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Sample records for syndrome therapie cellulaire

  1. Directed Therapy for Exfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angelilli, Allison; Ritch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disorder of the extracellular matrix that leads the production of abnormal fibrillar material that leads to elevated intraocular pressure and a relatively severe glaucoma. Exfoliation material is deposited in numerous ocular tissues and extraocular organs. XFS is associated with ocular ischemia, cerebrovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease and cardiovascular disease. Current modalities of treatment include intraocular pressure lowering with topical antihypertensives, laser trabeculoplasty and filtration surgery. The disease paradigm for XFS should be expanded to include directed therapy designed specifically to target the underlying disease process. Potential targets include preventing the formation or promoting the depolymerization of exfoliation material. Novel therapies targeting trabecular meshwork may prove particularly useful in the care of exfoliative glaucoma. The systemic and ocular associations of XFS underscore the need for a comprehensive search for neuroprotective agents in its treatment. PMID:19888433

  2. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  3. Complementary and alternative therapies for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roizen, Nancy J

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy, and a host of other therapies such as massage therapy have been used. There is a lack of well-designed scientific studies on the use of alternative therapies in individuals with Down syndrome. Antioxidants hold theoretical promise for treatment of the cognitive, immune, malignancy, and premature aging problems associated with Down syndrome. Medications for treatment of Alzheimer's disease may also result in benefit for the population of individuals with Down syndrome. PMID:15977315

  4. Emerging Therapies in Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Danieli; Tektonidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a hypercoagulable state characterized by arterial and venous thromboses and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Although warfarin remains the main therapeutic choice in APS, there is still concern about its efficacy, safety, and patient compliance. Patients with refractory APS to conventional therapy as well as patients with non-classical manifestations of APS may have alternative treatment approaches. APS pathogenesis has been further elucidated over the past years identifying new molecules as potential new treatment targets. This review summarizes available data from in vitro and animal models and clinical studies on the role of new potential treatment approaches including new oral anticoagulants and immunoregulatory agents: direct thrombin or factor Xa inhibitors, hydroxychloroquine, statins, B cell inhibition, complement inhibition, peptide therapy, nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated kinase inhibitors, defibrotide, abciximab, mTOR inhibitor, and other potential targets. Large multicenter prospective studies of well-characterized APS patients are needed to assess the efficacy and safety profile of these potential treatment alternatives. PMID:26995745

  5. Antidepressant therapy in the chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, S; Seth, R; Montgomery, S

    1991-01-01

    The chronic fatigue syndrome is a condition receiving increasing recognition. Symptoms of depression are not infrequent and may be persistent and severe enough to warrant treatment. The controversy over the use of antidepressant therapy in this condition may present a dilemma for the general practitioner considering possible treatments. This paper draws on the literature and on the authors' own observations of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome to suggest guidelines for the use of antidepressant therapy. PMID:1822108

  6. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome are cancer syndromes which affect multiple organs and lead to significant decline in quality of life in affected patients. These syndromes are rare and typically affect the adolescent and young adult population, resulting in greater cumulative years of life lost. Improved understanding of the underpinnings of the genetic pathways underlying these syndromes and the rapid evolution of targeted therapies in general have made it possible to develop therapeutic options for these patients and other genetic cancer syndromes. Targeted therapies especially antiangiogenics and inhibitors of the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway have shown activity in selected group of patients affected by these syndromes or in patients harboring specific sporadic mutations which are otherwise characteristic of these syndromes. Unfortunately due to the rare nature, patients with these syndromes are not the focus of clinical trials and unique results seen in these patients can easily go unnoticed. Most of the data suggesting benefits of targeted therapies are either case reports or small case series. Thus, a literature review was indicated. In this review we explore the use of molecularly targeted therapy options in Von Hippel-Lindau disease, Cowden syndrome, and Proteus syndrome. PMID:25725225

  7. [Dyserythropoietic syndromes: incidence, diagnosis, therapy].

    PubMed

    Cacciola, E

    1990-10-01

    The nosography of the dyserythropoietic syndromes remains poorly defined in the field of clinical hematology. The prominent pathophysiologic feature lies in the "ineffective erythropoiesis" as expressed by bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia with dysplasia accompanied by a normal or only slightly increased reticulocyte count. Both erythrokinetics and ferrokinetics are impaired, as shown by either slight reduction of the red cell survival or marked increased rate of serum iron transport together with reduced cellular iron utilization. The dyserythropoietic syndromes can be classified as acquired, secondary or congenital. The acquired ones, especially the sideroblastic forms, belonging to the myelodysplastic syndromes, are typical of the elderly whereas the congenital are of childhood. Their treatment is still a matter of controversy. However, the employment of folic acid, Vit. B12, pyridoxine and androgens can be useful in selected cases. In case of severe anemia, blood transfusion are required in association with iron chelating agents. However, some biological molecules, such as erythropoietin, interleukins 3 and 4, hemopoietic growth factors (especially GM-CSF), could represent future prospects of treatment. PMID:2291009

  8. Upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation after reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: a study by the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire.

    PubMed

    Damaj, Gandhi; Mohty, Mohammad; Robin, Marie; Michallet, Mauricette; Chevallier, Patrice; Beguin, Yves; Nguyen, Stephanie; Bories, Pierre; Blaise, Didier; Maillard, Natacha; Rubio, Marie Therese; Fegueux, Nathalie; Cornillon, Jerome; Clavert, Aline; Huynh, Anne; Adès, Lionel; Thiébaut-Bertrand, Anne; Hermine, Olivier; Vigouroux, Stephane; Fenaux, Pierre; Duhamel, Alain; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Cytoreduction before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes remains a debatable issue. After excluding patients who had received preconditioning induction chemotherapy, we analyzed 128 consecutive patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who received reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMA) allo-SCT. Among them, 40 received azacitidine (AZA) before transplant (AZA group) and 88 were transplanted up front (best supportive care [BSC] group). At diagnosis, 55 patients had intermediate 2 or high-risk scores per the International Prognostic Scoring System and 33 had a high cytogenetic risk score. Progression to a more advanced disease before allo-SCT was recorded in 22 patients. Source of stem cells were blood (n = 112) or marrow (n = 16) from sibling (n = 78) or HLA-matched unrelated (n = 50) donors. With a median follow-up of 60 months, 3-year overall survival, relapse-free survival, cumulative incidence of relapse, and nonrelapse mortality were, respectively, 53% versus 53% (P = .69), 37% versus 42% (P = .78), 35% versus 36% (P = .99), and 20% versus 23% (P = .74), for the AZA group and BSC group, respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed the absence of statistical differences in outcome between the AZA and BSC groups, after adjusting for potential confounders using the propensity score approach. The absence of cytoreduction before RIC/NMA allo-SCT did not seem to alter the outcome. However, our results emphasize the need to perform prospective protocols to delineate the role of debulking strategy and to identify subsets of patients who may benefit from this approach. PMID:24838178

  9. Dual pathway therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stachon, Peter; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Zirlik, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    In 10 % of patients, who suffer an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a major cardiovascular event occurs despite optimal therapy. The occlusion of the vessel is driven by atherothrombosis, which arises from platelet activation and activation of the coagulation cascade. In the last decade the secondary prevention continuously improved by development of dual anti-platelet therapy with new P2Y12-inhibitors such as clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Until recently, the coagulation cascade was not targeted in secondary prevention. The coagulation factor Xa plays a crucial role in thrombosis and is elevated in patients after acute coronary syndrome, therefore representing an attractive target for novel therapies in ACS. Former studies with vitamin K antagonists showed reduction of cardiovascular events but increased major bleedings. Two phase-3 trials investigated the role of novel oral anticoagulant agents on top of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with ACS. The APPRAISE-2 study, which tested the oral factor Xa inhibitor apixaban was prematurely terminated because of an increase of major bleedings in the absence of an effect on cardiovascular events. In contrast, the ATLAS ACS2 TIMI-51 trial interrogating the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban in a low dose regimen showed significant reduction of cardiovascular events as well as total mortality. Thus, add-on treatment with low dose rivaroxaban emerged as a new option for patients with ACS. This review illustrates recent advances in the development of antithrombotic therapy in acute coronary syndromes, provides guidance on which patients should receive which therapy for secondary prevention of events, and points out potentially fruitful new strategies for the future of antithrombotic treatment in ACS. PMID:26660521

  10. Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Intervention for Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Kathleen A.

    The paper reviews music therapy, the educational background of music therapists, music therapy's various settings, and its use as an intervention with girls with Rett Syndrome. Sample music therapy programs for three girls (aged 5, 14, and 20 years) with Rett Syndrome are presented. The sample programs provide: student descriptions; the girls'…

  11. Novel biomarkers and therapies in cardiorenal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Latini, Roberto; Aleksova, Aneta; Masson, Serge

    2016-04-01

    Renal and cardiac diseases frequently co-exist and are associated with adverse outcomes. The clinical management of patients with a cardiorenal syndrome aims at reducing fluid overload and congestion, while improving kidney function. Early diagnosis and prompt therapies are key to better outcome. Biomarkers may help to gain insight on the ongoing pathological processes and since an accurate and early diagnosis of the cardiorenal syndrome based on clinical findings is not always possible. Serum creatinine, the derived eGFR and blood urea nitrogen are the standard tools for recognizing changes in renal function but suffer some limitations. In this review we will discuss the role of emerging biomarkers of renal tubular and glomerular injury, bone-mineral axis, or tubular cell-cycle arrest. PMID:26894469

  12. MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION SYNDROME AND CYTOKINE DIRECTED THERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Grom, Alexei A.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is an episode of overwhelming inflammation that occurs most commonly in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is characterized by expansion and activation of T lymphocytes and hemophagocytic macrophages, and bears great similarity to hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). This disorder has substantial morbidity and mortality, and there is frequently a delay in recognition and initiation of treatment. Here, we will review what is known about the pathogenesis of MAS and in particular its similarities to HLH. The development of MAS is characterized by a cytokine storm, with the elaboration of numerous proinflammatory cytokines. We will examine the evidence for various cytokines in the initiation and pathogenesis of MAS, and discuss how new biologic therapies may alter the risk of MAS. Finally we will review current treatment options for MAS, and examine how cytokine-directed therapy could serve as novel treatment modalities. PMID:24974063

  13. Review of pharmacological therapies in fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of drug therapy for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and is based on interdisciplinary FMS management guidelines, meta-analyses of drug trial data, and observational studies. In the absence of a single gold-standard medication, patients are treated with a variety of drugs from different categories, often with limited evidence. Drug therapy is not mandatory for the management of FMS. Pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran, and amitriptyline are the current first-line prescribed agents but have had a mostly modest effect. With only a minority of patients expected to experience substantial benefit, most will discontinue therapy because of either a lack of efficacy or tolerability problems. Many drug treatments have undergone limited study and have had negative results. It is unlikely that these failed pilot trials will undergo future study. However, medications, though imperfect, will continue to be a component of treatment strategy for these patients. Both the potential for medication therapy to relieve symptoms and the potential to cause harm should be carefully considered in their administration. PMID:24433463

  14. Evaluation and therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loy, R; Seibel, M M

    1988-12-01

    The amenorrhea associated with bilateral polycystic ovaries, described by Stein and Leventhal, actually represents a syndrome involving various organs and systems. Clinically, this symptom complex commonly presents as menstrual disturbances, infertility, excessive body weight, and hirsutism. An understanding of the pathophysiology that underlies these symptoms provides a logical basis for evaluation and treatment of the syndrome. The diagnostic approach may involve biochemical determinations (baseline, stimulated, and suppressed) and radiologic testing. Therapy is directed at chronic anovulation, the hyperandrogenism responsible for hirsutism and acne, and the prophylaxis against endometrial and breast carcinomas. Ovulation can be induced with various agents, many of which have a risk of ovarian hyperstimulation in the PCOD patient. The use of GnRH agonists with HMG or FSH for ovulation induction will probably increase in the future. Although classic wedge resection has little place in modern management of PCOD, the recent laparoscopic ovarian cautery remains largely unstudied with respect to long-term postoperative plasma androgen levels and pelvic adhesions. It is too premature to evaluate this new surgical therapy. Hirsutism is effectively treated with estrogen-progestin combinations, medroxyprogesterone acetate, androgen receptor blockers (spironolactone, cimetidine, cyproterone acetate, and cyproheptadine), and glucocorticoids. To date, the available GnRH agonists have not been found selective enough to be used in the treatment of hirsutism, owing to possible long-term complications. Most medical approaches should include electrolysis for permanent hair removal. At present, gynecologic surgery seems to have little place in the management of hirsutism. PMID:3143568

  15. [Optimization of pharmacological therapy for weakness syndrome in incurable patients].

    PubMed

    Ryazankina, A A; Rozengard, S A; Glushchenko, V A; Karitsky, A P; Kvashnin, A V

    2015-01-01

    In this work there is considered the possibility of correction of therapy for weakness syndrome in incurable patients with the use of drugs affecting dopamine and serotonin exchanges. It is showed that the use of 100 mg of ladasten, 16 mg of ondansetron orally per day and 50 mg of agomelatine per night is more effective in therapy for fatigue/weakness syndrome in incurable cancer patients compared to standard therapy. PMID:26087610

  16. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  17. Rifaximin therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hoonmo L; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  18. Rifaximin Therapy of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  19. Cognitive - Behavioral Therapy in Central Sensitivity Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a formal therapeutic approach that encourages selfmanagement of illnesses in accordance with the BioPsychoSocial model. CBT is composed of numerous skills grounded in known principles of behavioral and cognitive change. Each skill is designed to influence one of the facets associated with the perception of pain (i.e., sensory factors, emotional factors, or cognitive factors). Across the various Central Sensitivity Syndromes (CSS), CBT is thought to be beneficial to at least a portion of individuals afflicted. This paper provides a description of CBT, some recommendations for integrating CBT into clinical practice, and a brief review of the evidence supporting the use of CBT with various forms of CSS. PMID:26717953

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  1. [Autoimmune hepatitis and overlap syndrome: therapy].

    PubMed

    Löhr, H F

    2002-08-21

    Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represent acute and chronic inflammatory liver diseases in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. Only for AIH there is evidence of an autoimmune etiology and humoral and cellular immune reactions are found directed against various liver cell antigens. By diverse autoantibodies several subgroups of autoimmune hepatitis can be distinguished. A very important disease promoting factor seems to be the genetically determined background for autoimmunity characterized by the HLA haplotype A1, B8 and DR3, respectively DR4. Although the histopathology of AIH shows no pathognomonic features distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus induced chronic hepatitis there are some distinct characteristic morphological lesions. If untreated the prognosis of AIH is unfavourable but the benefit from immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprin is well established. In the last years there was increasing evidence for an overlap syndrome between AIH and PBC and rarely AIH and PSC. These patients are characterized by PBC characteristic bileduct lesions and oftenly antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). They also show AIH typical inflammatory hepatic lesions in the periportal areas and portal tracts and oftenly the typical genetical background, the HLA haplotype A1, B8, DR3 or DR4. Most of these patients respond probably to a combination therapy containing prednisolon, azathioprine and ursodesoxycholic acid that leads to the reduction of the inflammatory activity. PMID:12233265

  2. [Is a gene therapy for diabetic syndromes foreseeable?].

    PubMed

    Assan, R; Clauser, E; Larger, E

    1994-01-01

    The concepts and methods of gene therapy are summarized in order to assess a possible implication in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Gene therapy requires identification of the critical genetic defect and then the preparation and introduction of the therapeutic transgene, with an appropriate targeting and a strong regulated expression. The bases of the different human diabetic syndromes are reviewed in their present state of knowledge: they are mostly clarified in the case of MODY, extreme insulin resistance syndromes, and some mitochondrial diabetic syndromes; but still obscure in the case of Type 2 and Type 1 diabetic syndromes. Substantial contributions to the understanding of the pathophysiology of diabetes have been brought by transgenic animal models. Gene therapy of human diabetic syndromes may become available, in an undetermined future, particularly under the forms of insulin secreting transgenic "organoïds". Such treatments should be proportionate to the intrinsic severity of the candidate diseases and carefully screened for safety. PMID:8001711

  3. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53). PMID:25549704

  4. Systemic therapy of Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cushing’s disease (CD) in a stricter sense derives from pathologic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion usually triggered by micro- or macroadenoma of the pituitary gland. It is, thus, a form of secondary hypercortisolism. In contrast, Cushing’s syndrome (CS) describes the complexity of clinical consequences triggered by excessive cortisol blood levels over extended periods of time irrespective of their origin. CS is a rare disease according to the European orphan regulation affecting not more than 5/10,000 persons in Europe. CD most commonly affects adults aged 20–50 years with a marked female preponderance (1:5 ratio of male vs. female). Patient presentation and clinical symptoms substantially vary depending on duration and plasma levels of cortisol. In 80% of cases CS is ACTH-dependent and in 20% of cases it is ACTH-independent, respectively. Endogenous CS usually is a result of a pituitary tumor. Clinical manifestation of CS, apart from corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH-), ACTH-, and cortisol-producing (malign and benign) tumors may also be by exogenous glucocorticoid intake. Diagnosis of hypercortisolism (irrespective of its origin) comprises the following: Complete blood count including serum electrolytes, blood sugar etc., urinary free cortisol (UFC) from 24 h-urine sampling and circadian profile of plasma cortisol, plasma ACTH, dehydroepiandrosterone, testosterone itself, and urine steroid profile, Low-Dose-Dexamethasone-Test, High-Dose-Dexamethasone-Test, after endocrine diagnostic tests: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultra-sound, computer tomography (CT) and other localization diagnostics. First-line therapy is trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) of the pituitary adenoma (in case of ACTH-producing tumors). In patients not amenable for surgery radiotherapy remains an option. Pharmacological therapy applies when these two options are not amenable or refused. In cases when pharmacological therapy becomes necessary, Pasireotide should be used

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Risaku

    2016-01-01

    Acute radiation syndrome affects military personnel and civilians following the uncontrolled dispersal of radiation, such as that caused by detonation of nuclear devices and inappropriate medical treatments. Therefore, there is a growing need for medical interventions that facilitate the improved recovery of victims and patients. One promising approach may be cell therapy, which, when appropriately implemented, may facilitate recovery from whole body injuries. This editorial highlights the current knowledge regarding the use of mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the benefits and limitations of which are under investigation. Establishing successful therapies for acute radiation syndrome may require using such a therapeutic approach in addition to conventional approaches. PMID:27182446

  6. Purple toes syndrome associated with warfarin therapy in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, David B; Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2003-05-01

    Purple toes syndrome is an extremely uncommon, nonhemorrhagic, cutaneous complication associated with warfarin therapy. It is characterized by the sudden appearance of bilateral, painful, purple lesions on the toes and sides of the feet that blanch with pressure. The syndrome usually develops 3-8 weeks after the start of warfarin therapy. A 47-year-old man with a history of purple toes syndrome that resolved after discontinuing warfarin--prescribed for a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in his right lower leg--experienced an acute, proximal DVT in his other leg. Warfarin again was prescribed; 1 week later, purple toes syndrome developed in that extremity. Warfarin therapy again was discontinued, and intravenous unfractionated heparin was started; the patient's clinical picture indicated a possible pulmonary embolism, and laboratory analysis suggested antiphospholipid syndrome. The patient's toe pain resolved, but the purple discoloration persisted. Follow-up laboratory analysis confirmed antiphospholipid syndrome, and warfarin was restarted with close monitoring. No further complications occurred with long-term therapy. Although a rare complication of therapy, clinicians should monitor for the development of purple toes syndrome in patients taking warfarin. PMID:12741443

  7. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: neurofibromatosis type 1, neurofibromatosis type 2, and Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary cancer syndromes are well known in the oncology community, typically affecting children, adolescents, and young adults and thereby resulting in great cumulative morbidity and mortality. These syndromes often lag behind their de novo counterparts in the development of approved novel treatment options due to their rarity in the general population. Recent work has allowed the identification of molecular aberrations and associated targeted therapies that may effectively treat these conditions. In this review, we seek to characterize some of the involved aberrations and associated targeted therapies for several germline malignancies, including neurofibromatosis types 1 and 2, and Gorlin syndrome. Though patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may be too rare to effectively include in large clinical trials, by understanding the pathophysiology of these diseases, clinicians can attain insights into the use of targeted therapies in their own practice when treating affected individuals. PMID:25549703

  8. Favre-Racouchot syndrome associated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.J.; Su, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    A 56-year-old woman developed Favre-Racouchot syndrome involving her face and scalp primarily at the sites of x-ray irradiation for therapy of an astrocytoma. The patient had not had comedones prior to radiotherapy and did not have a history of excessive sun exposure. The patient showed an excellent response to topical retinoic acid gel. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of Favre-Racouchot syndrome developing after radiation therapy to be reported in the literature; its pathogenesis is discussed in this paper.

  9. Role of Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Donna-Ann; Maslin, Benjamin; Legler, Aron; Springer, Erin; Asgerally, Abbas; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) for the treatment of chronic pain. This review examines alternative and complimentary therapies, which can be incorporated as part of a biopsychosocial approach in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. In the present investigation, literature from articles indexed on PubMed was evaluated including topics of alternative therapies, complimentary therapies, pain psychology, biofeedback therapy, physical exercise therapies, acupuncture, natural and herbal supplements, whole-body cryotherapy, and smartphone technologies in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. This review highlights the key role of psychology in the treatment of chronic pain. Cognitive behavior therapy appears to be the most impactful while biofeedback therapy has also been shown to be effective for chronic pain. Exercise therapy has been shown to be effective in short-, intermediate-, and long-term pain states. When compared to that in sham controls, acupuncture has shown some benefit for neck pain immediately after the procedure and in the short term and improvement has also been demonstrated in the treatment of headaches. The role of smartphones and whole-body cryotherapy are new modalities and further studies are needed. Recent literature suggests that several alternate therapies could play a role in the treatment of chronic pain, supporting the biopsychosocial model in the treatment of pain states. PMID:27038968

  10. Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome: Weighing in on Therapy Options.

    PubMed

    Piper, Amanda

    2016-03-01

    Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is becoming an increasingly encountered condition both in respiratory outpatient clinics and in hospitalized patients. The health consequences and social disadvantages of obesity hypoventilation syndrome are significant. Unfortunately, the diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy is commonly delayed when the syndrome is not recognized or misdiagnosed. Positive airway pressure therapy remains the mainstay of treatment and is effective in controlling sleep-disordered breathing and improving awake blood gases in the majority of individuals. Evidence supporting one mode of therapy over another is limited. Both continuous and bilevel therapy modes can successfully improve daytime gas exchange, with adherence to therapy an important modifiable factor in the response to treatment. Despite adherence to therapy, these individuals continue to experience excess mortality primarily due to cardiovascular events compared with those with eucapnic sleep apnea using CPAP. This difference likely arises from ongoing systemic inflammation secondary to the morbidly obese state. The need for a comprehensive approach to managing nutrition, weight, and physical activity in addition to reversal of sleep-disordered breathing is now widely recognized. Future studies need to evaluate the impact of a more aggressive and comprehensive treatment plan beyond managing sleep-disordered breathing. The impact of early identification and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing on the development and reversal of cardiometabolic dysfunction also requires further attention. PMID:26292036

  11. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  12. Dance Therapy with Physical Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupont, Blanche Burt; Schulmann, Diana

    This study sought to investigate effects of a dance program on bilateral toe-standing balance and single-point static balance skills of a group of children with Down Syndrome. Thirteen experimental and 10 control group students between the ages of 3 and 13 years were assessed on toe-standing balance and single-point standing balance on the right…

  13. Liposteroid (dexamethasone palmitate) therapy for West syndrome: a comparative study with ACTH therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Asoh, M; Murakami, H; Kamiyama, N; Ohta, C

    1998-05-01

    Dexamethasone palmitate (liposteroid) was used for the treatment of West syndrome and compared with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy. A single intravenous injection of liposteroid (0.25 mg/kg) was administered seven times in 3 months (total dosage = 1.75 mg/kg) to five symptomatic patients with West syndrome, aged 4-11 months. ACTH (0.025 mg/kg/day) was administered intramuscularly for 6 weeks according to the conventional therapy in Japan (total dosage = 0.625 mg/kg) to five symptomatic patients with West syndrome, aged 6-10 months. Nodding spasm and hypsarrhythmia on EEG disappeared in all patients in the liposteroid therapy group within four doses; however, partial seizures and focal spikes on EEG reappeared in three patients 2 months after the end of liposteroid therapy. In the ACTH therapy group, nodding spasm and hypsarrhythmia on EEG similarly disappeared during treatment in all patients, but nodding spasm reappeared 2 months after therapy in two patients and partial seizures reappeared in one patient 3 months after therapy. No notable adverse reactions occurred in the liposteroid group, but transient dysfunction of the thyroid and anterior pituitary gland and increased levels of serum cortisol were experienced in the ACTH group. These results suggest that glucocorticoid incorporated in a lipid emulsion is useful for the treatment of West syndrome. PMID:9650682

  14. Successful therapy of macrophage activation syndrome with dexamethasone palmitate.

    PubMed

    Nakagishi, Yasuo; Shimizu, Masaki; Kasai, Kazuko; Miyoshi, Mari; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potential life-threatening complication of childhood systemic inflammatory disorders. Corticosteroids are commonly used as the first-line therapy for MAS. We report four patients with MAS who were successfully treated with dexamethasone palmitate (DexP), a liposome-incorporated dexamethasone, much more efficient than free corticosteroids. DexP effectively inhibited inflammation in MAS patients in whom the response to pulse methylprednisolone was not sufficient to manage their diseases. DexP was also effective as the first-line therapy for MAS. Based on these findings, DexP is an effective therapy in treating MAS patients. PMID:24754272

  15. Asperger's syndrome: diagnosis, comorbidity and therapy.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, F I; Sahli, Z T; Pleskow, J; Mousa, S A

    2015-03-01

    Asperger's syndrome (AS), a behavioral disorder that is related to autism, is associated with abnormal social functioning and repetitive behaviors but not with a decrease in intelligence or linguistic functionality. This article reviews the clinical diagnosis of AS and discusses the comorbid disorders that may be present with AS, as well as the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pharmacotherapies given to AS patients, as reported in preclinical and clinical studies. AS may be present with several comorbid disorders including: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. The difficulty in distinguishing AS from autism results in treating the comorbid disorder symptoms, rather than treating the symptoms of AS. Accordingly, there is a great need to further understand the psychobiology of AS and its association with other disorders, which should expand the pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic options and improve the quality of life for AS patients. PMID:25655905

  16. Complementary Therapy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, C. I.; Nori, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disease. PCOS afflicts 5 to 10 % of women of reproductive age. The symptoms are: amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, hirsutism, obesity, infertility, chronic hyperandrogenic anovulation and acne. Other risk factors aggravate this condition: insulin resistance, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation and subclinical cardiovascular disease. Anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life are also common. This review highlights the mechanisms and the beneficial effects of acupuncture, exercise and resveratrol on animal models and on humans affected by PCOS. PMID:24809037

  17. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause and the use of laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson-Colas, Juana; Segal, Saya

    2015-12-01

    Genitourinary syndrome of menopause is a common condition that left untreated can progress and negatively affect quality of life and sexual function. Laser therapy has a therapeutic role for several gynecologic conditions and most recently has gained interest as a non-hormonal treatment for genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). The laser is well tolerated and may increase thickness of the squamous epithelium and improve vascularity of the vagina. These morphological changes presumably alleviate symptoms of dryness, dyspareunia, and irritation. However, the duration of therapeutic effects and safety of repeated applications at this point is not clear. Further research is needed in the form of controlled studies of the laser and other non-hormonal GSM therapies. The objective of this paper is to review the existing literature describing laser therapy for GSM. PMID:26323234

  18. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  19. Pathogenesis of Hepatorenal Syndrome: Implications for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Durand, François; Graupera, Isabel; Ginès, Pere; Olson, Jody C; Nadim, Mitra K

    2016-02-01

    Patients with cirrhosis are prone to develop acute kidney injury (AKI) due to a number of causes, including bacterial infections with or without septic shock, hypovolemia, administration of nephrotoxic drugs, and intrinsic kidney diseases, among others. Most importantly, patients with advanced cirrhosis develop a distinctive cause of AKI, characterized by rapidly progressive glomerular filtration rate loss associated with marked disturbances in circulatory function in the absence of obvious pathologic abnormalities in the kidneys, known as hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Decreased kidney function results from intense renal vasoconstriction secondary to the complex circulatory changes of cirrhosis with splanchnic vasodilatation and effective hypovolemia. Beyond activation of vasoactive systems, factors including impaired renal blood flow autoregulation and systemic inflammation may play a role in the development of HRS. Most patients improve with albumin and vasopressors; however, the prognosis of HRS remains very poor. Novel biomarkers may be helpful in distinguishing HRS from other causes of AKI in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:26500178

  20. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome: is there a role for occupational therapy?

    PubMed

    Rubal, Elaine; Iwanenko, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) continues to evolve as a disabling phenomenon characterized by debilitating fatigue and consequential components that limit the functional ability of persons afflicted with the disease. A composite review of the current literature addresses a brief history, etiology, legitimacy, incidence and prevalence, prognosis, diagnosis, impact, and treatment of CFS. The primary focus illustrates available treatment strategies that have been incorporated into occupational therapy practice. As a profession that has made contributions to populations with chronic disease and symptoms similar to those suffering from CFS, the use of effective methods should reinforce the need for occupational therapy intervention with this population. PMID:23927616

  2. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome occurring during continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Shamir; Khademian, Zarir P.; Mistry, Kirtida

    2013-01-01

    The dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is characterized by progressive neurological symptoms and signs attributable to cerebral edema that occurs due to fluid shifts into the brain following a relatively rapid decrease in serum osmolality during hemodialysis (HD). Since continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is less efficient at solute clearance than intermittent HD, it seems logical that this mode of therapy is less likely to cause DDS. This entity has not been previously reported to occur with this modality. Here, we report two cases of DDS associated with CRRT that provide insights into its pathophysiological mechanisms and suggest strategies for its prevention. PMID:26120445

  3. Rituximab therapy in nephrotic syndrome due to AH amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Matsuda, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Daigo; Gono, Takahisa; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with AH amyloidosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic leukemia that has remained in a stable state with a nephrotic syndrome for 17 months since the commencement of cyclic rituximab therapy aimed at suppression of pathogenetic gamma heavy chains. Free light chains in serum and CD20-positive cells in peripheral blood were useful as hematological markers in the patient. Rituximab might be a potent therapeutic option for AH amyloidosis associated with a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:19590993

  4. Le naevus bleu cellulaire atypique du poignet: à propos d'un cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Boussakri, Hassan; Roux, Jean Luc; Durand, Luc; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Le naevus bleu cellulaire atypique est une entité pathologique rare et sa localisation au niveau du poignet est exceptionnelle. Il est Considéré comme une Variante à des caractéristiques intermédiaires entre le naevus bleu cellulaire typique et le naevus bleu malin, dont l’évolution est incertaine. Le but de notre travail est d'attirer l'attention sur cette variété lésionnelle rare et de discuter les diagnostiques différentiels, ainsi que décrire les aspects histologique et les options thérapeutiques possibles. PMID:25426206

  5. Nutritional therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1989-09-01

    Nutritional factors relative to IBS include diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Etiologically, foods do not cause IBS. A small percentage of patients with childhood allergic diatheses, usually in association with atopic dermatitis and asthma, may be intolerant to one or more of wheat, corn, dairy products, coffee, tea, or citrus fruits. Diagnostically, many patients labeled as IBS subjects are in fact intolerant to the ingestion of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, or combinations of fructose and sorbitol. A precise dietary history will characterize this group. Taken in its broadest context, IBS involves the entire hollow tract inclusive of esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The symptomatic presentation relative to the hollow organ involved allows the selection of dietary manipulations that may help to reduce symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux, a consequence of low LES pressure in some IBS patients, may be treated with the elimination of fatty foods, alcohol, chocolate, and peppermint. Delayed gastric emptying may be helped by the elimination of fatty foods and reduction of soluble fiber. Aberrant small bowel motor function may be ameliorated by reduction of lactose, sorbitol, and fructose and the addition of soluble fiber. Gas syndromes may be improved by reduced intake of beans, cabbage, lentils, legumes, apples, grapes, and raisins. Colonic motor dysfunction may be overcome by the gradual addition of combinations of soluble and insoluble fiber-containing foods and supplements. The selective use of activated charcoal and simethicone may be helpful. PMID:2553606

  6. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  7. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wardrope, Katrina E; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction. PMID:27275457

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome following Rituximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wardrope, Katrina E.; Manson, Lynn; Metcalfe, Wendy; Sullivan, Eoin D. O

    2016-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab is associated with rare but significant adverse events, notably posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We report a case of concomitant ARDS and PRES developing after rituximab therapy for treatment of cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis. There are 7 reported cases of PRES complicating rituximab use. PRES onset varied from immediate to 21 days after administration. All patients recovered completely, and rituximab was reintroduced in half of the cases. The occurrence of ARDS in association with rituximab is rarer. Only 3 confirmed cases exist, and ARDS may occur as a delayed reaction.

  9. Iron Chelation Therapy in Thalassemia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cianciulli, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron) the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients. PMID:21415999

  10. The quest for targeted therapy in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Shimriet; Hukema, Renate K; Willemsen, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common, monogenetic cause of intellectual disability and autism-spectrum disorders. Although there is no effective therapy, greater understanding of disturbed neuronal pathways has introduced options for targeted therapy. But whereas many FXS phenotypes were improved in preclinical studies with drugs targeting these pathways in the FXS mouse model, attempts to translate these animal-model success stories into treatment of patients in clinical trials have been extremely disappointing. Complicating factors, particularly in animal studies, include mouse inbred strains, variability in functional studies between laboratories, publication bias and lack of reliable and objective primary outcome measures in both mice and patients. Possibly most important, however, is one factor that has been little explored: the complexity of the molecular imbalance in FXS and the need to simultaneously target several different disturbed pathways and different cellular compartments. New, well-conceived animal studies should generate more productive approaches in the quest for targeted therapy for FXS. PMID:26294013

  11. Restless legs syndrome-current therapies and management of augmentation.

    PubMed

    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Winkelmann, Juliane; Inoue, Yuichi; Paulus, Walter

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS) can severely affect quality of life and disturb sleep, so that pharmacological treatment is necessary, especially for elderly patients. Treatment guidelines recommend initiation of therapy with dopamine agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole or the rotigotine transdermal patch, all approved in most countries) or α-2-δ ligands (gabapentin enacarbil, approved in the USA and Japan), depending on the country and availability. Where approved, opioids (prolonged release oxycodone-naloxone, approved in Europe) are also recommended as a second-line therapy for severe RLS. Several iron formulations can be effective but are not yet approved for RLS therapy, whereas benzodiazepines and other anticonvulsants are not recommended or approved. Less is known about effective management of RLS that is associated with other conditions, such as uraemia or pregnancy. Furthermore, very little data are available on the management of RLS when first-line treatment fails or patients experience augmentation. In this Review, we summarize state-of-the-art therapies for RLS in the context of the diagnostic criteria and available guidelines, based on knowledge ranging from Class I evidence for the treatment of idiopathic RLS to Class IV evidence for the treatment of complications such as augmentation. We consider therapies, including combination therapies, that are used in clinical practice for long-term management of RLS, despite a lack of trials and approval, and highlight the need for practical long-term evaluation of current trials. PMID:26215616

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists. PMID:22457686

  13. Corticosteroid Injections Versus Manual Physical Therapy for Treatment of the Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicine Summaries for Patients Corticosteroid Injections Versus Manual Physical Therapy for Treatment of the Shoulder Impingement Syndrome The ... Outcome of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection Compared With Manual Physical Therapy for the Management of the Unilateral Shoulder Impingement ...

  14. Transcatheter therapy for Lutembacher's syndrome: The road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Ramalingam; Chakraborty, Saujatya; Bagga, Shiv

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with Lutembacher's syndrome underwent balloon mitral valvotomy (BMV) and device closure of the atrial septal defect (ASD). BMV necessitated technical modification of taking the Inoue balloon over the wire (OTW) into the left ventricle (LV). The procedure was complicated by slippage of ASD device into the right atrium, which was managed successfully by percutaneous retrieval, and deployment of a larger device. The case highlights the challenges associated with the seemingly easy transcatheter therapy for this disease entity. PMID:24701084

  15. Application of ozone therapy in the vestibulocochlear syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Silvia; Del Cerro, Alejandro; Alvarez, Tania; Hernández, Francisco

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ozone therapy in the treatment of 50 patients with peripheral vestibulocochlear syndrome. Ozone was injected in the cervical region C2-C3, for 20 sessions. Evaluation criteria was based in the evolution of nystagmus, tinnitus, hearing loss and vertigo. Also, oxidative stress parameters were measured. Results demonstrated that patient improvements, according to vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus and nystagmus, were of 90, 80, 65 and 100%, respectively. These patients were initially under condition of systemic oxidative stress, however, at the end of the study a redox balance was achieved. No side effects were observed. PMID:22963338

  16. Macrophage activation syndrome in the era of biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Grom, Alexei A; Horne, AnnaCarin; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) refers to acute overwhelming inflammation caused by a 'cytokine storm'. Although increasingly recognized as a life-threatening complication of various rheumatic diseases, clinically, MAS is strikingly similar to primary and secondary forms of haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). Not surprisingly, many rheumatologists prefer the term secondary HLH rather than MAS to describe this condition, and efforts to change the nomenclature are in progress. The pathophysiology of MAS remains elusive, but observations in animal models, as well as data on the effects of new anticytokine therapies on rates and clinical presentations of MAS in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), provide clues to the understanding of this perplexing clinical phenomenon. In this Review, we explore the latest available evidence and discuss potential diagnostic challenges in the era of increasing use of biologic therapies. PMID:27009539

  17. Cervical Syndrome – the Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kasumovic, Mersija; Gorcevic, Emir; Gorcevic, Semir; Osmanovic, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The cervical syndrome refers to a set of disorders caused by the changes in the cervical spine and the soft-tissue surrounding it, with pain as the predominant symptom. Sore neck has been a common problem among a large section of today`s population. The factors contributing to this issue include the modern lifestyle, prolonged sitting and incorrect, fixed or constrained working postures. The root of these difficulties is found in the mechanical disorders of the cervical spine structures, poor body posture and jerky body movements. In the Scandinavian countries neck pain is considered to be a public health problem. Methods: The study evaluated 25 patients with an established diagnosis of cervical syndrome. The research was conducted at the PI Institute of Occupational and Sports Medicine of Zenica–Doboj Canton. Each patient received twenty physical therapy treatment sessions. Results and conclusions: The study included 25 patients suffering from the cervical syndrome. The statistical analysis of gender distribution indicated that 36% of the patients were male, while 64% were female. The mean age of study participants was 46.76±4,23. The patients ranged in age from 39 to 54 years, with no statistically significant difference in the mean age of male and female patients, p=0.691. Analysing the types of occupational activities performed by the patients, the study found a positive relation between neck pain and prolonged sitting at work. The patients who performed office work made up 76% of the total number. Each method of physical therapy applied in the treatment of neck pain patients proved useful. However, the combination of electrotherapy, kinesiotherapy and manual massage proved to be most effective. Conclusion: The cervical syndrome is a common medical condition primarily affecting adult population, with prevalence being higher among women and office workers. The condition places a considerable socioeconomic burden on the afflicted

  18. Children with Down Syndrome Improved in Motor Functioning and Muscle Tone Following Massage Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Field, Tiffany; Largie, Shay; Mora, Dana; Bornstein, Joan; Waldman, Ronnie

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-one moderate to high functioning young children (mean age, two years) with Down syndrome receiving early intervention (physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy) were randomly assigned to additionally receive two 0.5-hour massage therapy or reading sessions (control group) per week for two months. On the first and last day…

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome: diet and complementary medicine therapies?].

    PubMed

    Gerkens, A

    2012-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent and invalidating functional bowel disorder with entangled mechanisms. Its therapeutic approach is therefore complex. Classical therapies, prescribed alone or in combination in light of the predominant symptom, consist of antispasmodics, fibers, laxatives, antidiarrheals, and psychotropic agents. Other emerging pharmacological therapies, such as prokinetics, prosecretory or serotoninergic agents, bile acid modulators and antibiotics have been recently studied in clinical trials. Dietary measures can include reduction of short-chain poorly absorbed carbohydrates (FODMAPs) and gluten restriction. Assessment of food allergy can be proposed in a subgroup of IBS patients. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies, that are generally low cost and safe, appear to be appreciated by patients. Probiotics have demonstrated action on the gut microbiote modulation, and may be helpful in a subset of patients. Peppermint oil has an established visceral analgesic effect. Hypnotherapy represents an original, global and effective approach. Finally, education, reassurance and listening to the patient, leading to a solid therapeutic relationship, represents an essential backdrop of remedy or diet effectiveness. PMID:23091952

  20. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome; gut microbiota and probiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Tojo González, Rafael; Suarez Gonzalez, Adolfo; Rúas Madiedo, Patricia; Mancebo Mata, Alejo; Pipa Muñiz, María; Barreiro Alonso, Eva; Roman Llorente, Francisco Javier; Moro Villar, María Carmen; Arce González, Marta María; Villegas Diaz, María Francisca; Mosquera Sierra, Eugenia; Ruiz Ruiz, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. This common disorder is managed by varying clinical styles as no dominant therapeutic strategy has emerged. The pathophysiology of IBS remains unknown, but several lines of evidence link this disorder with the gut microbiota. Although controversy exists, gut microbiota is likely contributing to symptoms of IBS, at least in some patients, through an altered fermentation process, an impaired intestinal barrier function, a harmful modulation of enteric sensorimotor function, a promotion of low-grade inflammation without tissue damage, and a harmful modulation of the brain-gut axis. Probiotic therapy has a modest effect on IBS symptomatic relief, but the actual evidence is not strong enough to support a general recommendation of use. The best results are achieved, in children, with Lactobacillus rhamnusus GG, which moderately improves abdominal pain, while in adults the benefit appears to be greatest employing Bifidobacterium species. PMID:25659060

  1. [Multimodal therapy concepts for failed back surgery syndrome].

    PubMed

    Casser, Hans-Raimund

    2016-09-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a frequent complication (15-40 %) of lumbar disc surgery and is rarely successfully treated by surgery with the exception of a re-prolapse associated with radicular pain. Multimodal pain treatment, however, is indicated by a lack of pathoanatomical correlates, unclear cause and psychosocial risk factors.This review describes a standardized non-operative treatment starting with broad interdisciplinary clarification by medical, psychological and physiotherapeutic means (assessment).If the conditions for multimodal pain therapy are met, the OPS 8‑918-procedure can be applied to avoid chronic developing pain. In doing so, the already issued quality standards and guidelines for documentation should be respected. PMID:27514828

  2. More is better: combination therapies for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ornstein, Moshe C; Mukherjee, Sudipto; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2015-03-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous collection of clonal hematopoietic malignancies that exist as a subgroup of the myeloid neoplasms as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). They are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, subsequent cytopenias, transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and poor overall survival. There are currently three FDA-approved medications for MDS; lenalidomide, azacitidine, and decitabine. The role of these agents is to diminish the clinical impact of MDS and delay its progression to AML. However, despite known results with these monotherapies, recent clinical trials with a variety of combinations for MDS have demonstrated promising results. These trials include combinations of hypomethylating agents, histone deacetylase inhibitors, growth factors, and chemotherapy among others. In this paper we review the current literature on combination therapies in MDS, analyze on-going and concluded trials, and suggest future possibilities for combination strategies in MDS. PMID:25659727

  3. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with biologic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Malika; Jafri, Kashif; Sharim, Rebecca; Silverman, Susanna; Sindher, Sayantani B; Shahane, Anupama; Kwan, Mildred

    2015-02-01

    The use of biologics in the treatment of autoimmune disease, cancer, and other immune conditions has revolutionized medical care in these areas. However, there are drawbacks to the use of these medications including increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. One unforeseen risk once opportunistic infection has occurred with biologic use is the onset of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) upon drug withdrawal. Although originally described in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, it has become clear that IRIS may occur when recovery of immune function follows opportunistic infection in the setting of previous immune compromise/suppression. In this review, we draw attention to this potential pitfall on the use of biologic drugs. PMID:25504263

  4. Testosterone Supplementation Therapy in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clinical complex of risk factors including increased waist circumference, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and insulin resistance whose presence increases the likelihood of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With a quarter of the American adult population affected, MetS has been referred to as the most significant public health threat of the 21st century. While lifestyle modification and weight loss are recommended, no specific pharmacological treatment is known. Given that low levels of testosterone have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MetS and an inverse relationship exists between circulating testosterone and the development of MetS, it is tempting to speculate that men with MetS may benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). As such, this review seeks to examine the role of testosterone and the use of TST as a treatment modality in men with MetS. PMID:25387223

  5. Stroke-like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qian; Yang, Li; Tan, Li-Ming; Qin, Li-Xia; Wang, Chun-Yu; Zhang, Hai-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, neuroimaging, treatment, and outcome of stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome, and to propose diagnostic criteria for this disorder. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for articles in English published from 1995 to 2015 using the terms of “stroke-like AND migraine AND radiation.” Reference lists of the identified articles and reviews were used to retrieve additional articles. Study Selection: Data and articles related to late-onset effects of cerebral radiation were selected and reviewed. Results: SMART is a rare condition that involves complex migraines with focal neurologic deficits following cranial irradiation for central nervous system malignancies. The recovery, which ranges from hours to days to weeks, can be partial or complete. We propose the following diagnostic criteria for SMART: (1) Remote history of therapeutic external beam cranial irradiation for malignancy; (2) prolonged, reversible clinical manifestations mostly years after irradiation, which may include migraine, seizures, hemiparesis, hemisensory deficits, visuospatial defect, aphasia, confusion and so on; (3) reversible, transient, unilateral cortical gadolinium enhancement correlative abnormal T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal of the affected cerebral region; (4) eventual complete or partial recovery, the length of duration of recovery ranging from hours to days to weeks; (5) no evidence of residual or recurrent tumor; (6) not attributable to another disease. To date, no specific treatment has been identified for this syndrome. Conclusions: SMART is an extremely rare delayed complication of brain irradiation. However, improvements in cancer survival rates have resulted in a rise in its frequency. Hence, awareness and recognition of the syndrome is important to make a rapid diagnosis and avoid aggressive interventions such as brain biopsy and cerebral angiography. PMID

  6. [Treatment of nephrotic syndrome: immuno- or rather podocyte therapy?].

    PubMed

    Lewko, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a group of clinical symptoms resulting from massive proteinuria caused by impairment of the glomerular filtration barrier. The filtration barrier comprises glomerular basement membrane with endothelial cells lining its inner side and a podocyte monolayer covering its outer aspect. As well as forming part of the glomerular filter, podocytes also regulate synthesis of other components of the filtration barrier. Therefore, integrity of these cells is crucial for maintaining the normal ultrafiltration function. The pathogenesis of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) was proposed to be associated with autoimmunity and appearance in the circulation of a still unknown protein permeability factor (PF) inducing changes in the glomerular filtration barrier. Several candidate PFs have been identified to date, and current results indicate that podocytes are target cells for all of them. Changes in podocyte structure and functions induced by these factors are typical for changes observed in patients with nephrotic proteinuria. Most pharmacotherapeutic approaches in NS are based on various immunosuppressive agents and are targeted toward minimizing proteinuria. It appears, however, that these drugs not only target the cells of the immune system but also act directly on podocytes. Thus, it can be concluded that detailed studies on mechanisms regulating podocyte functions as well as designing drugs to protect these cells are required for effective therapy of NS. PMID:27180964

  7. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  8. Metabolic Syndromes Associated with HIV: Mitigating the Side Effects of Drug Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer, William W.; Sattler, Fred R.

    2001-01-01

    HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) are associated with such metabolic disorders as AIDS wasting syndrome, metabolic dysregulation, and abnormalities of serum lipids. Adjunctive therapies (e.g., diet and antilipid therapy); risk factor modification (e.g., smoking cessation and blood pressure control); aerobic exercise;…

  9. New Receptor Targets for Medical Therapy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite setbacks to the approval of new medications for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, interim guidelines on endpoints for IBS trials have enhanced interest as new targets for medical therapy are proposed based on novel mechanisms or chemical entities. Aim To review the approved lubiprostone, two targets that are not meeting expectations (tachykinins and corticotrophin-releasing hormone), the efficacy and safety of new 5-HT4 agonists, intestinal secretagogues (chloride channel activators, and guanylate cyclase-C agonists), bile acid modulation, anti-inflammatory agents and visceral analgesics. Methods Review of selected articles based on PubMed search and clinically relevant information on mechanism of action, safety, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy Conclusions The spectrum of peripheral targets of medical therapy address chiefly the bowel dysfunction of IBS, and these effects are associated with pain relief. There are less clear targets related to the abdominal pain or visceral sensation in IBS. The new 5-HT4 agonists are more specific than older agents, and show cardiovascular safety to date. Secretory agents have high specificity, low bioavailability, and efficacy. The potential risks of agents “borrowed” from other indications (like hyperlipidemia, inflammatory bowel disease or somatic pain) deserve further study. There is reason for optimism in medical treatment of IBS. PMID:19785622

  10. Novel nutraceutic therapies for the treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Méndez-Del Villar, Miriam; Pérez-Rubio, Karina G; Zuñiga, Laura Y; Cortez-Navarrete, Marisol; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Alejandra; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-04-10

    Nutraceutic therapies such as berberine, bitter melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Irvingia gabonensis, resveratrol and ursolic acid have been shown to help control metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effect of berberine on glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension, obesity and MetS has been evaluated in animal models and humans. Most clinical trials involving bitter melon have been conducted to evaluate its effect on glucose metabolism; nevertheless, some studies have reported favorable effects on lipids and blood pressure although there is little information about its effect on body weight. Gymnema sylvestre helps to decrease body weight and blood sugar levels; however, there is limited information on dyslipidemia and hypertension. Clinical trials of Irvingia gabonensis have shown important effects decreasing glucose and cholesterol concentrations as well decreasing body weight. Resveratrol acts through different mechanisms to decrease blood pressure, lipids, glucose and weight, showing its effects on the population with MetS. Finally, there is evidence of positive effects with ursolic acid in in vitro and in vivo studies on glucose and lipid metabolism and on body weight and visceral fat. Therefore, a review of the beneficial effects and limitations of the above-mentioned nutraceutic therapies is presented. PMID:27076875

  11. Novel nutraceutic therapies for the treatment of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Méndez-del Villar, Miriam; Pérez-Rubio, Karina G; Zuñiga, Laura Y; Cortez-Navarrete, Marisol; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Alejandra; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Nutraceutic therapies such as berberine, bitter melon, Gymnema sylvestre, Irvingia gabonensis, resveratrol and ursolic acid have been shown to help control metabolic syndrome (MetS). The effect of berberine on glucose and lipid metabolism, hypertension, obesity and MetS has been evaluated in animal models and humans. Most clinical trials involving bitter melon have been conducted to evaluate its effect on glucose metabolism; nevertheless, some studies have reported favorable effects on lipids and blood pressure although there is little information about its effect on body weight. Gymnema sylvestre helps to decrease body weight and blood sugar levels; however, there is limited information on dyslipidemia and hypertension. Clinical trials of Irvingia gabonensis have shown important effects decreasing glucose and cholesterol concentrations as well decreasing body weight. Resveratrol acts through different mechanisms to decrease blood pressure, lipids, glucose and weight, showing its effects on the population with MetS. Finally, there is evidence of positive effects with ursolic acid in in vitro and in vivo studies on glucose and lipid metabolism and on body weight and visceral fat. Therefore, a review of the beneficial effects and limitations of the above-mentioned nutraceutic therapies is presented. PMID:27076875

  12. Physical Therapy and Infants with Down's Syndrome: The Effects of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Susan R.

    1981-01-01

    The neuromotor development of Down's syndrome (DS) infants is reviewed, current physical therapy approaches are cited, a neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT) approach is described, and a study on the effects of NDT on motor performance in DS infants is reported. (SB)

  13. Iatrogenic diabetes mellitus during ACTH therapy in an infant with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Bottazzi, Andrea; Tzialla, Chrissoula; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Larizza, Daniela

    2011-12-01

    West syndrome is a rare epileptic disease of infancy, typified by an association of characteristic spasms, hypsarrhythmia on electroencephalography and severe psychomotor retardation or deterioration. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is the current first-line therapy for West syndrome despite the fact that ACTH therapy is associated with various adverse effects. We describe a rare case of iatrogenic diabetes mellitus during ACTH therapy in a patient with symptomatic West syndrome. The infant had cushingoid facies, hirsutism and biochemical evidence of diabetes due to excessive glucocorticoid production with hyperplasia of both adrenal glands at ultrasound examination, without mineralocorticoid excess; in addition, he presented also short-term weight gain, marked electrolyte disturbances, hypokalemic alkalosis and infections. When ACTH is used to treat patients with West syndrome, it is necessary to follow glycemic levels until to the end of therapy. PMID:21253781

  14. Regression of Sweet's syndrome associated with Crohn's disease after anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rahier, J F; Lion, L; Dewit, O; Lambert, M

    2005-01-01

    The association of inflammatory bowel disease and acute febrile neutrophilic dermatitis (Sweet's syndrome) has infrequently been reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with ileo- anal Crohn's disease who presented simultaneously an erythema nodosum and a Sweet's syndrome. A dramatic regression of the cutaneous lesions was observed after infliximab treatment, indicating that this therapy might be useful for both Crohn's disease and Sweet's syndrome. PMID:16268426

  15. [Interference therapy and radon baths in the combined treatment of patients with reflex cervicobrachial syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, F E; Semenistaia, S V

    1998-01-01

    Patients with cervicobrachialgic syndromes on interference therapy, exercise treatment, massage of the cervical collar region received balneotherapy. 42 of them took water baths, 39 took dry air radon baths. These complexes proved effective in cervicobrachialgic syndromes, the effect being slightly dependent on the clinical symptoms of the disease. PMID:9987978

  16. Timing of therapies for Down syndrome: the sooner, the better

    PubMed Central

    Stagni, Fiorenza; Giacomini, Andrea; Guidi, Sandra; Ciani, Elisabetta; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is the unavoidable hallmark of Down syndrome (DS), with a heavy impact on public health. Accumulating evidence shows that DS is characterized by numerous neurodevelopmental alterations among which the reduction of neurogenesis, dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations appear to play a particularly prominent role. Although the mechanisms whereby gene triplication impairs brain development in DS have not been fully clarified, it is theoretically possible to correct trisomy-dependent defects with targeted pharmacotherapies. This review summarizes what we know about the effects of pharmacotherapies during different life stages in mouse models of DS. Since brain alterations in DS start to be present prenatally, the prenatal period represents an optimum window of opportunity for therapeutic interventions. Importantly, recent studies clearly show that treatment during the prenatal period can rescue overall brain development and behavior and that this effect outlasts treatment cessation. Although late therapies are unlikely to exert drastic changes in the brain, they may have an impact on the hippocampus, a brain region where neurogenesis continues throughout life. Indeed, treatment at adult life stages improves or even rescues hippocampal neurogenesis and connectivity and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, although the duration of these effects still remains, in the majority of cases, a matter of investigation. The exciting discovery that trisomy-linked brain abnormalities can be prevented with early interventions gives us reason to believe that treatments during pregnancy may rescue brain development in fetuses with DS. For this reason we deem it extremely important to expedite the discovery of additional therapies practicable in humans in order to identify the best treatment/s in terms of efficacy and paucity of side effects. Prompt achievement of this goal is the big challenge for the scientific community of researchers

  17. Cognitive behavior therapy for night eating syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Allison, Kelly C; Lundgren, Jennifer D; Moore, Reneé H; O'Reardon, John P; Stunkard, Albert J

    2010-01-01

    Because no studies of psychotherapy treatments for night eating syndrome (NES) have been published, we conducted a pilot study of a 10-session cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for NES. Twenty-five patients (19 female, 6 male) were screened and comprehensively assessed before being enrolled. At each visit, patients completed the Night Eating Symptom Scale (NESS), were weighed, and number of awakenings and the number of nocturnal ingestions and daily caloric intake were calculated from weekly food and sleep records. Mixed model regression analyses [of the data] showed significant decreases in caloric intake after dinner (35.0% to 24.9%); number of nocturnal ingestions (8.7 to 2.6 per week); weight (82.5 to 79.4 kg); and NESS score (28.7 to 16.3; all p values <0.0001). Number of awakenings per week, depressed mood, and quality of life also improved significantly (p values <.02). This first clinical trial of CBT for NES shows significant improvements in the core aspects of NES and weight reduction, suggesting the need for a controlled treatment trial. PMID:20405767

  18. Complementary/alternative therapies for premenstrual syndrome: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Ernst, E

    2001-07-01

    Complementary/alternative therapies are popular with women who have premenstrual syndrome. This systematic review was designed to determine whether use of such therapies is supported by evidence of effectiveness from rigorous clinical trials. Trials were located through searching 7 databases and checking the reference lists of articles. Randomized controlled trials investigating a complementary/alternative therapy in women with premenstrual syndrome published in the peer-reviewed literature were included in the review. Twenty-seven trials were included investigating herbal medicine (7 trials), homeopathy (1), dietary supplements (13), relaxation (1), massage (1), reflexology (1) chiropractic (1), and biofeedback (2). Despite some positive findings, the evidence was not compelling for any of these therapies, with most trials suffering from various methodological limitations. On the basis of current evidence, no complementary/alternative therapy can be recommended as a treatment for premenstrual syndrome. PMID:11483933

  19. Targeted therapy for genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2015-02-01

    With the advent of genomics-based treatment in recent years, the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of various malignancies has increased exponentially. Though much data is available regarding the efficacy of targeted therapies for common malignancies, genetic cancer syndromes remain a somewhat unexplored topic with comparatively less published literature. This review seeks to characterize targeted therapy options for the following genetic cancer syndromes: Fanconi anemia, inherited medullary thyroid cancer, tuberous sclerosis, and RASopathies. By understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as available molecularly targeted therapies, oncologists, in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counsellors, can begin to develop effective clinical management options and therapy regimens for the patients with these genetic syndromes that they may encounter in their practice. PMID:25725224

  20. Photodynamic therapy for diffuse choroidal hemangioma in a child with Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Ryan; Lee, Lawrence; Kwan, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder involving the leptomeninges, skin of the face, and, in 40% of cases, diffuse choroidal hemangioma. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with Sturge-Weber syndrome and a large diffuse choroidal hemangioma with retinal detachment involving the majority of the retina. The patient underwent photodynamic therapy. The retinal detachment resolved completely within 3 months of treatment. This case represents the youngest patient in the literature to undergo successful treatment with photodynamic therapy for Sturge-Weber syndrome-associated diffuse choroidal hemangioma. PMID:25828818

  1. Endovascular Therapy Is Effective for Leriche Syndrome with Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Tasuku; Shiode, Nobuo; Kawase, Tomoharu; Tamekiyo, Hiromichi; Otsuka, Masaya; Okimoto, Tomokazu; Hayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented to our hospital due to intermittent claudication and swelling in his left leg. He had Leriche syndrome and deep vein thrombosis. We performed endovascular therapy (EVT) for Leriche syndrome, and a temporary filter was inserted in the inferior vena cava. He received anticoagulation therapy for deep vein thrombosis. The stenotic lesion in the terminal aorta was stented with an excellent postprocedural angiographic result and dramatic clinical improvement after EVT. This case suggests that EVT can be a treatment for Leriche syndrome. PMID:26064695

  2. Metabolic syndrome-related hepatocellular carcinoma treated by volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Klein, J; Dawson, L A; Tran, T H; Adeyi, O; Purdie, T; Sherman, M; Brade, A

    2014-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (hcc) is a leading cause of cancer mortality, and its incidence is increasing in developed countries. Risk factors include cirrhosis from viral hepatitis or alcohol abuse. Metabolic syndrome is a newly recognized, but important, risk factor that is likely contributing to the increased incidence of hcc. Surgery is the therapy of choice for hcc, but local therapies are often contraindicated, usually because of advanced disease or comorbid conditions such as cardiac disease (which is associated with metabolic syndrome). Current radiation therapy techniques such as stereotactic body radiotherapy allow for treatment plans that highly conform to the target and provide excellent sparing of normal structures. Radiation therapy is emerging as a viable option in patients not eligible for surgery or other locoregional therapies. Here, we report a case of a large hcc presenting in a patient with metabolic syndrome without significant alcohol history or biochemical liver dysfunction. The patient was not a candidate for locoregional therapies because of cardiac and renal comorbidities typical of patients experiencing the long-term sequelae of metabolic syndrome. Treatment using an arc-based volumetric-modulated arc therapy technique allowed for the highest dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumour while the peripheral radiation dose was minimized. A complete local response was confirmed by computed tomography imaging 21 months after treatment completion. PMID:24764717

  3. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  4. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  5. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Women: Can Therapy Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Susan G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents current research on chronic fatigue syndrome, which currently afflicts mostly females between ages of 25 and 55. Notes that, because depression is common symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome, mental health practitioners are often involved with victims and must formulate appropriate treatment strategy that considers physiological,…

  6. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  7. Direct acting antiviral therapy is curative for chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahebjam, Farhad; Hajdu, Cristina H; Nortey, Esther; Sigal, Samuel H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena are common in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Management of chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis syndrome has until recently been problematic due to the adverse effects of interferon on autoimmune processes and immunosuppression on viral replication. In this report we describe 3 patients with chronic hepatitis C/autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome who responded rapidly to direct acting anti-viral therapy. The resolution of the autoimmune process supports a direct viral role in its pathophysiology. PMID:27190580

  8. [Foetal therapy for Down syndrome: a pro-active ethical reflection].

    PubMed

    de Wert, G M W R; Dondorp, W J

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal screening for Down syndrome has to date focused on facilitating the informed choice to continue or not with a pregnancy. The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) for Down syndrome does potentially offer the option to apply foetal neurocognitive therapy for Down syndrome (FTDS). Current research in animal models looks promising and therefore a proactive ethical reflection in relation to clinical trials is urgently needed. This discussion includes an exploration of the ethical aspects of FTDS. There seem to be no convincing a priori objections on the basis of the social model of disability. Arguments in terms of (respect for) autonomy, wellbeing and justice seem to in principle support such therapy. Still, both the conditions for sound clinical trials and the implications of possible effective therapy for current prenatal screening need further scrutiny. PMID:27334087

  9. [Evidence-based therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is recognized as the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The heterogeneous endocrinopathy is characterized by clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhoea, anovulatory infertility, and polycystic ovarian morphology. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The symptoms and complaint of the patients vary with age. To maximise health gain of the syndrome, adequate, evidence based effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by studies, meta-analysis and systematic reviews about the therapeutical possibilities for treating obesity, hyperandrogenism, menstrual abnormalities, infertility and psychological problems related to polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:26551444

  10. Speech & Language Therapy for Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Better Speech for Children with Down Syndrome Blueberry Shoes Productions. (2005) Try Reading Again: How to ... Did You Say? A Guide to Speech Intelligibility. Blueberry Shoes Productions. (2006) Resources New & Expectant Parents Where ...

  11. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: Risk Factors, Diagnosis, and Current Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luckianow, Gina M.; Ellis, Matthew; Governale, Deborah; Kaplan, Lewis J.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome's manifestations are difficult to definitively detect on physical examination alone. Therefore, objective criteria have been articulated that aid the bedside clinician in detecting intra-abdominal hypertension as well as the abdominal compartment syndrome to initiate prompt and potentially life-saving intervention. At-risk patient populations should be routinely monitored and tiered interventions should be undertaken as a team approach to management. PMID:22720147

  12. The Metabolic Syndrome and Mind-Body Therapies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joel G.; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome, affecting a substantial and increasing percentage of the worldwide population, is comprised of a cluster of symptoms associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other chronic conditions. Mind-body modalities based on Eastern philosophy, such as yoga, tai chi, qigong, and meditation, have become increasingly popular worldwide. These complementary therapies have many reported benefits for improving symptoms and physiological measures associated with the metabolic syndrome. However, clinical trial data concerning the effectiveness of these practices on the syndrome as a whole have not been evaluated using a systematic and synthesizing approach. A systematic review was conducted to critically evaluate the data from clinical trials examining the efficacy of mind-body therapies as supportive care modalities for management of the metabolic syndrome. Three clinical trials addressing the use of mind-body therapies for management of the metabolic syndrome were identified. Findings from the studies reviewed support the potential clinical effectiveness of mind-body practices in improving indices of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:21773016

  13. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological diseases: genes, syndromes, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Urdinguio, Rocio G; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and modifications to histone proteins regulate high-order DNA structure and gene expression. Aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of many diseases, including cancer. The neurological disorder most intensely studied with regard to epigenetic changes is Rett syndrome; patients with Rett syndrome have neurodevelopmental defects associated with mutations in MeCP2, which encodes the methyl CpG binding protein 2, that binds to methylated DNA. Other mental retardation disorders are also linked to the disruption of genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms; such disorders include alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, and Coffin-Lowry syndrome. Moreover, aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification profiles of discrete DNA sequences, and those at a genome-wide level, have just begun to be described for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, and in other neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this Review, we describe epigenetic changes present in neurological diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:19833297

  14. [The role of horse-therapy in improvement of children with Down syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klimberg, Aneta

    2002-01-01

    Many years of experience in horse-therapy show that this is the efficient method of rehabilitation of disabled children, also with Down syndrome. This method improves not only proficiency, but also mental sphere and social functions of children. 3 cases of children with Down syndrome in age 7-8 years rehabilitated by horse-therapy, and other methods (physical exercises, swimming, talking exercises) through 1-3 year have been described. In every case adding horse-therapy to other methods of rehabilitation gave measurable advantages both in physical sphere and also in mental and social spheres. In parents' opinion disabled children are highly motivated to take part in the classes of horse-therapy. It should be emphasized that in every described case we have seen high involvement of parents in rehabilitation process. PMID:17474591

  15. Cotard's syndrome with schizophreniform disorder can be successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Caliyurt, Okan; Vardar, Erdal; Tuglu, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Cotard's syndrome associated with psychotic symptoms. A 27-year-old man was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of schizophreniform disorder. His presenting symptoms, which had started 1 month before hospital admission, were somatic delusions of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular malfunction and the absence of a stomach, which resulted in a decrease in weight from 75 kg to 63 kg in 1 month. Cranial computed tomographic images showed dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed central atrophy and lateral ventricle dilatation. Single- photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left temporal, left frontal and left parietal hypoperfusion. The patient did not respond to antipsychotic therapies, but he was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy. This report emphasizes that Cotard's syndrome may be accompanied by lesions of the left hemisphere and that electroconvulsive therapy could be the first-line therapy in such patients with psychotic disorder. PMID:15069468

  16. Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome After Topical Steroid Therapy for Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Sahıp, Birsen; Celık, Mehmet; Ayturk, Semra; Kucukarda, Ahmet; Mert, Onur; Dıncer, Nejla; Guldıken, Sıbel; Tugrul, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used for the treatment of many diseases, such as inflammatory, allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. They can be used in the form of topical, oral, inhalable, rectal, and intra-articular agents. Many topical steroid-related iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome cases affecting especially children have been reported in the literature. Topical steroid-related Cushing's syndrome is rarely seen in adults. In this report, we present the case of a 32-year-old male patient with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome related to long-term clobetasol propionate treatment for psoriasis. In the context of such treatment, the glucocorticoid withdrawal problem has to be overcome. At present there is no consensus on steroid withdrawal. Patients on long-term glucocorticoid treatment must be evaluated for potential adverse effects and withdrawal symptoms by their physician and their endocrinologist. PMID:26955131

  17. Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome After Topical Steroid Therapy for Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sahıp, Birsen; Celık, Mehmet; Ayturk, Semra; Kucukarda, Ahmet; Mert, Onur; Dıncer, Nejla; Guldıken, Sıbel; Tugrul, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are used for the treatment of many diseases, such as inflammatory, allergic, autoimmune, and neoplastic diseases. They can be used in the form of topical, oral, inhalable, rectal, and intra-articular agents. Many topical steroid-related iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome cases affecting especially children have been reported in the literature. Topical steroid-related Cushing's syndrome is rarely seen in adults. In this report, we present the case of a 32-year-old male patient with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome related to long-term clobetasol propionate treatment for psoriasis. In the context of such treatment, the glucocorticoid withdrawal problem has to be overcome. At present there is no consensus on steroid withdrawal. Patients on long-term glucocorticoid treatment must be evaluated for potential adverse effects and withdrawal symptoms by their physician and their endocrinologist. PMID:26955131

  18. [Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Associated with Cancer Therapy].

    PubMed

    Mitsuya, Koichi; Nakasu, Yoko; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Yasui, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Takashi; Kuji, Shiho; Onozawa, Yusuke; Endo, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome(PRES)is a subacute neurological syndrome typically manifesting with headache, cortical blindness, and seizures. This syndrome is associated with risk factors such as malignant hypertension, eclampsia, and renal failure. Numerous case reports depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The direct causal mechanisms of PRES in cancer patients have not yet been identified. Cytotoxic chemotherapy may cause direct endothelial damage, which would impact the blood brain barrier. Angiogenesis inhibitors also cause elevation in blood pressure;this is significant, because PRES onset may be solely related to hypertension. An increased number of case reports involving new molecular targeted agent suggests that incidence of PRES as an oncological emergency may increase in the future. PMID:26965062

  19. Outcomes of Male Patients with Alport Syndrome Undergoing Renal Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Temme, Johanna; Kramer, Anneke; Jager, Kitty J.; Lange, Katharina; Peters, Frederick; Müller, Gerhard-Anton; Kramar, Reinhard; Heaf, James G.; Finne, Patrik; Palsson, Runolfur; Reisæter, Anna V.; Hoitsma, Andries J.; Metcalfe, Wendy; Postorino, Maurizio; Zurriaga, Oscar; Santos, Julio P.; Ravani, Pietro; Jarraya, Faical; Verrina, Enrico; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Patients with the hereditary disease Alport syndrome commonly require renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the second or third decade of life. This study compared age at onset of RRT, renal allograft, and patient survival in men with Alport syndrome receiving various forms of RRT (peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis, or transplantation) with those of men with other renal diseases. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients with Alport syndrome receiving RRT identified from 14 registries in Europe were matched to patients with other renal diseases. A linear spline model was used to detect changes in the age at start of RRT over time. Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to examine patient and graft survival. Results Age at start of RRT among patients with Alport syndrome remained stable during the 1990s but increased by 6 years between 2000–2004 and 2005–2009. Survival of patients with Alport syndrome requiring dialysis or transplantation did not change between 1990 and 2009. However, patients with Alport syndrome had better renal graft and patient survival than matched controls. Numbers of living-donor transplantations were lower in patients with Alport syndrome than in matched controls. Conclusions These data suggest that kidney failure in patients with Alport syndrome is now being delayed compared with previous decades. These patients appear to have superior patient survival while undergoing dialysis and superior patient and graft survival after deceased-donor kidney transplantation compared with patients receiving RRT because of other causes of kidney failure. PMID:22997344

  20. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  1. [Hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome. Successful therapy with intravenous immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Staubach-Renz, P; von Stebut, E; Bräuninger, W; Maurer, M; Steinbrink, K

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases can initially present as chronic urticaria. We describe the course of a patient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome (HUVS) as well as his successful treatment with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG). HUVS was diagnosed clinically and confirmed by histology and laboratory studies. After only one cycle with IVIG (2 g/kg) all HUVS symptoms were significantly decreased. PMID:17453168

  2. Music Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome: Perceptions of Caregivers in a Special School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pienaar, Dorothea

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a genetic disorder resulting from chromosome 21 having three copies (trisomy 21). Cognitive functioning and anatomical features cause speech and language development delay (Kumin, 2003). Children with DS generally enjoy communication (Schoenbrodt, 2004), and respond well to interaction and social scripts. Music therapy has…

  3. Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in a Mental Health Center: A Benchmarking Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheeres, Korine; Wensing, Michel; Knoop, Hans; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the success of implementing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in a representative clinical practice setting and compared the patient outcomes with those of previously published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of CBT for CFS. Method: The implementation interventions were the…

  4. Successful Treatment of Olfactory Reference Syndrome with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Pichora, Andrea L.; Antony, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) is characterized by a preoccupation with the belief that one's body emits a foul odor. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was used to treat a woman in her 50s who presented in our outpatient anxiety disorders specialty clinic with ORS, accompanied by embarrassment, shame, distress, avoidance behavior, and social…

  5. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Relatively Active and for Passive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazelmans, Ellen; Prins, Judith; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2006-01-01

    In chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), facilitating, initiating, and perpetuating factors are distinguished. Although somatic factors might have initiated symptoms in CFS, they do not explain the persistence of fatigue. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for CFS focuses on factors that perpetuate and prolong symptoms. Recently it has been shown that,…

  6. Increase in Prefrontal Cortical Volume following Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Floris P.; Koers, Anda; Kalkman, Joke S.; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Hagoort, Peter; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Toni, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disabling disorder, characterized by persistent or relapsing fatigue. Recent studies have detected a decrease in cortical grey matter volume in patients with CFS, but it is unclear whether this cerebral atrophy constitutes a cause or a consequence of the disease. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an…

  7. Primary therapy for small cell lung cancer reversing the Eaton-Lambert syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kalter, S.; Dhingra, H.M.; Farha, P.

    1985-02-01

    A case report is presented of a patient with small cell carcinoma of the lung associated with the classic Eaton-Lambert syndrome. He received intermittent anticholinesterase therapy, with minimal improvement. Combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy for the primary neoplasm produced considerable improvement, with normal EMG findings after complete remission was achieved. 7 references, 1 table.

  8. Unusual case of recurrent SMART (stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Ramnath Santosh; Sreedher, Gayathri; Malhotra, Konark; Guduru, Zain; Agarwal, Deeksha; Flaherty, Mary; Leichliter, Timothy; Rana, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare delayed complication of cerebral radiation therapy. A 53-year-old female initially presented with headache, confusion and left homonymous hemianopia. Her medical history was notable for cerebellar hemangioblastoma, which was treated with radiation in 1987. Her initial brain MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) revealed cortical enhancement in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. She improved spontaneously in 2 weeks and follow-up scan at 4 weeks revealed no residual enhancement or encephalomalacia. She presented 6 weeks later with aphasia. Her MRI brain revealed similar contrast-enhancing cortical lesion but on the left side. Repeat CSF studies was again negative other than elevated protein. She was treated conservatively and recovered completely within a week. Before diagnosing SMART syndrome, it is important to rule out tumor recurrence, encephalitis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and stroke. Typically the condition is self-limiting, and gradually resolves. PMID:27570398

  9. Outcome after three years of laronidase enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Jacobs, S; Kierstein, J; Van Hove, J

    2006-12-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with laronidase, recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase, for mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) has been clinically available since April 2003. Pre-approval studies were performed on patients with the more attenuated forms of MPS I, Hurler-Scheie and Scheie syndromes. The clinical efficacy of laronidase on the severe form of MPS I, Hurler syndrome, is not well known. We present a patient with Hurler syndrome who has been treated with laronidase for 3 years. Clinically, the patient demonstrated improvement in urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) levels and hepatomegaly, but continued to experience decline in respiratory status, musculoskeletal and spinal involvement, and developmental skills. Overall, the benefit of ERT with laronidase in advanced Hurler syndrome appeared to be minimal in this patient. PMID:17089217

  10. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhao, Cheng-qiang; Ye, Gang; Liu, Can-dong; Xu, Wen-dong

    2016-01-01

    Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  11. Menopause, the metabolic syndrome, and mind-body therapies

    PubMed Central

    Innes, Kim E.; Selfe, Terry Kit; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk rises sharply with menopause, likely due to the coincident increase in insulin resistance and related atherogenic changes that together comprise the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome, a cluster of metabolic and hemodynamic abnormalities strongly implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of cardiovascular disease. A growing body of research suggests that traditional mind-body practices such as yoga, tai chi, and qigong may offer safe and cost-effective strategies for reducing insulin resistance syndrome-related risk factors for cardiovascular disease in older populations, including postmenopausal women. Current evidence suggests that these practices may reduce insulin resistance and related physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease; improve mood, well-being, and sleep; decrease sympathetic activation; and enhance cardiovagal function. However, additional rigorous studies are needed to confirm existing findings and to examine long-term effects on cardiovascular health. PMID:18779682

  12. Novel risk factors for acute coronary syndromes and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Tong, David C; Wilson, Andrew M; Layland, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Acute coronary syndromes represent not merely disrupted atherosclerotic plaques or luminal stenoses but rather a complex clinical syndrome. The traditional conception of pathogenesis and management of ACS has been challenged by numerous recent landmark ACS trials. Current prognostication models lack clinical precision and can be challenging to the clinicians in tailoring management strategies for individual patients. In this review we summarise the emerging evidence of novel risk factors (plaque phenotype, coronary blood flow, endothelial dysfunction, microvascular dysfunction, and inflammation) in predicting future events and outcomes in ACS population. As the search for miracle cure for ischaemic heart disease continues, one is hopeful that emerging therapeutic approaches targeting these novel risk factors will improve long-term outcomes of ACS. PMID:27394979

  13. Aquaporin gene therapy corrects Sjögren's syndrome phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhennan; Yin, Hongen; Cabrera-Pérez, Javier; Guimaro, Maria C; Afione, Sandra; Michael, Drew G; Glenton, Patricia; Patel, Ankur; Swaim, William D; Zheng, Changyu; Nguyen, Cuong Q; Nyberg, Fred; Chiorini, John A

    2016-05-17

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a chronic autoimmune disease that is estimated to affect 35 million people worldwide. Currently, no effective treatments exist for Sjögren's syndrome, and there is a limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. The present work revealed that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel critical for salivary gland fluid secretion, is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 6. Increased expression of this cytokine is strongly associated with the most common symptom of primary Sjögren's syndrome, the loss of salivary gland function. This finding led us to develop a therapy in the treatment of Sjögren's syndrome by increasing the water permeability of the gland to restore saliva flow. Our study demonstrates that the targeted increase of gland permeability not only resulted in the restoration of secretory gland function but also resolved the hallmark salivary gland inflammation and systemic inflammation associated with disease. Secretory function also increased in the lacrimal gland, suggesting this local therapy could treat the systemic symptoms associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:27140635

  14. Randomized Multicenter Feasibility Trial of Myofascial Physical Therapy for Treatment of Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Mary P; Anderson, Rodney U; Potts, Jeannette; Payne, Christopher K; Peters, Kenneth M; Clemens, J Quentin; Kotarinos, Rhonda; Fraser, Laura; Cosby, Annamarie; Fortman, Carole; Neville, Cynthia; Badillo, Suzanne; Odabachian, Lisa; Sanfield, Anna; O’Dougherty, Betsy; Halle-Podell, Rick; Cen, Liyi; Chuai, Shannon; Landis, J Richard; Kusek, John W; Nyberg, Leroy M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized clinical trial designed to compare two methods of manual therapy (myofascial physical therapy (MPT) and global therapeutic massage (GTM)) among patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain syndromes. Materials and Methods Our goal was to recruit 48 subjects with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome or interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome at six clinical centers. Eligible patients were randomized to either MPT or GTM and were scheduled to receive up to 10 weekly treatments, each 1 hour in duration. Criteria to assess feasibility included adherence of therapists to prescribed therapeutic protocol as determined by records of treatment, adverse events which occurred during study treatment, and rate of response to therapy as assessed by the Patient Global Response Assessment (GRA). Primary outcome analysis compared response rates between treatment arms using Mantel-Haenszel methods. Results Twenty-three (49%) men and 24 (51%) women were randomized over a six month period. Twenty-four (51%) patients were randomized to GTM, 23 (49%) to MPT; 44 (94%) patients completed the study. Therapist adherence to the treatment protocols was excellent. The GRA response rate of 57% in the MPT group was significantly higher than the rate of 21% in the GTM treatment group (p=0.03). Conclusions The goals to judge feasibility of conducting a full-scale trial of physical therapy methods were met. The preliminary findings of a beneficial effect of MPT warrants further study. PMID:19535099

  15. Is riluzole a potential therapy for Rett syndrome?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with autistic features and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) in the majority of cases. Besides symptomatic treatment, no therapeutic trials have shown effectiveness for RTT. Some perspectives in the treatment of RTT have been provided by recent works showing a phenotypic reversal by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in a RTT mouse model. Glutamate may also play an important role in the primary pathogenesis in Rett syndrome through the excitotoxic neuronal injury in experimental models. Riluzole, an agent currently approved for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a glutamatergic modulator and BDNF enhancer with neuroprotective properties. For these reasons, riluzole could potentially play an important role in the treatment of RTT symptoms. Several points regarding the use of riluzole in RTT are discussed. Further evaluation of the therapeutic effects of this agent in RTT animal models is needed before clinical trials can begin. PMID:25858436

  16. Home ventilation therapy in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Mangado, Nicolás; Troncoso Acevedo, María Fernanda; Gómez García, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea is a highly prevalent disease that is often underdiagnosed at present. It has a significant economic and social welfare impact, accounting for a large part of the resources assigned to home respiratory therapies. As part of the 2014 SEPAR Year of the Chronic Patient and Domiciliary Respiratory Care sponsored by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, this article reviews the most recent publications on the indications and controversial issues in the treatment of sleep apnea, the latest evidence for indication of various positive pressure devices, and adjustment modes, ranging from the use of empirical formulae or mathematical estimations to modern auto-CPAP equipment, while not forgetting the gold standard of manual titration. Emphasis is placed on the need for monitoring required by patients to ensure treatment adherence and compliance. Finally, other therapies that are not the object of this article are briefly reviewed. PMID:25059585

  17. Surfactant replacement therapy for adult respiratory distress syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Evans, D A; Wilmott, R W; Whitsett, J A

    1996-05-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy may have a role in the treatment of ARDS in children. The current studies suggest that rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant is more effective than slow tracheal instillation or aerosolized delivery. Studies suggest that exogenous surfactant given early in the development of ARDS is more effective than therapy provided late in the course of the disease. Natural surfactants appear to be more effective than artificial surfactants due to the presence of SP-B and SP-C, which prevent inhibition of the exogenous surfactant by the protein leakage into the alveolus that is characteristic of ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy appears to be safe and well tolerated. A surfactant that can be delivered by aerosol would be useful since this is more easily tolerated by the patients, requires less surfactant, and would be more cost effective when compared with tracheal instillation. Aerosolized surfactant could be given to patients who have not yet required mechanical ventilation, thus potentially preventing the progression of the acute lung injury to respiratory failure. The recent failure of a large multi-center trial of aerosolized Exosurf for the treatment of sepsis-related ARDS72 may have been due to the failure of the delivery system as opposed to the surfactant used in the trial; therefore, further research into aerosol delivery systems is needed. There may be different responses to exogenous surfactant therapy by patients with ARDS of different etiologies, such as aspiration pneumonia, sepsis, or trauma. Well-planned placebo-controlled trials will be required to determine these differences. The data supporting the role of surfactant replacement for the treatment of ARDS in children is growing. However, before widespread use of surfactant is considered, a multi-center, placebo-controlled trial will be required to establish the safety and efficacy of surfactant replacement in such patients. PMID:8726159

  18. Down Syndrome: From Understanding the Neurobiology to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Herault, Yann; Lott, Ira T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Reeves, Roger H.

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common example of a neurogenetic aneuploid disorder leading to mental retardation. In most cases, DS results from an extra copy of human chromosome 21 producing deregulated gene expression in brain that gives raise to subnormal intellectual functioning. Understanding the consequences of dosage imbalance attributable to trisomy 21 (T21) has accelerated because of recent advances in genome sequencing, comparative genome analysis, functional genome exploration, and the use of model organisms. This has led to new evidence-based therapeutic approaches to prevention or amelioration of T21 effects on brain structure and function (cognition) and has important implications for other areas of research on the neurogenomics of cognition and behavior. PMID:21068296

  19. Passive hyperimmune therapy: a viable treatment option for the patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raven, N C

    1994-01-01

    New drugs and therapies are continually emerging in an effort to delay the progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive status to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). One such treatment is passive hyperimmune therapy (PHT), which was first researched and subsequently published in 1988. Passive hyperimmune therapy involves plasmapheresis of an asymptomatic HIV-positive donor with high p24 antibodies, no detectable p24 antigen, and a helper-inducer T-cell count greater than 400. The plasma is then pooled, sterilized, and administered to symptomatic HIV-positive patients as a monthly intravenous infusion in an effort to provide passive immunotherapy. In this article, an overview of PHT is provided, including benefits, adverse reactions, and other similar therapies available, so that the nurse who cares for HIV-positive patients can continue to be a significant source of information to them. PMID:7965365

  20. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-Willi and Down syndromes: a post-modern medical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lantos, J D

    2000-04-01

    Post-modernism means the end of traditional certainties. In this paper, growth hormone (GH) is conceptualized as a post-modern medical therapy. It is used in the treatment of conditions that are not traditional diseases, for indications that are not precisely defined. Down syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome represent two clinical conditions in which GH can possibly be used. It is argued that the difference between the two syndromes instructs us as to the principles that might guide appropriate use of GH in the future. In particular, for children, the more GH treatment can be shown to produce benefits other than increased height, the more justifiable its use will be. PMID:10984261

  1. Remission of refractory pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome using targeted antibiotic therapy in 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Join-Lambert, Olivier; Duchatelet, Sabine; Delage, Maïa; Miskinyte, Snaigune; Coignard, Hélène; Lemarchand, Nicolas; Alemy-Carreau, Murielle; Lortholary, Olivier; Nassif, Xavier; Hovnanian, Alain; Nassif, Aude

    2015-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum, severe acne, and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) syndrome can prove refractory to treatment and is characterized by relapses and recurrences. The combination of antibiotic therapy and surgery can produce success in the management of the syndrome. Acute treatment is required, but maintenance therapy is also necessary to prevent disease relapse. The response to antibiotic therapy is hypothesis generating, raising the issue of a modified host response. To date, anecdotal reports support the use of surgery and medical therapy, but controlled investigations with extended follow-up are necessary to substantiate preliminary data observed with individual cases. PMID:26470620

  2. Emerging Pharmacologic Therapies for Constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Constipation.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Shanti; Guentner, Amanda; Chey, William D

    2014-04-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic functional constipation are common digestive disorders that negatively impact quality of life and account for billions of dollars in health care costs. Related to the heterogeneity of pathogenesis that underlie these disorders and the failure of symptoms to reliably predict underlying pathophysiology, traditional therapies provide relief to only a subset of affected individuals. The evidence surrounding new and emerging pharmacologic treatments, which include both luminally and systemically acting drugs, is discussed here. These include agents such as lubiprostone, bile acid modulations, guanylate cyclase-C receptor agonists, serotonin receptor modulators and herbal therapies. PMID:24840367

  3. An anterior mediastinal lesion in TAFRO syndrome showing complete remission after glucocorticoid and tocilizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Kentaro; Murata, Kengo; Inagaki, Yuji; Oota, Souichi; Takamori, Mikio

    2016-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), myelofibrosis (F), renal dysfunction (R), and organomegaly (O) (TAFRO) syndrome is a variant of multicentric Castleman's disease. We describe here a 57-year-old man who presented with persistent fever, pleural effusion, and ascites. He was negative for human immunodeficiency virus and human herpes virus-8. A computed tomography scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass and small inguinal lymphadenopathy. Although a biopsy of the anterior mediastinum showed fatty tissue infiltrated with CD20 (+) and CD45RO (+) lymphocytes, a biopsy of the left inguinal lymph node revealed a hyaline vascular type of Castleman's disease. He subsequently developed severe thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. In addition, his bone marrow biopsy showed myelofibrosis. TAFRO syndrome was diagnosed based on the lymph node pathology and the characteristic manifestations of the syndrome. Tocilizumab and glucocorticoid therapy achieved complete remission and regression of the mediastinal mass. To our knowledge, this is the first report of TAFRO syndrome accompanied by an anterior mediastinal mass, which responded very well to therapy. PMID:27516889

  4. Transfert d'énergie linéique et radiosensibilité cellulaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courdi, A.; Pignol, J. P.; Iborra-Brassart, N.; Hérault, J.; Fares, G.; Hachem, A.; Chauvel, P.

    1998-04-01

    ée dans les cellules ayant un rapport α/beta plus faible après exposition aux photons, selon le modèle linéaire-quadratique. Les particules moins efficaces que les photons en terme de mortalité cellulaire moyenne induisent des dégâts individuels importants, révélés par la production de micronoyaux (MN) multiples. Concernant le lien entre l'EBR et la radio-sensibilité intrinsèque, les données récentes utilisant à la fois la technique des colonies et la méthode des MN, montrent que l'EBR est d'autant plus élevée que les cellules sont radiorésistantes aux photons.

  5. The syndrome of continuous muscle fibre activity following gold therapy.

    PubMed

    Grisold, W; Mamoli, B

    1984-01-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from arthritis received a total dose of 500 mg sodium aurothiomalate during a period of 5 months. His clinical state then deteriorated and he had to be hospitalized. Upon admission he was bedridden, his level of consciousness was slightly impaired, he was confused and respiration was laboured. Continuous muscle activity was noted on all extremities and at first, erroneously, fasciculations were diagnosed. The EMG exhibited continuous muscle fibre activity consisting of duplets, triplets and multiplets. The discharges occurred in an irregular pattern; when various muscles were examined at the same time no synchronicity could be observed between muscle discharges. In the left m. deltoideus an increased percentage of polyphasic potentials was found, whereas mean duration of motor unit potentials was normal. Spontaneous activity remained unchanged during sleep and administration of intravenous diazepam or phenytoin. Blocking of ulnar nerve at either elbow or wrist level did not stop spontaneous activity in m. abductor digiti quinti. Ischaemia increased the amount of discharges after 7 min. Within 4 months after termination of gold therapy the patient's condition improved and he was discharged from hospital. Regular EMG follow-up after 8 months showed complete cessation of abnormal spontaneous activities. Nerve conduction velocities were normal except for markedly reduced compound action potential in peroneal nerves. Continuous muscle fibre activity as a side-effect of gold therapy is described. PMID:6440953

  6. Sequential Combination Therapy Leading to Sustained Remission in a Patient with SAPHO Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huber, C E; Judex, A G; Freyschmidt, J; Feuerbach, S; Schölmerich, J; Müller-Ladner, U

    2009-01-01

    The SAPHO syndrome represents a variety of clinically similar disorders with the key features of hyperostotic bone lesions in combination with chronic pustular skin disease. The respective pathophysiology of bone and joint manifestations in SAPHO syndrome is still a matter of discussion. For example it does not appear to represent reactive arthritis and HLA B27 antigen, with the latter being typically present in patients with spondyloarthopathies. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome is also not well established and consists of various antiinflammatory and antirheumatic drugs. Here, we report a female patient with active SAPHO syndrome suffering from sternal swelling of unknown origin that had been known for 10 years and a 4-year-history of severe lower back pain. Remarkable were also a typical pustulous palmar erythema associated with swelling and decreased motility of both MCP-I joints. Inflammation parameters were high with an ESR 68 mm/1st hour and a CRP of 19.6 mg/l. She was initially treated with rofecoxib and doxycycline, followed by sulfasalazine with only partial clinical response. Thereafter, both articular symptoms as well as cutaneous lesions responded well to a combination therapy with methotrexate and sulfasalazine. Thus, the case illustrates nicely that methotrexate in combination with another DMARD can be successfully applied to patients with long-term active SAPHO syndrome. PMID:19471601

  7. Physical Therapy for Metabolic Syndrome Prevention in Workers: Novel Role of Physical Therapist.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tomonori; Nemoto, Yuki; Utumi, Takako; Munakata, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, physical therapists have usually been involved in physical therapy for patients with functional disorders associated with cerebrovascular or orthopedic diseases in hospitals. With the aging of Japanese society, the number of diseased people will progressively increase; thus, it is important to pay much more attention to disease prevention. In this regard, physical therapists are expected to play a new role in the field of preventive medicine. Metabolic syndrome or central obesity with multiple cardiometabolic risks is associated with a high risk of type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular diseases and is now a central target for early detection and intervention for disease prevention. The incidence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and men showed a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome than women in all generations. We have been involved in the guidance of workers with metabolic syndrome for a long time, and we conducted a multicenter study to establish effective guidance for these worker. In this paper, we will use our evidence to discuss the role of physical therapists in providing guidance for preventing metabolic syndrome. We are now conducting worksite supporting exercise intervention for workers who were resistant to conventional lifestyle guidance. In addition, the unique role of physical therapists in this new trial will be introduced. PMID:27246150

  8. Myofunctional therapy applied to upper airway resistance syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-01-01

    The literature presents publications on the treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) by myofunctional therapy, but there are no reports of this approach to patients with upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). The objective was to verify the effect of myofunctional therapy in a case of UARS in relation to morphological and functional aspects of the stomatognathic system, anthropometric data, and quality of sleep. Patient, aged 61 years, diagnosed with UARS, underwent 12 sessions of myofunctional therapy for 3 months with exercises aimed at the suprahyoid, the tongue, and the soft palate muscles. Evaluations were performed before the start of the therapeutic process, right after the end, as well as 1, 2, 4, and 10 months after the completion of the treatment, considering: tonicity and mobility of the suprahyoid muscles, the tongue, and the soft palate; modified Mallampati grade; neck circumference; body mass index; and parameters of sleep quality. After the therapeutic process, there was a decrease in scores related to the tonus of the suprahyoid muscles, mobility, and tonus of the tongue and of the soft palate. The Mallampati grade was IV in the initial evaluation, and III in subsequent assessment. There was a reduction of 2 cm in neck circumference and BMI remained similar over time. In analyzing the three parameters of sleep quality, improvement was observed in all evaluations after discharge. Therefore, the effect of myofunctional therapy in a case of UARS was positive for all parameters. PMID:26691626

  9. The Effect of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) Therapy on Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raeissadat, Seyed Ahmad; Rayegani, Seyed Mansoor; Rezaei, Sajad; Bahrami, Mohammad Hasan; Eliaspour, Dariush; Karimzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To study the effects of Polarized Polychromatic Noncoherent Light (Bioptron) therapy on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods: This study was designed as a randomized clinical trial. Forty four patients with mild or moderate CTS (confirmed by clinical and electrodiagnostic studies) were assigned randomly into two groups (intervention and control goups). At the beginning of the study, both groups received wrist splinting for 8 weeks. Bioptron light was applied for the intervention group (eight sessions, for 3/weeks). Bioptron was applied perpendicularly to the wrist from a 10 centimeter sdistance. Pain severity and electrodiagnostic measurements were compared from before to 8 weeks after initiating each treatment. Results: Eight weeks after starting the treatments, the mean of pain severity based on Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores decreased significantly in both groups. Median Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) latency decreased significantly in both groups. However, other electrophysiological findings (median Compound Motor Action Potential (CMAP) latency and amplitude, also SNAP amplitude) did not change after the therapy in both groups. There was no meaningful difference between two groups regarding the changes in the pain severity. Conclusion: Bioptron with the above mentioned parameters led to therapeutic effects equal to splinting alone in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. However, applying Bioptron with different therapeutic protocols and light parameters other than used in this study, perhaps longer duration of therapy and long term assessment may reveal different results favoring Bioptron therapy. PMID:25606338

  10. Identifying risk factors of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in AIDS patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Zheng, Yuhuang; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Guoqiang; Chen, Xia; Mamadou, Diallo; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi

    2013-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome typically occurs within days after patients undergo highly active anti-retroviral therapy and is a big hurdle for effective treatment of AIDS patients. In this study, we monitored immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in 238 AIDS patients treated with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among them, immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurred in 47 cases (19.7%). Immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients had significantly higher rate of opportunistic infection (p<0.001) and persistently lower CD4(+) cell count (p<0.001) compared to the non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome patients. In contrast, no significant differences in HIV RNA loads were observed between the immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group and non-immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome group. These data suggest that a history of opportunistic infection and CD4(+) cell counts at baseline may function as risk factors for immune reconstitution inflammation syndrome occurrence in AIDS patients as well as potential prognostic markers. These findings will improve the management of AIDS with highly active anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:23434049

  11. An occupational therapy approach to persons with chronic fatigue syndrome: part two, assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Renee R; Kielhofner, Gary W

    2003-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a highly disabling condition that significantly interferes with occupational life. Occupational therapy services are very relevant for this population. Yet, information about the assessment and treatment of CFS is almost absent from occupational therapy literature. As a result, few occupational therapists possess expertise in evaluating and providing therapy for this complex condition. This paper describes an approach to evaluating and providing services for individuals with CFS according to the Model of Human Occupation. This model offers an integrative means of understanding the synergistic and evolving relationships between motivation, values, roles, habits, functional capabilities, and the environment as they influence individuals with CFS, and it provides a framework for the types of changes required in these different domains during the rehabilitation process. A case study illustrates recommended assessment and intervention approaches. PMID:23944638

  12. Growth hormone therapy for Prader–willi syndrome: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS’ clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype–phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  13. Growth hormone therapy for Prader-willi syndrome: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Grugni, Graziano; Sartorio, Alessandro; Crinò, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by a dysregulation of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I axis, as the consequence of a complex hypothalamic involvement. PWS' clinical picture seems to resemble the classic non-PWS GH deficiency (GHD), including short stature, excessive body fat, decreased muscle mass, and impaired quality of life. GH therapy is able to ameliorate the phenotypic appearance of the syndrome, as well as to improve body composition, physical strength, and cognitive level. In this regard, however, some pathophysiologic and clinical questions still remain, representing a challenge to give the most appropriate care to PWS patients. Data about the prevalence of GHD in PWS children are not unequivocal, ranging from 40% to 100%. In this context, to establish whether the presence (or not) of GHD may have a different effect on clinical course during GH therapy may be helpful. In addition, the comparison of GH effects in PWS children diagnosed as small for gestational age with those obtained in subjects born appropriate for gestational age is of potential interest for future trials. Emerging information seems to demonstrate the maintenance of beneficial effects of GH therapy in PWS subjects after adolescent years. Thus, GH retesting after achievement of final height should be taken into consideration for all PWS patients. However, it is noteworthy that GH administration exerts positive effects both in PWS adults with and without GHD. Another critical issue is to clarify whether the genotype-phenotype correlations may be relevant to specific outcome measures related to GH therapy. Moreover, progress of our understanding of the role of GH replacement and concomitant therapies on bone characteristics of PWS is required. Finally, a long-term surveillance of benefits and risks of GH therapy is strongly recommended for PWS population, since most of the current studies are uncontrolled and of short duration. PMID:27330297

  14. [Panic attacks and panic syndrome--diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Katschnig, H; Nutzinger, D O

    1990-01-01

    Paroxysmal states of anxiety that cannot be traced back to somatic causes have been called panic attacks since the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM III) of the American Psychiatric Association. This term has since been accepted as part of psychiatric everyday language in many countries. The present review discusses initially the diagnostic and differential diagnostic aspects against the background of nosological classifications as practised to date, with particular emphasis on the requirements of the practising psychiatrist. The authors of this review hold the opinion that whereas the phenomenon of panic attack is a valid concept, the conceptualisation of a panic disorder is still largely hypothetical. The often observed "natural history"--after panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety, coupling of attacks to certain situations, avoidance of these situations, as well as agoraphobia, depressivity, self-medication with tranquilisers and alcohol, hypochondriacal fears with increased consultation of doctors, and family conflicts may develop--requires early therapeutic intervention. Hence, the second part of this article presents the pharmacological and psychotherapeutical treatment methods for panic attacks and their complications as developed and successfully tried out during the past few years. The efficacy has been proven of drug therapy on the one hand of prophylactic treatment using tricyclic antidepressives, MAO-inhibitors and alprazolam or clonazepam, and on the other hand also of a non-continuous attack-related treatment strategy. Of the more recent psychotherapeutic methods, relaxation methods and the cognitive treatment of panic attacks are discussed. This direct focus on panic attacks seems to be more promising than the conventional treatment methods centered on secondary symptoms such as anticipatory anxiety or agoraphobia. PMID:2179978

  15. High-dose enzyme replacement therapy in murine Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Herzog, Tyler; Koniar, Brenda L; Gunther, Roland; Whitley, Chester B

    2014-02-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive disease that is systemic, including progressive neurodegeneration, mental retardation and death before the age of 10 years. MPS I results from deficiency of α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) in lysosomes and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Clinical enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with intravenous laronidase reverses some aspects of MPS I disease (e.g., hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, glycosaminoglycanuria) and ameliorates others (e.g., pulmonary function, cardiac disease, arthropathy, exercise tolerance). However, neurologic benefits are thought to be negligible because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) blocks enzyme from reaching the central nervous system (CNS). We considered the possibility that a very high dose of intravenous laronidase might be able to traverse the BBB in small quantities, and provide some metabolic correction in the brain. To address this question, high-dose laronidase was administered (11.6 mg/kg, once per week, 4 weeks) to adult MPS I mice. IDUA enzyme activity in the cortex of treated mice increased to 97% of that in wild type mice (p<0.01). GAG levels in cortex were reduced by 63% of that from untreated MPS I mice (p<0.05). Further, immunohistochemical analysis showed that treatment reduced secondary GM3-ganglioside accumulation in treated MPS I mice. Water T-maze tests showed that the learning abnormality in MPS I mice was reduced (p<0.0001). In summary, repeated, high-dose ERT facilitated laronidase transit across the BBB, reduced GAG accumulation within the CNS, and rescued cognitive impairment. PMID:24100243

  16. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) ‎

    PubMed Central

    Maddineshat, Maryam; Keyvanloo, Sodabe; Lashkardoost, Hossein; Arki, Mina; Tabatabaeichehr, Mahbubeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Standards of care and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) vary. Non-drug ‎psychosocial intervention therapy is recommended for women with any kind of ‎discomfort or distress caused by PMS. The current study examined the effectiveness of ‎group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the symptoms of PMS at a girls’ dormitory of ‎North Khorasan University of Medical Sciences. Method: In this quasi-experimental study, 32 female students with PMS who were majoring in ‎nursing and midwifery and residing in the dormitory were selected using the ‎convenience sampling method and were assigned to experimental and control groups. ‎The Standardized Premenstrual Symptoms Screening Tool was used as the research ‎tool. Eight sessions of cognitive-behavioral group therapy were held for the students Results: There was a significant difference in psychological symptoms before and after ‎cognitive-behavioral therapy (p=0.012). Furthermore, cognitive-behavioral therapy was ‎effective on social interferences caused by PMS symptoms (p=0.012).‎ Conclusion: Group cognitive-behavioral therapy effectively alleviates PMS symptoms in female ‎college students.‎ PMID:27252766

  17. Pharmacologic and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maneerattaporn, Monthira; Saad, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain or discomfort in association with altered bowel habits (diarrhea and/or constipation). Other gastrointestinal symptoms, such as bloating and flatulence, are also common. A variety of factors are believed to play a role in the development of IBS symptoms, including altered bowel motility, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial stressors, altered brain-gut interactions, immune activation/low grade inflammation, alterations in the gut microbiome, and genetic factors. In the absence of biomarkers that can distinguish between IBS subgroups on the basis of pathophysiology, treatment of this condition is predicated upon a patient's most bothersome symptoms. In clinical trials, effective therapies have only offered a therapeutic gain over placebos of 7-15%. Evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) include lubiprostone and tegaserod; evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of diarrhea predominant IBS (IBS-D) include the probiotic Bifidobacter infantis, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin, and alosetron. Additionally, there is persuasive evidence to suggest that selected antispasmodics and antidepressants are of benefit for the treatment of abdominal pain in IBS patients. Finally, several emerging therapies with novel mechanisms of action are in development. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies including probiotics, herbal therapies and acupuncture are gaining popularity among IBS sufferers, although concerns regarding manufacturing standards and the paucity of high quality efficacy and safety data remain. PMID:21927652

  18. Do Not Forget Nephrotic Syndrome as a Cause of Increased Requirement of Levothyroxine Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Vita, Roberto; Di Bari, Flavia; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome increases L-thyroxine requirements because of urinary loss of free and protein-bound thyroid hormones. We report 2 hypothyroid patients referred to us because of high serum TSH, even though the L-thyroxine daily dose was maintained at appropriate levels or was increased. The cause of nephrotic syndrome was multiple myeloma in one patient and diabetic glomerulosclerosis in the other patient. As part of the periodic controls for diabetes, urinalysis was requested only in the second patient so that proteinuria could be detected. However, as in the first patient, facial puffiness and body weight increase were initially attributed to hypothyroidism, which was poorly compensated by L-thyroxine therapy. In the first patient, the pitting nature of the pedal edema was missed at the initial examination. An endocrinologist consulted over the phone by the practitioner hypothesized some causes of intestinal malabsorption of L-thyroxine. This diagnosis would have been accepted had the patient continued taking a known sequestrant of L-thyroxine, i.e. calcium carbonate. The diagnostic workup of patients with increasing requirements of L-thyroxine replacement therapy should not be concentrated on the digestive system alone. Careful history taking and physical examination need to be thorough. Endocrinologists should not forget nephrotic syndrome that, in turn, can be secondary to serious diseases. PMID:26280000

  19. Antioxidant Effects of Potassium Ascorbate with Ribose Therapy in a Case with Prader Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Anichini, C.; Lotti, F.; Longini, M.; Proietti, F.; Felici, C.; Perrone, S.; Buonocore, G.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in several human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, atherosclerosis, carcinogenesis, as well as genetic diseases. We previously found that OS occurs in Down Syndrome as well as in Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS). Here we describe the clinical case of a female patient with Prader Willi Syndrome (PWS), a genomic imprinting disorder, characterized by obesity, atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus type 2, pathologies in which a continuous and important production of free radicals takes place. We verified the presence of OS by measuring a redox biomarkers profile including total hydroperoxides (TH), non protein-bound iron (NPBI), thiols (SH), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and isoprostanes (IPs). Thus we introduced in therapy an antioxidant agent, namely potassium ascorbate with ribose (PAR), in addition to GH therapy and we monitored the redox biomarkers profile for four years. A progressive decrease in OS biomarkers occurred until their normalization. In the meantime a weight loss was observed together with a steady growth in standards for age and sex. PMID:22960339

  20. Dual antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes and coronary artery interventions.

    PubMed

    Sathyamurthy, I; Jayanthi, K

    2014-07-01

    Optimization of platelet inhibition in patients with acute coronary syndromes reduces the risk for ischemic events, but at the same time increases the risk for bleeding. There are several predictors of bleeding risk in patients with acute coronary syndromes. These include demographic variables such as advanced age, female gender, low body weight, concomitant diseases such as diabetes,renal insufficiency, noncardiac vascular disease such as cerebral vascular disease and a history of bleeding. It also includes the type of acute coronary syndromes such as patients presenting with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, high killip class and low blood pressure. The diabetic population contains a higher proportion of patients who do not respond to antiplatelet drugs as expected and who also have more activated platelets that deserve very vigorous inhibition. The importance of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and stenting is much discussed. Yet there are some questions which are to be answered clearly such as the following:- 1) In the need to balance the benefit of clot prevention with bleeding risk, is it better to continue dual antiplatelet therapy for longer than one year? 2) If so, is this benefit specific to drug eluting stents or to a more general population of stent patients? 3) Is the benefit mediated by prevention of stent thrombosis or is there a global reduction in cardiovascular risk? This review is to understand all these aspects and help a physician use antiplatelet drugs appropriately in day to day clinical practice for better patient outcomes. PMID:25672032

  1. Conus magus vs. Irukandji syndrome: a computational approach of a possible new therapy.

    PubMed

    András, Csaba D; Albert, Csilla; Salamon, Szidónia; Gálicza, Judit; András, Réka; András, Emil

    2011-10-10

    The Irukandji syndrome is caused by the sting of some small jellyfish species. The syndrome has severe life-threatening consequences. The exacerbating pain and cardiovascular symptoms (tachycardia and hypertension) are hard to control in many cases. We suggest a way to experiment a new possible therapy with an FDA approved analgesic, ziconotide, a synthetic derivative from a marine cone snail (Conus magus) venom component, which is administrated intravenously. The proposed experimental plasma concentration of ziconotide for rats is in the range of 0-6μgml(-1). Based on a molecular biological scenario of the venom action mechanism at cellular level, we suggest that the proposed method should be functional in re-establishing the normal cardiovascular parameters of the experimental animals and concomitantly it should abolish the severe pain caused by envenomation. We expect that positive experimental results in agreement with our theory will lead to the possibility of a new therapy for the Irukandji syndrome and possibly for other envenomations with similar ethyology. PMID:21777663

  2. Cerebral Hyperperfusion in a Child with Stroke-Like Migraine Attacks after Radiation Therapy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ardicli, Didem; Gocmen, Rahsan; Oguz, Kader K; Varan, Ali; Yalnizoglu, Dilek

    2016-08-01

    Stroke-like migraine attacks after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of cranial radiotherapy characterized by migraine-like headache and transient neurological deficits with typical gyriform enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential underlying mechanisms are endothelial damage or dysfunction, vascular instability, vasospasm and, neuronal dysfunction.We report an 11-year-old girl with a primary diagnosis of medulloblastoma presented with acute-onset severe headache and left-sided weakness, 20 months after completing cranial radiotherapy. MRI demonstrated unilateral cortical swelling and concomitant leptomeningeal, gyral contrast enhancement, and MR perfusion imaging showed increased cortical perfusion in the right temporo-parieto-occipital region. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously over several days.SMART syndrome appears to be a reversible, long-term complication of cranial radiotherapy. So far, a limited number of pediatric patients with SMART syndrome have been reported. Prompt recognition of clinical signs and radiological imaging of SMART syndrome may help prevent unnecessary interventions and initiate appropriate diagnostic workup and management. PMID:27104483

  3. Use of Cyclosporine Therapy in Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS): A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Raza; Altaf, Areeba; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Mari, Anum; Noorani, Sahir; Saeed, Eraj; Mevawalla, Areesh Amir; Haq, Zaiyn Ul; Faquih, Muhammad Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    A chronic, progressive disorder Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS) accounts for 10-20% of all children with Nephrotic Syndrome. It is a heterogeneous disorder comprised of persistent edema, proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia. Treatment for steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is challenging and children who suffer from SRNS require aggressive treatment to achieve remission. Calcineurin inhibitors have been used more in an empirical manner than on the basis of clear rationale. It was in 1984 when cyclosporine was first considered for the treatment of steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome. Cyclosporin is a calcineurin inhibitor that suppresses immune response by downregulating the transcription of various cytokine genes. Till now many studies have been conducted to determine dosages, duration of therapy, side effects and advantages of cyclosporine. Treatment of SRNS remains a difficult challenge in pediatric nephrology. Treatment should be individualized according to the underlying histopathology, and clinical and environmental conditions of the children. There is an urgent need to distinguish as soon as possible those patients who may benefit from prolonged immunosuppressive treatment from those who will not benefit from such treatment and who will just suffer from its major side effects. The emerging evidence that the majority of genetic forms of SRNS should receive symptomatic treatment only, should also be clinically tested and studies baring its significance should be evaluated in the future. PMID:26573045

  4. The effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Madjlesi, Faezeh; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Mirzaei, Rezvan; Forogh, Bijan; Daliri, Seyedeh Somayeh; Derakhshandeh, Seyed Majid; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Raissi, G. Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Rome II and III diagnostic criteria for dyssynergic defecation recommended the exclusion of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study determined the effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without IBS. Materials and Methods: This study was a nonrandomized, single blinded, semi experimental study. Dyssynergic defecation patients with and without IBS were asked to undergo biofeedback therapy 8 sessions. The defecation dynamics and balloon expulsion time were evaluated before, at the end and 1 month after the biofeedback therapy. IBS symptoms were graded using a 4-point Likert scale. Mann–Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman test were applied to analyze data using SPSS software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: After the biofeedback therapy, the IBS symptoms have been decreased significantly (the median of 2 before and 1 after therapy, P < 0.01). The biofeedback therapy significantly decreased the anismus index in IBS group by the mean of 0.75 ± 0.31, 0.28 ± 0.07 and 0.28 ± 0.06 in three phases, respectively. Similar results were found in non-IBS patients (the mean of 0.74 ± 0.32, 0.28 ± 0.08, 0.27 ± 0.08 in three phases, respectively). The symptoms of constipation (sensation of incomplete evacuation, difficult and painful defecation), defecation facilitative manual maneuver frequency, pelvic floor muscles resting amplitude and strain amplitude decreased and squeezing amplitude improved significantly after biofeedback therapy in both groups with and without IBS (P < 0.001). There were not significant differences between patients with and without IBS (P > 0.05) with respect to outcome. No complication was observed in treatment groups. Conclusion: Dyssynergic constipation patients with and without IBS will likely benefit from biofeedback therapy. PMID:25538778

  5. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered. PMID:22120615

  6. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  7. Successful Treatment of Lower Limb Complex Regional Pain Syndrome following Three Weeks of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Rita; Segal, Shira C.; Clarke, Hance

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a treatment that delivers 100% oxygen at increased atmospheric pressures. The efficacy of HBOT for treating pain has been described in various animal pain models and may have clinical efficacy in the treatment of human chronic pain syndromes. We present our experience with posttraumatic Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type 2 in a patient who underwent 15 sessions of HBOT. A 41-year-old male with one-year history of CRPS of left foot followed by left ankle fracture demonstrated less pain, decreased swelling, less allodynia, and improvement in skin color and range of motion of the lower limb after 3 weeks of HBOT. Patient was back to work for the first time in over a year. HBOT may be considered as a valuable therapeutic tool in the treatment of long-standing CRPS. PMID:27445607

  8. The Role of Surfactant Therapy in Nonrespiratory Distress Syndrome Conditions in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Amaris; Bhandari, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    While treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with surfactant in premature neonates is well established, evidence for its use in non-RDS conditions, especially in the term neonate, has been less abundant. The last published review on a PubMed search was in 2001. In this review, we comprehensively and critically evaluated the evidence from the literature regarding the use of surfactant in specific non-RDS disorders in neonates. Surfactant administered as a bolus should be considered in the treatment of meconium aspiration syndrome with progressive respiratory failure. While controversial in congenital diaphragmatic hernia, it should be considered in Group B streptococcal pneumonia. As evidence evolves, we anticipate the broader application and more routine use of surfactant therapy for respiratory failure because of causes other than RDS. PMID:26171600

  9. Down's syndrome-associated Single Minded 2 gene as a pancreatic cancer drug therapy target.

    PubMed

    DeYoung, Maurice Phil; Tress, Matthew; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2003-10-01

    We report here a pancreatic cancer drug therapy utility of a gene involved in Down's syndrome. Single Minded 2 gene (SIM2) from Down's Syndrome Critical Region was expressed in pancreatic cancer-derived cell lines as well as in tumor tissues, but not in the normal pancreas. A related member of the SIM family, SIM1, did not show similar specificity. Inhibition by antisense technology of one of the isoforms of SIM2, the short-form (SIM2-s) expression in the CAPAN-1 pancreatic cancer cell line, caused a pronounced growth inhibition and induced cell death through apoptosis. The specificity of antisense was inferred from inhibition of SIM2-s mRNA but not the related members of SIM family. In view of the high mortality rate of pancreatic cancer patients, these findings have important implications for the future of pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:14550949

  10. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Gao, Qian; Hou, Jingshan; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  11. Effects of Temperature on Chronic Trapezius Myofascial Pain Syndrome during Dry Needling Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature on chronic trapezius myofascial pain syndrome during dry needling therapy. Sixty patients were randomized into two groups of dry needling (DN) alone (group A) and DN combined with heat therapy group (group B). Each patient was treated once and the therapeutic effect was assessed by the visual analogue scale (VAS), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment. Evaluation based on VAS and PPT showed that the pain of patients in groups A and B was significantly (P < 0.05) relieved at seven days, one month, and three months after treatment Compared to before treatment. There was significantly (P < 0.05) less pain in group B than group A at one and three months after treatment. The SF-36 evaluation demonstrated that the physical condition of patients in both groups showed significant (P < 0.05) improvement at one month and three months after treatment than before treatment. Our study suggests that both DN and DN heating therapy were effective in the treatment of trapezius MPS, and that DN heating therapy had better long-term effects than DN therapy. PMID:25383083

  12. Enzyme replacement therapy in Hurler syndrome after failure of hematopoietic transplant

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Leonor; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The most severe form of Mucopolysaccharosidosis type I (MPS-I), Hurler syndrome, presents with progressive respiratory, cardiac and musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive deterioration. Treatment includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the case of an 8-year old boy with MPS-I, homozygous for W402X, treated at 10 months of age with HSCT and after failure of the transplant, with ERT during 2 years showing good results, including a positive neuropsychological development. PMID:26937401

  13. Enzyme replacement therapy in Hurler syndrome after failure of hematopoietic transplant.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Leonor; Aldamiz-Echevarria, Luis

    2015-06-01

    The most severe form of Mucopolysaccharosidosis type I (MPS-I), Hurler syndrome, presents with progressive respiratory, cardiac and musculoskeletal symptoms and cognitive deterioration. Treatment includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and/or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the case of an 8-year old boy with MPS-I, homozygous for W402X, treated at 10 months of age with HSCT and after failure of the transplant, with ERT during 2 years showing good results, including a positive neuropsychological development. PMID:26937401

  14. Review of intravesical therapies for bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosamilia, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic pain condition characterised by urinary frequency, urgency and pain or discomfort which the patient attributes to the bladder. It is a complex condition to manage and treat and requires a multi-disciplinary and multi-modal approach. As well as lifestyle and behavioural modifications, physical therapy and oral medications, intravesical treatments can be used in the treatment algorithm for BPS/IC. A number of intravesical agents are reviewed in this paper along with the available evidence for their use. PMID:26816864

  15. Analysis of Factors Associated With Radiation-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia Syndrome After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Norihisa Sato, Shuhei; Katsui, Kuniaki; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Yoshida, Atsushi; Morito, Tsuneharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Mizuta, Akifumi; Waki, Takahiro; Niiya, Harutaka; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate factors associated with radiation-induced bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 702 women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery at seven institutions between July 1995 and December 2006 were analyzed. In all patients, the whole breast was irradiated with two tangential photon beams. The criteria used for the diagnosis of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome were as follows: (1) radiotherapy to the breast within 12 months, (2) general and/or respiratory symptoms lasting for {>=}2 weeks, (3) radiographs showing lung infiltration outside the radiation port, and (4) no evidence of a specific cause. Results: Radiation-induced BOOP syndrome was seen in 16 patients (2.3%). Eleven patients (68.8%) were administered steroids. The duration of steroid administration ranged from 1 week to 3.7 years (median, 1.1 years). Multivariate analysis revealed that age ({>=}50 years; odds ratio [OR] 8.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16-67.76; p = 0.04) and concurrent endocrine therapy (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.09-8.54; p = 0.03) were significantly associated with BOOP syndrome. Of the 161 patients whose age was {>=}50 years and who received concurrent endocrine therapy, 10 (6.2%) developed BOOP syndrome. Conclusions: Age ({>=}50 years) and concurrent endocrine therapy can promote the development of radiation-induced BOOP syndrome after breast-conserving therapy. Physicians should carefully follow patients who received breast-conserving therapy, especially those who are older than 50 years and received concurrent endocrine therapy during radiotherapy.

  16. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  17. Iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome and topical steroid therapy: case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Decani, Sem; Federighi, Veronica; Baruzzi, Elisa; Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    Topical corticosteroids are considered first-line therapy in patients with chronic inflammatory oral mucosal diseases; among them, clobetasol propionate is one of the most widely used in oral medicine. Under physiological conditions, the transmucosal application is characterized by a significantly greater absorption than the skin application. Contrary to many publications about the side effects of topical corticosteroids in dermatology, few studies have investigated the systemic effects due to local application of these drugs on oral mucosa. Although topical steroid therapy for the management of oral diseases is generally associated with local adverse effects (candidiasis, stomatopyrosis, and hypogeusia), these drugs can also lead to systemic side effects, such as suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and Cushing's syndrome. This review reports five cases of systemic adverse effects caused by clobetasol propionate topical treatment. PMID:23210698

  18. [Acute-onset eosinophilic leukemia associated with tumor lysis syndrome after imatinib and steroid pulse therapy].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Tomoe; Saito, Yuriko; Tokuhira, Michihide; Tomikawa, Atsushi; Sagawa, Morihiko; Haba, Yuichiro; Hanzawa, Kyoko; Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Reiko; Tamaru, Jun-ichi; Itoyama, Shinji; Mori, Shigehisa; Kizaki, Masahiro

    2010-05-01

    An 83-year-old woman had been suffering from palpitations and fatigue for a month. An annual screening test revealed an increased WBC count so she was referred to our hospital. CBC showed extremely elevated WBC count (186,300/microl), in which the population of blastic eosinophils was over 90%. The eosinophils expressed CD7/13/33/34/DR, and the karyotype demonstrated 47,XX,+8. The fusion gene of FIP1-LP/PDGFRalpha in peripheral blood was negative. As plural effusion due to the underlying disease progressively worsened, she was given prednisolone and hydroxyurea, but the effect was limited. Steroid pulse therapy and imatinib (100 mg/day) were administrated. As a result, a prompt response was observed. The WBC count rapidly decreased, but tumor lysis syndrome led to acute renal failure and disseminated intravasucular coagulation appeared. Supportive therapies such as artificial dialysis and transfusions were conducted, but unfortunately she died because of alveolar hemorrhage. PMID:20534953

  19. Endovascular therapy for advanced post-thrombotic syndrome: Proceedings from a multidisciplinary consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Vedantham, Suresh; Kahn, Susan R; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Comerota, Anthony J; Parpia, Sameer; Meleth, Sreelatha; Earp, Diane; Williams, Rick; Sista, Akhilesh K; Marston, William; Rathbun, Suman; Magnuson, Elizabeth A; Razavi, Mahmood K; Jaff, Michael R; Kearon, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and chronic iliac vein obstruction suffer major physical limitations and impairment of health-related quality of life. Currently there is a lack of evidence-based treatment options for these patients. Early studies suggest that imaging-guided, catheter-based endovascular therapy can eliminate iliac vein obstruction and saphenous venous valvular reflux, resulting in reduced PTS severity; however, these observations have not been rigorously validated. A multidisciplinary expert panel meeting was convened to plan a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate endovascular therapy for the treatment of advanced PTS. This article summarizes the findings of the panel, and is expected to assist in developing a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial and other studies to improve the care of patients with advanced PTS. PMID:27247235

  20. NTOS symptoms and mobility: a case study on neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome involving massage therapy.

    PubMed

    Streit, Robin S

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is a neuromuscular condition affecting brachial plexus functionality. NTOS is characterized by paresthesia, pain, muscle fatigue, and restricted mobility in the upper extremity. This study quantified massage therapy's possible contribution to treatment of NTOS. A 24-year-old female with NTOS received eight treatments over 35 days. Treatment included myofascial release, trigger point therapy, cross fiber friction, muscle stripping, and gentle passive stretching. Abduction and lateral rotation at the glenohumeral (GH joint) assessments measured range of motion (ROM). A resisted muscle test evaluated upper extremity strength. The client rated symptoms daily via a visual analog scale (VAS). Findings showed improvement in ROM at the GH joint. VAS ratings revealed a reduction in muscle weakness, pain, numbness, and 'paresthesia'. Results suggest massage may be useful as part of a broad approach to managing NTOS symptoms and improving mobility. PMID:24411148

  1. Case Report: The Effects of Massage Therapy on a Woman with Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Mary Lillias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to a group of conditions resulting from compression of the neurovascular structures of the thoracic outlet. The parameters for physical therapy include myofascial release (MFR), neuromuscular therapy (NMT), muscle strengthening, and stretching. This case study examined the effects of neuromuscular therapy, massage, and other manual therapies on a 56-year-old female presenting with bilateral numbness over the forearms and hands on waking. Numbness occurred most days, progressing to “dead rubbery” forearms and hands once or twice a month. Methods The treatment plan was implemented over eight weeks and consisted of six, 50-minute bodywork sessions. Several nonbodywork strategies were also employed to address potential contributing factors to the TOS symptomology experienced by the client. Objective measurements included posture analysis (PA), range of movement (ROM), and Roos and Adson’s tests. The Measure Your Own Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2), a client-generated measure of clinical outcome, was used to measure clinical change. Results MYMOP2 overall profile score results demonstrated an improvement of 2.25 from pretreatment to post-treatment measurement. Clinically meaningful change was measured by the individual and was indicative of substantial symptom improvement where a score change of over one was considered as meaningful. Conclusions A course of massage was effective for numbness symptoms in an individual with TOS, and results lasted over a year without additional treatments. Further research is needed to fully understand the effects of massage for TOS symptoms. PMID:25452819

  2. The effect of cetylated fatty esters and physical therapy on myofascial pain syndrome of the neck.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Deepak; Jacob, Biju Nirmal; Ajeesh, P S; Bookout, Jack B; Barathur, Raj R

    2011-07-01

    Participants with Myofascial Pain Syndrome (MPS) of the neck were randomly assigned into 2 groups of the double-blinded study: topical cetylated fatty ester complex (CFEC) cream application plus physical therapy (CF-PT; n=37), and placebo cream application plus physical therapy (PL-PT; n=35). There were 3 visits during 4 weeks of treatment. Physical Therapy (PT), given twice/week, included Ischaemic Compression, Deep Pressure Trigger Point Massage and Myofascial Releases. Topical cream [CFEC cream (5.6%) and 1.5% menthol] or placebo cream [1.5% menthol, in a cream base] was applied twice/day. CF-PT provided the fastest and most effective study treatment modality. The addition of CFEC cream to PT resulted in statistically significant improvements, compared to PL-PT, for reduction of pain, neck disability and life quality indicators. Our results indicate that cetylated derivatives of fatty acids can effectively reduce pain and symptoms associated with neck MPS, when combined with physical therapy. PMID:21665114

  3. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  4. Choroidal thickness changes with photodynamic therapy for a diffuse choroidal hemangioma in Sturge–Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cacciamani, Andrea; Scarinci, Fabio; Parravano, Mariacristina; Giorno, Paola; Varano, Monica

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the choroidal thickness (CT) changes associated with visual function following photodynamic therapy (PDT) for a diffuse choroidal hemangioma in Sturge–Weber syndrome. We report a case of Sturge–Weber syndrome and symptomatic serous retinal detachment (SRD) with diffuse choroidal hemangioma treated with PDT. Visual acuity (VA), macular sensitivity measured by means of MP1 microperimeter (Nidek Technologies, Padova, Italy), retinal and CT, measured by means of enhanced depth optical coherence tomography (EDI–OCT, Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) were analyzed at baseline, 3 and 12 months follow-up.After the PDT VA and macular sensitivity improved.The OCT examination showed the resolution of SRD. The choroid was measured after PDT using EDI–OCT. At baseline, the subfoveal CT showed a progressive thickness reduction from 251 to 83 lm during follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CT changes after PDT for a diffuse choroidal hemangioma in Sturge–Weber syndrome in a longterm follow-up. The CT measurement represents a potential parameter to better follow choroidal hemangiomas and their response to treatment. However,the long-term choroidal changes should be carefully taken into account. PMID:24658736

  5. Biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in a patient with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corral, Juan E; Kataria, Rahul; Vickers, Dawn; Koutouby, Raghad; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-01-01

    Constipation is a common feature of Prader-Willi syndrome. Research exploring the prevalence, cause and treatment options for constipation is limited and lacks objective measurements such as anorectal manometry. We report a case of a 16-year-old lady with Prader-Willi syndrome presenting with rectal pain and constipation for 2 years despite multiple medications and weekly enemas. She also noted passive fecal incontinence that required frequent manual disimpactions. Anorectal manometry revealed an abnormal relaxation of the puborectalis and external sphincter muscles on push maneuvers suggesting dyssynergic defecation and rectal hypersensitivity. Contraction and relaxation of her pelvic muscles were recorded with electromyography. Relaxation of the puborectalis muscle improved significantly after three biofeedback sessions. Patient was successfully tapered off laxatives and has been maintained on linaclotide only. Dyssynergic defecation may be a common finding in Prader-Willi syndrome. In selected cases we recommend anorectal manometry to identify neuromuscular dysfunction and subsequent biofeedback therapy depending on the degree of mental retardation to minimize overuse of laxatives. PMID:26423048

  6. Occurrence of DNET and other brain tumors in Noonan syndrome warrants caution with growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Geoffrey D; SantaCruz, Karen; Hart, Blaine; Clericuzio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder caused by mutations in the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway that is well known for its relationship with oncogenesis. An 8.1-fold increased risk of cancer in Noonan syndrome has been reported, including childhood leukemia and solid tumors. The same study found a patient with a dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNET) and suggested that DNET tumors are associated with NS. Herein we report an 8-year-old boy with genetically confirmed NS and a DNET. Literature review identified eight other reports, supporting the association between NS and DNETs. The review also ascertained 13 non-DNET brain tumors in individuals with NS, bringing to 22 the total number of NS patients with brain tumors. Tumor growth while receiving growth hormone (GH) occurred in our patient and one other patient. It is unknown whether the development or progression of tumors is augmented by GH therapy, however there is concern based on epidemiological, animal and in vitro studies. This issue was addressed in a 2015 Pediatric Endocrine Society report noting there is not enough data available to assess the safety of GH therapy in children with neoplasia-predisposition syndromes. The authors recommend that GH use in children with such disorders, including NS, be undertaken with appropriate surveillance for malignancies. Our case report and literature review underscore the association of NS with CNS tumors, particularly DNET, and call attention to the recommendation that clinicians treating NS patients with GH do so with awareness of the possibility of increased neoplasia risk. PMID:26377682

  7. [Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). Pathophysiology, diagnostics, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Köck, F X; Borisch, N; Koester, B; Grifka, J

    2003-05-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS type I)--formerly termed Sudeck's atrophy or reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD)--causes chronic, poorly controllable pain, autonomic, sensorimotor disorders,and serious trophic alterations in the later stages. It develops in the distal extremities mostly after minimal trauma or surgical intervention and rarely spontaneously. The severity of symptoms is disproportionate to the causative event. The latest scientific findings show that the previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), which was supposed to be a result of a hyperreactive autonomic nervous system,is a very complex syndrome that occurs on different integration levels of the nervous system. Sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) may be facultatively characteristic, but is not to be misunderstood as an underlying mechanism. A neurogenic inflammation reaction has recently been discussed, just as had been postulated by Paul Sudeck long before. That was the reason why the International Association for the Study of Pain (ISAP) introduced the more descriptive term "complex regional pain syndrome" (CRPS) type I in 1994. Due to the complexity of the process necessitating qualified knowledge, it is important to immediately refer patients to a specialized pain OPD or clinic. The diagnosis of CRPS type I is based upon a carefully taken case history and a clinical examination by an experienced practitioner. Imaging diagnostic tools and laboratory findings are of no or only low predicative value. The question of whether SMP exists after diagnosing CRPS type I is eminent for therapy planning. Therefore, diagnostic regional anesthetics are still important in spite of their uncertain prognostic relevance. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, medical treatment, and psychotherapy play an important role in the primary treatment of CRPS type I as noninvasive procedures. Despite heavy criticism, invasive sympathetic block, subsequent to adequate diagnostics, is an

  8. Development of cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention for patients with Dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Salam, K P Abdul; Sharma, Mahendra P; Prakash, Om

    2012-10-01

    Dhat syndrome is a culture-bound syndrome prevalent in the natives of the Indian subcontinent characterized by excessive concern about harmful consequences of loss of semen (ICD-10). Treatment offered to the patients suffering from it continues to be esoteric, unstructured and without standardization. The present study aimed to develop and examine the feasibility of Cognitive - Behavior Therapy module for patients with Dhat syndrome. A draft module was developed based on existing theoretical knowledge and suggestions from five mental health professionals. This module was then applied on five patients with Dhat syndrome to assess and judge the suitability of the module. The pre and post-assessments were carried out using Sexual Knowledge and Attitude Questionnaire - II, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, The Cognitive-Somatic Anxiety Scale, Screener for Somatoform Disorder, International Index for Erectile Function, Clinical Global Impressions, The World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment - BREF. Experiences and insights gained from each patient were used to refine the module before applying on the next patient. The final module consisted of the following components was developed: Basic sex education, cognitive restructuring, relaxation training, imaginal desensitization, masturbatory training as homework and Kegel's exercises and 'start-stop technique' and 'squeeze technique' for sexual dysfunctions. Results of the study reveal that it is feasible to carry out the CBT module in clinical settings. Number of sessions ranged from 11 to 16 sessions. The duration of the session was 45 minutes on the average. Findings of the present study revealed improvement in sexual knowledge, anxiety, depressive and somatic symptoms. Implications and limitations of the study are highlighted and suggestions for future research offered. PMID:23372242

  9. Immuno-therapy of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Extracorporeal Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava

    Methods Results Summary and conclusions Introduction: Existing Medical Management of the Acute Radiation Syndromes (ARS) does not include methods of specific immunotherapy and active detoxication. Though the Acute Radiation Syndromes were defined as an acute toxic poisonous with development of pathological processes: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS), Toxic Multiple Organ Injury (TMOI), Toxic Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome(TMODS), Toxic Multiple Organ Failure (TMOF). Radiation Toxins of SRD Group play an important role as the trigger mechanisms in development of the ARS clinical symptoms. Methods: Immuno-Lympho-Plasmo-Sorption is a type of Immuno-therapy which includes prin-ciples of immunochromato-graphy, plasmopheresis, and hemodialysis. Specific Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies are the active pharmacological agents of immunotherapy . Antiradia-tion Antitoxic Antibodies bind selectively to Radiation Neurotoxins, Cytotoxins, Hematotox-ins and neutralize their toxic activity. We have developed the highly sensitive method and system for extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption with antigen-specific IgG which is clinically important for treatment of the toxic and immunologic phases of the ARS. The method of extracorporeal-immune-lypmh-plasmo-sorption includes Antiradiation Antitoxic Antibodies (AAA) immobilized on microporous polymeric membranes with a pore size that is capable to provide diffusion of blood-lymph plasma. Plasma of blood or lymph of irradiated mammals contains Radiation Toxins (RT) that have toxic and antigenic properties. Radiation Toxins are Antigen-specific to Antitoxic blocking antibodies (Immunoglobulin G). Plasma diffuses through membranes with immobilized AAA and AA-antibodies bind to the polysaccharide chain of tox-ins molecules and complexes of AAA-RT that are captured on membrane surfaces. RT were removed from plasma. Re-transfusion of plasma of blood and lymph had been provided. We show a statistical significant

  10. [Guillain-Barré syndrome: clinical features, immune mechanisms, and therapies].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K

    1996-12-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the peripheral motor nerves and nerve roots. The cause of GBS is unknown; it is though to be immune-mediated. The following seven clinical features usually distinguish this syndrome: 1) the neurological symptoms are preceded 1 to 3 weeks by an antecedent event. 2) symptoms and signs progress rapidly for several days up to 2 weeks, followed by a period of stability before gradual improvement to normal function after several months, 3) there is symmetric weakness, 4) there is a loss of tendon reflexes, 5) cerebrospinal fluid protein is elevated, 6) conduction velocity in motor nerves is reduced and F-waves are absent, and 7) most patients recover functionally. There are variants of this common presentation, such as acute motor axonal neuropathy and acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy, of the many variants, the most aberrant is Fisher syndrome. The clinical criteria for diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome and the electrodiagnostic criteria for demyelination of the peripheral nerve are described. Circulating antineural antibodies directed at a number of antigens have been demonstrated in GBS, occasionally against P2 protein (P2), galactocerebroside, and ganglioside GM1. We studied peripheral blood samples from patients with acute phase GBS using flow cytometry. The proportion of activated T cells (CD4 + HLA-DR +) was increased in comparison to the proportion in healthy controls. The helper-inducer (CD4 + CD29 +) subset was also increased; the suppressor-inducer (CD4 + CD45RA +) subset was neither increased nor decreased. Activated T cells and helper-inducer cells may play a crucial role in the onset of GBS. Lymphocytes sensitized to P2 were demonstrated in the acute stage of GBS, but not in any other neurological diseases. The lymphocytes recognized the P2 residues 60-78. We also demonstrated a significant relationship between GBS and IILA-A2, B61, Cw3, and DR6 antigens. Early

  11. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Revealed by Systems Immunology in a Melanoma Patient Undergoing Anti-PD-1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Greenplate, Allison R; Johnson, Douglas B; Roussel, Mikael; Savona, Michael R; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Puzanov, Igor; Ferrell, P Brent; Irish, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies aimed at blocking the interaction between programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligands have shown impressive efficacy in a variety of malignancies and are generally well tolerated. Research has focused intensely on T cells and their interaction with cells within melanoma tumors, while relatively little is understood about the systems immunology of the cells in the blood during checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Longitudinal cytomic analysis using mass cytometry can characterize all the cells in a small sample of blood and has the potential to reveal key shifts in the cellular milieu occurring during treatment. We report a case of advanced melanoma in which mass cytometry detected abnormal myeloid cells resulting from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in the blood following treatment with an anti-PD-1 agent. Myeloid blasts comprised <1% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) 1 month after the start of treatment. Six months after starting therapy, myeloid blasts comprised 5% of PBMCs, and a bone marrow biopsy confirmed refractory anemia with excess blasts-2 (RAEB-2). Longitudinal mass cytometry immunophenotyping comprehensively characterized blast phenotype evolution and revealed elevated PD-1 expression on the surface of nonblast myeloid cells. These findings highlight the clinical significance of cytomic monitoring, indicate that the myeloid compartment should be monitored during checkpoint inhibitor therapy, and emphasize the value of systems immunology in medicine. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 474-80. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26966176

  12. Efficacy of plasma therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with complement factor H mutations.

    PubMed

    Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Wagner, Eric; Phan, Véronique; Clermont, Marie-José; Merouani, Aïcha; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Goodship, Timothy H J; Robitaille, Pierre

    2008-08-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) frequently results in end-stage renal failure and can be lethal. Several studies have established an association between quantitative or qualitative abnormalities in complement factor H and aHUS. Although plasma infusion and exchange are often advocated, guidelines have yet to be established. Long-term outcome for patients under treatment is still unknown. We describe a patient who, at 7 months of age, presented with aHUS associated with combined de novo complement factor H mutations (S1191L and V1197A) on the same allele. Laboratory investigations showed normal levels of complements C4, C3 and factor H. Plasma exchanges and large-dose infusion therapy resulted in a resolution of hemolysis and recovery of renal function. Three recurrences were successfully treated by intensification of the plasma infusion treatment to intervals of 2 or 3 days. This patient showed good response to large doses of plasma infusions and her condition remained stable for 30 months with weekly plasma infusions (30 ml/kg). Long-term tolerance and efficacy of such intensive plasma therapy are still unknown. Reported secondary failure of plasma therapy in factor H deficiency warrants the search for alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:18425537

  13. Continuous subcutaneous IGF-1 therapy via insulin pump in a patient with Donohue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weber, David R.; Stanescu, Diana E.; Semple, Robert; Holland, Cheryl; Magge, Sheela N.

    2015-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (DS) is a severe form of congenital insulin resistance due to mutation(s) in the insulin receptor (INSR) gene. Given the similarities between insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) receptors, recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1) has been used to treat severe insulin resistance due to INSR mutation(s). Traditional subcutaneous therapy may be limited by the shortened IGF-1 half-life in these patients. We report the case of a female with molecularly confirmed DS treated with continuous rhIGF-1 therapy via an insulin pump. With treatment, the patient’s hemoglobin A1c decreased from 9.8% to 8.8%, and her weight increased by 0.8 kg. Development of an ovarian tumor complicated her course, but it was unclear whether this was related to rhIGF-1 therapy. Limited treatment options exist for patients with DS. The use of continuous rhIGF-1 via an insulin pump may be a viable option, although further experience is needed to establish safety and efficacy. PMID:25153212

  14. Directed Therapy: An Approach to the Improved Treatment of Exfoliation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Angelilli, Allison; Ritch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related, generalized disorder of the extracellular matrix characterized by the production and progressive accumulation of a fibrillar extracellular material in many ocular tissues and is the most common identifiable cause of open-angle glaucoma worldwide. Exfoliation syndrome plays an etiologic role in open-angle glaucoma, angle-closure glaucoma, cataract, and retinal vein occlusion. It is accompanied by an increase in serious complications at the time of cataract extraction, such as zonular dialysis, capsular rupture, and vitreous loss. It is associated systemically with an increasing number of vascular disorders, hearing loss, and Alzheimer's disease. Exfoliation syndrome appears to be a disease of elastic tissue microfibrils. Directed therapy simply means devising specific treatments for specific diseases. There was little incentive to attempt to distinguish between various open-angle glaucomas if the treatments were essentially the same. However, this view also prevented the application of directed therapy in those instances in which such was available and applicable. Pilocarpine has multiple beneficial actions in eyes with XFS. Not only does it lower IOP, but by increasing aqueous outflow, it should enable the trabecular meshwork to clear more rapidly, and by limiting pupillary movement, should slow the progression of the disease. Theoretically, miotics should be the first line of treatment. Pilocarpine 2% q.h.s. can provide sufficient limitation of pupillary mobility without causing these side effects. In 2007, two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of the lysyl oxidase-like 1 (LOXL1) gene located on chromosome 15 were specifically associated with XFS and XFG. LOXL1 is a member of the lysyl oxidase family of enzymes, which are essential for the formation, stabilization, maintenance, and remodelling of elastic fibers and prevent age-related loss of elasticity of tissues. LOXL1 protein is a major

  15. Evidence for Long-term Efficacy and Safety of Gene Therapy for Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome in Preclinical Models

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Francesco; Bosticardo, Marita; Charrier, Sabine; Draghici, Elena; Locci, Michela; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Panaroni, Cristina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Sanvito, Francesca; Doglioni, Claudio; Liabeuf, Marie; Gjata, Bernard; Montus, Marie; Siminovitch, Katherine; Aiuti, Alessandro; Naldini, Luigi; Dupré, Loïc; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Galy, Anne; Villa, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome (WAS) is a life-threatening X-linked disease characterized by immunodeficiency, thrombocytopenia, autoimmunity, and malignancies. Gene therapy could represent a therapeutic option for patients lacking a suitable bone marrow (BM) donor. In this study, we analyzed the long-term outcome of WAS gene therapy mediated by a clinically compatible lentiviral vector (LV) in a large cohort of wasnull mice. We demonstrated stable and full donor engraftment and Wiskott–Aldrich Syndrome protein (WASP) expression in various hematopoietic lineages, up to 12 months after gene therapy. Importantly, we observed a selective advantage for T and B lymphocytes expressing transgenic WASP. T-cell receptor (TCR)-driven T-cell activation, as well as B-cell's ability to migrate in response to CXCL13, was fully restored. Safety was evaluated throughout the long-term follow-up of primary and secondary recipients of WAS gene therapy. WAS gene therapy did not affect the lifespan of treated animals. Both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tumors arose, but we excluded the association with gene therapy in all cases. Demonstration of long-term efficacy and safety of WAS gene therapy mediated by a clinically applicable LV is a key step toward the implementation of a gene therapy clinical trial for WAS. PMID:19259069

  16. Potential future therapies for irritable bowel syndrome: will disease modifying therapy as opposed to symptomatic control become a reality?

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin C

    2005-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome can remit spontaneously, implying cure is possible. Predictors of good prognosis include a short history, acute onset(possibly postinfective origin), absence of psychological disorders, and resolution of chronic life stressors. Possible-disease modifying treatments with long-lasting effects include diet and anti-inflammatory and psychological treatments. Dietary modifications, which often involve excluding dairy and wheat products, are successful in some patients. Anti-inflammatory treatments have been subjected to one RCT in postinfective IBS without benefit. Probiotics may have benefit in altering bacterial flora and as anti-inflammatory agents, but further trials are needed before they can be recommended. Psychological treatments may produce long-lasting responses. Relaxation therapy appears to have a nonspecific benefit. Psychotherapy has been shown to have long-term benefit and is particularly acceptable to, and effective for, those with overt psychological distress. Hypnotherapy has been shown to be effective in randomized placebo controlled trials and has a sustained effect. PMID:15862939

  17. Neurologic improvement without angiographic improvement after antithyroid therapy in a patient with Moyamoya syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishigami, Akiko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Rieko; Miyashita, Fumio; Iihara, Koji; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease with special complications, including Graves' disease, is called as moyamoya syndrome. A 22-year-old Japanese woman had left middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction complicated with Graves' disease. She had right-sided hemiparesis that deteriorated on day 8 with the infarct growth and thyrotoxicosis. On angiogram, the left MCA was occluded at the origin without moyamoya vessels. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed misery-perfusion phenomenon in the left MCA territory. After initiation of the antithyroid therapy, her hemiparesis became milder. Seventeen months later, her thyroid function was normalized and net-like collateral moyamoya vessels proliferated in the left MCA territory. Misery-perfusion phenomenon persisted on PET. This report is unique in the point of neurologic recovery of the moyamoya patient right after initiation of antithyroid medication without radiological improvement. PMID:24119625

  18. Combination anti-VEGF and corticosteroid therapy for idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, Gagan K; Payne, John F; Ray, Robin; Mehta, Sonia; Bergstrom, Chris S; Yeh, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Vision loss associated with the idiopathic retinal vasculitis, aneurysms, and neuroretinitis (IRVAN) syndrome most commonly occurs from macular edema or complications related to neovascularization. The authors present a case of advanced IRVAN associated with a massive exudative response characterized by peripheral retinal telangiectasias, exudative retinal detachment, and macular edema with lipid maculopathy. The patient was managed successfully with visual acuity from hand motion to 20/150 using a combination of local corticosteroids, intravitreal bevacizumab, panretinal photocoagulation, and eventually pars plana vitrectomy for progressive vitreomacular traction. VEGF- and non-VEGF-mediated mechanisms appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of IRVAN given the efficacy of combination therapy. [ophthalmic surg lasers imaging retina. 2013;44:599-602.]. PMID:24221466

  19. [Therapy of thrombocytosis in myeloproliferative syndromes using recombinant interferon-alpha-2a].

    PubMed

    Tichelli, A; Gratwohl, A; Delacrétaz, F; Dazzi, H; Stebler, C; Wernli, M; Holdener, E E; Nissen, C; Speck, B

    1989-09-30

    In a prospective open study 16 consecutive patients with a myeloproliferative syndrome and thrombocytosis were treated with interferon (IFN) alpha-2a. 4 patients had polycythemia vera, 4 essential thrombocythemia, 3 myeloid metaplasia and 5 chronic granulocytic leukemia. Platelet counts decreased in all treated patients within 2 to 12 weeks from a median value of 1010 x 10(9)/l to 350 x 10(9)/l. No primary or secondary resistance was observed. The initial dose of IFN was 9 m U per day. After correction of the thrombocytosis, it was progressively reduced to a minimum dose of 3 m U per week. Despite the good platelet response to IFN, leukocytosis persisted in 3 patients and polycythemia in a further 3. Side effects and poor compliance required discontinuation of therapy in 6 patients. Special attention is focused on the follow-up in 6 patients who have been treated for more than 15 months. PMID:2799342

  20. Immunosuppressive therapy for patients with Down syndrome and idiopathic aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kyogo; Muramatsu, Hideki; Okuno, Yusuke; Narita, Atsushi; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Horikoshi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Kojima, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is a rare hematological complication of Down syndrome (DS). The safety and efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy (IST) in individuals with DS remain unknown. We used a standard regimen of IST, comprising antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine A, to treat three children with DS and idiopathic acquired AA. Two patients achieved a hematological (complete or partial) response and became transfusion independent at the final follow-up. The third patient failed to respond to IST and underwent bone marrow transplantation from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donor. None of the patients experienced severe or unexpected adverse events during IST. Our experience suggests that IST is a safe and reasonable treatment, even in individuals with DS who suffer from AA and lack an HLA-matched sibling donor. PMID:27107757

  1. Refractory atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy responsive to bortezomib-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev; Gertz, Morie A; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a relatively rare disorder described by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Atypical HUS could be genetic, acquired, or idiopathic (without known genetic changes or environmental triggers). Monoclonal protein has uncommonly been reported as a cause of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). We report a 59-year-old white man who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) with MAHA and was given a diagnosis of aHUS with monoclonal gammopathy. His kidney function and proteinuria worsened with persistent hemolysis despite eculizumab and later cyclophosphamide and prednisone treatment. He responded well to VRD (bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone) regimen. Renal function, proteinuria, and hemolysis all improved, and he was been in remission for more than 15 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment with bortezomib-based regimen for a patient with aHUS and monoclonal protein refractory to eculizumab therapy. PMID:25345382

  2. Breaking the cycle: cognitive behavioral therapy and biofeedback training in a case of cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slutsker, Barak; Konichezky, Andres; Gothelf, Doron

    2010-12-01

    The present article presents a case of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) along with heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback training for the treatment of a medication unresponsive 13-year-old boy with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). CVS is characterized by recurring stereotypic episodes of vomiting, interspersed with asymptomatic periods. Triggers for vomiting include anticipatory anxiety related to school examinations, family conflicts, and birthday parties as well as infectious diseases, and certain foods. Current treatment design addressed two pivotal etiological factors: autonomic dysregulation and anticipatory anxiety. Treatment outcome suggests that vomiting episodes may be successfully prevented by aiding the patient to identify and manage precipitant psychological stressors, to regulate HRV patterns, and gain a renewed sense of bodily control and self-efficacy. Further research is suggested using a controlled study with pre- and post-behavioral and stress measures to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT and biofeedback training compared to pharmacotherapy and placebo. PMID:21154016

  3. Lichen planus-like drug reaction associated with recombinant human growth hormone therapy in a child patient with Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mariana Quirino Silveira; Mendonca, Elismauro Fancisco

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disease with an incidence rate of between 1:2000 and 1:5000 live female births. The treatment of TS differs according to age and Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (RHGH) therapy is usually given for the treatment of short stature in girls with TS in childhood. We describe the first case of a TS patient who presented with a clinical picture compatible with oral and palmoplantar lichen planus-like reaction during RHGH therapy; spontaneous remission occurred after therapy suspension. PMID:27136634

  4. Manual Therapy and Exercise for a Patient With Neck-Tongue Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Niethamer, Lisa; Myers, Robin

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is defined as neck and/or head pain accompanied by ipsilateral dysesthesia of the tongue with sudden rotation of the head. Proposed causes include compression or irritation of the C2 nerve root as it courses behind the atlantoaxial joint or hypertrophy of the inferior oblique muscle. The primary purpose of this case report was to describe the conservative physical therapy treatment of a patient with uncomplicated NTS. Case Description The patient was a 13-year-old girl who reported insidious onset of sharp pain in the neck, numbness/tingling of the ipsilateral tongue/face, and tinnitus with cervical rotation. Symptoms occurred several times a week for approximately 10 seconds. Examination revealed impaired function, increased forward head posture, decreased cervical range of motion, and positive neurodynamic assessment. The patient's treatment included manual therapy and exercise for postural stabilization. Outcomes Following 8 visits, pain of the neck and tongue numbness had resolved. Score on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), cervical range of motion, and posture had also improved. At the 22-month follow-up, infrequent, momentary symptoms in the neck and dysesthesia of the tongue were reported. The PSFS remained the same. Objective measures were normal. Discussion This case report describes the physical therapy management of an individual with NTS. The management strategy followed a protocol similar to that used for cervicogenic headaches, due to the involvement of the upper cervical spine with both NTS and cervicogenic headache and the lack of evidence for the treatment of NTS. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(3):217-224. Epub 11 Feb 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6195. PMID:26868897

  5. Cefepime compared with ceftazidime as initial therapy for serious bacterial infections and sepsis syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, H; Hoepelman, A I; Rozenberg-Arska, M; Branger, J M; Voskuil, J H; Geers, A B; Kluyver, M; Hart, H C; Poest-Clement, E; van Beugen, L

    1994-01-01

    In an open randomized multicenter comparative study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of cefepime (CP; 2.0 g given intravenously every 12 h) and ceftazidime (CZ; 2.0 g given intravenously every 8 h) as initial treatment for adult patients with suspected serious bacterial infections. A total of 133 patients entered the study, of whom 114 were evaluable for clinical and microbiological response assessment: 56 received CP and 58 received CZ. About 50% (30 who received CP and 25 who received CZ) fulfilled the criteria of the sepsis syndrome. The treatment groups were comparable with respect to sex distribution, mean age, underlying diseases, treatment duration, APACHE II score, and type of infection. The most commonly cultured microorganisms were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. The causative microorganisms were eradicated from 92% (37 of 40) of patients with a microbiologically documented infection who underwent treatment with CP; they were eradicated from 86% (42 to 49) of patients who received CZ. The responses of only clinically documented infections in the CP group were 90% (27 of 30 patients); in the CZ group they were 87% (26 of 30 patients). When patients fulfilled the criteria of the sepsis syndrome (septic shock excluded), the causative microorganisms were eradicated from 89% (16 of 18) of CP-treated patients and 86% (12 of 14) of CZ-treated patients. None of these differences was statistically significant. Mortality was the same in both groups (four patients in each group) and was not attributable to the study medication. In conclusion, CP is at least as effective and as safe as CZ, as initial antimicrobial therapy for suspected serious bacterial infections in nonneutropenic patients with or without the sepsis syndrome. CP has the additional advantage in that it can be given twice daily, which may lead to a decrease in hospital costs. PMID:8203833

  6. Emerging antiplatelet therapy for coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Packard, Kathleen A; Campbell, Jennifer A; Knezevich, Jon T; Davis, Estella M

    2012-03-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is used widely with proven benefit for the prevention of further ischemic cardiac complications in patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and a history of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The limitations of conventional antiplatelet therapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, or prasugrel, as well as the fact that rates of recurrent ischemic events still remain high with use of these agents, underscore the need to investigate alternate agents that may further reduce event rates while limiting bleeding risk. The selection of antiplatelet therapy is further influenced by the following: ticagrelor was approved in July 2011 by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and clopidogrel is slated to become available as a generic productin 2012. We provide an overview of emerging agents for the treatment of CAD and ACS, including the reversible P2Y(12) antagonists ticagrelor, cangrelor, and elinogrel, and a new class of oral protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) inhibitors, vorapaxar and atopaxar.The recently approved P2Y(12) antagonists prasugrel and ticagrelor demonstrate enhanced ability to prevent adverse cardiac outcomes. However, this comes at a cost of a potential increased risk of bleeding. New adverse effects have also emerged, including dyspnea for all of the reversible P2Y(12) antagonists (ticagrelor, cangrelor, and elinogrel) and ventricular pauses for ticagrelor. In addition, the newer P2Y(12) antagonists have a faster onset and offset. Two of these agents, cangrelor and elinogrel, are available as intravenous formulations, which may provide additional benefits in patients who undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Trials with the PAR-1 inhibitors have also shown trends toward reductions in cardiac events, but not without the possibility of increased bleeding. More than ever, as the arsenal of antiplatelet therapy expands, health care providers need to understand the pharmacologic and pharmacodynamic differences

  7. IMPACT OF CHRONIC ANTI-CHOLESTEROL THERAPY ON DEVELOPMENT OF MICROVASCULAR RAREFACTION IN THE METABOLIC SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Goodwill, Adam G.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; James, Milinda E.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2011-01-01

    Object The obese Zucker rat (OZR) model of the metabolic syndrome is partly characterized by moderate hypercholesterolemia in addition to other contributing co-morbidities. Previous results suggest that vascular dysfunction in OZR is associated with chronic reduction in vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and chronic inflammation, both frequently associated with hypercholesterolemia. As such, we evaluated the impact of chronic cholesterol reducing therapy on the development of impaired skeletal muscle arteriolar reactivity and microvessel density in OZR and its impact on chronic inflammation and NO bioavailability. Materials and Methods Beginning at 7 weeks of age, male OZR were treated with gemfibrozil, probucol, atorvastatin or simvastatin (in chow) for 10 weeks. Subsequently, plasma and vascular samples were collected for biochemical/molecular analyses, while arteriolar reactivity and microvessel network structure were assessed using established methodologies after 3, 6 and 10 weeks of drug therapy Results All interventions were equally effective at reducing total cholesterol, although only the statins also blunted the progressive reductions to vascular NO bioavailability, evidenced by greater maintenance of acetylcholine-induced dilator responses, an attenuation of adrenergic constrictor reactivity, and an improvement in agonist-induced NO production. Comparably, while minimal improvements to arteriolar wall mechanics were identified with any of the interventions, chronic statin treatment reduced the rate of microvessel rarefaction in OZR. Associated with these improvements was a striking statin-induced reduction in inflammation in OZR, such that numerous markers of inflammation were correlated with improved microvascular reactivity and density. However, using multivariate discriminant analyses, plasma RANTES, IL-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α were determined to be the strongest contributors to differences between groups, although their relative importance varied

  8. Injury to the lung from cancer therapy: Clinical syndromes, measurable endpoints, and potential scoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.; Rubin, P.; Phillips, T.L.

    1995-03-30

    Toxicity of the respiratory system is a common side effect and complication of anticancer therapy that can result in significant morbidity. The range of respiratory compromise can extend from acute lethal events to degrees of chronic pulmonary decompensation, manifesting years after the initial cancer therapy. This review examines the anatomic-histologic background of the lung and the normal functional anatomic unit. The pathophysiology of radiation and chemotherapy induced lung injury is discussed as well as the associated clinical syndromes. Radiation tolerance doses and volumes are assessed in addition to chemotherapy tolerance and risk factors and radiation-chemotherapy interactions. There are a variety of measurable endpoints for detection and screening. Because of the wide range of available quantitative tests, it would seem that the measurement of impaired lung function is possible. The development of staging systems for acute and late toxicity is discussed an a new staging system for Late Effects in Normal Tissues :(LENT) is proposed. 115 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Treatment of snoring with positional therapy in patients with positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Lee, Li-Ang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Position therapy plays a role in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether position therapy using a head-positioning pillow (HPP) could reduce snoring sounds in patients with mild-to-moderate positional OSAS, taking into account the potential confounding effects of body weight. A total of 25 adults with positional OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]supine:AHInon-supine ≥ 2) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were asked to use their own pillows at home during the first night (N0), and the HPP during the second (N1) and third (N2) nights. The primary outcome measures included the subjective snoring severity (SS, measured on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10) and the objective snoring index (SI, expressed as the number of snoring events per hour measured on an acoustic analytical program). Both endpoints were recorded over three consecutive nights. From N0 to N2, the median SS and SI values in the entire study cohort decreased significantly from 5.0 to 4.0 and from 218.0 events/h to 115.0 events/h, respectively. In the subgroup of overweight patients, SS showed a significant improvement, whereas SI did not. Both SS and SI were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients. PMID:26657174

  10. Recent insights: mesenchymal stromal/stem cell therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Shahd; Laffey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes respiratory failure, which is associated with severe inflammation and lung damage and has a high mortality and for which there is no therapy. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are adult multi-progenitor cells that can modulate the immune response and enhance repair of damaged tissue and thus may provide a therapeutic option for ARDS. MSCs demonstrate efficacy in diverse in vivo models of ARDS, decreasing bacterial pneumonia and ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury while enhancing repair following ventilator-induced lung injury. MSCs reduce the pro-inflammatory response to injury while augmenting the host response to bacterial infection. MSCs appear to exert their effects via multiple mechanisms—some are cell interaction dependent whereas others are paracrine dependent resulting from both soluble secreted products and microvesicles/exosomes derived from the cells. Strategies to further enhance the efficacy of MSCs, such as by overexpressing anti-inflammatory or pro-repair molecules, are also being investigated. Encouragingly, early phase clinical trials of MSCs in patients with ARDS are under way, and experience with these cells in trials for other diseases suggests that the cells are well tolerated. Although considerable translational challenges, such as concerns regarding cell manufacture scale-up and issues regarding cell potency and batch variability, must be overcome, MSCs constitute a highly promising potential therapy for ARDS. PMID:27408702

  11. Treatment of snoring with positional therapy in patients with positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Chyuan; Lee, Li-Ang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Position therapy plays a role in treating snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether position therapy using a head-positioning pillow (HPP) could reduce snoring sounds in patients with mild-to-moderate positional OSAS, taking into account the potential confounding effects of body weight. A total of 25 adults with positional OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI]supine:AHInon-supine ≥ 2) were prospectively enrolled. Patients were asked to use their own pillows at home during the first night (N0), and the HPP during the second (N1) and third (N2) nights. The primary outcome measures included the subjective snoring severity (SS, measured on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 10) and the objective snoring index (SI, expressed as the number of snoring events per hour measured on an acoustic analytical program). Both endpoints were recorded over three consecutive nights. From N0 to N2, the median SS and SI values in the entire study cohort decreased significantly from 5.0 to 4.0 and from 218.0 events/h to 115.0 events/h, respectively. In the subgroup of overweight patients, SS showed a significant improvement, whereas SI did not. Both SS and SI were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients. PMID:26657174

  12. [Subcutaneous stimulation as additional therapy to spinal cord stimulation in a post-laminectomy syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Akbaş, Mert; Yeğin, Mehmet Arif; Özdemir, İrem; Göksu, Ethem; Akyüz, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation as treatment of chronic low back pain via neuromodulation has been frequently performed in recent years. The dorsal column is stimulated by an electrode placed at the epidural region. In the case presently described, subcutaneous lead was implanted in a patient with failed back syndrome after spinal cord stimulation was inadequate to treat back and gluteal pain. A 65-year-old male had undergone surgery to treat lumbar disc herniation, after which he received physical therapy and multiple steroid injections due to unrelieved pain. He was admitted to the pain clinic with pain radiating to right gluteal muscle and leg. Spinal cord stimulation was performed and, as pain was not relieved, subcutaneous lead was applied to the right cluneal nerve distribution. Following treatment, the patient scored 1-2 on visual analog scale. Pain had been reduced by over 80%. Octad electrode was placed between T8 and T10 vertebrae after Tuohy needle was introduced to intervertebral area between L1 and L2. Paresthesia occurred in the right extremity. Boundaries were determined by area of right gluteal region in which paresthesia did not occur. Octad electrode was placed subcutaneously after vertical line was drawn from center point. Paresthesia occurred throughout the region. Pulse wave was 390-450 msec; frequency was 10-30 Hz. Subcutaneous electrode replacement is effective additional therapy when pain is not relieved by spinal cord stimulation. PMID:27225614

  13. Clinical pilot study: efficacy of triple antibiotic therapy in Blastocystis positive irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blastocystis species are common human enteric parasites. Carriage has been linked to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Treatment of Blastocystis spp. with antimicrobials is problematic and insensitive diagnostic methods and re-infection complicate assessment of eradication. We investigated whether triple antibiotic therapy comprising diloxanide furoate, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and secnidazole (TAB) given to diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) patients positive for Blastocystis would achieve eradication. Methods In a longitudinal, prospective case study 10 D-IBS Blastocystis-positive patients took 14 days of diloxanide furoate 500 mg thrice daily, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 160/80 mg twice daily and secnidazole 400 mg thrice daily. Faecal specimens were collected at baseline, day 15 and 4 weeks after completion of TAB. Specimens were analysed using faecal smear, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 16 SSU rRNA. Patients kept a concurrent clinical diary. Results Six (60%) patients cleared Blastocystis spp. after TAB, including three who had failed previous therapy. Subtypes detected were ST3 (60%), ST4 (40%), ST1 (20%) and ST7, 8 (10%); four patients had mixed ST infections. Serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels were low in 40% of patients. Higher rates of Blastocystis clearance were observed in patients symptomatic for less than a year (Mann–Whitney, p = 0.032, 95% confidence) with no associations found with age, previous antibiotic therapy, faecal parasite load, ST, IgA level or clinical improvement. Conclusions Clearance of Blastocystis spp. was achieved with TAB in 60% of D-IBS patients, an improvement over conventional monotherapy. Higher clearance rates are needed to facilitate investigation of the relevance of this parasite in clinically heterogenous IBS. PMID:25349629

  14. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Isert, Mecki; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Weil, Yvonne; Tirneci, Vanessa; Kasper, Alexander; Weber, Adele; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Herrmann, Eva; Linnemann, Birgit

    2015-08-01

    Because of the possible interference of antiphospholipid antibodies (APL) with the phospholipid component of thromboplastin reagents, concerns have been raised about the validity of international normalized ratio (INR) testing to monitor anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To investigate the reliability of the INR, we determined the INR using various prothrombin time (PT) assays and compared the results with those of a chromogenic factor X (CFX) assay. The study cohort consisted of 40 APS patients and 100 APL-negative patients who were on anticoagulant therapy for reasons other than APS. The agreement (i.e. the percentage of patients with a difference ≤0.5 INR units) between the PT-derived INR and CFX-derived INR equivalents was only moderate in both patient groups. The best agreement with CFX-derived INR equivalents was observed for the Thromborel S reagent in APS patients (69.1 %) and for Neoplastin Plus in APL-negative patients (72.0 %). Regarding the results for the point-of-care system CoaguChek XS, an agreement between the INR and the CFX-derived INR equivalent was less frequently observed in the APS patients (55.6 vs. 67.8 %; p = 0.050). When considering all 3058 pairs of INR tests within the international sensitivity index (ISI)-calibrated range of 1.5 to 4.5 s, we did not observe a higher variability of INR values in either the APS patient group or the subgroup of APS patients positive for lupus coagulants compared with the APL-negative controls. In conclusion, monitoring vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy with laboratory INR measurements seems to be suitable for the majority of APS patients. PMID:25859986

  15. COMBINATION THERAPY EFFECTIVENESS OF EZETIMIBE AND ATORVASTATIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Japaridze, L; Sadunishvili, M; Megreladze, I

    2016-03-01

    Atorvastatin reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and the risk of cardiovascular events, but whether the addition of ezetimibe (EZE) , a nonstatin drug that reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, can reduce the rate of cardiovascular events further is not known. We conducted a 16-week one-center, prospective, randomized, and open-label clinical trial, involving 323 patients who had been hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome within the preceding 14 days. They were received atorvastatin 20 mg during 28 days and after that 292 patients, who had LDL cholesterol levels≥1.81 mmol/L, were randomized to ezetimibe 10 mg/day co-administered with atorvastatin therapy (EZE+Statin) or doubling their current atorvastatin dose. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina requiring rehospitalization, coronary revascularization (≥30 days after randomization), or nonfatal stroke. At 16 weeks, the mean LDL cholesterol level during the study was 1.60 mmol per liter in the atorvastatine-ezetimibe group, as compared with 1.91 mmol per liter in the atorvastatin-monotherapy group (p<0.001). The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 16 weeks were 88 .1 % in the atorvastatin-ezetimibe group and 77.0 % in the atorvastatin monotherapy group (absolute risk reduction, 11.1 percentage points; hazard ratio, 2.099 ; 95% confidence interval, 1.165 to 3.781; p=0.014). Patients receiving ezetimibe and statin were more likely to achieve target LDL-C after 16 weeks compared to patients doubling their statin dose. When added to statin therapy, ezetimibe resulted in incremental lowering of LDL cholesterol levels and improved cardiovascular outcomes. Ezetimibe/statin combination therapy was well tolerated among this patients, without safety concerns. PMID:27119829

  16. The Benefit of Movement: Dance/Movement Therapy and Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Chloe M.

    2016-01-01

    There are various forms of therapies for children with disabilities, including physical therapy, speech therapy, and alternative therapies such as music and dance therapy. Each form of therapy has its benefits for those with disabilities, but ultimately the success of the therapy rests on the attention paid to the individual. Especially for…

  17. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Diminish Fibromyalgia Syndrome – Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Efrati, Shai; Golan, Haim; Bechor, Yair; Faran, Yifat; Daphna-Tekoah, Shir; Sekler, Gal; Fishlev, Gregori; Ablin, Jacob N.; Bergan, Jacob; Volkov, Olga; Friedman, Mony; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Buskila, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) is a persistent and debilitating disorder estimated to impair the quality of life of 2–4% of the population, with 9:1 female-to-male incidence ratio. FMS is an important representative example of central nervous system sensitization and is associated with abnormal brain activity. Key symptoms include chronic widespread pain, allodynia and diffuse tenderness, along with fatigue and sleep disturbance. The syndrome is still elusive and refractory. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on symptoms and brain activity in FMS. Methods and Findings A prospective, active control, crossover clinical trial. Patients were randomly assigned to treated and crossover groups: The treated group patients were evaluated at baseline and after HBOT. Patients in the crossover-control group were evaluated three times: baseline, after a control period of no treatment, and after HBOT. Evaluations consisted of physical examination, including tender point count and pain threshold, extensive evaluation of quality of life, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for evaluation of brain activity. The HBOT protocol comprised 40 sessions, 5 days/week, 90 minutes, 100% oxygen at 2ATA. Sixty female patients were included, aged 21–67 years and diagnosed with FMS at least 2 years earlier. HBOT in both groups led to significant amelioration of all FMS symptoms, with significant improvement in life quality. Analysis of SPECT imaging revealed rectification of the abnormal brain activity: decrease of the hyperactivity mainly in the posterior region and elevation of the reduced activity mainly in frontal areas. No improvement in any of the parameters was observed following the control period. Conclusions The study provides evidence that HBOT can improve the symptoms and life quality of FMS patients. Moreover, it shows that HBOT can induce neuroplasticity and significantly rectify abnormal

  18. The immune pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuhuang; Zhou, Huaying; He, Yan; Chen, Zi; He, Bo; He, Mei

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the immunological pathogenesis of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). A total of 238 patients with AIDS who received initial HAART were included in this prospective cohort study. Blood samples were collected immediately, at baseline, at week 12, and at week 24 after initial HAART and at the onset of IRIS. Lymphocyte subsets, Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and interleukin (IL)-7 levels were measured by flow cytometry or ELISA. Among the 238 patients with AIDS who received HAART, 47 patients developed IRIS. The percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive, memory, and activated cells exhibited no significant differences between AIDS patients with and without IRIS 24 weeks after initial HAART. The percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells was lower in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients before HAART, 12 weeks after HAART, 24 weeks after HAART, and at the onset of IRIS. IL-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were significantly higher at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. In contrast, IL-4 and IL-10 levels were significantly lower at week 4 and at the onset of IRIS in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients. Plasma IL-7 decreased gradually with the progression of HAART. The level of IL-7 was higher in IRIS patients than in non-IRIS patients at all follow-up time points. An imbalance of Th1/Th2 cytokines, a consistently low CD(+)CD25(+)Fox3(+) percentage, and a high IL-7 level may be crucial in the pathogenesis of IRIS in AIDS patients who had received HAART. PMID:25131160

  19. [Regional intraosseous thrombolytic therapy in comprehensive treatment of patients with diabetic foot syndrome].

    PubMed

    Beliaev, A N; Rodin, A N; Kozlov, S A

    2016-01-01

    The authors assessed efficacy of regional intraosseous administration of urokinase medac in comprehensive treatment of patients with complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome by means of analysing therapeutic results in a total of 65 patients presenting with pyonecrotic complications of diabetic foot. The patients were subdivided into 2 groups. The control group was composed of 35 patients receiving basic therapy. The study group comprised 30 patients subjected to comprehensive treatment including regional intraosseous (into the heel bone of the affected limb) administration of urokinase medac at a dose of 100 thousand IU for 5 days. Efficacy of treatment was evaluated by the course of the wound process, indices of haemostasis, free radical oxidation, results of surgical treatment. In patients of the Study Group the terms of wound purification from pyonecrotic masses amounted to 9.8±0.3 days, which was by 4.7 days less than in the Control Group patients (p<0.01), marginal epithelialization of wounds also occurred averagely by 6.4 days faster. On day 22 of using the basic therapy alone, the haemostasis system preserved the condition of coagulation activity. The Study Group patients as early as on day 5 of treatment demonstrated shifts towards normocoagulation. In the Control Group by day 22 of treatment, the level of malonic dialdehyde decreased by 18.5%, the index of catalase activity increased by 24.6% (p<0.05); in the Study Group the level of malonic dialdehyde decreased by 42.6% and catalase activity increased by 69.4% (p<0.01). On the background of using urokinase the number of high amputations decreased by 18% and the number of operations with the supporting function preserved decreased by 12% as compared with basic therapy alone. A conclusion was made that additional use of regional intraosseous administration of urokinase medac as compared with basic therapy alone promoted a more significant decrease in the coagulation activity of blood and the level of

  20. Benefits of long-term GH therapy in Prader-Willi syndrome: a 4-year study.

    PubMed

    Carrel, Aaron L; Myers, Susan E; Whitman, Barbara Y; Allen, David B

    2002-04-01

    Obesity, poor growth, and hypotonia in children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are accompanied by abnormal body composition resembling a GH-deficient state. Hypothalamic dysfunction in PWS includes decreased GH secretion, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for GH treatment. While short-term benefits of treatment with GH have been shown, whether these beneficial effects are dose dependent and persist or wane with prolonged therapy remains uncertain. Effects of 24 additional months of GH treatment at varying doses (0.3, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/m(2).d) on growth, body composition, strength and agility, pulmonary function, resting energy expenditure (REE), and fat utilization were assessed in 46 children with PWS, who had previously been treated with GH therapy (1 mg/m(2).d) for 12-24 months. Percent body fat, lean muscle mass, and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Indirect calorimetry was used to determine REE and to calculate respiratory quotient. A modified Bruininks-Oseretski test of physical performance evaluated strength and agility. During months 24-48 of GH therapy, continued beneficial effects on body composition (decrease in fat mass and increase in lean body mass), growth velocity, and REE occurred with GH therapy doses of 1.0 and 1.5 mg/m(2).d (P < 0.05), but not with 0.3 mg/m(2).d. BMD continued to improve at all doses of GH (P < 0.05). Prior improvements in strength and agility that occurred during the initial 24 months were sustained but did not improve further during the additional 24 months regardless of dose. Salutary and sustained GH-induced changes in growth, body composition, BMD, and physical function in children with PWS can be achieved with daily administration of GH doses > or =1 mg/m(2). Lower doses of GH, (0.3 mg/m(2).d) effective in improving body composition in GHD adults, do not appear to be effective in children with PWS at sustaining improvement in body composition. PMID:11932286

  1. Outcome following Gene Therapy in Patients with Severe Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abina, Salima Hacein-Bey; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Blondeau, Johanna; Caccavelli, Laure; Charrier, Sabine; Buckland, Karen; Picard, Capucine; Six, Emmanuelle; Himoudi, Nourredine; Gilmour, Kimberly; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Hara, Havinder; Xu-Bayford, Jinhua; Rivat, Christine; Touzot, Fabien; Mavilio, Fulvio; Lim, Annick; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Héritier, Sébastien; Lefrere, Francois; Magalon, Jeremy; Pengue-Koyi, Isabelle; Honnet, Géraldine; Blanche, Stéphane; Sherman, Eric A.; Male, Frances; Berry, Charles; Malani, Nirav; Bushman, Frederic D.; Fischer, Alain; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Galy, Anne; Cavazzana, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Importance Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a rare primary immunodeficiency associated with severe microthrombocytopenia. Partially HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is associated with significant co-morbidity. Objective To assess the outcome and safety of autologous HSC gene therapy in WAS. Design Gene-corrected autologous HSC were infused in 7 consecutive WAS patients (age range: 0.8 to 15.5 years, mean 7 years) following myeloablative conditioning. Setting and participants: Patients with severe WAS lacking HLA-matched related or unrelated HSC donors were treated between December 2010 and January 2014. The follow up of patients in this intermediate analysis ranged from 9 to 42 months. Intervention A single infusion of gene-modified CD34+ cells with an advanced lentiviral vector. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Primary outcomes were improvement at 24 months in eczema, the frequency and severity of infections, bleeding tendency, autoimmunity and reduction in disease-related days of hospitalization. Secondary outcomes were improvement in immunological and haematological parameters, and evidence for safety through vector integration analysis. Results Six out of the 7 patients were alive at the time of last follow-up (mean and median follow-up time: 28 and 27 months respectively) and showed sustained clinical benefit. One patient died 7 months after treatment from pre-existing drug- resistant herpes virus infections. Eczema and susceptibility to infections resolved in all 6 patients. Autoimmunity improved in 5/5 patients. No severe bleeding episodes were recorded after treatment, and at last follow up 6/6 patients were free from blood product support and thrombopoietic agonists. Hospitalization days were reduced from 25 days (median) in the 2 years pretreatment to 0 days (median) in the 2 years post treatment. All 6 surviving patients exhibited high-level, stable engraftment of functionally corrected lymphoid cells. The degree of

  2. [Paradigm shift in the therapy of Wilkie's syndrome. From bowel reconstruction to transposition of the superior mesenteric artery].

    PubMed

    Grotemeyer, D; Pourhassan, S; Sandmann, W

    2009-04-01

    The superior mesenteric artery syndrome--also known as Wilkie's syndrome or as arteriomesenteric obstruction of the duodenum--is a rare condition of upper intestinal obstruction in which the third part of the duodenum is compressed by the overlying, narrow-angled superior mesenteric artery against the posterior structures. It is characterized by early satiety, recurrent vomiting, abdominal distention, weight loss and postprandial distress. When nonsurgical management is not possible or the problem is refractory, surgical intervention is necessary. Usually a reconstruction of the intestinal passage is performed. We report the first case of successful transposition of the superior mesenteric artery into the infrarenal aorta in the therapy of Wilkie's syndrome. PMID:19066831

  3. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Islam, Marjan; Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  4. Refractory Toxic Shock-Like Syndrome from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis and Intravenous Immunoglobulin as Salvage Therapy: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Dennis; Altshuler, Jerry; Altshuler, Diana; Schwartz, David; Torregrossa, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Infections from Streptococcus dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis (SDSE) can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from mild cellulitis to invasive disease, such as endocarditis and streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS). Despite prompt and appropriate antibiotics, mortality rates associated with shock have remained exceedingly high, prompting the need for adjunctive therapy. IVIG has been proposed as a possible adjunct, given its ability to neutralize a wide variety of superantigens and modulate a dysregulated inflammatory response. We present the first reported cases of successful IVIG therapy for reversing shock in the treatment of SDSE TSLS. PMID:27597908

  5. The effectiveness of low laser therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo controlled double‐blind prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; AY, Saime; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Conflicting results were reported about the effectiveness of Low level laser therapy on musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 850‐nm gallium arsenide aluminum (Ga‐As‐Al) laser therapy on pain, range of motion and disability in subacromial impingement syndrome. METHODS: A total of 52 patients (33 females and 19 males with a mean age of 53.59±11.34 years) with subacromial impingement syndrome were included. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group I (n = 30, laser group) received laser therapy (5 joule/cm2 at each point over maximum 5‐6 painful points for 1 minute). Group II (n = 22, placebo laser group) received placebo laser therapy. Initially cold pack (10 minutes) was applied to all of the patients. Also patients were given an exercise program including range of motion, stretching and progressive resistive exercises. The therapy program was applied 5 times a week for 14 sessions. Pain severity was assessed by using visual analogue scale. Range of motion was measured by goniometer. Disability was evaluated by using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index. RESULTS: In group I, statistically significant improvements in pain severity, range of motion except internal and external rotation and SPADI scores were observed compared to baseline scores after the therapy (p<0.05). In Group II, all parameters except range of motion of external rotation were improved (p<0.05). However, no significant differences were recorded between the groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The Low level laser therapy seems to have no superiority over placebo laser therapy in reducing pain severity, range of motion and functional disability. PMID:21120304

  6. Allogeneic transplantation for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Litzow, Mark R.; Tarima, Sergey; Pérez, Waleska S.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Cutler, Corey S.; de Lima, Marcos; DiPersio, John F.; Gale, Robert Peter; Keating, Armand; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Luger, Selina; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Phillips, Gordon L.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDSs) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML) have a poor prognosis with conventional therapy. Encouraging results are reported after allogeneic transplantation. We analyzed outcomes in 868 persons with t-AML (n = 545) or t-MDS (n = 323) receiving allogeneic transplants from 1990 to 2004. A myeloablative regimen was used for conditioning in 77%. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) and relapse were 41% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38-44) and 27% (24-30) at 1 year and 48% (44-51) and 31% (28-34) at 5 years, respectively. Disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 32% (95% CI, 29-36) and 37% (34-41) at 1 year and 21% (18-24) and 22% (19-26) at 5 years, respectively. In multivariate analysis, 4 risk factors had adverse impacts on DFS and OS: (1) age older than 35 years; (2) poor-risk cytogenetics; (3) t-AML not in remission or advanced t-MDS; and (4) donor other than an HLA-identical sibling or a partially or well-matched unrelated donor. Five-year survival for subjects with none, 1, 2, 3, or 4 of these risk factors was 50% (95% CI, 38-61), 26% (20-31), 21% (16-26), 10% (5-15), and 4% (0-16), respectively (P < .001). These data permit a more precise prediction of outcome and identify subjects most likely to benefit from allogeneic transplantation. PMID:20032503

  7. Thai Elephant-Assisted Therapy Programme in Children with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Satiansukpong, Nuntanee; Pongsaksri, Maethisa; Sasat, Daranee

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of the Thai Elephant-Assisted Therapy Programme for children with Down syndrome (DS) (TETP-D) on balance, postural control and visual motor integration (VMI). A quasi-experimental design with blind control was used. Sixteen children with DS from grades 1 to 6, in a Thailand, public school were recruited for this study. The participants were divided voluntarily into two groups: control and experimental. These both groups received regular school activities, but the experimental group had added treatment, which consisted of TETP-D twice a week for 2 months. The balance subtest of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2, the postural control record form and Beery VMI were applied as outcome measure 1 week before and after the TETP-D. The results showed no significant difference in balance or postural control. However, a significant difference of VMI was shown between the two groups (z = 13.5, p = .04). Children with DS benefited from the TETP-D as it improved their VMI. The TETP-D could improve balance and postural control if provided within a suitable frequency and duration. Further research is needed to test this hypothesis. The limitations of this study are the significant differences in some aspects of the groups at pre-test such as gender and supine flexion of postural control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26728446

  8. Comparison of efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subaşı, Volkan; Çakır, Tuncay; Arıca, Zuhal; Sarıer, Rahime Nur; Filiz, Meral Bilgilisoy; Doğan, Şebnem Koldaş; Toraman, Naciye Füsun

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of kinesiological taping and subacromial injection therapy in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Seventy patients diagnosed with SIS were randomly assigned to group 1 (n = 35, injection group) or group 2 (n = 35, kinesiological taping group). Betamethasone plus prilocaine was injected to subacromial space in the patients in group 1. In group 2, tape was applied three times for a period of five consecutive days with a 2-day recovery interval. A 3-month exercise program was prescribed for both groups including stretching and strengthening exercises. All patients were assessed at baseline and at 1 and 3 months post-intervention. Assessments were made by visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, range of motion (ROM) measurements, specific tests, and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI). Significant differences were detected in VAS and SPADI scores as well as ROM measurements in both groups when compared to baseline (p > 0.05). No significant differences were detected between the groups except for active flexion degree in favor of group 1 (p = 0.004). Both kinesiological taping and steroid injection in conjunction with an exercise program were found to be effective in the treatment of SIS. Kinesio taping may be an alternative treatment option in the rehabilitation of SIS especially when a non-invasive technique is needed. PMID:25403253

  9. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS. PMID:27268087

  10. Effects of Hormone Therapy on Oxidative Stress in Postmenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Zacarías-Flores, Mariano; Castrejón-Delgado, Lizett; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Ana Karen; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral hormone therapy (HT) on oxidative stress (OS) in postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome (MetS). A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. We formed four groups of 25 women each; healthy (HW) and MetS women (MSW) were assigned to HT (1 mg/day of estradiol valerate plus 5 mg/10 day of medroxiprogesterone) or placebo. We measured plasma lipoperoxides, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, total plasma antioxidant status and uric acid, as OS markers. Alternative cut-off values of each parameter were defined and a stress score (SS) ranging from 0 to 7 was used as total OS. MetS was defined according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) criteria. Participants were seen at baseline, 3 and 6 months. After 6 months, MetS decreased in MSW-HT (48%), their triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) improved; in the other groups no difference was found. SS in MSW-HT decreased (3.8 ± 0.3 to 1.7 ± 0.3, p < 0.05) and OS was also reduced (44%), this effect was evident since 3 mo. HW-HT with high OS also decreased (40%). In placebo groups there was no change. Our findings suggest that HT improve lipids and OS associated to MetS in postmenopausal women. PMID:27563883

  11. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome during sunitinib therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hadj, Jamal Oulad; Braven, Rogier DEN; Tillier, Corrine; Schrijver, Hans M; Verheul, Henk M W; VAN DER Vliet, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Sunitinib is an oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic and antitumor activity that is approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC), malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Well-known side effects of sunitinib include hypertension, fatigue, thyroid dysfunction, cardiotoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity and skin toxicity. In this study, we report the case of a 61-year-old male with papillary metastatic RCC who responded to sunitinib but developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures during the third cycle. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compatible with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). After the administration of anti-epileptic drugs and the withdrawal of sunitinib there was rapid clinical improvement. Notably, radiological characteristics of RPLS persisted during second-line therapy with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and only resolved when everolimus was terminated due to disease progression. Although sunitinib-induced RPLS has been reported previously, our case is the first to additionally suggest that everolimus may sustain and therefore potentially contribute to the occurrence of RPLS. PMID:22783436

  12. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  13. New therapies for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS):--a review.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V G

    1999-03-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been associated with high mortality. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology, recognition of precipitating events and improved management has decreased the mortality over the years. Mechanical ventilation is still the corner stone of the management of the disease. It is well recognised that high tidal volumes and airway pressures increase the morbidity, hence the need to use alternative modes of ventilation like pressure control with or without inverse ratio ventilation. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is still experimental and not easily available, whereas prone position to improve oxygenation is simple and inexpensive. The concept of pathological oxygen dependency and therapy aimed at supranormal values has failed to improve survival. Restricting the fluids to prevent further oedema formation in an already wet lung has improved the survival rate. Nitric oxide and surfactant have failed to produce desirable effect in large studies. Pharmacological support to inhibit inflammation with non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antifungal agents, prostaglandin and corticosteroids have all failed. Interestingly corticosteroid rescue treatment in the late phase of ARDS has shown promise. Antiendotoxin and anticytokine studies which began with much enthusiasm is yet to produce desirable results. PMID:10972019

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression following acute coronary syndromes: a concern for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Pourafkari, Nosratollah; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of depression in patients with cardiovascular disease is higher than general population and especially following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a significant number of patients report a wide spectrum of behavioral and mood changes attributable to clinical depression. Treatment of depression following ACS event is particularly challenging since most of the therapeutic modalities are associated with increasing the systemic sympathetic tone from neurogenic or pharmacologic sources. Increased activity of the adrenergic and catecholamine activity may further deter the myocardial oxygen supply and demand therefore treating depression should be carefully evaluated for its risk benefit ratio. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is recommended for patients with severe depression, in whom behavioral and pharmacologic treatments have failed. Patients who refuse to take medications or present with any psychological emergency such as harming self or others, are also candidates for ECT. ECT is also associated with sudden surges of catecholamines and may cause recurrent myocardial ischemia and fatal dysrhythmias in patients convalescing from an ACS event. Herein, we provide an overview and practical guidelines for management of patients presented for ECT following ACS. PMID:27185716

  15. CYP2C19 polymorphisms in acute coronary syndrome patients undergoing clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y M; Zhao, Z C; Zhang, L; Li, H Z; Li, Z; Sun, H L

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the polymorphisms of CYP2C19 (CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on clopidogrel therapy in Zhengzhou city for guidance on clinical medication and reduction in the incidence of thromboembolic events. Two hundred and thirty-four ACS patients undergoing PCI were included in the study, including 171 males (average age = 64.13 ± 12 years) and 63 females (average age = 67.86 ± 10.20 years). Pyrosequencing analysis detected CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes, which were divided into wild-type homozygous C/C, mutant heterozygous C/T, and mutant homozygous T/T. This study further explored the relationship between CYP2C19 polymorphisms and clopidogrel resistance in ACS patients. Gene frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*2 were 39.74, 50, and 10.26%, respectively, while the frequencies of C/C, C/T, and T/T for CYP2C19*3 were 94.02, 5.55, and 0.43%, respectively. According to platelet aggregation analysis, 203 cases normally responded to clopidogrel (86.8%) and 31 cases were clopidogrel resistant (13.2%). There was a correlation between gender and genotype distribution but none between age and genotype. In addition, patients with clopidogrel resistance were treated with ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy instead of clopidogrel, and only 1 case in all patients suffered thrombotic events during a 3-12 month follow-up. In conclusion, CYP2C19*2/*3 polymorphisms may be associated with clopidogrel resistance. Wild-type homozygote and single mutant heterozygote of CYP2C19*2/*3 can be given a normal dose of clopidogrel, while carriers with single mutant homozygote or double mutant heterozygote require ticagrelor antiplatelet therapy as an alternative. PMID:27323099

  16. Probable case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Takayoshi; Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old, interferon-ineligible, treatment-naive man who was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C due to hepatitis C virus genotype 1b began combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. On day 14 of treatment, hepatic reserve and renal function deterioration was observed, while his transaminase levels were normal. Both daclatasvir and asunaprevir were discontinued on day 18 of treatment, because the patient complained of dark urine and a rash on his trunk and four limbs. After discontinuing antiviral therapy, the abnormal laboratory finding and clinical manifestations gradually improved, without recurrence. Our case fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of probable drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome. Despite the 18-d treatment, sustained virological response 12 was achieved. Based on the clinical course, we concluded that there was a clear cause-and-effect relationship between the treatment and adverse events. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first case of probable DRESS syndrome that includes concomitant deterioration of hepatic reserve and renal function due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir, regardless of normalization of transaminase levels. Our case suggests that we should pay attention not only to the transaminase levels but also to allergic symptoms associated with organ involvement during combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. PMID:26677451

  17. Probable case of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom syndrome due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir.

    PubMed

    Suga, Takayoshi; Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-12-16

    A 66-year-old, interferon-ineligible, treatment-naive man who was diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C due to hepatitis C virus genotype 1b began combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. On day 14 of treatment, hepatic reserve and renal function deterioration was observed, while his transaminase levels were normal. Both daclatasvir and asunaprevir were discontinued on day 18 of treatment, because the patient complained of dark urine and a rash on his trunk and four limbs. After discontinuing antiviral therapy, the abnormal laboratory finding and clinical manifestations gradually improved, without recurrence. Our case fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of probable drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome. Despite the 18-d treatment, sustained virological response 12 was achieved. Based on the clinical course, we concluded that there was a clear cause-and-effect relationship between the treatment and adverse events. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first case of probable DRESS syndrome that includes concomitant deterioration of hepatic reserve and renal function due to combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir, regardless of normalization of transaminase levels. Our case suggests that we should pay attention not only to the transaminase levels but also to allergic symptoms associated with organ involvement during combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir. PMID:26677451

  18. Surfactant therapy in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome and in near-term or term newborns with acute RDS.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, R

    2006-05-01

    Many different surfactant preparations derived from animal sources, as well as synthetic surfactants, are available for the treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Natural, modified surfactants containing surfactant-associated proteins appear to be more effective than non-protein-containing synthetic surfactants. Comparative trials with poractant alfa at a higher initial dose of 200 mg/kg appear to be associated with rapid weaning of FiO2, less need for additional doses, and decreased mortality in infants <32 weeks gestation when compared with beractant. Early rescue (<30 min of age) surfactant therapy is an effective method to minimize over treatment of some preterm infants who may not develop RDS. Surfactant therapy followed by rapid extubation to nasal ventilation appears to be more beneficial than continued mechanical ventilation. In near-term or term newborns with acute RDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be 70% effective in improving respiratory failure. PMID:16625226

  19. LEGO[R] Therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme: An Evaluation of Two Social Skills Interventions for Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Gina; Granader, Yael; Humphrey, Ayla; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2008-01-01

    LEGO[R] therapy and the Social Use of Language Programme (SULP) were evaluated as social skills interventions for 6-11 year olds with high functioning autism and Asperger Syndrome. Children were matched on CA, IQ, and autistic symptoms before being randomly assigned to LEGO or SULP. Therapy occurred for 1 h/week over 18 weeks. A no-intervention…

  20. Effect of metformin therapy on 2-h post-glucose insulin levels in patients of polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pikee; Prakash, Anupam; Nigam, Aruna

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate if 2-h post glucose insulin level is an effective tool to monitor insulin resistance in response to metformin therapy, in infertile women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This prospective observational study was carried out in a tertiary care infertility clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 40 women with PCOS were categorized as having insulin resistance if fasting or 2-h post glucose insulin levels were >25 or >41μU/ml respectively. Post glucose insulin was compared before and after six months of metformin therapy along with other clinical, hormonal and metabolic parameters by using McNemar and the Student’s t-test. RESULTS: Fasting insulin was elevated in 4 (10%) and post-load insulin in 34 (85%) patients; after metformin therapy respective values were 2 (5%) and 16 (40%). Metformin therapy reduced post glucose insulin levels (P<0.001), improved the regularity of periods (P<0.001) and resulted in reduction of LH levels (P<0.001), total testosterone (P<0.001) and mean Body mass index (BMI) (P=0.047). Metformin therapy did not alter waist-hip ratio and fasting insulin levels. CONCLUSION: 2-h post glucose insulin level is an effective tool to monitor insulin resistance in PCOS patients and improves significantly after metformin therapy, similar to improvements observed in clinical, hormonal and metabolic parameters. PMID:21234175

  1. [Efficacy of alcohol withdrawal syndrome therapy in patients from Independent Public Hospital for Mental Diseases in Miedzyrzecz].

    PubMed

    Szymański, Michal; Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Jabłecka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol is a serious social problem. Research on alcohol addicts prove that its consumption affects the physical and mental health of drinking person, his/her family and the social dimension (eg. crime, unemployment, poverty). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AW) in patients of 2417 Unit of Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndromes of Independent Public Hospital for Mental Diseases (SPSNPCH) in Miedzyrzecz. The study was conducted in 122 of 24/7 Unit of Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndromes (SPSNPCH) treated from January to March 2015. Patients during hospitalization were subjected to intensive pharmacotherapy of AW (Stage I) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (Stage II). Of the group of 122 people starting treatment Stage I was completed by 112 patients (90%); 10 patients (8%) have been discharged at their own request. The participation in Stage II was consented only by 54 patients, of which 6 (4%) withdrew from this form of therapy. Full two-stage treatment consisting of pharmacotherapy of AWS and then psychotherapy was completed only by 48 (39%) patients. PMID:26946557

  2. The prevalence and correlates of mind-body therapy practices in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Yvonne W.; Tamim, Hala; Stewart, Donna E.; Arthur, Heather M.; Grace, Sherry L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives While the benefits of mind-body therapy (MBT) for cardiac secondary prevention continues to be investigated, the prevalence of such practices by cardiac patients is not well known. The aim of this study was to quantitatively examine the prevalence of MBT practice and its sociodemographic, clinical, psychosocial and behavioral correlates among patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods Six hundred and sixty-one ACS in-patients (75% response rate) recruited from three hospitals completed a demographic survey, and clinical data were extracted from charts. Four hundred and sixty five patients (81% retention rate; 110 (23.7%) female) responded to an 18-month post-discharge survey that queried about MBT use and its correlates. Results One hundred and sixty-three (35.1%) ACS patients practised MBT in their lifetime, and 118 (25.4%) were currently practising. MBT users were more often women (OR = 2.98), non-white (OR = 2.17), had higher levels of education (OR = 2.22), past smokers (OR = 3.33), reported poorer mental health (OR =2.15), and engaged in more exercise (OR = 1.65). Conclusion One-third of ACS patients practised some form of MBT. The greater MBT practice among female ACS patients is noteworthy, given their generally lower physical activity and lower receipt of evidence-based treatments including cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, there is some evidence that MBT can promote mental well-being, and thus such practice might reduce risk related to negative affect in cardiac patients. PMID:19186341

  3. Effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the treatment of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Kiyani, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: The carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a new and noninvasive treatment including extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the treatment of CTS. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 60 patients with moderate CTS in selected health centers of Isfahan Medical University from November 2014 to April 2015. Patients with CTS were randomly divided into two groups. Conservative treatment including wrist splint at night for 3 months, consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 2 weeks, and oral consumption of Vitamin B1 for a month was recommended for both groups. The first group was treated with ESWT, one session per week for 4 weeks. Focus probe with 0.05, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.15 energy and shock numbers 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 were used from the first session to the fourth, respectively. The evaluated parameters were assessed before treatment and after 3 and 6 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19, Student’s t-test, and Chi-square test. Results: All parameters were significantly decreased in the ESWT group after 3 months. These results remained almost constant after 6 months compared with 3 months after treatment. However, only two parameters considerably improved after 3 months of treatment in the control group. The entire indexes in the control group implicated the regression of results in long-term period. Conclusion: It is recommended to use ESWT as a conservative treatment in patients with CTS. PMID:27563630

  4. Persistence of the benefit of an antioxidant therapy in children and teenagers with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parisotto, Eduardo Benedetti; Giaretta, Andréia Gonçalves; Zamoner, Ariane; Moreira, Emilia Addison Machado; Fröde, Tânia Silvia; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi; Filho, Danilo Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an antioxidant intervention in biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) in the blood of Down syndrome (DS) children and teenagers during four different stages. A control group was composed by healthy children (n=18), assessed once, and a Down group composed by DS patients (n=21) assessed at the basal period (t0), as well as after 6 months of antioxidant supplementation (t1), after 12 months (after interruption of the antioxidant intervention for 6 months) (t2), and again after further 6 months of antioxidant supplementation (t3). Biomarkers of inflammation (myeloperoxidase activity - MPO and levels of IL-1β and TNF-α) and OS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances - TBARS, protein carbonyls - PC), reduced glutathione (GSH), uric acid (UA) and vitamin E levels, as well as antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activities, were measured after each period. After the antioxidant supplementation, the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, GR, GGT and MPO were downregulated, while TBARS contents were strongly decreased, the contents of GSH and vitamin E were significantly increased, and no changes in G6PD and GST activity as well as in UA and PC levels were detected. After the interruption of the antioxidant therapy for 6 months, DS patients showed elevated GPx and GGT activities and also elevated UA and TBARS levels. No changes in SOD, CAT, GR, GST, G6PD and MPO activities as well as in GSH, vitamin E, PC, TNF-α and IL-1β levels were detected. The results showed that the antioxidant intervention persistently attenuated the systemic oxidative damage in DS patients even after a relatively long period of cessation of the antioxidant intervention. PMID:26207872

  5. Targeted therapy of short-bowel syndrome with teduglutide: the new kid on the block.

    PubMed

    Vipperla, Kishore; O'Keefe, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Extensive intestinal resection impairs the absorptive capacity and results in short-bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF), when fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, micro-, and macronutrient homeostasis cannot be maintained on a conventional oral diet. Several factors, including the length and site of the resected intestine, anatomical conformation of the remnant bowel, and the degree of postresection intestinal adaptation determine the disease severity. While mild SBS patients achieve nutritional autonomy with dietary modification (eg, hyperphagia, small frequent meals, and oral rehydration fluids), those with moderate-to-severe disease may develop SBS-IF and become dependent on parenteral support (PS) in the form of intravenous fluids and/or nutrition for sustenance of life. SBS-IF is a chronic debilitating disease associated with a poor quality of life, and carries significant morbidity and health care costs. Medical management of SBS-IF is primarily focused on individually tailored symptomatic treatment strategies, such as antisecretory and antidiarrheal agents to mitigate fluid losses, and PS. However, PS administration is associated with potentially life-threatening complications, such as central venous thromboses, bloodstream infections, and liver disease. In pursuit of a targeted therapy to augment intestinal adaptation, research over the past 2 decades has identified glucagon-like peptide, an intestinotrophic gut peptide that has been shown to enhance intestinal absorptive capacity by causing an increase in the villus length, crypt depth, and mesenteric blood flow and by decreasing gastrointestinal motility and secretions. Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, is the first targeted therapeutic agent to gain approval for use in adult SBS-IF. Teduglutide was shown to result in significant (20%-100%) reduction in PS-volume requirement and have a satisfactory safety profile in three randomized control trials. Further research

  6. Antioxidant therapy improves non-thyroidal illness syndrome in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pingping; Li, Yun; Xu, Gaosi

    2016-05-01

    Background The roles of antioxidant therapy on non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) in uremic rats is still unclear. Materials and methods Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into blank, 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx), pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, 10 mg/100 g), sodium bicarbonate (SB, 0.1 g/100 g), N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 80 mg/100 g) and thyroid hormones (TH, levothyroxine 2 μg/100 g) groups. The serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), interleukin (IL)-1β, free triiodothyronine (FT3), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were detected in the sixth week. The expressions of IL-1β and deiodinase type 1 (DIO1) were assessed by western blotting. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory signal pathway was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results Compared with 5/6 Nx group, PDTC and NAC significantly reduced the levels (p < 0.01, respectively) of serum MDA, AOPP, TSH, and elevated levels of serum SOD (p < 0.01, respectively) and FT3 (p = 0.016 and p < 0.01). Neither had significant effects on serum IL-1β content (p = 0.612 and p = 0.582). PDTC and NAC markedly decreased the protein expression of IL-1β (p < 0.01) and increased the protein expression of DIO1 (p < 0.01), respectively. Both had been considerably blunted NF-κB activity (p < 0.01). Conclusions In uremic rat model, PDTC and NAC can effectively improve oxidative stress level and NTIS. In terms of improving oxidative stress level, NAC is probably superior to PDTC. PMID:26895214

  7. Targeted therapy of short-bowel syndrome with teduglutide: the new kid on the block

    PubMed Central

    Vipperla, Kishore; O’Keefe, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Extensive intestinal resection impairs the absorptive capacity and results in short-bowel syndrome-associated intestinal failure (SBS-IF), when fluid, electrolyte, acid-base, micro-, and macronutrient homeostasis cannot be maintained on a conventional oral diet. Several factors, including the length and site of the resected intestine, anatomical conformation of the remnant bowel, and the degree of postresection intestinal adaptation determine the disease severity. While mild SBS patients achieve nutritional autonomy with dietary modification (eg, hyperphagia, small frequent meals, and oral rehydration fluids), those with moderate-to-severe disease may develop SBS-IF and become dependent on parenteral support (PS) in the form of intravenous fluids and/or nutrition for sustenance of life. SBS-IF is a chronic debilitating disease associated with a poor quality of life, and carries significant morbidity and health care costs. Medical management of SBS-IF is primarily focused on individually tailored symptomatic treatment strategies, such as antisecretory and antidiarrheal agents to mitigate fluid losses, and PS. However, PS administration is associated with potentially life-threatening complications, such as central venous thromboses, bloodstream infections, and liver disease. In pursuit of a targeted therapy to augment intestinal adaptation, research over the past 2 decades has identified glucagon-like peptide, an intestinotrophic gut peptide that has been shown to enhance intestinal absorptive capacity by causing an increase in the villus length, crypt depth, and mesenteric blood flow and by decreasing gastrointestinal motility and secretions. Teduglutide, a recombinant analog of glucagon-like peptide-2, is the first targeted therapeutic agent to gain approval for use in adult SBS-IF. Teduglutide was shown to result in significant (20%–100%) reduction in PS-volume requirement and have a satisfactory safety profile in three randomized control trials. Further

  8. The long QT syndrome: a transatlantic clinical approach to diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Peter J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    The mind-boggling progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the long QT syndrome (LQTS) has been the subject of many articles and reviews. Still, when it comes to the management of the patients affected by this life-threatening disorder, too many errors still take place, both in the diagnostic process and in the therapeutic choices. The price of these errors is paid by the patients and their families. This review is not directed to the relatively small number of LQTS experts who know what to do. It does not deal with genetics, with epidemiology, or with the well-known clinical manifestations. We have focused solely on the approach to diagnosis and therapy and we have directed this review to the average clinical cardiologist who, in his/her practice, sees occasionally patients affected or suspected to be affected by LQTS; the cardiologist who may know enough to manage them but not enough to be completely confident on his/her most critical choices. We have provided our personal views without making any attempt to blend differences whenever present. On most issues we agree fully but where we do not, we make it clear to the reader by indicating who is thinking what. The result may be unconventional, but it mirrors the challenges, often severe, that we all face in managing and protecting these patients from sudden death while also helping them live and thrive despite their diagnosis. We trust that this unabashed presentation of our clinical approach will be useful for both cardiologists and patients. PMID:23509228

  9. Identification of Down's syndrome critical locus gene SIM2-s as a drug therapy target for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    DeYoung, Maurice Phil; Tress, Matthew; Narayanan, Ramaswamy

    2003-04-15

    We report here a cancer drug therapy use of a gene involved in Down's syndrome. Using bioinformatics approaches, we recently predicted Single Minded 2 gene (SIM2) from Down's syndrome critical region to be specific to certain solid tumors. Involvement of SIM2 in solid tumors has not previously been reported. Intrigued by a possible association between a Down's syndrome gene and solid tumors, we monitored SIM2 expression in solid tumors. Isoform-specific expression of SIM2 short-form (SIM2-s) was seen selectively in colon, prostate, and pancreatic carcinomas but not in breast, lung, or ovarian carcinomas nor in most normal tissues. In colon tumors, SIM2-s expression was seen in early stages. Antisense inhibition of SIM2-s expression in a colon cancer cell line caused inhibition of gene expression, growth inhibition, and apoptosis. The administration of the antisense, but not the control, oligonucleotides caused a pronounced inhibition of tumor growth in nude mice with no major toxicity. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the genes-to-drugs paradigm, establish SIM2-s as a molecular target for cancer therapeutics, and may further understanding of the cancer risk of Down's syndrome patients. PMID:12676991

  10. [Outcome of two patients with Hurler's syndrome under enzyme replacement therapy with human recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase].

    PubMed

    Sardón, O; García Pardos, C; Mintegui, J; Pérez Ruiz, E; Coll, M J; Chabás, A; Olivé, T; Ruiz Benito, A

    2005-07-01

    We performed a prospective study of two patients with Hurler's syndrome (aged 4.8 years and 17 months at the beginning of the intervention) under enzyme replacement therapy with human recombinant alpha-L-iduronidase for 452 and 28 weeks respectively. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety and efficacy of the intervention during the treatment periods. Several diagnostic imaging tests, clinical examinations, and serial laboratory determinations were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the therapy in both patients. In patient 1 (a boy aged 4.8 years, homozygote W402X), the treatment was always intended to be palliative because of the advanced stage of the disease. In patient 2 (a 17-month-old girl, heterozygote W402X) the treatment was initiated early with subsequent clinical stabilization without acquisition of regressive factors. Bone marrow transplantation from an unrelated donor was successful. Currently, because of the lack of histocompatible bone marrow donors, transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood are being performed with satisfactory results. In the future, gene therapy may be able to prevent the diseases associated with Hurler's syndrome and halt the neurocognitive deterioration characteristic of these patients. PMID:15989873

  11. Treatment results of high dose cabergoline as an adjuvant therapy in six patients with established severe ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saharkhiz, Nasrin; Akbari Sene, Azadeh; Salehpour, Saghar; Tamimi, Maryam; Vasheghani Farahani, Masoumeh; Sheibani, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The beneficial role of cabergoline as a prophylactic agent to prevent ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS) among high-risk patients has been demonstrated in previous studies. But data for its role as a treatment for established severe OHSS is still limited. We represent the treatment results of high dose oral cabergoline in management of six patients after the syndrome is established. Case: High-dose oral cabergoline (1 mg daily for eight days) was prescribed as an adjuvant to symptomatic treatment for six hospitalized patients with established severe OHSS following infertility treatment cycles. In two cases OHSS resolved rapidly despite the occurrence of ongoing pregnancy. Conclusion: Considering the treatment outcomes of our patients, high dose cabergoline did not eliminate the need for traditional treatments, but it was a relatively effective and safe therapy in management of established severe OHSS, and prevented the increase in its severity following the occurrence of pregnancy. PMID:25469130

  12. Physiological responses to psychological challenge under hypnosis in patients considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome: implications for diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, L J; Conway, A; Nixon, P G

    1986-01-01

    Thirty patients who were considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome on clinical grounds (history and observation) were referred for testing: 29 patients completed a forced hyperventilation provocation test, and 28 underwent hypnosis during which time a psychological challenge was introduced which was meaningful to each individual patient. In 19/27 of these patients the PetCO2 fell by an average of 18.2 mmHg and persisted spontaneously for more than three minutes. In 10 normal controls studied in a similar fashion there was an average fall of 5 mmHg. The difference in response between responders and controls/non-responders was highly significant (P less than 0.001). A review of the literature is presented for comparison. It is considered that a psychological challenge under hypnosis may have important implications for diagnosis and therapy in some patients considered to have the hyperventilation syndrome. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:3081708

  13. Scheie syndrome: enzyme replacement therapy does not prevent progression of cervical myelopathy due to spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Illsinger, S; Lücke, T; Hartmann, H; Mengel, E; Müller-Forell, W; Donnerstag, F; Das, A M

    2009-12-01

    Hurler-Scheie syndrome is caused by alpha-l-iduronidase deficiency. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can improve physical capacity and reduces organomegaly. However, the effect on bradytrophic connective tissue is limited. As intravenously administered enzyme cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, the therapy of choice for the more severe Hurler syndrome is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). In the more attenuated Scheie syndrome, neurological impairment is less severe; therefore, ERT may be appropriate to treat these patients. Information on long-term outcome in Scheie patients undergoing ERT is scarce. We report a 38-year-old female Scheie patient who has been on ERT for 8 years. While non-neurological symptoms improved, she developed paresthesias in her hands and feet and progressive pain in her legs. Somatosensory evoked potentials were abnormal, suggesting dysfunction of the dorsal funiculus and lemniscus medialis. After 6 years of ERT, a spinal MRI showed dural thickening at the upper cervical spine. These soft-tissue deposits are presumably due to the accumulation of mucopolysaccharides. Intramedullary hyperintensities at the level of C1/2 revealed cervical myelopathy. An MRI before the start of ERT had shown milder spinal lesions. Cystic lesions in the white matter of the centrum semiovale due to dilated Virchow-Robin spaces were essentially unchanged compared with the MRI scan before ERT. Decompression of the spinal cord resulted in clinical improvement. In an adult patient with Scheie syndrome, ERT failed to prevent progression of cervical myelopathy. Clinical significance of cerebral changes is unclear. Whether early HCT or intrathecal ERT could have prevented these lesions remains speculative. PMID:19894140

  14. [Urination disorders in the man: differential diagnoses and therapy of benign prostate syndrome].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Schmid, Hans-Peter

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms in men are highly associated with benign prostate syndrome. Nevertheless, a correct diagnosis is required to exclude other pathologies. In addition to neurogenic causes other urological differential diagnoses can be clarified and treated. If diagnosis of benign prostatic syndrome is confirmed, various medical and surgical treatment options are available. PMID:24088234

  15. Psychological Therapies in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Altayar, Osama; Prokop, Larry J.; Sood, Amit; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disease with few effective treatments. Psychosocial factors are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBS. Objective. To evaluate the evidence for psychological therapies in IBS treatment. Methods. We searched six medical databases through February 6, 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological therapies for the treatment of IBS. Two independent reviewers identified the RCTs, extracted the data, and assessed trial quality. We used the random-effect model to pool standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) across trials. Results. 15 RCTs that mostly evaluated cognitive behavioral therapy were included. Psychological therapies were associated with improvement in IBS symptoms severity scales (SMD −0.618; 95% CI: −0.853 to −0.383), IBS-Quality of Life (SMD 0.604; 95% CI: 0.440 to 0.768), and abdominal pain (SMD −0.282; 95% CI: −0.562 to −0.001). No statistically significant effect was observed on diarrhea or constipation. Limitations. The trials were at increased risk of bias and the overall sample size was small leading to imprecision. Conclusion. Psychological therapies may improve the quality of life and symptom severity in IBS. The effect size noted is moderate to large and is clinically meaningful. PMID:25802514

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy is associated with improvement in overactive bladder symptoms in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ipekci, Tumay; Cetintas, Gulgun; Celik, Orcun; Sarac, Sema; Tunckiran, Ahmet; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Material and methods One-hundred and fifty women underwent an overnight polysomnography study between May 2014 and September 2014. Their voiding symptoms were evaluated using the OAB symptom score (OABSS) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short-Form at OSAS diagnosis and approximately 3-months after CPAP therapy. OSAS severity was assessed according to the apnea-hypopnea-index. Results We evaluated 140 women and 111 of them (79.3%) reported symptoms consistent with OAB. There were no statistically significant differences between OSAS severity with a prevalence of OAB (p = 0.92). The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) was 35.7% (n = 50) and 39.6% (n = 44) in all patients and patients with OAB, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between UI with OAB (p = 0.58). Baseline OABSS is comparable between OSAS severity (p = 0.143). After 3-months CPAP therapy, OABSS and ICIQ-SF sum scores were significantly decreased in patients with severe and moderate OSAS (p <0.01), however, change of OABSS sum score was insignificant in patients with mild OSAS (p = 0.44). Conclusions CPAP therapy improves the OAB, OABSS and ICIQ-SF scores in women with severe and moderate OSAS. OSAS-induced OAB may be alleviated following CPAP therapy. PMID:27123331

  17. [ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME AND LIPID-LOWERING THERAPY. DOES THE IMPROVE-IT STUDY MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE?].

    PubMed

    Lancellotti, P; Pierard, L A; Scheen, A J

    2015-09-01

    Statins reduce both LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with and without cardiovascular disease. Intensive statin therapy, compared with moderate-dose statin therapy, incrementally lowers LDL-C levels and rates of cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Ezetimibe, by diminishing the absorption of cholesterol from the intestine, additionally reduces LDL-C when added to statins. In this article, we discuss the potential benefits of the combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe for the long-term management of patients with acute coronary syndrome through an analysis of the IMPROVE-IT results (IMProved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial). This randomised double blind trial included 18,144 patients with a LDL-C of 50 to 100 (with statin) or 125 (without statin) mg/dl and had a median follow-up of 6 years. The objective of the study was to test the efficacy of simvastatin 40 mg versus simvastatin 40 mg and 10 mg ezetimibe. The primary endpoint included cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina and coronary revascularization. The addition of ezetimibe to simvastatin resulted in an incremental lowering of LDL-C (reached value 53.2 versus 69.9 mg/dl, p < 0.001) and a further improvement of the patient prognosis (relative reduction of primary endpoint: -6.4%, p = 0.016). In addition, the combined therapy showed no significant adverse effects, particularly regarding the risk of cancers, which confirms the safety of ezetimibe. In acute coronary syndrome, the prescription of ezetimibe should be considered (class HA, level of evidence B) in patients with a LDL-C a 70 mg/dl despite maximally tolerated dose of statin. PMID:26638446

  18. [Schnitzler syndrome: case report, the experience with glucocorticoid and anakinra (Kineret) therapies and monitoring of systemic cytokine response].

    PubMed

    Szturz, P; Adam, Z; Klabusay, M; Fojtík, Z; Kadanka, Z; Stehlíková, O; Chovancová, J; Kalvodová, L; Corbová, D; Starý, K; Neubauer, J; Prásek, J; Koukalová, R; Rehák, Z; Hájek, R; Mayer, J

    2011-01-01

    Schnitzler syndrome is a rare idiopathic disease characterized by chronic urtica, presence of monoclonal IgM immunoglobuline and further, less common symptoms. This case report describes another case of this disease affecting a male adult born in 1963. The first symptoms, eruptions of non-pruritic urticarial rash, appeared in this patient at the age of 43. In addition, bone pains (mainly tibias) and joint pains (mainly knees) were present. Later on however, severe attacks of fever, chills and shaking together with bone and joint pains were added to during which new urticarial eruptions appeared. Primarily, the man was followed up without any substantial therapeutic results at a department of dermatovenerology, subsequently, due to a finding of monoclonal IgM kappa immunoglobulin (serum concentration 1.9 g/l) he was referred to our department for the reason of gammopathy being a differential diagnosis. On a CT scan hyperostosis in claviculae and pelvic bones was identified. Also on the CT, an increase in cortical thickness was described in the long bones of the lower extremities, where areas of technetium pyrophosphate accumulation were identified on a bone scintigraphy. These areas were found in the chest and sacral regions as well. From the blood exams, the proinflammatory status of the organism was apparent (CRP 35.9 mg/l, erythrocyte sedimentation rate 92 mm/h, leukocytes 12.4 x 10(9)/l). After excluding other differential diagnoses, the patient was diagnosed with Schnitzler syndrome. As regards therapy, we made initial use of the effect of corticoids which abated the symptoms, however, these were causing serious adverse reactions in the form of iatrogenous Cushing's syndrome. The therapy took a turn only after biologic therapy with anakinra (interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) had started, which minimized the Schnitzler symptoms with very good drug tolerance. In the work we measured serum levels of interleukins for disease activity monitoring. The most sensitive

  19. Appropriate antiplatelet and antithrombotic therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes: recent updates to the ACC/AHA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Shamir R

    2002-12-01

    Thrombosis is the most important pathological mechanism of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). In addition to standard antithrombotic treatment with aspirin and heparin, clopidogrel, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors, and low-molecular-weight have a therapeutic benefit in ACS patients. Updated American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines for the management of ACS patients were published in mid-2002, and this article summarizes the rationale for the recommendations outlined in these guidelines for the use of antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapies. PMID:12668860

  20. Challenges in understanding Sjögren's syndrome - improved insights into the pathogenesis generate hope for innovative therapies?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The reviews in this series on Sjögren syndrome provide an up-to-date summary and perspectives on the pathogenesis of this interesting entity with glandular and frequently systemic manifestations, the value of preclinical models, and our current understanding of therapeutic approaches. The last of these includes what has been learned from trials blocking tumor necrosis factor and, more recently, anti-CD20 therapy. Potential therapeutic targets, such as blockade of the B cell-activating factor, the role of interferon-alpha, and targeting CD22, are discussed. PMID:21888689

  1. Linezolid-Induced Near-Fatal Serotonin Syndrome During Escitalopram Therapy: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Kulkarni, Pratibha R.

    2013-01-01

    Linezolid is a synthetic antimicrobial agent of the oxazolidinone class with weak, nonspecific inhibitor of monoamine oxidase enzymes. Concomitant therapy with an adrenergic or serotonergic agent or consuming tyramine (>100 mg/day) may induce serotonin syndrome (SS). We present a case report of near-fatal adverse interaction between linezolid and escitalopram inducing SS in a 65-year-old woman with sepsis, under empirical antibiotic treatment. This report also summarizes the current relevant literature as identified via PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO, supplemented with a manual search of cross references. PMID:24379509

  2. Salvage therapy with high dose Intravenous Immunoglobulins in acquired Von Willebrand Syndrome and unresponsive severe intestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 91-year-old woman affected with acquired Von Willebrand (VW) syndrome and intestinal angiodysplasias presented with severe gastrointestinal bleeding (hemoglobin 5 g/dl). Despite replacement therapy with VW factor/factor VIII concentrate qid, bleeding did not stop (eleven packed red blood cell units were transfused over three days). High circulating levels of anti-VW factor immunoglobulin M were documented immunoenzimatically. Heart ultrasound showed abnormalities of the mitral and aortic valves with severe flow alterations. When intravenous immunoglobulins were added to therapy, prompt clinical and laboratory responses occurred: complete cessation of bleeding, raise in hemoglobin, VW factor antigen, VW ristocetin cofactor and factor VIII levels as well as progressive reduction of the anti-VWF autoantibody levels. PMID:24926417

  3. Effect of Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) on hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) syndrome. Methods In this monocentric, randomized, patient-assessor blinded, placebo-controlled trial, patients with HSP were randomly divided into the rESWT (n=17) and control (n=17) groups. Treatment was administered four times a week for 2 weeks. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Constant-Murley score (CS) were assessed before and after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks. The Modified Ashworth Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scores and range of motion of the shoulder were also assessed. Results VAS scores improved post-intervention and at the 2-week and 4-week follow-up in the intervention group (p<0.05). Respective differences in VAS scores between baseline and post-intervention in the intervention and control groups were –1.69±1.90 and –0.45±0.79, respectively (p<0.05), between baseline and 2-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.60±1.74 and –0.34±0.70, respectively (p<0.05), and between baseline and 4-week follow-up in the intervention and control groups were –1.61±1.73 and –0.33±0.71, respectively (p<0.05). Baseline CS improved from 19.12±11.02 to 20.88±10.37 post-intervention and to 20.41±10.82 at the 2-week follow-up only in the intervention group (p<0.05). Conclusion rESWT consisting of eight sessions could be one of the effective and safe modalities for pain management in people with HSP. Further studies are needed to generalize and support these results in patients with HSP and a variety conditions, and to understand the mechanism of rESWT for treating HSP. PMID:27446789

  4. In what type of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome is DMSO intravesical instillation therapy effective?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is the most-used agent for intravesical instillation. We conducted this retrospective clinical study to determine in what type of the interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) DMSO was effective. Methods We combined DMSO with hydrodistension in 2003 and from 2004 we performed hydrodistension alone. Hydrodistension had been performed in 7 cases of IC/BPS with Hunner’s lesions (H group) and 7 cases of IC/BPS without Hunner’s lesions (non-H group), and they served as the control group (C group; n=14). There was also a DMSO group (D group; n=14) that consisted of an H group of 7 cases and an non-H group of 7 cases in which the hydrodistension had been immediately followed by intravesical instillation of 50% DMSO 50 mL. Before, and 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months (M) after the intervention, the patients were asked to complete a 4-day frequency-volume chart (FVC) and the O’Leary-Sant IC symptom index (ICSI) questionnaire and IC problem index (ICPI) questionnaire, and to rate their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results All parameters were improved after hydrodistension in both the C group and the D group. However, comparison of the C group and D group according to whether Hunner lesions were present showed that there were no significant differences in any of the postoperative parameters between the non-H groups in the C group and D group, but in the H groups, average and maximum voided volume were significantly higher and the ICSI, ICPI, and VAS scores were lower in the D group. Moreover, the significant differences increased with the duration of the postoperative period. Conclusions DMSO intravesical instillation therapy was useful in both maintaining and improving the effectiveness of hydrodistension in IC/BPS with Hunner lesions. However, DMSO did not have any particular efficacy in the treatment of IC/BPS in the absence of Hunner lesions. PMID:26816859

  5. The risk of ischaemic colitis in irritable bowel syndrome patients treated with serotonergic therapies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James H

    2011-07-01

    Ischaemic colitis (IC) is the most common form of ischaemic injury to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. IC typically presents with the sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, cramping and rectal bleeding, and is usually self-limited with low morbidity, although it may cause gangrenous or fulminant colitis, especially when the right colon is involved. Multiple medical conditions, as well as several pharmacological agents, are associated with IC, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and drugs used for its treatment that act on gut serotonin 5-HT receptors. These include the selective 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist alosetron, currently approved for the treatment of severe diarrhoea-predominant IBS in women who fail to respond to conventional treatment, and cilansetron, another 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist that is no longer in clinical development. In addition, the 5-HT(4) receptor partial agonist tegaserod, which was approved for the treatment of constipation-predominant IBS in women, was associated with IC in the postmarketing setting, as was renzapride, a 5-HT(4) agonist/5-HT(3) antagonist. Although several hypotheses have been proposed, the pathophysiological basis for development of IC with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists or 5-HT(4) receptor agonists remains unknown. Of interest, several population-based studies demonstrated that a diagnosis of IBS (independent of serotonergic therapies) increases the risk of developing IC 2- to 4-fold. As a result, IBS patients with the acute onset of abdominal pain, tenderness, diarrhoea or lower intestinal bleeding, especially those with predisposing conditions or medications, should be evaluated promptly for IC. The management of IC remains supportive; most cases of non-gangrenous IC, as seen in the alosetron and tegaserod databases, have been transient and have resolved spontaneously without complications or death. Despite the small number of deaths associated with alosetron in patients with complications of constipation and

  6. Evaluation of noncytotoxic DNMT1-depleting therapy in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Saunthararajah, Yogen; Sekeres, Mikkael; Advani, Anjali; Mahfouz, Reda; Durkin, Lisa; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Englehaupt, Ricki; Juersivich, Joy; Cooper, Kathleen; Husseinzadeh, Holleh; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Rump, Matthew; Hobson, Sean; Earl, Marc; Sobecks, Ronald; Dean, Robert; Reu, Frederic; Tiu, Ramon; Hamilton, Betty; Copelan, Edward; Lichtin, Alan; Hsi, Eric; Kalaycio, Matt; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Mutational inactivation in cancer of key apoptotic pathway components, such as TP53/p53, undermines cytotoxic therapies that aim to increase apoptosis. Accordingly, TP53 mutations are reproducibly associated with poor treatment outcomes. Moreover, cytotoxic treatments destroy normal stem cells with intact p53 systems, a problem especially for myeloid neoplasms, as these cells reverse the low blood counts that cause morbidity and death. Preclinical studies suggest that noncytotoxic concentrations of the DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) inhibitor decitabine produce p53-independent cell-cycle exits by reversing aberrant epigenetic repression of proliferation-terminating (MYC-antagonizing) differentiation genes in cancer cells. METHODS. In this clinical trial, patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 25) received reduced decitabine dosages (0.1–0.2 mg/kg/day compared with the FDA-approved 20–45 mg/m2/day dosage, a 75%–90% reduction) to avoid cytotoxicity. These well-tolerated doses were frequently administered 1–3 days per week, instead of pulse cycled for 3 to 5 days over a 4- to 6-week period, to increase the probability that cancer S-phase entries would coincide with drug exposure, which is required for S-phase–dependent DNMT1 depletion. RESULTS. The median subject age was 73 years (range, 46–85 years), 9 subjects had relapsed disease or were refractory to 5-azacytidine and/or lenalidomide, and 3 had received intensive chemoradiation to treat other cancers. Adverse events were related to neutropenia present at baseline: neutropenic fever (13 of 25 subjects) and septic death (1 of 25 subjects). Blood count improvements meeting the International Working Group criteria for response occurred in 11 of 25 (44%) subjects and were highly durable. Treatment-induced freedom from transfusion lasted a median of 1,025 days (range, 186–1,152 days; 3 ongoing), and 20% of subjects were treated for more than 3 years. Mutations and/or deletions of key

  7. Managing Sjögren’s Syndrome and non-Sjögren Syndrome dry eye with anti-inflammatory therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coursey, Terry G; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye from Sjögren’s syndrome is a multifactorial disease that results in dysfunction of the lacrimal functional unit. Studies have shown changes in tear composition, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinase. T-lymphocytes have been shown to increase in the conjunctiva and lacrimal glands in patient and animal models. This inflammation is in part responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease, which results in symptoms of eye irritation, ocular surface epithelial disease, and loss of corneal barrier function. There are a number of anti-inflammatory approaches for treating this disease. The current study reviews details of immune response and anti–inflammatory therapies used to control this disease. PMID:25120351

  8. [On dog-days sticking for treatment of heat syndrome: discussion on the draft of Guidelines on Clinical Application of Acupoint Sticking Therapy treating Winter Diseases in Summer].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yun; Yi, Wei

    2010-06-01

    The information of Guidelines on Clinical Application of Acupoint Sticking Therapy Treating Winter Diseases in Summer suggests that acupoint sticking therapy treating winter diseases in summer is refer to deficiency-cold diseases and is not applicable to heat syndrome. According to the basic theories "maintaining yang in spring and summer" "correspondence between man and universe" in Internal Classic and combining the clinical practice, the authors then demonstrate the feasibility and necessity of dog-days sticking for treatment of heat syndrome, and expound the connotation of acupoint sticking with cold-natured or cool-natured herbal drugs and the clinical significance of dog-days sticking for treatment of heat syndrome. At the same time, the different opinion and expectation is put forward to further improve this therapy. PMID:20578392

  9. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome.Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software.Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration.High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683

  10. Prognostic Factors of the Efficacy of High-dose Corticosteroid Therapy in Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, and Low Platelet Count Syndrome During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Ren, Chenchen; Mao, Minhong; Cui, Shihong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to identify the factors which can affect the efficacy of corticosteroid (CORT) therapy in the management of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome. Research articles reporting the efficacy of CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients were searched in several electronic databases including EMBASE, Google Scholar, Ovid SP, PubMed, and Web of Science. Study selection was based on predefined eligibility criteria. Efficacy was defined by the changes from baseline in HELLP syndrome indicators after CORT therapy. Meta-analyses were carried out with Stata software. Data of 778 CORT-treated HELLP syndrome patients recruited in 22 studies were used in the analyses. Corticosteroid treatment to HELLP syndrome patients was associated with significant changes from baseline in platelet count; serum levels of aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH); mean blood pressure; and urinary output. Lower baseline platelet count predicted higher change in platelet count after CORT therapy. Lower baseline platelet count and lower baseline urinary output predicted greater changes in LDH levels after CORT therapy. There was also an inverse relationship between the change from baseline in LDH levels and intensive care duration. Higher CORT doses were associated with greater declines in the aspartate aminotransaminase, alanine transaminase, and LDH levels. Incidence of cesarean delivery was inversely associated with the gestation age. The percentage of nulliparous women had a positive association with the intensive care stay duration. High-dose CORT therapy to HELLP syndrome patients provides benefits in improving disease markers and reducing intensive care duration, especially in cases such as mothers with much lower baseline platelet count and LDH levels. PMID:27043683