additionally, there is persuasive evidence to suggest that selected antispasmodics and antidepressants are of benefit for the treatment of abdominal pain in IBS patients. Finally, several emerging therapies with novel mechanisms of action are in development. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies including probiotics, herbal therapies and acupuncture are gaining popularity among IBS sufferers, although concerns regarding manufacturing standards and the paucity of high quality efficacy and safety data remain. PMID:21927652

  18. Do Not Forget Nephrotic Syndrome as a Cause of Increased Requirement of Levothyroxine Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Vita, Roberto; Di Bari, Flavia; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome increases L-thyroxine requirements because of urinary loss of free and protein-bound thyroid hormones. We report 2 hypothyroid patients referred to us because of high serum TSH, even though the L-thyroxine daily dose was maintained at appropriate levels or was increased. The cause of nephrotic syndrome was multiple myeloma in one patient and diabetic glomerulosclerosis in the other patient. As part of the periodic controls for diabetes, urinalysis was requested only in the second patient so that proteinuria could be detected. However, as in the first patient, facial puffiness and body weight increase were initially attributed to hypothyroidism, which was poorly compensated by L-thyroxine therapy. In the first patient, the pitting nature of the pedal edema was missed at the initial examination. An endocrinologist consulted over the phone by the practitioner hypothesized some causes of intestinal malabsorption of L-thyroxine. This diagnosis would have been accepted had the patient continued taking a known sequestrant of L-thyroxine, i.e. calcium carbonate. The diagnostic workup of patients with increasing requirements of L-thyroxine replacement therapy should not be concentrated on the digestive system alone. Careful history taking and physical examination need to be thorough. Endocrinologists should not forget nephrotic syndrome that, in turn, can be secondary to serious diseases. PMID:26280000

  19. Antioxidant Effects of Potassium Ascorbate with Ribose Therapy in a Case with Prader Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Anichini, C.; Lotti, F.; Longini, M.; Proietti, F.; Felici, C.; Perrone, S.; Buonocore, G.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in several human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, carcinogenesis, as well as genetic diseases. We previously found that OS occurs in Down Syndrome as well as in Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS). Here we describe the clinical case of a female patient with Prader Willi Syndrome (PWS), a genomic imprinting disorder, characterized by obesity, atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus type 2, pathologies in which a continuous and important production of free radicals takes place. We verified the presence of OS by measuring a redox biomarkers profile including total hydroperoxides (TH), non protein-bound iron (NPBI), thiols (SH), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and isoprostanes (IPs). Thus we introduced in therapy an antioxidant agent, namely potassium ascorbate with ribose (PAR), in addition to GH therapy and we monitored the redox biomarkers profile for four years. A progressive decrease in OS biomarkers occurred until their normalization. In the meantime a weight loss was observed together with a steady growth in standards for age and sex. PMID:22960339

  20. Conus magus vs. Irukandji syndrome: a computational approach of a possible new therapy.

    PubMed

    András, Csaba D; Albert, Csilla; Salamon, Szidónia; Gálicza, Judit; András, Réka; András, Emil

    2011-10-10

    The Irukandji syndrome is caused by the sting of some small jellyfish species. The syndrome has severe life-threatening consequences. The exacerbating pain and cardiovascular symptoms (tachycardia and hypertension) are hard to control in many cases. We suggest a way to experiment a new possible therapy with an FDA approved analgesic, ziconotide, a synthetic derivative from a marine cone snail (Conus magus) venom component, which is administrated intravenously. The proposed experimental plasma concentration of ziconotide for rats is in the range of 0-6μgml(-1). Based on a molecular biological scenario of the venom action mechanism at cellular level, we suggest that the proposed method should be functional in re-establishing the normal cardiovascular parameters of the experimental animals and concomitantly it should abolish the severe pain caused by envenomation. We expect that positive experimental results in agreement with our theory will lead to the possibility of a new therapy for the Irukandji syndrome and possibly for other envenomations with similar ethyology. PMID:21777663

  1. Dual antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes and coronary artery interventions.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, I; Jayanthi, K

    2014-07-01

    Optimization of platelet inhibition in patients with acute coronary syndromes reduces the risk for ischemic events, but at the same time increases the risk for bleeding. There are several predictors of bleeding risk in patients with acute coronary syndromes. These include demographic variables such as advanced age, female gender, low body weight, concomitant diseases such as diabetes,renal insufficiency, noncardiac vascular disease such as cerebral vascular disease and a history of bleeding. It also includes the type of acute coronary syndromes such as patients presenting with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, high killip class and low blood pressure. The diabetic population contains a higher proportion of patients who do not respond to antiplatelet drugs as expected and who also have more activated platelets that deserve very vigorous inhibition. The importance of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and stenting is much discussed. Yet there are some questions which are to be answered clearly such as the following:- 1) In the need to balance the benefit of clot prevention with bleeding risk, is it better to continue dual antiplatelet therapy for longer than one year? 2) If so, is this benefit specific to drug eluting stents or to a more general population of stent patients? 3) Is the benefit mediated by prevention of stent thrombosis or is there a global reduction in cardiovascular risk? This review is to understand all these aspects and help a physician use antiplatelet drugs appropriately in day to day clinical practice for better patient outcomes. PMID:25672032

  2. Cerebral Hyperperfusion in a Child with Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ardicli, Didem; Gocmen, Rahsan; Oguz, Kader K; Varan, Ali; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of cranial radiotherapy characterized by migraine-like headache and transient neurological deficits with typical gyriform enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential underlying mechanisms are endothelial damage or dysfunction, vascular instability, vasospasm and, neuronal dysfunction.We report an 11-year-old girl with a primary diagnosis of medulloblastoma presented with acute-onset severe headache and left-sided weakness, 20 months after completing cranial radiotherapy. MRI demonstrated unilateral cortical swelling and concomitant leptomeningeal, gyral contrast enhancement, and MR perfusion imaging showed increased cortical perfusion in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously over several days.SMART syndrome appears to be a reversible, long-term complication of cranial radiotherapy. So far, a limited number of pediatric patients with SMART syndrome have been reported. Prompt recognition of clinical signs and radiological imaging of SMART syndrome may help prevent unnecessary interventions and initiate appropriate diagnostic workup and management. PMID:27104483

  3. Use of Cyclosporine Therapy in Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Raza; Altaf, Areeba; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Mari, Anum; Noorani, Sahir; Saeed, Eraj; Mevawalla, Areesh Amir; Haq, Zaiyn Ul; Faquih, Muhammad Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    A chronic, progressive disorder Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS) accounts for 10-20% of all children with Nephrotic Syndrome. It is a heterogeneous disorder comprised of persistent edema, proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia. Treatment for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is challenging and children who suffer from SRNS require aggressive treatment to achieve remission. Calcineurin inhibitors have been used more in an empirical manner than on the basis of clear rationale. It was in 1984 when cyclosporine was first considered for the treatment of steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome. Cyclosporin is a calcineurin inhibitor that suppresses immune response by downregulating the transcription of various cytokine genes. Till now many studies have been conducted to determine dosages, duration of therapy, side effects and advantages of cyclosporine. Treatment of SRNS remains a difficult challenge in pediatric nephrology. Treatment should be individualized according to the underlying histopathology, and clinical and environmental conditions of the children. There is an urgent need to distinguish as soon as possible those patients who may benefit from prolonged immunosuppressive treatment from those who will not benefit from such treatment and who will just suffer from its major side effects. The emerging evidence that the majority of genetic forms of SRNS should receive symptomatic treatment only, should also be clinically tested and studies baring its significance should be evaluated in the future. PMID:26573045

  4. The effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Madjlesi, Faezeh; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Mirzaei, Rezvan; Forogh, Bijan; Daliri, Seyedeh Somayeh; Derakhshandeh, Seyed Majid; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Raissi, G. Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Rome II and III diagnostic criteria for dyssynergic defecation recommended the exclusion of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study determined the effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without IBS. Materials and Methods: This study was a nonrandomized, single blinded, semi experimental study. Dyssynergic defecation patients with and without IBS were asked to undergo biofeedback therapy 8 sessions. The defecation dynamics and balloon expulsion time were evaluated before, at the end and 1 month after the biofeedback therapy. IBS symptoms were graded using a 4-point Likert scale. Mann–Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman test were applied to analyze data using SPSS software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: After the biofeedback therapy, the IBS symptoms have been decreased significantly (the median of 2 before and 1 after therapy, P < 0.01). The biofeedback therapy significantly decreased the anismus index in IBS group by the mean of 0.75 ± 0.31, 0.28 ± 0.07 and 0.28 ± 0.06 in three phases, respectively. Similar results were found in non-IBS patients (the mean of 0.74 ± 0.32, 0.28 ± 0.08, 0.27 ± 0.08 in three phases, respectively). The symptoms of constipation (sensation of incomplete evacuation, difficult and painful defecation), defecation facilitative manual maneuver frequency, pelvic floor muscles resting amplitude and strain amplitude decreased and squeezing amplitude improved significantly after biofeedback therapy in both groups with and without IBS (P < 0.001). There were not significant differences between patients with and without IBS (P > 0.05) with respect to outcome. No complication was observed in treatment groups. Conclusion: Dyssynergic constipation patients with and without IBS will likely benefit from biofeedback therapy. PMID:25538778

  5. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered. PMID:22120615

  6. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  7. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C.; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  8. The Role of Surfactant Therapy in Nonrespiratory Distress Syndrome Conditions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Amaris; Bhandari, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    While treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant in premature neonates is well established, evidence for its use in non-RDS conditions, especially in the term neonate, has been less abundant. The last published review on a PubMed search was in 2001. In this review, we comprehensively and critically evaluated the evidence from the literature regarding the use of surfactant in specific non-RDS disorders in neonates. Surfactant administered as a bolus should be considered in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome with progressive respiratory failure. While controversial in congenital diaphragmatic hernia, it should be considered in Group B streptococcal pneumonia. As evidence evolves, we anticipate the broader application and more routine use of surfactant therapy for respiratory failure because of causes other than RDS. PMID:26171600

  9. Down's syndrome-associated Single Minded 2 gene as a pancreatic cancer drug therapy target.

    PubMed

    DeYoung, Maurice Phil; Tress, Matthew; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2003-10-01

    We report here a pancreatic cancer drug therapy utility of a gene involved in Down's syndrome. Single Minded 2 gene (SIM2) from Down's Syndrome Critical Region was expressed in pancreatic cancer-derived cell lines as well as in tumor tissues, but not in the normal pancreas. A related member of the SIM family, SIM1, did not show similar specificity. Inhibition by antisense technology of one of the isoforms of SIM2, the short-form (SIM2-s) expression in the CAPAN-1 pancreatic cancer cell line, caused a pronounced growth inhibition and induced cell death through apoptosis. The specificity of antisense was inferred from inhibition of SIM2-s mRNA but not the related members of SIM family. In view of the high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer patients, these findings have important implications for the future of pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:14550949

  10. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Qian; Hou, Jingshan; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  11. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  12. Enzyme replacement therapy in Hurler syndrome after failure of hematopoietic transplant

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Leonor; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of Mucopolysaccharosidosis type I (MPS-I), Hurler syndrome, presents with progressive respiratory, cardiac and musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive deterioration. Treatment includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the case of an 8-year old boy with MPS-I, homozygous for W402X, treated at 10 months of age with HSCT and after failure of the transplant, with ERT during 2 years showing good results, including a positive neuropsychological development. PMID:26937401

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy in Hurler syndrome after failure of hematopoietic transplant.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Leonor; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis

    2015-06-01

    The most severe form of Mucopolysaccharosidosis type I (MPS-I), Hurler syndrome, presents with progressive respiratory, cardiac and musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive deterioration. Treatment includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the case of an 8-year old boy with MPS-I, homozygous for W402X, treated at 10 months of age with HSCT and after failure of the transplant, with ERT during 2 years showing good results, including a positive neuropsychological development. PMID:26937401

  14. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  15. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  16. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  17. Endovascular therapy for advanced post-thrombotic syndrome: Proceedings from a multidisciplinary consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Kahn, Susan R; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Comerota, Anthony J; Parpia, Sameer; Meleth, Sreelatha; Earp, Diane; Williams, Rick; Sista, Akhilesh K; Marston, William; Rathbun, Suman; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Razavi, Mahmood K; Jaff, Michael R; Kearon, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and chronic iliac vein obstruction suffer major physical limitations and impairment of health-related quality of life. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatment options for these patients. Early studies suggest that imaging-guided, catheter-based endovascular therapy can eliminate iliac vein obstruction and saphenous venous valvular reflux, resulting in reduced PTS severity; however, these observations have not been rigorously validated. A multidisciplinary expert panel meeting was convened to plan a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate endovascular therapy for the treatment of advanced PTS. This article summarizes the findings of the panel, and is expected to assist in developing a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial and other studies to improve the care of patients with advanced PTS. PMID:27247235

  18. NTOS symptoms and mobility: a case study on neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome involving massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Streit, Robin S

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is a neuromuscular condition affecting brachial plexus functionality. NTOS is characterized by paresthesia, pain, muscle fatigue, and restricted mobility in the upper extremity. This study quantified massage therapy's possible contribution to treatment of NTOS. A 24-year-old female with NTOS received eight treatments over 35 days. Treatment included myofascial release, trigger point therapy, cross fiber friction, muscle stripping, and gentle passive stretching. Abduction and lateral rotation at the glenohumeral (GH joint) assessments measured range of motion (ROM). A resisted muscle test evaluated upper extremity strength. The client rated symptoms daily via a visual analog scale (VAS). Findings showed improvement in ROM at the GH joint. VAS ratings revealed a reduction in muscle weakness, pain, numbness, and 'paresthesia'. Results suggest massage may be useful as part of a broad approach to managing NTOS symptoms and improving mobility. PMID:24411148

  19. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and topical steroid therapy: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Decani, Sem; Federighi, Veronica; Baruzzi, Elisa; Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    Topical corticosteroids are considered first-line therapy in patients with chronic inflammatory oral mucosal diseases; among them, clobetasol propionate is one of the most widely used in oral medicine. Under physiological conditions, the transmucosal application is characterized by a significantly greater absorption than the skin application. Contrary to many publications about the side effects of topical corticosteroids in dermatology, few studies have investigated the systemic effects due to local application of these drugs on oral mucosa. Although topical steroid therapy for the management of oral diseases is generally associated with local adverse effects (candidiasis, stomatopyrosis, and hypogeusia), these drugs can also lead to systemic side effects, such as suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and Cushing's syndrome. This review reports five cases of systemic adverse effects caused by clobetasol propionate topical treatment. PMID:23210698

  20. [Acute-onset eosinophilic leukemia associated with tumor lysis syndrome after imatinib and steroid pulse therapy].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Tomoe; Saito, Yuriko; Tokuhira, Michihide; Tomikawa, Atsushi; Sagawa, Morihiko; Haba, Yuichiro; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Reiko; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2010-05-01

    An 83-year-old woman had been suffering from palpitations and fatigue for a month. An annual screening test revealed an increased WBC count so she was referred to our hospital. CBC showed extremely elevated WBC count (186,300/microl), in which the population of blastic eosinophils was over 90%. The eosinophils expressed CD7/13/33/34/DR, and the karyotype demonstrated 47,XX,+8. The fusion gene of FIP1-LP/PDGFRalpha in peripheral blood was negative. As plural effusion due to the underlying disease progressively worsened, she was given prednisolone and hydroxyurea, but the effect was limited. Steroid pulse therapy and imatinib (100 mg/day) were administrated. As a result, a prompt response was observed. The WBC count rapidly decreased, but tumor lysis syndrome led to acute renal failure and disseminated intravasucular coagulation appeared. Supportive therapies such as artificial dialysis and transfusions were conducted, but unfortunately she died because of alveolar hemorrhage. PMID:20534953

  1. The effect of cetylated fatty esters and physical therapy on myofascial pain syndrome of the neck.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Deepak; Jacob, Biju Nirmal; Ajeesh, P S; Bookout, Jack B; Barathur, Raj R

    2011-07-01

    Participants with Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) of the neck were randomly assigned into 2 groups of the double-blinded study: topical cetylated fatty ester complex (CFEC) cream application plus physical therapy (CF-PT; n=37), and placebo cream application plus physical therapy (PL-PT; n=35). There were 3 visits during 4 weeks of treatment. Physical Therapy (PT), given twice/week, included Ischaemic Compression, Deep Pressure Trigger Point Massage and Myofascial Releases. Topical cream [CFEC cream (5.6%) and 1.5% menthol] or placebo cream [1.5% menthol, in a cream base] was applied twice/day. CF-PT provided the fastest and most effective study treatment modality. The addition of CFEC cream to PT resulted in statistically significant improvements, compared to PL-PT, for reduction of pain, neck disability and life quality indicators. Our results indicate that cetylated derivatives of fatty acids can effectively reduce pain and symptoms associated with neck MPS, when combined with physical therapy. PMID:21665114

  2. Case Report: The Effects of Massage Therapy on a Woman with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Mary Lillias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of conditions resulting from compression of the neurovascular structures of the thoracic outlet. The parameters for physical therapy include myofascial release (MFR), neuromuscular therapy (NMT), muscle strengthening, and stretching. This case study examined the effects of neuromuscular therapy, massage, and other manual therapies on a 56-year-old female presenting with bilateral numbness over the forearms and hands on waking. Numbness occurred most days, progressing to “dead rubbery” forearms and hands once or twice a month. Methods The treatment plan was implemented over eight weeks and consisted of six, 50-minute bodywork sessions. Several nonbodywork strategies were also employed to address potential contributing factors to the TOS symptomology experienced by the client. Objective measurements included posture analysis (PA), range of movement (ROM), and Roos and Adson’s tests. The Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2), a client-generated measure of clinical outcome, was used to measure clinical change. Results MYMOP2 overall profile score results demonstrated an improvement of 2.25 from pretreatment to post-treatment measurement. Clinically meaningful change was measured by the individual and was indicative of substantial symptom improvement where a score change of over one was considered as meaningful. Conclusions A course of massage was effective for numbness symptoms in an individual with TOS, and results lasted over a year without additional treatments. Further research is needed to fully understand the effects of massage for TOS symptoms. PMID:25452819

  3. Choroidal thickness changes with photodynamic therapy for a diffuse choroidal hemangioma in Sturge–Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cacciamani, Andrea; Scarinci, Fabio; Parravano, Mariacristina; Giorno, Paola; Varano, Monica

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the choroidal thickness (CT) changes associated with visual function following photodynamic therapy (PDT) for a diffuse choroidal hemangioma in Sturge–Weber syndrome. We report a case of Sturge–Weber syndrome and symptomatic serous retinal detachment (SRD) with diffuse choroidal hemangioma treated with PDT. Visual acuity (VA), macular sensitivity measured by means of MP1 microperimeter (Nidek Technologies, Padova, Italy), retinal and CT, measured by means of enhanced depth optical coherence tomography (EDI–OCT, Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) were analyzed at baseline, 3 and 12 months follow-up.After the PDT VA and macular sensitivity improved.The OCT examination showed the resolution of SRD. The choroid was measured after PDT using EDI–OCT. At baseline, the subfoveal CT showed a progressive thickness reduction from 251 to 83 lm during follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CT changes after PDT for a diffuse choroidal hemangioma in Sturge–Weber syndrome in a longterm follow-up. The CT measurement represents a potential parameter to better follow choroidal hemangiomas and their response to treatment. However,the long-term choroidal changes should be carefully taken into account. PMID:24658736

  4. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corral, Juan E; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  5. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  6. Occurrence of DNET and other brain tumors in Noonan syndrome warrants caution with growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Geoffrey D; SantaCruz, Karen; Hart, Blaine; Clericuzio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway that is well known for its relationship with oncogenesis. An 8.1-fold increased risk of cancer in Noonan syndrome has been reported, including childhood leukemia and solid tumors. The same study found a patient with a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) and suggested that DNET tumors are associated with NS. Herein we report an 8-year-old boy with genetically confirmed NS and a DNET. Literature review identified eight other reports, supporting the association between NS and DNETs. The review also ascertained 13 non-DNET brain tumors in individuals with NS, bringing to 22 the total number of NS patients with brain tumors. Tumor growth while receiving growth hormone (GH) occurred in our patient and one other patient. It is unknown whether the development or progression of tumors is augmented by GH therapy, however there is concern based on epidemiological, animal and in vitro studies. This issue was addressed in a 2015 Pediatric Endocrine Society report noting there is not enough data available to assess the safety of GH therapy in children with neoplasia-predisposition syndromes. The authors recommend that GH use in children with such disorders, including NS, be undertaken with appropriate surveillance for malignancies. Our case report and literature review underscore the association of NS with CNS tumors, particularly DNET, and call attention to the recommendation that clinicians treating NS patients with GH do so with awareness of the possibility of increased neoplasia risk. PMID:26377682

  7. [Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). Pathophysiology, diagnostics, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Köck, F X; Borisch, N; Koester, B; Grifka, J

    2003-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS type I)--formerly termed Sudeck's atrophy or reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD)--causes chronic, poorly controllable pain, autonomic, sensorimotor disorders,and serious trophic alterations in the later stages. It develops in the distal extremities mostly after minimal trauma or surgical intervention and rarely spontaneously. The severity of symptoms is disproportionate to the causative event. The latest scientific findings show that the previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), which was supposed to be a result of a hyperreactive autonomic nervous system,is a very complex syndrome that occurs on different integration levels of the nervous system. Sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) may be facultatively characteristic, but is not to be misunderstood as an underlying mechanism. A neurogenic inflammation reaction has recently been discussed, just as had been postulated by Paul Sudeck long before. That was the reason why the International Association for the Study of Pain (ISAP) introduced the more descriptive term "complex regional pain syndrome" (CRPS) type I in 1994. Due to the complexity of the process necessitating qualified knowledge, it is important to immediately refer patients to a specialized pain OPD or clinic. The diagnosis of CRPS type I is based upon a carefully taken case history and a clinical examination by an experienced practitioner. Imaging diagnostic tools and laboratory findings are of no or only low predicative value. The question of whether SMP exists after diagnosing CRPS type I is eminent for therapy planning. Therefore, diagnostic regional anesthetics are still important in spite of their uncertain prognostic relevance. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical treatment, and psychotherapy play an important role in the primary treatment of CRPS type I as noninvasive procedures. Despite heavy criticism, invasive sympathetic block, subsequent to adequate diagnostics, is an

  8. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  9. Development of cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for patients with Dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salam, K P Abdul; Sharma, Mahendra P; Prakash, Om

    2012-10-01

    Dhat syndrome is a culture-bound syndrome prevalent in the natives of the Indian subcontinent characterized by excessive concern about harmful consequences of loss of semen (ICD-10). Treatment offered to the patients suffering from it continues to be esoteric, unstructured and without standardization. The present study aimed to develop and examine the feasibility of Cognitive - Behavior Therapy module for patients with Dhat syndrome. A draft module was developed based on existing theoretical knowledge and suggestions from five mental health professionals. This module was then applied on five patients with Dhat syndrome to assess and judge the suitability of the module. The pre and post-assessments were carried out using Sexual Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire - II, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, The Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Scale, Screener for Somatoform Disorder, International Index for Erectile Function, Clinical Global Impressions, The World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment - BREF. Experiences and insights gained from each patient were used to refine the module before applying on the next patient. The final module consisted of the following components was developed: Basic sex education, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, imaginal desensitization, masturbatory training as homework and Kegel's exercises and 'start-stop technique' and 'squeeze technique' for sexual dysfunctions. Results of the study reveal that it is feasible to carry out the CBT module in clinical settings. Number of sessions ranged from 11 to 16 sessions. The duration of the session was 45 minutes on the average. Findings of the present study revealed improvement in sexual knowledge, anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms. Implications and limitations of the study are highlighted and suggestions for future research offered. PMID:23372242

  10. [Guillain-Barré syndrome: clinical features, immune mechanisms, and therapies].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K

    1996-12-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the peripheral motor nerves and nerve roots. The cause of GBS is unknown; it is though to be immune-mediated. The following seven clinical features usually distinguish this syndrome: 1) the neurological symptoms are preceded 1 to 3 weeks by an antecedent event. 2) symptoms and signs progress rapidly for several days up to 2 weeks, followed by a period of stability before gradual improvement to normal function after several months, 3) there is symmetric weakness, 4) there is a loss of tendon reflexes, 5) cerebrospinal fluid protein is elevated, 6) conduction velocity in motor nerves is reduced and F-waves are absent, and 7) most patients recover functionally. There are variants of this common presentation, such as acute motor axonal neuropathy and acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy, of the many variants, the most aberrant is Fisher syndrome. The clinical criteria for diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome and the electrodiagnostic criteria for demyelination of the peripheral nerve are described. Circulating antineural antibodies directed at a number of antigens have been demonstrated in GBS, occasionally against P2 protein (P2), galactocerebroside, and ganglioside GM1. We studied peripheral blood samples from patients with acute phase GBS using flow cytometry. The proportion of activated T cells (CD4 + HLA-DR +) was increased in comparison to the proportion in healthy controls. The helper-inducer (CD4 + CD29 +) subset was also increased; the suppressor-inducer (CD4 + CD45RA +) subset was neither increased nor decreased. Activated T cells and helper-inducer cells may play a crucial role in the onset of GBS. Lymphocytes sensitized to P2 were demonstrated in the acute stage of GBS, but not in any other neurological diseases. The lymphocytes recognized the P2 residues 60-78. We also demonstrated a significant relationship between GBS and IILA-A2, B61, Cw3, and DR6 antigens. Early

  11. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Revealed by Systems Immunology in a Melanoma Patient Undergoing Anti-PD-1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Greenplate, Allison R; Johnson, Douglas B; Roussel, Mikael; Savona, Michael R; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Puzanov, Igor; Ferrell, P Brent; Irish, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies aimed at blocking the interaction between programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligands have shown impressive efficacy in a variety of malignancies and are generally well tolerated. Research has focused intensely on T cells and their interaction with cells within melanoma tumors, while relatively little is understood about the systems immunology of the cells in the blood during checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Longitudinal cytomic analysis using mass cytometry can characterize all the cells in a small sample of blood and has the potential to reveal key shifts in the cellular milieu occurring during treatment. We report a case of advanced melanoma in which mass cytometry detected abnormal myeloid cells resulting from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in the blood following treatment with an anti-PD-1 agent. Myeloid blasts comprised <1% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) 1 month after the start of treatment. Six months after starting therapy, myeloid blasts comprised 5% of PBMCs, and a bone marrow biopsy confirmed refractory anemia with excess blasts-2 (RAEB-2). Longitudinal mass cytometry immunophenotyping comprehensively characterized blast phenotype evolution and revealed elevated PD-1 expression on the surface of nonblast myeloid cells. These findings highlight the clinical significance of cytomic monitoring, indicate that the myeloid compartment should be monitored during checkpoint inhibitor therapy, and emphasize the value of systems immunology in medicine. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 474-80. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26966176

  12. Continuous subcutaneous IGF-1 therapy via insulin pump in a patient with Donohue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weber, David R.; Stanescu, Diana E.; Semple, Robert; Holland, Cheryl; Magge, Sheela N.

    2015-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (DS) is a severe form of congenital insulin resistance due to mutation(s) in the insulin receptor (INSR) gene. Given the similarities between insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptors, recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1) has been used to treat severe insulin resistance due to INSR mutation(s). Traditional subcutaneous therapy may be limited by the shortened IGF-1 half-life in these patients. We report the case of a female with molecularly confirmed DS treated with continuous rhIGF-1 therapy via an insulin pump. With treatment, the patient’s hemoglobin A1c decreased from 9.8% to 8.8%, and her weight increased by 0.8 kg. Development of an ovarian tumor complicated her course, but it was unclear whether this was related to rhIGF-1 therapy. Limited treatment options exist for patients with DS. The use of continuous rhIGF-1 via an insulin pump may be a viable option, although further experience is needed to establish safety and efficacy. PMID:25153212

  13. Efficacy of plasma therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with complement factor H mutations.

    PubMed

    Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Wagner, Eric; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aïcha; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Goodship, Timothy H J; Robitaille, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) frequently results in end-stage renal failure and can be lethal. Several studies have established an association between quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in complement factor H and aHUS. Although plasma infusion and exchange are often advocated, guidelines have yet to be established. Long-term outcome for patients under treatment is still unknown. We describe a patient who, at 7 months of age, presented with aHUS associated with combined de novo complement factor H mutations (S1191L and V1197A) on the same allele. Laboratory investigations showed normal levels of complements C4, C3 and factor H. Plasma exchanges and large-dose infusion therapy resulted in a resolution of hemolysis and recovery of renal function. Three recurrences were successfully treated by intensification of the plasma infusion treatment to intervals of 2 or 3 days. This patient showed good response to large doses of plasma infusions and her condition remained stable for 30 months with weekly plasma infusions (30 ml/kg). Long-term tolerance and efficacy of such intensive plasma therapy are still unknown. Reported secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency warrants the search for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:18425537

  14. Directed Therapy: An Approach to the Improved Treatment of Exfoliation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angelilli, Allison; Ritch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related, generalized disorder of the extracellular matrix characterized by the production and progressive accumulation of a fibrillar extracellular material in many ocular tissues and is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma worldwide. Exfoliation syndrome plays an etiologic role in open-angle glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, cataract, and retinal vein occlusion. It is accompanied by an increase in serious complications at the time of cataract extraction, such as zonular dialysis, capsular rupture, and vitreous loss. It is associated systemically with an increasing number of vascular disorders, hearing loss, and Alzheimer's disease. Exfoliation syndrome appears to be a disease of elastic tissue microfibrils. Directed therapy simply means devising specific treatments for specific diseases. There was little incentive to attempt to distinguish between various open-angle glaucomas if the treatments were essentially the same. However, this view also prevented the application of directed therapy in those instances in which such was available and applicable. Pilocarpine has multiple beneficial actions in eyes with XFS. Not only does it lower IOP, but by increasing aqueous outflow, it should enable the trabecular meshwork to clear more rapidly, and by limiting pupillary movement, should slow the progression of the disease. Theoretically, miotics should be the first line of treatment. Pilocarpine 2% q.h.s. can provide sufficient limitation of pupillary mobility without causing these side effects. In 2007, two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of the lysyl oxidase-like 1 (LOXL1) gene located on chromosome 15 were specifically associated with XFS and XFG. LOXL1 is a member of the lysyl oxidase family of enzymes, which are essential for the formation, stabilization, maintenance, and remodelling of elastic fibers and prevent age-related loss of elasticity of tissues. LOXL1 protein is a major

  15. Evidence for Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Gene Therapy for Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome in Preclinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Francesco; Bosticardo, Marita; Charrier, Sabine; Draghici, Elena; Locci, Michela; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Panaroni, Cristina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Sanvito, Francesca; Doglioni, Claudio; Liabeuf, Marie; Gjata, Bernard; Montus, Marie; Siminovitch, Katherine; Aiuti, Alessandro; Naldini, Luigi; Dupré, Loïc; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Galy, Anne; Villa, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is a life-threatening X-linked disease characterized by immunodeficiency, thrombocytopenia, autoimmunity, and malignancies. Gene therapy could represent a therapeutic option for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow (BM) donor. In this study, we analyzed the long-term outcome of WAS gene therapy mediated by a clinically compatible lentiviral vector (LV) in a large cohort of wasnull mice. We demonstrated stable and full donor engraftment and Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) expression in various hematopoietic lineages, up to 12 months after gene therapy. Importantly, we observed a selective advantage for T and B lymphocytes expressing transgenic WASP. T-cell receptor (TCR)-driven T-cell activation, as well as B-cell's ability to migrate in response to CXCL13, was fully restored. Safety was evaluated throughout the long-term follow-up of primary and secondary recipients of WAS gene therapy. WAS gene therapy did not affect the lifespan of treated animals. Both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tumors arose, but we excluded the association with gene therapy in all cases. Demonstration of long-term efficacy and safety of WAS gene therapy mediated by a clinically applicable LV is a key step toward the implementation of a gene therapy clinical trial for WAS. PMID:19259069

  16. Potential future therapies for irritable bowel syndrome: will disease modifying therapy as opposed to symptomatic control become a reality?

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin C

    2005-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome can remit spontaneously, implying cure is possible. Predictors of good prognosis include a short history, acute onset(possibly postinfective origin), absence of psychological disorders, and resolution of chronic life stressors. Possible-disease modifying treatments with long-lasting effects include diet and anti-inflammatory and psychological treatments. Dietary modifications, which often involve excluding dairy and wheat products, are successful in some patients. Anti-inflammatory treatments have been subjected to one RCT in postinfective IBS without benefit. Probiotics may have benefit in altering bacterial flora and as anti-inflammatory agents, but further trials are needed before they can be recommended. Psychological treatments may produce long-lasting responses. Relaxation therapy appears to have a nonspecific benefit. Psychotherapy has been shown to have long-term benefit and is particularly acceptable to, and effective for, those with overt psychological distress. Hypnotherapy has been shown to be effective in randomized placebo controlled trials and has a sustained effect. PMID:15862939

  17. Combination anti-VEGF and corticosteroid therapy for idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Gagan K; Payne, John F; Ray, Robin; Mehta, Sonia; Bergstrom, Chris S; Yeh, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Vision loss associated with the idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis (IRVAN) syndrome most commonly occurs from macular edema or complications related to neovascularization. The authors present a case of advanced IRVAN associated with a massive exudative response characterized by peripheral retinal telangiectasias, exudative retinal detachment, and macular edema with lipid maculopathy. The patient was managed successfully with visual acuity from hand motion to 20/150 using a combination of local corticosteroids, intravitreal bevacizumab, panretinal photocoagulation, and eventually pars plana vitrectomy for progressive vitreomacular traction. VEGF- and non-VEGF-mediated mechanisms appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of IRVAN given the efficacy of combination therapy. [ophthalmic surg lasers imaging retina. 2013;44:599-602.]. PMID:24221466

  18. [Therapy of thrombocytosis in myeloproliferative syndromes using recombinant interferon-alpha-2a].

    PubMed

    Tichelli, A; Gratwohl, A; Delacrétaz, F; Dazzi, H; Stebler, C; Wernli, M; Holdener, E E; Nissen, C; Speck, B

    1989-09-30

    In a prospective open study 16 consecutive patients with a myeloproliferative syndrome and thrombocytosis were treated with interferon (IFN) alpha-2a. 4 patients had polycythemia vera, 4 essential thrombocythemia, 3 myeloid metaplasia and 5 chronic granulocytic leukemia. Platelet counts decreased in all treated patients within 2 to 12 weeks from a median value of 1010 x 10(9)/l to 350 x 10(9)/l. No primary or secondary resistance was observed. The initial dose of IFN was 9 m U per day. After correction of the thrombocytosis, it was progressively reduced to a minimum dose of 3 m U per week. Despite the good platelet response to IFN, leukocytosis persisted in 3 patients and polycythemia in a further 3. Side effects and poor compliance required discontinuation of therapy in 6 patients. Special attention is focused on the follow-up in 6 patients who have been treated for more than 15 months. PMID:2799342

  19. Neurologic improvement without angiographic improvement after antithyroid therapy in a patient with Moyamoya syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Akiko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Rieko; Miyashita, Fumio; Iihara, Koji; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease with special complications, including Graves' disease, is called as moyamoya syndrome. A 22-year-old Japanese woman had left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction complicated with Graves' disease. She had right-sided hemiparesis that deteriorated on day 8 with the infarct growth and thyrotoxicosis. On angiogram, the left MCA was occluded at the origin without moyamoya vessels. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed misery-perfusion phenomenon in the left MCA territory. After initiation of the antithyroid therapy, her hemiparesis became milder. Seventeen months later, her thyroid function was normalized and net-like collateral moyamoya vessels proliferated in the left MCA territory. Misery-perfusion phenomenon persisted on PET. This report is unique in the point of neurologic recovery of the moyamoya patient right after initiation of antithyroid medication without radiological improvement. PMID:24119625

  20. Breaking the cycle: cognitive behavioral therapy and biofeedback training in a case of cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slutsker, Barak; Konichezky, Andres; Gothelf, Doron

    2010-12-01

    The present article presents a case of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) along with heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback training for the treatment of a medication unresponsive 13-year-old boy with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). CVS is characterized by recurring stereotypic episodes of vomiting, interspersed with asymptomatic periods. Triggers for vomiting include anticipatory anxiety related to school examinations, family conflicts, and birthday parties as well as infectious diseases, and certain foods. Current treatment design addressed two pivotal etiological factors: autonomic dysregulation and anticipatory anxiety. Treatment outcome suggests that vomiting episodes may be successfully prevented by aiding the patient to identify and manage precipitant psychological stressors, to regulate HRV patterns, and gain a renewed sense of bodily control and self-efficacy. Further research is suggested using a controlled study with pre- and post-behavioral and stress measures to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT and biofeedback training compared to pharmacotherapy and placebo. PMID:21154016

  1. Refractory atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy responsive to bortezomib-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev; Gertz, Morie A; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a relatively rare disorder described by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Atypical HUS could be genetic, acquired, or idiopathic (without known genetic changes or environmental triggers). Monoclonal protein has uncommonly been reported as a cause of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). We report a 59-year-old white man who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) with MAHA and was given a diagnosis of aHUS with monoclonal gammopathy. His kidney function and proteinuria worsened with persistent hemolysis despite eculizumab and later cyclophosphamide and prednisone treatment. He responded well to VRD (bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone) regimen. Renal function, proteinuria, and hemolysis all improved, and he was been in remission for more than 15 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment with bortezomib-based regimen for a patient with aHUS and monoclonal protein refractory to eculizumab therapy. PMID:25345382

  2. Immunosuppressive therapy for patients with Down syndrome and idiopathic aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kyogo; Muramatsu, Hideki; Okuno, Yusuke; Narita, Atsushi; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Horikoshi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Kojima, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is a rare hematological complication of Down syndrome (DS). The safety and efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy (IST) in individuals with DS remain unknown. We used a standard regimen of IST, comprising antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A, to treat three children with DS and idiopathic acquired AA. Two patients achieved a hematological (complete or partial) response and became transfusion independent at the final follow-up. The third patient failed to respond to IST and underwent bone marrow transplantation from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donor. None of the patients experienced severe or unexpected adverse events during IST. Our experience suggests that IST is a safe and reasonable treatment, even in individuals with DS who suffer from AA and lack an HLA-matched sibling donor. PMID:27107757

  3. Lichen planus-like drug reaction associated with recombinant human growth hormone therapy in a child patient with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mariana Quirino Silveira; Mendonca, Elismauro Fancisco

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disease with an incidence rate of between 1:2000 and 1:5000 live female births. The treatment of TS differs according to age and Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (RHGH) therapy is usually given for the treatment of short stature in girls with TS in childhood. We describe the first case of a TS patient who presented with a clinical picture compatible with oral and palmoplantar lichen planus-like reaction during RHGH therapy; spontaneous remission occurred after therapy suspension. PMID:27136634

  4. Manual Therapy and Exercise for a Patient With Neck-Tongue Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Niethamer, Lisa; Myers, Robin

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is defined as neck and/or head pain accompanied by ipsilateral dysesthesia of the tongue with sudden rotation of the head. Proposed causes include compression or irritation of the C2 nerve root as it courses behind the atlantoaxial joint or hypertrophy of the inferior oblique muscle. The primary purpose of this case report was to describe the conservative physical therapy treatment of a patient with uncomplicated NTS. Case Description The patient was a 13-year-old girl who reported insidious onset of sharp pain in the neck, numbness/tingling of the ipsilateral tongue/face, and tinnitus with cervical rotation. Symptoms occurred several times a week for approximately 10 seconds. Examination revealed impaired function, increased forward head posture, decreased cervical range of motion, and positive neurodynamic assessment. The patient's treatment included manual therapy and exercise for postural stabilization. Outcomes Following 8 visits, pain of the neck and tongue numbness had resolved. Score on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), cervical range of motion, and posture had also improved. At the 22-month follow-up, infrequent, momentary symptoms in the neck and dysesthesia of the tongue were reported. The PSFS remained the same. Objective measures were normal. Discussion This case report describes the physical therapy management of an individual with NTS. The management strategy followed a protocol similar to that used for cervicogenic headaches, due to the involvement of the upper cervical spine with both NTS and cervicogenic headache and the lack of evidence for the treatment of NTS. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(3):217-224. Epub 11 Feb 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6195. PMID:26868897

  5. Cefepime compared with ceftazidime as initial therapy for serious bacterial infections and sepsis syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, H; Hoepelman, A I; Rozenberg-Arska, M; Branger, J M; Voskuil, J H; Geers, A B; Kluyver, M; Hart, H C; Poest-Clement, E; van Beugen, L

    1994-01-01

    In an open randomized multicenter comparative study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of cefepime (CP; 2.0 g given intravenously every 12 h) and ceftazidime (CZ; 2.0 g given intravenously every 8 h) as initial treatment for adult patients with suspected serious bacterial infections. A total of 133 patients entered the study, of whom 114 were evaluable for clinical and microbiological response assessment: 56 received CP and 58 received CZ. About 50% (30 who received CP and 25 who received CZ) fulfilled the criteria of the sepsis syndrome. The treatment groups were comparable with respect to sex distribution, mean age, underlying diseases, treatment duration, APACHE II score, and type of infection. The most commonly cultured microorganisms were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The causative microorganisms were eradicated from 92% (37 of 40) of patients with a microbiologically documented infection who underwent treatment with CP; they were eradicated from 86% (42 to 49) of patients who received CZ. The responses of only clinically documented infections in the CP group were 90% (27 of 30 patients); in the CZ group they were 87% (26 of 30 patients). When patients fulfilled the criteria of the sepsis syndrome (septic shock excluded), the causative microorganisms were eradicated from 89% (16 of 18) of CP-treated patients and 86% (12 of 14) of CZ-treated patients. None of these differences was statistically significant. Mortality was the same in both groups (four patients in each group) and was not attributable to the study medication. In conclusion, CP is at least as effective and as safe as CZ, as initial antimicrobial therapy for suspected serious bacterial infections in nonneutropenic patients with or without the sepsis syndrome. CP has the additional advantage in that it can be given twice daily, which may lead to a decrease in hospital costs. PMID:8203833

  6. Emerging antiplatelet therapy for coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Packard, Kathleen A; Campbell, Jennifer A; Knezevich, Jon T; Davis, Estella M

    2012-03-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is used widely with proven benefit for the prevention of further ischemic cardiac complications in patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and a history of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The limitations of conventional antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, or prasugrel, as well as the fact that rates of recurrent ischemic events still remain high with use of these agents, underscore the need to investigate alternate agents that may further reduce event rates while limiting bleeding risk. The selection of antiplatelet therapy is further influenced by the following: ticagrelor was approved in July 2011 by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and clopidogrel is slated to become available as a generic productin 2012. We provide an overview of emerging agents for the treatment of CAD and ACS, including the reversible P2Y(12) antagonists ticagrelor, cangrelor, and elinogrel, and a new class of oral protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) inhibitors, vorapaxar and atopaxar.The recently approved P2Y(12) antagonists prasugrel and ticagrelor demonstrate enhanced ability to prevent adverse cardiac outcomes. However, this comes at a cost of a potential increased risk of bleeding. New adverse effects have also emerged, including dyspnea for all of the reversible P2Y(12) antagonists (ticagrelor, cangrelor, and elinogrel) and ventricular pauses for ticagrelor. In addition, the newer P2Y(12) antagonists have a faster onset and offset. Two of these agents, cangrelor and elinogrel, are available as intravenous formulations, which may provide additional benefits in patients who undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Trials with the PAR-1 inhibitors have also shown trends toward reductions in cardiac events, but not without the possibility of increased bleeding. More than ever, as the arsenal of antiplatelet therapy expands, health care providers need to understand the pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic differences

  7. IMPACT OF CHRONIC ANTI-CHOLESTEROL THERAPY ON DEVELOPMENT OF MICROVASCULAR RAREFACTION IN THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; James, Milinda E.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2011-01-01

    Object The obese Zucker rat (OZR) model of the metabolic syndrome is partly characterized by moderate hypercholesterolemia in addition to other contributing co-morbidities. Previous results suggest that vascular dysfunction in OZR is associated with chronic reduction in vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and chronic inflammation, both frequently associated with hypercholesterolemia. As such, we evaluated the impact of chronic cholesterol reducing therapy on the development of impaired skeletal muscle arteriolar reactivity and microvessel density in OZR and its impact on chronic inflammation and NO bioavailability. Materials and Methods Beginning at 7 weeks of age, male OZR were treated with gemfibrozil, probucol, atorvastatin or simvastatin (in chow) for 10 weeks. Subsequently, plasma and vascular samples were collected for biochemical/molecular analyses, while arteriolar reactivity and microvessel network structure were assessed using established methodologies after 3, 6 and 10 weeks of drug therapy Results All interventions were equally effective at reducing total cholesterol, although only the statins also blunted the progressive reductions to vascular NO bioavailability, evidenced by greater maintenance of acetylcholine-induced dilator responses, an attenuation of adrenergic constrictor reactivity, and an improvement in agonist-induced NO production. Comparably, while minimal improvements to arteriolar wall mechanics were identified with any of the interventions, chronic statin treatment reduced the rate of microvessel rarefaction in OZR. Associated with these improvements was a striking statin-induced reduction in inflammation in OZR, such that numerous markers of inflammation were correlated with improved microvascular reactivity and density. However, using multivariate discriminant analyses, plasma RANTES, IL-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α were determined to be the strongest contributors to differences between groups, although their relative importance varied

  8. Treatment of snoring with positional therapy in patients with positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Lee, Li-Ang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Position therapy plays a role in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether position therapy using a head-positioning pillow (HPP) could reduce snoring sounds in patients with mild-to-moderate positional OSAS, taking into account the potential confounding effects of body weight. A total of 25 adults with positional OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]supine:AHInon-supine ≥ 2) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were asked to use their own pillows at home during the first night (N0), and the HPP during the second (N1) and third (N2) nights. The primary outcome measures included the subjective snoring severity (SS, measured on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10) and the objective snoring index (SI, expressed as the number of snoring events per hour measured on an acoustic analytical program). Both endpoints were recorded over three consecutive nights. From N0 to N2, the median SS and SI values in the entire study cohort decreased significantly from 5.0 to 4.0 and from 218.0 events/h to 115.0 events/h, respectively. In the subgroup of overweight patients, SS showed a significant improvement, whereas SI did not. Both SS and SI were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients. PMID:26657174

  9. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.; Rubin, P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1995-03-30

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed an a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues :(LENT) is proposed. 115 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Treatment of snoring with positional therapy in patients with positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Lee, Li-Ang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Position therapy plays a role in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether position therapy using a head-positioning pillow (HPP) could reduce snoring sounds in patients with mild-to-moderate positional OSAS, taking into account the potential confounding effects of body weight. A total of 25 adults with positional OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]supine:AHInon-supine ≥ 2) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were asked to use their own pillows at home during the first night (N0), and the HPP during the second (N1) and third (N2) nights. The primary outcome measures included the subjective snoring severity (SS, measured on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10) and the objective snoring index (SI, expressed as the number of snoring events per hour measured on an acoustic analytical program). Both endpoints were recorded over three consecutive nights. From N0 to N2, the median SS and SI values in the entire study cohort decreased significantly from 5.0 to 4.0 and from 218.0 events/h to 115.0 events/h, respectively. In the subgroup of overweight patients, SS showed a significant improvement, whereas SI did not. Both SS and SI were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients. PMID:26657174

  11. [Subcutaneous stimulation as additional therapy to spinal cord stimulation in a post-laminectomy syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Mert; Yeğin, Mehmet Arif; Özdemir, İrem; Göksu, Ethem; Akyüz, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation as treatment of chronic low back pain via neuromodulation has been frequently performed in recent years. The dorsal column is stimulated by an electrode placed at the epidural region. In the case presently described, subcutaneous lead was implanted in a patient with failed back syndrome after spinal cord stimulation was inadequate to treat back and gluteal pain. A 65-year-old male had undergone surgery to treat lumbar disc herniation, after which he received physical therapy and multiple steroid injections due to unrelieved pain. He was admitted to the pain clinic with pain radiating to right gluteal muscle and leg. Spinal cord stimulation was performed and, as pain was not relieved, subcutaneous lead was applied to the right cluneal nerve distribution. Following treatment, the patient scored 1-2 on visual analog scale. Pain had been reduced by over 80%. Octad electrode was placed between T8 and T10 vertebrae after Tuohy needle was introduced to intervertebral area between L1 and L2. Paresthesia occurred in the right extremity. Boundaries were determined by area of right gluteal region in which paresthesia did not occur. Octad electrode was placed subcutaneously after vertical line was drawn from center point. Paresthesia occurred throughout the region. Pulse wave was 390-450 msec; frequency was 10-30 Hz. Subcutaneous electrode replacement is effective additional therapy when pain is not relieved by spinal cord stimulation. PMID:27225614

  12. Recent insights: mesenchymal stromal/stem cell therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shahd; Laffey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes respiratory failure, which is associated with severe inflammation and lung damage and has a high mortality and for which there is no therapy. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are adult multi-progenitor cells that can modulate the immune response and enhance repair of damaged tissue and thus may provide a therapeutic option for ARDS. MSCs demonstrate efficacy in diverse in vivo models of ARDS, decreasing bacterial pneumonia and ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury while enhancing repair following ventilator-induced lung injury. MSCs reduce the pro-inflammatory response to injury while augmenting the host response to bacterial infection. MSCs appear to exert their effects via multiple mechanisms—some are cell interaction dependent whereas others are paracrine dependent resulting from both soluble secreted products and microvesicles/exosomes derived from the cells. Strategies to further enhance the efficacy of MSCs, such as by overexpressing anti-inflammatory or pro-repair molecules, are also being investigated. Encouragingly, early phase clinical trials of MSCs in patients with ARDS are under way, and experience with these cells in trials for other diseases suggests that the cells are well tolerated. Although considerable translational challenges, such as concerns regarding cell manufacture scale-up and issues regarding cell potency and batch variability, must be overcome, MSCs constitute a highly promising potential therapy for ARDS. PMID:27408702

  13. Clinical pilot study: efficacy of triple antibiotic therapy in Blastocystis positive irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blastocystis species are common human enteric parasites. Carriage has been linked to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Treatment of Blastocystis spp. with antimicrobials is problematic and insensitive diagnostic methods and re-infection complicate assessment of eradication. We investigated whether triple antibiotic therapy comprising diloxanide furoate, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and secnidazole (TAB) given to diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) patients positive for Blastocystis would achieve eradication. Methods In a longitudinal, prospective case study 10 D-IBS Blastocystis-positive patients took 14 days of diloxanide furoate 500 mg thrice daily, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 160/80 mg twice daily and secnidazole 400 mg thrice daily. Faecal specimens were collected at baseline, day 15 and 4 weeks after completion of TAB. Specimens were analysed using faecal smear, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 16 SSU rRNA. Patients kept a concurrent clinical diary. Results Six (60%) patients cleared Blastocystis spp. after TAB, including three who had failed previous therapy. Subtypes detected were ST3 (60%), ST4 (40%), ST1 (20%) and ST7, 8 (10%); four patients had mixed ST infections. Serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels were low in 40% of patients. Higher rates of Blastocystis clearance were observed in patients symptomatic for less than a year (Mann–Whitney, p = 0.032, 95% confidence) with no associations found with age, previous antibiotic therapy, faecal parasite load, ST, IgA level or clinical improvement. Conclusions Clearance of Blastocystis spp. was achieved with TAB in 60% of D-IBS patients, an improvement over conventional monotherapy. Higher clearance rates are needed to facilitate investigation of the relevance of this parasite in clinically heterogenous IBS. PMID:25349629

  14. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Isert, Mecki; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Weil, Yvonne; Tirneci, Vanessa; Kasper, Alexander; Weber, Adele; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Herrmann, Eva; Linnemann, Birgit

    2015-08-01

    Because of the possible interference of antiphospholipid antibodies (APL) with the phospholipid component of thromboplastin reagents, concerns have been raised about the validity of international normalized ratio (INR) testing to monitor anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To investigate the reliability of the INR, we determined the INR using various prothrombin time (PT) assays and compared the results with those of a chromogenic factor X (CFX) assay. The study cohort consisted of 40 APS patients and 100 APL-negative patients who were on anticoagulant therapy for reasons other than APS. The agreement (i.e. the percentage of patients with a difference ≤0.5 INR units) between the PT-derived INR and CFX-derived INR equivalents was only moderate in both patient groups. The best agreement with CFX-derived INR equivalents was observed for the Thromborel S reagent in APS patients (69.1 %) and for Neoplastin Plus in APL-negative patients (72.0 %). Regarding the results for the point-of-care system CoaguChek XS, an agreement between the INR and the CFX-derived INR equivalent was less frequently observed in the APS patients (55.6 vs. 67.8 %; p = 0.050). When considering all 3058 pairs of INR tests within the international sensitivity index (ISI)-calibrated range of 1.5 to 4.5 s, we did not observe a higher variability of INR values in either the APS patient group or the subgroup of APS patients positive for lupus coagulants compared with the APL-negative controls. In conclusion, monitoring vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy with laboratory INR measurements seems to be suitable for the majority of APS patients. PMID:25859986

  15. COMBINATION THERAPY EFFECTIVENESS OF EZETIMIBE AND ATORVASTATIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Japaridze, L; Sadunishvili, M; Megreladze, I

    2016-03-01

    Atorvastatin reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, but whether the addition of ezetimibe (EZE) , a nonstatin drug that reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, can reduce the rate of cardiovascular events further is not known. We conducted a 16-week one-center, prospective, randomized, and open-label clinical trial, involving 323 patients who had been hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome within the preceding 14 days. They were received atorvastatin 20 mg during 28 days and after that 292 patients, who had LDL cholesterol levels≥1.81 mmol/L, were randomized to ezetimibe 10 mg/day co-administered with atorvastatin therapy (EZE+Statin) or doubling their current atorvastatin dose. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina requiring rehospitalization, coronary revascularization (≥30 days after randomization), or nonfatal stroke. At 16 weeks, the mean LDL cholesterol level during the study was 1.60 mmol per liter in the atorvastatine-ezetimibe group, as compared with 1.91 mmol per liter in the atorvastatin-monotherapy group (p<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 16 weeks were 88 .1 % in the atorvastatin-ezetimibe group and 77.0 % in the atorvastatin monotherapy group (absolute risk reduction, 11.1 percentage points; hazard ratio, 2.099 ; 95% confidence interval, 1.165 to 3.781; p=0.014). Patients receiving ezetimibe and statin were more likely to achieve target LDL-C after 16 weeks compared to patients doubling their statin dose. When added to statin therapy, ezetimibe resulted in incremental lowering of LDL cholesterol levels and improved cardiovascular outcomes. Ezetimibe/statin combination therapy was well tolerated among this patients, without safety concerns. PMID:27119829

  16. The Benefit of Movement: Dance/Movement Therapy and Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Chloe M.

    2016-01-01

    There are various forms of therapies for children with disabilities, including physical therapy, speech therapy, and alternative therapies such as music and dance therapy. Each form of therapy has its benefits for those with disabilities, but ultimately the success of the therapy rests on the attention paid to the individual. Especially for…

  17. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Diminish Fibromyalgia Syndrome – Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Efrati, Shai; Golan, Haim; Bechor, Yair; Faran, Yifat; Daphna-Tekoah, Shir; Sekler, Gal; Fishlev, Gregori; Ablin, Jacob N.; Bergan, Jacob; Volkov, Olga; Friedman, Mony; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Buskila, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a persistent and debilitating disorder estimated to impair the quality of life of 2–4% of the population, with 9:1 female-to-male incidence ratio. FMS is an important representative example of central nervous system sensitization and is associated with abnormal brain activity. Key symptoms include chronic widespread pain, allodynia and diffuse tenderness, along with fatigue and sleep disturbance. The syndrome is still elusive and refractory. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on symptoms and brain activity in FMS. Methods and Findings A prospective, active control, crossover clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned to treated and crossover groups: The treated group patients were evaluated at baseline and after HBOT. Patients in the crossover-control group were evaluated three times: baseline, after a control period of no treatment, and after HBOT. Evaluations consisted of physical examination, including tender point count and pain threshold, extensive evaluation of quality of life, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for evaluation of brain activity. The HBOT protocol comprised 40 sessions, 5 days/week, 90 minutes, 100% oxygen at 2ATA. Sixty female patients were included, aged 21–67 years and diagnosed with FMS at least 2 years earlier. HBOT in both groups led to significant amelioration of all FMS symptoms, with significant improvement in life quality. Analysis of SPECT imaging revealed rectification of the abnormal brain activity: decrease of the hyperactivity mainly in the posterior region and elevation of the reduced activity mainly in frontal areas. No improvement in any of the parameters was observed following the control period. Conclusions The study provides evidence that HBOT can improve the symptoms and life quality of FMS patients. Moreover, it shows that HBOT can induce neuroplasticity and significantly rectify abnormal

  18. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  19. [Regional intraosseous thrombolytic therapy in comprehensive treatment of patients with diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beliaev, A N; Rodin, A N; Kozlov, S A

    2016-01-01

    The authors assessed efficacy of regional intraosseous administration of urokinase medac in comprehensive treatment of patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome by means of analysing therapeutic results in a total of 65 patients presenting with pyonecrotic complications of diabetic foot. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups. The control group was composed of 35 patients receiving basic therapy. The study group comprised 30 patients subjected to comprehensive treatment including regional intraosseous (into the heel bone of the affected limb) administration of urokinase medac at a dose of 100 thousand IU for 5 days. Efficacy of treatment was evaluated by the course of the wound process, indices of haemostasis, free radical oxidation, results of surgical treatment. In patients of the Study Group the terms of wound purification from pyonecrotic masses amounted to 9.8±0.3 days, which was by 4.7 days less than in the Control Group patients (p<0.01), marginal epithelialization of wounds also occurred averagely by 6.4 days faster. On day 22 of using the basic therapy alone, the haemostasis system preserved the condition of coagulation activity. The Study Group patients as early as on day 5 of treatment demonstrated shifts towards normocoagulation. In the Control Group by day 22 of treatment, the level of malonic dialdehyde decreased by 18.5%, the index of catalase activity increased by 24.6% (p<0.05); in the Study Group the level of malonic dialdehyde decreased by 42.6% and catalase activity increased by 69.4% (p<0.01). On the background of using urokinase the number of high amputations decreased by 18% and the number of operations with the supporting function preserved decreased by 12% as compared with basic therapy alone. A conclusion was made that additional use of regional intraosseous administration of urokinase medac as compared with basic therapy alone promoted a more significant decrease in the coagulation activity of blood and the level of

  20. Benefits of long-term GH therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome: a 4-year study.

    PubMed

    Carrel, Aaron L; Myers, Susan E; Whitman, Barbara Y; Allen, David B

    2002-04-01

    Obesity, poor growth, and hypotonia in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are accompanied by abnormal body composition resembling a GH-deficient state. Hypothalamic dysfunction in PWS includes decreased GH secretion, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for GH treatment. While short-term benefits of treatment with GH have been shown, whether these beneficial effects are dose dependent and persist or wane with prolonged therapy remains uncertain. Effects of 24 additional months of GH treatment at varying doses (0.3, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/m(2).d) on growth, body composition, strength and agility, pulmonary function, resting energy expenditure (REE), and fat utilization were assessed in 46 children with PWS, who had previously been treated with GH therapy (1 mg/m(2).d) for 12-24 months. Percent body fat, lean muscle mass, and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Indirect calorimetry was used to determine REE and to calculate respiratory quotient. A modified Bruininks-Oseretski test of physical performance evaluated strength and agility. During months 24-48 of GH therapy, continued beneficial effects on body composition (decrease in fat mass and increase in lean body mass), growth velocity, and REE occurred with GH therapy doses of 1.0 and 1.5 mg/m(2).d (P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 mg/m(2).d. BMD continued to improve at all doses of GH (P < 0.05). Prior improvements in strength and agility that occurred during the initial 24 months were sustained but did not improve further during the additional 24 months regardless of dose. Salutary and sustained GH-induced changes in growth, body composition, BMD, and physical function in children with PWS can be achieved with daily administration of GH doses > or =1 mg/m(2). Lower doses of GH, (0.3 mg/m(2).d) effective in improving body composition in GHD adults, do not appear to be effective in children with PWS at sustaining improvement in body composition. PMID:11932286

  1. Outcome following Gene Therapy in Patients with Severe Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Blondeau, Johanna; Caccavelli, Laure; Charrier, Sabine; Buckland, Karen; Picard, Capucine; Six, Emmanuelle; Himoudi, Nourredine; Gilmour, Kimberly; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Hara, Havinder; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Rivat, Christine; Touzot, Fabien; Mavilio, Fulvio; Lim, Annick; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Héritier, Sébastien; Lefrere, Francois; Magalon, Jeremy; Pengue-Koyi, Isabelle; Honnet, Géraldine; Blanche, Stéphane; Sherman, Eric A.; Male, Frances; Berry, Charles; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Galy, Anne; Cavazzana, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Importance Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with severe microthrombocytopenia. Partially HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is associated with significant co-morbidity. Objective To assess the outcome and safety of autologous HSC gene therapy in WAS. Design Gene-corrected autologous HSC were infused in 7 consecutive WAS patients (age range: 0.8 to 15.5 years, mean 7 years) following myeloablative conditioning. Setting and participants: Patients with severe WAS lacking HLA-matched related or unrelated HSC donors were treated between December 2010 and January 2014. The follow up of patients in this intermediate analysis ranged from 9 to 42 months. Intervention A single infusion of gene-modified CD34+ cells with an advanced lentiviral vector. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Primary outcomes were improvement at 24 months in eczema, the frequency and severity of infections, bleeding tendency, autoimmunity and reduction in disease-related days of hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were improvement in immunological and haematological parameters, and evidence for safety through vector integration analysis. Results Six out of the 7 patients were alive at the time of last follow-up (mean and median follow-up time: 28 and 27 months respectively) and showed sustained clinical benefit. One patient died 7 months after treatment from pre-existing drug- resistant herpes virus infections. Eczema and susceptibility to infections resolved in all 6 patients. Autoimmunity improved in 5/5 patients. No severe bleeding episodes were recorded after treatment, and at last follow up 6/6 patients were free from blood product support and thrombopoietic agonists. Hospitalization days were reduced from 25 days (median) in the 2 years pretreatment to 0 days (median) in the 2 years post treatment. All 6 surviving patients exhibited high-level, stable engraftment of functionally corrected lymphoid cells. The degree of

  2. [Paradigm shift in the therapy of Wilkie's syndrome. From bowel reconstruction to transposition of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Grotemeyer, D; Pourhassan, S; Sandmann, W

    2009-04-01

    The superior mesenteric artery syndrome--also known as Wilkie's syndrome or as arteriomesenteric obstruction of the duodenum--is a rare condition of upper intestinal obstruction in which the third part of the duodenum is compressed by the overlying, narrow-angled superior mesenteric artery against the posterior structures. It is characterized by early satiety, recurrent vomiting, abdominal distention, weight loss and postprandial distress. When nonsurgical management is not possible or the problem is refractory, surgical intervention is necessary. Usually a reconstruction of the intestinal passage is performed. We report the first case of successful transposition of the superior mesenteric artery into the infrarenal aorta in the therapy of Wilkie's syndrome. PMID:19066831

  3. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Islam, Marjan; Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  4. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  5. The effectiveness of low laser therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo controlled double‐blind prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; AY, Saime; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Conflicting results were reported about the effectiveness of Low level laser therapy on musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 850‐nm gallium arsenide aluminum (Ga‐As‐Al) laser therapy on pain, range of motion and disability in subacromial impingement syndrome. METHODS: A total of 52 patients (33 females and 19 males with a mean age of 53.59±11.34 years) with subacromial impingement syndrome were included. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group I (n = 30, laser group) received laser therapy (5 joule/cm2 at each point over maximum 5‐6 painful points for 1 minute). Group II (n = 22, placebo laser group) received placebo laser therapy. Initially cold pack (10 minutes) was applied to all of the patients. Also patients were given an exercise program including range of motion, stretching and progressive resistive exercises. The therapy program was applied 5 times a week for 14 sessions. Pain severity was assessed by using visual analogue scale. Range of motion was measured by goniometer. Disability was evaluated by using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index. RESULTS: In group I, statistically significant improvements in pain severity, range of motion except internal and external rotation and SPADI scores were observed compared to baseline scores after the therapy (p<0.05). In Group II, all parameters except range of motion of external rotation were improved (p<0.05). However, no significant differences were recorded between the groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The Low level laser therapy seems to have no superiority over placebo laser therapy in reducing pain severity, range of motion and functional disability. PMID:21120304

  6. Allogeneic transplantation for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Litzow, Mark R.; Tarima, Sergey; Pérez, Waleska S.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Cutler, Corey S.; de Lima, Marcos; DiPersio, John F.; Gale, Robert Peter; Keating, Armand; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Luger, Selina; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Phillips, Gordon L.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDSs) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) have a poor prognosis with conventional therapy. Encouraging results are reported after allogeneic transplantation. We analyzed outcomes in 868 persons with t-AML (n = 545) or t-MDS (n = 323) receiving allogeneic transplants from 1990 to 2004. A myeloablative regimen was used for conditioning in 77%. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) and relapse were 41% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38-44) and 27% (24-30) at 1 year and 48% (44-51) and 31% (28-34) at 5 years, respectively. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 32% (95% CI, 29-36) and 37% (34-41) at 1 year and 21% (18-24) and 22% (19-26) at 5 years, respectively. In multivariate analysis, 4 risk factors had adverse impacts on DFS and OS: (1) age older than 35 years; (2) poor-risk cytogenetics; (3) t-AML not in remission or advanced t-MDS; and (4) donor other than an HLA-identical sibling or a partially or well-matched unrelated donor. Five-year survival for subjects with none, 1, 2, 3, or 4 of these risk factors was 50% (95% CI, 38-61), 26% (20-31), 21% (16-26), 10% (5-15), and 4% (0-16), respectively (P < .001). These data permit a more precise prediction of outcome and identify subjects most likely to benefit from allogeneic transplantation. PMID:20032503

  7. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  8. New therapies for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS):--a review.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V G

    1999-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been associated with high mortality. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology, recognition of precipitating events and improved management has decreased the mortality over the years. Mechanical ventilation is still the corner stone of the management of the disease. It is well recognised that high tidal volumes and airway pressures increase the morbidity, hence the need to use alternative modes of ventilation like pressure control with or without inverse ratio ventilation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is still experimental and not easily available, whereas prone position to improve oxygenation is simple and inexpensive. The concept of pathological oxygen dependency and therapy aimed at supranormal values has failed to improve survival. Restricting the fluids to prevent further oedema formation in an already wet lung has improved the survival rate. Nitric oxide and surfactant have failed to produce desirable effect in large studies. Pharmacological support to inhibit inflammation with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antifungal agents, prostaglandin and corticosteroids have all failed. Interestingly corticosteroid rescue treatment in the late phase of ARDS has shown promise. Antiendotoxin and anticytokine studies which began with much enthusiasm is yet to produce desirable results. PMID:10972019

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression following acute coronary syndromes: a concern for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Pourafkari, Nosratollah; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of depression in patients with cardiovascular disease is higher than general population and especially following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a significant number of patients report a wide spectrum of behavioral and mood changes attributable to clinical depression. Treatment of depression following ACS event is particularly challenging since most of the therapeutic modalities are associated with increasing the systemic sympathetic tone from neurogenic or pharmacologic sources. Increased activity of the adrenergic and catecholamine activity may further deter the myocardial oxygen supply and demand therefore treating depression should be carefully evaluated for its risk benefit ratio. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is recommended for patients with severe depression, in whom behavioral and pharmacologic treatments have failed. Patients who refuse to take medications or present with any psychological emergency such as harming self or others, are also candidates for ECT. ECT is also associated with sudden surges of catecholamines and may cause recurrent myocardial ischemia and fatal dysrhythmias in patients convalescing from an ACS event. Herein, we provide an overview and practical guidelines for management of patients presented for ECT following ACS. PMID:27185716

  10. Thai Elephant-Assisted Therapy Programme in Children with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Satiansukpong, Nuntanee; Pongsaksri, Maethisa; Sasat, Daranee

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of the Thai Elephant-Assisted Therapy Programme for children with Down syndrome (DS) (TETP-D) on balance, postural control and visual motor integration (VMI). A quasi-experimental design with blind control was used. Sixteen children with DS from grades 1 to 6, in a Thailand, public school were recruited for this study. The participants were divided voluntarily into two groups: control and experimental. These both groups received regular school activities, but the experimental group had added treatment, which consisted of TETP-D twice a week for 2 months. The balance subtest of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2, the postural control record form and Beery VMI were applied as outcome measure 1 week before and after the TETP-D. The results showed no significant difference in balance or postural control. However, a significant difference of VMI was shown between the two groups (z = 13.5, p = .04). Children with DS benefited from the TETP-D as it improved their VMI. The TETP-D could improve balance and postural control if provided within a suitable frequency and duration. Further research is needed to test this hypothesis. The limitations of this study are the significant differences in some aspects of the groups at pre-test such as gender and supine flexion of postural control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26728446

  11. Comparison of efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subaşı, Volkan; Çakır, Tuncay; Arıca, Zuhal; Sarıer, Rahime Nur; Filiz, Meral Bilgilisoy; Doğan, Şebnem Koldaş; Toraman, Naciye Füsun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Seventy patients diagnosed with SIS were randomly assigned to group 1 (n = 35, injection group) or group 2 (n = 35, kinesiological taping group). Betamethasone plus prilocaine was injected to subacromial space in the patients in group 1. In group 2, tape was applied three times for a period of five consecutive days with a 2-day recovery interval. A 3-month exercise program was prescribed for both groups including stretching and strengthening exercises. All patients were assessed at baseline and at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Assessments were made by visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM) measurements, specific tests, and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI). Significant differences were detected in VAS and SPADI scores as well as ROM measurements in both groups when compared to baseline (p > 0.05). No significant differences were detected between the groups except for active flexion degree in favor of group 1 (p = 0.004). Both kinesiological taping and steroid injection in conjunction with an exercise program were found to be effective in the treatment of SIS. Kinesio taping may be an alternative treatment option in the rehabilitation of SIS especially when a non-invasive technique is needed. PMID:25403253

  12. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS. PMID:27268087

  13. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Zacarías-Flores, Mariano; Castrejón-Delgado, Lizett; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Ana Karen; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT) on oxidative stress (OS) in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW) and MetS women (MSW) were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone) or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS) ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%), their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05) and OS was also reduced (44%), this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%). In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women. PMID:27563883

  14. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome during sunitinib therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hadj, Jamal Oulad; Braven, Rogier DEN; Tillier, Corrine; Schrijver, Hans M; Verheul, Henk M W; VAN DER Vliet, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Sunitinib is an oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic and antitumor activity that is approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Well-known side effects of sunitinib include hypertension, fatigue, thyroid dysfunction, cardiotoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity and skin toxicity. In this study, we report the case of a 61-year-old male with papillary metastatic RCC who responded to sunitinib but developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures during the third cycle. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compatible with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). After the administration of anti-epileptic drugs and the withdrawal of sunitinib there was rapid clinical improvement. Notably, radiological characteristics of RPLS persisted during second-line therapy with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and only resolved when everolimus was terminated due to disease progression. Although sunitinib-induced RPLS has been reported previously, our case is the first to additionally suggest that everolimus may sustain and therefore potentially contribute to the occurrence of RPLS. PMID:22783436

  15. CYP2C19 polymorphisms in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y M; Zhao, Z C; Zhang, L; Li, H Z; Li, Z; Sun, H L

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the polymorphisms of CYP2C19 (CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou city for guidance on clinical medication and reduction in the incidence of thromboembolic events. Two hundred and thirty-four ACS patients undergoing PCI were included in the study, including 171 males (average age = 64.13 ± 12 years) and 63 females (average age = 67.86 ± 10.20 years). Pyrosequencing analysis detected CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes, which were divided into wild-type homozygous C/C, mutant heterozygous C/T, and mutant homozygous T/T. This study further explored the relationship between CYP2C19 polymorphisms and clopidogrel resistance in ACS patients. Gene frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*2 were 39.74, 50, and 10.26%, respectively, while the frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*3 were 94.02, 5.55, and 0.43%, respectively. According to platelet aggregation analysis, 203 cases normally responded to clopidogrel (86.8%) and 31 cases were clopidogrel resistant (13.2%). There was a correlation between gender and genotype distribution but none between age and genotype. In addition, patients with clopidogrel resistance were treated with ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy instead of clopidogrel, and only 1 case in all patients suffered thrombotic events during a 3-12 month follow-up. In conclusion, CYP2C19*2/*3 polymorphisms may be associated with clopidogrel resistance. Wild-type homozygote and single mutant heterozygote of CYP2C19*2/*3 can be given a normal dose of clopidogrel, while carriers with single mutant homozygote or double mutant heterozygote require ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy as an alternative. PMID:27323099

  16. Probable case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir.

    PubMed

    Suga, Takayoshi; Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-12-16

    A 66-year-old, interferon-ineligible, treatment-naive man who was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C due to hepatitis C virus genotype 1b began combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. On day 14 of treatment, hepatic reserve and renal function deterioration was observed, while his transaminase levels were normal. Both daclatasvir and asunaprevir were discontinued on day 18 of treatment, because the patient complained of dark urine and a rash on his trunk and four limbs. After discontinuing antiviral therapy, the abnormal laboratory finding and clinical manifestations gradually improved, without recurrence. Our case fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of probable drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome. Despite the 18-d treatment, sustained virological response 12 was achieved. Based on the clinical course, we concluded that there was a clear cause-and-effect relationship between the treatment and adverse events. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first case of probable DRESS syndrome that includes concomitant deterioration of hepatic reserve and renal function due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir, regardless of normalization of transaminase levels. Our case suggests that we should pay attention not only to the transaminase levels but also to allergic symptoms associated with organ involvement during combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. PMID:26677451

  17. Probable case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Takayoshi; Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old, interferon-ineligible, treatment-naive man who was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C due to hepatitis C virus genotype 1b began combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. On day 14 of treatment, hepatic reserve and renal function deterioration was observed, while his transaminase levels were normal. Both daclatasvir and asunaprevir were discontinued on day 18 of treatment, because the patient complained of dark urine and a rash on his trunk and four limbs. After discontinuing antiviral therapy, the abnormal laboratory finding and clinical manifestations gradually improved, without recurrence. Our case fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of probable drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome. Despite the 18-d treatment, sustained virological response 12 was achieved. Based on the clinical course, we concluded that there was a clear cause-and-effect relationship between the treatment and adverse events. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first case of probable DRESS syndrome that includes concomitant deterioration of hepatic reserve and renal function due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir, regardless of normalization of transaminase levels. Our case suggests that we should pay attention not only to the transaminase levels but also to allergic symptoms associated with organ involvement during combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. PMID:26677451

  18. Surfactant therapy in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and in near-term or term newborns with acute RDS.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, R

    2006-05-01

    Many different surfactant preparations derived from animal sources, as well as synthetic surfactants, are available for the treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Natural, modified surfactants containing surfactant-associated proteins appear to be more effective than non-protein-containing synthetic surfactants. Comparative trials with poractant alfa at a higher initial dose of 200 mg/kg appear to be associated with rapid weaning of FiO2, less need for additional doses, and decreased mortality in infants <32 weeks gestation when compared with beractant. Early rescue (<30 min of age) surfactant therapy is an effective method to minimize over treatment of some preterm infants who may not develop RDS. Surfactant therapy followed by rapid extubation to nasal ventilation appears to be more beneficial than continued mechanical ventilation. In near-term or term newborns with acute RDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be 70% effective in improving respiratory failure. PMID:16625226

  19. LEGO[R] Therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme: An Evaluation of Two Social Skills Interventions for Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Gina; Granader, Yael; Humphrey, Ayla; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    LEGO[R] therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme (SULP) were evaluated as social skills interventions for 6-11 year olds with high functioning autism and Asperger Syndrome. Children were matched on CA, IQ, and autistic symptoms before being randomly assigned to LEGO or SULP. Therapy occurred for 1 h/week over 18 weeks. A no-intervention…

  20. Effect of metformin therapy on 2-h post-glucose insulin levels in patients of polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pikee; Prakash, Anupam; Nigam, Aruna

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate if 2-h post glucose insulin level is an effective tool to monitor insulin resistance in response to metformin therapy, in infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This prospective observational study was carried out in a tertiary care infertility clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 40 women with PCOS were categorized as having insulin resistance if fasting or 2-h post glucose insulin levels were >25 or >41μU/ml respectively. Post glucose insulin was compared before and after six months of metformin therapy along with other clinical, hormonal and metabolic parameters by using McNemar and the Student’s t-test. RESULTS: Fasting insulin was elevated in 4 (10%) and post-load insulin in 34 (85%) patients; after metformin therapy respective values were 2 (5%) and 16 (40%). Metformin therapy reduced post glucose insulin levels (P<0.001), improved the regularity of periods (P<0.001) and resulted in reduction of LH levels (P<0.001), total testosterone (P<0.001) and mean Body mass index (BMI) (P=0.047). Metformin therapy did not alter waist-hip ratio and fasting insulin levels. CONCLUSION: 2-h post glucose insulin level is an effective tool to monitor insulin resistance in PCOS patients and improves significantly after metformin therapy, similar to improvements observed in clinical, hormonal and metabolic parameters. PMID:21234175

  1. [Efficacy of alcohol withdrawal syndrome therapy in patients from Independent Public Hospital for Mental Diseases in Miedzyrzecz].

    PubMed

    Szymański, Michal; Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Jabłecka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol is a serious social problem. Research on alcohol addicts prove that its consumption affects the physical and mental health of drinking person, his/her family and the social dimension (eg. crime, unemployment, poverty). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AW) in patients of 2417 Unit of Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndromes of Independent Public Hospital for Mental Diseases (SPSNPCH) in Miedzyrzecz. The study was conducted in 122 of 24/7 Unit of Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndromes (SPSNPCH) treated from January to March 2015. Patients during hospitalization were subjected to intensive pharmacotherapy of AW (Stage I) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (Stage II). Of the group of 122 people starting treatment Stage I was completed by 112 patients (90%); 10 patients (8%) have been discharged at their own request. The participation in Stage II was consented only by 54 patients, of which 6 (4%) withdrew from this form of therapy. Full two-stage treatment consisting of pharmacotherapy of AWS and then psychotherapy was completed only by 48 (39%) patients. PMID:26946557

  2. Targeted therapy of short-bowel syndrome with teduglutide: the new kid on the block.

    PubMed

    Vipperla, Kishore; O'Keefe, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Extensive intestinal resection impairs the absorptive capacity and results in short-bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF), when fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, micro-, and macronutrient homeostasis cannot be maintained on a conventional oral diet. Several factors, including the length and site of the resected intestine, anatomical conformation of the remnant bowel, and the degree of postresection intestinal adaptation determine the disease severity. While mild SBS patients achieve nutritional autonomy with dietary modification (eg, hyperphagia, small frequent meals, and oral rehydration fluids), those with moderate-to-severe disease may develop SBS-IF and become dependent on parenteral support (PS) in the form of intravenous fluids and/or nutrition for sustenance of life. SBS-IF is a chronic debilitating disease associated with a poor quality of life, and carries significant morbidity and health care costs. Medical management of SBS-IF is primarily focused on individually tailored symptomatic treatment strategies, such as antisecretory and antidiarrheal agents to mitigate fluid losses, and PS. However, PS administration is associated with potentially life-threatening complications, such as central venous thromboses, bloodstream infections, and liver disease. In pursuit of a targeted therapy to augment intestinal adaptation, research over the past 2 decades has identified glucagon-like peptide, an intestinotrophic gut peptide that has been shown to enhance intestinal absorptive capacity by causing an increase in the villus length, crypt depth, and mesenteric blood flow and by decreasing gastrointestinal motility and secretions. Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, is the first targeted therapeutic agent to gain approval for use in adult SBS-IF. Teduglutide was shown to result in significant (20%-100%) reduction in PS-volume requirement and have a satisfactory safety profile in three randomized control trials. Further research

  3. Persistence of the benefit of an antioxidant therapy in children and teenagers with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parisotto, Eduardo Benedetti; Giaretta, Andréia Gonçalves; Zamoner, Ariane; Moreira, Emilia Addison Machado; Fröde, Tânia Silvia; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi; Filho, Danilo Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an antioxidant intervention in biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) in the blood of Down syndrome (DS) children and teenagers during four different stages. A control group was composed by healthy children (n=18), assessed once, and a Down group composed by DS patients (n=21) assessed at the basal period (t0), as well as after 6 months of antioxidant supplementation (t1), after 12 months (after interruption of the antioxidant intervention for 6 months) (t2), and again after further 6 months of antioxidant supplementation (t3). Biomarkers of inflammation (myeloperoxidase activity - MPO and levels of IL-1β and TNF-α) and OS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances - TBARS, protein carbonyls - PC), reduced glutathione (GSH), uric acid (UA) and vitamin E levels, as well as antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activities, were measured after each period. After the antioxidant supplementation, the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GGT and MPO were downregulated, while TBARS contents were strongly decreased, the contents of GSH and vitamin E were significantly increased, and no changes in G6PD and GST activity as well as in UA and PC levels were detected. After the interruption of the antioxidant therapy for 6 months, DS patients showed elevated GPx and GGT activities and also elevated UA and TBARS levels. No changes in SOD, CAT, GR, GST, G6PD and MPO activities as well as in GSH, vitamin E, PC, TNF-α and IL-1β levels were detected. The results showed that the antioxidant intervention persistently attenuated the systemic oxidative damage in DS patients even after a relatively long period of cessation of the antioxidant intervention. PMID:26207872

  4. The long QT syndrome: a transatlantic clinical approach to diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Peter J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The mind-boggling progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the long QT syndrome (LQTS) has been the subject of many articles and reviews. Still, when it comes to the management of the patients affected by this life-threatening disorder, too many errors still take place, both in the diagnostic process and in the therapeutic choices. The price of these errors is paid by the patients and their families. This review is not directed to the relatively small number of LQTS experts who know what to do. It does not deal with genetics, with epidemiology, or with the well-known clinical manifestations. We have focused solely on the approach to diagnosis and therapy and we have directed this review to the average clinical cardiologist who, in his/her practice, sees occasionally patients affected or suspected to be affected by LQTS; the cardiologist who may know enough to manage them but not enough to be completely confident on his/her most critical choices. We have provided our personal views without making any attempt to blend differences whenever present. On most issues we agree fully but where we do not, we make it clear to the reader by indicating who is thinking what. The result may be unconventional, but it mirrors the challenges, often severe, that we all face in managing and protecting these patients from sudden death while also helping them live and thrive despite their diagnosis. We trust that this unabashed presentation of our clinical approach will be useful for both cardiologists and patients. PMID:23509228

  5. Targeted therapy of short-bowel syndrome with teduglutide: the new kid on the block

    PubMed Central

    Vipperla, Kishore; O’Keefe, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Extensive intestinal resection impairs the absorptive capacity and results in short-bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF), when fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, micro-, and macronutrient homeostasis cannot be maintained on a conventional oral diet. Several factors, including the length and site of the resected intestine, anatomical conformation of the remnant bowel, and the degree of postresection intestinal adaptation determine the disease severity. While mild SBS patients achieve nutritional autonomy with dietary modification (eg, hyperphagia, small frequent meals, and oral rehydration fluids), those with moderate-to-severe disease may develop SBS-IF and become dependent on parenteral support (PS) in the form of intravenous fluids and/or nutrition for sustenance of life. SBS-IF is a chronic debilitating disease associated with a poor quality of life, and carries significant morbidity and health care costs. Medical management of SBS-IF is primarily focused on individually tailored symptomatic treatment strategies, such as antisecretory and antidiarrheal agents to mitigate fluid losses, and PS. However, PS administration is associated with potentially life-threatening complications, such as central venous thromboses, bloodstream infections, and liver disease. In pursuit of a targeted therapy to augment intestinal adaptation, research over the past 2 decades has identified glucagon-like peptide, an intestinotrophic gut peptide that has been shown to enhance intestinal absorptive capacity by causing an increase in the villus length, crypt depth, and mesenteric blood flow and by decreasing gastrointestinal motility and secretions. Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, is the first targeted therapeutic agent to gain approval for use in adult SBS-IF. Teduglutide was shown to result in significant (20%–100%) reduction in PS-volume requirement and have a satisfactory safety profile in three randomized control trials. Further

  6. The prevalence and correlates of mind-body therapy practices in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Yvonne W.; Tamim, Hala; Stewart, Donna E.; Arthur, Heather M.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives While the benefits of mind-body therapy (MBT) for cardiac secondary prevention continues to be investigated, the prevalence of such practices by cardiac patients is not well known. The aim of this study was to quantitatively examine the prevalence of MBT practice and its sociodemographic, clinical, psychosocial and behavioral correlates among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods Six hundred and sixty-one ACS in-patients (75% response rate) recruited from three hospitals completed a demographic survey, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Four hundred and sixty five patients (81% retention rate; 110 (23.7%) female) responded to an 18-month post-discharge survey that queried about MBT use and its correlates. Results One hundred and sixty-three (35.1%) ACS patients practised MBT in their lifetime, and 118 (25.4%) were currently practising. MBT users were more often women (OR = 2.98), non-white (OR = 2.17), had higher levels of education (OR = 2.22), past smokers (OR = 3.33), reported poorer mental health (OR =2.15), and engaged in more exercise (OR = 1.65). Conclusion One-third of ACS patients practised some form of MBT. The greater MBT practice among female ACS patients is noteworthy, given their generally lower physical activity and lower receipt of evidence-based treatments including cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, there is some evidence that MBT can promote mental well-being, and thus such practice might reduce risk related to negative affect in cardiac patients. PMID:19186341

  7. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  8. Antioxidant therapy improves non-thyroidal illness syndrome in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pingping; Li, Yun; Xu, Gaosi

    2016-05-01

    Background The roles of antioxidant therapy on non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) in uremic rats is still unclear. Materials and methods Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into blank, 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx), pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 10 mg/100 g), sodium bicarbonate (SB, 0.1 g/100 g), N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 80 mg/100 g) and thyroid hormones (TH, levothyroxine 2 μg/100 g) groups. The serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), interleukin (IL)-1β, free triiodothyronine (FT3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were detected in the sixth week. The expressions of IL-1β and deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) were assessed by western blotting. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory signal pathway was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results Compared with 5/6 Nx group, PDTC and NAC significantly reduced the levels (p < 0.01, respectively) of serum MDA, AOPP, TSH, and elevated levels of serum SOD (p < 0.01, respectively) and FT3 (p = 0.016 and p < 0.01). Neither had significant effects on serum IL-1β content (p = 0.612 and p = 0.582). PDTC and NAC markedly decreased the protein expression of IL-1β (p < 0.01) and increased the protein expression of DIO1 (p < 0.01), respectively. Both had been considerably blunted NF-κB activity (p < 0.01). Conclusions In uremic rat model, PDTC and NAC can effectively improve oxidative stress level and NTIS. In terms of improving oxidative stress level, NAC is probably superior to PDTC. PMID:26895214

  9. Identification of Down's syndrome critical locus gene SIM2-s as a drug therapy target for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    DeYoung, Maurice Phil; Tress, Matthew; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2003-04-15

    We report here a cancer drug therapy use of a gene involved in Down's syndrome. Using bioinformatics approaches, we recently predicted Single Minded 2 gene (SIM2) from Down's syndrome critical region to be specific to certain solid tumors. Involvement of SIM2 in solid tumors has not previously been reported. Intrigued by a possible association between a Down's syndrome gene and solid tumors, we monitored SIM2 expression in solid tumors. Isoform-specific expression of SIM2 short-form (SIM2-s) was seen selectively in colon, prostate, and pancreatic carcinomas but not in breast, lung, or ovarian carcinomas nor in most normal tissues. In colon tumors, SIM2-s expression was seen in early stages. Antisense inhibition of SIM2-s expression in a colon cancer cell line caused inhibition of gene expression, growth inhibition, and apoptosis. The administration of the antisense, but not the control, oligonucleotides caused a pronounced inhibition of tumor growth in nude mice with no major toxicity. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the genes-to-drugs paradigm, establish SIM2-s as a molecular target for cancer therapeutics, and may further understanding of the cancer risk of Down's syndrome patients. PMID:12676991

  10. [Outcome of two patients with Hurler's syndrome under enzyme replacement therapy with human recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase].

    PubMed

    Sardón, O; García Pardos, C; Mintegui, J; Pérez Ruiz, E; Coll, M J; Chabás, A; Olivé, T; Ruiz Benito, A

    2005-07-01

    We performed a prospective study of two patients with Hurler's syndrome (aged 4.8 years and 17 months at the beginning of the intervention) under enzyme replacement therapy with human recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase for 452 and 28 weeks respectively. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety and efficacy of the intervention during the treatment periods. Several diagnostic imaging tests, clinical examinations, and serial laboratory determinations were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the therapy in both patients. In patient 1 (a boy aged 4.8 years, homozygote W402X), the treatment was always intended to be palliative because of the advanced stage of the disease. In patient 2 (a 17-month-old girl, heterozygote W402X) the treatment was initiated early with subsequent clinical stabilization without acquisition of regressive factors. Bone marrow transplantation from an unrelated donor was successful. Currently, because of the lack of histocompatible bone marrow donors, transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood are being performed with satisfactory results. In the future, gene therapy may be able to prevent the diseases associated with Hurler's syndrome and halt the neurocognitive deterioration characteristic of these patients. PMID:15989873

  11. Physiological responses to psychological challenge under hypnosis in patients considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, L J; Conway, A; Nixon, P G

    1986-01-01

    Thirty patients who were considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome on clinical grounds (history and observation) were referred for testing: 29 patients completed a forced hyperventilation provocation test, and 28 underwent hypnosis during which time a psychological challenge was introduced which was meaningful to each individual patient. In 19/27 of these patients the PetCO2 fell by an average of 18.2 mmHg and persisted spontaneously for more than three minutes. In 10 normal controls studied in a similar fashion there was an average fall of 5 mmHg. The difference in response between responders and controls/non-responders was highly significant (P less than 0.001). A review of the literature is presented for comparison. It is considered that a psychological challenge under hypnosis may have important implications for diagnosis and therapy in some patients considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:3081708

  12. Treatment results of high dose cabergoline as an adjuvant therapy in six patients with established severe ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Akbari Sene, Azadeh; Salehpour, Saghar; Tamimi, Maryam; Vasheghani Farahani, Masoumeh; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The beneficial role of cabergoline as a prophylactic agent to prevent ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) among high-risk patients has been demonstrated in previous studies. But data for its role as a treatment for established severe OHSS is still limited. We represent the treatment results of high dose oral cabergoline in management of six patients after the syndrome is established. Case: High-dose oral cabergoline (1 mg daily for eight days) was prescribed as an adjuvant to symptomatic treatment for six hospitalized patients with established severe OHSS following infertility treatment cycles. In two cases OHSS resolved rapidly despite the occurrence of ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: Considering the treatment outcomes of our patients, high dose cabergoline did not eliminate the need for traditional treatments, but it was a relatively effective and safe therapy in management of established severe OHSS, and prevented the increase in its severity following the occurrence of pregnancy. PMID:25469130

  13. Scheie syndrome: enzyme replacement therapy does not prevent progression of cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Illsinger, S; Lücke, T; Hartmann, H; Mengel, E; Müller-Forell, W; Donnerstag, F; Das, A M

    2009-12-01

    Hurler-Scheie syndrome is caused by alpha-l-iduronidase deficiency. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can improve physical capacity and reduces organomegaly. However, the effect on bradytrophic connective tissue is limited. As intravenously administered enzyme cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, the therapy of choice for the more severe Hurler syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). In the more attenuated Scheie syndrome, neurological impairment is less severe; therefore, ERT may be appropriate to treat these patients. Information on long-term outcome in Scheie patients undergoing ERT is scarce. We report a 38-year-old female Scheie patient who has been on ERT for 8 years. While non-neurological symptoms improved, she developed paresthesias in her hands and feet and progressive pain in her legs. Somatosensory evoked potentials were abnormal, suggesting dysfunction of the dorsal funiculus and lemniscus medialis. After 6 years of ERT, a spinal MRI showed dural thickening at the upper cervical spine. These soft-tissue deposits are presumably due to the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides. Intramedullary hyperintensities at the level of C1/2 revealed cervical myelopathy. An MRI before the start of ERT had shown milder spinal lesions. Cystic lesions in the white matter of the centrum semiovale due to dilated Virchow-Robin spaces were essentially unchanged compared with the MRI scan before ERT. Decompression of the spinal cord resulted in clinical improvement. In an adult patient with Scheie syndrome, ERT failed to prevent progression of cervical myelopathy. Clinical significance of cerebral changes is unclear. Whether early HCT or intrathecal ERT could have prevented these lesions remains speculative. PMID:19894140

  14. [Urination disorders in the man: differential diagnoses and therapy of benign prostate syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Schmid, Hans-Peter

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms in men are highly associated with benign prostate syndrome. Nevertheless, a correct diagnosis is required to exclude other pathologies. In addition to neurogenic causes other urological differential diagnoses can be clarified and treated. If diagnosis of benign prostatic syndrome is confirmed, various medical and surgical treatment options are available. PMID:24088234

  15. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy is associated with improvement in overactive bladder symptoms in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ipekci, Tumay; Cetintas, Gulgun; Celik, Orcun; Sarac, Sema; Tunckiran, Ahmet; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Material and methods One-hundred and fifty women underwent an overnight polysomnography study between May 2014 and September 2014. Their voiding symptoms were evaluated using the OAB symptom score (OABSS) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short-Form at OSAS diagnosis and approximately 3-months after CPAP therapy. OSAS severity was assessed according to the apnea-hypopnea-index. Results We evaluated 140 women and 111 of them (79.3%) reported symptoms consistent with OAB. There were no statistically significant differences between OSAS severity with a prevalence of OAB (p = 0.92). The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) was 35.7% (n = 50) and 39.6% (n = 44) in all patients and patients with OAB, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between UI with OAB (p = 0.58). Baseline OABSS is comparable between OSAS severity (p = 0.143). After 3-months CPAP therapy, OABSS and ICIQ-SF sum scores were significantly decreased in patients with severe and moderate OSAS (p <0.01), however, change of OABSS sum score was insignificant in patients with mild OSAS (p = 0.44). Conclusions CPAP therapy improves the OAB, OABSS and ICIQ-SF scores in women with severe and moderate OSAS. OSAS-induced OAB may be alleviated following CPAP therapy. PMID:27123331

  16. Psychological Therapies in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Altayar, Osama; Prokop, Larry J.; Sood, Amit; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disease with few effective treatments. Psychosocial factors are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBS. Objective. To evaluate the evidence for psychological therapies in IBS treatment. Methods. We searched six medical databases through February 6, 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological therapies for the treatment of IBS. Two independent reviewers identified the RCTs, extracted the data, and assessed trial quality. We used the random-effect model to pool standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) across trials. Results. 15 RCTs that mostly evaluated cognitive behavioral therapy were included. Psychological therapies were associated with improvement in IBS symptoms severity scales (SMD −0.618; 95% CI: −0.853 to −0.383), IBS-Quality of Life (SMD 0.604; 95% CI: 0.440 to 0.768), and abdominal pain (SMD −0.282; 95% CI: −0.562 to −0.001). No statistically significant effect was observed on diarrhea or constipation. Limitations. The trials were at increased risk of bias and the overall sample size was small leading to imprecision. Conclusion. Psychological therapies may improve the quality of life and symptom severity in IBS. The effect size noted is moderate to large and is clinically meaningful. PMID:25802514

  17. [ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AND LIPID-LOWERING THERAPY. DOES THE IMPROVE-IT STUDY MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE?].

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, P; Pierard, L A; Scheen, A J

    2015-09-01

    Statins reduce both LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Intensive statin therapy, compared with moderate-dose statin therapy, incrementally lowers LDL-C levels and rates of cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Ezetimibe, by diminishing the absorption of cholesterol from the intestine, additionally reduces LDL-C when added to statins. In this article, we discuss the potential benefits of the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe for the long-term management of patients with acute coronary syndrome through an analysis of the IMPROVE-IT results (IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial). This randomised double blind trial included 18,144 patients with a LDL-C of 50 to 100 (with statin) or 125 (without statin) mg/dl and had a median follow-up of 6 years. The objective of the study was to test the efficacy of simvastatin 40 mg versus simvastatin 40 mg and 10 mg ezetimibe. The primary endpoint included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina and coronary revascularization. The addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin resulted in an incremental lowering of LDL-C (reached value 53.2 versus 69.9 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and a further improvement of the patient prognosis (relative reduction of primary endpoint: -6.4%, p = 0.016). In addition, the combined therapy showed no significant adverse effects, particularly regarding the risk of cancers, which confirms the safety of ezetimibe. In acute coronary syndrome, the prescription of ezetimibe should be considered (class HA, level of evidence B) in patients with a LDL-C a 70 mg/dl despite maximally tolerated dose of statin. PMID:26638446

  18. [Schnitzler syndrome: case report, the experience with glucocorticoid and anakinra (Kineret) therapies and monitoring of systemic cytokine response].

    PubMed

    Szturz, P; Adam, Z; Klabusay, M; Fojtík, Z; Kadanka, Z; Stehlíková, O; Chovancová, J; Kalvodová, L; Corbová, D; Starý, K; Neubauer, J; Prásek, J; Koukalová, R; Rehák, Z; Hájek, R; Mayer, J

    2011-01-01

    Schnitzler syndrome is a rare idiopathic disease characterized by chronic urtica, presence of monoclonal IgM immunoglobuline and further, less common symptoms. This case report describes another case of this disease affecting a male adult born in 1963. The first symptoms, eruptions of non-pruritic urticarial rash, appeared in this patient at the age of 43. In addition, bone pains (mainly tibias) and joint pains (mainly knees) were present. Later on however, severe attacks of fever, chills and shaking together with bone and joint pains were added to during which new urticarial eruptions appeared. Primarily, the man was followed up without any substantial therapeutic results at a department of dermatovenerology, subsequently, due to a finding of monoclonal IgM kappa immunoglobulin (serum concentration 1.9 g/l) he was referred to our department for the reason of gammopathy being a differential diagnosis. On a CT scan hyperostosis in claviculae and pelvic bones was identified. Also on the CT, an increase in cortical thickness was described in the long bones of the lower extremities, where areas of technetium pyrophosphate accumulation were identified on a bone scintigraphy. These areas were found in the chest and sacral regions as well. From the blood exams, the proinflammatory status of the organism was apparent (CRP 35.9 mg/l, erythrocyte sedimentation rate 92 mm/h, leukocytes 12.4 x 10(9)/l). After excluding other differential diagnoses, the patient was diagnosed with Schnitzler syndrome. As regards therapy, we made initial use of the effect of corticoids which abated the symptoms, however, these were causing serious adverse reactions in the form of iatrogenous Cushing's syndrome. The therapy took a turn only after biologic therapy with anakinra (interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) had started, which minimized the Schnitzler symptoms with very good drug tolerance. In the work we measured serum levels of interleukins for disease activity monitoring. The most sensitive

  19. Appropriate antiplatelet and antithrombotic therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes: recent updates to the ACC/AHA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shamir R

    2002-12-01

    Thrombosis is the most important pathological mechanism of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). In addition to standard antithrombotic treatment with aspirin and heparin, clopidogrel, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, and low-molecular-weight have a therapeutic benefit in ACS patients. Updated American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for the management of ACS patients were published in mid-2002, and this article summarizes the rationale for the recommendations outlined in these guidelines for the use of antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapies. PMID:12668860

  20. Challenges in understanding Sjögren's syndrome - improved insights into the pathogenesis generate hope for innovative therapies?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The reviews in this series on Sjögren syndrome provide an up-to-date summary and perspectives on the pathogenesis of this interesting entity with glandular and frequently systemic manifestations, the value of preclinical models, and our current understanding of therapeutic approaches. The last of these includes what has been learned from trials blocking tumor necrosis factor and, more recently, anti-CD20 therapy. Potential therapeutic targets, such as blockade of the B cell-activating factor, the role of interferon-alpha, and targeting CD22, are discussed. PMID:21888689

  1. Linezolid-Induced Near-Fatal Serotonin Syndrome During Escitalopram Therapy: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Kulkarni, Pratibha R.

    2013-01-01

    Linezolid is a synthetic antimicrobial agent of the oxazolidinone class with weak, nonspecific inhibitor of monoamine oxidase enzymes. Concomitant therapy with an adrenergic or serotonergic agent or consuming tyramine (>100 mg/day) may induce serotonin syndrome (SS). We present a case report of near-fatal adverse interaction between linezolid and escitalopram inducing SS in a 65-year-old woman with sepsis, under empirical antibiotic treatment. This report also summarizes the current relevant literature as identified via PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO, supplemented with a manual search of cross references. PMID:24379509

  2. Salvage therapy with high dose Intravenous Immunoglobulins in acquired Von Willebrand Syndrome and unresponsive severe intestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 91-year-old woman affected with acquired Von Willebrand (VW) syndrome and intestinal angiodysplasias presented with severe gastrointestinal bleeding (hemoglobin 5 g/dl). Despite replacement therapy with VW factor/factor VIII concentrate qid, bleeding did not stop (eleven packed red blood cell units were transfused over three days). High circulating levels of anti-VW factor immunoglobulin M were documented immunoenzimatically. Heart ultrasound showed abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves with severe flow alterations. When intravenous immunoglobulins were added to therapy, prompt clinical and laboratory responses occurred: complete cessation of bleeding, raise in hemoglobin, VW factor antigen, VW ristocetin cofactor and factor VIII levels as well as progressive reduction of the anti-VWF autoantibody levels. PMID:24926417

  3. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) syndrome. Methods In this monocentric, randomized, patient-assessor blinded, placebo-controlled trial, patients with HSP were randomly divided into the rESWT (n=17) and control (n=17) groups. Treatment was administered four times a week for 2 weeks. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Constant-Murley score (CS) were assessed before and after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks. The Modified Ashworth Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores and range of motion of the shoulder were also assessed. Results VAS scores improved post-intervention and at the 2-week and 4-week follow-up in the intervention group (p<0.05). Respective differences in VAS scores between baseline and post-intervention in the intervention and control groups were –1.69±1.90 and –0.45±0.79, respectively (p<0.05), between baseline and 2-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.60±1.74 and –0.34±0.70, respectively (p<0.05), and between baseline and 4-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.61±1.73 and –0.33±0.71, respectively (p<0.05). Baseline CS improved from 19.12±11.02 to 20.88±10.37 post-intervention and to 20.41±10.82 at the 2-week follow-up only in the intervention group (p<0.05). Conclusion rESWT consisting of eight sessions could be one of the effective and safe modalities for pain management in people with HSP. Further studies are needed to generalize and support these results in patients with HSP and a variety conditions, and to understand the mechanism of rESWT for treating HSP. PMID:27446789

  4. In what type of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome is DMSO intravesical instillation therapy effective?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is the most-used agent for intravesical instillation. We conducted this retrospective clinical study to determine in what type of the interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) DMSO was effective. Methods We combined DMSO with hydrodistension in 2003 and from 2004 we performed hydrodistension alone. Hydrodistension had been performed in 7 cases of IC/BPS with Hunner’s lesions (H group) and 7 cases of IC/BPS without Hunner’s lesions (non-H group), and they served as the control group (C group; n=14). There was also a DMSO group (D group; n=14) that consisted of an H group of 7 cases and an non-H group of 7 cases in which the hydrodistension had been immediately followed by intravesical instillation of 50% DMSO 50 mL. Before, and 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months (M) after the intervention, the patients were asked to complete a 4-day frequency-volume chart (FVC) and the O’Leary-Sant IC symptom index (ICSI) questionnaire and IC problem index (ICPI) questionnaire, and to rate their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results All parameters were improved after hydrodistension in both the C group and the D group. However, comparison of the C group and D group according to whether Hunner lesions were present showed that there were no significant differences in any of the postoperative parameters between the non-H groups in the C group and D group, but in the H groups, average and maximum voided volume were significantly higher and the ICSI, ICPI, and VAS scores were lower in the D group. Moreover, the significant differences increased with the duration of the postoperative period. Conclusions DMSO intravesical instillation therapy was useful in both maintaining and improving the effectiveness of hydrodistension in IC/BPS with Hunner lesions. However, DMSO did not have any particular efficacy in the treatment of IC/BPS in the absence of Hunner lesions. PMID:26816859

  5. Evaluation of noncytotoxic DNMT1-depleting therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Saunthararajah, Yogen; Sekeres, Mikkael; Advani, Anjali; Mahfouz, Reda; Durkin, Lisa; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Englehaupt, Ricki; Juersivich, Joy; Cooper, Kathleen; Husseinzadeh, Holleh; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Rump, Matthew; Hobson, Sean; Earl, Marc; Sobecks, Ronald; Dean, Robert; Reu, Frederic; Tiu, Ramon; Hamilton, Betty; Copelan, Edward; Lichtin, Alan; Hsi, Eric; Kalaycio, Matt; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Mutational inactivation in cancer of key apoptotic pathway components, such as TP53/p53, undermines cytotoxic therapies that aim to increase apoptosis. Accordingly, TP53 mutations are reproducibly associated with poor treatment outcomes. Moreover, cytotoxic treatments destroy normal stem cells with intact p53 systems, a problem especially for myeloid neoplasms, as these cells reverse the low blood counts that cause morbidity and death. Preclinical studies suggest that noncytotoxic concentrations of the DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) inhibitor decitabine produce p53-independent cell-cycle exits by reversing aberrant epigenetic repression of proliferation-terminating (MYC-antagonizing) differentiation genes in cancer cells. METHODS. In this clinical trial, patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 25) received reduced decitabine dosages (0.1–0.2 mg/kg/day compared with the FDA-approved 20–45 mg/m2/day dosage, a 75%–90% reduction) to avoid cytotoxicity. These well-tolerated doses were frequently administered 1–3 days per week, instead of pulse cycled for 3 to 5 days over a 4- to 6-week period, to increase the probability that cancer S-phase entries would coincide with drug exposure, which is required for S-phase–dependent DNMT1 depletion. RESULTS. The median subject age was 73 years (range, 46–85 years), 9 subjects had relapsed disease or were refractory to 5-azacytidine and/or lenalidomide, and 3 had received intensive chemoradiation to treat other cancers. Adverse events were related to neutropenia present at baseline: neutropenic fever (13 of 25 subjects) and septic death (1 of 25 subjects). Blood count improvements meeting the International Working Group criteria for response occurred in 11 of 25 (44%) subjects and were highly durable. Treatment-induced freedom from transfusion lasted a median of 1,025 days (range, 186–1,152 days; 3 ongoing), and 20% of subjects were treated for more than 3 years. Mutations and/or deletions of key

  6. The risk of ischaemic colitis in irritable bowel syndrome patients treated with serotonergic therapies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James H

    2011-07-01

    Ischaemic colitis (IC) is the most common form of ischaemic injury to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. IC typically presents with the sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, cramping and rectal bleeding, and is usually self-limited with low morbidity, although it may cause gangrenous or fulminant colitis, especially when the right colon is involved. Multiple medical conditions, as well as several pharmacological agents, are associated with IC, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and drugs used for its treatment that act on gut serotonin 5-HT receptors. These include the selective 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist alosetron, currently approved for the treatment of severe diarrhoea-predominant IBS in women who fail to respond to conventional treatment, and cilansetron, another 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist that is no longer in clinical development. In addition, the 5-HT(4) receptor partial agonist tegaserod, which was approved for the treatment of constipation-predominant IBS in women, was associated with IC in the postmarketing setting, as was renzapride, a 5-HT(4) agonist/5-HT(3) antagonist. Although several hypotheses have been proposed, the pathophysiological basis for development of IC with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists or 5-HT(4) receptor agonists remains unknown. Of interest, several population-based studies demonstrated that a diagnosis of IBS (independent of serotonergic therapies) increases the risk of developing IC 2- to 4-fold. As a result, IBS patients with the acute onset of abdominal pain, tenderness, diarrhoea or lower intestinal bleeding, especially those with predisposing conditions or medications, should be evaluated promptly for IC. The management of IC remains supportive; most cases of non-gangrenous IC, as seen in the alosetron and tegaserod databases, have been transient and have resolved spontaneously without complications or death. Despite the small number of deaths associated with alosetron in patients with complications of constipation and

  7. Managing Sjögren’s Syndrome and non-Sjögren Syndrome dry eye with anti-inflammatory therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coursey, Terry G; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye from Sjögren’s syndrome is a multifactorial disease that results in dysfunction of the lacrimal functional unit. Studies have shown changes in tear composition, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinase. T-lymphocytes have been shown to increase in the conjunctiva and lacrimal glands in patient and animal models. This inflammation is in part responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease, which results in symptoms of eye irritation, ocular surface epithelial disease, and loss of corneal barrier function. There are a number of anti-inflammatory approaches for treating this disease. The current study reviews details of immune response and anti–inflammatory therapies used to control this disease. PMID:25120351

  8. [On dog-days sticking for treatment of heat syndrome: discussion on the draft of Guidelines on Clinical Application of Acupoint Sticking Therapy treating Winter Diseases in Summer].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yun; Yi, Wei

    2010-06-01

    The information of Guidelines on Clinical Application of Acupoint Sticking Therapy Treating Winter Diseases in Summer suggests that acupoint sticking therapy treating winter diseases in summer is refer to deficiency-cold diseases and is not applicable to heat syndrome. According to the basic theories "maintaining yang in spring and summer" "correspondence between man and universe" in Internal Classic and combining the clinical practice, the authors then demonstrate the feasibility and necessity of dog-days sticking for treatment of heat syndrome, and expound the connotation of acupoint sticking with cold-natured or cool-natured herbal drugs and the clinical significance of dog-days sticking for treatment of heat syndrome. At the same time, the different opinion and expectation is put forward to further improve this therapy. PMID:20578392

  9. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome.Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software.Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration.High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  10. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software. Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration. High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  11. A Systematic Overview of Reviews for Complementary and Alternative Therapies in the Treatment of the Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Häuser, Winfried; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic overview of reviews aimed to summarize evidence and methodological quality from systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods. The PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were screened from their inception to Sept 2013 to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of CAM interventions for FMS. Methodological quality of reviews was rated using the AMSTAR instrument. Results. Altogether 25 systematic reviews were found; they investigated the evidence of CAM in general, exercised-based CAM therapies, manipulative therapies, Mind/Body therapies, acupuncture, hydrotherapy, phytotherapy, and homeopathy. Methodological quality of reviews ranged from lowest to highest possible quality. Consistently positive results were found for tai chi, yoga, meditation and mindfulness-based interventions, hypnosis or guided imagery, electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback, and balneotherapy/hydrotherapy. Inconsistent results concerned qigong, acupuncture, chiropractic interventions, electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback, and nutritional supplements. Inconclusive results were found for homeopathy and phytotherapy. Major methodological flaws included missing details on data extraction process, included or excluded studies, study details, and adaption of conclusions based on quality assessment. Conclusions. Despite a growing body of scientific evidence of CAM therapies for the management of FMS systematic reviews still show methodological flaws limiting definite conclusions about their efficacy and safety. PMID:26246841

  12. A Systematic Overview of Reviews for Complementary and Alternative Therapies in the Treatment of the Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Häuser, Winfried; Dobos, Gustav; Langhorst, Jost

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic overview of reviews aimed to summarize evidence and methodological quality from systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Methods. The PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases were screened from their inception to Sept 2013 to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of CAM interventions for FMS. Methodological quality of reviews was rated using the AMSTAR instrument. Results. Altogether 25 systematic reviews were found; they investigated the evidence of CAM in general, exercised-based CAM therapies, manipulative therapies, Mind/Body therapies, acupuncture, hydrotherapy, phytotherapy, and homeopathy. Methodological quality of reviews ranged from lowest to highest possible quality. Consistently positive results were found for tai chi, yoga, meditation and mindfulness-based interventions, hypnosis or guided imagery, electromyogram (EMG) biofeedback, and balneotherapy/hydrotherapy. Inconsistent results concerned qigong, acupuncture, chiropractic interventions, electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback, and nutritional supplements. Inconclusive results were found for homeopathy and phytotherapy. Major methodological flaws included missing details on data extraction process, included or excluded studies, study details, and adaption of conclusions based on quality assessment. Conclusions. Despite a growing body of scientific evidence of CAM therapies for the management of FMS systematic reviews still show methodological flaws limiting definite conclusions about their efficacy and safety. PMID:26246841

  13. Cytokine release syndrome after blinatumomab treatment related to abnormal macrophage activation and ameliorated with cytokine-directed therapy.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Rheingold, Susan R; Maude, Shannon L; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Barrett, David M; Seif, Alix E; Nichols, Kim E; Suppa, Erica K; Kalos, Michael; Berg, Robert A; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Aplenc, Richard; Gore, Lia; Grupp, Stephan A

    2013-06-27

    Blinatumomab is a CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell receptor-engaging (BiTE) antibody with efficacy in refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Some patients treated with blinatumomab and other T cell-activating therapies develop cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We hypothesized that patients with more severe toxicity may experience abnormal macrophage activation triggered by the release of cytokines by T-cell receptor-activated cytotoxic T cells engaged by BiTE antibodies and leading to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). We prospectively monitored a patient during blinatumomab treatment and observed that he developed HLH. He became ill 36 hours into the infusion with fever, respiratory failure, and circulatory collapse. He developed hyperferritinemia, cytopenias, hypofibrinogenemia, and a cytokine profile diagnostic for HLH. The HLH continued to progress after discontinuation of blinatumomab; however, he had rapid improvement after IL-6 receptor-directed therapy with tocilizumab. Patients treated with T cell-activating therapies, including blinatumomab, should be monitored for HLH, and cytokine-directed therapy may be considered in cases of life-threatening CRS. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00103285. PMID:23678006

  14. Henoch-Schöenlein syndrome in Qatar: the effects of steroid therapy and paucity of renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Dawod, S T; Akl, K F

    1990-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 40 patients admitted to Hamad General Hospital in the state of Qatar between January 1983 and December 1987 with the diagnosis of Henoch-Schöenlein syndrome. Of the 40 patients, 25 were boys and 15 were girls, with a ratio of 1.6:1. Ages ranged from 2 years 3 months to 13 years, with a mean of 6 years. There were six episodes of recurrence in four patients. There was a clustering of cases in late summer and early winter. About half of the patients had a history of preceding upper respiratory infection. All of them had the typical skin rash. The percentages of joint, gastro-intestinal and renal manifestations were 80%, 65% and 17.39%, respectively. One patient had penile swelling which has not been reported before. Steroid therapy seemed to enhance early resolution of abdominal pain but did not affect the course of the syndrome. Sixty-seven per cent of the patients were followed up for from 4 weeks to 5 years, with a mean of 8 months. Only one patient with renal involvement continued to have proteinuria with microscopic haematuria and hypertension. The rest were normal within about 2 months. The remarkably low incidence of renal involvement in our study may be related to local variations in causative factors. Henoch-Schöenlein syndrome is a milder disease in Qatar than in other countries. PMID:1703745

  15. The effectiveness and cost evaluation of pain exposure physical therapy and conventional therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is a new treatment option for patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. It has been evaluated in retrospective as well as in prospective studies and proven to be safe and possibly effective. This indicates that Pain Exposure Physical Therapy is now ready for clinical evaluation. The results of an earlier performed pilot study with an n = 1 design, in which 20 patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 were treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy, were used for the design and power calculation of the present study. After completion and evaluation of this phase III study, a multi-centre implementation study will be conducted. The aim of this study is to determine whether Pain Exposure Physical Therapy can improve functional outcomes in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Methods/design This study is designed as a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. 62 patients will be randomized with a follow-up of 9 months to demonstrate the expected treatment effect. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 is diagnosed in accordance with the Bruehl/International Association for the Study of Pain criteria. Conventional therapy in accordance with the Dutch guideline will be compared with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Primary outcome measure is the Impairment level SumScore, restricted version. Discussion This is the first randomized controlled study with single blinding that has ever been planned in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 and does not focus on a single aspect of the pain syndrome but compares treatment strategies based on completely different pathophysiological and cognitive theories. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00817128; National Trial Register NTR2090 PMID:22515496

  16. Effect of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Health-Related Quality of Life in Females With Premenstrual Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Izadi-Mazidi, Maryam; Davoudi, Iran; Mehrabizadeh, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is characterized by intense physical and psychological changes. The most common symptoms include anxiety, depression, fatigue, anger, irritability, sense of being out of control, confusion, change in appetite and sleep, bloating and breast tenderness. The symptoms affect the quality of life of women, and cause impairment in many aspects of life. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) on improvement of health-related quality of life in female students with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Materials and Methods In this study, 40 students with PMS were selected from Shahid Chamran university in Tehran, Iran, and were randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups. Participants in the intervention group received 10 sessions of CBT. Women in the control group did not receive any treatment. Results The results of ANCOVA were statistically significant (P < 0.001), and showed that group CBT improved the quality of life in the experimental group compared to the control group. In addition, the effects of the intervention on quality of life lasted for 2 months. Conclusions Cognitive-behavioral therapy can be effective in improvement of health-related quality of life of female students with PMS. PMID:27284283

  17. [Hyper-IgE syndrome with ENT manifestations. Overview and case report of successful therapy with high dosage i.v. immunoglobulin].

    PubMed

    Waldfahrer, F; Pahl, S; Federspil, P A; Iro, H

    1999-12-01

    Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (Hiob syndrome or Buckley syndrome) is a rare disorder of the immune system that can show characteristic manifestations in the head and neck. Typical symptoms are fever, recurrent urticarial rashes, lymphadenitis, and bacterial infections of the skin and various parenchymatous organs. Diagnosis is established by elevated serum IgE concentrations with the absence of any signs of allergy or parasitic disease. We present our clinical experiences in managing of a 29-year old woman whose hyper IgE syndrome was diagnosed initially during of the treatment of lymphatic hyperplasia of the base of the tongue although she had typical symptoms of hyper IgE syndrome for some years. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIG) was found to be well-tolerated and effective. More than one year after a single course of immunoglobin therapy symptoms markedly improved. Current knowledge and therapeutic options in hyper IgE syndrome are discussed. We recommend that IVIG be considered as one of the first choices in the treatment of hyper IgE syndrome. PMID:10654184

  18. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes After Radiation Therapy Are Similar to De Novo Disease and Differ From Other Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Valentina; Winkfield, Karen M.; Ok, Chi Young; Niemierko, Andrzej; Kluk, Michael J.; Attar, Eyal C.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Wang, Sa A.; Hasserjian, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) represent a unique clinical syndrome occurring in patients treated with chemotherapy and/or external-beam radiation (XRT) and are characterized by poorer prognosis compared with de novo disease. XRT techniques have evolved in recent years and are associated with significantly reduced bone marrow exposure. The characteristics of post-XRT t-MN in the current era have not been studied. Patients and Methods We analyzed patients who developed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) after XRT alone (47 patients) or cytotoxic chemotherapy/combined-modality therapy (C/CMT, 181 patients) and compared them with patients with de novo MDS or AML (222 patients). We estimated bone marrow exposure to radiation and compared the clinical, pathologic, and cytogenetic features and outcome of the XRT patients with the C/CMT patients and with patients with de novo MDS and AML. Results Patients with t-MN after XRT alone had superior overall survival (P = .006) and lower incidence of high-risk karyotypes (P = .01 for AML and < .001 for MDS) compared with patients in the C/CMT group. In contrast, there were no significant differences in survival or frequency of high-risk karyotypes between the XRT and de novo groups. Conclusion AML and MDS diagnosed in the past decade in patients after receiving XRT alone differ from t-MN occurring after C/CMT and share genetic features and clinical behavior with de novo AML/MDS. Our results suggest that post-XRT MDS/AML may not represent a direct consequence of radiation toxicity and warrant a therapeutic approach similar to de novo disease. PMID:22585703

  19. Grapes (Vitis vinifera) as a Potential Candidate for the Therapy of the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akaberi, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Hosein

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with several disorders, including hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia as well as cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Plant-derived polyphenols, compounds found in numerous plant species, play an important role as potential treatments for components of metabolic syndrome. Studies have provided evidence for protective effects of various polyphenol-rich foods against metabolic syndrome. Fruits, vegetables, cereals, nuts, and berries are rich in polyphenolic compounds. Grapes (Vitis vinifera), especially grape seeds, stand out as rich sources of polyphenol potent antioxidants and have been reported helpful for inhibiting the risk factors involved in the metabolic syndrome such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension. There are also many studies about gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anti-obesity effects of grape polyphenolic compounds especially proanthocyanidins in the literature. The present study investigates the protective effects of grape seeds in metabolic syndrome. The results of this study show that grape polyphenols have significant effects on the level of blood glucose, lipid profile, blood pressure, as well as beneficial activities in liver and heart with various mechanisms. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of grape polyphenols is discussed. More detailed mechanistic investigations and phytochemical studies for finding the exact bioactive component(s) and molecular signaling pathways are suggested. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26800498

  20. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome, and the effects of low-dose hydrocortisone therapy.

    PubMed

    Cleare, A J; Miell, J; Heap, E; Sookdeo, S; Young, L; Malhi, G S; O'Keane, V

    2001-08-01

    These neuroendocrine studies were part of a series of studies testing the hypotheses that 1) there may be reduced activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in chronic fatigue syndrome and 2) low-dose augmentation with hydrocortisone therapy would improve the core symptoms. We measured ACTH and cortisol responses to human CRH, the insulin stress test, and D-fenfluramine in 37 medication-free patients with CDC-defined chronic fatigue syndrome but no comorbid psychiatric disorders and 28 healthy controls. We also measured 24-h urinary free cortisol in both groups. All patients (n = 37) had a pituitary challenge test (human CRH) and a hypothalamic challenge test [either the insulin stress test (n = 16) or D-fenfluramine (n = 21)]. Baseline cortisol concentrations were significantly raised in the chronic fatigue syndrome group for the human CRH test only. Baseline ACTH concentrations did not differ between groups for any test. ACTH responses to human CRH, the insulin stress test, and D- fenfluramine were similar for patient and control groups. Cortisol responses to the insulin stress test did not differ between groups, but there was a trend for cortisol responses both to human CRH and D-fenfluramine to be lower in the chronic fatigue syndrome group. These differences were significant when ACTH responses were controlled. Urinary free cortisol levels were lower in the chronic fatigue syndrome group compared with the healthy group. These results indicate that ACTH responses to pituitary and hypothalamic challenges are intact in chronic fatigue syndrome and do not support previous findings of reduced central responses in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function or the hypothesis of abnormal CRH secretion in chronic fatigue syndrome. These data further suggest that the hypocortisolism found in chronic fatigue syndrome may be secondary to reduced adrenal gland output. Thirty-two patients were treated with a low-dose hydrocortisone regime in a double

  1. Post reperfusion syndrome during liver transplantation: From pathophysiology to therapy and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Laici, Cristiana; Bardi, Tommaso; Ercolani, Giorgio; Lorenzini, Laura; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This review aims at evaluating the existing evidence regarding post reperfusion syndrome, providing a description of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and possible management and preventive strategies. A PubMed search was conducted using the MeSH database, “Reperfusion” AND “liver transplantation” were the combined MeSH headings; EMBASE and the Cochrane library were also searched using the same terms. 52 relevant studies and one ongoing trial were found. The concept of post reperfusion syndrome has evolved through years to a multisystemic disorder. The implications of the main organ, recipient and procedure related factors in the genesis of this complex syndrome are discussed in the text as the novel pharmacologic and technical approaches to reduce its incidence. However the available evidence about risk factors, physiopathology and preventive measures is still confusing, the presence of two main definitions and the numerosity of possible confounding factors greatly complicates the interpretation of the studies. PMID:26819522

  2. Post reperfusion syndrome during liver transplantation: From pathophysiology to therapy and preventive strategies.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Laici, Cristiana; Bardi, Tommaso; Ercolani, Giorgio; Lorenzini, Laura; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-28

    This review aims at evaluating the existing evidence regarding post reperfusion syndrome, providing a description of the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and possible management and preventive strategies. A PubMed search was conducted using the MeSH database, "Reperfusion" AND "liver transplantation" were the combined MeSH headings; EMBASE and the Cochrane library were also searched using the same terms. 52 relevant studies and one ongoing trial were found. The concept of post reperfusion syndrome has evolved through years to a multisystemic disorder. The implications of the main organ, recipient and procedure related factors in the genesis of this complex syndrome are discussed in the text as the novel pharmacologic and technical approaches to reduce its incidence. However the available evidence about risk factors, physiopathology and preventive measures is still confusing, the presence of two main definitions and the numerosity of possible confounding factors greatly complicates the interpretation of the studies. PMID:26819522

  3. The evolution of dual antiplatelet therapy in the setting of acute coronary syndrome: ticagrelor versus clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Amico, Frank; Amico, Angela; Mazzoni, Jennifer; Moshiyakhov, Mark; Tamparo, William

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Wallentin L, Becker RC, Budaj A, et al. Ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes. N Eng J Med 2009; 361(11): 1045-1057. For acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a dual antiplatelet regimen comprised of treatment with aspirin and either P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists, clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor is usually employed. This article compares clopidogrel with ticagrelor for the prevention of vascular events and death in broad population of ACS patients ranging from UA, NSTEMI to STEMI, utilizing planned strategies of medical or invasive treatment strategy. PMID:26560350

  4. [Experiences with therapy of pediatric sleep apnea syndrome and obstructive nasopharyngeal respiratory pattern with nasal BIPAP and CPAP therapy].

    PubMed

    Zwacka, G; Scholle, S

    1995-03-01

    Sleep-apnea in childhood shows a frequency similar to adults but it is caused by many other reasons. Therapeutic effects of nasal CPAP and BIPAP can replace surgical ENT-Therapy in large extent mainly in ages at 2-5 years. But also in older children is it possible to treat obstructive sleep apnea and hypoventilation neuromuscular diseases by BIPAP. Examples for treatment of children by BIPAP who are two years old were given. Other demonstrated cases cover children with stridor congenitus, obstructive sleep apnea, hypoventilation, adenoidal breathing disturbances with primary surgical treated tonsillar hyperplasia and one case of thoracal postobstructive malformation with therapeutic BIPAP options. PMID:7617601

  5. Adverse events and deterioration reported by participants in the PACE trial of therapies for chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Dominic; Johnson, Anthony; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Sharpe, Michael; Angus, Brian; Chalder, Trudie; White, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Adverse events (AEs) are health related events, reported by participants in clinical trials. We describe AEs in the PACE trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and baseline characteristics associated with them. Methods AEs were recorded on three occasions over one year in 641 participants. We compared the numbers and nature of AEs between treatment arms of specialist medical care (SMC) alone, or SMC supplemented by adaptive pacing therapy (APT), cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) or graded exercise therapy (GET). We examined associations with baseline measures by binary logistic regression analyses, and compared the proportions of participants who deteriorated by clinically important amounts. Results Serious adverse events and reactions were infrequent. Non-serious adverse events were common; the median (quartiles) number was 4 (2, 8) per participant, with no significant differences between treatments (P = .47). A greater number of NSAEs were associated with recruitment centre, and baseline physical symptom count, body mass index, and depressive disorder. Physical function deteriorated in 39 (25%) participants after APT, 15 (9%) after CBT, 18 (11%) after GET, and 28 (18%) after SMC (P < .001), with no significant differences in worsening fatigue. Conclusions The numbers of adverse events did not differ significantly between trial treatments, but physical deterioration occurred most often after APT. The reporting of non-serious adverse events may reflect the nature of the illness rather than the effect of treatments. Differences between centres suggest that both standardisation of ascertainment methods and training are important when collecting adverse event data. PMID:24913337

  6. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Buskila, Dan; Shir, Yoram; Sommer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin) and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran) were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques). PMID:24348701

  7. Evaluation of risk markers fluctuation during an initial therapy with rosiglitazon in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macić-Dzanković, Amra; Dzanković, Fuad; Pojskić, Belma; Velija-Asimi, Zelija

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of hypoglycaemic drug-agonists of PPAR-gama receptors-rosiglitazone (Avandia,4 mg - Glaxo Smith Kline) on values of wide-spread risk - markers-fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and uric acid and glicolysated haemoglobin HbA1C as parameter of metabolic control .We included fourty patients with criteria for metabolic syndrome and evaluated results into groups of diabetic and prediabetic patients according to criteria of IDF (International Diabetic Federation)These risk markers and glicolysated haemoglobin HbA1C were observed at the start of therapy, then after four, eight and twelve weeks and results were compared and statistically calculated. Three months initial therapy with rosiglitazone significantly reduced values of HbA1C, fibrinogen and CRP but not uric acid in prediabetic patients.Rosiglitazone initial three months therapy significantly reduced HbA1C, fibrinogen and uric acid, but not CRP in diabetic patients. PMID:20001999

  8. Effect of Antiplatelet Therapy on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Heng; Gu, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Su; Chen, Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiplatelet agents are commonly used for cardiovascular diseases, but their pleiotropic effects in critically ill patients are controversial. We therefore performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to investigate the effect of antiplatelet therapy in the critically ill. Methods Nine cohort studies, retrieved from PubMed and Embase before November 2015, involving 14,612 critically ill patients and 4765 cases of antiplatelet users, were meta-analysed. The main outcome was hospital or 30-day mortality. Secondary outcome was acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or acute lung injury (ALI). Random- or fixed-effect models were taken for quantitative synthesis of the data. Results Antiplatelet therapy was associated with decreased mortality (odds ratio (OR) 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.52–0.71; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001) and ARDS/ALI (OR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.50–0.82; I2 = 0%; P <0. 001). In every stratum of subgroups, similar findings on mortality reduction were consistently observed in critically ill patients. Conclusions Antiplatelet therapy is associated with reduced mortality and lower incidence of ARDS/ALI in critically ill patients, particularly those with predisposing conditions such as high-risk surgery, trauma, pneumonia, and sepsis. However, it remains unclear whether similar findings can be observed in the unselected and broad population with critical illness. PMID:27182704

  9. [Apparative aversive therapy in combination with verbal suggestions in special obsessional syndromes (initial investigation)].

    PubMed

    Dummer, W

    1977-12-01

    The author restricts the use of aversion therapy by means of deliberate production of pain to obsessional, especially therapy-resistant disturbances of a permanent nature, with consideration being, of course, given to ethical factors. Experiences worthy of generalization are derived from methodically varied courses of treatment, bringing out suggestive moments subliminally involved in any therapeutical situation and also specifically used by the therapist. In addition, the author emphasizes the need for simultaneously developing, besides aversion therapy, positive attitudes and behavior patterns. PMID:609650

  10. Managing acute withdrawal syndrome on patients with heroin and morphine addiction by acupuncture therapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Po-kuang; Lu, Gabriel P; Lu, Dominic P; Lu, D P; Lu, Winston I

    2004-01-01

    Though there are articles and case reports about using acupuncture to detoxify and to break the narcotic addiction, few articles describe in the West about using acupuncture therapy to treat the emergence of acute withdrawal symptom due to heroin, opium, or morphine. Most often the method of treatment are using the methadone or benzodiazepine and phenoziazine drugs this article describes many years of clinical experience with non-drug approach to treat the acute withdrawal symptoms with acupuncture therapy. Unlike the drug approach, which usually has side effects, there is no adverse effect with acupuncture therapy. PMID:15807100

  11. Diffuse choroidal hemangioma associated with exudative retinal detachment in a Sturge-Weber syndrome case: photodynamic therapy and intravitreous bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Pava, Edwin J; Saenz-Bocanegra, Carlos H; Flores-Trejo, Alejandro; Castro-Santana, Norma A

    2015-03-01

    We report the case of a young female patient with a diffuse choroidal hemangioma (DCH) and glaucoma as part of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) and symptomatic retinal detachment that was treated successfully with photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB). The patient was treated with a single session of PDT, a 689-nm laser was used to deliver 50J/cm(2) with a maximum spot size of 6400μm, for 166s. IVB was administered 3 days later. The exudative retinal detachment (ERD), macular edema and visual acuity improved one week after treatment. The patient was followed for 18 months with no recurrence of ERD, and her visual acuity was preserved. PDT followed by IVB may be an effective treatment option for visual deterioration due to ERD in patients with DCHs, as are found in SWS. PMID:25560419

  12. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Turnock, Adam R.; Fleischer, Brian P.; Carney, Martin J.; Vanderlan, Wesley B.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones. PMID:27302498

  13. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Turnock, Adam R; Fleischer, Brian P; Carney, Martin J; Vanderlan, Wesley B

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones. PMID:27302498

  14. [A Case of a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Serious Hand-Foot Syndrome Induced by High-Dose Cytarabine Therapy].

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Hiroaki; Aoi, Miki; Yuge, Masaaki; Sugimura, Yuriko; Kitamura, Kunio; Yamamura, Masumi; Tachi, Tomoya; Teramachi, Hitomi

    2016-07-01

    A 40's year-old female patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia received high-dose cytarabine(HD-Ara-C)as her third induction therapy. Because the pharmacist in charge noticed on a prior interview that she had experienced a mild skin eruption similar to hand-foot syndrome(HFS)in the previous round oftherapy(idarubicin and cytarabine), heparinoid lotion and hypoallergenic soap were used to prevent HFS. However, HFS occurred on day 3, and further developed on day 6 to grade 3 with painful erythema, swelling, and paresthesia affecting the entire surface of both hands. We cared for her with moisturization, lifestyle guidance, rotation of steroid ointment, and occlusive dressing techniques according to a multidisciplinary team approach composed ofa hematologist, dermatologist, pharmacist, and nurse. Her symptoms resolved on day 40. PMID:27431642

  15. Ispaghula therapy in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in overall well-being is related to reduction in bowel dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jalihal, A; Kurian, G

    1990-01-01

    This placebo controlled, double-blind, cross-over trial involving 20 patients was conducted to assess the effect of ispaghula husk on the major bowel symptoms and the whole gut transit time in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to determine if changes in these parameters were related to global improvement. All 20 patients were interviewed at the end of the treatment periods and 14 patients kept concurrent daily records. Ispaghula therapy resulted in improvement in global symptoms and satisfying bowel movements (P less than 0.001) but produced no change in abdominal pain or flatulence. There was a correlation between the improvement of well-being and the number of days of satisfying bowel movements (P less than 0.001) but not with the indexes of pain, stool frequency or changes in the transit time. The easing of bowel dissatisfaction appears to be a major reason for the therapeutic success of ispaghula in IBS. PMID:2129822

  16. Tumor lysis syndrome in a chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient with pleural effusion after oral fludarabine and cyclophosphamide therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Nishina, Sayaka; Mimura, Yuto; Kawakami, Toru; Senoo, Yasushi; Sakai, Kaoko; Nakazawa, Ko; Kitano, Kiyoshi

    2014-06-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a rare complication of the treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Since the advent of new therapeutic agents with higher response rates, however, TLS has been observed with increasing frequency. An 84-year-old woman with a nine-year history of untreated CLL presented with exacerbating dyspnea due to pleural effusion. CLL cells without Richter transformation were observed in the pleural effusion at a high concentration, as well as in lymph nodes and bone marrow. After 5 days of oral fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (FC) therapy, the patient developed TLS, which necessitated rescue with hemodialysis. Although transient exacerbation of pleurisy occurred, the effusion cytology ameliorated, and she eventually achieved complete remission after additional two courses of FC and rituximab. Sequestration of fludarabine in the pleural effusion may be attributable to the development of TLS. PMID:24584911

  17. Thoracic manifestations of paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome during or after antituberculous therapy in HIV-negative patients.

    PubMed

    Pornsuriyasak, Prapaporn; Suwatanapongched, Thitiporn

    2015-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a consequence of exaggerated and dysregulated host's inflammatory response to invading microorganism, leading to uncontrolled inflammatory reactions. IRIS associated with tuberculosis (TB) is well recognized among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, but it is less common among HIV-negative patients. IRIS can manifest as a paradoxical worsening or recurring of preexisting tuberculous lesions or development of new lesions despite successful antituberculous treatment. Hence, the condition might be misdiagnosed as superimposed infections, treatment failure, or relapse of TB. This pictorial essay reviewed diagnostic criteria and various thoracic manifestations of the paradoxical form of TB-associated IRIS (TB-IRIS) that might aid in early recognition of this clinical entity among HIV-negative patients. The treatment and outcomes of TB-IRIS were also discussed. PMID:25698091

  18. Refractory postsurgical pyoderma gangrenosum in a patient with Beckwith Wiedemann syndrome: response to multimodal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fakhar, Faiza; Memon, Sehrish; Deitz, Diane; Abramowitz, Richard; Alpert, Deborah R

    2013-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare neutrophilic dermatosis that may be difficult to diagnose and treat. We presented a 41-year-old woman who required skin grafting following third-degree burns to her left breast. She suffered recurrent graft dehiscence and infections over many years, prompting elective bilateral reduction mammoplasty. She subsequently developed suture margin ulcerations unresponsive to topical therapies and antibiotics. Skin biopsies were non-specific, and a clinical diagnosis of PG was established. Although initially responsive to corticosteroids, wounds promptly recurred following steroid taper. She was treated unsuccessfully with various immunomodulatory agents and underwent elective bilateral mastectomy. Following a mastectomy, she developed progressive deep chest wall ulcerations. She failed numerous immunomodulatory treatments, surgical wound closure and negative pressure wound therapy. Ultimately, treatment with adalimumab, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone, in addition to hyperbaric oxygen therapy facilitated progressive healing. Our case highlights the role of collaborative multimodal therapy for the treatment of refractory PG. PMID:24154999

  19. Increased uptake of guideline-recommended oral antiplatelet therapy: insights from the Canadian acute coronary syndrome reflective.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sumeet; Zile, Brigita; Tan, Mary K; Saranu, Jhansi; Bucci, Claudia; Yan, Andrew T; Robertson, Patrick; Quantz, Mackenzie A; Letovsky, Eric; Tanguay, Jean-Francois; Dery, Jean-Pierre; Fitchett, David; Madan, Mina; Cantor, Warren J; Heffernan, Michael; Natarajan, Madhu K; Wong, Graham C; Welsh, Robert C; Goodman, Shaun G

    2014-12-01

    Current guideline-based recommendations for oral dual-antiplatelet therapy in an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) include the use of newer adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitor (ADPri) regimens and agents. The Canadian ACS Reflective Program is a multicenter observational quality-enhancement project that compared the use of ADPri therapy in 2 phases (November 2011-March 2013 and April 2013-November 2013) and also compared ADPri use with previous national data from the Canadian Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (2000-2008). Of 3099 patients with ACS, 30.6% had ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), 52.3% had non-STEMI, and 17% had unstable angina. There was high use of dual-antiplatelet therapy for ≤ 24 hours, with important increases noted when compared with previous national experience (P for trend, < 0.0001). Clopidogrel was the most commonly used ADPri (82.2%), with lower use of the newer agents ticagrelor (9.0%) and prasugrel (3.1%). Ticagrelor and prasugrel use was most frequent in patients with STEMI undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention PCI (34.3%). There was relatively lower use of ADPri therapy at discharge; it was given mainly to patients who did not undergo PCI (68.2%) and to those with non-ST-elevation ACS (82%). When comparing the 2 consecutive phases of data collection in the ACS Reflective, there was an approximate 3- and 2-fold increase in the early and discharge use of the newer ADPri agents, respectively. In conclusion, there has been a temporal increase in ADPri use compared with previous national experience and an increased uptake of newer ADPri agents. Additional work is needed to identify and address barriers limiting optimal implementation of these newer guideline-recommended agents into routine Canadian practice. PMID:25475475

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy of intravesical therapy for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Barua, Jayanta M; Arance, Ignacio; Angulo, Javier C; Riedl, Claus R

    2016-08-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterised by persistent irritating micturition symptoms and pain. The objective was to compare the clinical efficacy of currently available products for intravesical therapy of BPS/IC and to assess their pharmacoeconomic impact. A Pubmed/Medline database search was performed for articles on intravesical therapy for BPS/IC. A total of 345 publications were identified, from which 326 were excluded. Statistical evaluation was performed with effect size (ES) assessment of symptom reduction and response rates. The final set of 19 articles on intravesical BPS/IC therapy included 5 prospective controlled trials (CTs), the remaining were classified as uncontrolled clinical studies. The total number of patients included was 801, 228 of whom had been evaluated in a CT. For CTs, the largest ES for symptom reduction as well as response rate was observed for high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMW-HA), with similar findings in two uncontrolled studies with HMW-HA. The number needed to treat to achieve a response to intravesical therapy was 2.67 for intravesical pentosan polysulphate and 1.31 for HMW-HA which were superior to all other instillates. HMW-HA was significantly superior in cost effectiveness and cost efficacy to all other instillation regimes. The present meta-analysis combined medical and pharmacoeconomic aspects and demonstrated an advantage of HMW-HA over other instillation agents; however, direct comparisons between the different products have not been performed to date in properly designed controlled studies. PMID:26590137

  1. Growth Hormone Therapy Benefits Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome Patients with Short Stature: A Retrospective Study of 75 Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Guo, Ling-Ling; Han, Bai-Yu; Wang, An-Ping; Liu, Hong-Yan; Su, Xing; Guo, Qing-Hua; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aim to investigate the long-term benefits of growth hormone (GH) therapy in short stature adolescents and adults with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS), which would be beneficial for future clinical applications. Design and Methods. In this study, initial height, final height, total height gain, and GH treatment history were retrospectively investigated in 75 Chinese PSIS patients. We compared height gain between the GH treated cohort and untreated cohort and explored the impact of different GH therapy duration on height gain. Results. For GH treated patients, their final height (SDS) increased from −1.99 ± 1.91 (−6.93~2.80) at bone age (BA) of 11.2 (5.0~17.0) years to −1.47 ± 1.64 (−7.82~1.05) at BA of 16.6 (8.0~18.0) years (P = 0.016). And GH treated patients had more height gain than the untreated patients (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference between the different GH therapy duration groups (P = 0.001): GH 0 versus GH 3, P = 0.000; GH 1 versus GH 3, P = 0.028; GH 2 versus GH 3, P = 0.044. Conclusion. Adult Chinese PSIS patients with short stature benefited the most from at least 12 months of GH therapy. Although patient diagnosis age was lagged behind in the developing countries, GH treatment was still effective for them and resulted in a higher final height and more height gain. PMID:27190512

  2. Duration of dual antiplatelet therapy following percutaneous coronary intervention on re-hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The optimal duration of dual antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) remains uncertain. The objective of this study was to examine the association between duration of dual antiplatelet therapy and re-hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in ACS patients who underwent PCI. Methods We identified 975 newly diagnosed ACS patients who underwent PCI between July, 2007 and June, 2009, at a medical center in Taiwan. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association between duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (9 months, 12 months and 15 months) and risks of re-hospitalization for ACS. Results At a mean follow-up of 2.3 years, we found that use of clopidogrel for ≥ 12 months was associated with a decreased risk of re-hospitalization for ACS (adjusted HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.36-0.95; p = 0.03). However, use of clopidogrel for ≥ 15 months was not associated with a decreased risk of re-hospitalization for ACS (adjusted HR 0.57, 95% CI 0.29-1.13; p = 0.11). Similar results were found in patients who implanted drug-eluting stents (DES), for whom at least 12 months of clopidogrel therapy is especially critical. Conclusion The benefit of ≥ 12 months of clopidogrel use in reducing the risk of re-hospitalization for ACS was significant among ACS patients who underwent PCI and was especially critical for those who implanted DES. PMID:24533683

  3. [Congenital myasthenic syndromes: difficulties in the diagnosis, course and prognosis, and therapy--The French National Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Network experience].

    PubMed

    Eymard, B; Stojkovic, T; Sternberg, D; Richard, P; Nicole, S; Fournier, E; Béhin, A; Laforêt, P; Servais, L; Romero, N; Fardeau, M; Hantaï, D

    2013-02-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are a heterogeneous group of disorders caused by genetic defects affecting neuromuscular transmission and leading to muscle weakness accentuated by exertion. Three different aspects have been investigated by members of the national French CMS Network: the difficulties in making a proper diagnosis; the course and long-term prognosis; and the response to therapy, especially for CMS that do not respond to cholinesterase inhibitors. CMS diagnosis is late in most cases because of confusion with other entities such as: congenital myopathies, due to the frequent presentation in patients of myopathies such as permanent muscle weakness, atrophy and scoliosis, and the abnormalities of internal structure, diameter and distribution of fibers (type I predominance, type II atrophy) seen on biopsy; seronegative autoimmune myasthenia gravis, when CMS is of late onset; and metabolic myopathy, with the presence of lipidosis in muscle. The long-term prognosis of CMS was studied in a series of 79 patients recruited with the following gene mutations: CHRNA; CHRNE; DOK7; COLQ; RAPSN; AGRN; and MUSK. Disease-course patterns (progressive worsening, exacerbation, stability, improvement) could be variable throughout life in a given patient. DOK7 patients had the most severe disease course with progressive worsening: of the eight wheelchair-bound and ventilated patients, six had mutations of this gene. Pregnancy was a frequent cause of exacerbation. Anticholinesterase agents are the first-line therapy for CMS patients, except for cases of slow-channel CMS, COLQ and DOK7. In our experience, 3,4-DAP was a useful complement for several patients harboring CMS with AChR loss or RAPSN gene mutations. Ephedrine was given to 18 patients (eight DOK7, five COLQ, four AGRN and one RAPSN). Tolerability was good. Therapeutic responses were encouraging even in the most severely affected patients, particularly with DOK7 and COLQ. Salbutamol was a good alternative in

  4. Androgen Receptor Roles in Insulin Resistance and Obesity in Males: The Linkage of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy to Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D.; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents. PMID:25249645

  5. Radiation Therapy for Gorham-Stout Syndrome: Results of a National Patterns-of-Care Study and Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, Reinhard; Micke, Oliver; Surholt, Christine; Berger, Bernhard; Martini, Carmen; Fueller, Juergen; Schimpke, Thomas; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases conducted a national patterns-of-care study to investigate the value of radiation therapy (RT) in the management of Gorham-Stout syndrome. Methods and Materials: In 2009 a structured questionnaire was circulated to 230 German RT institutions to assess information about the number of patients, the RT indication and technique, and the target volume definition, as well as accompanying treatments, outcome data, and early or late radiation toxicity. Results: In November 2009 responses were available from 197 departments (85.6%): 29 university hospitals (14.7%), 89 community hospitals (45.2%), and 79 private RT offices (40.1%). Of these institutions, 8 (4.0%) had experience using RT, for a total of 10 cases in various anatomic sites. Four patients underwent irradiation postoperatively, and six patients received primary RT. The total doses applied after computed tomography-based treatment planning ranged from 30 to 45 Gy. After a median follow-up period of 42 months, local disease progression was avoided in 8 cases (80.0%). In 2 of these cases a progression occurred beyond the target volume. Acute and late toxicity was mild; in 4 patients RT was associated with Grade I side effects according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. The literature analysis of 38 previously published articles providing results after the use of RT in 44 patients showed stable or regressive disease in 77.3%. Conclusions: RT may prevent disease progression effectively in Gorham-Stout syndrome in 77% to 80% of cases. Total doses ranging from 30 to 45 Gy applied after computed tomography-based treatment planning are recommended.

  6. Host-directed therapies for improving poor treatment outcomes associated with the middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Azhar, Esam I; Arabi, Yaseen; Alotaibi, Badriah; Rao, Martin; McCloskey, Brian; Petersen, Eskild; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Three years after its first discovery in Jeddah Saudi Arabia, the novel zoonotic pathogen of humans, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) continues to be a major threat to global health security.(1) Sporadic community acquired cases of MERS continue to be reported from the Middle East. The recent nosocomial outbreaks in hospitals in Seoul, Korea and at the National Guard Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia indicate the epidemic potential of MERS-CoV. Currently there are no effective anti-MERS-CoV anti-viral agents or therapeutics and MERS is associated with a high mortality rate (40%) in hospitalised patients. A large proportion of MERS patients who die have a range of pulmonary pathology ranging from pneumonia to adult respiratory distress syndrome with multi-organ failure, compounded by co-morbidities, reflecting a precarious balance of interactions between the host-immune system and MERS-CoV. Whilst we wait for new MERS-CoV specific drugs, therapeutics and vaccines to be developed, there is a need to advance a range of Host-Directed Therapies. A range of HDTs are available, including commonly used drugs with good safety profiles, which could augment host innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to MERS-CoV, modulate excessive inflammation and reduce lung tissue destruction. We discuss the rationale and potential of using Host-Directed Therapies for improving the poor treatment outcomes associated with MERS. Carefully designed randomized controlled trials will be needed to determine whether HDTs could benefit patients with MERS. The recurrent outbreaks of MERS-CoV infections at hospitals in the Middle East present unique opportunities to conduct randomized clinical trials. The time has come for a more coordinated global response to MERS and a multidisciplinary global MERS-CoV response group is required to take forward priority research agendas. PMID:26365771

  7. Yang/Qi Invigoration: An Herbal Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome with Yang Deficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Jihang; Ko, Kam Ming

    2015-01-01

    According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, Yang and Qi are driving forces of biological activities in the human body. Based on the crucial role of the mitochondrion in energy metabolism, we propose an extended view of Yang and Qi in the context of mitochondrion-driven cellular and body function. It is of interest that the clinical manifestations of Yang/Qi deficiencies in TCM resemble those of chronic fatigue syndrome in Western medicine, which is pathologically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. By virtue of their ability to enhance mitochondrial function and its regulation, Yang- and Qi-invigorating tonic herbs, such as Cistanches Herba and Schisandrae Fructus, may therefore prove to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome with Yang deficiency. PMID:25763095

  8. Description of common musculoskeletal findings in Williams Syndrome and implications for therapies.

    PubMed

    Copes, L E; Pober, B R; Terilli, C A

    2016-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS), also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), is a relatively rare genetic disorder affecting ∼1/10,000 persons. Since the disorder is caused by a micro-deletion of ∼1.5 Mb, it is not surprising that the manifestations of WS are extremely broad, involving most body systems. In this paper, we primarily focus on the musculoskeletal aspects of WS as these findings have not been the subject of a comprehensive review. We review the MSK features commonly seen in individuals with WS, along with related sensory and neurological issues interacting with and compounding underlying MSK abnormalities. We end by providing perspective, particularly from the vantage point of a physical therapist, on therapeutic interventions to address the most common MSK and related features seen in WS. Clin. Anat. 29:578-589, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26749433

  9. Orbital Lipomatosis: A Complication of Steroid Therapy in the Sweet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Gwendoline; Pare, Arnaud; Sury, Florent; Goga, Dominque; Laure, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The description of a Sweet syndrome steroid dependant-induced orbital lipomatosis is reported. A 76-year-old-man with history of Sweet syndrome presented with severe bilateral proptosis (Hertel value, 25 mm) with decreased visual acuity and evoked potentials lengthened. A bilateral transpalpebral orbital decompression was performed by resection of intraorbital fat without bone removal. The surgery was uneventful. The volume of resected orbital fat was 15 ml for both sides. Proptosis reduction was 6 mm. Postoperative Hertel values were 19 mm, and evoked potentials were improved. The proptosis was managed successfully. Orbital lipectomy led to minimal sequelae and may be repeated if necessary in this case. PMID:25120096

  10. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae

    2016-01-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  11. Pathologic Femoral Neck Fracture Due to Fanconi Syndrome Induced by Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Suk; Kim, Byung-Kook; Lee, Ho-Jae; Dan, Jinmyoung

    2016-06-01

    In Fanconi syndrome, hypophosphatemic osteomalacia is caused by proximal renal tubule dysfunction which leads to impaired reabsorption of amino acids, glucose, urate, and phosphate. We present a rare case of a 43-year-old Korean male who was found to have insufficiency stress fracture of the femoral neck secondary to osteomalacia due to Fanconi syndrome. He had been receiving low-dose adefovir dipivoxil (ADV, 10 mg/day) for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection for 7 years and he subsequently developed severe hypophosphatemia and proximal renal tubule dysfunction. The incomplete femoral neck fracture was fixed with multiple cannulated screws to prevent further displacement of the initial fracture. After cessation of ADV and correction of hypophosphatemia with oral phosphorus supplementation, the patient's clinical symptoms, such as bone pain, muscle weakness, and laboratory findings improved. PMID:27247753

  12. Concurrence of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Bilateral Parotitis after Minocycline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jimi; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Tae-Heung; Choi, Deok-Jin; Kim, Jin-Pyeong; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline is an antibiotic of tetracycline derivatives that is commonly used in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. It has been reported to cause rare adverse events from mild cutaneous eruption to severe forms including drug-induced lupus, serum sickness-like reaction, and hypersensitivity reactions, etc. The risks of adverse events attributed to minocycline have not been ascertained reliably and there are concerns about the safety of minocycline which could possibly result in life-threatening events such as the Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Here we demonstrate an unusual case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in conjunction with bilateral parotitis after the intake of minocycline in a Korean boy suggesting discreet use of the drug. PMID:21103193

  13. Corticosteroid replacement therapy in hepatoadrenal syndrome: case report with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tomaselli, Tania; Privitera, Graziella; Fede, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Luisa; Scicali, Roberto; Di Vita, Rossella; Compagnone, Domenico; Purrello, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    In liver cirrhosis, hepatoadrenal syndrome has been described recently as a progressive impairment in the adrenocortical reserve, with deficient production or action of glucocorticoids resulting in adrenal insufficiency. Data on the treatment of this syndrome are scarce. We report a case of a 60-year-old male patient referred to our hospital because of rectal bleeding and bilateral leg swelling. He complained of marked weakness, bilateral leg swelling, and shortness of breath with exertion for the last 2 months. Biochemistry and imaging indicated liver cirrhosis. Because of the weakness and persistent hypotension, we performed a low-dose synacthen test, which indicated adrenal insufficiency (baseline cortisol level 1.8 μg/dl, increasing to 3.5 and 3.7 μg/dl at 20 and 30 min, respectively). The patient's general condition improved promptly after corticosteroid supplementation. PMID:22850193

  14. Colchicine therapy in amyloidosis related with plasmacytic Castleman disease presenting with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paydas, Saime; Paydas, Semra; Ergin, Melek

    2015-09-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a neoplasm that presents with single or multiple lymphadenopathy. The disease is characterized by fever, weight loss, anemia, polyclonal hyperglobulinemia, splenomegaly, thrombocytosis and peripheral lymphadenopathy. In this paper, we report a young man with plasmacytic type CD and amyloid A (AA) deposition who presented with intra-abdominal mass and nephrotic syndrome. He was successfully treated with colchicine following surgery. PMID:26354576

  15. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  16. Corticosteroid Therapy for Management of Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count (HELLP) Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Minhong; Chen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome is a severe condition of pregnancy that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Corticoteroid (CORT) therapy is common in the management of HELLP syndrome. This study evaluates the efficacy of CORT therapy to patients with HELLP Syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHODS A literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases. Meta-analyses of means difference and odds ratio were carried under the random-effects model. RESULTS Fifteen studies (675 CORT treated and 787 control HELLP patients) were included. CORT treatment significantly improved platelet count (mean difference between CORT treated and controls in changes from baseline, MD: 38.08 [15.71, 60.45]×109; p=0.0009), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (MD: -440 [-760, -120] IU/L; p=0.007), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (MD: -143.34 [-278.69, -7.99] IU/L; p=0.04) but the decrease in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels was not statistically significant (MD: -48.50 [-114.32, 17.32] IU/L; p=0.15). Corticosteroid treatment was also associated with significantly less blood transfusion rate (odds ratio, OR: 0.42 [0.24, 0.76]; p=0.004) and hospital/ICU stay (MD: -1.79 [-3.54, -0.05] days; p=0.04). Maternal mortality (OR: 1.27 [0.45, 3.60]; p=0.65), birth weight (MD: 0.09 [-0.11, 0.28]; p=0.38) and the prevalence of morbid conditions (OR: 0.79 [0.58, 1.08]; p=0.14) did not differ significantly between both groups. CONCLUSIONS Corticosteroid administration to HELLP patients improves platelet count, and the serum levels of LDH and ALT, and reduces hospital/ICU stay and blood transfusion rate, but is not significantly associated with better maternal mortality and overall morbidity. PMID:26633822

  17. Ex-vivo gene therapy restores LEKTI activity and corrects the architecture of Netherton syndrome-derived skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Larcher, Fernado; Semenova, Ekaterina; Talbot, Gill E; Harper, John I; Del Rio, Marcela; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2011-02-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a debilitating congenital skin disorder caused by mutations in the SPINK5 gene encoding the lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI). It is characterized by defective keratinization, recurrent infections, and hypernatraemic dehydration with a mortality rate of about 10% in the first year of life. Currently, there are no curative treatments for NS. We have developed a HIV-1 based, self-inactivating lentiviral vector to express SPINK5 in keratinocytes as part of an ex-vivo gene therapy strategy for NS. High transduction efficiency was achieved in NS keratinocytes and reconstitution of LEKTI expression was confirmed in previously deficient cells. These genetically corrected keratinocytes were further tested in an in vitro organotypic culture (OTC) system and in vivo mouse/human skin engraftment model. Results showed correction of epidermal architecture in both OTCs and regenerated skin grafts. Importantly, the results from corrected skin grafts indicated that even where detectable LEKTI expression was restored to a limited numbers of cells, a wider bystander benefit occurred around these small populations. As LEKTI is a secreted protein, the genetically modified graft may provide not only an immediate local protective barrier, but also act as a source of secreted LEKTI providing a generalized benefit following ex-vivo gene therapy. PMID:20877344

  18. Genetic Syndromes and Genes Involved in the Development of the Female Reproductive Tract: A Possible Role for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Connell, MT; Owen, CM; Segars, JH

    2014-01-01

    Müllerian and vaginal anomalies are congenital malformations of the female reproductive tract resulting from alterations in the normal developmental pathway of the uterus, cervix, fallopian tubes, and vagina. The most common of the Müllerian anomalies affect the uterus and may adversely impact reproductive outcomes highlighting the importance of gaining understanding of the genetic mechanisms that govern normal and abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. Modern molecular genetics with study of knock out animal models as well as several genetic syndromes featuring abnormalities of the female reproductive tract have identified candidate genes significant to this developmental pathway. Further emphasizing the importance of understanding female reproductive tract development, recent evidence has demonstrated expression of embryologically significant genes in the endometrium of adult mice and humans. This recent work suggests that these genes not only play a role in the proper structural development of the female reproductive tract but also may persist in adults to regulate proper function of the endometrium of the uterus. As endometrial function is critical for successful implantation and pregnancy maintenance, these recent data suggest a target for gene therapy. Future research will be needed to determine if gene therapy may improve reproductive outcomes for patients with demonstrated deficient endometrial expression related to abnormal gene expression. PMID:25506511

  19. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  20. Validity of Outcome Prediction Scoring Systems in Korean Patients with Severe Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome Receiving Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Yeo, Hye Ju; Yoon, Seong Hoon; Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Woo Hyun; Jeon, Doo Soo; Kim, Yun Seong; Son, Bong Soo; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Recently, several prognostic scoring systems for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) have been published. The aim of this study was to validate the established scoring systems for outcome prediction in Korean patients. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 50 patients on ECMO therapy in our center from 2012 to 2014. A calculation of outcome prediction scoring tools was performed and the comparison across various models was conducted. In our study, the overall hospital survival was 46% and successful weaning rate was 58%. The Predicting Death for Severe ARDS on V-V ECMO (PRESERVE) score showed good discrimination of mortality prediction for patients on ECMO with AUC of 0.80 (95% CI 0.66-0.90). The respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survival prediction (RESP) score and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II score also showed fair prediction ability with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.65-0.89) and AUC of 0.78 (95% CI 0.64-0.88), respectively. However, the ECMOnet score failed to predict mortality with AUC of 0.51 (95% CI 0.37-0.66). When evaluating the predictive accuracy according to optimal cut-off point of each scoring system, RESP score had a best specificity of 91.3% and 66.7% of sensitivity, respectively. This study supports the clinical usefulness of the prognostic scoring tools for severe ARDS with ECMO therapy when applying to the Korean patients receiving ECMO. PMID:27247503

  1. Translocation (6;15)(q12;q15): A Novel Mutation in a Patient with Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Saba F.; Sonu, Rebecca J.; Dwyre, Denis M.; Jonas, Brian A.; Rashidi, Hooman H.

    2015-01-01

    Most myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) present with loss or gain of chromosomal material and less commonly show translocations as a sole abnormality. In addition, certain translocations are more commonly seen in MDS than others, but to our knowledge, the presence of t(6;15) has not been reported in MDS, specifically therapy-related MDS (t-MDS) cases. Patients with t-MDS, a group of heterogeneous stem cell related disorders resulting as a latent complication of cytotoxic and/or radiation therapy, generally tend to have a poorer prognosis than de novo MDS. We present a unique case of a patient who initially presented with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a normal karyotype and FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations. The patient was successfully treated with chemotherapy and an autologous bone marrow transplant but subsequently developed a new FLT3-ITD negative t-MDS with a unique translocation, t(6;15)(q12;q15), three years after transplant. To our knowledge, this unique sole translocation has never been reported in MDS or t-MDS and given her successful response to treatment and remission, presence of this translocation may have some prognostic value. PMID:26798525

  2. Phase I trial of low-dose oral Clofarabine in myelodysplastic syndromes patients who have failed frontline therapy.

    PubMed

    Rudrapatna, Venkatesh K; Morley, Kimberly; Boucher, Kenneth M; Pierson, Andrew S; Shull, Christian T; Kushner, James P; Shami, Paul J

    2015-08-01

    We investigated protracted low-dose oral Clofarabine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Adults with an International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score of INT-1 or higher who had failed first line therapy were eligible. INT-1 patients had to be transfusion-dependent. We started with oral Clofarabine at 5mg (fixed dose) daily for 10 consecutive days on a 28-day cycle. Toxicity prompted a modification to 1mg PO daily for 10 days and then 1mg PO daily for 7 days. Patients received treatment indefinitely until loss of response or unacceptable toxicity. Nine patients (5 women) were enrolled and evaluable (median age 65 years; range 55-81). A 10-day regimen of oral Clofarabine at 5mg/day induced Grade IV pancytopenia. A dose of 1 mg/day for 7/28 days was very well tolerated without significant toxicity. Three patients had responses (2 with responses lasting up to 21 and 51 cycles) defined as stable disease in spite of no significant change on bone marrow evaluation. Low-dose oral Clofarabine (1mg daily for 7/28 days) proved both effective and safe for patients with MDS who had failed prior therapy. This patient population is particularly sensitive to more protracted Clofarabine treatment schedules. PMID:26038120

  3. Amlodipine/Atorvastatin single-pill therapy for blood pressure and lipid goals in African Americans: influence of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; Flack, John M; Saunders, Elijah; Victor, Ronald; Watson, Karol; Kursun, Attila; Jamieson, Michael J; Shi, Harry

    2009-10-01

    African Americans with diabetes +/- the metabolic syndrome are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. This subanalysis of the Clinical Utility of Caduet in Simultaneously Achieving Blood Pressure and Lipid End Points (CAPABLE) trial studied attainment of the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals by 8 flexibly titrated doses (5/10-10/80 mg) of amlodipine/atorvastatin single pill in 494 African Americans with hypertension and dyslipidemia, according to the presence of diabetes +/- the metabolic syndrome. In 169 diabetic patients, the metabolic syndrome was associated with poorer BP goal attainment (38.5% vs 48.5% in diabetic patients without the metabolic syndrome). Among diabetic patients (+/- the metabolic syndrome) 61% to 62% reached LDL-C goal. More than 60% of patients with diabetes uncontrolled for LDL-C were maintained on suboptimal atorvastatin therapy (mean final dose: 29.9 mg vs maximum of 80 mg). Reluctance to intensify therapy to attain accepted targets in high-risk individuals suggests a degree of clinical inertia not explained by objective evidence of dose-dependent intolerance. PMID:19817942

  4. [Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) - difficulties in diagnostics, therapy and assessment].

    PubMed

    Böger, A

    2015-03-01

    CRPS is still widely unknown among physicians. However, surgeons and GPs should know the diagnostic criteria and the modern therapeutic approaches in order to start early therapy according to recent medical guidelines. Pain specialists and/ or neurologists should be involved because of their clinical and neuroanatomic knowledge. First-line therapy comprises neither extensive instrumental diagnostic procedures nor invasive treatments, which - in some cases - could even worsen the disease. The key point is a variety of specific physiotherapeutic techniques. The prognosis is not as poor as many physicians believe. PMID:25971143

  5. [Phantom limb pain syndrome: therapeutic approach using mirror therapy in a Geriatric Department].

    PubMed

    González García, Paloma; Manzano Hernández, M Pilar; Muñoz Tomás, M Teresa; Martín Hernández, Carlos; Forcano García, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of mirror visual feedback was initially introduced to alleviate phantom pain by restoring motor function through plastic changes in the human primary motor cortex. It is a promising novel technique that gives a new perspective to neurological rehabilitation. Using this therapy, the mirror neuron system is activated and decrease the activity of those systems that perceive protopathic pain, making somatosensory cortex reorganization possible. This paper reports the results of the mirror therapy in three patients with phantom limb pain after recent lower limb amputation, showing its analgesic effects and its benefits as a comprehensive rehabilitation instrument for lower limb amputee geriatric patients. PMID:23498652

  6. [Atrial fibrillation in Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Development and therapy].

    PubMed

    Duckeck, W; Kuck, K H

    1993-02-01

    In patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome the accessory pathway may participate in various tachyarrhythmias thereby influencing symptoms and prognosis. Atrial fibrillation occurs in 10 to 32% of patients and may have life-threatening consequences by precipitating ventricular fibrillation in patients with rapid conduction due to an accessory pathway with short anterograde refractory period (< 250 ms). Pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation in the WPW syndrome and therapeutic options are reviewed in this presentation. Spontaneous degeneration of atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia has been reported to represent the most frequent mode of initiation of atrial fibrillation during electrophysiologic study (up to 64% of episodes). Hemodynamic changes during tachycardia may lead to increased sympathetic tone, hypoxemia or increased tension of the atrial wall, thus, triggering atrial fibrillation. Induction of reentrant tachycardia during electrophysiologic study also has shown to be strongly correlated to its clinical prevalence and is inducible in up to 77% of patients with atrial fibrillation. The pathogenesis and high incidence of atrial fibrillation in patients with WPW syndrome is related to presence and functional properties of the accessory pathway. After surgical excision or catheter ablation more than 90% of patients are free of this arrhythmia. Anterograde conduction properties of the pathway appear to be more important than retrograde properties. High incidence of atrial fibrillation is related to short anterograde refractory periods, and of note, this arrhythmia is rare (3%) in patients with concealed pathways. With intracardiac recordings, Jackman et al. could demonstrate atrial fibrillation due to micro-reentry originating in accessory pathway networks.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8454253

  7. Genetics and Genomics of Sjogren's Syndrome: Research provides Clues to Pathogenesis and Novel Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Barbara M.; Nazmul-Hossain, Abu N. M.; Patel, Ketan; Hughes, Pamela; Moser, Kathy L.; Rhodus, Nelson L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose While the key inciting events that drive the progression from autoantibodies to clinical disease remain to be clarified, new light has been shed on the factors contributing to disease susceptibility and the role of genetic factors in determining Sjogren's syndrome (SS) disease phenotypes. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the role of genetic markers in the susceptibility to and pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome. This paper also discusses how genomic and proteomic technology can help in the design of specific therapeutics. Key Findings Recent evidence suggests that inflammatory genes associated with interferon pathways, and specific regulatory genes that control the maturation and proliferation of B cells, contribute to the pathogenesis of Sjogren's syndrome. Both gene expression profiling technology and gene association studies have been used to identify these key biologic pathways. Molecularly defined subsets of pSS patients are also being revealed by these studies. Previously identified gene loci which predispose to multiple autoimmune disorders have been confirmed supporting the paradigm of “general” autoimmune disease genes. Association of SS with many additional susceptibility loci are likely to be established through ongoing genome-wide association scans (GWAS). Clues from genetic studies suggest that targeting B cells will prove to be an effective way of reducing the systemic manifestations of pSS and are supported by early clinical trials. Summary Genome-wide technologies are likely to identify new genes and molecular pathways in the pathogenesis of SS that will be useful not only to identify patients at risk for SS, but also to identify subsets of patients at risk for variable levels of disease severity. In the future, these studies could identify novel biomarkers that will lead to significant advances in management by providing the means to tailor therapeutic strategies to individual patients. PMID:21497524

  8. [Effectiveness of pinaverium bromide therapy on colonic motility disorders in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wittmann, T; Fehér, A; Rosztóczy, A; Jánosi, J

    1999-02-28

    The special patterns of the slow wave activity in irrittable bowel syndrome by means of surface electromyography were examined and the effect of pinaverium bromide on the symptoms and on the colonic motility in this disease was estimated. Twenty two patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 7 healthy controls were selected to the study. The clinical symptoms were abdominal pain and bloating in all patients, constipation in 9, and diarrhoea in 6 cases. Surface electromyography was carried out before and on the 14th day of the treatment with pinaverium bromide (50 mg t. i. d). The colonic motility was analysed in a 2 hour fasting and a 2 hour postprandial period following a standard (800 kCal) meal. The slow wave frequency of 0.01-0.04 Hz were selected and analysed. The mean frequency of activity peaks (n/10 min) and power-index (area under curve, microV 10 min) were measured. For statistical analysis Student's t-test was applied. Electromyogram of patients with irritable bowel syndrome showed a significant increase of the measured colonic motility parameters both in fasting and postprandial states. Fourteen days of pinaverium bromide treatment was able to significantly reduce the intensity of the colonic motor activity. Administration of pinaverium bromide completely released in 6 and significantly improved the abdominal pain in other 12 patients, while the bloating disappeared in 12 and was significantly improved in 5 from 22 patients. Pinaverium bromide was able to normalise the stool frequency: the weekly number of stools was decreased from 16 to 7 in the patients complaining diarrhoea ant it was increased from 2 to 6 in the patients with constipation. PMID:10204402

  9. Prostate Cancer and Li-Fraumeni Syndrome: Implications for Screening and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Spees, Colleen K; Kelleher, Kelly J; Abaza, Ronney; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-03-01

    Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder associated with mutations in the TP53 gene and characterized by a propensity to develop a variety of malignancies resulting in a shortened lifespan. We report a case of prostate cancer in a 50 year old male with LFS. Experimental studies suggest that TP53 mutations in prostate cancer are associated with therapeutic resistance to radiation, chemotherapy, and anti-androgens, implying that LFS men may experience more aggressive cancer biology with implications for therapeutic decisions. The potential of prostate cancer to develop earlier in LFS favors institution of screening at earlier ages. PMID:26793489

  10. Prostate Cancer and Li-Fraumeni Syndrome: Implications for Screening and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spees, Colleen K.; Kelleher, Kelly J.; Abaza, Ronney; Clinton, Steven K.

    2015-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder associated with mutations in the TP53 gene and characterized by a propensity to develop a variety of malignancies resulting in a shortened lifespan. We report a case of prostate cancer in a 50 year old male with LFS. Experimental studies suggest that TP53 mutations in prostate cancer are associated with therapeutic resistance to radiation, chemotherapy, and anti-androgens, implying that LFS men may experience more aggressive cancer biology with implications for therapeutic decisions. The potential of prostate cancer to develop earlier in LFS favors institution of screening at earlier ages. PMID:26793489

  11. Progressive neurodegenerative syndrome in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia receiving intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Sag, Aslihan Taskiran; Saka, Esen; Ozgur, Tuba Turul; Sanal, Ozden; Ayvaz, Deniz Cagdas; Elibol, Bulent; Kurne, Asli Tuncer

    2014-09-01

    A progressive encephalopathy of unknown etiology has been described in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders. In this report, we characterize the clinical features of this progressive neurodegenerative dementing disorder in a young man with Bruton agammaglobulinemia, through neuropsychological tests and a video sequence. The clinical course of the encephalopathy seems rather uniform: Cognition, especially frontal lobe function, is affected in the early stages, and some patients develop movement disorders. The syndrome causes severe cognitive and physical disability, and can eventually be fatal. The autoimmunity results from dysregulated immune responses, but the underlying mechanism has not yet been fully explained. PMID:25237746

  12. [Metabolic therapy with Actovegin in case of ischemic syndrome of limbs].

    PubMed

    Dibirov, M D

    2014-01-01

    Actovegin was used in complex conservative and surgical treatment of lower limb chronic ischemia and diabetic foot syndrome in 200 patients. In 120 patients Actovegin was used in combination with reconstructive operations, angioplasty and stenting for preparation for surgery. In 80 patients Actovegin was used as independent method of treatment. In severe cases the medicine was injected intravenously 1000-2000 mg №10-15, and in mild degrees (IIA-IIB) - 400-800 mg intramuscularly with conversion on the tablet form in the future. Clinical picture, dopplerographic and microcirculatory data evidence about absolute safety, efficiency and comparative cheapness of the parenteral and enteral forms of Actovegine. PMID:24736538

  13. Adult Nephrotic Syndrome after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Renal Pathology is the Best Predictor of Response to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Beyar-Katz, Ofrat; Davila, Etty Kruzel; Zuckerman, Tsila; Fineman, Riva; Haddad, Nuhad; Okasha, Doaa; Henig, Israel; Leiba, Ronit; Rowe, Jacob M; Ofran, Yishai

    2016-06-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a rare phenomenon usually associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This systematic review of post-HSCT NS cases reported in the literature aimed to identify risk factors and unique features of the disease in this clinical setting. One hundred sixteen cases of post-HSCT NS published in the English literature between 1988 and 2015 were revealed and analyzed. The median onset of NS was 20.5 months (range, 3 to 174) post-HSCT. NS development was associated with acute or chronic GVHD in 87.2% of cases. Membranous nephropathy (MGN) was the most frequent pathology (65.5%), followed by minimal change disease (MCD) (19%). Complete remission of the NS was achieved in 63.5% of patients (59.1% of MGN cases and 81.3% of MCD cases; P = .15). Patients presenting with MCD recovered at a median of 1.75 months (range, 1 to 12) and with MGN a median of 7 months (range, 1 to 53) (P = .001). NS was treated with corticosteroids alone in 16.8% of patients and with a combination of corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents in 73.5% of patients. Univariate analysis failed to identify a single predictive factor of response to therapy. In conclusion, post-HSCT NS usually develops concomitant to GVHD and is associated with high rates of response to therapy. Although most patients were treated with a combination of immunosuppressive drugs, single-agent therapy with steroids may be sufficient in some cases. PMID:26740372

  14. Radiation therapy as part of the therapeutic regimen for extensive multilocular myxedema in a patient with exophthalmos, myxedema and osteoarthropathy syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ELSAYAD, KHALED; KRIZ, JAN; BAUCH, JULIA; SCOBIOALA, SERGIU; HAVERKAMP, UWE; SUNDERKÖTTER, CORD; EICH, HANS THEODOR

    2015-01-01

    Exophthalmos, myxedema and osteoarthropathy (EMO) comprise the triad known as EMO syndrome, which is rarely observed in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. The present study reports the case of a patient with EMO, including the response of this rare combination to radiotherapy. A 48-year-old patient with EMO syndrome presented to the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, eight years prior to writing with therapy-resistant pretibial myxedema and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of the metacarpal bones. The patient had been diagnosed with Graves' disease (GD) 26 years prior to presentation, which was treated by thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy. Four years subsequent to the diagnosis of GD, the patient developed exophthalmos, which was treated using radiotherapy. An evident pretibial, foot and hand myxedema developed within the 10 years following the onset of orbitopathy. The skin lesions were treated using radiation therapy subsequent to the failure of multiple surgical procedures and medical treatments. Almost eight years subsequent to the administration of irradiation, no recurrence was observed on the lower right leg, nor was any recurrence on the lower left leg observed approximately four years subsequent to the completion of radiotherapy. However, an additional lesion on the left hand demonstrated slow progression following treatment with radiation therapy. The present study indicates that radiation therapy can be considered as adjuvant therapy for patients with refractory myxedema, to prevent or delay the recurrence of myxedema subsequent to surgical excision. PMID:26137080

  15. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. Results The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. Conclusions This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. Trial registration ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005. PMID:24225069

  16. B-cell reconstitution after lentiviral vector–mediated gene therapy in patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Maria Carmina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Pala, Francesca; Ferrua, Francesca; Uva, Paolo; Brigida, Immacolata; Sereni, Lucia; van der Burg, Mirjam; Ottaviano, Giorgio; Albert, Michael H.; Grazia Roncarolo, Maria; Naldini, Luigi; Aiuti, Alessandro; Villa, Anna; Bosticardo, Marita

    2015-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections, and susceptibility to autoimmunity and lymphomas. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice; however, administration of WAS gene–corrected autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been demonstrated as a feasible alternative therapeutic approach. Objective Because B-cell homeostasis is perturbed in patients with WAS and restoration of immune competence is one of the main therapeutic goals, we have evaluated reconstitution of the B-cell compartment in 4 patients who received autologous hematopoietic stem cells transduced with lentiviral vector after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen combined with anti-CD20 administration. Methods We evaluated B-cell counts, B-cell subset distribution, B cell–activating factor and immunoglobulin levels, and autoantibody production before and after gene therapy (GT). WAS gene transfer in B cells was assessed by measuring vector copy numbers and expression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Results After lentiviral vector-mediated GT, the number of transduced B cells progressively increased in the peripheral blood of all patients. Lentiviral vector-transduced progenitor cells were able to repopulate the B-cell compartment with a normal distribution of B-cell subsets both in bone marrow and the periphery, showing a WAS protein expression profile similar to that of healthy donors. In addition, after GT, we observed a normalized frequency of autoimmune-associated CD19+CD21−CD35− and CD21low B cells and a reduction in B cell–activating factor levels. Immunoglobulin serum levels and autoantibody production improved in all treated patients. Conclusions We provide evidence that lentiviral vector-mediated GT induces transgene expression in the B-cell compartment, resulting in ameliorated B-cell development and functionality and contributing to immunologic

  17. Cabergoline plus metformin therapy effects on menstrual irregularity and androgen system in polycystic ovary syndrome women with hyperprolactinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghaneei, Azam; Jowkar, Akram; Hasani Ghavam, Mohammad Reza; Ghaneei, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: 30% of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) show mild, transient hyperprolactinemia. It is suggested that a reduction of the dopamine inhibitory effect might raise both prolactin and luteinizing hormone. Objective: To investigate the adjuvant cabergoline therapy effects on menstrual irregularity and androgen system in PCOS women with hyperprolactinemia. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was done on 110 polycystic ovary syndrome women with increased serum prolactin concentration [1.5 fold more than normal level (>37.5 ng/ml)]. Participants were divided into two groups: Case group (n=55) treated with metformin 1gr/day and cabergoline 0.5 mg/week for 4 months and control group (n=55) treated with metformin 1g/day and placebo weekly. Testosterone, prolactin, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate level were measured before and four months after intervention in two groups. Also, situation of menstrual cycles asked and recorded before and after intervention. Results: We found decrease in the mean of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, weight and total testosterone level in the two groups after intervention but their changes were not significant. Patients in case group showed a significant decrease in serum prolactin level before and after intervention (p<0.001), but no difference was found in control group. All patients in both studied groups had irregular menstrual cycles, which regulate after intervention and the difference was significant (p=0.02). Conclusion: The results showed that cabergoline can be used as a safe administration in PCOS patients with hyperprolactinemia to improve the menstrual cycles. Considering that the administration of cabergoline plus metformin may reduce the required duration and dose of metformin, patient acceptability of this approach is higher. PMID:25999998

  18. Effect of radial shock wave therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: A prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yung-Tsan; Ke, Ming-Jen; Chou, Yu-Ching; Chang, Chih-Ya; Lin, Ching-Yueh; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Chen, Liang-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Three recent studies demonstrated the positive effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for treating carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, none have entirely proved the effects of ESWT on CTS because all studies had a small sample size and lacked a placebo-controlled design. Moreover, radial ESWT (rESWT) has not been used to treat CTS. We conducted a prospective randomized, controlled, double-blinded study to assess the effect of rESWT for treating CTS. Thirty-four enrolled patients (40 wrists) were randomized into intervention and control groups (20 wrists in each). Participants in the intervention group underwent three sessions of rESWT with nightly splinting, whereas those in the control group underwent sham rESWT with nightly splinting. The primary outcome was visual analog scale (VAS), whereas the secondary outcomes included the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ), cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. Evaluations were performed before treatment and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the third rESWT session. A significantly greater improvement in the VAS, BCTQ scores, and CSA of the median nerve was noted in the intervention group throughout the study as compared to the control group (except for BCTQ severity at week 12 and CSA at weeks 1 and 4) (p < 0.05). This is the first study to assess rESWT in a randomized placebo-controlled trial and demonstrate that rESWT is a safe and effective method for relieving pain and disability in patients with CTS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:977-984, 2016. PMID:26610183

  19. Virus reactivation and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kano, Yoko; Inaoka, Miyuki; Sakuma, Keiichi; Shiohara, Tetsuo

    2005-04-15

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) is a severe multi-organ system reaction caused by specific drugs. Many reports have revealed that human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) reactivation contributes to the development of DIHS. In addition, recent articles have shown that reactivation of other herpesviruses such as human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) might be also implicated in the development of DIHS. These observations suggest that not only HHV-6 but also other herpesvirses might reactivate from the latency and play an important role in the appearance of clinical manifestations of DIHS. Several patients with DIHS were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in addition to systemic corticosteroids. The results have been encouraging although virus reactivation could not be suppressed. Although the pathomechanism of IVIG treatment in patients with DIHS remains unknown, the therapeutic effects of IVIG could be dependent, in part, on functional capabilities of anti-virus IgG contained in IVIG. PMID:15767030

  20. [Acute Kidney Injury, Type - 3 cardiorenal syndrome, Biomarkers, Renal Replacement Therapy].

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Bellasi, Antonio; Barbera, Vincenzo; Cozzolino, Mario; Russo, Domenico; De Pascalis, Antonio; Santoboni, Francesca; Villani, Annalisa; De Rosa, Silvia; Colafelice, Marco; Russo, Luigi; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and major cardiovascular events represent main cause of death in both acute and chronic kidney disease patients. Kidney and heart failure are common and frequently co-exist This organ-organ interaction, also called organ cross-talk, leads to well-known definition of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Here we will describe cardiovascular involvement in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Also known as Type-3 CRS or acute reno-cardiac CRS, it occurs when AKI contributes and/or precipitates development of acute cardiac injury. AKI may directly or indirectly produces an acute cardiac event and it can be associated with volume overload, metabolic acidosis and electrolytes disorders such as hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia, coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis which has been also described in patients with AKI with the consequence of direct negative effects on cardiac performance. PMID:27374388

  1. [The low FODMAP diet as a therapy for irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    van der Waaij, Laurens A; Stevens, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common, sometimes disabling disorder for which there is a lack of effective treatments. Many patients report that the make-up of the diet has an effect on their symptoms. The western diet consists of many different molecules. Some of them are small, fermentable and cannot be absorbed (FODMAPs). The low FODMAP diet was recently developed in Australia. In randomised controlled trials 37-45% of IBS patients experience symptom reduction with this diet. The low FODMAP diet starts with a 6-week elimination phase. If symptoms decrease substantially, it is followed by a structured reintroduction phase of the various FODMAPs over several weeks, after which patients are left with a diet that is simpler to follow. PMID:24823855

  2. Antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes: current agents and impact on patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tayeb, Hussam M; Nelson, Adam J; Willoughby, Scott R; Worthley, Matthew I

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherothrombosis and subsequent development of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The understanding of this process has driven a large body of evidence demonstrating the mortality and morbidity benefits of antiplatelet agents in the ACS population. As expected, however, these agents come with an intrinsically increased risk of bleeding which underlies the vast majority of their complications and adverse effects. In today’s setting of compounding comorbidities and broadening indications, finding the balance between thrombosis prevention and bleeding risk remains the challenge for all clinicians considering these medications. This article reviews the current main antiplatelet agents that are available for clinical use and outlines their impact on ACS outcome. We also outline factors which affect the response to these agents and discuss strategies to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:22915965

  3. Guillain Barre syndrome in an HIV-1-infected patient after the beginning of combined antiretroviral therapy: an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Digiulio, Maria Anna; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-associated Guillan-Barre syndrome (hGBS) is an ascendant progressive polyradiculoneuropathy described throughout the course of the viral disease, mainly associated with the acute retroviral syndrome. HGBS is occasionally described in severely immunocompromised subjects in the context of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The case described occurred soon after the start of a combined antiretroviral treatment in an HIV-1 infected patient with ulcerative colitis in the absence of severe immunosuppression. This manifestation may be interpreted as an uncommon appearance of an immune reconstitution syndrome in the presence of a predisposing autoimmune pathology. PMID:24531178

  4. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  5. Immune Reconstitution Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... RECONSTITUTION SYNDROME? Some people who start antiretroviral therapy (ART) get health problems even though their HIV comes ... may occur in about 20% of people starting ART. HOW WAS THE SYNDROME IDENTIFIED? Several patients developed ...

  6. The challenge of individualised risk assessment and therapy planning in elderly high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent one of the most frequent and serious haematologic diseases of the elderly. Effective therapies exist ranging from best supportive care to haematologic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Decision making, however, is rather complex in this group of patients because ageing is a multidimensional process involving not only physiological changes but also changes in functional, social, emotional and cognitive capacities. All these factors can have a significant impact on the efficacy and tolerability of a potential therapy and therefore have to be thoroughly assessed before deciding on individual treatment regimens. Risk assessment tools are available both to classify the stage and prognosis of MDS and to meet the needs of elderly patients. A tool explicitly focussing on elderly MDS patients, however, is still missing. The current report approached this issue by combining the well established MDS-risk score 'International Prognostic Scoring System' (IPSS) with the 'Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment' (MGA). As decision making is most complex in high-risk MDS patients, the new algorithm is presented exemplarily for this group of patients. In a first step, MDS-related risk is identified using IPSS, in a second step, patients are assigned to one of three risk categories of the MGA (go-go/fit, slow-go/vulnerable, no-go/frail). While go-go patients might be subjected to therapies comparable to those given to younger patients, in no-go patients, a palliative therapy combined with best supportive care will probably be most appropriate. In slow-go patients, age-related life expectancy taken from public age statistics should be compared to the MDS-related life expectancy. Based on this combined assessment procedure and also on treatment tolerance in terms of the expectations/wishes of the patient and his/her family, an individualised therapeutic approach should be developed. Specific treatment recommendations for these three groups of

  7. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26945533

  8. [Hurler syndrome. Early diagnosis and successful enzyme replacement therapy: a new therapeutic approach. Case report].

    PubMed

    Dupont, C; El Hachem, C; Harchaoui, S; Ribault, V; Amiour, M; Guillot, M; Maire, I; Froissart, R; Guffon-Fouilhoux, N

    2008-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder due to alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency. Its severe prognosis has been significantly improved by enzyme replacement therapy using recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase (laronidase). We report the case of a boy who was diagnosed at 19 months of age with Hurler's disease, the most severe form of MPS I, and received thereafter a treatment by laronidase, resulting in clinical and biological improvement. The aim of this case report is to draw physicians' attention on the presenting signs of Hurler's disease, in order to enable an earlier diagnosis, increasing the treatment's benefits. PMID:18162380

  9. Purinergic signaling and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: From viral entry to therapy

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Daniela F; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela BR

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a serious condition associated to severe immune dysfunction and immunodeficiency. Mechanisms involved in HIV-associated immune activation, inflammation and loss of CD4+ T cells have been extensively studied, including those concerning purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic signaling components are involved in viral entry and replication and disease progression. Research involving the participation of purinergic signaling in HIV infection has been not only important to elucidate disease mechanisms but also to introduce new approaches to therapy. The involvement of purinergic signaling in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and its implications in the control of the HIV infection are reviewed in this paper. PMID:26279989

  10. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of oral antioxidant supplement therapy in patients with dry eye syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jehn-Yu; Yeh, Po-Ting; Hou, Yu-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of oral antioxidant supplementation in the treatment of patients with dry eye syndrome (DES). Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blinded study compared the effects of an antioxidant supplement (containing anthocyanosides, astaxanthin, vitamins A, C, and E, and several herbal extracts, including Cassiae semen and Ophiopogonis japonicus) with placebo on patients with DES. We assessed dry eye symptoms, visual acuity, Schirmer’s test, tear film breakup time, cornea and conjunctiva fluorescein staining, serum anti-SSA/anti-SSB antibodies, and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tears. The supplementation period was 8 weeks and patients were followed up every 4 weeks for 16 weeks. A linear mixed model was used to compare the groups, while within-group differences were tested by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Forty-three patients, 20 and 23 in treatment and placebo groups, respectively, completed the study. Liver and renal functions were normal. Diastolic blood pressure decreased in the treatment group. There were no significant differences in systolic blood pressure, dry eye symptoms, serum anti-SSA and anti-SSB, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, or fluorescein corneal staining between the groups. Tear film breakup time scores and Schirmer’s test without topical anesthesia significantly improved in the treatment group. Tear ROS level differed between the groups and decreased after treatment. Overall subjective impression revealed a significant improvement with treatment compared with placebo. Conclusion Oral antioxidant supplementations may increase tear production and improve tear film stability by reducing tear ROS. The vegetable-based antioxidant supplement used in this study is safe and can be utilized as an adjuvant therapy to conventional artificial tear therapy for patients with DES. PMID:27274185

  11. Effect of Combination Therapy on Cardiovascular Risk in the Pit Miners with Hypertension, Metabolic Syndrome and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Becarevic, Munevera; Barakovic, Fahir; Batic-Mujanovic, Olivera; Beganlic, Azijada

    2014-01-01

    Background: Higher cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality in depressed patient has demonstrated repeatedly. Aim: Determine the degree of occurrence of hypertension, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and depression in the pit miners and the impact of the six-month holistic treatment of all CV risk factors and depression in the overall CV risk in miners with hypertension, MetS and depression. Methods: From 492 pit miners was taken smoking status, measured blood pressure, waist circumference and body mass index. Analysis was done using the concentration of sugar in blood, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL cholesterol and determined total CV risk. All respondents filled self-assessment Beck's depression scale. Prevalence MetS hypertension and depression were determined. Group of 67 patients with joint hypertension, MetS and depression that is treated six months with psychotropic and somatotropin medication, was singled out. After six months, the effect of therapy on the risk factors and total CV was assessed. Results: Among 492 miners 67 (13,61%) of them had hypertension, MetS and depression. After six months treatment, it showed statistically significant reduction in blood pressure (p=0,0001), waist circumference (p=0,0001) ,total (p=0,002), HDL (p=0,007) and LDL cholesterol (p=0,003), smoking (p=0,002), Beck's scale results (p=0,007) and reduction in total CV risk. Conclusion: After six month of combine therapy in respondents has led to reduced CV risk and level of all factors, except BMI and triglycerides. PMID:24944535

  12. Short-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy, manual therapy, and Kinesio taping in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a major contributing factor of shoulder pain; and treatment approaches (Kinesio® taping [KT], Exercise [EX], manual therapy [MT], and high-intensity laser therapy [HILT]) have been developed to treat the pain. The key objective of this study was to compare the effects of KT, MT, and HILT on the pain, the range of motion (ROM), and the functioning in patients with SAIS. Seventy patients with SAIS were randomly divided into four groups based on the treatment(s) each group received [EX (n = 15), KT + EX (n = 20), MT + KT + EX (n = 16), and MT + KT + HILT + EX (n = 19)]. All the patients were assessed before and at the end of the treatment (15th day). The main outcome assessments included the evaluation of severity of pain by visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation ROM measurements by a universal goniometry. Shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) was used to measure pain and disability associated with shoulder pathology. Statistically significant differences were found in the treatment results of all parameters in MT + KT + EX and HILT + MT + KT + EX groups (p < 0.05). When the means of ROM and SPADI results of three groups were compared, statistically significant differences were found between all the groups (p < 0.05). These differences were significant especially between the groups MT + KT + EX and KT + EX (p < 0.05) and HILT + MT + KT + EX and KT + EX (p < 0.05). HILT and MT were found to be more effective in minimizing pain and disability and increasing ROM in patients with SAIS. Further studies with follow-up periods are required to determine the advantages of these treatments conclusively. PMID:27220527

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy in an attenuated case of mucopolysaccharidosis type I (Scheie syndrome): a 6.5-year detailed follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jurecka, Agnieszka; Marucha, Jolanta; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta; Różdżyńska-Świątkowska, Agnieszka; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2012-12-01

    We present the 6.5-year follow-up of a boy with Scheie syndrome whose therapy was initiated at age 2.5 years. Detailed anthropometric features, echocardiography, ophthalmologic and audiologic examinations, psychologic tests, joint range of motion, skeletal radiographs, ultrasound studies of liver and spleen volumes, urinary glycosaminoglycans, and antibodies were documented. After 6.5 years of enzyme replacement therapy, the patient experienced a decline in overall status, and the disease progressed significantly despite treatment. The patient's height at age 9 was equal to that at age 6. The patient developed heart insufficiency and a deterioration of airway flow. The patient's intelligence quotient remained unchanged, i.e., at the average level of 86 on the Terman-Merill Scale. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cervical spinal canal stenosis and marked spinal cord compression with myelopathy. A worsening of carpal tunnel syndrome was also evident. Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed increased central corneal thickness and intraocular pressure. In audiologic assessment, the patient's results were similar to those after 3 years of treatment. The only benefit involved temporarily improved passive and active shoulder flexion. Overall, the benefit of enzyme replacement therapy with laronidase on Scheie syndrome appeared minimal. PMID:23127271

  14. Are Pain-Related Fears Mediators for Reducing Disability and Pain in Patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1? An Explorative Analysis on Pain Exposure Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J.; Staal, J. Bart; van Dongen, Robert T. M.; Frölke, Jan Paul M.; Klomp, Frank P.; van de Meent, Henk; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether pain-related fears are mediators for reducing disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 when treating with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy. Design An explorative secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial. Participants Fifty-six patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1. Interventions The experimental group received Pain Exposure Physical Therapy in a maximum of five treatment sessions; the control group received conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Outcome measures Levels of disability, pain, and pain-related fears (fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and kinesiophobia) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. Results The experimental group had a significantly larger decrease in disability of 7.77 points (95% CI 1.09 to 14.45) and in pain of 1.83 points (95% CI 0.44 to 3.23) over nine months than the control group. The potential mediators pain-related fears decreased significantly in both groups, but there were no significant differences between groups, which indicated that there was no mediation. Conclusion The reduction of pain-related fears was comparable in both groups. We found no indication that pain-related fears mediate the larger reduction of disability and pain in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 treated with Pain Exposure Physical Therapy compared to conventional treatment. Trial registration International Clinical Trials Registry NCT00817128 PMID:25919011

  15. Prediction of Outcome in Women With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Who Receive Manual Physical Therapy Interventions: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Palacios-Ceña, María; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of a randomized trial. Background A clinical prediction rule to identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) most likely to respond to manual physical therapy has been published but requires further testing to determine its validity. Objective To assess the validity of a clinical prediction rule proposed for the management of patients with CTS in a different group of patients with a variety of treating clinicians. Methods A preplanned secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of manual physical therapies, including desensitization maneuvers of the central nervous system, in 120 women suffering from CTS was performed. Patients were randomized to receive 3 sessions of manual physical therapy (n = 60) or surgical release/decompression of the carpal tunnel (n = 60). Self-perceived improvement with a global rating of change was recorded at 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Pain intensity (mean pain and worst pain on a 0-to-10 numeric pain-rating scale) and scores on the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (functional status and symptom severity subscales) were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. A baseline assessment of status on the clinical prediction rule was performed (positive status on the clinical prediction rule was defined as meeting at least 2 of the following criteria: pressure pain threshold of less than 137 kPa over the affected C5-6 joint; heat pain threshold of less than 39.6°C over the affected carpal tunnel; and general health score [Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey] of greater than 66 points). Linear mixed models with repeated measures were used to examine the validity of the rule. Results Participants with a positive status on the rule who received manual physical therapy did not experience greater improvements compared to those with a negative status on the rule for mean pain (P = .65), worst pain (P = .86), function (P = .99), or symptom

  16. The role of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Rao, Satish S C

    2011-08-01

    Alterations in gut flora may play an important role in the pathophysiology of bowel symptoms, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). If so, antibiotics that affect gut flora may offer a novel approach for the management of patients with IBS. Here, we discuss the results of two identically designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (TARGET 1 and TARGET 2) of a poorly absorbed antibiotic, rifaximin, in patients with IBS. In these studies, 1260 patients (females 76.1 and 72.1%, respectively) who had IBS without constipation were randomized to receive either rifaximin 550 mg or placebo, three-times daily for 2 weeks. Subsequently, daily symptoms were assessed and patients were followed up for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure - adequate relief of global IBS symptoms during the first 4 weeks after treatment - was met in significantly more patients who received rifaximin than placebo (p < 0.001). In addition, more patients in the rifaximin group than in the placebo group (p < 0.001) reported an adequate relief of bloating, and an improvement in abdominal pain and stool consistency - secondary outcome measures. The incidence of adverse events with rifaximin was similar to placebo, and the drug was well tolerated. In summary, a 2-week course of rifaximin provided significant relief of IBS symptoms, as well as bloating and abdominal pain. PMID:21780893

  17. Constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: A review of current and emerging drug therapies

    PubMed Central

    Jadallah, Khaled A; Kullab, Susan M; Sanders, David S

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent medical condition that adversely affects patient quality of life and constitutes a significant economic burden on healthcare resources. A large proportion of patients suffer from the constipation subtype of IBS (IBS-C), most commonly afflicting older individuals and those with a lower socioeconomic status. Conventional pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options have limited efficacies and/or significant adverse events, which lead to increased long-term health care expenditures. Failure to effectively treat IBS-C patients over the past decades has largely been due to a poor understanding of disease pathophysiology, lack of a global view of the patient, and an inappropriate selection of patients and treatment endpoints in clinical trials. In recent years, however, more effective and safer drugs have been developed for the treatment of IBS-C. The advancement in the area of pharmacologic treatment is based on new knowledge of the pathophysiologic basis of IBS-C and the development of drugs with increased selectivity within pharmacologic classes with recognized efficacies. This narrative review covers the spectrum of available drugs and their mechanisms of action, as well as the efficacy and safety profiles of each as determined in relevant clinical trials that have investigated treatment options for IBS-C and chronic constipation. A brief summary of laxative-based treatment options is presented, followed by up-to-date assessments for three classes of drugs: prokinetics, prosecretory agents, and bile acid modulators. PMID:25083062

  18. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver: percutaneous stent therapy in Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, J; Görich, J; Kramme, E; Merkle, E; Sokiranski, R; Kern, P; Brambs, H J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Infiltration of the hepatic veins in the alveolar echinococcosis can lead to the development of the Budd-Chiari syndrome. The medical and surgical treatment of this condition is generally unsatisfactory. The results of successful interventional treatment with percutaneous stent implantation in the hepatic veins are reported. METHODS: Using a transjugular approach, metal mesh stents (Boston Scientific, Medi-Tech Accuflex 8/60 mm) were placed in the median and left hepatic veins of a 53 year old woman. After the intervention, oral chemotherapy with albendazole (2 x 400 mg/day) was continued, but no anticoagulants were given. RESULTS: Stent placement was performed without complications. The clinical picture improved rapidly: normalisation of portal blood flow was confirmed by Doppler ultrasound and there was improvement of liver function, reduction of oesophageal varices, and disappearance of ascites. A follow-up examination at 15 months showed no evidence of stent occlusion. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment of portal hypertension in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver is problematic. In selected patients with portal hypertension secondary to hepatic vein stenoses but no cirrhosis, percutaneous stent placement in the hepatic veins represents a promising treatment alternative. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9026484

  19. Early environmental therapy rescues brain development in a mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Begenisic, Tatjana; Sansevero, Gabriele; Baroncelli, Laura; Cioni, Giovanni; Sale, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS), the most common genetic disorder associated with intellectual disabilities, is an untreatable condition characterized by a number of developmental defects and permanent deficits in the adulthood. Ts65Dn mice, the major animal model for DS, display severe cognitive and synaptic plasticity defects closely resembling the human phenotype. Here, we employed a multidisciplinary approach to investigate, for the first time in developing Ts65Dn mice, the effects elicited by early environmental enrichment (EE) on brain maturation and function. We report that exposure to EE resulted in a robust increase in maternal care levels displayed by Ts65Dn mothers and led to a normalization of declarative memory abilities and hippocampal plasticity in trisomic offspring. The positive effects of EE on Ts65Dn phenotype were not limited to the cognitive domain, but also included a rescue of visual system maturation. The beneficial EE effects were accompanied by increased BDNF and correction of over-expression of the GABA vesicular transporter vGAT. These findings highlight the beneficial impact of early environmental stimuli and their potential for application in the treatment of major functional deficits in children with DS. PMID:26244989

  20. Intradermal Therapy (Mesotherapy) for the Treatment of Acute Pain in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Giorgio; Capone, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common cause of severe hand pain. In this study we treated acute pain in CTS patients by means of local intradermal injections of anti-inflammatory drugs (mesotherapy). Methods In twenty-five patients (forty-five hands), CTS diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and neurophysiological examination prior to mesotherapy. A mixture containing lidocaine 10 mg, ketoprophen lysine-acetylsalycilate 80 mg, xantinol nicotinate 100 mg, cyanocobalamine 1,000 mcg plus injectable water was used. Sites of injection were three parallel lines above the transverse carpal ligament and two v-shaped lines, one at the base of the thenar eminence, and the other at the base of the hypothenar eminence. Results The day after the treatment, all but four patients reported a significant reduction in pain and paresthesias. After 12 months, 17 patients had a complete pain relief, eight patients reported recurrence of pain and sensory symptoms and four out of them underwent surgical treatment. Conclusions With the obvious limits of a small-size open-label study, our results suggest that mesotherapy can temporary relieve pain and paresthesias in most CTS patients and in some cases its effect seems to be long-lasting. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm our preliminary findings and to compare mesotherapy to conventional approaches for the treatment of CTS. PMID:24478901

  1. Diamel Therapy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Reduces Hyperinsulinaemia, Insulin Resistance, and Hyperandrogenaemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Yero, Arturo; Santana Pérez, Felipe; Ovies Carballo, Gisel; Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    For to determine the effect of Diamel on the insulin resistance, insulin sensitivity, and sexual hormones results in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A study was carried out on 37 patients with this disorder. A triple-blind clinical trial was designed in which the Diamel food supplement was compared with a placebo. The women with reproductive ages were randomly distributed in two groups, with 18 and 19 women respectively, and they took Diamel or placebo and were followed up during 6 months with clinical and biochemical evaluation. A significant decrease in the HOMA-IR from the initial value at six months was observed in the group with Diamel. The insulin sensitivity improved considerably in this group. The rate of menstrual recovery was higher in the group with Diamel, and two patients from this group obtained pregnancy. The hormone levels shows a significant decrease in testosterone at 3 months in the group with Diamel compared with the control group. The LH also decreases in the same group when comparing the start with 6 months.We concluded that the Diamel decreases insulin resistance and improves sensitivity to this hormone in women with PCOS, with improvement in the levels of LH and testosterone. PMID:22778733

  2. Extended Occupational Therapy Reintegration Strategies for a Woman With Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Machiko R; Buckner, Kathryn; Saharan, Sumandeep; Persons, Kimberley; Liao, Sheng Hui

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a unique long-term functional recovery process to promote successful community reintegration for a woman with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), a rare autoimmune disease. Her main symptoms were very limited mobility and depressive symptoms due to the unknown cause of and cure for the illness. Holistic occupational strategies helped the client stabilize her emotional state, create a safe home environment, improve a communication method, increase physical activity, and promote social participation. Participation in a fall prevention clinical trial lowered her risk of falling; at 9 mo, she reached 75% of the maximum Social Integration score; at 13 mo, she reached near-normal level for activities of daily living (ADLs) and her fastest time for the Timed Up and Go test; and at 2 yr, she achieved a 100% score in instrumental ADLs. For community integration of clients with GBS, a comprehensive strategic self-management approach should be prescribed for long-term recovery. PMID:27294986

  3. Pulsed vs. CW low level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysfunction, Sclerodactyly, and Telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) has been identified has a major player in the pathogenic process, while low level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940nm using microsecond domain pulsing and continuous wave mode (CW) on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks, using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow, and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, and health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Significant functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with best results seen with the pulsing mode. No significant adverse effects were noted. Two mechanisms of action may be at play. The 940nm wavelength provides inside-out heating possibly vasodilating capillaries which in turn increases catabolic processes leading to a reduction of in situ calcinosis. LLLT may also improve symptoms by triggering a cascade of cellular reactions, including the modulation of inflammatory mediators.

  4. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome: reduction of medication use after pelvic floor physical therapy with an internal myofascial trigger point wand.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rodney U; Harvey, Richard H; Wise, David; Nevin Smith, J; Nathanson, Brian H; Sawyer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    This study documents the voluntary reduction in medication use in patients with refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome utilizing a protocol of pelvic floor myofascial trigger point release with an FDA approved internal trigger point wand and paradoxical relaxation therapy. Self-referred patients were enrolled in a 6-day training clinic from October, 2008 to May, 2011 and followed the protocol for 6 months. Medication usage and symptom scores on a 1-10 scale (10 = most severe) were collected at baseline, and 1 and 6 months. All changes in medication use were at the patient's discretion. Changes in medication use were assessed by McNemar's test in both complete case and modified intention to treat (mITT) analyses. 374 out of 396 patients met inclusion criteria; 79.7 % were male, median age of 43 years and median symptom duration of 5 years. In the complete case analysis, the percent of patients using medications at baseline was 63.6 %. After 6 months of treatment the percentage was 40.1 %, a 36.9 % reduction (p < 0.001). In the mITT analysis, there was a 22.7 % overall reduction from baseline (p < 0.001). Medication cessation at 6 months was significantly associated with a reduction in total symptoms (p = 0.03). PMID:25708131

  5. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME (IRIS)-ASSOCIATED BURKITT LYMPHOMA FOLLOWING COMBINATION ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Dorer, Russell P.; Aboulafia, David M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is defined as a paradoxical worsening or unmasking of infections and autoimmune diseases, following initiation of combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). More recently, the case definition of IRIS has been broadened to include certain malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and less frequently Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Here in we describe 3 patients infected with HIV who began cART and within a median of 15 weeks each achieved non-detectable HIV viral loads, and yet within 6 months presented for medical attention with fevers, night sweats, weight loss and bulky lymphadenopathy. Laboratory studies included elevated lactate dehydrogenase and β-2 microglobulin levels and well preserved CD4+ lymphocyte counts in excess of 350 cells/µL. In each patient lymph node biopsies were diagnostic of Burkitt lymphoma (BL). Patients were managed with multi-agent chemotherapy in conjunction with cART. We also survey the medical literature of other cases of IRIS-associated BL. Although the pathogenesis of IRIS-associated BL is not well elucidated, chronic antigenic stimulation coupled with immune deterioration, followed by subsequent restoration of the immune response and aberrant cytokine expression may be a pathway to lymphomagenesis. IRIS-associated BL should be suspected in patients with normal or near normal CD4+ lymphocyte counts who develop progressive lymphadenopathy post-initiation of cART. PMID:25458079

  6. Acupuncture Therapy Is More Effective Than Artificial Tears for Dry Eye Syndrome: Evidence Based on a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Yu, Hong; Song, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background. The efficacy of acupuncture in dry eye syndrome patients remains controversial. Methods. Pubmed, Ovid, Cochrane libraries, CNKI, Wanfang, and CQVIP databases were electronically searched until October 1, 2014. Outcomes including tear break-up time (BUT), Schirmer I test (SIT), and cornea fluorescein staining (CFS) were analyzed. A meta-analysis was performed using both fixed- and random-effects models based on heterogeneity across studies. Results. Seven studies were included in this study; 198 and 185 patients were randomly treated with acupuncture and artificial tears, respectively. The overall BUT of patients in acupuncture group was significantly longer than that of the artificial tears group after treatment (P < 0.00001). The SIT was significantly higher in the acupuncture group than that in the artificial tears group after treatment (P = 0.001). The CFS of patients in acupuncture group was significantly improved compared to that in artificial group (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. Acupuncture therapy is effective for the dry eye patients, partly better than artificial tear treatment. PMID:25960747

  7. Treatment pattern of contemporary dual antiplatelet therapies after acute coronary syndrome: a Swedish nationwide population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Angerås, Oskar; Hasvold, Pål; Thuresson, Marcus; Deleskog, Anna; ÖBraun, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives New dual antiplatelet therapies (DAPTs) have been introduced in clinical practice for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This nationwide study investigated DAPT patterns over time and patient characteristics associated with the various treatments in a population with ACS. Design This observational cohort study linked morbidity, mortality and medication data from Swedish national registries. Results Overall, 91% (104 012 patients) of all patients admitted to the hospital with an ACS (2009–2013) were alive after discharge and included in this study. Compared with 2009, in 2013 patients investigated with angiography increased by 10%, patients revascularized with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) increased by 11% and patients prescribed DAPT increased by 8%. Mean DAPT duration increased from 225 to 298 days in patients investigated with angiography, and from 155 to 208 days in patients who were not investigated with angiography. Furthermore, in patients undergoing angiography a treatment switch from clopidogrel to ticagrelor was observed. DAPT with prasugrel was used to a low extent. Approximately 10% of patients initiated on prasugrel or ticagrelor switched to clopidogrel during the first year of treatment. Conclusion During the study more patients underwent angiography and PCI. There was an increase in the proportion of ACS patients receiving DAPT, as well as longer duration of DAPT in line with ESC guidelines. Among DAPT-treated patients, ticagrelor has emerged as the preferred P2Y12 antagonist in patients undergoing angiography, whereas clopidogrel tended to be prescribed to patients treated non-invasively. PMID:26564402

  8. Extended Neuralgic Amyotrophy Syndrome: voice therapy in one case of vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andréa Gomes de; Pinho, Márcia Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Neuralgic Amyotrophy (NA) is a rare disturb of the peripheral nervous system that can include extreme pain, multifocal paresis and atrophy of the muscles of the upper limbs. When the nerves located outside of the brachial plexus are involved, the term Neuralgic Amyotrophy Extended (ANE) is used. Diagnosis of NA is clinical and has a series of inclusion and compatibility criteria established by the European CMT Consortium. On this study the clinical history, multidimensional vocal assessment data and the vocal techniques used in five-weeks voice therapy for one patient, professional voice, with ANE are presented. In this case, sudden and recurrent paralysis of his right vocal fold was the only manifestation of the disease. At the end of the fifth week the patient's voice was normal, the spoken and sung vocal ranges were same as before the current episode of ANE and scores of his vocal self-assessment were appropriate. PMID:24918513

  9. [Diabetic foot syndrome and diabetic neuropathic osteoarthropathy (DNOAP): an update of conservative and surgical therapy methods].

    PubMed

    Hofstaetter, S G; Trieb, K

    2014-10-01

    A diabetic foot or Charcot foot diagnosed in time can reduce a lot of problems for the patient, lessen high medical expense, and last but not least prevent an amputation. Good treatment options of the diabetic foot result from new technologies in wound management, angioplastic vessel improvement and optimised orthopaedic aids. Nevertheless it stays a challenging issue for practitioners and medical and health care as well as hospital owners to master this problem which will be even growing in the long run. This article intends to raise the awareness for the diabetic foot and the neuropathic osteoarthropathy, and furthermore illustrate diagnostic steps and offer therapeutic options. After distinguishing the diabetic foot from the Charcot foot a selective therapy for each entity has to be initiated. An interdisciplinary approach of specialists in dermatology, radiology, orthopaedic and internal medicine, plastic surgery and orthopaedic shoemaking is essential for a good therapeutic monitoring in order to avoid the amputation of the lower leg. PMID:25313707

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  11. Astrocyte Glutamine Synthetase: Importance in Hyperammonemic Syndromes and Potential Target for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brusilow, Saul W.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Traystman, Richard J.; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many theories have been advanced to explain the encephalopathy associated with chronic liver disease and with the less common acute form. A major factor contributing to hepatic encephalopathy is hyperammonemia resulting from portacaval shunting and/or liver damage. However, an increasing number of causes of hyperammonemic encephalopathy have been discovered that present with the same clinical and laboratory features found in acute liver failure, but without liver failure. Here, we critically review the physiology, pathology, and biochemistry of ammonia (i.e., NH3 plus NH4+) and show how these elements interact to constitute a syndrome that clinicians refer to as hyperammonemic encephalopathy (i.e., acute liver failure, fulminant hepatic failure, chronic liver disease). Included will be a brief history of the status of ammonia and the centrality of the astrocyte in brain nitrogen metabolism. Ammonia is normally detoxified in the liver and extrahepatic tissues by conversion to urea and glutamine, respectively. In the brain, glutamine synthesis is largely confined to astrocytes, and it is generally accepted that in hyperammonemia excess glutamine compromises astrocyte morphology and function. Mechanisms postulated to account for this toxicity will be examined with emphasis on the osmotic effects of excess glutamine (the osmotic gliopathy theory). Because hyperammonemia causes osmotic stress and encephalopathy in patients with normal or abnormal liver function alike, the term “hyperammonemic encephalopathy” can be broadly applied to encephalopathy resulting from liver disease and from various other diseases that produce hyperammonemia. Finally, the possibility that a brain glutamine synthetase inhibitor may be of therapeutic benefit, especially in the acute form of liver disease, is discussed. PMID:20880508

  12. Autonomic modulation and antiarrhythmic therapy in a model of long QT syndrome type 3

    PubMed Central

    Fabritz, Larissa; Damke, Dierk; Emmerich, Markus; Kaufmann, Susann G.; Theis, Kathrin; Blana, Andreas; Fortmüller, Lisa; Laakmann, Sandra; Hermann, Sven; Aleynichenko, Elena; Steinfurt, Johannes; Volkery, Daniela; Riemann, Burkhard; Kirchhefer, Uwe; Franz, Michael R.; Breithardt, Günter; Carmeliet, Edward; Schäfers, Michael; Maier, Sebastian K.G.; Carmeliet, Peter; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2010-01-01

    Aims Clinical observations in patients with long QT syndrome carrying sodium channel mutations (LQT3) suggest that bradycardia caused by parasympathetic stimulation may provoke torsades de pointes (TdP). β-Adrenoceptor blockers appear less effective in LQT3 than in other forms of the disease. Methods and results We studied effects of autonomic modulation on arrhythmias in vivo and in vitro and quantified sympathetic innervation by autoradiography in heterozygous mice with a knock-in deletion (ΔKPQ) in the Scn5a gene coding for the cardiac sodium channel and increased late sodium current (LQT3 mice). Cholinergic stimulation by carbachol provoked bigemini and TdP in freely roaming LQT3 mice. No arrhythmias were provoked by physical stress, mental stress, isoproterenol, or atropine. In isolated, beating hearts, carbachol did not prolong action potentials per se, but caused bradycardia and rate-dependent action potential prolongation. The muscarinic inhibitor AFDX116 prevented effects of carbachol on heart rate and arrhythmias. β-Adrenoceptor stimulation suppressed arrhythmias, shortened rate-corrected action potential duration, increased rate, and minimized difference in late sodium current between genotypes. β-Adrenoceptor density was reduced in LQT3 hearts. Acute β-adrenoceptor blockade by esmolol, propranolol or chronic propranolol in vivo did not suppress arrhythmias. Chronic flecainide pre-treatment prevented arrhythmias (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Cholinergic stimulation provokes arrhythmias in this model of LQT3 by triggering bradycardia. β-Adrenoceptor density is reduced, and β-adrenoceptor blockade does not prevent arrhythmias. Sodium channel blockade and β-adrenoceptor stimulation suppress arrhythmias by shortening repolarization and minimizing difference in late sodium current. PMID:20110334

  13. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    PubMed

    Grewal, Nimrat; Franken, Romy; Mulder, Barbara J M; Goumans, Marie-José; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Jongbloed, Monique R M; DeRuiter, Marco C; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Poelmann, Robert E; Groot, Adriana C Gittenberger-de

    2016-05-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the histopathological substrates of aortopathy. Ascending aortic wall biopsies were divided in five groups: BAV (n = 36) and TAV (n = 23) without and with dilation and non-dilated MFS (n = 8). General histologic features, apoptosis, the expression of markers for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) maturation, markers predictive for ascending aortic dilation in BAV, and expression of fibrillin-1 were investigated. Both MFS and BAV showed an altered distribution and decreased fibrillin-1 expression in the aorta and a significantly lower level of differentiated VSMC markers. Interestingly, markers predictive for aortic dilation in BAV were not expressed in the MFS aorta. The aorta in MFS was similar to the aorta in dilated TAV with regard to the presence of medial degeneration and apoptosis, while other markers for degeneration and aging like inflammation and progerin expression were low in MFS, comparable to BAV. Both MFS and BAV aortas have immature VSMCs, while MFS and TAV patients have a similar increased rate of medial degeneration. However, the mechanism leading to apoptosis is expected to be different, being fibrillin-1 mutation induced increased angiotensin-receptor-pathway signaling in MFS and cardiovascular aging and increased progerin in TAV. Our findings could explain why angiotensin inhibition is successful in MFS and less effective in TAV and BAV patients. PMID:26129868

  14. Concurrent Therapy with a Low-carbohydrate Diet and Miglitol Remarkably Improved the Postprandial Blood Glucose and Insulin Levels in a Patient with Reactive Hypoglycemia due to Late Dumping Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Sachie; Iwahashi, Yasuyuki; Seo, Akane; Sumiyoshi, Michitaka; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Reactive hypoglycemia induced by late dumping syndrome is often observed after gastrectomy. However, no effective therapy has yet been fully established. We herein describe a case in which concurrent therapy with a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food and an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, miglitol, very effectively ameliorated the postprandial fluctuations in the blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in a patient with reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome following total gastrectomy. The administration of miglitol under a low-carbohydrate diet using low-glycemic-index food may therefore be an ideal treatment for reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome. PMID:27150868

  15. The role of free fatty acids in the inflammatory and cardiometabolic profile in adolescents with metabolic syndrome engaged in interdisciplinary therapy.

    PubMed

    Masquio, Deborah Cristina Landi; de Piano-Ganen, Aline; Oyama, Lila Missae; Campos, Raquel Munhoz da Silveira; Santamarina, Aline Boveto; de Souza, Gabriel Inácio de Morais Honorato; Gomes, Aline Dal'Olio; Moreira, Renata Guimarães; Corgosinho, Flávia Campos; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria Oller; Tock, Lian; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Dâmaso, Ana R

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if interdisciplinary therapy can influence the cardiometabolic and serum free fatty acid profile. The second aim was to evaluate if there is an association between serum free fatty acids, inflammation and cardiometabolic biomarkers in obese adolescents with and without metabolic syndrome submitted to a long-term interdisciplinary therapy. The study involved 108 postpuberty obese adolescents, who were divided according to metabolic syndrome (MetS) diagnosis: MetS (n=32) and Non-MetS (n=76). The interdisciplinary therapy consisted of a 1-year period of nutrition, psychology, physical exercise and clinical support. After therapy, both groups improved metabolic, inflammatory (leptin, adiponectin, leptin/adiponectin ratio, adiponectin/leptin ratio and C-reactive protein) and cardiometabolic profile (PAI-1 and ICAM). Metabolic syndrome prevalence reduced from 28.70% to 12.96%. Both groups reduced myristic acid (C14:0) and increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n3), heneicosapentaenoic acid (HPA, C21:5n3) and arachidonic acid (C20:4n6). After adjustment for metabolic syndrome and the number of metabolic syndrome parameters, multiple regression analysis showed that changes in VCAM and PAI-1 were negatively associated with changes in cis-linoleic acid (C18:2n6c). Additionally, changes in trans-linoleic acid (C18:2n6t) were also positively associated with these biomarkers. Moreover, leptin and leptin/adiponectin ratio were negatively associated with changes in docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, C22:5n3) and stearidonic acid (SDA, C18:4n3). Adiponectin/leptin ratio was positively associated with docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, C22:5n3). Changes in adiponectin were positively correlated with changes in omega 3, such as heneicosapentaenoic acid (HPA, C21:5n3) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, C22:5n3). Results support that interdisciplinary therapy can control inflammatory and cardiometabolic profile in obese adolescents. Moreover, serum

  16. The 'chest pain kit' study: A 'pill in the pocket' concept to improve the pre-hospital therapy of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kralev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The 'pill in the pocket' concept is an established therapy for atrial fibrillation. The current guidelines for the management of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction endorse the concept that faster time to reperfusion is associated with important reductions in morbidity and mortality. The mechanical reperfusion and outcome of these patients is significantly supported by dual antiplatelet therapy. There is no data comparing the effect of early self-application by the patient ('pill in the pocket') versus application by the emergency doctor of dual antiplatelet therapy and a factor Xa inhibitor in case of severe chest pain. In patients with a high risk of developing an acute coronary syndrome and previously selected by a cardiologist, early self-application of dual antiplatelet therapy and a factor Xa inhibitor (e.g. fondaparinux) immediately after calling the emergency doctor might be of significance in cases of acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism. In particular, in less developed areas where it might take a long time for the emergency doctor to arrive, this 'pill in the pocket' concept may be significant. PMID:20865688

  17. A Unique Role of GATA1s in Down Syndrome Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia Biology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Balci, Tugce B.; Berman, Jason N.; Dellaire, Graham; Xie, Chengzhi; Buck, Steven A.; Matherly, Larry H.; Ge, Yubin; Taub, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AMkL) in Down syndrome (DS) children is uniformly associated with somatic GATA1 mutations, which result in the synthesis of a shorter protein (GATA1s) with altered transactivation activity compared to the wild-type GATA1. It is not fully established whether leukemogenesis and therapeutic responses in DS AMkL patients are due to loss of the wild-type GATA1 or due to a unique function of GATA1s. Methodology Stable clones of CMK cells with decreased GATA1s or Bcl-2 levels were generated by using GATA1- or BCL-2-specific lentivirus shRNAs. In vitro ara-C, daunorubicin, and VP-16 cytotoxicities of the shRNA stable clones were determined by using the Cell Titer-blue reagent. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Changes in gene transcript levels were determined by gene expression microarray and/or real-time RT-PCR. Changes in protein levels were measured by Western blotting. In vivo binding of GATA1s to IL1A promoter was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Results Lentivirus shRNA knockdown of the GATA1 gene in the DS AMkL cell line, CMK (harbors a mutated GATA1 gene and only expresses GATA1s), resulting in lower GATA1s protein levels, promoted cell differentiation towards the megakaryocytic lineage and repressed cell proliferation. Increased basal apoptosis and sensitivities to ara-C, daunorubicin, and VP-16 accompanied by down-regulated Bcl-2 were also detected in the CMK GATA1 shRNA knockdown clones. Essentially the same results were obtained when Bcl-2 was knocked down with lentivirus shRNA in CMK cells. Besides Bcl-2, down-regulation of GATA1s also resulted in altered expression of genes (e.g., IL1A, PF4, and TUBB1) related to cell death, proliferation, and differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest that GATA1s may facilitate leukemogenesis and potentially impact therapeutic responses in DS AMkL by promoting proliferation and survival, and by repressing

  18. Skeletal findings in the first 12 months following initiation of glucocorticoid therapy for pediatric nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Phan, V; Blydt-Hansen, T; Feber, J; Alos, N; Arora, S; Atkinson, S; Bell, L; Clarson, C; Couch, R; Cummings, EA; Filler, G; Grant, RM; Grimmer, J; Hebert, D; Lentle, B; Ma, J; Matzinger, M; Midgley, J; Pinsk, M; Rodd, C; Shenouda, N; Stein, R; Stephure, D; Taback, S; Williams, K; Rauch, F; Siminoski, K; Ward, LM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vertebral fracture (VF) incidence following glucocorticoid (GC) initiation has not been previously reported in pediatric nephrotic syndrome. Methods VF were assessed on radiographs (Genant method); lumbar spine bone mineral density (LS BMD) was evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Sixty-five children were followed to 12 months post-GC initiation (median age: 5.4 years, range 2.3 to 17.9). Three of 54 children with radiographs (6%, 95% CI 2 to 15%) had incident VF at 1 year. The mean LS BMD Z-score was below the healthy average at baseline (mean ± SD −0.5 ± 1.1 p=0.001) and at 3 months (−0.6 ± 1.1 p<0.001), but not at 6 months (−0.3 ± 1.3, p=0.066) or 12 months (−0.3 ± 1.2, p=0.066). Mixed effect modeling showed a significant increase in LS BMD Z-scores between 3 and 12 months (0.22 SD, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.36, p=0.003). A sub-group (N=16; 25%) had LS BMD Z-scores that were ≤ −1.0 at 12 months. In these children, each additional 1000 mg/m2 of GC received in the first 3 months was associated with a decrease in LS BMD Z-score by 0.39 at 12 months (95% CI, −0.71 to −0.07; p=0.017). Conclusions The incidence of VF at 1 year was low and LS BMD Z-scores improved by 12 months in the majority. Twenty-five percent of children had LS BMD Z-scores ≤ −1.0 at 12 months. In these children, LS BMD Z-scores were inversely associated with early GC exposure, despite similar GC exposure compared to the rest of the cohort. PMID:23948876

  19. Enzyme replacement therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (Morquio A syndrome): effect and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B.; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Mason, Robert W.; Khan, Shaukat; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J.; Barrera, Luis A.; Mackenzie, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Following a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo (PBO)-controlled, multinational study in subjects with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) of elosulfase alfa has been approved in several countries. The study was designed to evaluate safety and efficacy of elosulfase alfa in patients with MPS IVA aged 5 years and older. Areas covered Outcomes of clinical trials for MPS IVA have been described. Subjects received either 2.0 mg/kg/week, 2.0 mg/kg/every other week, or PBO, for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline 6-min walk test (6MWT) distance compared to PBO. The 6MWT results improved in patients receiving 2 mg/kg weekly compared to PBO. The every other week regimen resulted in walk distances comparable to PBO. There was no change from baseline in the 3 Min Stair Climb Test in both treatment groups. Following completion of the initial study, patients, who continued to receive elosulfase alfa 2 mg/kg weekly (QW) for another 48 weeks (for a total of up to 72-week exposure), did not show additional improvement on 6MWT. Expert opinion We suggest that ERT is a therapeutic option for MPS IVA, providing a modest effect and the majority of the effects are seen in the soft tissues. PMID:26973801

  20. Advances in the development of novel antioxidant therapies as an approach for fetal alcohol syndrome prevention.

    PubMed

    Joya, Xavier; Garcia-Algar, Oscar; Salat-Batlle, Judith; Pujades, Cristina; Vall, Oriol

    2015-03-01

    Ethanol is the most common human teratogen, and its consumption during pregnancy can produce a wide range of abnormalities in infants known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The major characteristics of FASD can be divided into: (i) growth retardation, (ii) craniofacial abnormalities, and (iii) central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction. FASD is the most common cause of nongenetic mental retardation in Western countries. Although the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol neurotoxicity are not completely determined, the induction of oxidative stress is believed to be one central process linked to the development of the disease. Currently, there is no known effective strategy for prevention (other than alcohol avoidance) or treatment. In the present review we will provide the state of art in the evidence for the use of antioxidants as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment using whole-embryo and culture cells models of FASD. We conclude that the imbalance of the intracellular redox state contributes to the pathogenesis observed in FASD models, and we suggest that antioxidant therapy can be considered a new efficient strategy to mitigate the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:25131946

  1. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Neoplasms can produce a variety of remote effects on the host; these are referred to as paraneoplastic syndromes. The syndromes may affect any of the systems of the body, may precede or follow the diagnosis of the underlying neoplasm, and may or may not parallel the course of the neoplasm in severity. The diagnosis of and therapy for these syndromes can be challenging to a physician, but successful therapy may bring about worthwhile relief for the patient. In addition, the syndromes and the substances that cause them are sometimes useful in diagnosing and in following the course of certain neoplasms. Perhaps of greater importance, study of these remote effects of neoplasia may shed light on the nature of the neoplastic process itself. PMID:6990627

  2. Impact of enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with Morquio A syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Sawamoto, Kazuki; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Shimada, Tsutomu; Bober, Michael B; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Montaño, Adriana M; Giugliani, Roberto; Kubaski, Francyne; Yasuda, Eriko; Rodríguez-López, Alexander; Espejo-Mojica, Angela J; Sánchez, Oscar F; Mason, Robert W; Barrera, Luis A; Mackenzie, William G; Orii, Tadao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) can present with systemic skeletal dysplasia, leading to a need for multiple orthopedic surgical procedures, and often become wheelchair bound in their teenage years. Studies on patients with MPS IVA treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) showed a sharp reduction on urinary keratan sulfate, but only modest improvement based on a 6-minute walk test and no significant improvement on a 3-minute climb-up test and lung function test compared with the placebo group, at least in the short-term. Surgical remnants from ERT-treated patients did not show reduction of storage materials in chondrocytes. The impact of ERT on bone lesions in patients with MPS IVA remains limited. ERT seems to be enhanced in a mouse model of MPS IVA by a novel form of the enzyme tagged with a bone-targeting moiety. The tagged enzyme remained in the circulation much longer than untagged native enzyme and was delivered to and retained in bone. Three-month-old MPS IVA mice treated with 23 weekly infusions of tagged enzyme showed marked clearance of the storage materials in bone, bone marrow, and heart valves. When treatment was initiated at birth, reduction of storage materials in tissues was even greater. These findings indicate that specific targeting of the enzyme to bone at an early stage may improve efficacy of ERT for MPS IVA. Recombinant N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) (erGALNS) and in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris (prGALNS) has been produced as an alternative to the conventional production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Recombinant GALNS produced in microorganisms may help to reduce the high cost of ERT and the introduction of modifications to enhance targeting. Although only a limited number of patients with MPS IVA have been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), beneficial effects have been reported. A wheelchair-bound patient with a severe form of MPS

  3. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following fludarabine combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carney, D A; Westerman, D A; Tam, C S; Milner, A; Prince, H M; Kenealy, M; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, E H; Ritchie, D; Came, N; Seymour, J F

    2010-12-01

    Fludarabine combination chemotherapy achieves high response rates in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and indolent lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and characteristics of treatment-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML) after treatment with fludarabine in combination for lymphoproliferative disorders and identify risk factors for its development. In all, 176 patients treated with fludarabine combination were followed for a median of 41 months (range 6-125 months). In all, 19 cases of t-MDS/AML have been identified for an overall rate of 10.8%. Median overall survival post-t-MDS/AML diagnosis was 11 months. Patients developing t-MDS/AML included 11/54 with follicular lymphoma (FL) (crude rate 20.4%), 5/82 with CLL (6.1%) and 3/24 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia or marginal zone lymphoma (12.5%). Most patients had other cytotoxic treatments (median 4, range 0-7) but three with FL had fludarabine combination as their only line of treatment. Of the eleven patients (6.3%) who received mitoxantrone with their first fludarabine combination, four (36.4%) developed t-MDS/AML (P=0.007). There was a trend toward prior cytotoxic therapy increasing the risk for t-MDS/AML (P=0.067). Fludarabine combination chemotherapy is associated with a moderate risk of t-MDS/AML particularly when combined with mitoxantrone. This complication should be considered when evaluating the potential benefit of this treatment in lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:20962860

  4. Age-related perception of stature, acceptance of therapy, and psychosocial functioning in human growth hormone-treated girls with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lagrou, K; Xhrouet-Heinrichs, D; Heinrichs, C; Craen, M; Chanoine, J P; Malvaux, P; Bourguignon, J P

    1998-05-01

    This study evaluated the perception of stature, acceptance of therapy, and psychosocial functioning in relation to age at onset and time on treatment during 2 yr of GH therapy in 31 girls with Turner's syndrome grouped by age (group A: 3.7-5.8 yr, n = 9; group B: 7.2-11.8 yr, n = 13; group C: 12.5-16.4 yr, n = 9). The growth response after 2 yr was significant in the 3 groups when calculated in terms of growth norms for untreated Turner girls (mean increase in height SD score: +1.2, +1.5, and +1.1, respectively). The effect was less marked in terms of growth norms for normal girls, particularly in group B (+0.5 SD score). Height was perceived as a problem by most patients, except in the youngest girls at the start of treatment (group A) and in the majority of the adolescents after 2 yr of GH therapy (group C), without evidence of relation to growth response during therapy. The GH injections were fairly well accepted by all patients, except those younger than 6 yr. In all patients, expected adult height was unrealistic and became more realistic with age, whereas no consistent changes were observed in relation to growth response to GH therapy. The Child Behavior Checklist revealed elevated mean scores at the behavioral subscales of attention problems (group A and B), social problems, withdrawal, and anxiety-depression (most obviously in group B). No significant changes were seen during GH therapy. In group C, an elevated mean social problem score at the Youth Self Report and a low mean social self-esteem score at the Self-Esteem Inventory were observed before therapy and showed a significant improvement during 2 yr of GH treatment. These results, however, might be biased due to an increase in social desirability during therapy. We conclude that the perception of height, acceptance of GH therapy, and psychosocial functioning in girls with Turner's syndrome show important differences between age groups, with only slight changes observed during GH therapy. PMID:9589645

  5. Cerebral hemodynamics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    In obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) the periodic reduction or cessation of breathing due to narrowing or occlusion of the upper airway during sleep leads to daytime symptoms and increased cardiovascular risk, including stroke. The higher risk of stroke is related to the impairment in cerebral vascular autoregulation. Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) therapy at night is the most effective treatment for OSA. However, there is no suitable bedside monitoring method evaluating the treatment efficacy of CPAP therapy, especially to monitor the recovery of cerebral hemodynamics. NIRS is ideally suited for non-invasive monitoring the cerebral hemodynamics during sleep. In this study, we will for first time assess dynamic changes of cerebral hemodynamics during nocturnal CPAP therapy in 3 patients with OSA using NIRS. We found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, tissue oxygenation index (TOI) and blood volume associated with periodic apnea events without CPAP in all OSA patients. These oscillations were gradually attenuated and finally eliminated with the stepwise increments of CPAP pressures. The oscillations were totally eliminated in blood volume earlier than in other hemodynamic parameters. These results suggested that 1) the cerebral hemodynamic oscillations induced by OSA events can effectively be attenuated by CPAP therapy, and 2) blood flow and blood volume recovered first during CPAP therapy, followed by the recovery of oxygen consumption. Our study suggested that NIRS is a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of CPAP therapy in patients with OSA bedside and in real time.

  6. Laser Therapy and Occlusal Stabilization Splint for Temporomandibular Disorders in Patients With Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Randomized, Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Molina-Torres, Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Archilla, Alberto; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo; Albornoz-Cabello, Manuel; Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María

    2016-09-01

    Context • Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) report frequent and severe symptoms from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The appropriate treatment of TMDs remains controversial. No studies have occurred on the efficacy of therapy with a laser or an occlusal stabilization splint in the treatment of TMDs in patients with FMS. Objective • The study intended to investigate the therapeutic effects of laser therapy and of an occlusal stabilization splint for reducing pain and dysfunction and improving the quality of sleep in patients with TMDs and FMS. Design • The research team designed a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting • The study took place in the research laboratory at the University of Granada (Granada, Spain). Participants • Participants were 58 women and men who had been diagnosed with FMS and TMDs and who were referred from the clinical setting. Intervention • Participants were randomly assigned to the occlusal-splint or the laser group. The laser group received a treatment protocol in which laser therapy was applied to the participant's tender points, and the occlusal-splint group underwent a treatment protocol in which an occlusal stabilization splint was used. Both groups underwent treatment for 12 wk. Outcomes Measures • Pain intensity, widespread pain, quality of sleep, severity of symptoms, active and passive mouth opening, and joint sounds were assessed in both groups at baseline and after the last intervention. The measurements used were (1) a visual analogue scale (VAS), (2) the Widespread Pain Index (WPI), (3) the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS), (4) the Patient's Global Impression of Change (PGIC), (5) the Pittsburgh Quality of Sleep Questionnaire Index (PSQI), (6) an assessment of the number of tender points, (7) a measurement of the active mouth opening, (8) a measurement of the vertical overlap of the incisors, and (9) the measurement of joint sounds during mouth opening and closing. Results • The group X time

  7. Chinese Herbal Decoction Based on Syndrome Differentiation as Maintenance Therapy in Patients with Extensive-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Exploratory and Small Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; He, Shu lin; Zhao, Yuan chen; Zheng, Hong gang; Li, Cong huang; Bao, Yan ju; Qin, Ying gang; Hou, Wei; Hua, Bao Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the treatment effect and treatment length of Chinese herbal decoction (CHD) as maintenance therapy on patients with extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC) and to reflect the real syndrome differentiation (Bian Zheng) practices of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Patients and Methods. Different CHDs were prescribed for each patient based on syndrome differentiation. The length of CHD treatment was divided into two phases for analyzing progression-free survival (PFS) and postprogression survival (PPS). Results. Three hundred and fifty-seven CHDs were prescribed based on syndrome differentiation during the study period. Median PFS was significantly longer in patients who received CHD >3 months than patients who received CHD ≤3 months in the first phase (8.7 months versus 4.5 months; hazard ratio (HR), 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41–0.99; P = 0.0009). Median PPS was significantly longer in patients who received CHD >7 months than patients who received CHD ≤7 months in the second phase (11.7 months versus 5.1 months; HR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.90–2.74; P = 0.002). Conclusion. CHD could improve PFS and PPS, which are closely related to treatment time and deepness of response of first-line therapy. In addition, CHD could improve body function and keep patients in a relatively stable state. PMID:25815038

  8. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; López López, José; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). A diode laser was used in 78 BMS patients who were randomly assigned into four groups: IR1W, n = 20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, LLLT weekly sessions, 10 sessions); IR3W, n = 20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); red laser, n = 19 (685 nm, 35 mW, 2 J, 72 J/cm2, 58 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); and control-group (CG), n = 19. Symptoms were assessed at the end of the treatment and eight weeks later; quality of life related to oral health was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by the posthoc Tukey test. There was significant reduction of the symptoms in all groups at the end of the treatment, which was maintained in the follow-up. The scores of the IR1W and IR3W laser groups differed significantly from those of the CG. There was also a decrease in the OHIP-14 scores in the four groups. The IR3W laser group scores differed significantly from those of the CG. LLLT reduces the symptoms of BMS and may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for the relief of symptoms in patients with BMS. PMID:26359814

  9. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, controlled trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; López, José López; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). A diode laser was used in 78 BMS patients who were randomly assigned into four groups: IR1W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, LLLT weekly sessions, 10 sessions); IR3W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); red laser, n=19 (685 nm, 35 mW, 2 J, 72 J/cm2, 58 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); and control-group (CG), n=19. Symptoms were assessed at the end of the treatment and eight weeks later; quality of life related to oral health was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by the posthoc Tukey test. There was significant reduction of the symptoms in all groups at the end of the treatment, which was maintained in the follow-up. The scores of the IR1W and IR3W laser groups differed significantly from those of the CG. There was also a decrease in the OHIP-14 scores in the four groups. The IR3W laser group scores differed significantly from those of the CG. LLLT reduces the symptoms of BMS and may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for the relief of symptoms in patients with BMS.

  10. Growth Hormone Research Society Workshop Summary: Consensus Guidelines for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Therapy in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tony, Michèle; Höybye, Charlotte; Allen, David B.; Tauber, Maïthé; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Ambler, Geoffrey R.; Battista, Renaldo; Beauloye, Véronique; Berall, Glenn; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Butler, Merlin G.; Cassidy, Suzanne B.; Chihara, Kazuo; Cohen, Pinchas; Craig, Maria; Farholt, Stense; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Goldstone, Anthony P.; Greggi, Tiziana; Grugni, Graziano; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C.; Johannsson, Gudmundur; Johnson, Keegan; Kemper, Alex; Kopchick, John J.; Malozowski, Saul; Miller, Jennifer; Mogul, Harriette R.; Muscatelli, Françoise; Nergårdh, Ricard; Nicholls, Robert D.; Radovick, Sally; Rosenthal, M. Sara; Sipilä, Ilkka; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Vogels, Annick; Waters, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) has been used by the medical community and advocated by parental support groups since its approval in the United States in 2000 and in Europe in 2001. Its use in PWS represents a unique therapeutic challenge that includes treating individuals with cognitive disability, varied therapeutic goals that are not focused exclusively on increased height, and concerns about potential life-threatening adverse events. Objective: The aim of the study was to formulate recommendations for the use of rhGH in children and adult patients with PWS. Evidence: We performed a systematic review of the clinical evidence in the pediatric population, including randomized controlled trials, comparative observational studies, and long-term studies (>3.5 y). Adult studies included randomized controlled trials of rhGH treatment for ≥ 6 months and uncontrolled trials. Safety data were obtained from case reports, clinical trials, and pharmaceutical registries. Methodology: Forty-three international experts and stakeholders followed clinical practice guideline development recommendations outlined by the AGREE Collaboration (www.agreetrust.org). Evidence was synthesized and graded using a comprehensive multicriteria methodology (EVIDEM) (http://bit.ly.PWGHIN). Conclusions: Following a multidisciplinary evaluation, preferably by experts, rhGH treatment should be considered for patients with genetically confirmed PWS in conjunction with dietary, environmental, and lifestyle interventions. Cognitive impairment should not be a barrier to treatment, and informed consent/assent should include benefit/risk information. Exclusion criteria should include severe obesity, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, untreated severe obstructive sleep apnea, active cancer, or psychosis. Clinical outcome priorities should vary depending upon age and the presence of physical, mental, and social disability, and treatment should be continued for as

  11. Utilization of evidence-based therapy for acute coronary syndrome in high-income and low/middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Shimony, Avi; Grandi, Sonia M; Pilote, Louise; Joseph, Lawrence; O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Paradis, Gilles; Rinfret, Stéphane; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Adamjee, Nasreen; Yadav, Rakesh; Gamra, Habib; Diodati, Jean G; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2014-03-01

    Limited data exist regarding the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in high-income countries compared with low/middle-income countries. We aimed to compare in-hospital trends of revascularization and prescription of medications at discharge in patients with ACS from high-income (Canada and United States) and low/middle-income (India, Iran, Pakistan, and Tunisia) countries. Data from a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial investigating the effect of bupropion on smoking cessation in patients after an enzyme-positive ACS was used for our study. A total of 392 patients, 265 and 127 from high-income and from low/middle-income countries, respectively, were enrolled. Patients from high-income countries were older, and were more likely to have diagnosed hypertension and dyslipidemia. During the index hospitalization, patients from high-income countries were more likely to be treated by percutaneous coronary intervention (odds ratio [OR] 19.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 10.5 to 37.0). Patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction from high-income countries were more often treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (OR 16.3, 95% CI 6.3 to 42.3) in contrast with thrombolytic therapy (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.41). Patients from high-income countries were also more likely to receive evidence-based medications at discharge (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.19 to 4.52, a composite of aspirin, clopidogrel, and statin). In conclusion, patients with ACS in low/middle-income countries were less likely to be revascularized and to receive evidence-based medications at discharge. Further studies are needed to understand the underutilization of procedures and evidence-based medications in low/middle-income countries. PMID:24440324

  12. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Improve Post Concussion Syndrome Years after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury - Randomized Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fishlev, Gregori; Bechor, Yair; Volkov, Olga; Bergan, Jacob; Friedman, Mony; Hoofien, Dan; Shlamkovitch, Nathan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Efrati, Shai

    2013-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the US. Approximately 70-90% of the TBI cases are classified as mild, and up to 25% of them will not recover and suffer chronic neurocognitive impairments. The main pathology in these cases involves diffuse brain injuries, which are hard to detect by anatomical imaging yet noticeable in metabolic imaging. The current study tested the effectiveness of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) in improving brain function and quality of life in mTBI patients suffering chronic neurocognitive impairments. Methods and Findings The trial population included 56 mTBI patients 1–5 years after injury with prolonged post-concussion syndrome (PCS). The HBOT effect was evaluated by means of prospective, randomized, crossover controlled trial: the patients were randomly assigned to treated or crossover groups. Patients in the treated group were evaluated at baseline and following 40 HBOT sessions; patients in the crossover group were evaluated three times: at baseline, following a 2-month control period of no treatment, and following subsequent 2-months of 40 HBOT sessions. The HBOT protocol included 40 treatment sessions (5 days/week), 60 minutes each, with 100% oxygen at 1.5 ATA. “Mindstreams” was used for cognitive evaluations, quality of life (QOL) was evaluated by the EQ-5D, and changes in brain activity were assessed by SPECT imaging. Significant improvements were demonstrated in cognitive function and QOL in both groups following HBOT but no significant improvement was observed following the control period. SPECT imaging revealed elevated brain activity in good agreement with the cognitive improvements. Conclusions HBOT can induce neuroplasticity leading to repair of chronically impaired brain functions and improved quality of life in mTBI patients with prolonged PCS at late chronic stage. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715052 PMID:24260334

  13. Country, Sex, EDSS Change and Therapy Choice Independently Predict Treatment Discontinuation in Multiple Sclerosis and Clinically Isolated Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G.; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand’Maison, François; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fiol, Marcela; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Giuliani, Giorgio; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Cristiano, Edgardo; Herbert, Joseph; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Bergamaschi, Roberto; van Pesch, Vincent; Moore, Fraser; Vella, Norbert; Slee, Mark; Santiago, Vetere; Barnett, Michael; Havrdova, Eva; Young, Carolyn; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Tanner, Mary; Rutherford, Michelle; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a prospective study, MSBASIS, to assess factors leading to first treatment discontinuation in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods The MSBASIS Study, conducted by MSBase Study Group members, enrols patients seen from CIS onset, reporting baseline demographics, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores. Follow-up visits report relapses, EDSS scores, and the start and end dates of MS-specific therapies. We performed a multivariable survival analysis to determine factors within this dataset that predict first treatment discontinuation. Results A total of 2314 CIS patients from 44 centres were followed for a median of 2.7 years, during which time 1247 commenced immunomodulatory drug (IMD) treatment. Ninety percent initiated IMD after a diagnosis of MS was confirmed, and 10% while still in CIS status. Over 40% of these patients stopped their first IMD during the observation period. Females were more likely to cease medication than males (HR 1.36, p = 0.003). Patients treated in Australia were twice as likely to cease their first IMD than patients treated in Spain (HR 1.98, p = 0.001). Increasing EDSS was associated with higher rate of IMD cessation (HR 1.21 per EDSS unit, p<0.001), and intramuscular interferon-β-1a (HR 1.38, p = 0.028) and subcutaneous interferon-β-1a (HR 1.45, p = 0.012) had higher rates of discontinuation than glatiramer acetate, although this varied widely in different countries. Onset cerebral MRI features, age, time to treatment initiation or relapse on treatment were not associated with IMD cessation. Conclusion In this multivariable survival analysis, female sex, country of residence, EDSS change and IMD choice independently predicted time to first IMD cessation. PMID:22768046

  14. Improvements in manual dexterity relate to improvements in cognitive planning after assisted cycling therapy (ACT) in adolescents with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Simon D; Ringenbach, Shannon D R; Mulvey, Genna M; Sandoval-Menendez, Amber M; Cook, Megan R; Ganger, Rachel O; Bennett, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported beneficial effects of acute (i.e., single session) Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) on manual dexterity and cognitive planning ability in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). In the present study, we report the chronic effects of eight weeks of ACT, voluntary cycling (VC), and no cycling (NC), on the same measures in adolescents with DS. Participants completed 8 weeks of ACT, VC, or NC. Those in the ACT and VC groups completed 30min sessions three times per week on a stationary bicycle. During ACT, the mechanical motor of the bicycle augmented the cadence to a rate which was on average 79% faster than the voluntary cadence. During VC, the participants pedaled at a self-selected rate. Unimanual dexterity scores as measured with the Purdue Pegboard test (PPT) improved significantly more for the ACT and VC groups compared to the NC group. ACT lead to greater improvements than VC and NC in the assembly sub-test, which is a task that requires more advanced temporal and spatial processing. The ACT group improved significantly more than the VC group and non-significantly more than the NC group in cognitive planning ability as measured by the Tower of London test (ToL). There were also significant correlations between the assembly subtest of the PPT and all measures of the ToL. These correlations were stronger during post-testing than pre-testing. Pre-post changes in the combined PPT score and ToL number of correct moves correlated positively in the ACT group. These results support the efficacy of the salutary effects of ACT on global fine motor function and executive function in DS. Additionally, the performance on complex bimanual dexterity tasks appears to be related to the capacity of cognitive planning ability. This research has important implications for persons with movement deficits that affect activities of daily living. PMID:26280691

  15. Sustained release nitrite therapy results in myocardial protection in a porcine model of metabolic syndrome with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jessica M.; Islam, Kazi N.; Polhemus, David J.; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P.; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Goodchild, Traci T.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) reduces endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and exacerbates vascular dysfunction in patients with preexisting vascular diseases. Nitrite, a storage form of NO, can mediate vascular function during pathological conditions when endogenous NO is reduced. The aims of the present study were to characterize the effects of severe MetS and obesity on dyslipidemia, myocardial oxidative stress, and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) regulation in the obese Ossabaw swine (OS) model and to examine the effects of a novel, sustained-release formulation of sodium nitrite (SR-nitrite) on coronary vascular reactivity and myocardial redox status in obese OS subjected to critical limb ischemia (CLI). After 6 mo of an atherogenic diet, obese OS displayed a MetS phenotype. Obese OS had decreased eNOS functionality and NO bioavailability. In addition, obese OS exhibited increased oxidative stress and a significant reduction in antioxidant enzymes. The efficacy of SR-nitrite therapy was examined in obese OS subjected to CLI. After 3 wk of treatment, SR-nitrite (80 mg·kg−1·day−1 bid po) increased myocardial nitrite levels and eNOS function. Treatment with SR-nitrite reduced myocardial oxidative stress while increasing myocardial antioxidant capacity. Ex vivo assessment of vascular reactivity of left anterior descending coronary artery segments demonstrated marked improvement in vasoreactivity to sodium nitroprusside but not to substance P and bradykinin in SR-nitrite-treated animals compared with placebo-treated animals. In conclusion, in a clinically relevant, large-animal model of MetS and CLI, treatment with SR-nitrite enhanced myocardial NO bioavailability, attenuated oxidative stress, and improved ex vivo coronary artery vasorelaxation. PMID:25957218

  16. Education, progressive muscle relaxation therapy, and exercise for the treatment of night eating syndrome. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Maraldo, Toni M; Vercellone, Allison C; Gagne, Danielle A

    2015-06-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian rhythm disorder in which food intake is shifted toward the end of the day, interfering with sleep. According to the biobehavioral model of NES, the disorder is the result of a genetic predisposition that, coupled with stress, leads to enhanced reuptake of serotonin, thereby dysregulating circadian rhythms and decreasing satiety. Using the biobehavioral model as a guide, we developed a brief behavioral intervention using education, relaxation strategies, and exercise to address the core symptoms of NES. In this pilot randomized controlled clinical trial, 44 participants with NES were randomly assigned to an educational group (E; n = 14), E plus progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMR; n = 15); or PMR plus exercise (PMR Plus, n = 15). Participants received a baseline intervention with 1- and 3-week follow-up sessions. Effectiveness analyses showed that participants in all three groups evidenced significant reductions on measures of NES symptoms (p < .001), depression (p < .05), anxiety (p < .01), and perceived stress (p < .05). However, the only significant between group change was for the percent of food eaten after the evening meal, with the PMR group showing the greatest reduction (-30.54%), followed by the PMR Plus group (-20.42%) and the E group (-9.5%); only the difference between the PMR and E groups was statistically significant (p = .012). Reductions in NES scores were significantly associated with reductions on measures of depression (r = .47; p < .01) and perceived stress (r = .37; p < .05), but not anxiety (r = .26, p = ns). Results support the role of education and relaxation in the behavioral treatment of NES. PMID:25660340

  17. Predictors of thromboxane levels in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes on chronic aspirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Giubilato, Simona; Leo, Andrea; Cosentino, Nicola; Fracassi, Francesco; Cataneo, Leonardo; Porto, Italo; Leone, Antonio Maria; Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Biasucci, Luigi Marzio; Narducci, Maria Lucia; Pulcinelli, Fabio Maria; Crea, Filippo

    2012-07-01

    High levels of thromboxane A2 (TxA2), a key mediator of platelet activation and aggregation, are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We aimed at assessing the predictors of higher plasma levels of TxB2, the stable metabolite of TxA2, in consecutive patients presenting with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) on previous aspirin (ASA) treatment undergoing coronary angiography. Ninety-eight consecutive patients (age 61 ± 11, 75% males) with NSTE-ACS, on previous chronic ASA treatment, were prospectively enrolled in this study. Coronary disease extent was assessed by angiography according to the Bogaty score. In all patients, admission plasma levels of TxB2 (pg/ml) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and patients showing TxB2 levels in the fourth quartile were compared to patients showing TxB2 levels in the lower quartiles. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that platelet count (odds ratio [OR] 1.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.63, p=0.04), multivessel coronary disease (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.13-3.67, p=0.03), and coronary atherosclerosis extent index (OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.45-6.79, p=0.001) were independent predictors of TxB2 level upper quartile. Of note, C-reactive protein serum levels were similar in patients with TxB2 levels in the upper quartile as compared to those in the lower quartiles (p=0.49). In conclusion, NSTE-ACS patients with severe coronary atherosclerosis may have incomplete suppression of TxA2 production despite chronic ASA therapy. This finding suggests that additional efforts should be made to lower TxA2 levels in patients with widespread coronary artery disease. PMID:22535468

  18. The KDM2B- let-7b -EZH2 axis in myelodysplastic syndromes as a target for combined epigenetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Karoopongse, Ekapun; Yeung, Cecilia; Byon, John; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Holman, Zaneta J; Jiang, Peter Y Z; Yu, Qiang; Deeg, H Joachim; Marcondes, A Mario

    2014-01-01

    Both DNA and histone methylation are dysregulated in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Based on preliminary data we hypothesized that dysregulated interactions of KDM2B, let-7b and EZH2 signals lead to an aberrant epigenetic landscape. Gene expression in CD34+ cells from MDS marrows was analyzed by NanoString miR array and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functions of KDM2B, let-7b and EZH2 were characterized in myeloid cell lines and in primary MDS cells. Let-7b levels were significantly higher, and KDM2B and EZH2 expression was lower in primary CD34+ MDS marrow cells (n = 44) than in healthy controls (n = 21; p<0.013, and p<0.0001, respectively). Overexpression of let-7b reduced EZH2 and KDM2B protein levels, and decreased cells in S-phase while increasing G0/G1 cells (p = 0.0005), accompanied by decreased H3K27me3 and cyclin D1. Silencing of KDM2B increased let-7b expression. Treatment with the cyclopentanyl analog of 3-deazaadenosine, DZNep, combined with the DNA hypomethylating agent 5-azacitidine, decreased levels of EZH2, suppressed methylation of di- and tri-methylated H3K27, and increased p16 expression, associated with cell proliferation. Thus, KDM2B, via let-7b/EZH2, promotes transcriptional repression. DZNep bypassed the inhibitory KDM2B/let-7b/EZH2 axis by preventing H3K27 methylation and reducing cell proliferation. DZNep might be able to enhance the therapeutic effects of DNA hypomethylating agents such as 5-azacitidine, currently considered standard therapy for patients with MDS. PMID:25225797

  19. New oral anticoagulants in addition to single or dual antiplatelet therapy after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oldgren, Jonas; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H.; James, Stefan; Jönelid, Birgitta; Steg, Gabriel; Sundström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet treatment after an acute coronary syndrome might reduce ischaemic events but increase bleeding risk. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding direct thrombin or factor-Xa inhibition by any of the novel oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, darexaban, rivaroxaban, and ximelagatran) to single (aspirin) or dual (aspirin and clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy in this setting. Methods and results All seven published randomized, placebo-controlled phase II and III studies of novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes were included. The database consisted of 30 866 patients, 4135 (13.4%) on single, and 26 731 (86.6%) on dual antiplatelet therapy, with a non-ST- or ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome within the last 7–14 days. We defined major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) as the composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke; and clinically significant bleeding as the composite of major and non-major bleeding requiring medical attention according to the study definitions. When compared with aspirin alone the combination of an oral anticoagulant and aspirin reduced the incidence of MACE [hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval 0.70; 0.59–0.84], but increased clinically significant bleeding (HR: 1.79; 1.54–2.09). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel, adding an oral anticoagulant decreased the incidence of MACE modestly (HR: 0.87; 0.80–0.95), but more than doubled the bleeding (HR: 2.34; 2.06–2.66). Heterogeneity between studies was low, and results were similar when restricting the analysis to phase III studies. Conclusion In patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome, the addition of a new oral anticoagulant to antiplatelet therapy results in a modest reduction in cardiovascular events but a substantial increase in bleeding, most pronounced when new oral anticoagulants are combined with

  20. Development of cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome 41 months after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hideki; Hatakeyama, Shuji; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is one of the most lethal fungal infections in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The incidence of and mortality from cryptococcal meningitis have markedly decreased since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). However, despite its benefits, the initiation of cART results in immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in some patients. Although IRIS is occasionally difficult to distinguish from relapse or treatment failure, the distinction is important because IRIS requires a different treatment. Here, we present the case of a patient with AIDS who developed symptoms of cryptococcal IRIS 41 months after starting cART. To the best of our knowledge, the time between cART initiation and the onset of cryptococcal IRIS in this patient is the longest that has been reported in the literature. PMID:26425133

  1. Oral mucosal stigmata in hereditary-cancer syndromes: From germline mutations to distinctive clinical phenotypes and tailored therapies.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Manfredini, Marco; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2016-05-10

    Numerous familial tumor syndromes are associated with distinctive oral mucosal findings, which may make possible an early diagnosis as an efficacious marker for the risk of developing visceral malignancies. In detail, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden Syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome, Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndrome and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia show specific lesions of the oral mucosa and other distinct clinical and molecular features. The common genetic background of the above mentioned syndromes involve germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, such as APC, PTEN, PTCH1, STK11, RET, clearly implied in both ectodermal and mesodermal differentiation, being the oral mucosal and dental stigmata frequently associated in the specific clinical phenotypes. The oral and maxillofacial manifestations of these syndromes may become visible several years before the intestinal lesions, constituting a clinical marker that is predictive for the development of intestinal polyps and/or other visceral malignancies. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore necessary for both clinical diagnosis and management of the gene-carriers probands and their family members who have to be referred for genetic testing or have to be investigated for the presence of visceral cancers. PMID:26850131

  2. Long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome with chronic renal dysfunction treated in different therapy units at department of cardiology: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Cong; Sheng, Zulong; Yao, Yuyu; Wang, Xin; Yu, Chaojun; Ma, Genshan

    2015-01-01

    Coronary care unit is common in hospitals and clinical centers which offer intensive care and therapy for severe coronary artery disease patients. However, if coronary care unit could improve the long term prognosis of acute coronary syndrome patients with renal dysfunction remain unknown. Accordingly, we designed this study to evaluate the differences of incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events for acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction who treated in coronary care unit or normal unit. The primary end point was all cause mortality. A total of 414 acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction involved in the study. The results showed that during 12-48 months follow-up, death of any cause occurred in 1.8% patients (4 of 247) in coronary care unit group, as compared with 1.8% in the normal group (3 of 167) (hazard ratio, 1.098; 95% confidence interval, 0.246 to 4.904; P=0.903). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to the risk of death (P=0.903), revascularization (P=0.948), stroke (P=0.542), heart failure (P=0.198). This trial firstly revealed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit and normal units. Our study showed that acute coronary syndromes patients with renal dysfunction treated in coronary care unit obtained no significant benefits compared with patients in normal units, although there was a declining tendency of the risk of major adverse cardiovascular effectswith patients in coronary care unit. PMID:26770436

  3. [The influence of spa and resort-based therapy on the incorporated cesium elimination rate in children presenting with environmental disadaptation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Shvedunova, L N; Kaĭsinova, A S; Khodova, T V

    2011-01-01

    A total of 50 children presenting with environmental disadaptation syndrome have been treated based at N.K. Krupskaya health resort (Zheleznovodsk). The therapy included the consumption of mineral water with low salt content from the Slavyansky spring at a dose of 3-5 cub.ml per 1 kg b.w. 30 min before meal, thrice daily. Its influence on the radionuclide elimination rate from the organism of the patients previously exposed to enhanced levels of background radiation was estimated from the results of spectrometric and radiochemical analysis of their urine. It was shown that introduction of drinking mineral water into the program of combined spa and resort-based therapy causes a 2-3-fold increase in the cesium excretion rate and thereby reduces the internal radiation load. PMID:21834469

  4. Using a Contradictory Approach to Treat a Wound Induced by Hematoma in a Patient With Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Lessons Learnt.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Young; Hong, Joon Pio; Bordianu, Anca; Suh, Hyun Suk

    2015-09-01

    A 48-year-old woman with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) had multiple skin necrosis caused by massive bleeding and hematoma collection at the right lower leg, left thigh, and abdomen. During the first month, we did surgical debridement every 2 to 3 days with meticulous coagulation and applied negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Then as the base showed initial granulation, we changed the NPWT every 4 days. NPWT was used with lower pressure and cyclic mode (-40 to -75 mm Hg) to minimize trauma and to reduce the possibility of bleeding from the wounds. After 2 months of NPWT treatment, all the wounds eventually healed with secondary intension despite the patient's condition with diabetes, hemodialysis, anticoagulant use, and corticosteroid therapy. This report supports the idea that if accompanied by conservative debridement with meticulous bleeding control, application of NPWT in low pressures and close monitoring of the patient, NPWT is possible to use even in wounds of patients with risk for bleeding. PMID:26248826

  5. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  6. [Development of a withdrawal syndrome in a neonate after long-term therapy of the mother with metipranolol during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, M; Jurinová, J; Jencová, D; Mracnová, D; Kriska, M; Svec, P

    1993-10-01

    The authors describe the withdrawal syndrome of a beta-adrenolytic in neonates manifested above all 10-16 hours after delivery by alternating bradycardia and marked tachycardia independently on the infant's activity. The withdrawal syndromes correlate with the increased heart rate of the mother after delivery. The authors draw attention to the fact that the withdrawal syndrome in the neonate may develop after delivery if the mother used during pregnancy not only addictive drugs affecting the central nervous system but also drugs affecting the cardiovascular system such as the beta-adrenolytic metipranolol. PMID:7903602

  7. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome following Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Tuberculosis Patients: Findings from the SAPiT Trial

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Kogieleum; Yende-Zuma, Nonhlanhla; Padayatachi, Nesri; Naidoo, Kasavan; Jithoo, Niraksha; Nair, Gonasagrie; Bamber, Sheila; Gengiah, Santhana; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Friedland, Gerald; Karim, Salim Abdool

    2012-01-01

    Background Concerns about immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) remain a barrier to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation during anti-tuberculosis treatment in co-infected patients. Objective We assessed IRIS incidence, severity, and outcomes relative to timing of ART initiation in patients with HIV-related tuberculosis (HIV-TB). Setting An outpatient clinic in Durban, South Africa Patients 642 HIV-TB co-infected patients Design In a secondary analysis of the SAPiT trial, IRIS was assessed in patients randomized to initiate ART either within four weeks of tuberculosis treatment initiation (early integrated-treatment arm), within four weeks of completion of the intensive phase of tuberculosis treatment (late integrated-treatment arm) or within four weeks after tuberculosis therapy completion (sequential-treatment arm). IRIS was defined as new onset or worsening symptoms, signs or radiographic manifestations temporally related to treatment initiation accompanied by a treatment response. IRIS severity, hospitalization and time to resolution were monitored. Results IRIS incidence was 19.5 (n=43), 7.5 (n=18) and 8.1 (n=19) per 100 person-years in the early integrated-, late integrated-, and sequential-treatment arms, respectively; P < 0.001, and 45.5, 9.7 and 19.7 per 100 person-years in patients with baseline CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3, P = 0.004. IRIS incidence was higher in the early integrated- compared to the late integrated- (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 2.6, 95%confidence interval (CI): 1.5 to 4.8; P < 0.001) or sequential-treatment arm (IRR=2.4, 95%CI: 1.4 to 4.4; P < 0.001). IRIS cases in the early integrated-treatment arm were more severe (34.9% vs. 18.9%, P = 0.18); had significantly higher hospitalization rates (18/43 vs. 5/37; P = 0.01), and longer time to resolution (70.5 vs. 29.0 days; P = 0.001) compared to IRIS cases in the other two arms. Limitation IRIS could not be assessed, due to LTFU, withdrawal or death within 6 months of scheduled

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Paul N.; Soghikian, Maida V.; Bhangoo, Munveer S.

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  9. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Lemierre's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Paul N; Soghikian, Maida V; Bhangoo, Munveer S

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an infectious disease defined by the presence of septic thrombophlebitis with associated embolic phenomenon, most commonly to the lungs. Here we present two cases from a single institution of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) developing as a result of Lemierre's syndrome in previously healthy young adult men. ARDS can occur as a consequence of pulmonary septic emboli and sepsis, both of which are well-described consequences of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe important diagnostic and management considerations in the care of patients with hypoxemic respiratory failure and Lemierre's syndrome. Essential components of management include prompt antibiotic therapy, lung-protective ventilation strategies, and supportive care. PMID:25143837

  10. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Singla, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and bacteremia caused by primarily anaerobic organisms, following a recent oropharyngeal infection. This has been an uncommon illness in the era of antibiotic therapy, though it has been reported with increasing frequency in the past 15 years. Lemierre's syndrome should be suspected in young healthy patients with prolonged symptoms of pharyngitis followed by symptoms of septicemia or pneumonia, or an atypical lateral neck pain. Diagnosis is often confirmed by identification of thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and growth of anaerobic bacteria on blood culture. Treatment involves prolonged antibiotic therapy occasionally combined with anticoagulation. We review the literature and a case of a child with Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:24152679

  12. Detection of the Metabolic Syndrome in Schizophrenia and Implications for Antipsychotic Therapy: Is There a Role for Folate?

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Kyle J; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2014-01-01

    In general, presence of the metabolic syndrome is associated with significant cardiovascular mortality and represents a growing public health concern in the United States. Patients with a schizophrenia have a three times greater risk of death compared to the general population, with cardiovascular disease being the most common cause of this mortality. Use of the atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) to treat schizophrenia contributes significantly to this cardiovascular disease risk. While currently several different clinical guidelines exist to monitor for the metabolic consequences of AAP use, implementation is lacking. Due to the under monitoring of side effects and the lack of alternative treatment choices in schizophrenia, research has focused on the identification of various biomarkers and pharmacogenomic targets to focus on those at greatest risk for metabolic syndrome, thus aiming to increase the efficacy and minimize the side effects of the AAPs. This has led to several different lines of research. This manuscript focuses on summarizing the differing metabolic syndrome criteria, monitoring guidelines for AAPs and the role of folic acid as it relates to metabolic syndrome within the schizophrenia population. It will concentrate not only on the pharmacogenomics of folic acid metabolism, but also its epigenetic interaction with the environment. From this work, genetic variation within both the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and catechol-o-methyl transferase (COMT) genes has been associated with increased metabolic syndrome risk in schizophrenia patients treated with AAPs. Furthermore, the combination of folate pharmacogenetics and epigenetics has uncovered relationships between methylation, schizophrenia disease, treatment type and metabolic syndrome. Despite the several areas of biomarker research for schizophrenia related metabolic syndrome, translation to the clinical setting is still lacking and further studies are needed to bridge this gap. Future

  13. Heightened pain sensitivity in individuals with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome and the relationship to clinical outcomes following a manual therapy intervention.

    PubMed

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Robinson, Michael E; Price, Donald D; George, Steven Z

    2011-12-01

    Neurophysiological responses related to lessening of pain sensitivity are a suggested mechanism of manual therapy. Prior studies have observed generalized lower pain thresholds associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in comparison to healthy controls. The present study sought to determine whether similar findings were present in suprathreshold measures and measures specific to central integration of pain (temporal summation and after sensations). Additionally, we wished to determine whether measures of pain sensitivity were related to clinical outcomes in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS receiving a manual therapy intervention. Individuals with signs and symptoms of CTS reported greater pain sensitivity to suprathreshold measures of mechanical pain, temporal summation, and after sensation in comparison to healthy controls. Immediate lessening of mechanical pain sensitivity and after sensations in response to a manual therapy intervention and 3-week attenuation of temporal summation following a 3-week course of manual therapy were associated with 3-week changes in clinical pain intensity in participants with signs and symptoms of CTS. These findings suggest heightened pain sensitivity across several parameters may be associated with CTS. Furthermore, changes in mechanical pain, after sensation, and temporal summation may be related to improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:21764354

  14. Effect of Combining Therapy with Traditional Chinese Medicine-Based Psychotherapy and Herbal Medicines in Women with Menopausal Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Jing; Wen, Zehuai; Zha, Qinglin; Nie, Guangning; Huang, Xuchun; Zhang, Chunlin; Lu, Aiping; Jiang, Miao; Wang, Xiaoyun

    2012-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical study was designed to address the effectiveness of combined traditional-Chinese-medicine- (TCM-) based psychotherapy and Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in the treatment of menopausal syndrome. Altogether 424 eligible women diagnosed as menopausal syndrome and categorized as Kidney-Yin/Kidney-Yang deficiency pattern in TCM were randomly assigned into 4 groups and accepted TCM-based psychotherapy (PSY), CHM, PSY + CHM, or placebo therapies, respectively, for 12 weeks, and another 12 weeks were taken as the followup. Kupperman Index (KI) and the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life (MENQOL) with its four subscales (vasomotor, physical, psychosocial, and sexual) were employed for efficacy assessment. Results showed that 400 participants completed 12-week treatment, of which 380 finished the record of KI and MENQOF at week 24. The average adjusted number of KI score decreased between baseline and 12 weeks in all groups. Statistically significant differences were detected in the average adjusted change between the PSY + CHM group and placebo at overall time points (P < 0.05). No severe adverse events occurred in each group and no significant differences were indicated between any of the three groups and placebo in adverse event proportion. We concluded that TCM psychotherapy combined with CHM has a favorable outcome in treating menopausal syndrome. PMID:23304198

  15. Using a digital game for training desirable behavior in cognitive-behavioral therapy of burnout syndrome: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zielhorst, Thomas; van den Brule, Daphne; Visch, Valentijn; Melles, Marijke; van Tienhoven, Sam; Sinkbaek, Helle; Schrieken, Bart; Tan, Eduard S-H; Lange, Alfred

    2015-02-01

    Burnout is a globally increasing illness, and as a result, many forms of burnout therapy have arisen. The use of digital games can be psychotherapeutically effective because they can transform exercises that are by themselves unattractive into intrinsically motivated action. This pilot study aims to test whether a specially designed game contributes to patients learning desired behavior and achieving other specific therapeutic goals in an online cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)-based burnout treatment context. In total, 101 participants took part in the experiment, under four conditions: (a) Game+Therapy, (b) Therapy Only, (c) Game Only, and (d) No Game+No Therapy. Pre- and postmeasures were taken online. Results showed that the two therapy conditions (Game+Therapy and Therapy Only) showed a greater decrease in complaints and disengagement, and a stronger increase in coping skills than the nontherapy conditions (Game Only and No Game+No Therapy). As expected, the Game+Therapy condition outperformed the Therapy Only condition on combined improvement measures of burnout symptoms. However, analyses of individual measures showed no effects. It can be cautiously concluded that the therapeutic digital game may be a useful tool when embedded in a therapeutic burnout treatment program and is probably more efficient than CBT, as it is used in current practice. PMID:25684611

  16. Utilisation de l'essai comete et du biomarqueur gamma-H2AX pour detecter les dommages induits a l'ADN cellulaire par le 5-bromodeoxyuridine post-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Madeleine, Carole

    le BrdU au niveau cellulaire. Notre hypothese (basee sur des resultats preliminaires effectues dans notre laboratoire) est que l'irradiation de l'ADN cellulaire en presence de BrdU augmentera le nombre de bris simple brin sans toutefois augmenter le nombre de bris double brin. Les resultats presentes dans ce memoire semblent corroborer cette hypothese. Les nouvelles methodes d'analyse, soient l'essai comete et la detection des foci gamma-H2AX remettent en question ce qui a ete dit sur le BrdU au sujet de l'induction des cassures double brin depuis plusieurs annees. L'ensemble de ces nouveaux resultats effectue a l'aide de cellules ayant incorporees du BrdU sont en correlation avec de precedents resultats obtenus dans notre laboratoire sur des oligonucleotides bromes. Ils reaffirment que l'irradiation combinee au BrdU augmente l'induction de bris simple brin mais pas de bris double brin. L'investigation approfondie des mecanismes d'action non elucides du BrdU au niveau cellulaire et son utilisation a des moments strategiques pendant le traitement de radiotherapie pourraient accroitre son efficacite a des fins d'utilisation clinique. Mots cles : 5-bromodeoxyuridine, dimeres interbrins, dommage a l'ADN, essai comete, H2AX, radiosensibilisateur, radiotherapie

  17. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1−/− mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0–P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner’s membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1−/− mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. PMID:26084842

  18. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. PMID:26084842

  19. t(3;21)(q26;q22): a recurring chromosomal abnormality in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rubin, C M; Larson, R A; Anastasi, J; Winter, J N; Thangavelu, M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D; Le Beau, M M

    1990-12-15

    We have identified an identical reciprocal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 3 and 21 with breakpoints at bands 3q26 and 21q22, [t(3;21)(q26;q22)], in the malignant cells from five adult patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Primary diagnoses were Hodgkin's disease in two patients and ovarian carcinoma, breast cancer, and polycythemia vera in one patient each. Patients had been treated with chemotherapy including an alkylating agent for their primary disease 1 to 18 years before the development of t-MDS or t-AML. We have not observed the t(3;21) in over 1,500 patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia arising de novo or in over 1,000 patients with lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported that the t(3;21) occurs in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Thus, the t(3;21) appears to be limited to t-MDS/t-AML and CML, both of which represent malignant disorders of an early hematopoietic precursor cell. These results provide a new focus for the study of therapy-related leukemia at the molecular level. PMID:2265251

  20. Effect of Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Body Mass Index in Obese Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Muhammad Adeel; Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Nadeem, Rashid; Fulambarker, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Because obesity is a common cause of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), weight loss can be an effective treatment. OSAS also may cause weight gain in some patients. Effective treatment of sleep apnea may facilitate weight loss in obese patients. We hypothesize that positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is associated with weight loss in obese patients with OSAS. This was a single-center observational prospective cohort study. Forty-five patients were diagnosed with OSAS after polysomnographic analysis in sleep laboratory and underwent continuous positive airway pressure titration. Patients were followed for 3 months in terms of change in body mass index (BMI) and compliance with PAP therapy. Of the 45 patients recruited, 3 patients were eliminated because of miss recruitment. Nine patients had incomplete data, and the rest (n = 33) were included for analysis. The mean age was 54.9 ± 16.9 years (mean ± SD), 93.9% were male, and 90.9% were whites. Mean apnea-hypopnea index was 36.3 ± 28.17 events per hour. Mean BMI before treatment was 34.7 ± 3.9 kg/m. Fifteen patients (45.5%) were compliant with therapy of OSAS with PAP. There was no difference in age, gender, neck circumference, BMI, and apnea-hypopnea index of patients compliant to therapy when compared with those who were not. There was a significant decrease in BMI in patients compliant with PAP therapy compared with noncompliant patients (-1.2 ± 0.7 vs. 0.3 ± 0.9 kg/m, P ≤ 0.001). PAP therapy may cause significant loss of weight within 3 months in obese patients with OSAS. Further study is needed to elucidate the physiological basis of this change. PMID:25563675

  1. Three percent diquafosol ophthalmic solution as an additional therapy to existing artificial tears with steroids for dry-eye patients with Sjögren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, N; Sonomura, Y; Kato, H; Komuro, A; Kinoshita, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the long-term results of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution as an alternative therapy to existing ophthalmic solutions, including topical immunosuppression, for the treatment of dry eye in patients with Sjögren's syndrome. Methods This study involved 14 female dry-eye patients (mean age: 62.4 years) with Sjögren's syndrome who insufficiently responded to their current therapy. In all patients, 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution was administered six times daily for 12 months in substitution for artificial tears and sodium hyaluronate ophthalmic solution. Their use of corticosteroid eye drops remained unchanged from that prior to the treatment with diquafosol sodium. The subjective symptoms assessed, and ocular signs including tear meniscus radius and the tear film breakup time, and ocular-surface epithelial damage score were examined at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 12 months after initiating treatment. Results Among the subjective symptoms, significant improvement was obtained in dryness at 2 months post treatment, in eye fatigue at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 12 months post treatment, and in pain at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months post treatment. Difficulty in opening the eye, foreign body sensation, and redness were also significantly ameliorated at various time-points. The tear meniscus radius and the tear film breakup time were significantly improved throughout the observation period, and the corneal epithelial staining scores were significantly decreased at 3 months post treatment. Conclusions In dry-eye patients with Sjögren's syndrome, treatment with 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution improved both symptoms and signs, and that effectiveness was maintained for 12 months. PMID:26160526

  2. A Survey of Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Ogo, Etsuyo Komaki, Ritsuko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Uchida, Masafumi; Abe, Toshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We observed a rare and unique occurrence of radiation-induced pulmonary injury outside the tangential field for early breast cancer treatment. The findings appeared to be idiopathic and were called radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome. We surveyed major hospitals in Japan to review their findings of radiation-induced BOOP, in particular the clinical and pictorial characteristics of the entity. Methods and Materials: We reviewed surveys completed and returned by 20 institutions. The survey responses were based on a total of 37 cases of BOOP syndrome. We also reviewed X-ray and computed tomography scans provided by these institutions. We discussed the information derived from the questionnaire and analyzed patients' characteristics, methods used in the treatment of BOOP syndrome, and prognosis. Results: The incidence of the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was about 1.8% (37 of 2,056). We did not find a relationship between the characteristics of patients and the occurrence of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. The pulmonary findings were classified into four patterns on chest computed tomography scans. Progression of the pulmonary lesions observed on chest X-ray was classified into three patterns. Pneumonitis appeared within 6 months after radiotherapy was completed and disappeared within 6-12 months after its onset. At 5-year follow-up, 2 patients had died, 1 of breast cancer and the other of interstitial pneumonitis, which seemed to be idiopathic and unrelated to the radiation-induced BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Although the incidence of BOOP syndrome and its associated prognosis are not significant, the patients' clinical condition must be carefully followed.

  3. Efficacy and safety of individually tailored antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome after coronary stenting: a single center, randomized, feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hong-Chang; Li, Yi; Guan, Shao-Yi; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Zeng; Jing, Quan-Min; Wang, Zu-Lu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Background Low responsiveness to clopidogrel (LRC) is associated with increased risk of ischemic events. This study was aimed to explore the feasibility of tailored antiplatelet therapy according to the responsiveness to clopidogrel. Methods A total of 305 clopidogrel naïve patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) undergoing coronary stenting were randomly assigned to receive standard (n = 151) or tailored (n = 154) antiplatelet therapy. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation tests by light transmission aggregometry were performed to identify LRC patients assigned to the tailored group. The standard antiplatelet regimen was dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. The tailored antiplatelet therapy was standard regimen for non-LRC patients and an additional 6-month cilostazol treatment for LRC patients. The primary efficacy outcome was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke at one year. Results LCR was present in 26.6% (41/154) of patients in the tailored group. The percentage platelet aggregation for LCR patients was significantly decreased at three days after adjunctive cilostazol treatment (77.5% ± 12.1% vs. 64.5% ± 12.1%, P < 0.001). At one year follow-up, a non-significant 37% relative risk reduction of primary events were observed in the tailored group as compared to the standard group (5.8% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.257). There were no differences in the rates of stent thrombosis and hemorrhagic events between the two groups. Conclusions Tailored antiplatelet therapy for ACS patients after coronary stenting according to responsiveness to clopidogrel is feasible. However, its efficacy and safety need further confirmation by clinical trials with larger sample sizes. PMID:25678901

  4. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  5. Identification and validation of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine as a novel therapy for high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and secondary acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Liberante, Fabio Giuseppe; Pouryahya, Tara; McMullin, Mary-Frances

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a broad spectrum of diseases characterized by their clinical manifestation as one or more cytopenias, or a reduction in circulating blood cells. MDS is predominantly a disease of the elderly, with a median age in the UK of around 75. Approximately one third of MDS patients will develop secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) that has a very poor prognosis. Unfortunately, most standard cytotoxic agents are often too toxic for older patients. This means there is a pressing unmet need for novel therapies that have fewer side effects to assist this vulnerable group. This challenge was tackled using bioinformatic analysis of available transcriptomic data to establish a gene-based signature of the development and progression of MDS. This signature was then used to identify novel therapeutic compounds via statistically-significant connectivity mapping. This approach suggested re-purposing an existing and widely-prescribed drug, bromocriptine as a novel potential therapy in these disease settings. This drug has shown selectivity for leukemic cells as well as synergy with current therapies. PMID:26735888

  6. Long-term remission of pulmonary veno-occlusive disease associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome following immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Naniwa, Taio; Takeda, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    The patient described here is a 21-year-old Japanese woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) presenting with worsening of dyspnea, palpitation, recurrent parotitis, and arthritis. Chest computed tomography showed diffuse interlobular septal thickening and ground-glass opacities. Right heart catheterization demonstrated pulmonary hypertension, right-sided heart failure, normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and no evidence of arterio-venous shunt. Transbronchial lung biopsy showed luminal obliteration of pulmonary venules by intimal cellular proliferations, without abnormalities in the small pulmonary arteries. These findings were consistent with pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD). Immunosuppressive therapy, starting with prednisolone 20 mg/day and subsequently combined with azathioprine, resulted in the disappearance of the signs and symptoms, including exertional dyspnea and abnormal pulmonary parenchymal shadows on computed tomography, and the normalization of pulmonary artery pressure. So far, there have been no reported cases of PVOD associated with pSS. Of interest, immunosuppressive therapy without vasodilator therapy almost completely resolved the pulmonary hypertension in this patient. PMID:21394665

  7. Multidisciplinary treatment of disability in ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type/hypermobility syndrome: A pilot study using a combination of physical and cognitive-behavioral therapy on 12 women.

    PubMed

    Bathen, Trine; Hångmann, Anett Bjørnødegård; Hoff, Marie; Andersen, Liv Øinaes; Rand-Hendriksen, Svend

    2013-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) are two overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders. Patients with these conditions have many and various complaints; limitations in performing daily activities, reduced muscle strength and proprioception, kinesiophobia, and pain. There is a lack of evidence-based treatment approaches; a few studies have shown effect of physiotherapy. Many authors propose multidisciplinary treatment, but this has neither been described nor evaluated for this patient group. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate if a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program combining physical and cognitive-behavioral therapy was feasible, safe and effective for 12 women with EDS-HT/JHS. Intervention was offered as a group program and consisted of three parts: (1) Two and a half week in a rehabilitation unit with testing, physical training, group discussions and lectures. (2) Individual home exercises for three months with weekly guidance by local physiotherapist. (3) Readmission four days for retesting and further training advice. All participants completed the intervention. We found significant changes in perceived performance of daily activities, significant increase of muscle strength and endurance and a significant reduction of kinesiophobia. There were smaller changes in self-perceived pain. The participants also reported increased participation in daily life. PMID:23913726

  8. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder in the Context of Asperger's Syndrome: A Single-Subject Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardaciotto, LeeAnn; Herbert, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Asperger's Syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder characterized by social impairment, highly circumscribed interests, repetitive behaviors, and motor clumsiness. The social impairment features of AS are similar to characteristics of social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, little is known about the comorbidity of these disorders or the treatment…

  9. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type 1H: diagnosis and therapy in an interdisciplinary centre].

    PubMed

    Meyer-Marcotty, M V; Kollewe, K; Dengler, R; Grigull, L; Altintas, M A; Vogt, P M

    2012-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is common in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type 1H (MPS type 1H). Clinical signs of carpal tunnel syndrome are frequently absent in these children and it is often very difficult to perform and interpret neurophysiological investigations. In this article we wish to present our experience and results regarding the diagnosis and postoperative results after decompression of the median nerve.In an interdisciplinary set-up we are currently treating 11 MPS type 1H children following blood stem cell transplantation. 7 patients were operated 12 times (5 bilateral operations) because of a carpal tunnel syndrome (age at the time of operation 83,3 months, (43-143 months), 2 male, 5 female). 6 patients had a follow up after 23,7 months (9-59 months). 6 patients had a histological analysis of the flexor retinaculum. Three patients had a postoperative neurophysiological investigation.Each of the operated patients had at least 1 preoperative clinical sign of a carpal tunnel syndrome. We found at least 1 pathological finding in motor and sensory nerve conduction studies in each patient. 6 of the 7 children operated on were symptom-free at postoperative follow-up. 1 of the 3 patients with a postoperative neurophysiological follow up showed a deterioration of the nerve conduction studies. This patient was free of symptoms postoperatively. Biopsy of the flexor retinaculum confirmed abundant proteoglycan deposition. We had neither postoperative complications nor were revisional operations necessary.The Diagnosis of a carpal tunnel syndrome in children with MPS Typ 1H needs a thorough medical history, the correct interpretation of the clinical symptoms and sophisticated nerve conduction studies. Wether the improvement of the postoperative clinical situation lasts has to be evaluated in a long term investigation especially because in one patient in our group we saw a deterioration of the nerve conduction studies postoperatively. PMID:22382905

  10. Prosthetic Rehabilitation Following Socket Reconstruction with Blair-Brown Graft and Conformer Therapy for Management of Severe Post-Enucleation Socket Syndrome--A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshi; Singh, Saumyendra V; Kumar, Pradeep; Kumar Singh, Arun

    2015-06-01

    One of the most common tumors of the eye diagnosed in childhood is retinoblastoma, which mandates enucleation with adjunctive chemotherapy and radiotherapy to save the patient's life. The most common late enucleation complication is post-enucleation socket syndrome (PESS), which poses a management dilemma for the prosthodontist and surgeon, along with being a major esthetic concern for the patient. The reconstruction of such sockets is complex. The purpose of this clinical report is to describe the rehabilitation of such a pediatric patient with severe PESS. The patient was successfully rehabilitated by presurgical conformer therapy, socket reconstruction surgery with non-meshed intermediate split thickness skin graft (STSG)/Blair-Brown graft, and postsurgical conformer stent. This was followed by fabrication of a custom ocular prosthesis, to achieve favorable functional, physical, and psychological effects. PMID:25231188

  11. The effects of scapular stabilization based exercise therapy on pain, posture, flexibility and shoulder mobility in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a controlled randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moezy, Azar; Sepehrifar, Saeed; Solaymani Dodaran, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysfunction in the kinetic chain caused by poor scapula stabilization can contribute to shoulder injuries and Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (SIS). The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two treatment approaches scapular stabilization based exercise therapy and physical therapy in patients with SIS. Methods: The study is a randomized clinical trial in which 68 patients with SIS were randomly assigned in two groups of exercise therapy (ET) and physical therapy (PT) and received 18 sessions of treatment. Pain, shoulders' range of abduction and external rotation, shoulder protraction, scapular rotation and symmetry as well as postural assessment and Pectoralis minor length were evaluated pre and post intervention. The paired-sample t test and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between two groups. Results: Our findings indicated significant differences in abduction and external rotation range, improvement of forward shoulder translation and increase in the flexibility of the involved shoulder between the two groups (respectively ; p=0.024, p=0.001, p<0/0001, p<0/0001). No significant difference was detected in pain reduction between the groups (p=0.576). Protraction of the shoulder (p<0.0001), forward head posture (p<0/0001) and mid thoracic curvature (p<0.0001) revealed a significant improvement in the ET group. Apparent changes occurred in scapular rotation and symmetry in both groups but no significant differences were observed between the two groups (respectively; p=0.183, p=0.578). Conclusion: The scapular stabilization based exercise intervention was successful in increasing shoulder range, decreasing forward head and shoulder postures and Pectoralis minor flexibility. PMID:25664288

  12. Proteomics Approach Identifies Factors Associated With the Response to Low-Density Lipoprotein Apheresis Therapy in Patients With Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi-Okuma, Emiko; Shibata, Shigeru; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ota, Tatsuru; Watanabe, Sumiyo; Hisaki, Harumi; Okazaki, Tomoki; Toda, Tosifusa; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-04-01

    Low-density lipoprotein apheresis (LDL-A) has been shown to reduce proteinuria in a subgroup of nephrotic syndrome patients refractory to immunosuppressive therapy. Factors influencing the efficacy of LDL-A in nephrotic syndrome are completely unknown. Using a proteomics approach, we aimed to identify biological markers that predict the response to LDL-A in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Identification of plasma proteins bound to the dextran-sulfate column at the first session of LDL-A was determined by mass spectrometry. To investigate biological factors associated with the response to LDL-A, we compared profiles of column-bound proteins between responders (defined by more than 50% reduction of proteinuria after the treatment) and non-responders by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to mass spectrometry in seven patients with SRNS. Evaluation of proteins adsorbed to LDL-A column in patients with SRNS revealed the identity of 62 proteins, which included apolipoproteins, complement components, and serum amyloid P-component (SAP). Comparative analysis of the column-bound proteins between responders and non-responders by 2-DE demonstrated that apolipoprotein E (APOE) and SAP levels were increased in non-responders as compared with responders. These results were confirmed by western blotting. Moreover, serum levels of APOE and SAP were significantly higher in the non-responder group than in the responder group by ELISA. Our data provide comprehensive analysis of proteins adsorbed by LDL-A in SRNS, and demonstrate that the serum levels of APOE and SAP may be used to predict the response to LDL-A in these patients. PMID:26771065

  13. Pulsed versus continuous wave low-level light therapy on osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome): a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barolet, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc) was formerly known as CREST syndrome in reference to the associated clinical features: calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. The transforming growth factor beta has been identified as a major player in the pathogenic process, where low-level light therapy (LLLT) has been shown to modulate this cytokine superfamily. This case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of 940 nm using millisecond pulsing and continuous wave (CW) modes on osteoarticular signs and symptoms associated with lcSSc. The patient was treated two to three times a week for 13 weeks using a sequential pulsing mode on one elbow and a CW mode on the other. Efficacy assessments included inflammation, symptoms, pain, health scales, patient satisfaction, clinical global impression, and adverse effects monitoring. Considerable functional and morphologic improvements were observed after LLLT, with the best results seen with the pulsing mode. No adverse effects were noted. Pulsed LLLT represents a treatment alternative for osteoarticular signs and symptoms in limited scleroderma (CREST syndrome).

  14. Characteristics of children and young adults with Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation in a randomized trial comparing atenolol and losartan therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacro, Ronald V.; Guey, Lin T.; Dietz, Harry C.; Pearson, Gail D.; Yetman, Anji T.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Loeys, Bart L.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Bradley, Timothy J.; De Backer, Julie; Forbus, Geoffrey A.; Klein, Gloria L.; Lai, Wyman W.; Levine, Jami C.; Lewin, Mark B.; Markham, Larry W.; Paridon, Stephen M.; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Radojewski, Elizabeth; Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda; Sharkey, Angela M.; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Mahony, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pediatric Heart Network designed a clinical trial to compare aortic root growth and other short-term cardiovascular outcomes in children and young adults with Marfan syndrome randomized to receive atenolol or losartan. We report here the characteristics of the screened population and enrolled subjects. Methods and results Between 2007 and 2011, 21 clinical sites randomized 608 subjects, aged 6 months to 25 years who met the original Ghent criteria and had a body surface area–adjusted aortic root diameter z-score >3.0. The mean age at study entry was 11.2 years, 60% were male, and 25% were older teenagers and young adults. The median aortic root diameter z-score was 4.0. Aortic root diameter z-score did not vary with age. Mitral valve prolapse and mitral regurgitation were more common in females. Among those with a positive family history, 56% had a family member with aortic surgery, and 32% had a family member with a history of aortic dissection. Conclusions Baseline demographic, clinical, and anthropometric characteristics of the randomized cohort are representative of patients in this population with moderate to severe aortic root dilation. The high percentage of young subjects with relatives who have had aortic dissection or surgery illustrates the need for more definitive therapy; we expect that the results of the study and the wealth of systematic data collected will make an important contribution to the management of individuals with Marfan syndrome. PMID:23622922

  15. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. An overview of pharmacology and clinical aspects concerning the therapy of cochleo-vestibular syndromes by intratympanic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    CHIRTEŞ, FELICIAN; ALBU, SILVIU

    2013-01-01

    Intratympanic drug delivery refers to drug administration in the middle ear, the main advantage being direct diffusion of substances in the inner ear through the round window membrane with subsequent high intralabiryntine drug concentration and very low systemic side effects. The article is a review of literature concerning the inner ear barrier systems, the physiology of inner ear fluids, intralabirinthine pharmacokinetics and the commonest drugs applied in the middle ear for the treatment of cochleo-vestibular syndromes. PMID:26527944

  17. Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis (DSO) of the mandible in SAPHO syndrome: a novel approach with anti-TNF therapy. Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marí, Antonio; Morla, Arnaud; Melero, Mireia; Schiavone, Rocio; Rodríguez, Jesus

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible is now considered a local manifestation of SAPHO syndrome. This rare condition is thought to be of auto-inflammatory origin. The myriad of treatments shown in the literature, are basically empirical and reflect its unknown origin. We present a clinical case of refractory DSO treated with an anti-TNF drug (etanercept) with complete clinical remission. We advise against radical surgery and an interdisciplinary approach is recommended. A systematic literature review was also conducted. PMID:25441866

  18. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotten, A; Flipo, R M; Mentre, A; Delaporte, E; Duquesnoy, B; Chastanet, P

    1995-09-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne are sometimes associated with peculiar aseptic skeletal conditions, but such skeletal lesions can be found without skin lesions. The term SAPHO syndrome has been coined for this cluster of manifestations. (The acronym SAPHO refers to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis.) The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. Osteosclerosis of the vertebral bodies, hyperostosis, and erosions of the vertebral plates can be encountered. Unilateral sacroiliitis is frequently observed. Long bone involvement consists of osteosclerosis or osteolysis with periosteal new bone formation. Peripheral arthritis can be present but is rarely associated with joint destruction. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unknown, but a link with seronegative spondyloarthropathies is probable. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual syndrome to avoid misdiagnosis (eg, tumor, infection), unnecessary surgery, and antibiotic therapy. PMID:7501856

  19. Facts about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid from the sac surrounding the baby) Percutaneous umbilical blood sampling (PUBS)—examines blood from ... therapy, and they are typically offered through early intervention programs in each state. Children with Down syndrome ...

  20. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sangeeta; Chauhan, Ashutosh; Sethi, N T

    2008-10-01

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS) is a terminology used to describe a specific complication affecting patients with diabetes mellitus in the tropics. The syndrome encompasses a localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands to progressive, fulminant hand sepsis, potentially fatal. Since this syndrome is less recognized it is often under-reported. Authors present two cases of TDHS and emphasize on aggressive glycemic control and surgical therapy to prevent potential crippling or fatal complications. PMID:20165601

  1. Isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium kansasii in an HIV-positive patient, and possible development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Despotovic, A; Savic, B; Salemovic, D; Ranin, J; Jevtovic, Dj

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are rare but important causes of infection in HIV-positive individuals. A 28-year-old HIV-positive male presented with a high fever, non-productive cough, right subcostal pain, splenomegaly, a very low CD4 count, elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a normal white blood cell count. The suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) was very high, and sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Standard quadruple anti-TB therapy was initiated, but once culture of the sample revealed Mycobacterium kansasii, pyrazinamide was withdrawn. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was initiated soon after, consisting of abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz. The patient's general condition deteriorated 2 weeks after HAART initiation, which could have been due to the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). The patient recovered and was discharged in good condition. However, the results of resistance testing of the isolated organism arrived after discharge, and showed isoniazid and streptomycin resistance. This is the first case report of M. kansasii infection from Serbia and shows the difficulties encountered during the course of treatment. PMID:26603644

  2. Successful Management of Insulin Allergy and Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 4 with Desensitization Therapy and Glucocorticoid Treatment: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, Marjorie; Martínez, María Sofía; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Mejías, José Carlos; Miquilena, Edgar; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Insulin allergy is a rare complication of insulin therapy, especially in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Key manifestations are hypersensitivity-related symptoms and poor metabolic control. T1DM, as well as insulin allergy, may develop in the context of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), further complicating management. Case Report. A 17-year-old male patient, diagnosed with T1DM, was treated with various insulin therapy schemes over several months, which resulted in recurrent anaphylactoid reactions and poor glycemic control, after which he was referred to our Endocrinology and Immunology Department. A prick test was carried out for all commercially available insulin presentations and another insulin scheme was designed but proved unsuccessful. A desensitization protocol was started with Glargine alongside administration of Prednisone, which successfully induced tolerance. Observation of skin lesions typical of vitiligo prompted laboratory workup for other autoimmune disorders, which returned positive for autoimmune gastritis/pernicious anemia. These findings are compatible with APS type 4. Discussion. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of insulin allergy in type 4 APS, as well as this particular combination in APS. Etiopathogenic components shared by insulin allergy and APS beg for further research in immunogenetics to further comprehend pathophysiologic aspects of these diseases. PMID:25548690

  3. Successful management of insulin allergy and autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 4 with desensitization therapy and glucocorticoid treatment: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Joselyn; Villalobos, Marjorie; Martínez, María Sofía; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Torres, Wheeler; Mejías, José Carlos; Miquilena, Edgar; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Insulin allergy is a rare complication of insulin therapy, especially in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Key manifestations are hypersensitivity-related symptoms and poor metabolic control. T1DM, as well as insulin allergy, may develop in the context of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), further complicating management. Case Report. A 17-year-old male patient, diagnosed with T1DM, was treated with various insulin therapy schemes over several months, which resulted in recurrent anaphylactoid reactions and poor glycemic control, after which he was referred to our Endocrinology and Immunology Department. A prick test was carried out for all commercially available insulin presentations and another insulin scheme was designed but proved unsuccessful. A desensitization protocol was started with Glargine alongside administration of Prednisone, which successfully induced tolerance. Observation of skin lesions typical of vitiligo prompted laboratory workup for other autoimmune disorders, which returned positive for autoimmune gastritis/pernicious anemia. These findings are compatible with APS type 4. Discussion. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of insulin allergy in type 4 APS, as well as this particular combination in APS. Etiopathogenic components shared by insulin allergy and APS beg for further research in immunogenetics to further comprehend pathophysiologic aspects of these diseases. PMID:25548690

  4. Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) - a review and proposed strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, András M; Abrams, Kenneth L; Heckenlively, John R; Lundy, Steven K; Maggs, David J; Leeth, Caroline M; MohanKumar, Puliyur S; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Serreze, David V; van der Woerdt, Alexandra

    2016-07-01

    Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) is one of the leading causes of currently incurable canine vision loss diagnosed by veterinary ophthalmologists. The disease is characterized by acute onset of blindness due to loss of photoreceptor function, extinguished electroretinogram with an initially normal appearing ocular fundus, and mydriatic pupils which are slowly responsive to bright white light, unresponsive to red, but responsive to blue light stimulation. In addition to blindness, the majority of affected dogs also show systemic abnormalities suggestive of hyperadrenocorticism, such as polyphagia with resulting obesity, polyuria, polydipsia, and a subclinical hepatopathy. The pathogenesis of SARDS is unknown, but neuroendocrine and autoimmune mechanisms have been suggested. Therapies that target these disease pathways have been proposed to reverse or prevent further vision loss in SARDS-affected dogs, but these treatments are controversial. In November 2014, the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists' Vision for Animals Foundation organized and funded a Think Tank to review the current knowledge and recently proposed ideas about disease mechanisms and treatment of SARDS. These panel discussions resulted in recommendations for future research strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and potential therapy for this condition. PMID:26096588

  5. Comparison of shock wave therapy and nutraceutical composed of Echinacea angustifolia, alpha lipoic acid, conjugated linoleic acid and quercetin (perinerv) in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Tafuri, Silvio; Fiore, Alessandra; Pesce, Vito; Moretti, Biagio

    2015-06-01

    Even though the initial treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is conservative, knowledge of the clinical effects of supplements and of some methods of physiotherapy is still preliminary. Many biological mechanisms can support the administration of shock wave therapy (ESWT) or of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) based nutraceutical, conjugated linoleic acid (GLA), anti-oxidants and Echinacea angustifolia for CTS. The shock waves reduce the nerve compression, produce an anti-inflammatory action, and accelerate the regeneration of neuropathy. ALA and GLA induce antioxidant protective actions, reduce inflammation, promote neuroregeneration, and decrease pain. The Echinacea modulates the endogenous cannabinoid system.The aim of study is to verify the efficiency of shock wave therapy versus nutraceutical composed of ALA, GLA, and Echinacea in CTS. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study and they were randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Both groups showed significant improvements in pain, symptoms' severity and functional scores, and electrodiagnostic results until the sixth month. We verified a trend to a better pain regression in the nutraceutical group. The presence of the medicinal Echinacea represents an added value to the antioxidant effect in ALA and GLA, which can justify this result. ESWT or the association of ALA, GLA, and Echinacea proved to be two effective treatments for controlling symptoms and improving the evolution of CTS. PMID:25953494

  6. Combined therapy with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide/vincristine/prednisone for Sjogren's syndrome-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Carbone, J; Perez-Fernandez, R; Muñoz, A; Sabin, P; Carreño, L; Fernandez-Cruz, E

    2008-02-01

    Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is characterized by an increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Optimal treatment for NHL-complicating SS is not clearly established. NHL, which expresses the CD20 antigen on tumor cell surfaces, is a disease entity candidate to treatment with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. We report clinical and immunological data of a patient with SS and NHL who was treated with a regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide/vincristine/prednisone (CVP) plus rituximab. A 68-year-old women had a 26-year history of SS and autoimmune thyroiditis. The clinical course of SS was complicated with severe splenomegaly. An increased percentage of CD19+ B cells (up to 30%) was detected in peripheral blood during follow-up. Clonal rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain was detected. Low-grade B marginal zone lymphoma was diagnosed (peripheral blood immunophenotype: CD19+CD20+CD23+sIg+Kappa; bone marrow immunophenotype: 25% lymphocytes; CD19+CD20+CD79A/BCL2+). She received a total of six cycles of CVP plus rituximab (375 mg/m2). Therapy was well tolerated, and B lymphocytes were depleted from the peripheral blood. Splenomegaly normalized. No evidence of neoplastic infiltration was detected in bone marrow after completion of therapy, while certain symptoms of SS (sicca and arthralgia) improved with treatment. CVP plus rituximab proved effective in a patient with SS with NHL. PMID:18270861

  7. The TRACTISS Protocol: a randomised double blind placebo controlled clinical TRial of Anti-B-Cell Therapy In patients with primary Sjögren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome (PSS) mainly affects women (9:1 female:male ratio) and is one of the commonest autoimmune diseases with a prevalence of 0.1 – 0.6% of adult women. For patients with PSS there is currently no effective therapy that can alter the progression of the disease. The aim of the TRACTISS study is to establish whether in patients with PSS, treatment with rituximab improves clinical outcomes. Methods/design TRACTISS is a UK multi-centre, double-blind, randomised, controlled, parallel group trial of 110 patients with PSS. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis to receive two courses of either rituximab or placebo infusion in addition to standard therapy, and will be followed up for up to 48 weeks. The primary objective is to assess the extent to which rituximab improves symptoms of fatigue and oral dryness. Secondary outcomes include ocular dryness, salivary flow rates, lacrimal flow, patient quality of life, measures of disease damage and disease activity, serological and peripheral blood biomarkers, and glandular histology and composition. Discussion The TRACTISS trial will provide direct evidence as to whether rituximab in patients with PSS leads to an improvement in patient symptoms and a reduction in disease damage and activity. Trial registration UKCRN Portfolio ID: 9809 ISRCTN65360827. PMID:24438039

  8. Clinical activity and safety of the dual pathway inhibitor rigosertib for higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes following DNA methyltransferase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Lewis R; Greenberg, Peter; Raza, Azra; Olnes, Matthew J; Holland, James F; Reddy, Premkumar; Maniar, Manoj; Wilhelm, Francois

    2015-06-01

    Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na) is an inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase and polo-like kinase pathways that induces mitotic arrest and apoptosis in neoplastic cells, while sparing normal cells. Our purpose is to summarize the clinical activity and safety of intravenous (IV) rigosertib delivered by an external ambulatory infusion pump in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts-1, -2, or, -t myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) following prior treatment with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors. A total of 39 patients with MDS who fulfilled these criteria were enrolled in four phase 1-2 clinical trials of IV rigosertib. Thirty five (88%) had higher risk disease according to the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System. Median overall survival for this group of 39 patients was 35 weeks. Of 30 evaluable patients with follow-up bone marrow biopsies, 12 (40%) achieved complete (n = 5) or partial (n = 7) bone marrow blast responses. In addition, 15 patients achieved stabilization of bone marrow blasts. One patient with a complete bone marrow response also achieved a complete cytogenetic response. A second patient with stable bone marrow blasts achieved a partial cytogenetic response. Two of the responding patients and three patients with stable disease had hematological improvements. Rigosertib-induced bone marrow blast decreases and stability appeared to be predictive of prolonged survival. IV rigosertib had a favorable safety profile without significant myelosuppression. Most common drug-related toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, dysuria, and hematuria. In summary, IV rigosertib is well tolerated and has clinical activity in patients with higher risk MDS following DNMT inhibitor treatment. A multinational pivotal phase 3 randomized clinical trial of rigosertib versus best supportive care for patients with MDS with excess blasts following prior treatment with DNMT inhibitors (ONTIME: ON 01910.Na Trial In Myelodysplastic SyndromE) has recently

  9. Use of an Intrathecal Catheter for Analgesia, Anesthesia, and Therapy in an Obstetric Patient with Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gragasin, Ferrante S; Chiarella, Angelo B

    2016-03-15

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is a rare disorder chiefly observed in obese women of childbearing age. We describe a case of a parturient with PTCS managed successfully with an intrathecal catheter, after inadvertent dural puncture, for labor analgesia, surgical anesthesia, and treatment of headache because of intracranial hypertension during the peripartum period. Prolonged placement of the intrathecal catheter (i.e., >24 hours) may have contributed to the absence of postdural puncture headache symptoms and an uneventful postpartum period. Intrathecal catheter placement may therefore be a viable option in patients with PTCS should inadvertent dural puncture occur. PMID:26825990

  10. Lupus erythematosus and lichen planus overlap syndrome:a case report with a rapid response to topical corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Gulsen Tukenmez; Altunay, Ilknur Kıvanç; Sarıkaya, Sezgi; Sakiz, Damlanur

    2011-01-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) and lichen planus (LP) may occur as an overlap syndrome. We report the clinical characteristics of a young man with lesions diagnosed as LE and LP by histopathological and direct immunoflurosence examinations. We achieved remarkable clinical response from the treatment with topical corticosteroids and no recurrence was seen in a 6 months of follow up time. We found this case interesting because of the rapid improvement with corticosteroid and discussed if there is a real overlap or a coexistence according to the literature. PMID:25386300

  11. Feasibility, safety, clinical, and laboratory effects of convalescent plasma therapy for patients with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Yaseen; Balkhy, Hanan; Hajeer, Ali H; Bouchama, Abderrezak; Hayden, Frederick G; Al-Omari, Awad; Al-Hameed, Fahad M; Taha, Yusri; Shindo, Nahoko; Whitehead, John; Merson, Laura; AlJohani, Sameera; Al-Khairy, Khalid; Carson, Gail; Luke, Thomas C; Hensley, Lisa; Al-Dawood, Abdulaziz; Al-Qahtani, Saad; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Sadat, Musharaf; Rohde, Gernot; Leport, Catherine; Fowler, Robert

    2015-01-01

    As of September 30, 2015, a total of 1589 laboratory-confirmed cases of infection with the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have been reported to the World Health Organization (WHO). At present there is no effective specific therapy against MERS-CoV. The use of convalescent plasma (CP) has been suggested as a potential therapy based on existing evidence from other viral infections. We aim to study the feasibility of CP therapy as well as its safety and clinical and laboratory effects in critically ill patients with MERS-CoV infection. We will also examine the pharmacokinetics of the MERS-CoV antibody response and viral load over the course of MERS-CoV infection. This study will inform a future randomized controlled trial that will examine the efficacy of CP therapy for MERS-CoV infection. In the CP collection phase, potential donors will be tested by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) techniques for the presence of anti-MERS-CoV antibodies. Subjects with anti-MERS-CoV IFA titer of ≥1:160 and no clinical or laboratory evidence of MERS-CoV infection will be screened for eligibility for plasma donation according to standard donation criteria. In the CP therapy phase, 20 consecutive critically ill patients admitted to intensive care unit with laboratory-confirmed MERS-CoV infection will be enrolled and each will receive 2 units of CP. Post enrollment, patients will be followed for clinical and laboratory outcomes that include anti-MERS-CoV antibodies and viral load. This protocol was developed collaboratively by King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC), Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Infection Control Center Group and the World Health Organization-International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC-WHO) MERS-CoV Working Group. It was approved in June 2014 by the Ministry of the National Guard Health Affairs Institutional Review Board (IRB

  12. Laser therapy of painful shoulder and shoulder-hand syndrome in treatment of patients after the stroke.

    PubMed

    Karabegović, Azra; Kapidzić-Duraković, Suada; Ljuca, Farid

    2009-02-01

    The common complication after stroke is pain and dysfunction of shoulder of paralyzed arm, as well as the swelling of the hand. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of LASER therapy and to correlate with electrotherapy (TENS, stabile galvanization) in subjects after stroke. We analyzed 70 subjects after stroke with pain in shoulder and oedema of paralyzed hand. The examinees were divided in two groups of 35, and they were treated in the Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Tuzla during 2006 and 2007. Experimental group (EG) had a treatment with LASER, while the control group (CG) was treated with electrotherapy. Both groups had kinesis therapy and ice massage. All patients were examined on the admission and discharge by using the VAS, DASH, Barthel index and FIM. The pain intensity in shoulder was significantly reduced in EG (p<0,0001), swelling is lowered in EG (p=0,01). Barthel index in both groups was significant higher (p<0,01). DASH was significantly improved after LASER therapy in EG (p<0,01). EG had higher level of independency (p<0,01). LASER therapy used on EG shows significantly better results in reducing pain, swelling, disability and improvement of independency. PMID:19284397

  13. [Clinical signs, diagnostic approach and therapy for the so-called ovarian remnant syndrome in the bitch].

    PubMed

    Günzel-Apel, A-R; Buschhaus, J; Urhausen, C; Masal, C; Wolf, K; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Piechotta, M; Beyerbach, M; Schoon, H-A

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian remnant syndrome arises as a consequence of incomplete ovariectomy or ovariohysterectomy. Remnant ovarian tissue which has been left mostly unintentionally in the bitch may show endocrine activity a few weeks to several years after surgery, provoking a variety of clinical signs. The majority of affected bitches return to heat, in other cases signs of pseudopregnancy and endometritis may be observed. Occasionally, bitches with unclear clinical signs are presented with the suspicion of an inactive ovarian remnant. The following article intends to place the origin of the ovarian remnant syndrome into a factual context regarding the responsibility of the veterinarian and to demonstrate a reasonable diagnostic procedure according to the respective clinical signs. In this regard, the clinical-gynaecological examination, including vaginal cytology, must receive high priority, with the addition of progesterone analysis in peripheral blood plasma or serum if required. Using these combined diagnostic tools, ovarian remnants in stages of endocrine activity (follicular and luteal phases as well as cystic or tumourous ovarian tissue) can be easily unequivocally diagnosed. The application of a GnRH-stimulation test is only reasonable in bitches in which clinical signs are missing. In this context, the usefulness of semi-quantitative LH-assays is also discussed. PMID:22331327

  14. Syndromic disorders with short stature.

    PubMed

    Şıklar, Zeynep; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2014-01-01

    Short stature is one of the major components of many dysmorphic syndromes. Growth failure may be due to a wide variety of mechanisms, either related to the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor axis or to underlying unknown pathologies. In this review, the relatively more frequently seen syndromes with short stature (Noonan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Silver-Russell syndrome and Aarskog-Scott syndrome) were discussed. These disorders are associated with a number of endocrinopathies, as well as with developmental, systemic and behavioral issues. At present, GH therapy is used in most syndromic disorders, although long-term studies evaluating this treatment are insufficient and some controversies exist with regard to GH dose, optimal age to begin therapy and adverse effects. Before starting GH treatment, patients with syndromic disorders should be evaluated extensively. PMID:24637303

  15. Phase I study protocol for ex-vivo lentiviral gene therapy for the inherited skin disease, Netherton Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Mellerio, Jemima E; Bernadis, Catina; Harper, John; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Ghani, Sumera; Martinez-Queipo, Magdalena; Hara, Havinder; McNicol, Anne-Marie; McGrath, John; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-10-18

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a serious inherited skin disorder caused by mutations in the gene SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 5) which encodes for a serine protease inhibitor LEKTI (lymphoepithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor). Patients with NS have defective keratinization, hair shaft defects, recurrent infections, atopy and a predisposition to skin malignancies. Historically, one in ten infants has died before their first birthday. Currently there are no proven treatments to cure this condition. A SIN-lentiviral vector encoding the codon optimized SPINK5 gene under the control of a 572bp element derived from the human involucrin promoter (INVO) can confer compartment specific LEKTI expression in NS keratinocytes with restoration of normal skin architecture. Here we detail a study protocol for a phase I trial for feasibility and safety evaluations of autologous epidermal sheets generated from ex-vivo gene corrected keratinocyte stem cells, which will be grafted onto patients with mutation proven NS. PMID:24138501

  16. Phase I study protocol for ex vivo lentiviral gene therapy for the inherited skin disease, Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Mellerio, Jemima E; Bernadis, Catina; Harper, John; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Ghani, Sumera; Chan, Lucas; Martinez-Queipo, Magdalena; Hara, Havinder; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Farzaneh, Farzin; McGrath, John; Thrasher, Adrian; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-12-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a serious inherited skin disorder caused by mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 5 gene (SPINK5), which encodes for a serine protease inhibitor lymphoepithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor (LEKTI). Patients with NS have defective keratinization, hair shaft defects, recurrent infections, atopy, and a predisposition to skin malignancies. Historically, 1 in 10 infants has died before their first birthday. Currently, there are no proven treatments to cure this condition. A SIN-lentiviral vector encoding the codon-optimized SPINK5 gene under the control of a 572 bp element derived from the human involucrin promoter can confer compartment-specific LEKTI expression in NS keratinocytes with restoration of normal skin architecture. Here we detail a study protocol for a phase I trial for feasibility and safety evaluations of autologous epidermal sheets generated from ex vivo gene-corrected keratinocyte stem cells, which will be grafted onto patients with mutation-proven NS. PMID:24329107

  17. A novel Werner Syndrome mutation: pharmacological treatment by read-through of nonsense mutations and epigenetic therapies

    PubMed Central

    Agrelo, Ruben; Sutz, Miguel Arocena; Setien, Fernando; Aldunate, Fabian; Esteller, Manel; Da Costa, Valeria; Achenbach, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Werner Syndrome (WS) is a rare inherited disease characterized by premature aging and increased propensity for cancer. Mutations in the WRN gene can be of several types, including nonsense mutations, leading to a truncated protein form. WRN is a RecQ family member with both helicase and exonuclease activities, and it participates in several cell metabolic pathways, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Here, we reported a novel homozygous WS mutation (c.3767 C > G) in 2 Argentinian brothers, which resulted in a stop codon and a truncated protein (p.S1256X). We also observed increased WRN promoter methylation in the cells of patients and decreased messenger WRN RNA (WRN mRNA) expression. Finally, we showed that the read-through of nonsense mutation pharmacologic treatment with both aminoglycosides (AGs) and ataluren (PTC-124) in these cells restores full-length protein expression and WRN functionality. PMID:25830902

  18. Optimizing an Aversion Feeding Therapy Protocol for a Child with Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES)

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Rhonda; Mukkada, Vincent; Smith, Alan; Pitts, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines the difficulties of treating food aversion in a 9-month old child with a diagnosis of Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES). Given the need to first identify a set of “safe foods” with which to work, the twin goals of doing food challenges and minimizing aversion are initially not complimentary, and require an approach outside the standard of care. The chosen plan encouraged flexibility and a positive relationship with feeding-related items, while only introducing one food item at a time. Mom and child accomplished goals surrounding food play easily. She has successfully introduced a wide variety of new foods in small quantities and is currently working on reducing dependence on breast milk. Therapists must be prepared to modify currently accepted interventions to accommodate and support the required medical intervention. PMID:26779390

  19. [Subacromial pain syndromes as a possible results of errors in the initial diagnosis and therapy of the shoulder joint].

    PubMed

    Hadziahmetović, Z

    1999-01-01

    The author in this paper shows possible diagnostic mistakes in the development of subacromial painful arc syndrome (cases with inadequate diagnostics). A hundred cases with acute shoulder's injury (without fractures and luxationes) who were admitted at the Clinic for bone surgery and Emergency Department of Clinical Centre, CUC Sarajevo in period between 1 January 1998-30 June 1998. Only clinical and X-ray examination in part were performed. A very interesting case with subacromial impingement as a consequence of such kind of treatment is presented in this paper. It can be concluded that it is necessary to use as a routine a comparative advantages of Echosonography, CT, MRI, as non invasive diagnostic methods at clinically suspected intra or extra articular lesions. PMID:10386045

  20. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome caused by surgery and radiation therapy for a brain tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEI, QIUCHENG; WANG, XINYING; WU, CHAO; BI, JINGCHENG; ZHANG, LI

    2015-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is defined as an obstruction of the third part of duodenum due to compression by the superior mesenteric artery. Although traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for SMAS, few cases of SMAS resulting from brain surgery have been reported. SMAS has been observed to occur following neurosurgical surgery in pediatric patients but, to the best of our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in adults. The present study reports the case of a 21-year-old female patient who developed SMAS after persistent vomiting and prolonged weight loss following cerebellar tumor resection and cranial irradiation. The SMAS was confirmed by computed tomography and resolved following successful nutritional management. PMID:26622529

  1. Targeting components of the stress system as potential therapies for the metabolic syndrome: the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yumuk, Volkan D

    2006-11-01

    The three peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) subtypes PPAR-alpha, PPAR-gamma, and PPAR-delta are ligand-activated transcription factors of the nuclear receptor family. PPARs form obligate heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor, which bind to peroxisome-proliferator-response elements (PPREs). PPAR-alpha is expressed mainly in liver, brown fat, kidney, heart, and skeletal muscle; PPAR-gamma in intestine and adipose tissue; PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma are both expressed in vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and foam cells; PPAR-delta in skeletal muscle, human embryonic kidney, intestine, heart, adipose tissue, developing brain, and keratinocytes. Intense interest in the development of drugs with new mechanisms of action for the metabolic syndrome has focused attention on nuclear receptors, such as PPARs that function as regulators of energy homeostasis. Agonists of PPAR-alpha and PPAR-gamma are currently used to treat diabetic dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes. Dual PPAR-alpha/gamma agonists and PPAR-alpha/gamma/delta pan-agonists are under investigation for treatment of cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. Selective PPAR modulators (SPPARMs) are PPAR ligands that possess desirable efficacy and improved tolerance. Efforts are being made to identify novel partial agonists or antagonists for PPAR-gamma in order to combine their antidiabetic and antiobesity effects. Glucocorticoids are major mediators of the stress response and could be the link between stress and PPAR activator signaling and thus may affect the downstream metabolic pathways involved in fuel homeostasis. PMID:17148746

  2. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subjects with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. Methods To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Results Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. Conclusions For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an

  3. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome following combinatorial cisplatin and pemetrexed therapy for lung cancer in a normotensive patient: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    XIE, CHANGQING; JONES, VOVANTI T.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) is a rare neurological syndrome of the brain, causing symptoms such as headaches, seizures, altered mental status and visual disturbances. The condition is predominantly associated with hypertension, eclampsia, renal impairment, cytotoxic drugs, immunosuppressive agents and molecular targeted agents, but the precise underlying mechanism of RPLS is not fully understood. The present study describes the case of a 65-year-old female patient with stage IIA non-small cell lung cancer who received cisplatin/pemetrexed treatment at the Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center. Following 3 cycles of this therapy, the patient was referred to the Emergency Department of Vidant Medical Center with an altered mental status, subsequently presenting with epileptic seizures, a fever and a headache. A neurological examination revealed generalized hyperreflexia and paraparesis, with extensor posturing of the bilateral lower extremities. The lumbar puncture and electroencephalography results were normal, but cranial computed tomography (CT) scans revealed attenuation abnormalities in the bilateral parietal region and the left occipital lobe, with suspected metastasis. Cranial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated bilateral regions of increased signal intensity in the occipital, temporal and periventricular white matter. The patient was treated with anticonvulsants, steroids and antihypertensive drugs, recovered gradually from the symptoms and regained full consciousness. However, the patient reported residual weakness, presenting with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of 3, reflective of an inability to independently perform daily activities and self-care. A brain MRI performed 10 days later demonstrated that the subcortical edema had partially subsided. The patient was discharged on day 15 post-admission. A follow-up cranial CT examination 1 month later indicated a partial resolution of the abnormalities. The

  4. Analysis of Copper and Zinc Plasma Concentration and the Efficacy of Zinc Therapy in Individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome, Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Russo, A.J.; deVito, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess plasma zinc and copper concentration in individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome, Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) and autistic disorder, and to analyze the efficacy of zinc therapy on the normalization of zinc and copper levels and symptom severity in these disorders. Subjects and methods Plasma from 79 autistic individuals, 52 individuals with PDD-NOS, 21 individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome (all meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria), and 18 age and gender similar neurotypical controls, were tested for plasma zinc and copper using inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results Autistic and PDD-NOS individuals had significantly elevated plasma levels of copper. None of the groups (autism, Asperger’s or PDD-NOS) had significantly lower plasma zinc concentrations. Post zinc and B-6 therapy, individuals with autism and PDD-NOS had significantly lower levels of copper, but individuals with Asperger’s did not have significantly lower copper. Individuals with autism, PDD-NOS and Asperger’s all had significantly higher zinc levels. Severity of symptoms decreased in autistic individuals following zinc and B-6 therapy with respect to awareness, receptive language, focus and attention, hyperactivity, tip toeing, eye contact, sound sensitivity, tactile sensitivity and seizures. None of the measured symptoms worsened after therapy. None of the symptoms in the Asperger’s patients improved after therapy. Discussion These results suggest an association between copper and zinc plasma levels and individuals with autism, PDD-NOS and Asperger’s Syndrome. The data also indicates that copper levels normalize (decrease to levels of controls) in individuals with autism and PDD-NOS, but not in individuals with Asperger’s. These same Asperger’s patients do not improve with respect to symptoms after therapy, whereas many symptoms improved in the autism group. This may indicate an association between copper levels and

  5. [Bilateral operculum syndrome].

    PubMed

    Lerman-Sagie, T; Porat-Alkabetz, E; Meir, J J; Harel, S

    1996-09-01

    The bilateral operculum syndrome, is a unique developmental syndrome. It is characterized by spastic paralysis of the muscles of the face, pharynx, and of mastication, as well as by epilepsy and mental retardation. Imaging studies show bilateral, structural abnormalities in the frontal, perisylvian region consistent with polymicrogyria. These children are usually diagnosed as suffering from cerebral palsy, but in the bilateral operculum syndrome, intelligence is relatively preserved despite the severe motor involvement. Misdiagnosis may lead to improper estimation of rehabilitation potential preventing appropriate therapy, especially in the field of alternative communication. We present a 3-year-old boy, apparently the first case of this syndrome to be described in Israel. PMID:8940497

  6. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  7. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1E, 1F, 1G, 2A, 2B, 2C and 3A). Gene therapy to replace defective Usher genes is being studied ... treatments for Usher syndrome, including artificial retinal implants, gene therapy and stem cell treatments. For more information on ...

  8. Aortic and Mitral Valve Involvement in Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome VI: Surgical Implications in the Enzyme Replacement Therapy Era.

    PubMed

    Torre, Salvatore; Scarpelli, Mauro; Salviati, Alessandro; Buffone, Ebba; Faggian, Giuseppe; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2016-07-01

    Open-heart operations in patients with mucopolysaccharidoses are exceedingly rare and pose distinct clinical challenges. Few reports exist of valve replacement in type VI mucopolysaccharidosis, mostly entailing combined mitral and aortic valve replacement. Here reported is the case of a young woman with mitral and aortic valve disease, in whom the surgical procedure was confined to the aortic valve. The rationale behind this strategy, particularly in light of the benefits offered by specific enzyme replacement therapy of type VI mucopolysaccharidosis, is discussed. PMID:27343522

  9. [Manual therapy in general practice].

    PubMed

    Березуцкий, Владимир И

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to manual therapy practice for diagnostics and treatment of vertebrogenic pain syndrome in general practice. Analytical roundup of sources proves medical advantage of implementation of manual therapy basic methods by general practice specialists. PMID:27487550

  10. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection

  11. Early Surfactant Therapy With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or Continued Mechanical Ventilation in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates With Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Najafian, Bita; Fakhraie, Seyed Hasan; Afjeh, Seyed Abulfazl; Kazemian, Mohammad; Shohrati, Majid; Saburi, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various strategies have been suggested for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies of two common methods of RDS management among neonates with low birth weight. Patients and Methods: A cohort study was conducted on 98 neonates with definite diagnosis of RDS during 2008-2009. The neonates were divided into two groups by a blinded supervisor using simple randomization (odd and even numbers). Forty-five cases in the first group were treated with intubation, surfactant therapy, extubation (INSURE method) followed by nasal continuous positive airway pressure (N.CPAP) and 53 cases in the second group underwent intubation, surfactant therapy followed by mechanical ventilation (MV). Results: Five (11.1%) cases in the first group and 23 (43%) cases in the second group expired during the study. The rates of MV dependency among cases with INSURE failure and cases in the MV group were 37% and 83%, respectively (P < 0.001). Birth weight (BW) (P = 0.017), presence of retinopathy of prematurity (P = 0.022), C/S delivery (P = 0.029) and presence of lung bleeding (P = 0.010) could significantly predict mortality in the second group, although only BW (P = 0.029) had a significant impact on the mortality rate in the first group. Moreover, BW was significantly related to the success rate in the first group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: Our findings demonstrated that INSURE plus NCPAP was more effective than the routine method (permanent intubation after surfactant prescription). In addition, the lower rates of mortality, MV dependency, duration of hospitalization, and complications were observed in cases treated with the INSURE method compared to the routine one. PMID:24910785

  12. Cost-effectiveness of clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor for dual antiplatelet therapy after acute coronary syndrome: a decision-analytic model

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Qadir, Husam; Roifman, Idan; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of prasugrel or ticagrelor as part of dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) improves clinical outcomes relative to clopidogrel. The relative cost-effectiveness of these agents are unknown. We conducted an economic analysis evaluating 12 months of treatment with clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor after ACS. Methods: We developed a fully probabilistic Markov cohort decision-analytic model using a lifetime horizon, from the perspective of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The model incorporated risks of death, recurrent ACS, heart failure, major bleeding and other adverse effects of treatment. Data on probabilities and utilities were obtained from the published literature where available. The primary outcome was quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Results: Treatment with clopidogrel was associated with the lowest effectiveness (7.41 QALYs, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-14.79) and the lowest cost ($39 601, 95% CI $8434-$111 186). Ticagrelor treatment had an effectiveness of 7.50 QALYs (95% CI 1.13-14.84) at a cost of $40 649 (95% CI $9327-$111 881). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for ticagrelor relative to clopidogrel was $12 205 per QALY gained. Prasugrel had an ICER of $57 630 per QALY gained relative to clopidogrel. Ticagrelor was the preferred option in 90% of simulations at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per QALY gained. Interpretation: Ticagrelor was the most cost-effective agent when used as part of dual antiplatelet therapy after ACS. This conclusion was robust to wide variations in model parameters. PMID:26770967

  13. A prospective study of the cumulative incidence and course of restless legs syndrome in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease during chronic dopaminergic therapy.

    PubMed

    Marchesi, Elena; Negrotti, Anna; Angelini, Monica; Goldoni, Matteo; Abrignani, Giorgia; Calzetti, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The authors report the cumulative incidence of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) over a 3 years follow-up period in 92 de novo Parkinson's disease patients under chronic dopaminergic therapy and the clinical course of the sensory-motor disorder over 12 months as from its onset. The overall cumulative incidence of RLS was found by 15.3%, i.e. 14 incident cases, and by 11.9%, i.e. 11 incident cases, after the exclusion of possible "secondary" forms of the disorder. These figures are higher than those reported in general population in Germany (Study of Health in Pomerania), confirming our previous findings of incidence rate of the disorder. At the end of the 3 years follow-up period the prevalence of "current" RLS was significantly higher than that previously found in drug naïve Parkinson's disease patients and in controls, supporting the view that RLS emerging in the course of chronic dopaminergic therapy is the main determinant of the co-morbid association with Parkinson's disease. During the 12 months period of observation the RLS showed a frequency of occurrence of 6.08 episodes per month on average and a remittent clinical course was prevailing in the 11 incident cases, with a significant frequency decrease in the second as compared to the first 6 months, i.e. 3.26 versus 8.9 episodes per month, and none of the patients developed augmentation in the same period. It is hypothesized that the remittent course could be due to long-term adaptation (downregulation) of the hypersensitive post-synaptic dopamine receptors in the spinal cord to a continuous dopaminergic stimulation, possibly coupled with compensatory up-regulation of pre-synaptic dopamine re-uptake mechanism, in the patients in which the hypothalamic A11 area, site of origin of the dopamine-mediated diencephalo-spinal pathway, is involved in the neurodegenerative process. PMID:26566909

  14. Efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies in fibromyalgia syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Langhorst, Jost; Klose, Petra; Dobos, Gustav J; Bernardy, Kathrin; Häuser, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Effects were summarized using standardized mean differences (SMD [95% confidence interval]). Outcomes of safety were drop out because of adverse events and serious adverse events. A total of 7 out of 117 studies with 362 subjects and a median of 12 sessions (range 8-24) were included. MMT reduced sleep disturbances (-0.61 [-0.95, -0.27]; 0.0004), fatigue (-0.66 [-0.99, -0.34]; <0.0001), depression (-0.49 [-0.76, -0.22]; 0.0004) and limitations of HRQOL (-0.59 [-0.93, -0.24]; 0.0009), but not pain (-0.35 [-0.80, 0.11]; 0.14) compared to controls at final treatment. The significant effects on sleep disturbances (-0.52 [-0.97, -0.07]; 0.02) and HRQOL (-0.66 [-1.31, -0.01]; 0.05) could be maintained after a median of 4.5 (range 3-6) months. In subgroup analyses, only Yoga yielded significant effects on pain, fatigue, depression and HRQOL at final treatment. Drop out rate because of adverse events was 3.1%. No serious adverse events were reported. MMT are safe. Yoga had short-term beneficial effects on some key domains of FMS. There is a need for high-quality studies with larger sample sizes to confirm the results. PMID:22350253

  15. A preliminary prospective study of nutritional, psychological and combined therapies for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) in a private care setting

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Megan Anne; Howard, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a condition characterised by severe and persistent fatigue, neurological disturbances, autonomic and endocrine dysfunctions and sleep difficulties that have a pronounced and significant impact on individuals’ lives. Current National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines within the UK suggest that this condition should be treated with cognitive behavioural therapy and/or graded exercise therapy, where appropriate. There is currently a lack of an evidence base concerning alternative techniques that may be beneficial to those with ME/CFS. Objectives This study aimed to investigate whether three modalities of psychology, nutrition and combined treatment influenced symptom report measures in those with ME/CFS over a 3-month time period and whether there were significant differences in these changes between groups. Design and setting This is a preliminary prospective study with one follow-up point conducted at a private secondary healthcare facility in London, UK. Participants 138 individuals (110 females, 79.7%; 42 participants in psychology, 44 in nutrition and 52 in combined) participated at baseline and 72 participants completed the battery of measures at follow-up (52.17% response rate; 14, 27 and 31 participants in each group, respectively). Outcome measures Self-reported measures of ME/CFS symptoms, functional ability, multidimensional fatigue and perceived control. Results Baseline comparisons showed those in the combined group had higher levels of fatigue. At follow-up, all groups saw improvements in fatigue, functional ability and symptomatology; those within the psychology group also experienced a shift in perceived control over time. Conclusions This study provides early evidence that psychological, nutritional and combined techniques for the treatment of ME/CFS may influence symptomatology, fatigue, function and perceived control. However, these results must be

  16. The Efficacy of Shugan Jianpi Zhixie Therapy for Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaomin; Tang, Yang; Cheng, Jingru; Wang, Tian; Li, Fei; Kuang, Yuxiang; Luo, Ren; Zhao, Xiaoshan

    2015-01-01

    Background Shugan Jianpi Zhixie therapy (SJZT) has been widely used to treat diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D), but the results are still controversial. A meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials was performed to assess the efficacy and tolerability of SJZT for IBS-D. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure database, the Chinese Biomedical Literature database and the Wanfang database were searched up to June 2014 with no language restrictions. Summary estimates, including 95% confidence intervals (CI), were calculated for global symptom improvement, abdominal pain improvement, and Symptom Severity Scale (BSS) score. Results Seven trials (N=954) were included. The overall risk of bias assessment was low. SJZT showed significant improvement for global symptom compared to placebo (RR 1.61; 95% CI 1.24, 2.10; P =0.0004; therapeutic gain = 33.0%; number needed to treat (NNT) = 3.0). SJZT was significantly more likely to reduce overall BSS score (SMD –0.67; 95% CI –0.94, –0.40; P < 0.00001) and improve abdominal pain (RR 4.34; 95% CI 2.64, 7.14; P < 0.00001) than placebo. The adverse events of SJZT were no different from those of placebo. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that SJZT is an effective and safe therapy option for patients with IBS-D. However, due to the high clinical heterogeneity and small sample size of the included trials, further standardized preparation, large-scale and rigorously designed trials are needed. PMID:25853241

  17. A pilot study into the effects of music therapy on different areas of the brain of individuals with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, Nikolaus; Heine, Astrid M; Vogl, Julia; Weiss, Konrad; Aschraf, Asita; Hajek, Paul; Schnider, Peter; Tucek, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The global cerebral network allows music " to do to us what it does." While the same music can cause different emotions, the basic emotion of happy and sad songs can, nevertheless, be understood by most people. Consequently, the individual experience of music and its common effect on the human brain is a challenging subject for research. Various activities such as hearing, processing, and performing music provide us with different pictures of cerebral centers in PET. In comparison to these simple acts of experiencing music, the interaction and the therapeutic relationship between the patient and the therapist in Music Therapy (MT) provide us with an additional element in need of investigation. In the course of a pilot study, these problems were approached and reduced to the simple observation of pattern alteration in the brains of four individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (UWS) during MT. Each patient had three PET investigations: (i) during a resting state, (ii) during the first exposure to MT, and (iii) during the last exposure to MT. Two patients in the MT group received MT for 5 weeks between the 2nd and the 3rd PET (three times a week), while two other patients in the control group had no MT in between. Tracer uptake was measured in the frontal, hippocampal, and cerebellar region of the brain. With certain differences in these three observed brain areas, the tracer uptake in the MT group was higher (34%) than in the control group after 5 weeks. The preliminary results suggest that MT activates the three brain regions described above. In this article, we present our approach to the neuroscience of MT and discuss the impact of our hypothesis on music therapy practice, neurological rehabilitation of individuals in UWS and additional neuroscientific research. PMID:26347603

  18. A pilot study into the effects of music therapy on different areas of the brain of individuals with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Nikolaus; Heine, Astrid M.; Vogl, Julia; Weiss, Konrad; Aschraf, Asita; Hajek, Paul; Schnider, Peter; Tucek, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The global cerebral network allows music “ to do to us what it does.” While the same music can cause different emotions, the basic emotion of happy and sad songs can, nevertheless, be understood by most people. Consequently, the individual experience of music and its common effect on the human brain is a challenging subject for research. Various activities such as hearing, processing, and performing music provide us with different pictures of cerebral centers in PET. In comparison to these simple acts of experiencing music, the interaction and the therapeutic relationship between the patient and the therapist in Music Therapy (MT) provide us with an additional element in need of investigation. In the course of a pilot study, these problems were approached and reduced to the simple observation of pattern alteration in the brains of four individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (UWS) during MT. Each patient had three PET investigations: (i) during a resting state, (ii) during the first exposure to MT, and (iii) during the last exposure to MT. Two patients in the MT group received MT for 5 weeks between the 2nd and the 3rd PET (three times a week), while two other patients in the control group had no MT in between. Tracer uptake was measured in the frontal, hippocampal, and cerebellar region of the brain. With certain differences in these three observed brain areas, the tracer uptake in the MT group was higher (34%) than in the control group after 5 weeks. The preliminary results suggest that MT activates the three brain regions described above. In this article, we present our approach to the neuroscience of MT and discuss the impact of our hypothesis on music therapy practice, neurological rehabilitation of individuals in UWS and additional neuroscientific research. PMID:26347603

  19. Evolving Insights in the Pathogenesis and Therapy of Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Henry K.; Mishra, Anjali; Hake, Timothy; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies derived from skin-homing T cells. The most common forms of CTCL are Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS). Accurate diagnosis remains a challenge due to the heterogeneity of presentation and the lack of highly characteristic immunophenotypical and genetic markers. Over the past decade molecular studies have improved our understanding of the biology of CTCL. The identification of gene expression differences between normal and malignant T-cells has led to promising new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers that now need validation to be incorporated into clinical practice. These biomarkers may also provide insight into the mechanism of development of CTCL. Additionally, treatment options have expanded with the approval of new agents, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. A better understanding of the cell biology, immunology and genetics underlying the development and progression of CTCL will allow the design of more rational treatment strategies for these malignancies. This review summarizes the clinical epidemiology, staging and natural history of MF and SS; discusses the immunopathogenesis of MF and the functional role of the malignant T-cells; and reviews the latest advances in MF and SS treatment. PMID:21883142

  20. Clinical review: Stem cell therapies for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome - hope or hype?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A growing understanding of the complexity of the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), coupled with advances in stem cell biology, has led to a renewed interest in the therapeutic potential of stem cells for this devastating disease. Mesenchymal stem cells appear closest to clinical translation, given the evidence that they may favourably modulate the immune response to reduce lung injury, while maintaining host immune-competence and also facilitating lung regeneration and repair. The demonstration that human mesenchymal stem cells exert benefit in the endotoxin-injured human lung is particularly persuasive. Endothelial progenitor cells also demonstrate promise in reducing endothelial damage, which is a key pathophysiological feature of ALI. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are at an earlier stage in the translational process, but offer the hope of directly replacing injured lung tissue. The lung itself also contains endogenous stem cells, which may ultimately offer the greatest hope for lung diseases, given their physiologic role in replacing and regenerating native lung tissues. However, significant deficits remain in our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action of stem cells, their efficacy in relevant pre-clinical models, and their safety, particularly in critically ill patients. These gaps need to be addressed before the enormous therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALI/ARDS can be realised. PMID:22424108

  1. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with small fibrils in a patient with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Denley, Helen; Tagboto, Senyo

    2007-01-01

    Background Fibrillary glomerulonephritis is a rare cause of progressive renal dysfunction, often leading to the need for dialysis within a few years. The role of immunosuppressive treatment is still uncertain although this has been tried with variable success. Case presentation A 56 year old woman with the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (IgM anticardiolipin antibodies) was seen in the nephrology clinic with haematuria, proteinuria, and worsening renal function. A renal biopsy demonstrated a mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis on light microscopy and smaller fibrils (10.6–13.8 nm in diameter) than is usual for fibrillary glomerulonephritis (typically 18–22 nm) on electron microscopy. Amyloidosis was excluded following detailed evaluation. On account of rapidly worsening renal failure she was started on cyclophosphamide and prednisolone which led to the partial recovery and stabilization of her renal function. Conclusion This case highlights the need for routine electron microscopy in native renal biopsies, where the differential diagnosis is wide and varied and the light and immunofluorescence microscopic findings may be non specific. PMID:17490479

  2. A free radical scavenger but not FGF-2-mediated angiogenic therapy rescues myonephropathic metabolic syndrome in severe hindlimb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Fujii, Takaaki; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Jin, Chen-Hao; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Onohara, Toshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2006-04-01

    The therapeutic use of angiogenic factors shows promise in the treatment of critical limb ischemia; however, its potential for myonephropathic metabolic syndrome (MNMS), a fatal complication caused by arterial reconstruction, has not been elucidated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of recombinant Sendai virus-mediated gene transfer of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) directly compared with that of a radical scavenger, MCI-186, in a rat model of MNMS. MNMS was surgically induced by aortic occlusion below renal arteries for 4 h, followed by 6 h of reperfusion. Administration of MCI-186 (twice; iv 5 min before induced ischemia and ip 5 min before reperfusion; 10 mg/kg, respectively), but not FGF-2 gene transfer (once, 48 h before induced ischemia), dramatically prevented the increase of serum biochemical markers as well as the edema of the gastrocnemius muscle. The effect of MCI-186 was accompanied by the marked suppression of the neutrophilic infiltration into the local (muscle) and remote (lung) organs. Although serum and muscular levels of a neutrophil-chemoattractant (growth-related oncogene/cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1) were not affected by any treatment, the serum level of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was decreased by treatment with MCI-186 but not by treatment with FGF-2. These results suggest the distinct mechanism of MNMS from critical limb ischemia without reperfusion. Therefore, radical scavenging should be paid more attention than therapeutic angiogenesis when arterial circulation is reconstructed. PMID:16301206

  3. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy reduces oxidative stress markers and blood pressure in sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Murri, Mora; García-Delgado, Regina; Alcázar-Ramírez, José; Fernández de Rota, Luis; Fernández-Ramos, Ana; Cardona, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2011-12-01

    Sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation, which seems to promote oxidative stress. SAHS patients experience increases in hypertension, obesity and insulin resistance (IR). The purpose was to evaluate in SAHS patients the effects of 1 month of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on oxidative stress and the association between oxidative stress and insulin resistance and blood pressure (BP). Twenty-six SAHS patients requiring CPAP were enrolled. Measurements were recorded before and 1 month after treatment. Cellular oxidative stress parameters were notably decreased after CPAP. Intracellular glutathione and mitochondrial membrane potential increased significantly. Also, total antioxidant capacity and most of the plasma antioxidant activities increased significantly. Significant decreases were seen in BP. Negative correlations were observed between SAHS severity and markers of protection against oxidative stress. BP correlated with oxidative stress markers. In conclusion, we observed an obvious improvement in oxidative stress and found that it was accompanied by an evident decrease in BP with no modification in IR. Consequently, we believe that the decrease in oxidative stress after 1 month of CPAP treatment in these patients is not contributing much to IR genesis, though it could be related to the hypertension etiology. PMID:21286851

  4. Laser therapy for twin-twin transfusion syndrome in the absence of fetoscopically visible placental vascular anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Keisuke; Taguchi, Takako; Yamamoto, Ryo; Murata, Masaharu; Sasahara, Jun; Mitsuda, Nobuaki

    2013-01-01

    Fetoscopic laser photocoagulation (FLP) was performed at 22 weeks of gestation for a pregnancy complicated with twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and an anterior placenta. However, vascular anastomoses could not be identified by the fetoscope. To dichotomize the circulation between the twins, the terminal ends of the paired artery and vein of the recipient twin were coagulated. In addition, a line was drawn with the laser connecting the dots, which had been coagulated. The Doppler waveform as well as the amniotic fluid volume of each twin normalized after the procedure. The twins were delivered by cesarean section subsequent to onset of labor at gestational week 30; the recipient twin weighed 1,350 g and the donor twin weighed 550 g. Both twins had a normal neurologic exam at 6 months of age. Patent placental vascular anastomoses could not be detected. This case demonstrates that vascular anastomoses in TTTS may not be identified by a fetoscope and that FLP to coagulate the entire vascular equator closer to the area of the recipient twin was effective in this rare situation. PMID:24008354

  5. [The effects of physical therapy in prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the "syndrome of economy class"].

    PubMed

    Vavra-Hadziahmetović, Naricsa; Hadziahmetović, Zoran

    2006-01-01

    "Economy class syndrome" made headline news in Australia when young girl died from blood clot caused by deep vein thrombosis shortly after getting off a Sydney to London flight. Although medical research is yet to prove a link between long distance travelling and DVT, consumers sholud take precautions. Pain and swelling in one leg is usually the first sign of a DTV, although sometimes there won, t be any symptoms. In one to two percent of cases the blood clot can break away from the vein and travel to other major organs. If it s big enough it may cause breathing problems (pulmonary embolism), and in rare cases--around one in a thousand people with a DVT-death. During the flight: Change your position regularly and be aware of positions which might block your circulation. Regular excercise will help restore blood flow to your legs if you've been sitting for long period of time or in an awkward position. Dehydratation can cause the blood to thiceken. Alcohol and caffeine are known diuretics which may accentuate the effect of dry cabin air and immobility on blood flow. Drink 200 mls (a standards glass) of non-alcoholic fluids every hour and use the need to go to the toilet as an opportunity to change your posture. PMID:16528931

  6. Impact of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy with Proton Pump Inhibitors on the Outcome of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Macaione, Francesca; Montaina, Carla; Evola, Salvatore; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess if proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may reduce the effectiveness of clopidogrel, than H2 antagonist (anti-H2) in order to determine rehospitalization for acute coronary syndrome (re-ACS), target vessel revascularization (TVR) and cardiac death. This case-control study included 176 patients with ACS undergoing angioplasty (PCI) with drug-eluting stent implantation. The population was divided into two groups: PPI group (n = 121) consisting of patients receiving at discharge dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT) plus PPI and anti-H2 group (n = 55), consisting of patients receiving at discharge DAT + H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA). In a followup of 36 months the prevalence of ACS event (P = 0.014), TVR (P = 0.031) was higher in the PPI group than in the anti-H2 group; instead there was no statistically significant difference between groups for death. The variables independently associated with ACS were the diabetes, omeprazole, and esomeprazole; instead the variables independently associated with TVR were only omeprazole. Our data shows that the use of omeprazole and esomeprazole, with clopidogrel, is associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes after PCI with drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:22792485

  7. A Pilot Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Augmentation of Antibiotic Treatment in Youth with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Cary; Selles, Robert R.; Wu, Monica S.; King, Morgan A.; Patel, Priyal D.; Hanks, Camille E.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study reports an open trial of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exhibiting an onset pattern consistent with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Methods: Eleven primarily Caucasian youth with PANS-related OCD (range=4–14 years; 6 boys) who were incomplete responders to antibiotic treatment, received family-based CBT delivered either face-to-face or via web camera. Results: All participants completing treatment (8 of 8) were considered improved at posttreatment, and average obsessive-compulsive symptom severity was reduced by 49%. Significant reductions in obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and in clinician- and parent-rated OCD-related impairment were noted. Reductions in parent- and child-rated anxiety, child-rated OCD-related impairment, and comorbid neuropsychiatric symptoms were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Gains were maintained at follow-up, with 100% (6 of 6) of those assessed remaining improved. Implications for treatment and further research are discussed. PMID:25978743

  8. Aging Increases Susceptibility to High Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in C57BL/6 Mice: Improvement in Glycemic and Lipid Profile after Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-Souza, Valéria; César-Gomes, Cheila Juliana; Da Fonseca, Lucas José Sá; Guedes, Glaucevane Da Silva; Smaniotto, Salete; Rabelo, Luíza Antas

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been considered a novel component of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), with the oxidative stress participating in its progression. This study aimed to evaluate the metabolic profile in young and old mice with MetS, and the effects of apocynin and tempol on glycemic and lipid parameters. Young and old C57BL/6 mice with high fat diet- (HFD-) induced MetS received apocynin and tempol 50 mg·kg−1/day in their drinking water for 10 weeks. After HFD, the young group showed elevated fasting glucose, worsened lipid profile in plasma, steatosis, and hepatic lipid peroxidation. Nevertheless, the old group presented significant increase in fasting insulin levels, insulin resistance, plasma and hepatic lipid peroxidation, and pronounced steatosis. The hepatic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity did not differ between the groups. Tempol and apocynin seemed to prevent hepatic lipid deposition in both groups. Furthermore, apocynin improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in old mice. In summary, old mice are more susceptible to HFD-induced metabolic changes than their young counterparts. Also, the antioxidant therapy improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, and in addition, apocynin seemed to prevent the HFD-induced hepatic fat deposition, suggesting an important role of oxidative stress in the induction of NAFLD. PMID:27057272

  9. Six Versus Twelve Months Clopidogrel Therapy After Drug-Eluting Stenting in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome: An ISAR-SAFE Study Subgroup Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lohaus, Raphaela; Michel, Jonathan; Mayer, Katharina; Lahmann, Anna Lena; Byrne, Robert A; Wolk, Annabelle; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Han, Yaling; Adriaenssens, Tom; Tölg, Ralph; Seyfarth, Melchior; Maeng, Michael; Zrenner, Bernhard; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Wöhrle, Jochen; Kufner, Sebastian; Morath, Tanja; Ibrahim, Tareq; Bernlochner, Isabell; Fischer, Marcus; Schunkert, Heribert; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Mehilli, Julinda; Kastrati, Adnan; Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    In patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) the optimal duration of dual-antiplatelet therapy after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation remains unclear. At 6 months after intervention, patients receiving clopidogrel were randomly assigned to either a further 6-month period of placebo or clopidogrel. The primary composite endpoint was death, myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, stroke, or major bleeding 9 months after randomization. The ISAR-SAFE trial was terminated early due to low event rates and slow recruitment. 1601/4000 (40.0%) patients presented with ACS and were randomized to 6 (n = 794) or 12 months (n = 807) clopidogrel. The primary endpoint occurred in 14 patients (1.8%) receiving 6 months of clopidogrel and 17 patients (2.2%) receiving 12 months; hazard ratio (HR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-1.68, P = 0.60. There were 2 (0.3%) cases of stent thrombosis in each group; HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.14-7.09, P = >0.99. Major bleeding occurred in 3 patients (0.4%) receiving 6 months clopidogrel and 5 (0.6%) receiving 12 months; HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.15-2.49, P = 0.49. There was no significant difference in net clinical outcomes after DES implantation in ACS patients treated with 6 versus 12 months clopidogrel. Ischaemic and bleeding events were low beyond 6-months. PMID:27624287

  10. Cognitive-behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: comparison of outcomes within and outside the confines of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, Louise; Rimes, Katharine A; Deale, Alicia; Wessely, Simon; Chalder, Trudie

    2007-06-01

    Outcomes for cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have rarely been compared to those in routine clinical practice. Taking the case of CBT for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), we evaluated the results of a successful RCT against those of the same treatment given in the same setting as part of routine practice. Fatigue and social adjustment scores were compared for patients who received CBT for CFS as part of a RCT (N=30) and patients who received CBT as part of everyday clinical practice (N=384). The results in the RCT were superior to those in routine clinical practice. Between pre-treatment and 6-month follow-up, the RCT showed a larger reduction in fatigue and greater improvement in social adjustment than those in routine treatment. The changes in fatigue scores were similar for both groups during treatment but were greater in the RCT between post-treatment and follow-up. Potential reasons for the superior results of the RCT include patient selection, therapist factors and the use of a manualised treatment protocol. Practitioners need to pay particular attention to relapse prevention and ensuring adequate follow-up in addition to encouraging patients to continue with cognitive-behavioural strategies once treatment has ended. PMID:17074300

  11. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  12. A randomized pilot study to assess the safety and the value of low-level laser therapy versus clonazepam in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Cafaro, Adriana; Garrone, Marco; Gambino, Alessio; Cabras, Marco; Romagnoli, Ercole; Broccoletti, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Comparison between low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and clonazepam for treating burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients has never been documented; the aim of this study was to assess the effects of LLLT photobiomodulation versus medical therapy with clonazepam on BMS. Thirty-three patients (25 female, 8 male, mean age = 67.12) were randomly allocated to two different groups: the first one (group A, 18 patients) underwent two laser irradiation sessions weekly for 5 weeks, whereas the second one (group B, 15 patients) received topical clonazepam therapy [half a tablet (2 mg) in the mouth without swallowing for 3 min, three times a day for 21 days]. LLLT was delivered with a continuous wave 980-nm aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs) diode laser and the output of 300 mW, delivering a Fluence of 10 J/cm(2), using a "spot technique," with an average power density of about 1 W/cm(2). The laser probe was held perpendicularly at a distance of about 2 mm from the mucosa. Visual analogue scale (VAS), McGill Pain Questionnaire, present pain intensity (PPI), and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) assessed sensation of pain. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Geriatric Depression Scale assessed levels of anxiety and depression. Twelve weeks after the end of treatment, patients treated with LLLT experienced a decrease in pain sensation reported for all the parameters analyzed: VAS (P = 0.004), McGill Pain Questionnaire (P = 0.002), PPI (P = 0.002), and OHIP-49 (P = 0.010). The group treated with clonazepam had less favorable results for VAS (P = 0.33), McGill Pain Questionnaire (P = 0.005), PPI (P = 0.013), and OHIP-49 (P = 0.25). Levels of anxiety and depression did not change statistically in any groups (P > 0.05). Comparing the two groups, LLLT appeared to be superior in improving pain perception, but statistically only at 8 weeks after the end of the protocol proposed (P = 0.026). Based on this preliminary trial, LLLT is capable

  13. Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), is characterized by chronic disabling fatigue and other symptoms, which are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. Previous trials have suggested that graded exercise therapy (GET) is an effective and safe treatment. GET itself is therapist-intensive with limited availability. Objective While guided self-help based on cognitive behavior therapy appears helpful to patients, Guided graded Exercise Self-help (GES) is yet to be tested. Methods This pragmatic randomized controlled trial is set within 2 specialist CFS/ME services in the South of England. Adults attending secondary care clinics with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)-defined CFS/ME (N=218) will be randomly allocated to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus GES while on a waiting list for therapist-delivered rehabilitation. GES will consist of a structured booklet describing a 6-step graded exercise program, supported by up to 4 face-to-face/telephone/Skype™ consultations with a GES-trained physiotherapist (no more than 90 minutes in total) over 8 weeks. The primary outcomes at 12-weeks after randomization will be physical function (SF-36 physical functioning subscale) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes will include healthcare costs, adverse outcomes, and self-rated global impression change scores. We will follow up all participants until 1 year after randomization. We will also undertake qualitative interviews of a sample of participants who received GES, looking at perceptions and experiences of those who improved and worsened. Results The project was funded in 2011 and enrolment was completed in December 2014, with follow-up completed in March 2016. Data analysis is currently underway and the first results are expected to be submitted soon. Conclusions This study will indicate whether adding GES to SMC will benefit patients who often spend many months

  14. Short course daily prednisolone therapy during an upper respiratory tract infection in children with relapsing steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (PREDNOS 2): protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Relapses of childhood steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) are treated with a 4- to 8-week course of high-dose oral prednisolone, which may be associated with significant adverse effects. There is a clear association between upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and relapse development. Previous studies in developing nations have suggested that introducing a 5- to 7-day course of daily prednisolone during an URTI may prevent a relapse developing and the need for a treatment course of high-dose prednisolone. The aim of PREDNOS 2 is to evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-day course of daily prednisolone therapy during an URTI in reducing the development of a subsequent relapse in a developed nation. Methods/design The subjects will be 300 children with relapsing SSNS (≥2 relapses in preceding year), who will be randomised to receive either a 6-day course of daily prednisolone or no change to their current therapy (with the use of placebo to double blind) each time they develop an URTI over 12 months. A strict definition for URTI will be used. Subjects will be reviewed at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months to capture data regarding relapse history, ongoing therapy and adverse effect profile, including behavioural problems and quality of life. A formal health economic analysis will also be performed. The primary end point of the study will be the incidence of URTI-related relapse (3 days of Albustix +++) following the first infection during the 12-month follow-up period. DNA and RNA samples will be collected to identify a potential genetic cause for the disease. Subjects will be recruited from over 100 UK centres with the assistance of the Medicines for Children Research Network. PREDNOS 2 is funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment Programme (11/129/261). Discussion We propose that PREDNOS 2 will be a pivotal study that will inform the future standard of care for children with SSNS. If it is possible to reduce the

  15. Effects of PPARγ and RBP4 Gene Variants on Metabolic Syndrome in HIV-Infected Patients with Anti-Retroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Nan-Yao; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chang, Ho-Ching; Wu, Chi-Jung; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Lin, Hsiao-Ju; Wu, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Background PPARγ and RBP4 are known to regulate lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. The influences of PPARγ (C1431T and Pro12Ala) and RBP4 (−803GA) polymorphisms on metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected patients receiving anti-retroviral therapy were examined in this study. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study of HIV-1 infected adults with antiretroviral therapy for more than one year in the National Cheng Kung University Hospital was conducted. The gene polymorphisms were determined by quantitative PCR. Results Ninety-one patients were included in the study. Eighty-two (90.1%) patients were males with a mean age of 44.4 years. For the C1431T polymorphism in PPARγ, while patients with the T allele (48.4%) had trends toward lower rate of hypertriglyceridemia, the borderline significance together with insignificant power did not support the protective effect of the T allele against development of hypertriglyceridemia. For the Pro12Ala polymorphism in PPARγ, although patients with the Pro/Ala genotype (8.8%) had a higher level of serum LDL (138.0 vs. 111.5 mg/dl, P = 0.04) and trends toward higher rates of hypercholesterolemia and serum LDL>110 mg/dl, these variables were found to be independent of the Pro/Ala genotype in the multivariate analysis. For the −803GA polymorphism in RBP4, patients with the A allele (23.1%) more often had insulin resistance (HOMA>3.8; 33.3 vs. 8.7%, P = 0.01) and more often received anti-hypoglycemic drugs (14.3 vs. 1.4%, P = 0.04). The detrimental effect of the A allele in RBP4 −803GA polymorphism on development of insulin resistance was supported by the multivariate analysis adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The impacts of PPARγ C1431T and Pro12Ala polymorphisms on metabolism in HIV-infected patients are not significant. RBP4 −803GA polymorphism has increased risk of insulin resistance in HIV-infected patients with anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23145084

  16. Probiotic Therapy of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Why Is the Evidence Still Poor and What Can Be Done About It?

    PubMed Central

    Mazurak, Nazar; Broelz, Ellen; Storr, Martin; Enck, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite numerous randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses, there is no increased evidence for the efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We review this evidence, identify and analyse the reasons for this lack of evidence and propose methodological improvements for future studies. Methods Based on a literature search, we identified 56 papers that matched the purpose of our analyses. Twenty-seven studies used multi-species bacterial preparations and 29 used single-strain probiotics. They were analysed regarding patients included, treatment duration, probiotic dosage, and outcome measures. Results Trials in both groups suffered from heterogeneity with respect to probiotic concentration, duration of treatment, and other methodological issues (crossover design and underpowered studies). This heterogeneity did not allow the application of a meta-analytic approach and a systematic review was therefore performed instead. Multi-strain preparations combined 2 to 8 different bacterial subspecies, mostly lactobacilli or bifidobacteria, and used variable lengths of treatments. Overall, more than 50% of trials presented negative outcomes. The majority of the single-strain probiotic trials employing lactobacilli or Saccharomyces were negative, whereas trials employing bifidobacteria showed positive results. Conclusions The heterogeneity of the studies of probiotics in IBS questions the value of meta-analyses. The use of different bacterial strains and different mixtures of these strains, as well as different dosages, are the main contributors to this heterogeneity. Current data provides limited evidence for the efficacy of a small number of single-strain probiotics in IBS (mostly bifidobacteria) and sound studies following strict trial guidelines (Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency guidelines for clinical trials) are needed. We summarised and proposed some methodological issues for future studies in

  17. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy for a Jehovah's Witness Child With Severe Anemia due to Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woo, Da Eun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yu Kyung; Park, Yong Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) can rapidly develop profound anemia as the disease progresses, as a consequence of red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis and inadequate erythropoietin synthesis. Therefore, RBC transfusion should be considered in HUS patients with severe anemia to avoid cardiac or pulmonary complications. Most patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusion, even in the face of life-threatening medical conditions due to their religious convictions. These patients require management alternatives to blood transfusions. Erythropoietin is a glycopeptide that enhances endogenous erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. With the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), several authors have reported its successful use in patients refusing blood transfusion. However, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with rHuEPO are not established. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with diarrhea-associated HUS whose family members are Jehovah's Witnesses. He had severe anemia with acute kidney injury. His lowest hemoglobin level was 3.6 g/dL, but his parents refused treatment with packed RBC transfusion due to their religious beliefs. Therefore, we treated him with high-dose rHuEPO (300 IU/kg/day) as well as folic acid, vitamin B12, and intravenous iron. The hemoglobin level increased steadily to 7.4 g/dL after 10 days of treatment and his renal function improved without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful rHuEPO treatment in a Jehovah's Witness child with severe anemia due to HUS. PMID:26958070

  18. Health economic analysis of ticagrelor in patients with acute coronary syndromes intended for non-invasive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janzon, M; James, S; Cannon, C P; Storey, R F; Mellström, C; Nicolau, J C; Wallentin, L; Henriksson, M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cost effectiveness of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes (PLATO) study who were scheduled for non-invasive management. Methods A previously developed cost effectiveness model was used to estimate long-term costs and outcomes for patients scheduled for non-invasive management. Healthcare costs, event rates and health-related quality of life under treatment with either ticagrelor or clopidogrel over 12 months were estimated from the PLATO study. Long-term costs and health outcomes were estimated based on data from PLATO and published literature sources. To investigate the importance of different healthcare cost structures and life expectancy for the results, the analysis was carried out from the perspectives of the Swedish, UK, German and Brazilian public healthcare systems. Results Ticagrelor was associated with lifetime quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gains of 0.17 in Sweden, 0.16 in the UK, 0.17 in Germany and 0.13 in Brazil compared with generic clopidogrel, with increased healthcare costs of €467, €551, €739 and €574, respectively. The cost per QALY gained with ticagrelor was €2747, €3395, €4419 and €4471 from a Swedish, UK, German and Brazilian public healthcare system perspective, respectively. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that the cost per QALY gained with ticagrelor was below conventional threshold values of cost effectiveness with a high probability. Conclusions Treatment of patients with ACS scheduled for 12 months’ non-invasive management with ticagrelor is associated with a cost per QALY gained below conventional threshold values of cost effectiveness compared with generic clopidogrel. Trial registration number NCT000391872. PMID:25227704

  19. Colchicine therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients acts on caspase-1 to suppress NLRP3 inflammasome monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Stacy; Martínez, Gonzalo J; Payet, Cloe A; Barraclough, Jennifer Y; Celermajer, David S; Bursill, Christina; Patel, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    Inflammasome activation, with subsequent release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, has recently been implicated in atherosclerosis-associated inflammation. This study aims to assess in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients (1) inflammasome activation in circulating monocytes and (2) whether short-term oral colchicine, a recognized anti-inflammatory agent that has been shown to be cardio-protective in clinical studies, might acutely suppress inflammasome-dependent inflammation. ACS patients (n=21) were randomized to oral colchicine (1 mg followed by 0.5 mg 1 h later) or no treatment, and compared with untreated healthy controls (n=9). Peripheral venous blood was sampled pre- (day 1) and 24 h post- (day 2) treatment. Monocytes were cultured and stimulated with ATP. Analysis of key inflammasome markers was performed by ELISA. IL-1β secretion increased by 580.4% (P<0.01) in ACS patients compared with controls but only with ATP stimulation. Untreated ACS patients secreted significantly higher levels of IL-18 compared with healthy controls independent of ATP stimulation (P<0.05). Colchicine treatment in ACS patients markedly reduced intracellular and secreted levels of IL-1β compared with pre-treatment levels (P<0.05 for both), as well as significantly reducing pro-caspase-1 mRNA levels by 57.7% and secreted caspase-1 protein levels by 30.2% compared with untreated patients (P<0.05 for both). Monocytes from ACS patients are 'primed' to secrete inflammasome-related cytokines and short-term colchicine acutely and markedly suppresses monocyte caspase-1 activity, thereby reducing monocyte secretion of IL-1β. PMID:27129183

  20. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy for a Jehovah's Witness Child With Severe Anemia due to Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Da Eun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yu Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) can rapidly develop profound anemia as the disease progresses, as a consequence of red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis and inadequate erythropoietin synthesis. Therefore, RBC transfusion should be considered in HUS patients with severe anemia to avoid cardiac or pulmonary complications. Most patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusion, even in the face of life-threatening medical conditions due to their religious convictions. These patients require management alternatives to blood transfusions. Erythropoietin is a glycopeptide that enhances endogenous erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. With the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), several authors have reported its successful use in patients refusing blood transfusion. However, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with rHuEPO are not established. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with diarrhea-associated HUS whose family members are Jehovah's Witnesses. He had severe anemia with acute kidney injury. His lowest hemoglobin level was 3.6 g/dL, but his parents refused treatment with packed RBC transfusion due to their religious beliefs. Therefore, we treated him with high-dose rHuEPO (300 IU/kg/day) as well as folic acid, vitamin B12, and intravenous iron. The hemoglobin level increased steadily to 7.4 g/dL after 10 days of treatment and his renal function improved without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful rHuEPO treatment in a Jehovah's Witness child with severe anemia due to HUS. PMID:26958070

  1. Griscelli syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, H; Geikowski, A; Chin, T F; Chau, D; Arshad, A; Abu Bakar, K; Krishnan, S

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of Griscelli Syndrome (GS). Our patient initially presented with a diagnosis of haemophagocytic lymphistiocytosis (HLH). Subsequent microscopic analysis of the patient's hair follicle revealed abnormal distribution of melanosomes in the shaft, which is a hallmark for GS. Analysis of RAB27A gene in this patient revealed a homozygous mutation in exon 6, c.550C>T, p.R184X . This nonsense mutation causes premature truncation of the protein resulting in a dysfunctional RAB27A. Recognition of GS allows appropriate institution of therapy namely chemotherapy for HLH and curative haemotopoeitic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25500851

  2. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  3. Surfactant therapy and antibiotics in neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, C K; Sankar, M J; Jain, K; Agarwal, R; Paul, V K

    2016-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS), a common cause of respiratory failure in neonates, is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this review were to evaluate the effects of administration of (a) surfactant—either as lung lavage (SLL) or bolus surfactant (BS) and (b) antibiotics on mortality and severe morbidities in neonates with MAS. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE via PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL, WHOLIS and CABI using sensitive search strategies. We included eight studies on use of surfactant and three studies on use of antibiotics. Neither SLL nor BS reduced the risk of mortality in neonates with MAS (relative risk (RR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.09 to 1.57; and RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.66, respectively). Both SLL and BS reduced the duration of hospital stay (mean difference −2.0, 95% CI −3.66 to −0.34; and RR −4.68, 95% CI −7.11 to −2.24 days, respectively) and duration of mechanical ventilation (mean difference −1.31, 95% CI −1.91 to −0.72; and mean difference 5.4, 95% CI −9.76 to −1.03 days). Neonates who received BS needed extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) less often than the controls (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.91). Use of antibiotics for MAS did not result in significant reduction in the risk of mortality, sepsis or duration of hospital stay. Surfactant administration either as SLL or BS for MAS was found to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay; BS also reduced the need for ECMO. Administration of antibiotics did not show any significant clinical benefits in neonates with MAS and no evidence of sepsis. Given the limited number of studies and small number of neonates enrolled, there is an urgent need to generate more evidence on the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of these two treatment modalities before recommending them in routine clinical practice. PMID:27109092

  4. Clinically Combating Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) with Dopamine Agonist Therapy as a Paradigm Shift: Dopamine for Dinner?

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Febo, Marcelo; Thanos, Panayotis K; Baron, David; Fratantonio, James; Gold, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Everyday, there are several millions of people that are increasingly unable to combat their frustrating and even fatal romance with getting high and/or experiencing "normal" feelings of well-being. In the USA, the FDA has approved pharmaceuticals for drug and alcohol abuse: tobacco and nicotine replacement therapy. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) remarkably continue to provide an increasing understanding of the intricate functions of brain reward circuitry through sophisticated neuroimaging and molecular genetic applied technology. Similar work is intensely investigated on a worldwide basis with enhanced clarity and increased interaction between not only individual scientists but across many disciplines. However, while it is universally agreed that dopamine is a major neurotransmitter in terms of reward dependence, there remains controversy regarding how to modulate its role clinically to treat and prevent relapse for both substance and non-substance-related addictive behaviors. While the existing FDA-approved medications promote blocking dopamine, we argue that a more prudent paradigm shift should be biphasic-short-term blockade and long-term upregulation, enhancing functional connectivity of brain reward circuits. PMID:25750061

  5. Optimal timing of initiation of oral P2Y12-receptor antagonist therapy in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes. Lessons learnt from the ACCOAST-trial.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Uwe; Montalescot, Gilles; Ardissino, Diego; Bolognese, Leonardo; Clemmensen, Peter; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Widimsky, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The optimal time-point of the initiation of P2Y12 antagonist therapy in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NTSE-ACS) is still a matter of debate. European guidelines recommend P2Y12 as soon as possible after first medical contact. However, the only trial which compared the two strategies did not demonstrate any benefit of pre-treatment with prasugrel before angiography compared to starting therapy after angiography and just prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This paper summarizes the results of pharmacodynamic and previous studies, and gives recommendations for the initiation of P2Y12 antagonist therapy in NSTE-ACS in different clinical situations. PMID:25921481

  6. High-resolution epitope mapping by HX MS reveals the pathogenic mechanism and a possible therapy for autoimmune TTP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Casina, Veronica C.; Hu, Wenbing; Mao, Jian-Hua; Lu, Rui-Nan; Hanby, Hayley A.; Pickens, Brandy; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Lim, Woon K.; Mayne, Leland; Ostertag, Eric M.; Kacir, Stephen; Siegel, Don L.; Englander, S. Walter; Zheng, X. Long

    2015-01-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a thrombotic disorder that is fatal in almost all cases if not treated promptly, is primarily caused by IgG-type autoantibodies that inhibit the ability of the ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) metalloprotease to cleave von Willebrand factor (VWF). Because the mechanism of autoantibody-mediated inhibition of ADAMTS13 activity is not known, the only effective therapy so far is repeated whole-body plasma exchange. We used hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) to determine the ADAMTS13 binding epitope for three representative human monoclonal autoantibodies, isolated from TTP patients by phage display as tethered single-chain fragments of the variable regions (scFvs). All three scFvs bind the same conformationally discontinuous epitopic region on five small solvent-exposed loops in the spacer domain of ADAMTS13. The same epitopic region is also bound by most polyclonal IgG autoantibodies in 23 TTP patients that we tested. The ability of ADAMTS13 to proteolyze VWF is impaired by the binding of autoantibodies at the epitopic loops in the spacer domain, by the deletion of individual epitopic loops, and by some local mutations. Structural considerations and HX MS results rule out any disruptive structure change effect in the distant ADAMTS13 metalloprotease domain. Instead, it appears that the same ADAMTS13 loop segments that bind the autoantibodies are also responsible for correct binding to the VWF substrate. If so, the autoantibodies must prevent VWF proteolysis simply by physically blocking normal ADAMTS13 to VWF interaction. These results point to the mechanism for autoantibody action and an avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26203127

  7. An open-label pilot study of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in the treatment of failed back surgery syndrome pain.

    PubMed

    Harper, Wayne L; Schmidt, William K; Kubat, Nicole J; Isenberg, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pain following back surgery remains a major treatment challenge. The primary objective of this open-label exploratory study was to investigate the analgesic effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy administered twice daily over a 45-day period in 34 subjects (68% female) with persistent or recurrent pain following back surgery. A secondary goal was to guide the design of future randomized controlled trials that could target responsive subpopulations. All predefined primary and secondary outcomes, including change in pain intensity (PI), physical function (Oswestry Disability Index), analgesic consumption, and overall well-being (Patient Global Impression of Change), are reported. A responder analysis (≥30% reduction in PI versus baseline) was added as a post hoc evaluation. Safety outcomes, as well as results of a cost-avoidance survey, are also summarized. Of the 30 per-protocol subjects who completed the study, 33% reported a clinically meaningful (≥30%) reduction in PI. A higher response rate (60%) was reported for subjects who had undergone discectomy prior to the trial compared to subjects who had undergone other types of surgical interventions (decompression or fusion) without discectomy. Improvements in PI were paralleled by improvements in secondary outcomes. Relative to baseline, responders reported an average 44% and 55% reduction in back PI and leg PI (respectively), and an average 13% improvement in Oswestry Disability Index scores. In the per-protocol population, 50% of responders and 12% of nonresponders reported less analgesia consumption at the end of treatment versus baseline. Sixty-seven percent of per-protocol responders and 0% of nonresponders reported clinically meaningful improvement in overall well-being on the Patient Global Impression of Change scale. PMID:25678825

  8. An open-label pilot study of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy in the treatment of failed back surgery syndrome pain

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Wayne L; Schmidt, William K; Kubat, Nicole J; Isenberg, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pain following back surgery remains a major treatment challenge. The primary objective of this open-label exploratory study was to investigate the analgesic effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy administered twice daily over a 45-day period in 34 subjects (68% female) with persistent or recurrent pain following back surgery. A secondary goal was to guide the design of future randomized controlled trials that could target responsive subpopulations. All predefined primary and secondary outcomes, including change in pain intensity (PI), physical function (Oswestry Disability Index), analgesic consumption, and overall well-being (Patient Global Impression of Change), are reported. A responder analysis (≥30% reduction in PI versus baseline) was added as a post hoc evaluation. Safety outcomes, as well as results of a cost-avoidance survey, are also summarized. Of the 30 per-protocol subjects who completed the study, 33% reported a clinically meaningful (≥30%) reduction in PI. A higher response rate (60%) was reported for subjects who had undergone discectomy prior to the trial compared to subjects who had undergone other types of surgical interventions (decompression or fusion) without discectomy. Improvements in PI were paralleled by improvements in secondary outcomes. Relative to baseline, responders reported an average 44% and 55% reduction in back PI and leg PI (respectively), and an average 13% improvement in Oswestry Disability Index scores. In the per-protocol population, 50% of responders and 12% of nonresponders reported less analgesia consumption at the end of treatment versus baseline. Sixty-seven percent of per-protocol responders and 0% of nonresponders reported clinically meaningful improvement in overall well-being on the Patient Global Impression of Change scale. PMID:25678825

  9. Short Communication: Do Cytomegalovirus Antibody Levels Associate with Age-Related Syndromes in HIV Patients Stable on Antiretroviral Therapy?

    PubMed

    Brunt, Samantha J; Cysique, Lucette A; Lee, Silvia; Burrows, Sally; Brew, Bruce J; Price, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    HIV(+) persons stable on antiretroviral therapy (ART) face early onset of age-related diseases. This may arise from a high burden of cytomegalovirus (CMV). To address the role of CMV, we investigated univariate and multivariate associations between markers of systemic and endothelial inflammation, vascular damage, insulin resistance (IR), neurocognitive decline, and antibodies reactive with CMV. In this study, HIV(+) participants (n = 91) aged >45 years with <50 copies HIV RNA/ml plasma after >2 years on ART were assessed for cardiovascular risk (the D:A:D algorithm), type II diabetes (the HOMA-IR index), and neurocognitive performance. Blood samples were assayed for lipids, T cells, insulin, glucose, C-reactive protein, CX3CL1, sTNF-R1, total immunoglobulin G (IgG), and antibodies reactive with CMV lysate, glycoprotein B, or immediate-early-1. Levels of antibodies detected with the three antigens were tightly correlated. Levels of CMV lysate antibody were higher in patients than in age-matched healthy controls and reflected their nadir CD4 T-cell count (p = .001), total IgG (p = .02), and age (p = .08). Levels of CMV lysate antibody correlated with D:A:D score (p = .04), neurocognitive performance (p = .045), and fasting insulin (p = .02). In multivariable analyses, some associations reflected the effect of age, but CMV lysate antibody and CD8 T-cell counts were significant predictors of the HOMA-IR index (R(2) = 0.09, p = .01) independent of age. We conclude that associations between levels of CMV antibodies, cardiovascular risk, and neurocognitive health in HIV(+) patients stable on ART are moderated by age-associated increases in response to CMV, while CMV antibodies may be independently linked with IR. PMID:26876416

  10. High-resolution epitope mapping by HX MS reveals the pathogenic mechanism and a possible therapy for autoimmune TTP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Casina, Veronica C; Hu, Wenbing; Mao, Jian-Hua; Lu, Rui-Nan; Hanby, Hayley A; Pickens, Brandy; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Lim, Woon K; Mayne, Leland; Ostertag, Eric M; Kacir, Stephen; Siegel, Don L; Englander, S Walter; Zheng, X Long

    2015-08-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a thrombotic disorder that is fatal in almost all cases if not treated promptly, is primarily caused by IgG-type autoantibodies that inhibit the ability of the ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) metalloprotease to cleave von Willebrand factor (VWF). Because the mechanism of autoantibody-mediated inhibition of ADAMTS13 activity is not known, the only effective therapy so far is repeated whole-body plasma exchange. We used hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) to determine the ADAMTS13 binding epitope for three representative human monoclonal autoantibodies, isolated from TTP patients by phage display as tethered single-chain fragments of the variable regions (scFvs). All three scFvs bind the same conformationally discontinuous epitopic region on five small solvent-exposed loops in the spacer domain of ADAMTS13. The same epitopic region is also bound by most polyclonal IgG autoantibodies in 23 TTP patients that we tested. The ability of ADAMTS13 to proteolyze VWF is impaired by the binding of autoantibodies at the epitopic loops in the spacer domain, by the deletion of individual epitopic loops, and by some local mutations. Structural considerations and HX MS results rule out any disruptive structure change effect in the distant ADAMTS13 metalloprotease domain. Instead, it appears that the same ADAMTS13 loop segments that bind the autoantibodies are also responsible for correct binding to the VWF substrate. If so, the autoantibodies must prevent VWF proteolysis simply by physically blocking normal ADAMTS13 to VWF interaction. These results point to the mechanism for autoantibody action and an avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26203127

  11. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Tuberculosis-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Impaired Lung Function Among Advanced HIV/TB Co-infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ravimohan, Shruthi; Tamuhla, Neo; Kung, Shiang-Ju; Nfanyana, Kebatshabile; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Gross, Robert; Weissman, Drew; Bisson, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients with pulmonary TB (pTB) can have worsening of respiratory symptoms as part of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Thus, reconstitution of immune function on ART could drive incident lung damage in HIV/TB. Methods We hypothesized that increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which can degrade lung matrix, on ART are associated with TB-IRIS among a cohort of advanced, ART naïve, HIV-infected adults with pTB. Furthermore, we related early changes in immune measures and MMPs on ART to lung function in an exploratory subset of patients post-TB cure. This study was nested within a prospective cohort study. Rank sum and chi-square tests, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and logistic regression were used for analyses. Results Increases in MMP-8 following ART initiation were independently associated with TB-IRIS (p = 0.04; adjusted odds ratio 1.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.0–2.1]; n = 32). Increases in CD4 counts and MMP-8 on ART were also associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in one-second post-TB treatment completion (r = − 0.7, p = 0.006 and r = − 0.6, p = 0.02, respectively; n = 14). Conclusions ART-induced MMP increases are associated with TB-IRIS and may affect lung function post-TB cure. End-organ damage due to TB-IRIS and mechanisms whereby immune restoration impairs lung function in pTB deserve further investigation. PMID:27014741

  13. A phase I study of low-pressure hyperbaric oxygen therapy for blast-induced post-concussion syndrome and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Harch, Paul G; Andrews, Susan R; Fogarty, Edward F; Amen, Daniel; Pezzullo, John C; Lucarini, Juliette; Aubrey, Claire; Taylor, Derek V; Staab, Paul K; Van Meter, Keith W

    2012-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on the safety and efficacy of 1.5 ATA hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in military subjects with chronic blast-induced mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI)/post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sixteen military subjects received 40 1.5 ATA/60 min HBOT sessions in 30 days. Symptoms, physical and neurological exams, SPECT brain imaging, and neuropsychological and psychological testing were completed before and within 1 week after treatment. Subjects experienced reversible middle ear barotrauma (5), transient deterioration in symptoms (4), and reversible bronchospasm (1); one subject withdrew. Post-treatment testing demonstrated significant improvement in: symptoms, neurological exam, full-scale IQ (+14.8 points; p<0.001), WMS IV Delayed Memory (p=0.026), WMS-IV Working Memory (p=0.003), Stroop Test (p<0.001), TOVA Impulsivity (p=0.041), TOVA Variability (p=0.045), Grooved Pegboard (p=0.028), PCS symptoms (Rivermead PCSQ: p=0.0002), PTSD symptoms (PCL-M: p<0.001), depression (PHQ-9: p<0.001), anxiety (GAD-7: p=0.007), quality of life (MPQoL: p=0.003), and self-report of percent of normal (p<0.001), SPECT coefficient of variation in all white matter and some gray matter ROIs after the first HBOT, and in half of white matter ROIs after 40 HBOT sessions, and SPECT statistical parametric mapping analysis (diffuse improvements in regional cerebral blood flow after 1 and 40 HBOT sessions). Forty 1.5 ATA HBOT sessions in 1 month was safe in a military cohort with chronic blast-induced PCS and PTSD. Significant improvements occurred in symptoms, abnormal physical exam findings, cognitive testing, and quality-of-life measurements, with concomitant significant improvements in SPECT. PMID:22026588

  14. Apheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins used in addition to conventional therapy to treat high-risk pregnant antiphospholipid antibody syndrome patients. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ruffatti, Amelia; Favaro, Maria; Hoxha, Ariela; Zambon, Alessandra; Marson, Piero; Del Ross, Teresa; Calligaro, Antonia; Tonello, Marta; Nardelli, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Pregnant women with triple antibody positive antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who have had thrombosis or a history of early, severe pregnancy complications are generally considered at high risk of pregnancy loss. The objectives of this study were to investigate the efficacy and safety of a relatively new treatment protocol used in addition to conventional therapy in high-risk pregnant patients affected with primary APS. The study's two inclusion criteria were: (1) the presence of triple antiphospholipid positivity, (2) previous thrombosis and/or a history of one or more early, severe pregnancy complications. Eighteen pregnancies occurring between 2002 and 2015 in 14 APS patients, (mean age 34.8±3.6 SD) were monitored. All 14 (100%) patients had triple antiphospholipid positivity. In addition, six of them (42.8%) had a history of thrombosis, four (28.6%) had one or more previous early and severe pregnancy complications, and four (30.8%) met both clinical study criteria. The study protocol included weekly plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and fortnightly 1g/kg intravenous immunoglobulins. Seventeen of the pregnancies (94.4%) produced live neonates, all born between the 26th and 37th weeks of gestation (mean 33.1±3.5 SD). One female (5.5%), born prematurely at 24 weeks, died of sepsis a week after birth. There were two cases (11.1%) of severe pregnancy complications. No treatment side effects were registered. Given the high live birth rate and the safety associated to it, the study protocol described here could be taken into consideration by medical teams treating high-risk APS pregnant patients. PMID:27088752