Science.gov

Sample records for synthesis annual progress

  1. Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Malmberg, R.L.

    1993-02-09

    Polyamines are small positively charged compounds that have been hypothesized to be involved in a wide variety of plant physiological and development functions. The regulation of the polyamine synthesis pathway is uniquely interesting because of the existence of two pathways to putrescine synthesis, and the consequent questions of how these two pathways are compartmentalized and how they interact with each other. The specific directions our research is taking are: (1) A characterization of arginine decarboxylase regulation; we have discovered two post-translational mechanisms for regulating arginine decarboxylase activity. One of these is a novel protease that clips the arginine decarboxylase pre-protein to activate it. We would like to understand this activating protease better, determine its mechanism of action, and determine its importance in the overall scheme of arginine decarboxylase regulation. (2) We have begun a similar characterization of ornithine decarboxylase by purifying it from plants. (3) We are characterizing the polyamine mutant collection we have developed. (4) Finally, we have begun to characterize the evolution of arginine decarboxylase, as an additional approach that could shed light on its functions in plants. Our intent is to understand arginine decarboxylase structure and regulation in detail, and then to further explore regulatory differences between ornithine and arginine decarboxylases.

  2. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1999-03-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. The progress made on the program in this period is summarized.

  3. Synthesis of new prophylactic antiradiation drugs. Progress report no. 2 (annual), 1 Aug 80-31 Jul 81

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, L.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents details of the work done on the project (covered) during the last 12 months. Approaches to the synthesis of a number of 3-aryl l-(omega-aminoalkyl) adamantanes is described. Their final incorporation in the preparation of N-(adamantylalkyl) alpha-mercapto acetamidines, and derivatives, as potential antiradiation drugs is projected. The report divided into two major sections. The first deals with the preparation of 1,3-bis(2-aminoethyl) adamantane and its conversion to the disulfide of 1,3-bis(2-(mercaptomethylcarboxamidino) ethyl)-adamantane. The next section describes the synthesis of some 3-aryl-l-adamantanecarboxylic and acetic acids, 12 (n=0 or 1, respectively). These are the vital precursors needed for the synthesis of the essential 3-aryl (l-adamantylmethyl and ethylamines), 11, which will be a part of the N-substituent of the target alpha-mercaptoacetamidines and derivatives.

  4. Annual Progress report - General Task

    SciTech Connect

    Wesnousky, S.G.

    1993-09-30

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project {open_quotes}Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI).{close_quotes} A similar report was previously provided for the period of 1 October 1991 to 30 September 1992. The report initially covers the activities of the General Task and is followed by sections that describe the progress of the other ongoing tasks.

  5. 14 CFR 91.875 - Annual progress reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual progress reports. 91.875 Section 91....875 Annual progress reports. (a) Each operator subject to § 91.865 or § 91.867 of this chapter shall submit an annual report to the FAA, Office of Environment and Energy, on the progress it has made...

  6. 14 CFR 91.875 - Annual progress reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Annual progress reports. 91.875 Section 91....875 Annual progress reports. (a) Each operator subject to § 91.865 or § 91.867 of this chapter shall submit an annual report to the FAA, Office of Environment and Energy, on the progress it has made...

  7. Yakima Hatchery Experimental Design : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Curtis; Marshall, Anne

    1991-08-01

    This progress report details the results and status of Washington Department of Fisheries' (WDF) pre-facility monitoring, research, and evaluation efforts, through May 1991, designed to support the development of an Experimental Design Plan (EDP) for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), previously termed the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP or Y/KPP). This pre- facility work has been guided by planning efforts of various research and quality control teams of the project that are annually captured as revisions to the experimental design and pre-facility work plans. The current objective are as follows: to develop genetic monitoring and evaluation approach for the Y/KPP; to evaluate stock identification monitoring tools, approaches, and opportunities available to meet specific objectives of the experimental plan; and to evaluate adult and juvenile enumeration and sampling/collection capabilities in the Y/KPP necessary to measure experimental response variables.

  8. Combustion synthesis and engineering of nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications. Annual progress report, December 1, 1992--May 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.; Schulze, W.A.

    1993-05-28

    Fully dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles were prepared by the new nanofabrication process. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles and fabrication of dense, nanocrystalline ceramic parts. The synthesis step produced 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites, and is capable of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense parts at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times -- representing a factor of 10--100 reduction in process energy requirements. The process was demonstrated by producing ultrafine-grained yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, an important material with a variety of energy-related applications (solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.). Results from this period clearly illustrate the capabilities of this energy-efficient and directly commercializable process for producing dense, nanocrystalline, multicomponent oxide ceramics.

  9. Combustion synthesis and engineering of nanoparticles for electronic, structural and superconductor applications. Annual progress report, December 1, 1992--August 19, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stangle, G.C.; Amarakoon, V.R.W.; Schulze, W.A.

    1993-08-19

    Fully dense, nanocrystalline ceramic articles were prepared by a new nanofabrication process. The process consists of two steps: synthesis of ceramic nanoparticles and fabrication of dense, nanocrystalline ceramic parts. The synthesis step produced 10-nanometer-diameter crystallites, and is capable of being scaled up to kilogram/hour production rates. The fabrication step produced dense parts at significantly reduced sintering temperatures and times--representing a factor of 10--100 reduction in process energy requirements. Process was demonstrated by producing ultrafine-grained yttria-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, an important material with a variety of energy-related applications (e.g., solid electrolytes, oxygen sensors, electrode materials, thermal barrier coatings, etc.). Results from this period illustrate capabilities of this energy-efficient and directly commercializable process for producing dense, nanocrystalline, multicomponent oxide ceramics.

  10. PTAGIS Annual Progress Report, 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission.

    2002-05-01

    This is the annual report for the PTAGIS project. February 28, 2002 marked the end of the 2001/02 PTAGIS fiscal year. All critical project activities progressed on schedule. However, a number of activities that have been traditionally performed by PTAGIS have been curtailed due to lack of resources. These reduced activities include production and distribution of the ''PTAGIS Newsletter'', development of a robust Web-based interface to PTAGIS data, curtailment efforts to upgrade critical database server hardware systems and processes and other activities. The main reasons for the lack of resources are: (1) In June, 2001, the region made a decision to expedite the installation of PIT tag detection at Bonneville and McNary dams. BPA issued contract 7422 to PSMFC to provide labor and material to install these systems. Nearly every PTAGIS resource was dedicated to this effort; (2) The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Northwest Power Planning Council and Bonneville Power Administration have not solicited project proposals and budgets for over two years. Project requirements (represented in increasing scope, scale and complexity) have increased, but funding has not.

  11. Design and synthesis of the next generation of crown ethers for waste separations: An interlaboratory comprehensive proposal. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Dietz, M.L.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Hay, B.P.

    1997-09-01

    'The purpose of this task is to undertake the design, synthesis, and characterization of the next generation of crown ethers for metal-ion separations applicable to the US Department of Energy''s (DOE''s) environmental needs. The general target problem is the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal contaminants from certain environmental and waste streams. Although not a radioactivity hazard, Li{sup +} ions leaching from burial sites containing more than 12 metric tons of lithium compounds contaminate the groundwater at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and have raised noncompliance concerns because of the resultant toxicity to aquatic biota. A more highly visible problem has been treatment of high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and especially the Hanford Site. The fission products {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs have been explicitly targeted for removal by the following DOE programs: the Office of Environmental Management, the Office of Science and Technology, the Tank Waste Remediation System, the Tanks Focus Area, and the Efficient Separations and Processing Cross-Cutting Program. These seemingly ubiquitous fission products also appear in soil and groundwater at numerous DOE sites. In addition, radium has recently been named as a target contaminant at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. Unfortunately, the separations technologies needed to address these problems either do not exist or exhibit substantial deficiencies. Established techniques such as solvent extraction and ion exchange certainly have a strong role to play, especially as enhanced with the use of the new highly selective metal-ion hosts such as crown ethers and calixarenes. Recently applied results in the United States, France, Russia, and elsewhere have demonstrated the effective performance of crown ethers under realistic or actual process conditions for the removal of alkali and alkaline-earth metal ions

  12. Investigation of sulfur-tolerant catalysts for selective synthesis of hydrocarbon liquids from coal-derived gases. Annual technical progress report, September 19, 1980-September 18, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1981-10-31

    During the past contract year, considerable progress was made in characterization and activity/selectivity testing of iron and cobalt catalysts. Preparation of boride promoted cobalt and iron catalysts was refined and nearly completed. H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption and oxygen titration measurements were performed on a number of supported and unsupported catalysts, especially several boride promoted cobalt and iron catalysts. Activity/selectivity tests of 3 and 15% Fe/SiO/sub 2/ and Co/SiO/sub 2/ and of 6 borided cobalt and iron catalysts were completed. The product distributions for iron and cobalt boride catalysts are unusual and interesting. Boron promoted iron is more active and stable than iron/silica; cobalt boride has an unusually high selectivity for alcohols. Tests to determine effects of H/sub 2/S poisoning on activity/selectivity properties of 15% Co/SiO/sub 2/ indicate that a significant loss of activity occurs over a period of 24 to 28 h in the presence of 10 to 20 ppM H/sub 2/S. Product selectivity to liquids increased through a maximum during the gradual addition of sulfur. Reactant CO and H/sub 2/S interact partially to form COS which is less toxic than H/sub 2/S. H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption data were obtained for 3, 6 and 9% Co/ZSM-5 catalysts prepared and reactor tested by PETC. The unusual and interesting results suggest that metal-support interactions may have an important influence on reactant adsorption properties.

  13. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  14. Fifty years of progress in speech synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Juergen

    2004-10-01

    A common opinion is that progress in speech synthesis should be easier to discern than in other areas of speech communication: you just have to listen to the speech! Unfortunately, things are more complicated. It can be said, however, that early speech synthesis efforts were primarily concerned with providing intelligible speech, while, more recently, ``naturalness'' has been the focus. The field had its ``electronic'' roots in Homer Dudley's 1939 ``Voder,'' and it advanced in the 1950s and 1960s through progress in a number of labs including JSRU in England, Haskins Labs in the U.S., and Fant's Lab in Sweden. In the 1970s and 1980s significant progress came from efforts at Bell Labs (under Jim Flanagan's leadership) and at MIT (where Dennis Klatt created one of the first commercially viable systems). Finally, over the past 15 years, the methods of unit-selection synthesis were devised, primarily at ATR in Japan, and were advanced by work at AT&T Labs, Univ. of Edinburgh, and ATR. Today, TTS systems are able to ``convince some of the listeners some of the time'' that synthetic speech is as natural as live recordings. Ongoing efforts aim at replacing ``some'' with ``most'' for a wide range of real-world applications.

  15. 2010 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  16. Southeastern Community College Annual Progress Report, December 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, R. Gene

    Presenting information on the status of Southeastern Community College (SCC), in Iowa, this annual progress report highlights basic institutional data, financial information, and improvements and planned changes of the college as of 1995. Part 1 presents basic data on SCC, including facility locations, assessed property valuation, district…

  17. Progress in Scientific and Technical Communications, 1968 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Council for Science and Technology, Washington, DC. Committee on Scientific and Technical Information.

    This sixth annual report describes progress achieved by the Federal Government in improving the communication of scientific and technical information to support and enhance national science and technology. Included in the report are details regarding the scientific and technical activities of individual Federal Agencies, such as the Atomic Energy…

  18. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for FY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1999-08-04

    This FFA Annual Progress Report has been developed to summarize the information for activities performed during the Fiscal Year 1998 (October 1, 1997, to September 30, 1998) and activities planned for Fiscal Year 1999 by U.S. EPA, SCDHEC, and SRS at those units and areas identified for remediation in the Agreement.

  19. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  20. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  1. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  2. 14 CFR 91.875 - Annual progress reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual progress reports. 91.875 Section 91.875 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... established. (2) For each U.S. operator: (i) A plan to meet the compliance schedules in § 91.865 or §...

  3. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Satyapal, Sunita

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  4. 1999 annual progress report -- Energy conservation team

    SciTech Connect

    Chalk, S.

    1999-10-19

    This report highlights progress achieved during FY 1999 under the Light-duty Fuels Utilization R and D Program. The program is comprised of two elements: the Advanced Petroleum-Based APB Fuels Program which focused on developing and testing advanced fuels for use with compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines and fuel cells and the Alternative Fuels Program which focused on Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels. The report contains 17 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects. Fuel efficient vehicles with very low emissions are essential to meet the challenges of climate change, energy security, and improved air quality. The authors anticipate cooperative efforts with the auto and energy industries to develop new and innovative technologies that will be used to make advanced transportation vehicles that are fuel efficient, clean, and safe.

  5. Nuclear structure research. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.L.

    1993-10-31

    The most significant development this year has been the successful elucidation of the low-energy systematics of the very neutron-deficient Pr, Nd, Pm, and Sm isotopes. This includes an extensive set of Nilsson bandheads in {sup 133}Nd. Some serious errors in earlier decay scheme work were found. The results require some significant reassessments of mean-field calculations in this region. Part of our program continues to focus on shape coexistence and electric monopole (E0) transitions in nuclei. Following the discovery of coexisting ``gamma`` bands connected by E0 transitions in {sup 184}Pt, a similar behavior in {sup 186}Pt was established from {sup 186}Au decay data. This includes a pure E0 transition between states with J{sup {pi}} = 3{sup +}, just as was seen in {sup 184}Pt. Progress has been made in elucidating the low-energy systematics of the neutron-deficient Ir isotopes. A search for the population of the superdeformed band in {sup 194}Pb in the decay of {sup 194}Bi was unsuccessful. An extensive program of systematics for nuclei at and near N = Z has been initiated.

  6. Progress towards the synthesis of polymeric nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzana, H.E.; McMahan, A.K.; Yoo, C.S.; Barbee, T.W. III

    1994-06-01

    Current conventional energetic compounds rely on strong covalent bonds within individual molecules for energy storage. A new class of energetic compounds has been recently proposed that entirely replaces weak van der Waals interactions with strong covalent bonds arranged in a continuous, uniform network, thus tremendously enhancing the energy per volume. In particular, recent theoretical calculations have suggested that a phosphorus-like or polymeric form of nitrogen may exist metastably at atmospheric pressure as a hard, insulating solid with an enhanced energy per unit volume. It is predicted that the polymeric phase of nitrogen should be stable at high pressure. And therefore the megabar diamond anvil cell might provide the ideal vehicle for carrying out proof-of-existence experiments. currently, the authors are bringing to bear technologies for achieving multimegabar pressures and temperatures of several thousand K. These conditions are necessary to rearrange the bonds of strongly covalent systems into highly energetic configurations. There is no doubt that the transformations will show strong hysteresis making the initial synthesis difficult, but for these very same reasons, these new compounds potentially will be metastable at ambient conditions in their energetic state. They discuss their results and progress to date, indicating that they are well on their way to understanding the high pressure equation-of-state of sold N{sub 2}.

  7. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2001-05-01

    This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

  8. Solar thermal power systems. Annual technical progress report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Gerald W.

    1980-06-01

    The Solar Thermal Power Systems Program is the key element in the national effort to establish solar thermal conversion technologies within the major sectors of the national energy market. It provides for the development of concentrating mirror/lens heat collection and conversion technologies for both central and dispersed receiver applications to produce electricity, provide heat at its point of use in industrial processes, provide heat and electricity in combination for industrial, commercial, and residential needs, and ultimately, drive processes for production of liquid and gaseous fuels. This report is the second Annual Technical Progress Report for the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program and is structured according to the organization of the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program on September 30, 1979. Emphasis is on the technical progress of the projects rather than on activities and individual contractor efforts. Each project description indicates its place in the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program, a brief history, the significant achievements and real progress during FY 1979, also future project activities as well as anticipated significant achievements are forecast. (WHK)

  9. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

  10. FY2014 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-03-01

    The Energy Storage research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for projects focusing on batteries for plug-in electric vehicles. Program targets focus on overcoming technical barriers to enable market success including: (1) significantly reducing battery cost, (2) increasing battery performance (power, energy, durability), (3) reducing battery weight & volume, and (4) increasing battery tolerance to abusive conditions such as short circuit, overcharge, and crush. This report describes the progress made on the research and development projects funded by the Energy Storage subprogram in 2014. You can download individual sections at the following website, http://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/downloads/vehicle-technologies-office-2014-energy-storage-rd-annual-report.

  11. Recent progress on the total synthesis of acetogenins from Annonaceae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianguang; Shi, Zhihao; Tang, Yuping; Chen, Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Summary An overview of recent progress on the total synthesis of acetogenins from Annonaceae during the past 12 years is provided. These include mono-tetrahydrofurans, adjacent bis-tetrahydrofurans, nonadjacent bis-tetrahydrofurans, tri-tetrahydrofurans, adjacent tetrahydrofuran-tetrahydropyrans, nonadjacent tetrahydrofuran-tetrahydropyrans, mono-tetrahydropyrans, and acetogenins containing only γ-lactone. This review emphasizes only the first total synthesis of molecules of contemporary interest and syntheses that have helped to correct structures. In addition, some significant results on the novel synthesis and structure–activity relationship studies of annonaceous acetogenins are also introduced. PMID:19190742

  12. 21 CFR 601.70 - Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. 601.70 Section 601.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS LICENSING Postmarketing Studies § 601.70 Annual progress reports of postmarketing studies. (a) General requirements....

  13. 1993 annual final progress report: July 1992 through June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, A.; Crotty, G.; Chen, Z.; Sana, P.; Salami, J.; Doolittle, A.; Pang, A.; Pham, T.

    1994-11-01

    This is the first annual report since the Inauguration of the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Development (UCEP) at Georgia Tech. The essential objective of the Center is to improve the fundamental understanding of the science and technology of advanced PV devices and materials, to provide training and enrich the educational experience of students in the field, and to increase US competitiveness by providing guidelines to industry and DOE for achieving cost-effective and high efficiency PV devices. These objectives are to be accomplished through a combination of research and education. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments, including modeling, processing, and characterization of cast multicrystalline silicon solar cells; use of modeling and PCD measurements to develop a road map for progressing toward 20% multicrystalline and 25% single crystalline cells; the development of a novel PECVD SiN/SiO{sub 2} AR coating that also provides good surface passivation; PECVD deposited SiO{sub 2} films with record low S and D{sub it} at the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface; and educational activities and accomplishments.

  14. 78 FR 65705 - Request for Comments on the Annual Progress Report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ...BOEM requests comments on the Annual Progress Report (Report) on the OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program 2012-2017 (Five Year Program). The Annual Progress Report is available for review at: www.boem.gov/ Five-Year-Program-Annual-Progress-Report/. Information on the Five Year Program is available online at http://www.boem.gov/Oil-and-Gas-Energy-......

  15. 15 CFR 715.1 - Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). 715.1 Section 715.1 Commerce and... DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) § 715.1 Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). (a) Declaration of production by synthesis of UDOCs...

  16. 15 CFR 715.1 - Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). 715.1 Section 715.1 Commerce and... DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) § 715.1 Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). (a) Declaration of production by synthesis of UDOCs...

  17. 15 CFR 715.1 - Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). 715.1 Section 715.1 Commerce and... DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) § 715.1 Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). (a) Declaration of production by synthesis of UDOCs...

  18. 15 CFR 715.1 - Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). 715.1 Section 715.1 Commerce and... DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) § 715.1 Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). (a) Declaration of production by synthesis of UDOCs...

  19. 76 FR 61112 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Annual Progress Reports for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Annual Progress Reports for Empowerment Zones AGENCY: Office of Community Planning and Development, HUD. ACTION: Notice..., Departmental Reports Management Officer, QDAM, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 Seventh...

  20. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  1. ANNUAL AND POLYETIC PROGRESSION OF CITRUS CANKER ON TREES PROTECTED WITH COPPER SPRAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    : Mathematical models are important tools for comparative analysis of epidemics. In this paper, parameters obtained from the mathematical model that best fitted to the annual progress curves of citrus canker incidence were used to evaluate the effect of copper sprays and windbreaks on the annual and...

  2. 78 FR 17204 - Pesticide Reregistration Performance Measures and Goals; Annual Progress Report; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... subject to a formal comment period, EPA welcomes input from stakeholders and the general public. Written... AGENCY Pesticide Reregistration Performance Measures and Goals; Annual Progress Report; Notice of... information about EPA's annual achievements in meeting its performance measures and goals for...

  3. FY13 Annual Progress Report for SECA Core Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Koeppel, Brian J.

    2014-01-31

    This progress report covers technical work performed during fiscal year 2013 at PNNL under Field Work Proposal (FWP) 40552. The report highlights and documents technical progress in tasks related to advanced cell and stack component materials development and computational design and simulation. Primary areas of emphasis for the materials development work were metallic interconnects and coatings, cathode and anode stability/degradation, glass seals, and advanced testing under realistic stack conditions: Metallic interconnects and coatings • Effects of surface modifications to AISI 441 (prior to application of protective spinel coatings) on oxide scale growth and adhesion were evaluated as a function of temperature and time. Cathode stability/degradation • Effects of cathode air humidity on performance and stability of SOFC cathodes were investigated by testing anode-supported cells as a function of time and temperature. • In-situ high temperature XRD measurements were used to correlate changes in cathode lattice structure and composition with performance of anode-supported button cells. Anode stability/degradation • Effects of high fuel steam content on Ni/YSZ anodes were investigated over a range of time and temperature. • Vapor infiltration and particulate additions were evaluated as a potential means of improving tolerance of Ni/YSZ anodes to sulfur-bearing fuel species. Glass seals • A candidate compliant glass-based seal materials were evaluated in terms of microstructural evolution and seal performance as a function of time and temperature. Stack fixture testing • The SECA CTP stack test fixture was used for intermediate and long-term evaluation of candidate materials and processes. Primary areas of emphasis for the computational modeling work were coarse methodology, degradation of stack components, and electrochemical modeling: Coarse methodology • Improvements were made to both the SOFC-MP and SOFC ROM simulation tools. Degradation of stack

  4. GSA committees: Progress through service the Annual Program Committee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    The GSA's Annual Program Committee (APC) is directly responsible for the GSA's meeting and other responsibilities especially before the main event. It decides on the locations, the number and content of the technical sessions, annual membership surveys, hospitality for the guests, field trips and more. In addition, it pays significant attention to creative thinking about geoscience discoveries and directions as well as identify new and emerging areas of earth science. APC is also looking for new ideas, approaches and directions.

  5. Annual Progress Report of the Southern Rural Development Center, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State, MS.

    This annual report of the Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC) describes the agency's extension and research activities from October, 1996, to September 30, 1997. SRDC is one of four regional centers coordinating rural development research and extension education programs cooperatively with the land-grant institutions. SRDC cooperates with 29…

  6. Planning 1997-98, Progress 1996-97. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Gail M.

    Established in fall 1980, TheLearningCenter at South Plains College, in Texas, is designed to provide assistance to students seeking specialized services, offering developmental and college-level courses, peer-tutoring, computer-aided instruction, learning opportunities, and learning assessments. This annual report describes instructional…

  7. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  8. Oregon Migrant Health Project; Annual Progress Report 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    In this 1969 annual report, 10 objectives of the Oregon Migrant Health Project--which served approximately 18,400 migrants during the project year--are listed. These objectives relate to providing for diagnostic and medical services, preventive medical services, and dental care, as well as promoting health awareness, education, and improved living…

  9. Annual progress report, July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Research progress is reported for the year 1979-1980. The report is divided into sections dealing individually with the divisions of Biomolecular and Cellular Science, Environmental Biology, and Nuclear Medicine. The sections have been individually entered into EDB. (ACR)

  10. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

  11. Nitrogen control of chloroplast development and differentiation. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1991-12-01

    The growth and development of plants and photosynthetic microorganisms is commonly limited by the availability of nitrogen. Our work concerns understanding the mechanisms by which plants and algae that are subjected to nitrogen deprivation alter the composition of photosynthetic membranes and enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism. Toward these ends, we study biosynthetic and gene expression processes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which is grown in an ammonium-limited continuous culture system. We have found that the expression of nuclear genes, including those encoding for light-harvesting proteins, are severely repressed in nitrogen-limited cells whereas, in general, chloroplast protein synthesis is attenuated primarily at the level of mRNA translation. Conversely, nitrogen deprivation appears to lead to enhanced synthesis of enzymes that are involved in starch and storage lipid deposition. In addition, as a possible means by which photosynthetic electron transport activities and ATP synthesis is sustained during chronic periods of nitrogen deprivation, thylakoid membranes become enriched with components for chlororespiration. Characterization of the chlororespiratory electron transport constituents, including cytochrome complexes and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase is a major current effort. Also, we are striving to isolate the genes encoding chlororespiration proteins toward determining how they and others that are strongly responsive to nutrient availability are regulated.

  12. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1992. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  13. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R&D.

  14. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1991. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R D.

  15. Integral Fast Reactor Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1993. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: (1) metal fuel performance, (2) pyroprocess development, (3) safety experiments and analyses, (4) core design development, (5) fuel cycle demonstration, and (6) LMR technology R and D.

  16. Integral Fast Reactor Program annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.; Walters, L.C.; Laidler, J.J.; Pedersen, D.R.; Wade, D.C.; Lineberry, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes highlights of the technical progress made in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program in FY 1994. Technical accomplishments are presented in the following areas of the IFR technology development activities: metal fuel performance; pyroprocess development; safety experiments and analyses; core design development; fuel cycle demonstration; and LMR technology R&D.

  17. NATIONAL DRY DEPOSITION NETWORK SECOND ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT (1988)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Progress in the National Dry Deposition Network during calendar year 1988 is presented. The network configuration and operating procedures for the field, laboratory, and data management center are described and data are summarized. Forty-three sites were operational at the close ...

  18. Research on Automatic Classification, Indexing and Extracting. Annual Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, F.T.; And Others

    In order to contribute to the success of several studies for automatic classification, indexing and extracting currently in progress, as well as to further the theoretical and practical understanding of textual item distributions, the development of a frequency program capable of supplying these types of information was undertaken. The program…

  19. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 2000 [USDOE] [9th edition

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    This ninth edition of the Annual Report of Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress highlights waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost savings/avoidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pollution Prevention Program for Fiscal Year 2000. This edition marks the first time that progress toward meeting the 2005 Pollution Prevention Goals, issued by the Secretary of Energy in November 1999, is being reported. In addition, the Annual Report has a new format, and now contains information on a fiscal year basis, which is consistent with other DOE reports.

  20. FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    SciTech Connect

    2005-10-01

    In cooperation with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies, the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program is advancing the state of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in support of the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The initiative seeks to develop hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed to make it practical and cost-effective for Americans to choose to use fuel cell vehicles by 2020. Significant progress was made in fiscal year 2005 toward that goal.

  1. Ionization in liquids [annual] progress report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bakale, G.

    1994-12-31

    Progress in 1993--94 was focused on delineating how ions of the model nonpolar spherical solute Buckminsterfullerene interact differently with various nonpolar solvents than does the ellipsoidal fullerene analog C-70, and exposing a variety of new audiences to the electrophilicity-carcinogenicity relationship in order to obtain fresh insight into this relationship that may lead to elucidation of the role of electrons in carcinogenesis and thereby a better understanding of the biological effects of ionizing radiation. To achieve these goals a new collaboration was established with scientists at Oak Ridge National Lab who have unique facilities to characterize fullerene and its radiolytic products.

  2. The theory of hadronic systems. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.R.

    1993-04-12

    This report briefly discusses progress on the following topics: isospin breaking in the pion-nucleon system; direct capture of pions into deeply bound atomic states; knock out of secondary components in the nucleus; study of the radii of neutron distributions in nuclei; the hadronic double scattering operator; transparency in pion production; asymmetry in pion scattering and charge exchange from polarized nuclei; the mechanism of pion absorption in nuclei; the neutron-proton charge-exchange reaction; modification of the fundamental structure of nucleons in nuclei; and antiproton annihilation in nuclei.

  3. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  4. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    SciTech Connect

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  5. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This sixth Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 36 reporting sites from 1993 through 1997. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December 31, 1999. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation increased three percent from 1996 to 1997, and decreased 61 percent overall from 1993 to 1997. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1997 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. However, it is important to note that increases in low-level radioactive and low-level mixed waste generation could reverse this achievement. From 1996 to 1997, low-level radioactive waste generation increased 10 percent, and low-level mixed waste generation increased slightly. It is critical that DOE sites continue to reduce routine operations waste generation for all waste types, to ensure that DOE`s Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals are achieved by December 31, 1999.

  6. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  7. Herbaceous Energy Corps Program: Annual progress report for FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Turhollow, A.F.; Johnston, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program (HECP) for the year ending September 30, 1986. HECP is devoted to research on the development of terrestrial, nonwoody plant species for use as energy feedstocks. HECP emphasizes lignocellulosic forage crops. In FY 1986 screening and selection trials continued on 25 species of perennial and annual grasses and legumes in five projects in the Southeast and the Midwest-Lake States regions. Research also continued on the development of winter rapeseed as a diesel-fuel substitute. Activities in FY 1986 included genetic crosses and selections to incorporate atrazine resistance, development of Canola-quality winter rapeseed for the Southeast, and development of dwarf varieties. Production practices for double-cropped winter rapeseed in the Southeast were also examined. Exploratory research efforts in FY 1986 included the physiology and biochemistry of hydrocarbon production in latex-bearing plants, the productivity of cattail stands under sustained harvesting, the development of tissue culture techniques for hard-to-culture sorghum genotypes, and the start of a study to measure sustained productivity of old-field successional vegetation. Environmental and economic analyses in FY 1986 included studies on the uses of wetlands and wet soils, the use of lignocellulosic crops as an alcohol feedstock, the potential of direct combustion of lignocellulosic crops, and existing oilseed extraction facilities. 6 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Herbaceous Energy Crops Program. Annual progress report for FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Turhollow, A.F.; Johnston, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Herbaceous Energy Crops Program (HECP) for the year ending September 30, 1985. HECP emphasizes lignocellulosic forage crops. In FY 1985 screening and selection trails began on seven species of perennial and annual grasses and legumes in five projects in the Southeast and the Midwest-Lake State regions. Research also continued on the development of winter rapeseed as a disel-fuel substitute. Activities in FY 1985 included crosses and selections to incorporate atrazine resistance and reduced vernalization requirements in genotypes with desirable seed and oil qualities. Exploratory research efforts in FY 1985 included the physiology and biochemistry of hydrocarbon production in latex bearing plants, the productivity of cattail stands under sustained harvesting, and the development of tissue culture techniques for hard-to-culture sorghum genotypes. Environmental and economic analyses in FY 1985 included completion of a resource assessment of the southwestern United States, a study on successful new crop introductions, and initiation of studies on near-term markets for lignocellulosic energy crops and on vegetable oil extraction facilities. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

  10. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  11. 76 FR 64369 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Annual Progress Reports for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... soliciting public comments on the subject proposal. The primary purpose of this collection is to continue... Proposed Use: The primary purpose of this collection is to continue current data reporting for Rounds, I... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Annual Progress...

  12. 76 FR 66946 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Annual Progress Reports for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... (12/3/2011) 30 day sent early. The primary purpose of this collection is to continue current data... Proposed Use: The primary purpose of this collection is to continue current data reporting for Rounds, I... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Annual Progress...

  13. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report period ending December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1987-10-01

    This annual report on fusion energy discusses the progress on work in the following main topics: toroidal confinement experiments; atomic physics and plasma diagnostics development; plasma theory and computing; plasma-materials interactions; plasma technology; superconducting magnet development; fusion engineering design center; materials research and development; and neutron transport. (LSP)

  14. 78 FR 2684 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Annual Progress Report (APR) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Annual Progress Report... Community Planning and Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). ACTION: Notice... Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Room 4160, Washington, DC 20410-5000; telephone (202)...

  15. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Slezak, Lee

    2013-03-29

    Annual progress report that evaluates the technologies and performance characteristics of advanced automotive powertrain components and subsystems in an integrated vehicle systems context. These evaluations address light-, medium-, and heavy-duty vehicle platforms. This work is directed toward evaluating and verifying the targets of the VTO R&D teams and to providing guidance in establishing roadmaps for achievement of these goals.

  16. The domestic natural gas and oil initiatve. First annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This document is the first of a series of annual progress reports designed to inform the industry and the public of the accomplishments of the Domestic Natural Gas and Oil Initiative (the Initiative) and the benefits realized. Undertaking of the Initiative was first announced by Hazel O`Leary, Secretary of the Department of Energy (Department or DOE), in April 1993.

  17. Determining how magnetic helicity injection really works. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, P.M.

    1998-10-21

    Magnetic helicity injection is the essential process underlying both spheromak formation and helicity injection toroidal current drive in tokamaks (e.g., HIT and NSTX). The dynamical details of the helicity injection process are poorly understood because existing models avoid a dynamic description. In particular, Taylor relaxation, the main model motivating helicity injection efforts, is an argument that predicts the state to which a turbulent magnetic configuration relaxes after all dynamics are over. The goal of the Caltech experiment is to investigate the actual dynamics and topological evolution associated with relaxation and so determine how helicity injection really works. Although the global relaxation model (i.e., Taylor model) typically invokes axisymmetry, simple physical arguments (Cowling`s theorem) show that the detailed dynamics must involve topologically complex, non-axisymmetric processes. Progress for this project is given here.

  18. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2008-12-22

    , for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  19. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les

    2009-08-06

    , for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  20. Annual research progress report, FY 1980. Annual report 1 Oct 79-30 Sep 80

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.D.

    1980-10-01

    During Fiscal Year 1980 progress was attained at the Letterman Army Institute of Research in the following research areas: Basic and applied studies on blood, blood products and blood substitutes; physiology of hemorrhagic shock, pharmacological intervention of shock; the determination of coherent radiation exposure thresholds causing damage to the eye, definition and treatment for laser injuries of the skin and eye; military stress and combat effectiveness; evaluation and toxicology of insect repellents; defense against chemical agents. The progress made in this fiscal year is described in the reports of the work units presented.

  1. Autonomous Pathogen Detection System - FY02 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, B; Brown, S; Burris, K; Elkin, C; Hindson, B; Langlois, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Metz, T; Nasarabadi, S; Makarewicz, T; Milznovich, F; Venkateswaran, K S; Visuri, S

    2002-11-11

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field demonstrate a biological agent detection and identification capability, the Autonomous Pathogen Detector System (APDS). Integrating a flow cytometer and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detector with sample collection, sample preparation and fluidics will provide a compact, autonomously operating instrument capable of simultaneously detecting multiple pathogens and/or toxins. The APDS will operate in fixed locations, continuously monitoring air samples and automatically reporting the presence of specific biological agents. The APDS will utilize both multiplex immunoassays and nucleic acid assays to provide ''quasi-orthogonal'' multiple agent detection approaches to minimize false positives and increase the reliability of identification. Technical advances across several fronts must occur, however, to realize the full extent of the APDS. The end goal of a commercially available system for civilian biological weapon defense will be accomplished through three progressive generations of APDS instruments. The APDS is targeted for civilian applications in which the public is at high risk of exposure to covert releases of bioagent, such as major subway systems and other transportation terminals, large office complexes and convention centers. APDS is also designed to be part of a monitoring network of sensors integrated with command and control systems for wide-area monitoring of urban areas and major public gatherings. In this latter application there is potential that a fully developed APDS could add value to DoD monitoring architectures.

  2. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  3. UCSD geothermal chemistry program; Annual progress report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Weare, J.H.

    1989-10-01

    The development of a geothermal resource requires a considerable financial commitment. As in other energy extraction ventures, the security of this investment can be jeopardized by the uncertain behavior of the resource under operating conditions. Many of the most significant problems limiting the development of geothermal power are related to the chemical properties of the high temperature and highly pressured formation fluids from which the energy is extracted. When the pressure and temperature conditions on these fluids are changed either during the production phase (pressure changes) or during the extraction phase (temperature changes) of the operation, the fluids which were originally in equilibrium under the new conditions by precipitation of solid materials (scales) or release of dissolved gases (some toxic) in the formation and well bores or in the plant equipment. Unfortunately, predicting the behavior of the production fluids is difficult, because it is a function of many variables. In order to address these problems the Department of Energy is developing a computer model describing the chemistry of geothermal fluids. The model under development at UCSD is based on recent progress in the physical chemistry of concentrated aqueous solutions, and is covered in this report.

  4. 15 CFR 715.1 - Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual declaration requirements for production by synthesis of unscheduled discrete organic chemicals (UDOCs). 715.1 Section 715.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) research progress in 1988: Proceedings from the ninth annual EPRI NDE information meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Avioli, M.J. Jr.; Dau, G.J.; Liu, S.N.; Stein, J.; Welty, C.S.

    1989-05-01

    The increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety analysis through rapidly developing Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to initiate a Nondestructive Evaluation Program in 1974. To date, the major focus has been on light water reactor inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now underway. This report presents a comprehensive review of the EPRI effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. An organizational plan of the program is presented in overview. In addition, organization from several viewpoints is presented, e.g., in-service inspection operators, R and D personnel, and utility representatives. As the tenth in a planned series of annual progress reports of EPRI-funded NDE activities, this report also serves as the proceedings of the Ninth Annual EPRI NDE Information Meeting held in Charlotte, North Carolina, on November 15--16, 1988. It summarizes significant progress made since the previous EPRI Special Report NP-5490-SR was issued in June 1988. Section 1 contains information about the program organization, and the sections that follow contain contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. The progress reports are grouped by plant components -- pipe, pressure vessel, and steam generator and boiler tubes. In addition, Part 5 is devoted to discussions of technology transfer.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation research progress in 1989: Proceedings from the tenth annual EPRI NDE information meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Avioli, M.J. Jr.; Behravesh, M.M.; Gehl, S.M.; Liu, S.N.; Stein, J.; Welty, C.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The increasing cost of equipment for power generating plants and the potential increases in productivity and safety available through rapidity developing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology led EPRI to initiate a Nondestructive Evaluation Program in 1974. To date, the major focus has been on light water reactor (LWR) inspection problems; however, increased application to other systems is now under way. This report presents a comprehensive review of the EPRI effort in the NDE area. Most of the report consists of contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. An organizational plan of the program is presented in overview. In addition, organization from several viewpoints is presented, e.g., in-service inspection operators, R D personnel, and utility representatives. As the eleventh in a planned series of annual progress reports of EPRI-funded NDE activities, this report also serves as the proceedings of the Tenth Annual EPRI NDE Information Meeting held in Palo Alto, California, on November 14-15, 1989. It summarizes significant progress made since the previous EPRI Special Report NP-6075-SR was issued in May 1989. Section 1 contains information about the program organization, and the sections that follow contain contractor-supplied progress reports on each current project. The progress reports are grouped by plant components -- pipe and nozzle, pressure vessel, and boilers and steam generators. In addition, Part 5 is devoted to discussions of technology transfer. The individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  7. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems, Volume 1: Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This is the first annual technical progress report for The Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Systems Program. Two semi-annual technical progress reports were previously issued. This program was initially by the Department of Energy as an R D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular three-stage slagging combustor concept. Fuel-rich conditions inhibit NO/sub x/ formation from fuel nitrogen in the first stage; coal ash and sulfur is subsequently removed from the combustion gases by an impact separator in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage. 27 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Underground Energy Storage Program: 1981 annual report. Volume I. Progress summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1982-06-01

    This is the 1981 annual report for the Underground Energy Storage Program administered by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The two-volume document describes all of the major research funded under this program during the period March 1981 to March 1982. Volume I summarizes the activities and notable progress toward program objectives in both Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). Major changes in program emphasis and structure are also documented.

  9. Recent progress in the synthesis of metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujia; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-10-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted considerable attention for various applications due to their tunable structure, porosity and functionality. In general, MOFs have been synthesized from isolated metal ions and organic linkers under hydrothermal or solvothermal conditions via one-spot reactions. The emerging precursor approach and kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation strategy add more diversity to this field. In addition, to speed up the crystallization process and create uniform crystals with reduced size, many alternative synthesis routes have been explored. Recent advances in microwave-assisted synthesis and electrochemical synthesis are presented in this review. In recent years, post-synthetic approaches have been shown to be powerful tools to synthesize MOFs with modified functionality, which cannot be attained via de novo synthesis. In this review, some current accomplishments of post-synthetic modification (PSM) based on covalent transformations and coordinative interactions as well as post-synthetic exchange (PSE) in robust MOFs are provided.

  10. Recent progress in the synthesis of metal–organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yujia; Zhou, Hong -Cai

    2015-09-25

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted considerable attention for various applications due to their tunable structure, porosity and functionality. In general, MOFs have been synthesized from isolated metal ions and organic linkers under hydrothermal or solvothermal conditions via one-spot reactions. The emerging precursor approach and kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation strategy add more diversity to this field. In addition, to speed up the crystallization process and create uniform crystals with reduced size, many alternative synthesis routes have been explored. Recent advances in microwave-assisted synthesis and electrochemical synthesis are presented in this review. In recent years, post-synthetic approaches have been shown to be powerful tools to synthesize MOFs with modified functionality, which cannot be attained via de novo synthesis. In this study, some current accomplishments of post-synthetic modification (PSM) based on covalent transformations and coordinative interactions as well as post-synthetic exchange (PSE) in robust MOFs are provided.

  11. Recent progress in the synthesis of metal–organic frameworks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Yujia; Zhou, Hong -Cai

    2015-09-25

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted considerable attention for various applications due to their tunable structure, porosity and functionality. In general, MOFs have been synthesized from isolated metal ions and organic linkers under hydrothermal or solvothermal conditions via one-spot reactions. The emerging precursor approach and kinetically tuned dimensional augmentation strategy add more diversity to this field. In addition, to speed up the crystallization process and create uniform crystals with reduced size, many alternative synthesis routes have been explored. Recent advances in microwave-assisted synthesis and electrochemical synthesis are presented in this review. In recent years, post-synthetic approaches have been shown to bemore » powerful tools to synthesize MOFs with modified functionality, which cannot be attained via de novo synthesis. In this study, some current accomplishments of post-synthetic modification (PSM) based on covalent transformations and coordinative interactions as well as post-synthetic exchange (PSE) in robust MOFs are provided.« less

  12. Nutrition and Child Growth and Development in Tunisia. Annual Progress Report, September 1, 1971--August 31, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Harben Boutourline

    This annual report of the Yale Project describes the progress made on the nutrition and growth study of Tunisian children from September 1, 1971 through August 31, 1972. The report details: (1) the progress in analysis of the cross-sectional study data, which was completed as of June 30, 1972, and (2) the development of the present longitudinal…

  13. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program.

  14. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  15. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  16. Nonlinear and Nonideal MHD. Final annual progress report, January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, James D

    2003-04-30

    This is the third and final annual progress report on the current 3-year ''Nonlinear and Nonideal MHD'' DoE grand DE-FG02-86ER53218 for the six months since the November 2002 progress report. During this grant year the funding level was $309k. The participating personnel and their approximate degree of funded involvement in this research project this grant year has been as follows: Professor J. D. Callen (PI, 1.8 months during academic year, 2.2 summer months); Professor C.C. Hegna (Co-PI: 2.3 months during academic year, 1.5 summer months); postdoc Dr. S. Gupta (100%); and graduate students A.L. Garcia-Perciante (50% RA) and X. Liu (50% RA).

  17. Prediction of the Long Term Stability of Polyester-Based Recording Media. First Annual Report, June 1982; Second Annual Report, August 1983; Progress Report, December 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Daniel W.; And Others

    This document comprises three progress reports for a 5-year environmental aging study aimed at establishing the lifetimes of magnetic tapes and the poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) base of photographic and electronic film under archival storage conditions. The first annual report (1982) introduces the rationale for the project, provides…

  18. Compilation of 1988 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 2. Annual progress report No. 7, January-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This is the seventh compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of eight studies performed during 1988 at the Wisconsin and Michigan Transmitting Facilities. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships.

  19. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in supercritical reaction media. Progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Subramaniam, B.; Bochniak, D.; Snavely, K.

    1993-01-01

    Our goals for this quarter were to complete construction of the reactor and analytical units for carrying out Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in liquid (n-hexadecane) and in supercritical n-hexane phases. Progress during this quarter was slower than expected.

  20. Blacks and the Progressive Movement: Emergence of a New Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Jimmie

    1999-01-01

    Claims that many historians believe that the Progressive Era did not benefit the black community as it did the white community. Recognizes the activities of black reformers and their triumphs during this period of continued segregation addressing the role of the black church and the achievements of black women. (CMK)

  1. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  2. Development and application of the electrochemical etching technique. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    This annual progress report documents further advances in the development and application of electrochemical etching of polycarbonate foils (ECEPF) for fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron dosimetry as well as alpha particle dosimetry. The fast (> 1.1 MeV) and thermal neutron dosimetry techniques were applied to a thorough investigation of the neutron contamination inherent in and about the primary x-ray beam of several medical therapy electron accelerators. Because of the small size of ECEPF dosimeters in comparison to other neutron meters, they have an unusually low perturbation of the radiation field under measurement. Due to this small size and the increased sensitivity of the ECEPF dosimeter over current techniques of measuring neutrons in a high photon field, the fast neutron contamination in the primary x-ray beam of all the investigated accelerators was measured with precision and found to be greater than that suggested by the other, more common, neutron dosimetry methods.

  3. [Progress in synthesis technologies and application of aviation biofuels].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiang; Zhao, Xuebing; Yang, Ming; Liu, Dehua

    2013-03-01

    Development of aviation biofuels has attracted great attention worldwide because that the shortage of fossil resources has become more and more serious. In the present paper, the development background, synthesis technologies, current application status and existing problems of aviation biofuels were reviewed. Several preparation routes of aviation biofuels were described, including Fischer-Tropsch process, catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic cracking of bio-oil. The status of flight tests and commercial operation were also introduced. Finally the problems for development and application of aviation biofuels were stated, and some accommodation were proposed. PMID:23789270

  4. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, April D.; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D.; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the ‘classical’ (neutral) and ‘alternative’ (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. - Highlights: ► Altered hepatic bile acid composition is observed in progressive NAFLD. ► Bile acid synthesis enzymes are transcriptionally altered in NASH livers. ► Increased levels of taurine and conjugated bile acids

  5. Annual Program Progress Report under DOE/PHRI Cooperative Agreement: (July 1, 2001-June 30, 2002)

    SciTech Connect

    Palafox, Neal A., MD, MPH

    2002-07-31

    OAK B188 DOE/PHRI Special Medical Care Program in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)Annual Program Progress Report. The DOE Marshall Islands Medical Program continued, in this it's 48th year, to provide medical surveillance for the exposed population from Rongelap and Utrik and the additional DOE patients. The program was inaugurated in 1954 by the Atomic Energy Commission following the exposure of Marshallese to fallout from a nuclear test (Castle Bravo) at Bikini Atoll. This year marks the fourth year in which the program has been carried out by PHRI under a cooperative agreement with DOE. The DOERHRI Special Medical Care Program, awarded the cooperative agreement on August 28, 1998, commenced its health care program on January 15, 1999, on Kwajalein and January 22, 1999, on Majuro. This report details the program for the July 1, 2001, through the June 30, 2002, period. The program provides year-round, on-site medical care to the DOE patient population residing in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) and annual examinations to those patients living in Hawaii and on the Continental U.S.

  6. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

  7. Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models: Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Fellows, Robert J.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-12-02

    This Annual Progress Report describes the work performed and summarizes some of the key observations to date on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report describes activities undertaken to collect samples of soils from three regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and perform analyses to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Section 3 summarizes information gathered regarding agricultural practices and common and unusual crops grown in each of these three areas. Section 4 describes progress in studying radionuclide uptake in several representative crops from the three soil types in controlled laboratory conditions. Section 5 describes a range of international coordination activities undertaken by Project staff in order to support the underlying data needs of the Project. Section 6 provides a very brief summary of the status of the GENII Version 2 computer program, which is a “client” of the types of data being generated by the Project, and for which the Project will be providing training to the US NRC staff in the coming Fiscal Year. Several appendices provide additional supporting information.

  8. Annual Progress Report of the Coastal Bend Migrant Council Health Project, San Patricio Migrant Health Center (Texas), 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coastal Bend Migrant Council, Mathis, TX. San Patricio Migrant Health Center.

    The annual medical progress report covers migrant health services in San Patricio County, Texas, from February 1, 1973 to January 31, 1974. The report discusses: staff, administration, cardiology, dental services, health services, medical services, outreach and environmental health services, prescription services, registration and identification,…

  9. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  10. Compilation of 1989 annual reports of the Navy ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. Volume 2. tabs C-F. Annual progress report, Jan-Dec 89

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the eighth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications Systems Ecological Monitoring Program. The reports document the progress of eight studies performed during 1989 near the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility -- Republic, Michigan. The purpose of the monitoring is to determine whether electromagnetic fields produced by the ELF Communications System will affect resident biota or their ecological relationships. Soil Amoeba: Arthropoda and Earthworms: Pollinating Insects: Small Mammals and Nesting Birds.

  11. Review on the progress in synthesis and application of magnetic carbon nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Maiyong; Diao, Guowang

    2011-07-01

    This review focuses on the synthesis and application of nanostructured composites containing magnetic nanostructures and carbon-based materials. Great progress in fabrication of magnetic carbon nanocomposites has been made by developing methods including filling process, template-based synthesis, chemical vapor deposition, hydrothermal/solvothermal method, pyrolysis procedure, sol-gel process, detonation induced reaction, self-assembly method, etc. The applications of magnetic carbon nanocomposites expanded to a wide range of fields such as environmental treatment, microwave absorption, magnetic recording media, electrochemical sensor, catalysis, separation/recognization of biomolecules and drug delivery are discussed. Finally, some future trends and perspectives in this research area are outlined.

  12. Review on the progress in synthesis and application of magnetic carbon nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Maiyong; Diao, Guowang

    2011-07-01

    This review focuses on the synthesis and application of nanostructured composites containing magnetic nanostructures and carbon-based materials. Great progress in fabrication of magnetic carbon nanocomposites has been made by developing methods including filling process, template-based synthesis, chemical vapor deposition, hydrothermal/solvothermal method, pyrolysis procedure, sol-gel process, detonation induced reaction, self-assembly method, etc. The applications of magnetic carbon nanocomposites expanded to a wide range of fields such as environmental treatment, microwave absorption, magnetic recording media, electrochemical sensor, catalysis, separation/recognization of biomolecules and drug delivery are discussed. Finally, some future trends and perspectives in this research area are outlined. PMID:21611651

  13. Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

    2007-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst

  14. Biomass energy technology annual technical progress report, FY 1982. Volume II. Technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The goal of the BET program is to conduct an integrated R and D program for feedstock production and conversion of organic materials to economically produce energy products that will significantly contribute to meeting long-term US energy needs. In feedstock production, laboratory investigations are being performed to reduce the risks associated with the production of microalgal oils that can be used for energy applications and high-value chemical substitutes. Research also is being done on the biochemical mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production by macroalgal species. There has been significant progress in the DOE Short-Rotation Woods Crops Program aimed at increasing yields of biomass through both improved traditional/conventional silvicultural techniques and short-rotation intensive culture. Studies that evaluate the potential of milkweed as an energy feedstock were completed in FY 1982. In thermochemical conversion, evaluations of a variety of high-performance gasification systems for producing medium-Btu gas and synthesis gas were concluded in FY 1982. Free market forces are expected to stimulate private sector interest in developing the technology and marketing needed to commercialize medium-Btu gasification systems. Medium-Btu gases have numerous beneficial industrial applications, and this technology is close to entry into the marketplace. Progress has been made in FY 1982 toward understanding the basic mechanisms and kinetics affecting the thermochemical processing of biomass through fast pyrolysis and direct liquefaction techniques. In biochemical conversion, fundamental research is being performed on the anaerobic digestion process. FY 1982 research activities also included laboratory-scale experiments on photobiological methods for hydrogen production. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each of the 3 program areas for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  15. Impact of annual dosing with ivermectin on progression of onchocercal visual field loss.

    PubMed Central

    Cousens, S. N.; Cassels-Brown, A.; Murdoch, I.; Babalola, O. E.; Jatau, D.; Alexander, N. D.; Evans, J. E.; Danboyi, P.; Abiose, A.; Jones, B. R.

    1997-01-01

    Reported are the results of a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial of annual ivermectin dosing in 34 rural communities, Kaduna State, northern Nigeria, where guinea savanna onchocerciasis is mesoendemic. A total of 939 individuals underwent Friedmann field analysis at the first examination and saw at least 19 spots in at least one eye. Of these, 636 (68%) completed a subsequent Friedmann field analysis 2-3 years later. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for the ivermectin group versus the placebo group was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.42-0.98). There was some evidence that the impact of ivermectin was greatest among those who had received one dose of ivermectin. The majority of the deteriorations occurred in eyes that gave evidence of optic atrophy at the first examination. An analysis restricted to individuals with optic atrophy at baseline indicated a reduction of 45% in the incidence of visual field deterioration in the ivermectin group (95% CI: 8-67%). Previous findings have shown that ivermectin has an impact on the incidence of optic atrophy. Our results indicate, for the first time, that ivermectin has a substantial impact on the progression of visual field loss among those with pre-existing optic atrophy. PMID:9277010

  16. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly/annual technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dicks, J. B.; Chapman, J. N.; Crawford, L. W.

    1980-02-01

    In this Fourth Quarterly/Annual Report submitted under DOE contracts EX-76-C-01-1760 and DE-AC02-79ET10815, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, and development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Research and Development Laboratory. Work on the CFFF progressed with only minor problems. Total construction activity for all site work presently awarded is nearly 98% complete. Water analysis shows that Woods Reservoir baseline conditions are within EPA or Tennessee drinking water standards. For the primary combustor, the vitiation heater and primary combustor fabrication drawings were completed and the nozzle design was completed. The drum module for the radiant slagging furnace was awarded. On the MHD Power Generator, development continued in several areas of advanced analysis including development of time-dependent models for use with the one-dimensional code. For seed regeneration, the tentative determination is that the Tomlinson Tampella is the most economically viable method. With regard to capped electrode erosion, investigations have shown that the major degradation of the cladding still present is at the leading edge of the capped anode. To alleviate this, plans are to hot work the noble metal in the bending operation. In resolving another problem, a system employing the modified line-reversal method has been assembled and successfully tested to measure absolute plasma temperatures.

  17. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1988: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory are described in this annual progress report for Fiscal Year (FY) 1988. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of the way society makes choices in energy use and energy-using technologies, (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental implications of changes in energy technology, and (3) improving and developing new energy-efficient technologies. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on four major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) transportation and decision systems research, (3) technology research and development for improving the efficiency of energy and end-use technologies, and (4) electric power systems. The Division's total expenditures in FY 1988 were $44.3 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 139 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics.

  18. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.H.

    1991-06-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goals and accomplishments of the Energy Division are described in this annual progress report for FY 1990. The Energy Division is a multidisciplinary research organization committed to (1) increasing the knowledge and understanding of how societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society's understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy efficient technologies; and (4) developing improved transportation planning and policy. Disciplines of the 129 staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, chemical heat pumps, refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building enveloped (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), retrofits for existing buildings, and electric power systems. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. 48 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1988 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, Edward C.

    1989-02-01

    The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1988. Estimated kokanee abundance in early September was 10.2 million fish. This estimate is 70% higher than 1987 and 140% higher than the populations's low point in 1986. Increased population size over the past two years is the result of two consecutive strong year classes produced from high recruitment of hatchery and wild fry. High recruitment of wild fry in 1988 resulted from good parental escapement (strong year class) in 1987 and relatively high fry survival. Hatchery fry made up 51% of total fry recruitment (73% of total fry biomass), which is the largest contribution since hatchery supplementation began in the 1970s. High hatchery fry abundance resulted from a large release (13 million fry) from Cabinet Gorge Hatchery and excellent fry survival (29%) during their first summer in Lake Pend Oreille. Improved fry release strategies enhanced survival, which doubled from 1987 to 1988 and was ten times higher than survival in 1986. Our research goal is to maintain 30% survival so we are very optimistic, but need to replicate additional years to address annual variability. 27 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Fusion Energy Division: Annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, O.B. Jr.; Berry, L.A.; Sheffield, J.

    1988-11-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a major part of the national fusion program, carries out research in nearly all areas of magnetic fusion. Collaboration among staff from ORNL, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., private industry, the academic community, and other fusion laboratories, in the United States and abroad, is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source. This report documents the program's achievements during 1987. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, it also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are external to the division (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program include the following: experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, and development and testing of materials for fusion devices. Highlights from program activities are included in this report. 126 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  2. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division's total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division's programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  3. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.N.

    1992-04-01

    The Energy Division is one of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge Laboratory. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1991. The division`s total expenditures in FY 1991 were $39.1 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 124 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The Energy Division`s programmatic activities focus on three major areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities cover energy and resource analysis, the preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, analysis of emergency preparedness for natural and technological disasters, analysis of the energy and environmental needs of developing countries, technology transfer, and analysis of civilian transportation. Energy conservation technologies include electric power systems, building equipment (thermally activated heat pumps, advanced refrigeration systems, novel cycles), building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and technical issues for improving energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems concentrate on research for sponsors within the US military on improving the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  4. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-06-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  5. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  6. Microsupercomputers: Design and implementation. Semi-annual technical progress report, April-October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hennessy, J.L.; Horowitz, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    1. Executive Summary. A summary of progress for the period April 1989 through October 1989 follows: (1) Parallel Architecture: The Stanford DASH multiprocessor advances the state of parallel computing by combining the programmability of shared-memory machines with the scalability of distributed-memory machines. (2) Parallel Software: We have developed a compiler algorithm that applies a large set of loop-level optimizations to improve data locality in programs. (3) Super-Scalar Design: We have investigated how much parallelism is available at the lowest level -- in the base instruction stream of a processor. (4) Multi-level Caches: The presence of a second-level cache can decrease the optimum size and cycle time of the first-level cache, and significantly improve performance beyond the best attainable with a single level of caching. (5) Testers: A single chip tester, called Testarossa, contains a dRAM for the test vector storage, a decompressor to increase the effective vector size, and the pin electronics for 16 DUT pins. (6) Computer Aided Design: In the area of algorithm and tool development for high-level synthesis we have targeted two goals: control generation for synthesized structures and relative scheduling techniques under timing constraints. (7) Simulation: The goal of this research is to provide application tools for the proposed scalable shared memory multiprocessor.

  7. Nature and mechanism of induction of mutations. Annual progress report, August 1, 1980-October 1, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Nilan, R.A.; Kleinhofs, A.; Konzak, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    New knowledge of the mechanism of mutation induction and the nature of mutations in eukaryotes continues to be developed from experiments involving sodium azide. Azide is a potent mutagen in bacteria and in higher plants but it is weakly mutagenic and not carcinogenic in mammalian systems. It was determined that azide acted through a promutagen or organic metabolite both in barley and bacterial cells. This metabolite has been isolated and characterized. During the past year, considerable progress has been made in understanding the pathway by which the metabolite is synthesized in barley and bacteria. It can be synthesized in vitro both in bacteria and barley and some additional knowledge of the structure of the metabolite is being revealed through chemical synthesis of the metabolite. Additional information concerning the lack of azide mutagenicity in mammalian cells has been developed through the detailed studies of the action of azide and its metabolite from bacteria and barley on sister-chromatid exchanges in mammalian cells. Neither azide nor its metabolites of bacteria and barley are particularly effective, and to date no metabolite has been detected in mammalian cells. Azide-induced mutants in barley have been utilized in barley improvement, in probing the pathways of a number of biochemical and physiological processes and in understanding the structure of gene loci and the nature of mutations induced.

  8. Mineral cycling in soil and litter arthropod food chains. Annual progress report, February 1, 1983-January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1983-09-30

    This annual report describes progress in research on the influence of soil fauna on the general process of terrestrial decomposition. The major goal is to investigate the regulation of decomposition by soil arthropods. Methods have included radioactive tracer measurements of food chain dynamics, rates of nutrient or mineral element flow during decomposition, and simulation modeling. This year's report describes significant progress in defining the influence of soil arthropods in stimulating microbial immobilization of nutrients. Preliminary efforts to define the importance of the soil-litter macroarthropods are also reported.

  9. Decreased hepatotoxic bile acid composition and altered synthesis in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Shipkova, Petia; Aranibar, Nelly; Robertson, Donald; Reily, Michael D; Lu, Zhenqiang; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2013-04-15

    Bile acids (BAs) have many physiological roles and exhibit both toxic and protective influences within the liver. Alterations in the BA profile may be the result of disease induced liver injury. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease characterized by the pathophysiological progression from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The hypothesis of this study is that the 'classical' (neutral) and 'alternative' (acidic) BA synthesis pathways are altered together with hepatic BA composition during progression of human NAFLD. This study employed the use of transcriptomic and metabolomic assays to study the hepatic toxicologic BA profile in progressive human NAFLD. Individual human liver samples diagnosed as normal, steatosis, and NASH were utilized in the assays. The transcriptomic analysis of 70 BA genes revealed an enrichment of downregulated BA metabolism and transcription factor/receptor genes in livers diagnosed as NASH. Increased mRNA expression of BAAT and CYP7B1 was observed in contrast to decreased CYP8B1 expression in NASH samples. The BA metabolomic profile of NASH livers exhibited an increase in taurine together with elevated levels of conjugated BA species, taurocholic acid (TCA) and taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA). Conversely, cholic acid (CA) and glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) were decreased in NASH liver. These findings reveal a potential shift toward the alternative pathway of BA synthesis during NASH, mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of CYP7B1. Overall, the transcriptomic changes of BA synthesis pathway enzymes together with altered hepatic BA composition signify an attempt by the liver to reduce hepatotoxicity during disease progression to NASH. PMID:23391614

  10. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  11. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, D.M.; Wolff, P.P.

    1993-04-01

    Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related Issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY 1992. Energy Division`s total expenditures in FY 1992 were $42.8 million. The work is supported by the US Department of Energy, the US Department of Defense, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 116.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and mathematics and statistics. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy conservation technologies, and (3) military transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on waste management, technology transfer, analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries, and civilian transportation analysis. Energy conservation technologies focus on electric power systems, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Military transportation systems conduct research for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of military deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination. Much of Energy Division`s research is valuable to other organizations as well as to sponsors. This information is disseminated by the staff`s involvement in professional and trade organizations and workshops; joint research with universities and private-sector firms; collaboration with state and local governments; presentation of work at conferences; and publication of research results in journals, reports, and conference proceedings.

  12. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, P.P.

    1994-07-01

    One of 17 research divisions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy Division`s mission is to provide innovative solutions to energy and related issues of national and global importance through interdisciplinary research and development. Its goals and accomplishments are described in this annual progress report for FY1993. Energy Division is committed to (1) understanding the mechanisms by which societies make choices in energy use; (2) improving society`s understanding of the environmental, social, and economic implications of technological change; (3) developing and transferring energy-efficient technologies; (4) improving transportation policy and planning; (5) enhancing basic knowledge in the social sciences as related to energy and associated issues. Energy Division`s expenditures in FY1993 totaled $42 million. The work was supported by the US DOE, DOD, many other federal agencies, and some private organizations. Disciplines of the 126.5 technical staff members include engineering, social sciences, physical and life sciences, and computer sciences and data systems. The division`s programmatic activities cover three main areas: (1) analysis and assessment, (2) energy use and delivery technologies, and (3) transportation systems. Analysis and assessment activities involve energy and resource analysis, preparation of environmental assessments and impact statements, research on emergency preparedness, transportation analysis, and analysis of energy and environmental needs in developing countries. Energy use and delivery technologies focus on electric power systems, building equipment, building envelopes (walls, foundations, roofs, attics, and materials), and methods to improve energy efficiency in existing buildings. Transportation systems research is conducted both to improve the quality of civilian transportation and for sponsors within the US military to improve the efficiency of deployment, scheduling, and transportation coordination.

  13. The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Two base case flow sheets have now been prepared. In the first, which was originally presented in TPR4, a Texaco gasifier is used. Natural gas is also burned in sufficient quantity to increase the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the synthesis gas to the required value of 1. 1 for alcohol synthesis. Acid gas clean up and sulfur removal are accomplished using the Rectisol process followed by the Claus and Beavon processes. About 10% of the synthesis gas is sent to a power generation unit in order to produce electric power, with the remaining 90% used for alcohol synthesis. For this process, the estimated installed cost is $474.2 mm. The estimated annual operating costs are $64.5 MM. At a price of alcohol fuels in the vicinity of $1. 00/gal, the pay back period for construction of this plant is about four years. The details of this case, called Base Case 1, are presented in Appendix 1. The second base case, called Base Case 2, also has a detailed description and explanation in Appendix 1. In Base Case 2, a Lurgi Gasifier is used. The motivation for using a Lurgi Gasifier is that it runs at a lower temperature and pressure and, therefore, produces by-products such as coal liquids which can be sold. Based upon the economics of joint production, discussed in Technical Progress Report 4, this is a necessity. Since synthesis gas from natural gas is always less expensive to produce than from coal, then alcohol fuels will always be less expensive to produce from natural gas than from coal. Therefore, the only way to make coal- derived alcohol fuels economically competitive is to decrease the cost of production of coal-derived synthesis gas. one method for accomplishing this is to sell the by-products from the gasification step. The details of this strategy are discussed in Appendix 3.

  14. Effects of 3-aminobenzamide on DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.; Morgan, W.F.; Kapp, L.N.; Wolff, S.

    1983-01-01

    3-Aminobenzamide (3AB), in inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, is a potent inducer of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). Because of the possible relation between SCEs and DNA synthesis, the effects of 3AB on DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were examined. Unlike all other SCE-inducing agents whose effects on DNA synthesis have been studied, short term exposures (30-120 min) of 3AB did not inhibit the overall rate of DNA synthesis and this result was independent of the amount of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in the DNA. Longer exposure times (>24 h) did result in an extended S phase, but this was not due to an effect on the rate of DNA chain elongation. 3AB also delayed the entry of cells into S phase. The overall cell cycle delay was dose dependent, approaching 9 h after a 54 h exposure to 10 mM 3AB. Earlier reports that 3AB is neither mutagenic nor cytotoxic were confirmed. Thus 3AB acts to increase SCE frequency by a mechanism distinct from that which causes cytotoxicity and mutagenicity, and does not involve any inhibition in the rate of DNA chain growth. 25 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Lymphocyte protein synthesis is increased with the progression of HIV-associated disease to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Caso, G; Garlick, P J; Gelato, M C; McNurlan, M A

    2001-12-01

    HIV infection has been shown to affect lymphocyte function and to reduce lymphocyte responsiveness in vitro to mitogenic stimulation, but little is known about lymphocyte metabolism in vivo and how it is affected during the course of the disease. This study investigated the metabolic activity of lymphocytes in vivo through the progression of HIV-associated disease. Lymphocyte protein synthesis was measured with L-[(2)H(5)]phenylalanine (45 mg/kg body weight) in healthy volunteers (n=7), in patients who were HIV-positive (n=7) but asymptomatic, and in patients with AIDS (n=8). The rates of lymphocyte protein synthesis [expressed as a percentage of lymphocyte protein, i.e. fractional synthesis rate (FSR)] were not altered in HIV-positive patients compared with healthy controls (7.9+/-1.28% and 9.1+/-0.53%/day respectively), but were significantly elevated in AIDS patients (14.0+/-1.16%/day; P<0.05). The serum concentration of the cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) increased with the progression of the disease, and TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in AIDS patients (6.81+/-0.88 ng/l) than in healthy controls (3.09+/-0.27 ng/l; P<0.05). Lymphocyte protein FSR was positively correlated with serum TNF-alpha concentration (r=0.55, P=0.009) and negatively correlated with CD4(+) lymphocyte count (r=-0.70, P=0.004). The elevation of lymphocyte protein synthesis in AIDS patients suggests a higher rate of turnover of lymphocytes. This may be associated with a generalized activation of the immune system, which is also reflected by the elevated serum TNF-alpha concentration in the late stages of HIV-associated disease. PMID:11724643

  16. Annual Progress Report, 1975. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Included in this second annual report on the Southern Rural Development Center's (SRDC) 1974-75 plan of work are data re: orientation visits; regional workshops; technical consultants; liaison with regional agencies and organizations; information dissemination; annual evaluation; functional networks in the areas of land use issues, citizen…

  17. Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation : Annual Progress Report February 1, 2007 - January 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Timothy; Johnson, June; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    River stocks of steelhead and spring/summer Chinook salmon still have significant natural reproduction and thus are the focal species for this project's investigations. The overall goal is to monitor the abundance, productivity, distribution, and stock-specific life history characteristics of naturally produced steelhead trout and Chinook salmon in Idaho (IDFG 2007). We have grouped project tasks into three objectives, as defined in our latest project proposal and most recent statement of work. The purpose of each objective involves enumerating or describing individuals within the various life stages of Snake River anadromous salmonids. By understanding the transitions between life stages and associated controlling factors, we hope to achieve a mechanistic understanding of stock-specific population dynamics. This understanding will improve mitigation and recovery efforts. Objective 1. Measure 2007 adult escapement and describe the age structure of the spawning run of naturally produced spring/summer Chinook salmon passing Lower Granite Dam. Objective 2. Monitor the juvenile production of Chinook salmon and steelhead trout for the major population groups (MPGs) within the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins. Objective 3. Evaluate life cycle survival and the freshwater productivity/production of Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon. There are two components: update/refine a stock-recruit model and estimate aggregate smolt-to-adult survival. In this annual progress report, we present technical results for work done during 2007. Part 2 contains detailed results of INPMEP aging research and estimation of smolt-to-adult return rates for wild and naturally produced Chinook salmon (Objectives 1 and 3). Part 3 is a report on the ongoing development of a stock-recruit model for the freshwater phase of spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin (Objective 3). Part 4 is a summary of the parr density data (Objective 2) collected in 2007 using the new site selection

  18. DOE Annual Progress Report: Water Needs and Constraints for Hydrogen Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, A; Daily, W

    2009-07-02

    hydrogen production and distribution. The narrow scope of the lifecycle analysis enables economic optimization at the plant level with respect to cooling and water treatment technologies. As water withdrawal and disposal costs increase, more expensive, but more water-efficient technologies become more attractive. Some of the benefits of these technologies are offset by their increased energy usage. We use the H2A hydrogen production model to determine the overall cost of hydrogen under a range of water cost and technology scenarios. At the regional level, we are planning on following the hydrogen roll-out scenarios envisioned by Greene and Leiby (2008) to determine the impact of hydrogen market penetration on various watersheds. The economics of various water technologies will eventually be incorporated into the temporal and geographic Macro System Model via a water module that automates the spreadsheet models described. At the time of this progress report, the major achievement for FY2009 has been the completion of the framework and analytical results of the economic optimization of water technology for hydrogen production. This accomplishment required the collection of cost and performance data for multiple cooling and water treatment technologies, as well as the integration of a water and energy balance model with the H2A framework. 22 (twenty-two) different combinations of production method (SMR, electrolysis), scale (centralized, forecourt), cooling (evaporative tower, dry) and water treatment (reverse osmosis, ion exchange) were evaluated. The following data were collected: water withdrawal, water discharge, electricity consumption, equipment footprint, equipment cost, installation cost, annual equipment and material costs and annual labor costs. These data, when consolidated, fit into a small number of input cells in H2A. Items such as capital cost end up as line-items for which there is space in the existing H2A spreadsheets. Items such as electricity use are added

  19. FY2013 Vehicle and Systems Simulation and Testing R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    FY 2013 annual report focuses on the following areas: vehicle modeling and simulation, component and systems evaluations, laboratory and field evaluations, codes and standards, industry projects, and vehicle systems optimization.

  20. Inhibition of Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression by in vivo Targeting of Hyaluronan Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oesophageal cancer is a highly aggressive tumour entity with at present poor prognosis. Therefore, novel treatment options are urgently needed. Hyaluronan (HA) is a polysaccharide present in the matrix of human oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Importantly, in vitro ESCC cells critically depend on HA synthesis to maintain the proliferative phenotype. The aim of the present study is (1) to study HA-synthase (HAS) expression and regulation in human ESCC, and (2) to translate the in vitro results into a mouse xenograft model of human ESCC to study the effects of systemic versus tumour targeted HAS inhibition on proliferation and distribution of tumour-bound and stromal hyaluronan. Methods mRNA expression was investigated in human ESCC biopsies by semiquantitative real-time RT PCR. Furthermore, human ESCC were xenografted into NMRI nu/nu mice. The effects on tumour progression and morphology of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an inhibitor of HA-synthesis, and of lentiviral knock down of HA-synthase 3 (HAS3), the main HAS isoform in the human ESCC tissues and the human ESCC cell line used in this study, were determined. Tumour progression was monitored by calliper measurements and by flat-panel detector volume computed tomography (fpVCT). HA content, cellular composition and proliferation (Ki67) were determined histologically. Results mRNA of HAS isoform 3 (HAS3) was upregulated in human ESCC biopsies and HAS3 mRNA was positively correlated to expression of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. EGF was also proven to be a strong inductor of HAS3 mRNA expression in vitro. During the course of seven weeks, 4-MU inhibited progression of xenograft tumours. Interestingly, remodelling of the tumour into a more differentiated phenotype and inhibition of cell proliferation were observed. Lentiviral knockdown of HAS3 in human ESCC cells prior to xenografting mimicked all effects of 4-MU treatment suggesting that hyaluronan produced by ESCC is accountable

  1. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.; Lyon, W.S.

    1980-05-01

    The progress is reported in the following sections: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, technical support, bio-organic analysis, nuclear and radiochemical analysis, and quality assurance. (DLC)

  2. Assessing Progress toward Meeting the Goals of "The Illinois Commitment": Performance Indicators, 2003 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This is the first report on the performance indicators adopted by the Illinois Board of Higher Education in February 2003 to assess progress toward the six goals of "The Illinois Commitment." This imitative is a work in progress that will be implemented and refined over multiple years. This first report focuses on the statewide and "common"…

  3. Supramolecular chemistry of selective anion recognition for anions of environmental relevance. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman-James, K.; Wilson, G.S.; Kuczera, K.; Moyer, B.

    1998-06-01

    'This project has as its focus the design and synthesis of polyammonium macrocyclic receptors for oxoanions of environmental importance. The basic research aspects of this project involve: (1) synthesis (and the search for improved synthetic methods); (2) solid state structure determination and thermodynamics studies (to ascertain structural criteria for and strength of anion binding); and (3) molecular dynamics simulations (to assess solution characteristics of the interactions between anions and their receptors). Applications-oriented goals include the fabrication of more selective anion-selective electrodes and the use of these compounds in liquid-liquid separations. The latter goal comprises the subcontract with Dr. Bruce Moyer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report summarizes work after 1 year and 7 months of a 3-year project. To date, the authors have focussed on the design and synthesis of selective receptors for nitrate and phosphate.'

  4. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1991--March 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  5. Annual Progress Report, 1976. Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State University. SRDC Series Publication No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, State College, MS.

    Covering the 1976 activities of the Southern Rural Development Center (SRDC), this third annual report describes SRDC's: history; organization; regional workshops; functional networks; network bibliographies and other publications; Title V reports; grant received for training in rural development; orientation visits; consultants; information…

  6. NREL Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project: Status and outlook. Annual progress report, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, D.; Maxwell, E.; Stoffel, T.; Marion, B.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.; Myers, D.; Riordan, C.; Hammond, E.; Ismailidis, T.

    1993-06-01

    This annual report summaries the activities and accomplishments of the Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project during fiscal year 1992 (1 October to 30 September 1992). Managed by the Analytic Studies Division of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, this project is the major activity of the US Department of Energy`s Resource Assessment Program.

  7. FY2012 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Annual report on the work of the the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the Vehicle Technologies Office mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  8. Southern Rural Development Center Annual Progress Report, 1989. SRDC Series No. 118.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Rural Development Center, Mississippi State, MS.

    The background, organization, and recent publications of the Southern Rural Development Center (SDRC) are presented in this annual report of the 1988-1989 fiscal year. Forty-three activities and projects are briefly described, including conferences, meetings, and workshops sponsored and co-sponsored by SDRC. Four regional task forces are…

  9. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  10. NMR and optical studies of piezoelectric polymers. Annual progress report, April 1, 1990--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, V.H.; Tuthill, G.F.

    1993-04-01

    Progress is reported in several areas dealing with piezoelectric (electroactive) polymers (mostly vinylidene fluoride, trifluoroethylene, copolymers, PVF{sub 2}) and liquid crystals. Optical studies, neutron scattering, NMR, thermal, theory and modeling were done.

  11. ORNL nuclear waste programs annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Research progress is reported in 20 activities under the headings: spent fuels, defense waste management, commercial waste management, remedial action, and conventional reactors. Separate entries were prepared for each activity.

  12. University of Florida, University research program in robotics. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, C.D. III; Tulenko, J.S.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of environmental hardening, database, world modeling, vision, man-machine interface, advanced liquid metal reactor inspection robot, and articulated transporter/manipulator system (ATMS) development.

  13. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1994-05-01

    The US DOE funded this grant to the Medical University of South Carolina for a cancer and birth defects registry for an initial three year period which was completed as of April 29, 1994. While this Technical Progress Report is prepared principally to document the activities of year 03, it also summarizes the accomplishments of the first two years in order to put into perspective the energy and progress of the program over the entire three year funding cycle.

  14. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in slurry reactor systems. Technical progress report for period ending July 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, C.N.; Huff, G.A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    This is the first technical progress report on this grant, which had an effective date of initiation of March 9, 1981. During this period preliminary experimental results were obtained on the effects of reactant transport across the gas-liquid interface on synthesis gas conversion and product selectivity, utilizing an iron catalyst in a laboratory-scale, well-mixed slurry reactor.

  15. Rational design of metal ion sequestering agents. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, K.N.

    1998-06-01

    'This project addresses fundamental issues and requirements in developing hazardous metal ion separation technologies needed in the treatment and disposal of radioactive and chemical toxic waste. It encompasses the synthesis of new agents, followed by their characterization and evaluation, with the aim to optimize their metal ion sequestering properties for use in applied technologies. This research is focused on the following key areas: (1) basic design and synthesis of new metal ion specific sequestering ligands; (2) structural and thermodynamic investigations of these ligands and their complexes formed with the targeted metal ions; and (3) development of sequestering agents and their incorporation into systems designed to be prototypes of inexpensive and highly effective materials for hazardous metal ion decontamination. Basic studies of the sequestration of relevant toxic metals are required in order to develop processes that will treat effluents sufficiently well to allow direct release into the environment and minimize the production of secondary wastes.'

  16. Annual Continuation And Progress Report For Nuclear Theory At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W. E.; Quaglioni, S.; Schunck, N.; Vogt, R.; Vranas, P.

    2015-10-26

    Nuclear Theory research under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) is conducted within several funding sources and projects. These include base funding, and early career award, and a collaborative SciDAC-­3 award that is jointly funded by DOE/NP and the Advanced Simulations and Computations (ASC) effort within the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Therefore, this annual report is organized within the three primary sections covering these projects.

  17. Environmental Management Science Program awards. Fiscal year 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.; Benner, W.H.; DePaolo, D.J.; Faybishenko, B.; Majer, E.L.; Pallavicini, M.; Russo, R.E.; Shultz, P.G.; Wan, J.

    1997-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was awarded eight Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This report summarizes the progress of each grant in addressing significant DOE site cleanup issues after completion of the first year of research. The technical progress made to date in each of the research projects is described in greater detail in individual progress reports. The focus of the research projects covers a diversity of areas relevant to site cleanup, including bioremediation, health effects, characterization, and mixed waste. Some of the projects cut across a number of focus areas. Three of the projects are directed toward characterization and monitoring at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, as a test case for application to other sites.

  18. Report to Congress: 1995 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report is prepared in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, Public Law 96-573, 1980, as amended by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The report summarizes the progress of states and compact regions during calendar year 1995 in establishing new disposal facilities for commercially-generated low-level radioactive waste. The report emphasizes significant issues and events that have affected progress, and also includes an introduction that provides background information and perspective on United States policy for low-level radioactive waste disposal.

  19. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    'The Pacific Northwest National Lab. was awarded ten (10) Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) research grants in Fiscal Year 1996. This section gives a summary of how each grant is addressing significant DOE cleanup issues, including those at the Hanford Site. The technical progress made to date in each of these research projects is addressed in more detail in the individual progress reports contained in this document. This research is primarily focused in three areas-Tank Waste Remediation, Soil and Groundwater Cleanup, and Health Effects.'

  20. Cellulose Synthesis Is Coupled to Cell Cycle Progression at G1 in the Dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Alvin C.M.; Wong, Joseph T.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Cellulosic deposition in alveolar vesicles forms the “internal cell wall” in thecated dinoflagellates. The availability of synchronized single cells, the lack of secondary deposition, and the absence of cellulosic cell plates at division facilitate investigation of the possible roles of cellulose synthesis (CS) in the entire cell cycle. Flow cytograms of cellulosic contents revealed a stepwise process of CS in the dinoflagellate cell cycle, with the highest rate occurring at G1. A cell cycle delay in G1, but not G2/M, was observed after inhibition of CS. A cell cycle inhibitor of G1/S, but not G2/M, was able to delay cell cycle progression with a corresponding reduction of CS. The increase of cellulose content in the cell cycle corresponded well to the expected increase of surface area. No differences were observed in the cellulose to surface area ratio between normal and fast-growing G1 cells, implicating the significance of surface area in linking CS to the coupling of cell growth with cell cycle progression. The coupling of CS to G1 implicates a novel link between CS and cell cycle control, and we postulate that the coupling mechanism might integrate cell wall integrity to the cell size checkpoint. PMID:12692327

  1. [Molecular cloning and structural characteristics of the R complex of maize]. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    Studies on the R complex in Maize continued Progress is discussed in the following areas: Establishing identity of R components and cloning of R components; CO allele origin; molecular organization of R-r complex; NCO allele origin; genetic analysis of R-r complex; studies of the Sn locus and reverse paramutation.

  2. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-12-31

    Progress in understanding of the metabolism of monoterpenes by peppermint and spearmint is recorded including the actions of two key enzymes, geranyl pyrophosphate:limonene cyclase and a UDP-glucose dependent glucosyl transferase; concerning the ultrastructure of oil gland senescence; enzyme subcellular localization; regulation of metabolism; and tissue culture systems.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1984-05-01

    Progress and activities are reported in: analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials analysis, bio/organic analysis, general and environmental analysis, and quality assurance and safety. Supplementary activities are also discussed, and a bibliography of publications is also included. (DLC)

  4. Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Progress reports are presented for the following sections: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectroscopy; radioactive materials analysis; bio/organic analysis; and general and environmental analysis; quality assurance, safety, and tabulation analyses. In addition a list of publications and oral presentations and supplemental activities are included.

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R.; Johnson, G.

    1993-11-01

    This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

  7. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shults, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report is divided into: Analytical spectroscopy (optical spectroscopy, organic mass spectrometry, inorganic mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry), inorganic and radiochemistry (transuranium and activation analysis, low-level radiochemical analysis, inorganic analysis, radioactive materials analysis, special projects), organic chemistry (organic spectroscopy, separations and synthesis, special projects, organic analysis, ORNL/UT research program), operations (quality assurance/quality control, environmental protection, safety, analytical improvement, training, radiation control), education programs, supplementary activities, and presentation of research results. Tables are included for articles reviewed or refereed for periodicals, analytical service work, division manpower and financial summary, and organization chart; a glossary is also included.

  8. Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Annual progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Malmberg, R.L.

    1995-07-01

    After isolation of a cDNA clone for the plant ARGdc, this research focused on unusual post-translational modifications occuring in a arginine decarboxylase cDNA clone in oats. A novel regulatory mechanism for polyamines was explored and an attempt was made to characterize it. A plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA was identified in Arabidopsis. Further work remains on the mechanisms of polyamine regulation and function in plants.

  9. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

    2008-12-30

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

  10. In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine. Annual technical progress report, [1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, K.T.

    1991-12-31

    The overall goal of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation to human lymphocytes. Principally, we are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologies who administer radionuclides. Emphasis in the first year, as described in the first progress report, was on optimization of the hprt mutation assay, measurement of mutant frequencies in patients imaged with thallium-201, and measurement of mutant frequencies in controls. Emphasis in the second year has been on measurements of (1) chromosome aberrations in patients imaged with thallium-201, (2) mutant frequencies in patients imaged with technetium-99, (3) mutant frequencies in nuclear medicine technicians and physical therapists, (4) mutant frequencies in patients treated for Hodgkins disease with radiotherapy. The progress in these areas is described.

  11. Nuclear structure theory. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1979-August 31, 1980. [Univ. of Rochester

    SciTech Connect

    French, J.B.; Koltun, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year in the following areas of nuclear structure and reaction theory: statistical spectroscopy (including random matrix methods, with applications to fluctuations in spectra and in strength distributions, and to problems of ergodicity; group symmetries in spectral-distribution theory; electromagnetic and ..beta.. transitions); meson scattering and absorption by nuclei (including general scattering theory with absorption, multiple scattering theory and its reactive content, statistical theory of absorption); and meson currents in electromagnetic transitions.

  12. [Coal comminution] progress reports. Semi-annual report, October 1, 1997--March 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    This report presents the objectives, approach, and progress on six projects being undertaken at the University of Utah. The six projects, all related to the comminution of coal, are: Administration and Comminution Reference Center; Optimal energy utilization strategies for comminution; Ball mill scale-up; Ball media motion computer code; Fracture of brittle particles in constrained beds measured on the ultrafast load cell; and Development of a prototype oscillating ball mill.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  15. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, W.D.

    1986-05-01

    Progress reports are presented for the four major sections of the division: analytical spectroscopy, radioactive materials laboratories, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. A brief discussion of the division's role in the Laboratory's Environmental Restoration and Facilities Upgrade is given. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited.

  16. Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1998-07-01

    This report covers progress made on research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies, covering the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing research; fossil fuels supplies modeling and research; and oil and gas production.

  17. Research in theoretical physics. Annual progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1992-12-01

    Progress made in the following areas is summarized: simulation of extensive air showers induced by interactions existing beyond the currently accepted ``Standard Model`` of elementary particle interactions; search for physics beyond the ``Standard Model`` in gluonic inclusive decays of heavy quarks; obtaining limits on the applicability of the special theory of relativity; an improved method of obtaining upper limits on the masses of primaries of extensive air showers associated with point sources in the sky. 8 figs., 1 tab., 73 refs.

  18. 1989 Annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress during 1989 of states and compacts in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It also provides summary information on the volume of low-level waste received for disposal in 1989 by commercially operated low-level waste disposal facilities. This report is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99--240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  20. Yucca Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory annual progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Fortner, J.A.; Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.

    1995-02-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1993-September 1994. Studies have been performed to evaluate the performance of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under unsaturated conditions (low volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with simulated waste glasses have been in progress for over eight years and demonstrate that actinides from initially fresh glass surfaces will be released as a result of the spallation of reacted glass layers from the surface, as the small volume of water passes over the waste form. Studies are also underway to evaluate the performance of spent fuel samples and unirradiated UO{sub 2} in projected repository conditions. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for nine years and show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that form on the sample surface is similar to that observed in natural analogues. The reaction of spent fuel samples under conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for nearly two years, and the results suggest that spent fuel follows the same reaction progress as UO{sub 2}. The release of individual fission products and transuranic elements was not congruent, with the release being controlled by the formation of small particles or colloids that are suspended in solution and transported away from the waste form. The reaction progress depends on the composition of the spent fuel samples used and, likely, on the composition of the groundwater that contacts the waste form.

  1. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-11-01

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  2. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska. Annual progress report, July 1984--January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-12-31

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  3. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  4. Cancer and birth defects surveillance system for communities around the Savannah River Site. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, J.B.

    1993-05-01

    This technical report presents the age-adjusted total, and race and sex specific geographic patterns of cancer mortality for South Carolina (SC) counties utilizing the 1953--1987 average annual age-adjusted mortality rates (AAMRs). The mortality information was obtained from the State Cancer Control Map and Data Program produced by the National Cancer Institute , Centers for Disease Control and the American Cancer Society. The AAMRs for selected primary sites are classified as significantly different or not significantly different from the corresponding United States and SC mortality rates. Categories for classification of the rates are determined using 95% confidence intervals. Geographic patterns of significantly high county AAMRs are identified and discussed. Individual county rates are not emphasized. The terminology, mortality rates used throughout this report pertains to the 1953--1987 AAMRS.

  5. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change. Annual progress report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.P.

    1993-12-31

    The original project entitled ``Thennohaline Circulations and Global Climate Change`` was concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany C0{sub 2}-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions` exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. Because the North Atlantic is the source of much of the global ocean`s reservoir of deep water, and because this deep water could sequester large amounts of anthropogenically produced C0{sub 2}, changes in the rate of deep-water production are important to future climates. Since deep-water production is controlled by the annual cycle of the atmospheric forcing of the North Atlantic, and since this forcing depends on both hydrological and thermal processes as well as the windstress, there is the potential for feedback between the short-term response of the atmosphere to changing radiative forcing and the longer-term processes in the oceans. Work on this hypothesis led to a second line of investigation. The sensitivity of the annual cycle of the upper ocean to variable atmospheric forcing also determines the structure of the seasonal thermocline, and consequently it is necessary to include both synoptic-scale and interannual variability of atmospheric forcing to fully understand the potential effects of long-term trends of that forcing. Due to its large heat capacity and its nonlinear response to forcing, the upper ocean rectifies the forcing by radiative fluxes, turbulence, and windstress, creating responses on much longer time scales than those of the forcing.

  6. Compilation of 1986 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological-monitoring program. Volume 1. Tabs A-C. Annual progress report, January-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    This is the fifth compilation of annual reports for the Navy's ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program. This report documents the progress of the following studies: Herbaceous Plant Cover and Tree Studies; Litter Decomposition and Microflora; and The Effects of Exposing the Slime Mold Physarum Polycephalum to Electromagnetic Fields.

  7. Geothermal Energy R&D Program Annual Progress Report Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-01

    In this report, the DOE Geothermal Program activities were split between Core Research and Industrial Development. The technical areas covered are: Exploration Technology, Drilling Technology, Reservoir Technology (including Hot Dry Rock Research and The Geyser Cooperation), and Conversion Technology (power plants, materials, and direct use/direct heat). Work to design the Lake County effluent pipeline to help recharge The Geysers shows up here for the first time. This Progress Report is another of the documents that are reasonable starting points in understanding many of the details of the DOE Geothermal Program. (DJE 2005)

  8. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT): Semi-Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D N

    2012-02-29

    This report summarizes work carried out by the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Team for the period of July 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011. It discusses highlights, overall progress, period goals, and collaborations and lists papers and presentations. The UV-CDAT team is positioned to address the following high-level visualization requirements: (1) Alternative parallel streaming statistics and analysis pipelines - Data parallelism, Task parallelism, Visualization parallelism; (2) Optimized parallel input/output (I/O); (3) Remote interactive execution; (4) Advanced intercomparison visualization; (5) Data provenance processing and capture; and (6) Interfaces for scientists - Workflow data analysis and visualization construction tools, Visualization interfaces.

  9. FY 2014 Annual Progress Report - Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  10. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  11. Study of mechanisms of hydrogen diffusion in separation devices. Annual progress report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.H.

    1981-04-20

    The main results are in the following 3 areas: (1) static and dynamic properties of the hydrogen diffusion model; (2) exact asymptotic solutions of the model; (3) new physics of the lattice hydrogen. The progress made during this period has been particularly significant. The hydrogen diffusion model has brought to light a number of puzzling features of hydrogen metal systems. These advances have made it possible now to begin to study some of the long-range objectives put forth in the initial proposal.

  12. High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Feeley, O.C.; Johansson, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize oxygenated fuel ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from coal-derived H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2} synthesis via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-proanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. Both organic and inorganic catalysts will be investigated, and the better catalysts will be subjected to long term performance studies. The project is divided into the following three tasks: (1) synthesis of high octane ethers from alcohol mixtures containing predominantly methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol over superacid resins, (2) inorganic catalysts for the synthesis of high octane ethers form alcohols, and (3) long term performance and reaction engineering for scale-up of the alcohols-to-ether process. A summary of technical progress is provided in this report.

  13. Improved polymers for enhanced oil recovery synthesis and rheology. Second annual report, October 1978-September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.L.; Hester, R.D.; Neidlinger, H.H.; Wildman, G.C.

    1980-06-01

    The status of the following studies is given: macromolecular syntheses of model polymers (homopolymer synthesis, random copolymer synthesis, graft-copolymer syntheses); macromolecular characterization by size exclusion chromatography; dilute solution studies (ageing effects on viscosity, shear rate effects on viscosity, structure effects on viscosity, turbidimetric studies); polymer solution rheological studies; macromolecular flow through controlled porous media; and polymer solution flow through simulated porous reservoirs.

  14. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. Annual progress report, September 1, 1991--September 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R & D.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  17. Joint inversion of geophysical data for site characterization and restoration monitoring. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.A.; Roberts, J.J.; Berryman, J.G.; Wildenschild, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this project is to develop a computer code for joint inversion of seismic and electrical data, to improve underground imaging for site characterization and remediation monitoring. The computer code developed in this project will invert geophysical data to obtain direct estimates of porosity and saturation underground, rather than inverting for seismic velocity and electrical resistivity or other geophysical properties. This is intended to be a significant improvement in the state-of-the-art of underground imaging, since interpretation of data collected at a contaminated site would become much less subjective. Potential users include DOE scientists and engineers responsible for characterizing contaminated sites and monitoring remediation of contaminated sites. In this three-year project, the authors use a multi-phase approach consisting of theoretical and numerical code development, laboratory investigations, testing on available laboratory and borehole geophysics data sets, and a controlled field experiment, to develop practical tools for joint electrical and seismic data interpretation. This report summarizes work after about 1.7 years of a 3-year project. Progress on laboratory measurements is described first, followed by progress on developing algorithms for the inversion code to relate geophysical data to porosity and saturation.'

  18. Glucosylceramide synthesis inhibition affects cell cycle progression, membrane trafficking, and stage differentiation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Stefanić, Sasa; Spycher, Cornelia; Morf, Laura; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Wild, Peter; Hehl, Adrian B; Sonda, Sabrina

    2010-09-01

    Synthesis of glucosylceramide via glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) is a crucial event in higher eukaryotes, both for the production of complex glycosphingolipids and for regulating cellular levels of ceramide, a potent antiproliferative second messenger. In this study, we explored the dependence of the early branching eukaryote Giardia lamblia on GCS activity. Biochemical analyses revealed that the parasite has a GCS located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes that is active in proliferating and encysting trophozoites. Pharmacological inhibition of GCS induced aberrant cell division, characterized by arrest of cytokinesis, incomplete cleavage furrow formation, and consequent block of replication. Importantly, we showed that increased ceramide levels were responsible for the cytokinesis arrest. In addition, GCS inhibition resulted in prominent ultrastructural abnormalities, including accumulation of cytosolic vesicles, enlarged lysosomes, and clathrin disorganization. Moreover, anterograde trafficking of the encystations-specific protein CWP1 was severely compromised and resulted in inhibition of stage differentiation. Our results reveal novel aspects of lipid metabolism in G. lamblia and specifically highlight the vital role of GCS in regulating cell cycle progression, membrane trafficking events, and stage differentiation in this parasite. In addition, we identified ceramide as a potent bioactive molecule, underscoring the universal conservation of ceramide signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:20335568

  19. Recent progress in low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials: synthesis, improvement and emission properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Guogang; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there are several technologies used for flat panel displays (FPDs) and the development of FPDs with enhanced energy efficiency and improved display quality is strongly required. Field emission displays (FEDs) have been considered as one of the most promising next generation flat panel display technologies due to their excellent display performance and low energy consumption. For the development of FEDs, phosphors are irreplaceable components. In the past decade, the study of highly efficient low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials, namely FED phosphors, has become the focus of enhancing energy efficiency and realizing high-quality displays. This review summaries the recent progress in the chemical synthesis and improvement of novel, rare-earth and transition metal ions activated inorganic cathodoluminescent materials in powder and thin film forms. The discussion is focused on the modification of morphology, size, surface, composition and conductivity of phosphors and the corresponding effects on their cathodoluminescent properties. Special emphases are given to the selection of host and luminescent centers, the adjustment of emission colors through doping concentration optimization, energy transfer and mono- or co-doping activator ions, the improvement of chromaticity, color stability and color gamut as well as the saturation behavior and the degradation behavior of phosphors under the excitation of a low-voltage electron beam. Finally, the research prospects and future directions of FED phosphors are discussed with recommendations to facilitate the further study of new and highly efficient low-voltage cathodoluminescent materials. PMID:24960634

  20. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  1. National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems 2012 Annual Report: A Year of Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma Kiele

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems (NIRPS) maintains and advances U.S. leadership in all aspects of rocket propulsion for defense, civil, and commercial uses. The Institute's creation is in response to widely acknowledged concerns about the U.S. rocket propulsion base dating back more than a decade. U.S. leadership in rocket and missile propulsion is threatened by long-term industry downsizing, a shortage of new solid and liquid propulsion programs, limited ability to attract and retain fresh talent, and discretionary federal budget pressures. Numerous trade and independent studies cite erosion of this capability as a threat to national security and the U.S. economy resulting in a loss of global competitiveness for the U.S. propulsion industry. This report covers the period between May 2011 and December 2012, which includes the creation and transition to operations of NIRPS. All subsequent reports will be annual. The year 2012 has been an eventful one for NIRPS. In its first full year, the new team overcame many obstacles and explored opportunities to ensure the institute has a firm foundation for the future. NIRPS is now an active organization making contributions to the development, sustainment, and strategy of the rocket propulsion industry in the United States. This report describes the actions taken by the NIRPS team to determine the strategy, organizational structure, and goals of the Institute. It also highlights key accomplishments, collaborations with other organizations, and the strategic framework for the Institute.

  2. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  3. DE-FG03-01ER15237 Annual Progress Report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandra Navrotsky

    2003-06-06

    OAK B262 Annual report. We have investigated the thermodynamics of several nanoscale systems: Iron oxides: We have completed and published heat capacity and entropy data on goethite, lepidocrocite, and maghemite, as well as measured their heats of formation. We also have enthalpy of formation data for several poorly crystalline nanophase oxides (schwertmannite, ferrihydrite, and epsilon-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The next step is to measure thermodynamic properties as a function of surface area for several oxides. CoO-MgO: Thermochemical data for bulk samples are in press. Heat capacities have been measured for CoO, MgO, and some intermediate samples. Nanosized samples at several compositions are being prepared this summer. Thin films have been prepared and some solution calorimetry done, but additional sample preparation and characterization is needed. Hydration energetics: Our setups for gas adsorption calorimetry and water immersion calorimetry are being completed. We will test them with known materials (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, selected zeolites) and then proceed to work on TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and zeolites.

  4. Research in radiobiology: Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.C.; Buster, D.S.

    1987-12-31

    In the early 1950's the Atomic Energy Commission established at the University of Utah a large, long-term study designed to investigate the toxicity of internally deposited radionuclides in beagles. The first animals were injected on December 1, 1952 and thus began an odyssey unusual in modern science both for its duration and continued scientific interest and relevance. The original dogs were injected with /sup 239/Pu and /sup 226/Ra. Later, studies were initiated with /sup 241/Am, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 224/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 90/Sr, and /sup 228/Th. These studies were unique and have and will continue to contribute valuable scientific information on the behavior and effects of these substances in biological systems. We feel that the data collected from these studies will be useful for many decades to come as we ask more demanding questions relative to radionuclides and environmental, biological and health issues. While this publication will be the last of our series Research in Radiobiology, the lifespan carcinogenesis studies are continuing under a collaborative arrangement with the I.T.R.I. Beginning in 1988, the colony status tables of dogs in the Utah studies and reports of research by the Radiobiology faculty will be included in the annual I.T.R.I. report. Under our new collaborative arrangements with the I.T.R.I. for the conduct of the lifespan carcinogenesis studies, we expect a continued high level of scientific productivity from our faculty.

  5. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  7. A novel biomarker for beryllium sensitization in humans. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Albertini, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    'Overall, this project is designed to identify the beryllium reactive T-cell clones that are proliferating in vivo in individuals sensitized to beryllium. The basic method for identifying such clones is the hprt T-cell mutation assay. The rationale is that in vivo proliferating T-lymphocytes are more likely to undergo hprt mutations and/or be included in hprt mutant fractions of T-cells isolated from peripheral blood. T-lymphocytes isolated as hprt mutants from beryllium sensitized individuals are propagated in vitro and characterized for T-cell receptor (TCR)/3 gene usage patterns and antigen reactivity. Results will be compared with similar characteristics determined for T-cell clones from the same individuals that were developed in vitro from peripheral blood lymphocytes by beryllium stimulation. This research project has several specific aims. Progress for the year 10/1/96 to 9/30/97 is given.'

  8. Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1993 through March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1994-06-01

    This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1993, through March 31, 1994, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Bartlesville Project Office, the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Petroleum Reserves, and the US Agency for International Development. The five areas of research covered in this report are: Materials research and development; Environmental analysis and support; Bioprocessing; Coal combustion; and Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Nature and mechanism of induction of mutations. Annual progress report, August 1, 1979-August 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Nilan, R.A.; Kleinhofs, A.; Konzak, C.F.

    1980-08-01

    Past year results have increased understanding of the pathway by which the azide metabolite is synthesized in vivo, the development of a technique for producing an abundant amount of the metabolite in vitro and in furthering the understanding of the effect of azide and its metabolite of chromosomes through analyses of sister chromatid exchanges. Some additional information has been obtained on the chemical nature of the metabolite - specially possible differences of those from barley and from bacteria. Since the final budget was considerably less than requested, research on the chemical nature and identification of the metabolite had to be curtailed. Considerable progress was made on understanding the nature of azide-induced mutations through continued mapping of mutant alleles at the waxy pollen locus and characterization of the gene products and karyotype analysis of these mutant alleles.

  10. Space station propulsion technology. Annual progress report, 24 May 1985-23 May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Briley, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The progress on the Space Station Propulsion Technology Program is described. The objectives are to provide a demonstration of hydrogen/oxygen propulsion technology readiness for the Initial Operating Capability (IOC) space station application, specifically gaseous hydrogen/oxygen and warm hydrogen thruster concepts, and to establish a means for evolving from the IOC space station propulsion to that required to support and interface with advanced station functions. The evaluation of concepts was completed. The accumulator module of the test bed was completed and, with the microprocessor controller, delivered to NASA-MSFC. An oxygen/hydrogen thruster was modified for use with the test bed and successfully tested at mixture ratios from 4:1 to 8:1.

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  12. Analytical Chemistry Division. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W. S.

    1982-04-01

    The functions of the Analytical Chemistry Division fall into three general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development and utilization; (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections each of which may carry out any type of work falling into the thre categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections which are: analytical methodology; mass and emission spectrometry; analytical technical support; bio/organic analysis section; and nuclear and radiochemical analysis. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Chapter 7 covers supplementary activities. Chapter 8 is on presentation of research results (publications, articles reviewed or referred for periodicals). Approximately 56 articles, 31 proceedings publications and 33 reports have been published, and 119 oral presentations given during this reporting period.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  14. Fossil Energy Program Annual Progress Report for the Period April 1, 2000 through March 31, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, RR

    2001-06-14

    This report covers progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of fossil energy technologies. Projects on the ORNL Fossil Energy Program are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program, the DOE National Petroleum Technology Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The ORNL Fossil Energy Program research and development activities cover the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the SPR. An important part of the Fossil Energy Program is technical management of all activities on the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research (AR) Materials Program. The AR Materials Program involves research at other DOE and government laboratories, at universities, and at industrial organizations.

  15. Spray forming -- Aluminum: Third annual report (Phase 2). Technical progress -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarek, R.L.

    1998-04-20

    Commercial production of aluminum sheet and plate by spray atomization and deposition is a potentially attractive manufacturing alternative to conventional ingot metallurgy/hot-milling and to continuous casting processes because of reduced energy requirements and reduced cost. To realize the full potential of the technology, the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa), under contract by the US Department of Energy, is investigating currently available state-of-the-art atomization devices to develop nozzle design concepts whose spray characteristics are tailored for continuous sheet production. This third technical progress report will summarize research and development work conducted during the period 1997 October through 1998 March. Included are the latest optimization work on the Alcoa III nozzle, results of spray forming runs with 6111 aluminum alloy and preliminary rolling trials of 6111 deposits.

  16. Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides information on the progress of activities during fiscal year 1993 in the Spent Fuel and Waste Management Technology Development Program (SF&WMTDP) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). As a new program, efforts are just getting underway toward addressing major issues related to the fuel and waste stored at the ICPP. The SF&WMTDP has the following principal objectives: Investigate direct dispositioning of spent fuel, striving for one acceptable waste form; determine the best treatment process(es) for liquid and calcine wastes to minimize the volume of high level radioactive waste (HLW) and low level waste (LLW); demonstrate the integrated operability and maintainability of selected treatment and immobilization processes; and assure that implementation of the selected waste treatment process is environmentally acceptable, ensures public and worker safety, and is economically feasible.

  17. 1994 annual report on low-level radioactive waste management progress

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    This report for calendar year 1994 summarizes the progress that states and compact regions made during the year in establishing new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Although events that have occurred in 1995 greatly alter the perspective in terms of storage versus disposal, the purpose of this report is to convey the concerns as evidenced during calendar year 1994. Significant developments occurring in 1995 are briefly outlined in the transmittal letter and will be detailed in the report for calendar year 1995. The report also provides summary information on the volume of low-level radioactive waste received for disposal in 1994 by commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, and is prepared is in response to Section 7(b) of Title I of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985.

  18. Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1994 through March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, and DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Bartlesville Project Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The following research areas are covered in this report: Materials research and development; Environmental analysis support; Bioprocessing research; Coal combustion research; and Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science an Technology database.

  19. High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Technical progress report, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Johansson, M.; Feeley, O.C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize high octane ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2} coal-derived synthesis gas via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers.

  20. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty

    2009-06-10

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho

  1. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C{sub 10}) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C{sub 15} C{sub 20}, C{sub 30}, C{sub 40}) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C{sub 15}) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  2. Architectural design criteria for f-block metal sequestering agents. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Paine, R.T.; Roundhill, D.M.

    1997-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to provide the means to optimize ligand architecture for f-block metal recognition. The authors strategy builds on an innovative and successful molecular modeling approach in developing polyether ligand design criteria for the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The hypothesis underlying this proposal is that differences in metal ion binding with multidentate ligands bearing the same number and type of donor groups are primarily attributable to intramolecular steric factors. The authors propose quantifying these steric factors through the application of molecular mechanics models. The proposed research involves close integration of theoretical and experimental chemistry. The experimental work entails synthesizing novel ligands and experimentally determining structures and binding constants for metal ion complexation by series of ligands in which architecture is systematically varied. The theoretical work entails using electronic structure calculations to parameterize a molecular mechanics force field for a range of metal ions and ligand types. The resulting molecular mechanics force field will be used to predict low-energy structures for unidentate, bidentate, and multidentate ligands and their metal complexes through conformational searches. Results will be analyzed to assess the relative importance of several steric factors including optimal M-L length, optimal geometry at the metal center, optimal geometry at the donor atoms (complementarity), and conformation prior to binding (preorganization). An accurate set of criteria for the design of ligand architecture will be obtained from these results. These criteria will enable researchers to target ligand structures for synthesis and thereby dramatically reduce the time and cost associated with metal-specific ligand development.'

  3. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall]. Annual technical progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is involved in normal lignification.

  4. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  5. Acid-base behavior in hydrothermal processing of wastes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    'A major obstacle to the development of hydrothermal technology for treating DOE wastes has been a lack of scientific knowledge of solution chemistry, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. The progress over the last year is highlighted in the following four abstracts from manuscripts which have been submitted to journals. The authors also have made considerable progress on a spectroscopic study of the acid-base equilibria of Cr(VI). They have utilized novel spectroscopic indicators to study acid-base equilibria up to 380 C. Until now, very few systems have been studied at such high temperatures, although this information is vital for hydrothermal processing of wastes. The pH values of aqueous solutions of boric acid and KOH were measured with the optical indicator 2-naphthol at temperatures from 300 to 380 C. The equilibrium constant Kb-l for the reaction B(OH)3 + OH{sup -} = B(OH){sup -4} was determined from the pH measurements and correlated with a modified Born model. The titration curve for the addition of HCl to sodium borate exhibits strong acid-strong base behavior even at 350 C and 24.1 MPa. At these conditions, aqueous solutions of sodium borate buffer the pH at 9.6 t 0.25. submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. Acetic Acid and HCl Acid-base titrations for the KOH-acetic acid or NH{sub 3} -acetic acid systems were monitored with the optical indicator 2-naphthoic acid at 350 C and 34 MPa, and those for the HCl;Cl- system with acridine at 380 C and up to 34 MPa (5,000 psia ). KOH remains a much stronger base than NH,OH at high temperature. From 298 K to the critical temperature of water, the dissociation constant for HCl decreases by 13 orders of magnitude, and thus, the basicity of Cl{sup -} becomes significant. Consequently, the addition of NaCl to HCl raises the pH. The pH titration curves may be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the relevant equilibrium constants and Pitzer''s formulation of the Debye- Htickel equation for the activity coefficients.'

  6. Captive Rearing Program for Salmon River Chinook Salmon : Project Progress Report, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Venditti, David A.

    2003-10-01

    distributed themselves throughout the study section and displayed a progression of habitat associations and behavior consistent with progressing maturation and the onset of spawning. Five of the 18 redds spawned by captive-reared parents were hydraulically sampled to assess survival to the eyed stage of development. Eyed-eggs were collected from four of these, and survival to this stage ranged from 0%-89%. Expanding these results to the remaining redds produced an estimate of 15,000 eyed-eggs being produced by captive-reared fish.

  7. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, W.S.

    1983-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Dvision of Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) analytical research, development, and implementation; (2) programmatic research, development, and utilization; and (3) technical support. The Division is organized into five major sections, each of which may carry out any type of work falling in the three categories mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 5 of this report highlight progress within the five sections (analytical methodology, mass and emission spectrometry, radioactive materials, bio/organic analysis, and general and environmental analysis) during the period January 1, 1982 to December 31, 1982. A short summary introduces each chapter to indicate work scope. Information about quality assurance and safety programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 61 articles, 32 proceedings publications and 37 reports have been published, and 107 oral presentations were given during this reporting period.

  8. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: (1) Analytical Research, Development, and Implementation. The division maintains a program to conceptualize, investigate, develop, assess, improve, and implement advanced technology for chemical and physicochemical measurements. Emphasis is on problems and needs identified with ORNL and Department of Energy (DOE) programs; however, attention is also given to advancing the analytical sciences themselves. (2) Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization. The division carries out a wide variety of chemical work that typically involves analytical research and/or development plus the utilization of analytical capabilities to expedite programmatic interests. (3) Technical Support. The division performs chemical and physicochemical analyses of virtually all types. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each of which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1988. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8.

  9. Microstructural effects in abrasive wear. Third annual progress report, August 12, 1983-August 14, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Kosel, T.H.

    1984-08-14

    The two major goals of the project are to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of carbide removal and of the role of matrix properties in abrasion. In the area of carbide removal mechanisms, progress this year has included completion of the fixed-depth scratch test apparatus and its use to demonstrate the occurrence of gross carbide cracking under fixed-depth conditions; comparable cracking does not occur under fixed-load conditions at a similar mean load. A high-stress abrasion system has been constructed and tested which will facilitate studies of abrasion under conditions similar to those produced by the fixed-depth scratch test system. Analysis of the work on the size effect in abrasion of dual-phase alloys has been completed. The largest single item in this year's proposed work in a study of the abrasion resistance and mechanisms of material removal in model alloys having second-phase particles (SPP's) with varying fracture properties. In the area of the effects of matrix properties on abrasion, the majority of the effort this year has centered on transmission electron microscopy of the subsurface deformation microstructures developed during abrasion.

  10. Interfacial radiolysis effects in tank waste speciation. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, T.M.; Camaioni, D.; Meisel, D.

    1998-06-01

    'The purpose of this program is to deliver pertinent, fundamental information that can be used to make technically defensible decisions on safety issues and processing strategies associated with storage and clean up of DOE mixed chemical and radioactive wastes. The radioactive and chemical wastes present in DOE underground storage tanks contain complex mixtures of sludges, salts, and supernatant liquids. These mixtures, which contain a wide variety of oxide materials, aqueous solvents, and organic components, are constantly bombarded with gamma quanta, beta and alpha particles produced via the decay of radioactive isotopes. Currently, there is a vital need to understand radiolysis of organic and inorganic species present in mixed waste tanks because these processes: (a) produce mixtures of toxic, flammable, and potentially explosive gases (i.e., H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and volatile organics) (b) degrade organics, possibly to gas-generating organic fragments, even as the degradation reduces the hazards associated with nitrate-organic mixtures, (c) alter the surface chemistry of insoluble colloids in tank sludge, influencing sedimentation and the gas/solid interactions that may lead to gas entrapment phenomena. This report summarizes the technical achievements of a 3-year project that is now in its 2nd year. Progress in three areas is reported: (1) radiation effects at NaNO 3 crystal interfaces, (2) reactions of organic complexants with NO{sub 2} in water, and (3) radiation effects in oxide particles.'

  11. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  12. DOE/EPSCoR Traineeship Program: Progress report, academic year 1992--93. Annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, D.; Steadman, J.

    1993-12-31

    This progress report reviews the University of Wyoming`s approach to implementing the DOE Traineeship Program, and briefly describes the research performed by the DOE/EPSCoR Trainees during the academic year, 1992--1993. These brief descriptions of individual research projects demonstrate the wide scope of energy-related research that the DOE-EPSCoR Traineeships have initiated in Wyoming. The availability of this funding has encouraged many talented students to continue their education in fields of interest to DOE. These additional bright, energetic graduate students have improved the educational atmosphere for everyone. The visibility of the DOE program has sharpened the focus of the science and engineering departments on the energy-related research of importance to Wyoming and DOE. The impact of the DOE Traineeships in Wyoming has been substantial and very positive. It has not only increased the number of students studying in energy-related disciplines, but has also increased the quality of their graduate research. The program has also increased the visibility of DOE in Wyoming and has helped focus attention on the energy and environmental graduate education which is so essential to the University and the State.

  13. Studies in premixed combustion. Annual progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sivashinsky, G.I.

    1993-03-01

    During the period under review, significant progress was been made in studying the intrinsic dynamics of premixed flames and the problems of flame-flow interaction. (1) A weakly nonlinear model for Bunsen burner stabilized flames was proposed and employed for the simulation of three-dimensional polyhedral flames -- one of the most graphic manifestations of thermal-diffusive instability in premixed combustion. (2) A high-precision large-scale numerical simulation of Bunsen burner tip structure was conducted. The results obtained supported the earlier conjecture that the tip opening observed in low Lewis number systems is a purely optical effect not involving either flame extinction or leakage of unburned fuel. (3) A one-dimensional model describing a reaction wave moving through a unidirectional periodic flow field is proposed and studied numerically. For long-wavelength fields the system exhibits a peculiar non-uniqueness of possible propagation regimes. The transition from one regime to another occurs in a manner of hysteresis.

  14. Determining significant endpoints for ecological risk analyses. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, T.G.; Congdon, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, D.; Bedford, J.; Whicker, F.W.

    1997-11-01

    'This report summarizes the first year''s progress of research funded under the Department of Energy''s Environmental Management Science Program. The research was initiated to better determine ecological risks from toxic and radioactive contaminants. More precisely, the research is designed to determine the relevancy of sublethal cellular damage to the performance of individuals and to identify characteristics of non-human populations exposed to chronic, low-level radiation, as is typically found on many DOE sites. The authors propose to establish a protocol to assess risks to non-human species at higher levels of biological organization by relating molecular damage to more relevant responses that reflect population health. They think that they can achieve this by coupling changes in metabolic rates and energy allocation patterns to meaningful population response variables, and by using novel biological dosimeters in controlled, manipulative dose/effects experiments. They believe that a scientifically defensible endpoint for measuring ecological risks can only be determined once its understood the extent to which molecular damage from contaminant exposure is detrimental at the individual and population levels of biological organization.'

  15. Extended Burnup Demonstration Reactor Fuels Program. Annual progress report, April 1983-March 1984. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Exarhos, C.A.

    1985-06-20

    The US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation have participated since 1979 in a cooperative Extended Burnup Demonstration Program. Under the program, standard ENC-fabricated reload fuel in the Big Rock Point and Oyster Creek reactor cores has been irradiated to discharge burnups at or beyond 35,000 MWD/MTU, one to two cycles beyond its originally projected exposure life. The program provides for examination of the fuel at poolside before and after each extended burnup cycle as well as for limited destructive hot cell examination. The 1984 progress report covers work performed under the EBD program between April 1983 and March 1984. Major milestones reached during the period include completion of a hot cell examination on four high burnup rods from Big Rock Point and of a poolside on the Oyster Creek EBD fuel at discharge. The hot cell examination of four rods at burnups to 37.2 GWD/MTU confirmed poolside measurements on the same fuel, showing the urania and gadolinia-bearing fuel rods to be in excellent condition. No major cladding degradation, pellet restructuring, or pellet-clad interaction was found in any of the samples examined. The Oyster Creek fuel, examined at an assembly average exposure of 34.5 GWD/MTU, showed good performance with regard to both diametral creepdown and clad oxide accumulation.

  16. NRL HIFAR research program annual progress report FY92/93

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Progress during this reporting period has spanned several areas ranging from studies of fundamental intense-beam transport physics, including comparisons of simulations with experimental results, to accelerator system design and simulation code development. Performance of the research described here has continued to benefit from the close collaboration with personnel at LBL and LLNL. In addition, studies of the longitudinal and transverse physics, which are jointly supported by the Division of High Energy Physics of the US Department of Energy, have benefitted from collaboration with personnel at the University of Maryland associated with the Maryland transport experiment. The research results supported by this program have been, and will be, actively reported to the scientific community through papers presented at conferences and published in conference proceedings as well as in the refereed literature. The work which has been documented for publication is described, in detail, in copies of the referenced material provided in the Appendix. This work is also summarized briefly in the next section. An additional section describing, in depth, research which has not yet been prepared for publication, is also included. This work investigates the basic nonlinear physics which is important to the design of large aperture magnetic quadrupole transport systems, as well as the numerical requirements for reliable simulation of that physics.

  17. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a large and diversified organization. As such, it serves a multitude of functions for a clientele that exists both in and outside of ORNL. These functions fall into the following general categories: Analytical Research, Development and Implementation; Programmatic Research, Development, and Utilization; and Technical Support. The Analytical Chemistry Division is organized into four major sections, each which may carry out any of the three types of work mentioned above. Chapters 1 through 4 of this report highlight progress within the four sections during the period January 1 to December 31, 1989. A brief discussion of the division's role in an especially important environmental program is given in Chapter 5. Information about quality assurance, safety, and training programs is presented in Chapter 6, along with a tabulation of analyses rendered. Publications, oral presentations, professional activities, educational programs, and seminars are cited in Chapters 7 and 8. Approximately 69 articles, 41 proceedings, and 31 reports were published, and 151 oral presentations were given during this reporting period. Some 308,981 determinations were performed.

  18. Amorphous silicon research: Phase II. Annual technical progress report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research performed during Phase II of a three-phase, three-year program under NREL Subcontract No. ZAN-4-13318-02. The research program is intended to expand, enhance and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for the development of high-performance, two-terminal multijunction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) alloy modules. It is now well recognized that a multifunction, multibandgap approach has the potential of achieving the highest stable efficiency in a-Si:H alloy solar cells. In this approach, the bandgap of the materials of the component cell is varied in order to capture a wide spectrum of the solar photons. Significant progress has been made in the development of materials and cell design in the last few years, and a stable module efficiency of 10.2% has been demonstrated over one-square-foot area using a triple-junction approach in which the bottom two component cells use hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy. In order to meet the Department of Energy goal of achievement of 12% stable module efficiency, it is necessary to make further improvements in each of the component cells. This has been the thrust of the current program.

  19. Nuclear moments and nuclear structure. Annual progress report, September 1, 1983-July 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Madansky, L.; Lee, Y.K.

    1984-01-01

    A copy of a publication that represents the completion of a so-called anomalon search, which contemplated the decay into a photon, is presented. The second part of the report discusses the status of Experiment E67OH, a search for direct lepton production using a single arm spectrometer. The experimental arrangements and typical run parameters are discussed. An abstract of a paper describing our earlier work on pion production in central collisions is presented. The analysis of data on ..gamma..-ray and energetic neutrons from the ..mu../sup -/-capture in /sup 165/Ho has been completed, and the results are now published. The spectra indicated an enhancement of energetic neutrons and large nuclear excitations, which stimulated new theoretical interpretations. A new experiment was initiated at TRIUMF to study muon capture in light /sup 27/Al and /sup 28/Si. The analysis of the energetic particle emission from the exclusive pion-capture reaction in /sup 165/Ho is in its final state, and the interpretation of the spectra in terms of the exciton model is in progress. (WHK)

  20. Removal of technetium, carbon tetrachloride, and metals from DOE properties. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.; Darab, J.G.; Ponder, S.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of the project is to develop and characterize supported reducing agents, and solid waste forms derived from them, which will be effective in the removal of transition metal ions, chlorinated organic molecules, and technetium from aqueous mixed wastes. This work follows the discovery that a nanoscale form of zero-valent iron, dispersed on high surface area supports, reduces metal ions (chromium, mercury, and lead) and rhenium (as a surrogate for technetium) to insoluble forms much faster than does unsupported iron. The scientific goals of the project are to better understand the mechanism of the reduction process, to develop supports that are compatible with a variety of mixed waste compositions, and to develop surface modifiers for the supported iron aggregates that will optimize their selectivity for the contaminants of interest. The support composition is of particular interest in the case of technetium (Tc) separation and stabilization in the Hanford tank wastes. While it is expected that pertechnetate will be reduced insoluble TcO{sub 2} , the support material must be compatible with the vitrification process used in the final waste disposition. The surface modifications are also a focal point for Hanford applications because of the complex and variable makeup of the tank wastes. This report summarizes progress in the first 8 months of a 3-year collaborative project involving Penn State and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).'

  1. Survey of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation 1995 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, E.R.; Mitchell, J.M.; Webb, J.W.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

    1995-11-01

    This progress report discusses surveys of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. These surveys are important to help avoid or minimize potential impacts of projects on the ORR to species listed as threatened, endangered, or in need of management by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Currently, there are 69 species of federally or state-listed terrestrial vertebrates that may occur in Tennessee. Not all of these are expected to occur on the ORR, nor do resources permit comprehensive sampling for all of them over the entire ORR. To effectively organize sampling efforts, listed animal species that might be present were targeted using a prioritization system based on historical and recent sightings, species distributions, literature reviews, and personal communications. Sampling was conducted during the time of the year when each targeted species would most likely be encountered. Several trapping and surveying methods were used, including pitfall traps, Sherman traps, seining, artificial covers, and cave and avian surveys.

  2. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored. This report summarizes the progress achieved after only seven months of work on a three-year project.'

  3. Exploratory research on solvent refined coal liquefaction. Annual technical progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Exploratory Research on Solvent Refined Coal Liquefaction project by The Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co.'s Merriam Laboratory during 1979. In a series of experiments with varying feed gas composition, low levels (5 to 10 mole %) of carbon monoxide had little effect on the SRC II processing of Pittsburgh Seam coal (Powhatan No. 5 Mine) while higher levels (20 to 40 mole %) resulted in a general degradation of operability and reduced oil yields. Addition of finely divided (approx. 1 ..mu..m) pyrite to the reactive Powhatan coal had little effect on oil yields although the molecular weight of the distillation residue was apparently decreased. When finely divided pyrite and magnetite were added to the less reactive coals from the Loveridge and Blacksville No. 1 Mines (also Pittsburgh Seam), however, substantial increases in oil yields and product quality were obtained. In a comparison of upflow and downflow dissolver configurations with Powhatan coal in the SRC II mode, there was no difference in yields or product quality. A study characterizing specific reactors revealed a significantly higher conversion in the SRC I mode with a reactor approximating plug flow conditions compared to a completely backmixed reactor. In the SRC II mode there was only a slightly higher oil yield with the plug flow reactor.

  4. Surface and borehole electromagnetic imaging of conducting contaminant plumes. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    'Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component magnetic field detectors are deployed in other boreholes or on the surface. Sources and receivers are typically deployed in a configuration surrounding the region of interest. The goal of this procedure is to image electrical conductivity variations in the earth, much as x-ray tomography is used to image density variations through cross-sections of the body. Although such EM field techniques have been developed and applied, the algorithms for inverting the magnetic data to produce the desired images of electrical conductivity have not kept pace. One of the main reasons for the lag in the algorithm development has been the fact that the magnetic induction problem is inherently three dimensional: other imaging methods such as x-ray and seismic can make use of two-dimensional approximations that are not too far from reality, but the author does not have this luxury in EM induction tomography. In addition, previous field experiments were conducted at controlled test sites that typically do not have much external noise or extensive surface clutter problems often associated with environmental sites. To use the same field techniques in environments more typical of cleanup sites requires a new set of data processing tools to remove the effects of both noise and clutter. The goal of this project is to join theory and experiment to produce enhanced images of electrically conducting fluids underground, allowing better localization of contaminants and improved planning strategies for the subsequent remediation efforts. After explaining the physical context in more detail, this report will summarize the progress made in the first year of this project: (1) on code development and (2) on field tests of

  5. Analytical Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    The following sentences highlight some of the technical activities carried out during 1991. They illustrate the diversity of programs and technical work performed within the Analytical Chemistry Division. Our neutron activation analysis laboratory at HFIR was placed into operation during 1991. We have combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) with a preparation procedure developed at the Argonne National Laboratory to measure ultra-trace levels of U, Pu, Np, and Am in body fluids, primarily urine. Much progress has been made over the last year in the interfacing of an rf-powered glow discharge source to a double-focusing mass spectrometer. Preliminary experiments using electrospray ionization combined with ion trap mass spectrometry show much promise for the analysis of metals in solution. A secondary ion microprobe has been constructed that permits determination of the distribution of organic compounds less than a monolayer thick on samples as large as 1 cm diameter. Fourier transform mass spectrometry has been demonstrated to be a highly effective tool for the detailed characterization of biopolymers, especially normal and modified oligonucleotides. Much has been accomplished in understanding the fundamentals of quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Work with ITMS instrumentation has led to the development of rapid methods for the detection of trace organics in environmental and physiological samples. A new type of time-of-flight mass spectrometer was designed for use with our positron ionization experiments. Fundamental research on chromatography at high concentrations and on gas-solid adsorption has continued. The preparation of a monograph on the chemistry of environmental tobacco smoke was completed this year.

  6. Collaborative research: Hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Y.; Morrison, F.; Rector, J.

    1997-10-31

    'In the first year of the project progress has been made in several areas which are central to the project. Development of Joint Hydrogcological-Geophysical Co-Interpretation Procedure A strong effort was invested in developing the concepts and the algorithm of the joint hydrogeological-geophysical co-interpretation approach. The reason for the concerted effort in that direction is the large amount of time the authors expect this task will take before completion, and also by the need to direct the data collection efforts. They are currently testing several ideas for co-interpretation, but they are at a quite advanced stage. They are testing these ideas using synthetic studies as well as some preliminary data that has been collected at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab site. Part of the efforts is in developing methods for estimation of the semi-variograms of the logconductivity based on direct measurements as well as on seimsic velocity measurements as obtained from cross-well tomography. Preliminary tests show that these two sources of data complement each other quite well: the direct measurements supply the medium to small wave number portion of the logconductivity spectra, while a high resolution seismic survey supplies a good coverage of the large wave number part of the spectra. They advanced significantly with formulating their approach for using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) imaging techniques in shallow subsurface surveys. Synthetic surveys show that GPR maybe very suitable for mapping spatial variations in saturations. They have access to field data and are analyzing it. Some additional issues that were investigated are also listed.'

  7. Environmental analysis of endocrine disrupting effects from hydrocarbon contaminants in the ecosystem. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McLachlan, J.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this project is to determine how environmental contaminants, namely hydrocarbons, can act as hormones or anti-hormones (i.e., environmental hormones) in different species present in aquatic ecosystems. Species of particular focus are those which can serve as sentinel species (e.g., amphibians) and, thus, provide early warning signals for more widespread impacts on an ecosystem and its wildlife and human inhabitants. This reports the progress of 1.5 years of a three-year grant awarded to the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR). A growing body of evidence suggests that chemicals in the environment can disrupt the endocrine system of animals (i.e., wildlife and humans) and adversely impact the development of these species. Because of the multitude of known endocrine-disrupting chemicals and the numerous industrial and government sectors producing these chemicals, almost every federal agency has initiated research on the endocrine effects of chemicals relevant to their operations. This study represents the Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences'' only research on the impacts of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The activities employed by this project to determine these impacts include development of biotechnology screens (in vitro), animal screens (in vivo), and other analyses of aquatic ecosystem biomarkers of exposure. The results from this study can elucidate how chemicals in the environment, including those from DOE activities, can signal (and alter) the development of a number of species in aquatic ecosystems. These signals can have detrimental impacts not only on an organismal level, but also on community, population, and entire ecosystem levels, including humans.'

  8. Mixing rocesses in high-level waste tanks. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F.

    1998-06-01

    'Flammable gases can be generated in DOE high-level waste tanks, including radiolytic hydrogen, and during cesium precipitation from salt solutions, benzene. Under normal operating conditions the potential for deflagration or detonation from these gases is precluded by purging and ventilation systems, which remove the flammable gases and maintain a well-mixed condition in the tanks. Upon failure of the ventilation system, due to seismic or other events, however, it has proven more difficult to make strong arguments for well-mixed conditions, due to the potential for density-induced stratification which can potentially sequester fuel or oxidizer at concentrations significantly higher than average. This has complicated the task of defining the safety basis for tank operation. Waste-tank mixing processes have considerable overlap with similar large-enclosure mixing processes that occur in enclosure fires and nuclear reactor containments. Significant differences also exist, so that modeling techniques that have been developed previously can not be directly applied to waste tanks. In particular, mixing of air introduced through tank roof penetrations by buoyancy and pressure driven exchange flows, mixed convection induced by an injected high-velocity purge jet interacting with buoyancy driven flow, and onset and breakdown of stable stratification under the influence of an injected jet have not been adequately studied but are important in assessing the potential for accumulation of high-concentration pockets of fuel and oxygen. Treating these phenomena requires a combination of experiments and the development of new, more general computational models than those that have been developed for enclosure fires. U.C. Berkeley is now completing the second year of its three-year project that started in September, 1996. Excellent progress has been made in several important areas related to waste-tank ventilation and mixing processes.'

  9. Mechanics of bubbles in sludges and slurries. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Terrones, G.; Denn, M.M.; Muller, S.J.; Rossen, W.R.

    1998-06-01

    'Previous studies have established that the waste level of Hanford tanks responds to barometric pressure changes, the compressibility of retained bubbles accounts for the level changes, and the volume of retained gas can be determined from the measured waste level and barometric pressure changes. However, interactions between the gas bubbles and rheologically complex waste cause inaccurate retained gas estimates and are not well understood. Because the retained gas is typically a flammable mixture of hydrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide, accurate determination of the retained gas volume is a critical component for establishing the safety hazard of the tanks. Accurate estimates of retained gas from level/pressure data are highly desirable because direct in-situ measurements are very expensive in an individual tank and impossible in many single-shell tanks. The objective of this research project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the interactions between gas bubbles and tank waste during barometric pressure fluctuations. It is expected that the elucidation of the bubble/waste interaction mechanisms will lead to the development of models for a more accurate determination of: gas content in Hanford tanks, waste properties from level/pressure data, and the effect that barometric pressure fluctuations have on the slow release of bubbles. The results of this research will support critical operations at the Hanford Site associated with the flammable gas safety hazard and future waste operations such as salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval. This three-year research program, which began in FY 1998, is divided into four related problems. Progress has been made in each of the areas of modeling bubble behavior in continuum materials (sludges) from both a solid mechanics viewpoint and separately from a fluid mechanics viewpoint, modeling studies of compressible bubbles in particulate materials (slurries), and experimental studies of bubbles in both

  10. Chemical and ceramic methods toward safe storage of actinides using monazite. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, P.E.D.; Boatner, L.A.

    1998-06-01

    oxidatively stable ceramic composites: for example, use is contemplated as an enabling weak interface in oxide-oxide fiber composites (including as a high temperature starch on space shuttle blankets), and possibly as machinable ceramics, friction materials and other. The ceramic behavior of pure and doped monazite has not yet been studied in any detail. The sine-qua-non of ceramic studies and production is the reliable synthesis of reproducible starting powders and precursor chemicals that consistently reproduce the desired ceramic outcome. This has always been a more neglected (underfunded) side of ceramic studies; witness how many years passed before pure reproducible powders of alumina or silicon nitride became available for ceramic studies long after it was apparent that these were useful ceramics which, however, suffered from forming variation and degradation caused by small amounts of impurities.'