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Sample records for synthesize inp micrometer

  1. Efficient rapid microwave-assisted route to synthesize InP micrometer hollow spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Xiuwen Hu Qitu; Sun Chuansheng

    2009-01-08

    The efficiencies of two methods of synthesizing InP micro-scale hollow spheres are compared via the analogous solution-liquid-solid (ASLS) growth mechanism, either through a traditional solvothermal procedure, or via a microwave-assisted method. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images show that most of the as-grown samples are micrometer hollow spheres, which indicates the efficiency of both methods. For traditional solvothermal route, long time (10 h) is necessary to obtain the desired samples, however, for the microwave-assisted route, 30 min is enough for hollow spherical products. An optimal choice of microwave irradiating time allows reducing the reaction time from hours to minutes. The proposed ASLS growth mechanism has also been discussed in detail.

  2. Filar Micrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyle, Bob; Argyle, R. W.

    The measurement of double stars is central to the theme of this book and there are many ways of doing this, but this chapter is dedicated to the use of the filar micrometer which has been used seriously since the time of William Herschel. For a thorough discussion of the history and development of the filar micrometer see the paper by Brooks(1991). Much of our knowledge of longer period visual binaries depends on micrometric measures over the last 200 years. The filar micrometer is by far the most well-known device for measuring double stars. Its design remains largely the same as the original instrument which was first applied to an astronomical telescope by the Englishman William Gascoigne (ca. 1620-1644) in the late 1630s. The aim is to use fine threads located in the focal plane of the telescope lens or mirror to measure the relative position of the fainter component of a double star with respect to the brighter, regarding the latter as fixed for this purpose. This is done by the measurement of the angle which the line joining the two stars makes with the N reference in the eyepiece and the angular separation of the fainter star (B) from the brighter (A) in seconds of arc. These quantities are usually known as theta ( θ ) and rho ( ρ ) respectively and are defined in Chap. 1 .

  3. Optical contact micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Steven D.

    2014-08-19

    Certain examples provide optical contact micrometers and methods of use. An example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable lenses to receive an object and immobilize the object in a position. The example optical contact micrometer includes a pair of opposable mirrors positioned with respect to the pair of lenses to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses. The example optical contact micrometer includes a microscope to facilitate viewing of the object through the lenses via the mirrors; and an interferometer to obtain one or more measurements of the object.

  4. When is an INP not an INP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Emma; Connolly, Paul; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    Processes such as precipitation and radiation depend on the concentration and size of different hydrometeors within clouds therefore it is important to accurately predict them in weather and climate models. A large fraction of clouds present in our atmosphere are mixed phase; contain both liquid and ice particles. The number of drops and ice crystals present in mixed phase clouds strongly depends on the size distribution of aerosols. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), a subset of atmospheric aerosol particles, are required for liquid drops to form in the atmosphere. These particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. To nucleate ice particles in mixed phase clouds ice nucleating particles (INP) are required. These particles are rarer than CCN. Here we investigate the case where CCN and INPs are in direct competition with each other for water vapour within a cloud. Focusing on the immersion and condensation modes of freezing (where an INP must be immersed within a liquid drop before it can freeze) we show that the presence of CCN can suppress the formation of ice. CCN are more hydrophilic than IN and as such are better able to compete for water vapour than, typically insoluble, INPs. Therefore water is more likely to condense onto a CCN than INP, leaving the INP without enough condensed water on it to be able to freeze in the immersion or condensation mode. The magnitude of this suppression effect strongly depends on a currently unconstrained quantity. Here we refer to this quantity as the critical mass of condensed water required for freezing, Mwc. Mwc is the threshold amount of water that must be condensed onto a INP before it can freeze in the immersion or condensation mode. Using the detailed cloud parcel model, Aerosol-Cloud-Precipiation-Interaction Model (ACPIM), developed at the University of Manchester we show that if only a small amount of water is required for freezing there is little suppression effect and if a large amount of water is required there is a

  5. Laser interferometer micrometer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logue, S. H.

    1969-01-01

    Laser micrometer measures dimensions of precision gyro and gas bearing parts using the principle of measuring light phase changes rather than a direct fringe count. The system uses light beams to eliminate errors due to deformations and surface irregularities, and three interferometers.

  6. Noncontact fiber optic micrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Ibarra, F.; Guajardo-Gonzalez, Candelario; Castillo-Guzman, Arturo; Guzman-Ramos, Valentin; Selvas, Romeo

    2010-10-01

    A sensor instrument able to measuring the thickness of different semitransparent objects with a resolution of one micron is described. This is based on a fiber optic reflectometer and a laser autofocus system and permit to measuring the thickness of thin surfaces such as semiconductor films, plastic materials and semitransparent objects. The response time for the measuring was roughly 2 sec and the thickness results were compared with a digital mechanical micrometer and both are in good agreement.

  7. Automatic readout micrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritzen, T.

    1982-03-23

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  8. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, T.

    A measuring system is described for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principle use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse of fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  9. Automatic readout micrometer

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, Ted

    1982-01-01

    A measuring system is disclosed for surveying and very accurately positioning objects with respect to a reference line. A principal use of this surveying system is for accurately aligning the electromagnets which direct a particle beam emitted from a particle accelerator. Prior art surveying systems require highly skilled surveyors. Prior art systems include, for example, optical surveying systems which are susceptible to operator reading errors, and celestial navigation-type surveying systems, with their inherent complexities. The present invention provides an automatic readout micrometer which can very accurately measure distances. The invention has a simplicity of operation which practically eliminates the possibilities of operator optical reading error, owning to the elimination of traditional optical alignments for making measurements. The invention has an extendable arm which carries a laser surveying target. The extendable arm can be continuously positioned over its entire length of travel by either a coarse or fine adjustment without having the fine adjustment outrun the coarse adjustment until a reference laser beam is centered on the target as indicated by a digital readout. The length of the micrometer can then be accurately and automatically read by a computer and compared with a standardized set of alignment measurements. Due to its construction, the micrometer eliminates any errors due to temperature changes when the system is operated within a standard operating temperature range.

  10. Micrometer for Measuring Trepanned Grooves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    Special micrometer measures diameter of circular groove on face of large part, while part is mounted in lathe chuck. Tool has curved frame so it can reach around obstruction on centerline of part. At one end of frame is blade/ micrometer spindle for reaching into groove to be measured; this type of spindle does not rotate when micrometer thimble is turned in taking measurement. Other end of frame has sliding foot with blade.

  11. Identification and characterization of an essential family of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (INP51, INP52 and INP53 gene products) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, L E; Huynh, C V; Thorner, J; York, J D

    1998-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the S. cerevisiae INP51 locus (YIL002c) encodes an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase. Here we describe two related yeast loci, INP52 (YNL106c) and INP53 (YOR109w). Like Inp51p, the primary structures of Inp52p and Inp53p resemble the mammalian synaptic vesicle-associated protein, synaptojanin, and contain a carboxy-terminal catalytic domain and an amino-terminal SAC1-like segment. Inp51p (108 kD), Inp52p (136 kD) and Inp53p (124 kD) are membrane-associated. Single null mutants (inp51, inp52, or inp53) are viable. Both inp51 inp52 and inp52 inp53 double mutants display compromised cell growth, whereas an inp51 inp53 double mutant does not. An inp51 inp52 inp53 triple mutant is inviable on standard medium, but can grow weakly on media supplemented with an osmotic stabilizer (1 M sorbitol). An inp51 mutation, and to a lesser degree an inp52 mutation, confers cold-resistant growth in a strain background that cannot grow at temperatures below 15 degrees. Analysis of inositol metabolites in vivo showed measurable accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in the inp51 mutant. Electron microscopy revealed plasma membrane invaginations and cell wall thickening in double mutants and the triple mutant grown in sorbitol-containing medium. A fluorescent dye that detects endocytic and vacuolar membranes suggests that the vacuole is highly fragmented in inp51 inp52 double mutants. Our observations indicate that Inp51p, Inp52p, and Inp53p have distinct functions and that substrates and/or products of inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases may have roles in vesicle trafficking, membrane structure, and/or cell wall formation. PMID:9560389

  12. Airborne astronomy with a 150 micrometer - 500 micrometer heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under NASA Grant NAG2-254 awarded to the University of California. The project goal was to build a far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer for NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), and to use this instrument to observe atomic and molecular spectral lines from the interstellar medium. This goal was successfully achieved; the spectrometer is now in routine use aboard the KAO. Detections of particular note have been the 370 micrometers line of neutral atomic carbon, the 158 micrometers transition of ionized carbon, many of the high-J rotational lines of 12CO and 13CO between J=9-8 and J=22-21, the 119 micron ground-state rotational line of OH, and the 219 micron ground-state rotational line of H2D(+). All of these lines were observed at spectral resolutions exceeding 1 part in 10(exp 6), thereby allowing accurate line shapes and Doppler velocities to be measured.

  13. CNPq/INPE-LANDSAT system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debarrosaguirre, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The current status of the Brazilian LANDSAT facilities operated by Instituto de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) and the results achieved during the period from October 1, 1984 to August 31, 1985 are presented. INPE's Receiving Station at Cuiaba, MT, operates normally the two tracking and receiving systems it has installed, the old one (1973) for Band S and the new one (February 1983) for dual S- and X-band. Both MSS and TM recording capabilities are functional. Support to the NASA Backup Plan for MSS data also remains active. Routine recordings are being made for LANDSAT-5 only, for both MSS and TM. Originally, MSS was recorded over the full acquisition range. However, since December, 1984, due to further reduction of operational expenses, both instruments are being recorded over Brazilian territory only.

  14. Toward Unraveling the Nature of the Mysterious 21 and 30 Micrometer Emission Features of Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ajay; Li, A.

    2014-01-01

    feature carriers are probably synthesized in the PPN phase while the 30 micrometer feature carrier is being destroyed in the PPN phase through decomposition or shattering.

  15. InP materials/cell fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, T. J.

    1987-01-01

    The main points of discussion, conclusions and recommendations of a workshop on InP materials and cell fabrication are given. The importance of assessing the quality of p-Inp crystals supplied by different vendors, back contacts to solar cells, junction formation, energy conversion efficiency, testing for radiation resistance, and future develpments were among the topics discussed.

  16. Level Indicator On A Tubular Inside Micrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1995-01-01

    Leveling helps to ensure accurate measurements. Attachment helpful because in some situations that involve measurement of large, tight-tolerance inside dimensions, inside micrometers not held level between contact point give inaccurate readings. User adjusts position and orientation of micrometer and verifies level by observing bubble in level indicator. Upon feeling correct drag between micrometer tips and workpiece, user confident that tool used correctly and accurate measurement obtained.

  17. Positioned growth of InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, P. J.; Dalacu, D.; Lapointe, J.; Kam, A.; Mnaymneh, K.

    2011-02-01

    We describe two different approaches to growing precisely positioned InP nanowires on InP wafers. Both of these approaches utilize the selective area growth capabilities of Chemical Beam Epitaxy, one using the Au catalysed Vapour-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth mode, the other being catalyst-free. Growth is performed on InP wafers which are first coated with 20 nm of SiO2. These are then patterned using e-beam lithography to create nanometer scale holes in the SiO2 layer to expose the InP surface. For the VLS growth Au is then deposited into the holes in the SiO2 mask layer using a self-aligned lift-off process. For the catalyst-free growth no Au is deposited. In both cases the deposition of InP results in the formation of InP nanowires. In VLS growth the nanowire diameter is controlled by the size of the Au particle, whereas when catalyst-free the diameter is that of the opening in the SiO2 mask. The orientation of the nanowires is also different, <111>B when using Au particles and <111>A when catalyst-free. For the catalysed growth the effect of the Au particle can be turned off by modifying growth conditions allowing the nanowire to be clad, dramatically enhancing the optical emission from InAs quantum dots grown inside the nanowire.

  18. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formationmore » of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400°C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution ³¹P{¹H} and ¹H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.« less

  19. Two-Step Nucleation and Growth of InP Quantum Dots via Magic-Sized Cluster Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Dylan C.; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.

    2015-01-30

    We report on the role of magic-sized clusters (MSCs) as key intermediates in the synthesis of indium phosphide quantum dots (InP QDs) from molecular precursors. These observations suggest that previous efforts to control nucleation and growth by tuning precursor reactivity have been undermined by formation of these kinetically persistent MSCs prior to QD formation. The thermal stability of InP MSCs is influenced by the presence of exogenous bases as well as choice of the anionic ligand set. Addition of a primary amine, a common additive in previous InP QD syntheses, to carboxylate terminated MSCs was found to bypass the formation of MSCs, allowing for homogeneous growth of InP QDs through a continuum of isolable sizes. Substitution of the carboxylate ligand set for a phosphonate ligand set increased the thermal stability of one particular InP MSC to 400°C. The structure and optical properties of the MSCs with both carboxylate and phosphonate ligand sets were studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, powder XRD analysis, and solution ³¹P{¹H} and ¹H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the carboxylate terminated MSCs were identified as effective single source precursors (SSPs) for the synthesis of high quality InP QDs. Employing InP MSCs as SSPs for QDs effectively decouples the formation of MSCs from the subsequent second nucleation event and growth of InP QDs. The concentration dependence of this SSP reaction, as well as the shape uniformity of particles observed by TEM suggests that the stepwise growth from MSCs directly to QDs proceeds via a second nucleation event rather than an aggregative growth mechanism.

  20. Microfabricated High-Moment Micrometer-sized MRI Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zabow, Gary; Dodd, Stephen J.; Shapiro, Erik; Moreland, John; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2010-01-01

    While chemically synthesized superparamagnetic microparticles have enabled much new research based on MRI-tracking of magnetically labeled cells, signal-to-noise levels still limit the potential range of applications. Here it is shown how, through top-down microfabrication, contrast agent relaxivity can be increased several-fold, which should extend the sensitivity of such cell tracking studies. Microfabricated agents can benefit from both higher magnetic moments and higher uniformity than their chemically synthesized counterparts, implying increased label visibility and more quantitative image analyses. To assess the performance of microfabricated micrometer-sized contrast agent particles, analytic models and numerical simulations are developed and tested against new microfabricated agents described in this paper, as well as against results of previous imaging studies of traditional chemically synthesized microparticle agents. Experimental data showing signal effects of 500-nanometer thick, 2-micrometer diameter, gold-coated iron and gold-coated nickel disks verify the simulations. Additionally, it is suggested that measures of location better than the pixel resolution can be obtained and that these are aided using well-defined contrast agent particles achievable through microfabrication techniques. PMID:20928829

  1. Radiation effects on p+n InP junctions grown by MOCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Walters, Robert J.; Panunto, M. J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    The superior radiation resistance of InP over other solar cell materials such as Si or GaAs has prompted the development of InP cells for space applications. The early research on radiation effects in InP was performed by Yamaguchi and co-workers who showed that, in diffused p-InP junctions, radiation-induced defects were readily annealed both thermally and by injection, which was accompanied by significant cell recovery. More recent research efforts have been made using p-InP grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). While similar deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) results were found for radiation induced defects in these cells and in diffused junctions, significant differences existed in the annealing characteristics. After injection annealing at room temperature, Yamaguchi noticed an almost complete recovery of the photovoltaic parameters, while the MOCVD samples showed only minimal annealing. In searching for an explanation of the different annealing behavior of diffused junctions and those grown by MOCVD, several possibilities have been considered. One possibility is the difference in the emitter structure. The diffused junctions have S-doped graded emitters with widths of approximately 0.3 micrometers, while the MOCVD emitters are often doped with Si and have widths of approximately 300A (0.03 micrometers). The difference in the emitter thickness can have important effects, e.g. a larger fraction of the total photocurrent is generated in the n-type material for thicker emitters. Therefore the properties of the n-InP material may explain the difference in the observed overall annealing behavior of the cells.

  2. InP concentrator solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. S.; Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.; Emery, K. A.; Osterwald, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of high-performance, n(+)/p InP shallow-homojunction (SHJ) concentrator solar cells are described. The InP device structures were grown by atmospheric-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. A preliminary assessment of the effects of grid-collection distance and emitter-sheet resistance on cell performance is presented. At concentration ratios of around 100, cells with efficiencies of 21.4 percent AM0 (24.3 percent direct) at 25 C are fabricated. These are the highest efficiencies yet reported for single-junction InP solar cells. The performance of these cells as a function of temperature is discussed, and areas for future improvement are outlined. Application of these results to other InP-based photovoltaic devices is discussed.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of micrometer Cu/PVP architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Huajuan; Zhao, Yanbao; Sun, Lei

    2011-08-15

    Graphical abstract: A simple method for the synthesis of novel micrometer flower-like Cu/PVP architectures was introduced. Highlights: {yields} Micrometer flower-like copper/polyvinylpyrrolidone architectures were obtained by a simple chemical route. {yields} The amount of N{sub 2}H{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, the reaction temperature, the molar ratio of CuCl{sub 2} to PVP and different molecular weights of PVP play an important role in the controlling the morphology of the Cu/PVP architectures. {yields} A possible mechanism of the formation of Cu/PVP architectures was discussed. -- Abstract: Micrometer-sized flower-like Cu/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) architectures are synthesized by the reduction of copper (II) salt with hydrazine hydrate in aqueous solution in the presence of PVP capping agent. The resulting Cu/PVP architectures are investigated by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Cu/PVP flowers have uniform morphologies with an average diameter of 10 {mu}m, made of several intercrossing plates. The formation of Cu/PVP flowers is a new kinetic control process, and the factors such as the amount of N{sub 2}H{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, reaction temperature, molar ratio of CuCl{sub 2} to PVP and molecular weight of PVP have significant effect on the morphology of Cu/PVP architectures. A possible mechanism of the formation of micrometer Cu/PVP architectures was discussed.

  4. The sulfurized InP surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, C. W.; Geib, K. M.; Shin, J.; Iyer, R.; Lile, D. L.; Pouch, J. J.

    1989-07-01

    Sulfur treatments have previously been shown to improve the electrical characteristics of InP and GaAs devices. This paper reports the results of an Auger/x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation of the InP surface after sulfur treatment. It is shown that the sulfur remains on the surface bonded to indium. There is no indication of elemental sulfur or sulfur bonded to phosphorus. This suggests that the sulfur has replaced phosphorus on the surface and has filled the phosphorus vacancies.

  5. Electronic and vibrational spectra of InP quantum dots formed by sequential ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, R.; Henderson, D.O.; Tung, Y.S.; Ueda, A.; Hall, C.; Collins, W.E.; White, C.W.; Zuhr, R.A.; Zhu, J.G.

    1996-05-01

    Sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing has proven to be a novel and effective technique to fabricate InP quantum dots in dielectric hosts. This technique has been applied to synthesize other III{endash}V and II{endash}VI quantum dots. Due to the unique bimodal distribution of the indium in a silica host and a stoichiometric mismatch between the indium and phosphorus concentration profiles, it is believed that two different-sized InP quantum dots were fabricated. More importantly, we have shown that the infrared reflectance technique is a very effective method to identify the species in the dielectric host and is also a powerful tool to investigate surface phonon modes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  6. Spin Relaxation in InP and Strained InP Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimath, Akshaykumar; Ghosh, Bahniman

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we employ semiclassical Monte Carlo approach to study spin polarized transport in InP and strained InP nanowires on GaAs substrate. Due to higher spin relaxation lengths, InP is being researched as suitable III-V material for spintronics related applications. Spin relaxation in InP channel is as a result of D'yakonov-Perel (DP) relaxation and Elliott-Yafet (EY) relaxation. We have considered injection polarization along z-direction and the magnitude of ensemble averaged spin variation is studied along the x-direction i.e., along transport direction. The effect of strain on various scattering rates and spin relaxation length is studied. We then present the effect of variation of nanowire width on spin relaxation length for the case of both strained and unstrained InP nanowire. The wire cross-section is varied between 4 × 4 nm2 and 10 × 10 nm2.

  7. Grooved surfaces on InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1991-01-01

    Formation of a textured or grooved front surface on a solar cell can increase the efficiency in several ways, including enhanced absorption and light trapping. In III-IV materials the (111) plane is chemically different form the (1'1'1') plane, and both etching and epitaxial deposition behave differently on these surfaces. The current state of profile etching in InP is summarized. Data are presented on novel geometries attainable as a function of etchant temperature and composition, substrate orientation and carrier concentration, and the oxide thickness between the substrate and the photoresist. Depending on dopant concentration, the same etchant can produce either anisotropic or isotropic grooves. V-grooved solar cells were manufactured on InP, and the improved optical absorption was demonstrated. Preferred parameters for various applications are listed and discussed.

  8. InP monolithically integrated coherent transmitter.

    PubMed

    Andriolli, N; Fresi, F; Bontempi, F; Malacarne, A; Meloni, G; Klamkin, J; Poti, L; Contestabile, G

    2015-04-20

    A novel InP monolithically integrated coherent transmitter has been designed, fabricated and tested. The photonic integrated circuit consists of a distributed Bragg reflector laser and a modified nested Mach-Zehnder modulator having tunable input power splitters. Back-to-back coherent transmission for PDM-QPSK signals is reported up to 10 Gbaud (40 Gb/s) using the integrated laser and up to 32Gbaud (128 Gb/s) using an external low phase noise laser. PMID:25969111

  9. Electrochemical characterization of InP structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Maria; Faur, Mircea; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Wilt, David M.; Goradia, Manju

    1992-01-01

    Electrochemical (EC) techniques represent a simple and yet accurate method to characterize InP and related materials structures. With EC techniques, uncertainties in the measurements arising from factors such as surface effects, the composition and thickness of a front dead layer, the contacts, etc., can be significantly reduced when both a suitable electrolyte is used and the measuring conditions are carefully selected. In this work, the use of photoelectrochemical techniques with InP structures is reported. The work focuses on both the characterization and the optimization of structures grown by thermal diffusion and by epitaxial methods. Characterization of the structures is done by studying the variation in the density of surface states, number of defects, and net majority carrier concentration as a function of material removed. A step-by-step optimization process of n(sup +)p and p(sup+)n InP structures is also described. This involves the passivation and subsequent removal of damaged layers in order to extract the performance parameters of solar cells fabricated with these structures.

  10. Recent progress in InP solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving; Brinker, D. J.; Jain, R. K.; Swartz, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    Significant new developments in InP solar cell research are reviewed. Recent accomplishments include monolithic multibandgap two junction cells (three and two terminal) using InP as the top cell and lattice matched GaInAs and GaInAsP as the bottom, low bandgap component. Concentrator cells include the three terminal multibandgap cell and n + p cell using an InP substrate. The review also includes small scale production of ITO/InP cells and results for n + p InP and ITO/InP cells in space on board the LIPS 3 satellite.

  11. Three-Stage InP Submillimeter-Wave MMIC Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pukala, David; Samoska, Lorene; Man, King; Gaier, Todd; Deal, William; Lai, Richard; Mei, Gerry; Makishi, Stella

    2008-01-01

    A submillimeter-wave monolithic integrated- circuit (S-MMIC) amplifier has been designed and fabricated using an indium phosphide (InP) 35-nm gate-length high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) device, developed at Northrop Grumman Corporation. The HEMT device employs two fingers each 15 micrometers wide. The HEMT wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and make use of a pseudomorphic In0.75Ga0.25As channel, a silicon delta-doping layer as the electron supply, an In0.52Al0.48As buffer layer, and an InP substrate. The three-stage design uses coplanar waveguide topology with a very narrow ground-to-ground spacing of 14 micrometers. Quarter-wave matching transmission lines, on-chip metal-insulator-metal shunt capacitors, series thin-film resistors, and matching stubs were used in the design. Series resistors in the shunt branch arm provide the basic circuit stabilization. The S-MMIC amplifier was measured for S-parameters and found to be centered at 320 GHz with 13-15-dB gain from 300-345 GHz. This chip was developed as part of the DARPA Submillimeter Wave Imaging Focal Plane Technology (SWIFT) program (see figure). Submillimeter-wave amplifiers could enable more sensitive receivers for earth science, planetary remote sensing, and astrophysics telescopes, particularly in radio astronomy, both from the ground and in space. A small atmospheric window at 340 GHz exists and could enable ground-based observations. However, the submillimeter-wave regime (above 300 GHz) is best used for space telescopes as Earth s atmosphere attenuates most of the signal through water and oxygen absorption. Future radio telescopes could make use of S-MMIC amplifiers for wideband, low noise, instantaneous frequency coverage, particularly in the case of heterodyne array receivers.

  12. Wideband 1.064 micrometer detector evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of several candidate detectors for use as communications detectors in a 400 Mbps 1.064 micrometers laser communication system was evaluated. The results of communication system Bit Error Rate (BER) testing for the best detector of each type are summarized. Complete testing data of each type detector is presented. The 400 Mbps 1.064 micrometers communication system receiver test bed is described. The best communication system results for each detector type are included. Performance comparisons are made at 0.000001 BER, the specification level chosen for satellite laser communication links. The data is presented in two groups. The first indicates the best performance levels that can be expected on normal space laser communication system operation. The second cites the best performance levels which can be achieved by focusing the signal to diffraction limited spots on the photosensitive area.

  13. Unique Three-Dimensional InP Nanopore Arrays for Improved Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Zheng, Maojun; Ma, Liguo; Zhong, Miao; Zhu, Changqing; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Faze; Song, Jingnan; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-08-31

    Ordered three-dimensional (3D) nanostructure arrays hold promise for high-performance energy harvesting and storage devices. Here, we report the fabrication of InP nanopore arrays (NPs) in unique 3D architectures with excellent light trapping characteristic and large surface areas for use as highly active photoelectrodes in photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen evolution devices. The ordered 3D NPs were scalably synthesized by a facile two-step etching process of (1) anodic etching of InP in neutral 3 M NaCl electrolytes to realize nanoporous structures and (2) wet chemical etching in HCl/H3PO4 (volume ratio of 1:3) solutions for removing the remaining top irregular layer. Importantly, we demonstrated that the use of neutral electrolyte of NaCl instead of other solutions, such as HCl, in anodic etching of InP can significantly passivate the surface states of 3D NPs. As a result, the maximum photoconversion efficiency obtained with ∼15.7 μm thick 3D NPs was 0.95%, which was 7.3 and 1.4 times higher than that of planar and 2D NPs. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and photoluminescence analyses further clarified that the improved PEC performance was attributed to the enhanced charge transfer across 3D NPs/electrolyte interfaces, the improved charge separation at 3D NPs/electrolyte junction, and the increased PEC active surface areas with our unique 3D NP arrays. PMID:27501479

  14. Micrometer Instruments, Aviation Quality Control 1: 9225.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Second in a series of five, the course consists of the history and principles of the micrometer. The student must have mastered the skills offered in Introduction to Measurement and the Use of Scaled Instruments--9225.01. Techniques in reading and using the micrometer, checking, adjusting, and calibrating the micrometer are topics covered.…

  15. Facile synthesis of uniform large-sized InP nanocrystal quantum dots using tris(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)phosphine.

    PubMed

    Joung, Somyoung; Yoon, Sungwoo; Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Youngjo; Jeong, Sohee

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal III-V semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots [NQDs] have attracted interest because they have reduced toxicity compared with II-VI compounds. However, the study and application of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals are limited by difficulties in their synthesis. In particular, it is difficult to control nucleation because the molecular bonds in III-V semiconductors are highly covalent. A synthetic approach of InP NQDs was presented using newly synthesized organometallic phosphorus [P] precursors with different functional moieties while preserving the P-Si bond. Introducing bulky side chains in our study improved the stability while facilitating InP formation with strong confinement at a readily low temperature regime (210°C to 300°C). Further shell coating with ZnS resulted in highly luminescent core-shell materials. The design and synthesis of P precursors for high-quality InP NQDs were conducted for the first time, and we were able to control the nucleation by varying the reactivity of P precursors, therefore achieving uniform large-sized InP NQDs. This opens the way for the large-scale production of high-quality Cd-free nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:22289352

  16. Facile synthesis of uniform large-sized InP nanocrystal quantum dots using tris( tert-butyldimethylsilyl)phosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Somyoung; Yoon, Sungwoo; Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Youngjo; Jeong, Sohee

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal III-V semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots [NQDs] have attracted interest because they have reduced toxicity compared with II-VI compounds. However, the study and application of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals are limited by difficulties in their synthesis. In particular, it is difficult to control nucleation because the molecular bonds in III-V semiconductors are highly covalent. A synthetic approach of InP NQDs was presented using newly synthesized organometallic phosphorus [P] precursors with different functional moieties while preserving the P-Si bond. Introducing bulky side chains in our study improved the stability while facilitating InP formation with strong confinement at a readily low temperature regime (210°C to 300°C). Further shell coating with ZnS resulted in highly luminescent core-shell materials. The design and synthesis of P precursors for high-quality InP NQDs were conducted for the first time, and we were able to control the nucleation by varying the reactivity of P precursors, therefore achieving uniform large-sized InP NQDs. This opens the way for the large-scale production of high-quality Cd-free nanocrystal quantum dots.

  17. Terahertz emission from InP

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, S.; Lewis, R. A.

    2010-01-04

    We investigate the generation of THz radiation by the application of ultra-short near-infrared optical pulses to bulk unbiased InP. The THz radiation is detected in the direction of the specular reflection. While the overall emission characteristics are similar to those displayed by InAs under similar excitation conditions, in contrast to InAs, a single-cycle only variation in THz signal, of about +-20%, is observed as the sample is rotated through 360 deg. around the surface normal.

  18. Improvements in InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keavney, Christopher; Vernon, Stanley M.; Haven, Victor E.

    1988-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells with very thin n-type emitters have been made by both ion implantation and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Air mass zero efficiencies as high as 18.8 percent (NASA measurement) have been achieved. The best cells, which were those made by ion implantation, show an open-circuit voltage of 873 mV, short-circuit current of 35.7 mA/sq cm, and fill factor of 0.829. Improvements are anticipated in all three of these parameters. Internal quantum efficiency peaks at over 90 percent in the red end of the spectrum, but drops to 54 percent in the blue end. Other cells have achieved 74 percent in the blue end. A preliminary investigation of InP solar cells on foreign substrates has been carried out. Although problems have been encountered with doping of the InP by the substrate, cells of 7.1 percent efficiency on silicon and cells of 9.4 percent, efficiency on GaAs have been made.

  19. Nanocavities in He implanted InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicoine, M.; Roorda, S.; Masut, R. A.; Desjardins, P.

    2003-11-01

    The formation of nanocavities in InP(001) by room-temperature He implantation and subsequent thermal annealing was studied using a combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) analyses. The nanocavities size and depth distributions were measured as a function of He ion dose φHe (1×1016 to 9×1016cm-2) and ion energy E (25 to 70 keV), as well as annealing temperature Ta (600 to 750 °C) and time ta (5 to 25 min). HRXRD scans from annealed samples indicate an expansion of the InP lattice, contrary to what is usually observed following heavy-ion implantation. The critical φHe and Ta values for the formation of nanocavities were found by XTEM analysis to be between 1 and 2×1016cm-2 and between 600 and 620 °C, respectively. Cavities of diameter 4-50 nm with {110}, {101}, and {001} facets were obtained. Increasing Ta and ta resulted in larger cavities and increasing φHe produced a larger number of cavities. Furthermore we find that nanocavities are metastable as their size first increases with annealing temperature and time but then decreases until they disappear for ta>25 min at Ta=640 °C or ta>10 min at Ta=750 °C. Results are compared with similar work carried out on He-implanted silicon and differences between the two materials are explained in terms of defect diffusivity and surface energy, higher diffusivity enhancing cavity collapse and lower surface energy enhancing cavity growth.

  20. Progress in InP solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving; Brinker, David J.

    1988-01-01

    Progress, in the past year, in InP solar cell research is reviewed. Small area cells with AMO, total area efficiencies of 18.8 percent were produced by OMCVD and Ion Implantation. Larger area cells (2 and 4 sq cm) were processed on a production basis. One thousand of the 2 sq cm cells will be used to supply power to a small piggyback lunar orbiter scheduled for launch in February 1990. Laboratory tests of ITO/InP cells, under 10 MeV proton irradiation, indicate radiation resistance comparable to InP n/p homojunction cells. Computer modeling studies indicate that, for identical geometries and dopant concentrations, InP solar cells are significantly more radiation resistant than GaAs under 1 MeV electron irradiation. Additional computer modeling calculations were used to produce rectangular and circular InP concentrator cell designs for both the low concentration SLATS and higher concentration Cassegrainian Concentrators.

  1. Preferentially Etched Epitaxial Liftoff of InP Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G. (Inventor); Wilt, David M. (Inventor); DeAngelo, Frank L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method of removing epitaxial substrates from host substrates. A sacrificial release layer of ternary material is placed on the substrate. A layer of InP is then placed on the ternary material. Afterward a layer of wax is applied to the InP layer to apply compressive force and an etchant material is used to remove the sacrificial release layer.

  2. InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor Amplifiers to 255 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radisic, Vesna; Sawdai, Donald; Scott, Dennis; Deal, William; Dang, Linh; Li, Danny; Cavus, Abdullah; To, Richard; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Two single-stage InP heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT) amplifiers operate at 184 and 255 GHz, using Northrop Grumman Corporation s InP HBT MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) technology. At the time of this reporting, these are reported to be the highest HBT amplifiers ever created. The purpose of the amplifier design is to evaluate the technology capability for high-frequency designs and verify the model for future development work.

  3. InP MMIC Chip Set for Power Sources Covering 80-170 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Catherine

    2001-01-01

    We will present a Monolithic Millimeter-wave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) chip set which provides high output-power sources for driving diode frequency multipliers into the terahertz range. The chip set was fabricated at HRL Laboratories using a 0.1-micrometer gate-length InAlAs/InGaAs/InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process, and features transistors with an f(sub max) above 600 GHz. The HRL InP HEMT process has already demonstrated amplifiers in the 60-200 GHz range. In this paper, these high frequency HEMTs form the basis for power sources up to 170 GHz. A number of state-of-the-art InP HEMT MMICs will be presented. These include voltage-controlled and fixed-tuned oscillators, power amplifiers, and an active doubler. We will first discuss an 80 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator with 5 GHz of tunability and at least 17 mW of output power, as well as a 120 GHz oscillator providing 7 mW of output power. In addition, we will present results of a power amplifier which covers the full WRIO waveguide band (75-110 GHz), and provides 40-50 mW of output power. Furthermore, we will present an active doubler at 164 GHz providing 8% bandwidth, 3 mW of output power, and an unprecedented 2 dB of conversion loss for an InP HEMT MMIC at this frequency. Finally, we will demonstrate a power amplifier to cover 140-170 GHz with 15-25 mW of output power and 8 dB gain. These components can form a power source in the 155-165 GHz range by cascading the 80 GHz oscillator, W-band power amplifier, 164 GHz active doubler and final 140-170 GHz power amplifier for a stable, compact local oscillator subsystem, which could be used for atmospheric science or astrophysics radiometers.

  4. Characterization of CVD micrometer-size diamond (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Matsuda, J.; Ohmasa, M.

    1989-07-01

    formed from carbonaceous materials by impact shock or directly formed from vapor. Recent discovery of vapor-growth diamonds in carbonaceous chondrites has generated a renewed interest in the origin of ureilite diamonds. Two types of micrometer-size diamonds were prepared. One of them was grown under low pressure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from gaseous mixtures of H2 and CH4, and another was synthesized by shock effect (kindly offered by Nippon Oil & Fats Co., Ltd.) The micro-Laue method was applied to them in order to get information about their microstructures. Two characteristics are recognized in profiles of reflections themselves and in whole patterns of the Laue photographs. The reflections of CVD diamonds are elongated but symmetric in their profiles and are distributed regularly as they are indexed by the diamond lattice, while those of shock effect are also elongated and asymmetric, and are distributed at random as they cannot be indexed. The characteristics observed by the method may be useful to ascribe the origin to CVD or shock effect.

  5. High-efficiency heteroepitaxial InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.; Ward, J. S.; Emery, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    High-efficiency, thin-film InP solar cells grown heteroepitaxially on GaAs and Si single-crystal bulk substrates are being developed as a means of eliminating the problems associated with using single-crystal InP substrates. A novel device structure employing a compositionally graded Ga(x)In(1-x)As layer between the bulk substrate and the InP cell layers is used to reduce the dislocation density and improve the minority carrier properties in the InP. The structures are grown in a continuous sequence of steps using computer-controlled atmospheric pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (APMOVPE). Dislocation densities as low as 3 x 10(exp 7) sq cm and minority carrier lifetimes as high as 3.3 ns are achieved in the InP layers with this method using both GaAs or Si substrates. Structures prepared in this fashion are also completely free of microcracks. These results represent a substantial improvement in InP layer quality when compared to heteroepitaxial InP prepared using conventional techniques such as thermally cycled growth and post-growth annealing. The present work is is concerned with the fabrication and characterization of high-efficiency, thin-film InP solar cells. Both one-sun and concentrator cells were prepared for device structures grown on GaAs substrates. One-cell cells have efficiencies as high as 13.7 percent at 25 C. However, results for the concentrator cells are emphasized. The concentrator cell performance is characterized as a function of the air mass zero (AM0) solar concentration ratio and operating temperature. From these data, the temperature coefficients of the cell performance parameters are derived as a function of the concentration ratio. Under concentration, the cells exhibit a dramatic increase in efficiency and an improved temperature coefficient of efficiency. At 25 C, a peak conversion efficiency of 18.9 percent is reported. At 80 C, the peak AM0 efficiency is 15.7 percent at 75.6 suns. These are the highest efficiencies yet

  6. Atoms.inp Archive: Crystallographic Data from GSECARS

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The Atoms.inp Archive is a collection of crystallographic data for use in XAFS analysis. The crystallographic data is stored as atoms.inp files, which contain all the information necessary to describe the crystal, and can be used by the program ATOMS to generate feff.inp files. These files can then be used by the FEFF program [See http://leonardo.phys.washington.edu/feff/] to calculate a theoretical XAFS spectrum for the crystal. This archive exists because it can take a considerable amount of time to locate a suitable reference for a model structure to use for making theoretical XAFS standards. Even then, references sometimes give non-standard or incomplete crystallographic notation that ATOMS has difficulty interpreting. All of this means that getting a reliable atoms.inp file can take quite a bit of effort. It is hoped that this collection of well-documented and well-tested atoms.inp files will eliminate much of the work in creating theoretical XAFS standards from FEFF. [Taken from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/]. The collection currently has more than 200 crystal structures, 2748 data files, and it continues to expand. The collection is related to the UWXAFS Project [http://depts.washington.edu/uwxafs/] and to the work of the Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS). After searching the Archive, a user may also choose to run the web version of ATOMS software.

  7. Long-Term INP Measurements within the BACCHUS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrod, Jann; Bingemer, Heinz; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    The European research project BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding) studies the interactions between aerosols, clouds and the climate system, and tries to reconstruct pre-industrial aerosol and cloud conditions from data collected in pristine environments. The number concentration of Ice Nucleating Particles (INP) is an important, yet scarcely known parameter. As a partner of Work package 1 of BACCHUS we began in September 2014 to operate a globally spanned network of four INP sampling stations, which is the first of its kind. The stations are located at the ATTO observatory in the Brazilian Rainforest, the Caribbean Sea (Martinique), the Zeppelin Observatory at Svalbard in the Arctic, and in central Europe (Germany). Samples are collected routinely every day or every few days by electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles onto Si substrates. The samples are stored in petri-slides, and shipped to our laboratory in Frankfurt, Germany. The number of ice nucleating particles on the substrate is analyzed in the isothermal static diffusion chamber FRIDGE by growing ice on the INP and photographing and counting the crystals. The measurements in the temperature range from -20°C to -30°C and relative humidities of 100-135% (with respect to ice) address primarily the deposition/condensation nucleation modes. Here we present INP and supporting aerosol data from this novel INP network for the first time.

  8. Electron guns and collectors developed at INP for electron cooling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapa, A.N.; Shemyakin, A.V.

    1997-09-01

    Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) has a rich experience in designing electron guns and collectors for electron cooling devices. This paper is a review of the experience of several INP research groups in this field. Some results obtained at INP for systems without a guiding magnetic field are also discussed.

  9. Bridging the Gap between the Nanometer-Scale Bottom-Up and Micrometer-Scale Top-Down Approaches for Site-Defined InP/InAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Rainville, Christophe; Salmon, Adrian; Takiguchi, Masato; Tateno, Kouta; Gotoh, Hideki

    2015-11-24

    This work presents a method that bridges the gap between the nanometer-scale bottom-up and micrometer-scale top-down approaches for site-defined nanostructures, which has long been a significant challenge for applications that require low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing processes. We realized the bridging by controlling the seed indium nanoparticle position through a self-assembly process. Site-defined InP nanowires were then grown from the indium-nanoparticle array in the vapor-liquid-solid mode through a "seed and grow" process. The nanometer-scale indium particles do not always occupy the same locations within the micrometer-scale open window of an InP exposed substrate due to the scale difference. We developed a technique for aligning the nanometer-scale indium particles on the same side of the micrometer-scale window by structuring the surface of a misoriented InP (111)B substrate. Finally, we demonstrated that the developed method can be used to grow a uniform InP/InAs axial-heterostructure nanowire array. The ability to form a heterostructure nanowire array with this method makes it possible to tune the emission wavelength over a wide range by employing the quantum confinement effect and thus expand the application of this technology to optoelectronic devices. Successfully pairing a controllable bottom-up growth technique with a top-down substrate preparation technique greatly improves the potential for the mass-production and widespread adoption of this technology. PMID:26348087

  10. High Efficiency InP Solar Cells Through Nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy

    We describe high efficiency InP solar cells which utilize a periodic array of optically designed TiO2 nanocylinders. Optical and electronic simulations were performed to determine the spectrally resolved reflectivity and I-V characteristics of potential devices under AM1.5G illumination. The reflectivity of InP solar cells with these nanocylinders is found to have an average value of 2% over the visible and near-IR spectral range, which outperforms traditional antireflection coatings. Coupling between Mie scattering resonances and thin film interference effects is found to accurately describe the optical enhancement provided by the nanocylinders. These nanostructured solar cells have power conversion efficiencies greater than 23%, which is comparable to the highest quoted efficiencies for InP solar cells.

  11. Nanophotonic resonators for InP solar cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel A; Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N

    2016-05-16

    We describe high efficiency thin-film InP solar cells that utilize a periodic array of TiO2 nanocylinders. These nanophotonic resonators are found to reduce the solar-weighted average reflectivity of an InP solar cell to ~1.3%, outperforming the best double-layer antireflection coatings. The coupling between Mie scattering resonances and thin-film interference effects accurately describes the optical enhancement provided by the nanocylinders. The spectrally resolved reflectivity and J-V characteristics of the device under AM1.5G illumination are determined via coupled optical and electrical simulations, resulting in a predicted power conversion efficiency > 23%. We conclude that the nanostructured coating reduces reflection without negatively affecting the electronic properties of the InP solar cell by separating the nanostructured optical components from the active layer of the device. PMID:27409965

  12. InP concentrator solar cells for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. S.; Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.; Emery, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of high-performance, n(+)/p InP shallow-homojunction (SHJ) concentrator solar cells is described. The InP device structures were grown by atmospheric-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (APMOVPE). A preliminary assessment of the effects of grid collection distance and emitter sheet resistance on cell performance is presented. At concentration ratios of over 100, cells with AM0 efficiencies in excess of 21 percent at 25 C and 19 percent at 80 C are reported. These results indicate that high-efficiency InP concentrator cells can be fabricated using existing technologies. The performance of these cells as a function of temperature is discussed, and areas for future improvement are outlined.

  13. Radiation effects in heteroepitaxial InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Curtis, H. B.; Swartz, C. K.; Brinker, D. J.; Vargas-Aburto, C.

    1993-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial InP solar cells, with GaAs substrates, were irradiated by 0.5 and 3 MeV protons and their performance, temperature dependency, and carrier removal rates determined as a function of fluence. The radiation resistance of the present cells was significantly greater than that of non-heteroepitaxial InP cells at both proton energies. A clear difference in the temperature dependency of V(sub oc), was observed between heteroepitaxial and homoepitaxial InP cells. The analytically predicted dependence of dV(sub oc)/dT on Voc was confirmed by the fluence dependence of these quantities. Carrier removal was observed to increase with decreasing proton energy. The results obtained for performance and temperature dependency were attributed to the high dislocation densities present in the heteroepitaxial cells while the energy dependence of carrier removal was attributed to the energy dependence of proton range.

  14. Lateral spreading of Au contacts on InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1990-01-01

    The contact spreading phenomenon observed when small area Au contacts on InP are annealed at temperatures above about 400 C was investigated. It was found that the rapid lateral expansion of the contact metallization which consumes large quantities of InP during growth is closely related to the third stage in the series of solid state reactions that occur between InP and Au, i.e., to the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition. Detailed descriptions are presented of both the spreading process and the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition along with arguments that the two processes are manifestations of the same basic phenomenon.

  15. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  16. Palladium nanoparticles on InP for hydrogen detection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Layers of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles on indium phosphide (InP) were prepared by electrophoretic deposition from the colloid solution of Pd nanoparticles. Layers prepared by an opposite polarity of deposition showed different physical and morphological properties. Particles in solution are separated and, after deposition onto the InP surface, they form small aggregates. The size of the aggregates is dependent on the time of deposition. If the aggregates are small, the layer has no lateral conductance. Forward and reverse I-V characteristics showed a high rectification ratio with a high Schottky barrier height. The response of the structure on the presence of hydrogen was monitored. PMID:21711487

  17. Workshop on Heteroepitaxial InP Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Walters, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    In a generic sense, the justification for any sort of InP solar cell research applies, i.e. to take advantage of the inherently high radiation resistance and efficiency of InP solar cells. To be more specific, the approach is justified by its potential for significant cost reduction and the availability of greatly increased cell area afforded by substrates such as Si and Ge. The use of substrates, such as the latter two, would result in increased ruggedness, ease of handling, and improved manufacturability. The use of more rugged substrates would lead to a greatly increased capability for cell thinning leading to the desirable feature of reduced array weight.

  18. Autophagy-regulating TP53INP2 mediates muscle wasting and is repressed in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sala, David; Ivanova, Saška; Plana, Natàlia; Ribas, Vicent; Duran, Jordi; Bach, Daniel; Turkseven, Saadet; Laville, Martine; Vidal, Hubert; Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Kowalska, Irina; Straczkowski, Marek; Testar, Xavier; Palacín, Manuel; Sandri, Marco; Serrano, Antonio L.; Zorzano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A precise balance between protein degradation and synthesis is essential to preserve skeletal muscle mass. Here, we found that TP53INP2, a homolog of the Drosophila melanogaster DOR protein that regulates autophagy in cellular models, has a direct impact on skeletal muscle mass in vivo. Using different transgenic mouse models, we demonstrated that muscle-specific overexpression of Tp53inp2 reduced muscle mass, while deletion of Tp53inp2 resulted in muscle hypertrophy. TP53INP2 activated basal autophagy in skeletal muscle and sustained p62-independent autophagic degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. Animals with muscle-specific overexpression of Tp53inp2 exhibited enhanced muscle wasting in streptozotocin-induced diabetes that was dependent on autophagy; however, TP53INP2 ablation mitigated experimental diabetes-associated muscle loss. The overexpression or absence of TP53INP2 did not affect muscle wasting in response to denervation, a condition in which autophagy is blocked, further indicating that TP53INP2 alters muscle mass by activating autophagy. Moreover, TP53INP2 expression was markedly repressed in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and in murine models of diabetes. Our results indicate that TP53INP2 negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass through activation of autophagy. Furthermore, we propose that TP53INP2 repression is part of an adaptive mechanism aimed at preserving muscle mass under conditions in which insulin action is deficient. PMID:24713655

  19. [Study on pollution for the photoelectronic material InP].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian-cheng; Ding, Xiao-ping; Chen, Ding-qin

    2002-08-01

    The mass spectrum analysis of crystal face (100) and (111) and the photoluminescence analysis of crystal face (100) in the photoelectronic material InP were given. The Hall coefficient, charge carrier concentration and Hall mobility were determined. Experimental results indicate that the pollution of silicon is predominant. PMID:12938361

  20. Experiences with digital processing of images at INPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascarenhas, N. D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Four different research experiments with digital image processing at INPE will be described: (1) edge detection by hypothesis testing; (2) image interpolation by finite impulse response filters; (3) spatial feature extraction methods in multispectral classification; and (4) translational image registration by sequential tests of hypotheses.

  1. InP solar cell with window layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K. (Inventor); Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention features a thin light transmissive layer of the ternary semiconductor indium aluminum arsenide (InAlAs) as a front surface passivation or 'window' layer for p-on-n InP solar cells. The window layers of the invention effectively reduce front surface recombination of the object semiconductors thereby increasing the efficiency of the cells.

  2. Growth and properties of InP single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dun-fu, Fang; Xiang-xi, Wang; Yong-quan, Xu; Li-tong, Tan

    1984-04-01

    InP single crystals with various dopants including S, Sn, Zn and Fe have been grown successfully by the Czochralski method under high pressure with liquid encapsulation. It is found that by carefully adjusting the thermal symmetry of the heating field and by further improving the quality of the polycrystals and by dehydrating B 2O 3, twin-free InP crystals can be obtained even with a shoulder angle of up to 54°, and defects caused by thermal decomposition appear on the surface of the crystals during pulling. Furthermore, a comparison of the crystal perfection and uniformity between S-doped and Sn-doped InP crystals shows that the quality of the former is better than that of the latter. Dislocation-free Zn-doped p-InP single crystals without precipitates have also been easily obtained when the carrier concentration is greater than 2×10 18 cm -3 and the diameter less than 30 mm. By controlling the iron content, semi-insulating thermally stable single crystals of InP doped with ⩽0.03 wt% of Fe without precipitates and with a homogeneous resistivity can be produced.

  3. c-Myc inhibits TP53INP1 expression via promoter methylation in esophageal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Wenhao; Yang, Qinyuan; Huang, Miaolong; Qiao, Yongxia; Xie, Yuan; Yu, Yongchun; Jing, An; Li, Zhi

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} TP53INP1 expression is down-regulated in esophageal carcinoma and is associated with CGI-131 methylation. {yields} Inhibition of CGI-131 methylation upregulates TP53INP1 expression in ESCC cell lines. {yields} Ectopic expression of TP53INP1 inhibits growth of ESCC cells by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting cell cycle progression. {yields} c-Myc binds to the promoter of TP53INP1 in vivo and vitro and recruits DNMT3A to TP53INP1 promoter for CGI-131 methylation. -- Abstract: Tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a well known stress-induced protein that plays a role in both cell cycle arrest and p53-mediated apoptosis. Loss of TP53INP1 expression has been reported in human melanoma, breast carcinoma, and gastric cancer. However, TP53INP1 expression and its regulatory mechanism in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remain unclear. Our findings are in agreement with previous reports in that the expression of TP53INP1 was downregulated in 28% (10/36 cases) of ESCC lesions, and this was accompanied by significant promoter methylation. Overexpression of TP53INP1 induced G1 cell cycle arrest and increased apoptosis in ESCC cell lines (EC-1, EC-109, EC-9706). Furthermore, our study showed that the oncoprotein c-Myc bound to the core promoter of TP53INP1 and recruited DNA methyltransferase 3A to methylate the local promoter region, leading to the inhibition of TP53INP1 expression. Our findings revealed that TP53INP1 is a tumor suppressor in ESCC and that c-Myc-mediated DNA methylation-associated silencing of TP53INP1 contributed to the pathogenesis of human ESCC.

  4. High sensitivity infrared 10.6 micrometer heterodyne receiver development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented for a study on the design of an infrared 10.6-micrometer quantum-noise-limited optical receiver subsystem. Performance measurements of the HgCdTe photomixer preamplifier combination were carried out for photomixer temperatures up to 152 K and a photomixer frequency response of up to 420 MHz was obtained. Results of temperature and bias cycling of HgCdTe photomixers are reported. Design considerations for an operational 10.6 micrometer heterodyne receiver are presented. These consist of design data on required laser LO illumination, heat load levels for photomixer cooler, photomixer uniformity and the effects of photomixer impedance match on receiver sensitivity. Analysis and measurements of 10.6 micrometer heterodyne detection in an extrinsic photoconductive (p-type) HgCdTe photomixer are also presented.

  5. Azimuthally polarized cathodoluminescence from InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Brenny, B. J. M.; Osorio, C. I.; Polman, A.; Dam, D. van; Gómez Rivas, J.

    2015-11-16

    We determine the angle and polarization dependent emission from 1.75 µm and 2.50 µm long InP nanowires by using cathodoluminescence polarimetry. We excite the vertical wires using a 5 keV electron beam, and find that the 880 nm bandgap emission shows azimuthally polarized rings, with the number of rings depending on the wire height. The data agree well with a model in which spontaneous emission from the wire emitted into the far field interferes with emission reflected off the substrate. From the model, the depth range from which the emission is generated is found to be up to 400 nm below the top surface of the wires, well beyond the extent of the primary electron cloud. This enables a probe of the carrier diffusion length in the InP nanowires.

  6. Effects of mask imperfections on InP etching profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, D.T.C.; Yan, M.F.; Wynn, J.D.; Wilt, D.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the quality of etch masks has a significant effect on the InP etching profiles. In particular, the authors have shown that mask imperfections can cause defective etching profiles, such as vertical sidewalls and extra mask undercutting in InP. The authors also discovered that the geometry of these defective profiles is determined by the orientation of the substrate relative to the direction of the mask imperfections. Along a {l angle}110{r angle} line mask defect, the downward etching process changes the {l angle}110{r angle} v-grooves to vertical sidewalls without extra undercutting. For v-grooves aligned along the {l angle}110{r angle} direction, defects on the mask give a significant extra undercutting without changing the etching profile.

  7. Pressure dependence of local vibrational modes in InP

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, M. D.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Davidson, B. R.; Newman, R. C.

    2001-03-15

    Using infrared spectroscopy and a diamond-anvil cell, we have observed carbon and carbon-hydrogen local vibrational modes (LVM's) in InP at hydrostatic pressures as high as 5.5 GPa at liquid-helium temperatures. For pressures beyond 4.5 GPa, the carbon-hydrogen mode was not observed, perhaps as a result of a transformation of the complex into a different configuration. The LVM arising from carbon substitutional impurities varies linearly with pressure, whereas the shift of the carbon-hydrogen mode has a positive curvature. Both of these observations are in qualitative agreement with the pressure dependence of LVM's in GaAs. While the substitutional carbon impurities show very similar pressure shifts in the two materials, the linear pressure coefficient of the carbon-hydrogen stretch mode in InP is nearly three times that in GaAs. For all the measured modes, the Gru''neisen parameters increase with pressure.

  8. A single crystalline InP nanowire photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin; Li, Bang; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2016-08-01

    Single crystalline nanowires are critical for achieving high-responsivity, high-speed, and low-noise nanoscale photodetectors. Here, we report a metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector based on a single crystalline InP nanowire. The nanowires are grown by a self-catalyzed method and exhibit stacking-fault-free zinc blende crystal structure. The nanowire exhibits a typical n-type semiconductor property and shows a low room temperature dark current of several hundred pA at moderate biases. A photoresponsivity of 6.8 A/W is obtained at a laser power density of 0.2 mW/cm2. This work demonstrates that single crystalline InP nanowires are good candidates for future optoelectronic device applications.

  9. Defining capabilities of Si and InP photonics.

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, Gregory Allen

    2010-05-01

    Monolithic photonic integrated circuits (PICs) have a long history reaching back more than 40 years. During that time, and particularly in the past 15 years, the technology has matured and the application space grown to span sophisticated tunable diode lasers, 40 Gb/s electrical-to-optical signal converters with complex data formats, wavelength multiplexors and routers, as well as chemical/biological sensors. Most of this activity has centered in recent years on optical circuits built on either Silicon or InP substrates. This talk will review the three classes of PIC and highlight the unique strengths, and weaknesses, of PICs based on Silicon and InP substrates. Examples will be provided from recent R&D activity.

  10. Surface accumulation of hydrogen during capless annealing of InP

    SciTech Connect

    Haussler, W.

    1989-06-19

    InP samples, which had received a capless anneal in a phosphine/hydrogenatmosphere, were examined for hydrogen contamination by secondary-ion massspectrometry. It is found that hydrogen accumulates at the InP surface duringannealing. Annealing of Be-implanted InP leads to similar profile shapes for theBe and H atoms. Passivation of the Be acceptors, if effective at all, appears tobe of only minor significance.

  11. High-Energy 2-Micrometers Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy 2-micrometer wavelength lasers have been incorporated in a prototype coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Calibration tests and sample atmospheric data are presented on wind and aerosol profiling.

  12. 2 Micrometers InAsSb Quantum-dot Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Yueming; Uhl, David; Keo, Sam

    2004-01-01

    InAsSb quantum-dot lasers near 2 micrometers were demonstrated in cw operation at room temperature with a threshold current density of 733 A,/cm(sup 2), output power of 3 mW/facet and a differential quantum efficiency of 13%.

  13. Quantum confinement of excitons in wurtzite InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Pemasiri, K.; Jackson, H. E.; Smith, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Paiman, S.; Gao, Q.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2015-05-21

    Exciton resonances are observed in photocurrent spectra of 80 nm wurtzite InP nanowire devices at low temperatures, which correspond to transitions between the A, B, and C valence bands and the lower conduction band. Photocurrent spectra for 30 nm WZ nanowires exhibit shifts of the exciton resonances to higher energy, which are consistent with finite element calculations of wavefunctions of the confined electrons and holes for the various bands.

  14. Transfer of InP epilayers by wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, Klas

    2004-08-01

    Wafer bonding increases the freedom of design in the integration of dissimilar materials. For example, it is interesting to combine III-V compounds that have direct band gap and high mobility with silicon (Si) that is extensively used in microelectronic applications. The interest to integrate III-V-based materials with Si arises primarily from two types of applications: smart pixels for optical intra- and inter-chip interconnects in the so-called optoelectronic integrated circuits, and optoelectronic devices using some material advantages of combining III-V with Si. Also, in the III-V industry larger substrates are crucial for higher efficiency in high-volume production, and especially so for monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC). For indium phosphide (InP) the development of large-area substrates has not been able to keep up with market demands. One way to circumvent this problem is to use silicon substrates that are large-area, low-cost, and mechanically strong with high thermal conductivity. In addition, silicon is transparent at the emission wavelengths most often used in InP-based optoelectronics. Unfortunately, the large lattice-mismatch, 8.1%, between silicon and InP, has limited the success of heteroepitaxial growth. Hence, one alternative to be reviewed is InP-to-Si wafer bonding. When a direct semiconductor interface is not needed there are several other means of wafer bonding, e.g. adhesive, eutectic, and solid-state. These processes can be used for direct integration of small islets of epitaxially thin InP microelectronics onto other substrates, e.g. by transferring of InP-based epilayers to a Si-based microwave circuit by pick-and-place, BCB resist adhesive bonding and sacrificing of the InP substrate.

  15. Texturing of InP surfaces for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A unique process for texturing InP (100) wafers by anisotropic etching was developed. The process produces irregular V-grooves on the surface, which reduce the surface reflectivity. The process does not require photolithography or masking. The etching characteristics depend on doping, with etching tending to proceed more rapidly on the more heavily doped samples. Reduced reflectivity surfaces formed using this process can be applied to solar cells, photodetectors, and other optoelectronic devices.

  16. Diameter Dependence of Planar Defects in InP Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yiqian; Zhang, Minghuan; Han, Zhenlian; Yip, SenPo; Shen, Lifan; Han, Ning; Pun, Edwin Y B; Ho, Johnny C

    2016-01-01

    In this work, extensive characterization and complementary theoretical analysis have been carried out on Au-catalyzed InP nanowires in order to understand the planar defect formation as a function of nanowire diameter. From the detailed transmission electron microscopic measurements, the density of stacking faults and twin defects are found to monotonically decrease as the nanowire diameter is decreased to 10 nm, and the chemical analysis clearly indicates the drastic impact of In catalytic supersaturation in Au nanoparticles on the minimized planar defect formation in miniaturized nanowires. Specifically, during the chemical vapor deposition of InP nanowires, a significant amount of planar defects is created when the catalyst seed sizes are increased with the lower degree of In supersaturation as dictated by the Gibbs-Thomson effect, and an insufficient In diffusion (or Au-rich enhancement) would lead to a reduced and non-uniform In precipitation at the NW growing interface. The results presented here provide an insight into the fabrication of "bottom-up" InP NWs with minimized defect concentration which are suitable for various device applications. PMID:27616584

  17. Inp1p is a peroxisomal membrane protein required for peroxisome inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fagarasanu, Monica; Fagarasanu, Andrei; Tam, Yuen Yi C.; Aitchison, John D.; Rachubinski, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Cells have evolved molecular mechanisms for the efficient transmission of organelles during cell division. Little is known about how peroxisomes are inherited. Inp1p is a peripheral membrane protein of peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that affects both the morphology of peroxisomes and their partitioning during cell division. In vivo 4-dimensional video microscopy showed an inability of mother cells to retain a subset of peroxisomes in dividing cells lacking the INP1 gene, whereas cells overexpressing INP1 exhibited immobilized peroxisomes that failed to be partitioned to the bud. Overproduced Inp1p localized to both peroxisomes and the cell cortex, supporting an interaction of Inp1p with specific structures lining the cell periphery. The levels of Inp1p vary with the cell cycle. Inp1p binds Pex25p, Pex30p, and Vps1p, which have been implicated in controlling peroxisome division. Our findings are consistent with Inp1p acting as a factor that retains peroxisomes in cells and controls peroxisome division. Inp1p is the first peroxisomal protein directly implicated in peroxisome inheritance. PMID:15928207

  18. Comparative endothelial cell response on topographically patterned titanium and silicon substrates with micrometer to sub-micrometer feature sizes.

    PubMed

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Gott, Shannon C; Kozaka, Ryan; Rodgers, Victor G J; Rao, Masaru P

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the in vitro response of endothelial cells (EC) to variation in precisely-defined, micrometer to sub-micrometer scale topography on two different substrate materials, titanium (Ti) and silicon (Si). Both substrates possess identically-patterned surfaces composed of microfabricated, groove-based gratings with groove widths ranging from 0.5 to 50 µm, grating pitch twice the groove width, and groove depth of 1.3 µm. These specific materials are chosen due to their relevance for implantable microdevice applications, while grating-based patterns are chosen for the potential they afford for inducing elongated and aligned cellular morphologies reminiscent of the native endothelium. Using EA926 cells, a human EC variant, we show significant improvement in cellular adhesion, proliferation, morphology, and function with decreasing feature size on patterned Ti substrates. Moreover, we show similar trending on patterned Si substrates, albeit to a lesser extent than on comparably patterned Ti substrates. Collectively, these results suggest promise for sub-micrometer topographic patterning in general, and sub-micrometer patterning of Ti specifically, as a means for enhancing endothelialization and neovascularisation for novel implantable microdevice applications. PMID:25357245

  19. Comparative Endothelial Cell Response on Topographically Patterned Titanium and Silicon Substrates with Micrometer to Sub-Micrometer Feature Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Kozaka, Ryan; Rodgers, Victor G. J.; Rao, Masaru P.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the in vitro response of endothelial cells (EC) to variation in precisely-defined, micrometer to sub-micrometer scale topography on two different substrate materials, titanium (Ti) and silicon (Si). Both substrates possess identically-patterned surfaces composed of microfabricated, groove-based gratings with groove widths ranging from 0.5 to 50 µm, grating pitch twice the groove width, and groove depth of 1.3 µm. These specific materials are chosen due to their relevance for implantable microdevice applications, while grating-based patterns are chosen for the potential they afford for inducing elongated and aligned cellular morphologies reminiscent of the native endothelium. Using EA926 cells, a human EC variant, we show significant improvement in cellular adhesion, proliferation, morphology, and function with decreasing feature size on patterned Ti substrates. Moreover, we show similar trending on patterned Si substrates, albeit to a lesser extent than on comparably patterned Ti substrates. Collectively, these results suggest promise for sub-micrometer topographic patterning in general, and sub-micrometer patterning of Ti specifically, as a means for enhancing endothelialization and neovascularisation for novel implantable microdevice applications. PMID:25357245

  20. TP53inp1 Gene Is Implicated in Early Radiation Response in Human Fibroblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Nikolett; Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Kis, Enikő; Fodor, Lili; Mucsányi, Fruzsina; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2015-01-01

    Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein-1 (TP53inp1) is expressed by activation via p53 and p73. The purpose of our study was to investigate the role of TP53inp1 in response of fibroblasts to ionizing radiation. γ-Ray radiation dose-dependently induces the expression of TP53inp1 in human immortalized fibroblast (F11hT) cells. Stable silencing of TP53inp1 was done via lentiviral transfection of shRNA in F11hT cells. After irradiation the clonogenic survival of TP53inp1 knockdown (F11hT-shTP) cells was compared to cells transfected with non-targeting (NT) shRNA. Radiation-induced senescence was measured by SA-β-Gal staining and autophagy was detected by Acridine Orange dye and microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3B) immunostaining. The expression of TP53inp1, GDF-15, and CDKN1A and alterations in radiation induced mitochondrial DNA deletions were evaluated by qPCR. TP53inp1 was required for radiation (IR) induced maximal elevation of CDKN1A and GDF-15 expressions. Mitochondrial DNA deletions were increased and autophagy was deregulated following irradiation in the absence of TP53inp1. Finally, we showed that silencing of TP53inp1 enhances the radiation sensitivity of fibroblast cells. These data suggest functional roles for TP53inp1 in radiation-induced autophagy and survival. Taken together, we suppose that silencing of TP53inp1 leads radiation induced autophagy impairment and induces accumulation of damaged mitochondria in primary human fibroblasts. PMID:26512655

  1. A portable spectrometer for use from 5 to 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, G.; Kahle, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    A field portable spectrometer suitable for collecting data relevant to remote sensing applications in the 8 to 12 micrometer atmospheric window has been built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The instrument employs a single cooled HgCdTe detector and a continuously variable filter wheel analyzer. The spectral range covered is 5 to 14.5 micrometers and the resolution is approximately 1.5 percent of the wavelength. A description of the hardware is followed by a discussion of the analysis of the spectral data leading to finished emissivity and radiance spectra. A section is devoted to the evaluation of the instrument performance with respect to spectral resolution, radiometric precision, and accuracy. Several examples of spectra acquired in the field are included.

  2. X-Ray tomography with micrometer spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, Carsten; Snigirev, Anatoly A.; Koch, Andreas; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor

    1997-10-01

    3D computed tomographic images with micrometer resolution were made in phase-contrast mode with high energy x-rays at a third generation synchrotron source. The phase-contrast technique enables one to obtain information not only about the amplitude of the wave field behind the object and thus about the absorption, but also about the refractive index distribution inside the sample. Increasing the x-ray energy from the soft x-ray region up to 10-60 keV simplifies the experimental setup and opens the possibility to study organic samples at room-temperature and under normal pressure conditions. The projection data is recorded with a fast, high-resolution x-ray camera consisting of a 5 micrometers thin YAG scintillator crystal, a visible light microscope optics and a slow scan 1k X 1k CCD camera. The spatial resolution of phase-contrast microtomography is currently limited by the resolution of the x-ray detector to about 1-2 micrometers . First applications in biology and geophysics are shown.

  3. InP HEMT Integrated Circuits for Submillimeter Wave Radiometers in Earth Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, William R.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP integrated circuits has pushed well into the Submillimeter Wave frequency band, with amplification reported as high as 670 GHz. This paper provides an overview of current performance and potential application of InP HEMT to Submillimeter Wave radiometers for earth remote sensing.

  4. Crystal facet effect on structural stability and electronic properties of wurtzite InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Shu, Haibo; Jin, Mengting; Liang, Pei; Cao, Dan; Li, Can; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2014-06-01

    The crystal-facet effect on the structural stability and electronic properties of wurtzite InP nanowires (NWs) with different side-facets are investigated by using first-principles calculation within density-function theory. The surface-energy calculation suggests that side-facet structures of InP NWs are unreconstructed due to the fact that the low-index {11¯00} and {112¯0} facets with paired In-P dimers satisfy the electron counting rule. The calculated formation energies indicate that the structural stability of InP NWs strongly depends on their side-facets. Among considered InP NWs with different side-facets, the {11¯00} faceted NWs present the highest stability due to the relative low surface atom ratio, which is in good agreement with experimental observations where wurtzite InP NWs prefer to be surrounded by {11¯00} facets. The size dependence of NW band gap indicates that the band gap (Eg) of uniform-sized InP NWs with different side-facets follows the trend, Eg -{112¯0} > Eg -{11¯00}-{112¯0} > Eg -{11¯00}, when NW diameter is larger than 3 nm and a reverse trend is found in the smaller sized NWs (d < 3 nm). Our result opens the possibility to engineer the band gap of wurtzite InP NWs by controlling their side-facets.

  5. Electrochemical characterization of p(+)n and n(+)p diffused InP structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Faur, Maria; Faur, Mircea; Goradia, M.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    The relatively well documented and widely used electrolytes for characterization and processing of Si and GaAs-related materials and structures by electrochemical methods are of little or no use with InP because the electrolytes presently used either dissolve the surface preferentially at the defect areas or form residual oxides and introduce a large density of surface states. Using an electrolyte which was newly developed for anodic dissolution of InP, and was named the 'FAP' electrolyte, accurate characterization of InP related structures including nature and density of surface states, defect density, and net majority carrier concentration, all as functions of depth was performed. A step-by-step optimization of n(+)p and p(+)n InP structures made by thermal diffusion was done using the electrochemical techniques, and resulted in high performance homojunction InP structures.

  6. Gate tunable monolayer MoS{sub 2}/InP heterostructure solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shisheng Wang, Peng; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Zhiqian; Xu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Shengjiao; Xu, Wenli

    2015-10-12

    We demonstrate monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2})/indium phosphide (InP) van der Waals heterostructure with remarkable photovoltaic response. Furthermore, benefiting from the atomically thin and semiconductor nature of MoS{sub 2}, we have designed the gate tunable MoS{sub 2}/InP heterostructure. Applied with a top gate voltage, the Fermi level of MoS{sub 2} is effectively tuned, and the barrier height at the MoS{sub 2}/InP heterojunction correspondingly changes. The power conversion efficiency of MoS{sub 2}/InP solar cells has reached a value of 7.1% under AM 1.5G illumination with a gate voltage of +6 V. The tunable MoS{sub 2}/InP heterostructure may be promising for highly efficient solar cells.

  7. Flashlamp Pumped, Room Temperature, Nd:YAG Laser Operating at 0.946 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.

    1998-01-01

    Room temperature operation of flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG at 0.946 micrometers was achieved with a laser rod having undoped ends. Performance was characterized and compared with 1.064 micrometer operation and other quasi four level lasers.

  8. Sub-micrometer precision of optical imaging to locate the free surface of a micrometer fluid shape.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; Vega, E J; Ferrera, C

    2009-11-01

    In this note, we explore the precision of the optical imaging method for measuring the free surface position of a micrometer fluid shape. For this purpose, images of a liquid film deposited on a rod were acquired and processed. The resulting contour was compared with the corresponding solution to the Young-Laplace equation. The average deviation was about 30nm, 25 times smaller than the pixel size, reflecting the validity of optical imaging for most applications in microfluidics. PMID:19683246

  9. Electron irradiation effects in epitaxial InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsall, N. M.; Robson, N.; Sambell, A. J.; Anspaugh, B.; Cross, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Performance data for InP-based solar cells after irradiation with 1-MeV electrons up to a fluence of 1 x 1016 e/cm2 are presented. Three InP cell structures are considered. Two of these have epitaxially grown active regions, these being a homojunction design and in ITO/InP structure. These are compared with ITO/InP cells without the epitaxial base region. The cell parameter variations, the influence of illumination during irradiation, and the effect on cell spectral response and capacitance measurements are discussed. Substantial performance recovery after thermal annealing at 90 C is reported.

  10. Photon upconversion in degenerately sulfur doped InP nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mergenthaler, K; Lehmann, S; Wallentin, J; Zhang, W; Borgström, M T; Yartsev, A; Pistol, M-E

    2015-12-28

    Radiative recombination in degenerately n-doped InP nanowires is studied for excitation above and below the Fermi energy of the electron gas, using photoluminescence. Laser-induced electron heating is observed, which allows absorption below the Fermi energy. We observe photon upconversion where photo-excited holes recombine with high |k| electrons. This can be attributed to hole scattering to high |k|-values, and the temperature dependence of this process is measured. We show that hole relaxation via phonon scattering can be observed in continuous wave excitation luminescence measurements. PMID:26585229

  11. Lasers in InP generic photonic integration technology platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latkowski, Sylwester; Lenstra, Daan

    2015-04-01

    A review is given of a number of lasers in a form of photonic integrated circuits realized on InP substrate using a generic integration approach. The potential of these photonic circuits lies in their compactness, low power consumption, and significant reduction of fabrication cost by realization in generic foundry runs. Generic integration platforms offer the possibility of realizing functionally advanced photonic circuits using combinations of just a few standardized and parameterized building blocks. This vibrant field opens new doors to innovative product development for SMEs as well as curiosity-driven research.

  12. Photon upconversion in degenerately sulfur doped InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergenthaler, K.; Lehmann, S.; Wallentin, J.; Zhang, W.; Borgström, M. T.; Yartsev, A.; Pistol, M.-E.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative recombination in degenerately n-doped InP nanowires is studied for excitation above and below the Fermi energy of the electron gas, using photoluminescence. Laser-induced electron heating is observed, which allows absorption below the Fermi energy. We observe photon upconversion where photo-excited holes recombine with high |k| electrons. This can be attributed to hole scattering to high |k|-values, and the temperature dependence of this process is measured. We show that hole relaxation via phonon scattering can be observed in continuous wave excitation luminescence measurements.Radiative recombination in degenerately n-doped InP nanowires is studied for excitation above and below the Fermi energy of the electron gas, using photoluminescence. Laser-induced electron heating is observed, which allows absorption below the Fermi energy. We observe photon upconversion where photo-excited holes recombine with high |k| electrons. This can be attributed to hole scattering to high |k|-values, and the temperature dependence of this process is measured. We show that hole relaxation via phonon scattering can be observed in continuous wave excitation luminescence measurements. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C5NR05472A

  13. Heterogenously-integrated InP on Si microdisk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morthier, G.; Spuesens, T.; Mechet, P.; Olivier, N.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Regreny, P.; Van Thourhout, D.; Roelkens, G.

    2015-03-01

    We review recent theoretical and experimental work on InP membrane microdisk lasers heterogeneously integrated on SOI and coupled to a Si bus waveguide. After a general introduction on the fabrication and the operation principles, we will describe various improvements in the fabrication technology. This includes improvements in the yield of the bonding of the InP die on the SOI die and in the controllability of the bonding layer thickness, as well as an optimization of the alignment of the microdisk with respect to the silicon waveguide and some proposals for better heat sinking and loss reduction. Improvement in the alignment and the bonding has led to interesting results on the uniformity in device characteristics. In a second part, unidirectional behaviour and reflection sensitivity will be briefly discussed. Theoretical, numerical and experimental results will be shown about the unidirectional behavior and it will be explained how unidirectional microdisk lasers can be a lot less sensitive to external reflections than other lasers. We will also show how such lasers can be used as optical signal regenerators that can work with low optical input powers and that have small power consumption. We will end with a description of demonstrations of optical interconnects based on heterogeneously integrated microdisk lasers and heterogeneously integrated photodetectors. Optical interconnects on chip have been demonstrated at 10 Gb/s. An epitaxial layer stack that contains both the laser and the detector structure has been used for this purpose.

  14. Interband polarized absorption in InP polytypic superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Faria Junior, P. E.; Sipahi, G. M.; Campos, T.

    2014-11-21

    Recent advances in growth techniques have allowed the fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures with mixed wurtzite/zinc-blende crystal phases. Although the optical characterization of these polytypic structures is well reported in the literature, a deeper theoretical understanding of how crystal phase mixing and quantum confinement change the output linear light polarization is still needed. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the mixing effects of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases on the interband absorption and in the degree of light polarization of an InP polytypic superlattice. We use a single 8 × 8 k⋅p Hamiltonian that describes both crystal phases. Quantum confinement is investigated by changing the size of the polytypic unit cell. We also include the optical confinement effect due to the dielectric mismatch between the superlattice and the vaccum and we show it to be necessary to match experimental results. Our calculations for large wurtzite concentrations and small quantum confinement explain the optical trends of recent photoluminescence excitation measurements. Furthermore, we find a high sensitivity to zinc-blende concentrations in the degree of linear polarization. This sensitivity can be reduced by increasing quantum confinement. In conclusion, our theoretical analysis provides an explanation for optical trends in InP polytypic superlattices, and shows that the interplay of crystal phase mixing and quantum confinement is an area worth exploring for light polarization engineering.

  15. Micrometer-size vesicle formation triggered by UV light.

    PubMed

    Shima, Tatsuya; Muraoka, Takahiro; Hamada, Tsutomu; Morita, Masamune; Takagi, Masahiro; Fukuoka, Hajime; Inoue, Yuichi; Sagawa, Takashi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Omata, Yuki; Yamashita, Takashi; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-07-01

    Vesicle formation is a fundamental kinetic process related to the vesicle budding and endocytosis in a cell. In the vesicle formation by artificial means, transformation of lamellar lipid aggregates into spherical architectures is a key process and known to be prompted by e.g. heat, infrared irradiation, and alternating electric field induction. Here we report UV-light-driven formation of vesicles from particles consisting of crumpled phospholipid multilayer membranes involving a photoactive amphiphilic compound composed of 1,4-bis(4-phenylethynyl)benzene (BPEB) units. The particles can readily be prepared from a mixture of these components, which is casted on the glass surface followed by addition of water under ultrasonic radiation. Interestingly, upon irradiation with UV light, micrometer-size vesicles were generated from the particles. Neither infrared light irradiation nor heating prompted the vesicle formation. Taking advantage of the benefits of light, we successfully demonstrated micrometer-scale spatiotemporal control of single vesicle formation. It is also revealed that the BPEB units in the amphiphile are essential for this phenomenon. PMID:24898450

  16. Possible identifications of the 3.4 micrometer feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danks, Anthony C.; Lambert, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    A feature at 3.4 micrometer was first detected in Comet Halley by the IKS spectrometer on board the Vega 1 probe; and subsequently from the ground. The feature has since been reported in Comet Wilson. The presence of the feature is of considerable interest for a number of reasons. First, it may represent the detection of a new parent molecule, and when combined with data from Giotto and Vega yield new information on cometary chemistry and the early solar system composition. Secondly, it may represent a link to the interstellar medium, the feature corresponds in wavelength and shape with an interstellar feature seen in absorption in a luminous star, towards the Galactic center known as GC-IRS7. The feature in turn is thought to be related with a growing family of unidentified infrared emission features seen in stellar objects, planetary nebulae, reflection nebulae, HII regions and extra galactic sources. These features occur at wavelengths 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.25 micrometers. Further identification theory is given.

  17. Heteroepitaxial InP solar cells on Si and GaAs substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving; Swartz, Clifford K.; Brinker, David J.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of InP cells processed from thin layers of InP heteroepitaxially grown on GaAs, on silicon with an intervening GaAs layer, and on GaAs with intervening Ga(x)In(1-x)As layers are described, and the factors affecting cell efficiency are discussed. Under 10 MeV proton irradiations, the radiation resistances of the heteroepitaxial cells were superior to that of homoepitaxial InP cells. The superior radiation resistance is attributed to the high dislocation densities present in the heteroepitaxial cells.

  18. Surface etching for light trapping in encapsulated InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Reducing the reflection from the surface of InP is important for increasing the efficiency of solar cells and photodetectors. In this paper a new technique for reducing reflectance of glass-encapsulated InP is reported. Low-angle grooves are produced on the surface by a maskless anisotropic etch. Light reflected from the low angle grooves is trapped by total internal reflection at the glass/air interface and directed back to the InP surface. A significant decrease in surface reflection is measured.

  19. Microstructural and Compositional Relations of Granitoid Clasts in Lunar Breccias at the Micrometer to Sub-Micrometer Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Simon, J. I.; Mills, R. D.; Ross, D. K.; Tappa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Lunar granitoid lithologies have long been of interest for the information they provide on processes leading to silicic melt compositions on the Moon. The extraction of such melts over time affects the distribution and budget of incompatible materials (i.e., radiogenic heat producing elements and volatiles) of the lunar interior. We have recently shown that in addition to their high concentrations of incompatible lithophile elements, some granitoid clasts in lunar breccias have significant indigenous water contents in their alkali feldspars. This raises the importance of lunar granitoid materials in the expanding search for mineralogic/petrologic hosts of indigenous lunar water-related species. We are undertaking a detailed survey of the petrologic/mineralogical relations of granitoid clasts in lunar breccias to achieve a better understanding of the potential of these diverse assemblages as hosts for volatiles, and as candidates for additional isotope chronology studies. Our preliminary results reported here based on high-resolution field-emission SEM, EPMA and TEM studies uncover immense complexity in these materials at the micrometer to sub-micrometer scale that heretofore have not been fully documented.

  20. Particle detectors based on semiconducting InP epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, R.; Grym, J.; Zdansky, K.

    2011-01-01

    A study of electrical properties and detection performance of two types of Indium Phosphide detector structures was performed: (i) with p-n-junction and (ii) with Schottky contact prepared on high purity p-type InP. The p-n junction detectors were based on a high purity InP:Pr layers of both n- and p- type conductivity with carrier concentration on the order of 1014 cm-3 grown on Sn doped n-type substrate. Schottky barrier detectors were prepared by vacuum evaporation of Pd on high purity p-type epitaxial layer grown on Mn doped p-type substrate. The detection performance of particle detectors was measured by pulse-height spectra with alpha particles emitted from 241Am source at room temperature.

  1. Time-resolved photoluminescence of undoped InP

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.M.; Dunlavy, D.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K. ); Shaw, G.; Summers, G.P. ); Tzafaras, N.; Lentz, C. )

    1994-04-15

    Energy and time-resolved photoluminescence data have been obtained for nominally undoped ([ital n] 4.5[times]10[sup 15] cm[sup [minus]3]) bulk InP grown by the vertical-gradient freeze method. The data were taken as a function of temperature, from 80 to 290 K, and analyzed using a solution to the continuity equation. The resulting lifetime values range from 300 ns to 3.2 [mu]s, and surface recombination velocities were fund to be on the order of 10[sup 3] cm/s. The temperature dependence can be explained by assuming a radiatively limited recombination with a resulting [ital B] coefficient [ge]5.9[times]10[sup [minus]11] cm[sup 3]/s at 300 K.

  2. Anomalous photoluminescence in InP1-xBix.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xiren; Pan, Wenwu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Kai; Shao, Jun; Wang, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from InP1-xBix thin films with Bi concentrations in the 0-2.49% range reveals anomalous spectral features with strong and very broad (linewidth of 700 nm) PL signals compared to other bismide alloys. Multiple transitions are observed and their energy levels are found much smaller than the band-gap measured from absorption measurements. These transitions are related to deep levels confirmed by deep level transient spectroscopy, which effectively trap free holes and enhance radiative recombination. The broad luminescence feature is beneficial for making super-luminescence diodes, which can theoretically enhance spatial resolution beyond 1 μm in optical coherent tomography (OCT). PMID:27291823

  3. A 83 GHz InP DHBT static frequency divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youtao, Zhang; Xiaopeng, Li; Min, Zhang; Wei, Cheng; Xinyu, Chen

    2014-04-01

    A static frequency divider is presented using 0.7 μm InP DHBTs with 280 GHz ft/fmax. The divider is based on ECL master-slave D-flip-flop topology with 30 HBTs and 20 resistors with a chip size 0.62 × 0.65 mm2. The circuits use peaking inductance as a part of the loads to maximize the highest clock rate. Momentum simulation is used to accurately characterize the effect of the clock feedback lines at the W band. Test results show that the divider can operate from 1 GHz up to 83 GHz. Its phase noise is 139 dBc/Hz with 100 kHz offset. The power dissipation of divider core is 350 mW.

  4. InAs nanowire formation on InP(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, H. J.; Ashwin, M. J.; Jones, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of InAs on InP(001) by solid source molecular beam epitaxy has been studied for a range of different growth temperatures and annealing procedures. Atomic force microscopy images show that nanowires are formed for deposition in the temperature range of 400-480 deg. C, and also following high temperature annealing (480 deg. C) after deposition at 400 deg. C. The wires show preferential orientation along <110> and often exhibit pronounced serpentine behavior due to the presence of kinks, an effect that is reduced at increasing growth temperature. The results suggest that the serpentine behavior is related to the degree of initial surface order. Kinks in the wires appear to act as nucleation centers for In adatoms migrating along the wires during annealing, leading to the coexistence of large three-dimensional islands.

  5. Electrical detection of spin hyperpolarization in InP

    SciTech Connect

    Caspers, Christian; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2014-09-29

    The electrical detection of surface spin polarization in Indium Phosphide (InP) is demonstrated. Using a planar four-terminal architecture on top of semi-insulating Fe:InP (001) wafers, optical orientation is separated from electrical detection. Spin filter tunnel contacts consisting of InP/oxide/Co reveal significant asymmetries in the differential resistance upon helicity change of the optical pumping. The iron-rich tunnel oxide provides the main spin selection mechanism. A reproducible helicity-dependent asymmetry as high as 18% could be observed at T = 55 K and an external induction field μ{sub 0}H = 1 T. At room temperature and zero external field, a helicity-dependent asymmetry of 6% suggests the stand-alone applicability of the device either as an electronic spin sensor or as an optical helicity sensor.

  6. Optical and structural properties of 100 MeV Fe9+ ion irradiated InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, R. L.; Dubey, S. K.; Bodhane, S. P.; Kanjilal, D.

    2016-05-01

    Single crystal InP samples were irradiated with 100 MeV Fe9+ ions for ion fluences 1x1012 and 1x1013 cm-2. Optical properties of irradiated InP was investigated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy. The optical parameters like, refractive index, extinction coefficient, absorption coefficient is found to be fluence dependent near the surface as well as near the projected range. Small change in the optical parameters near the surface region as investigated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry indicatesthat the surfaces of irradiated InP are similar to non-irradiated InP. This is also supported by RBS/C measurements. The UV-VIS-NIR study revealed the decrease in the band gap and increase in the defect concentration in the irradiated sample as a result of nuclear energy loss.

  7. High efficiency InP solar cells from low toxicity tertiarybutylphosphine and trimethylindium by OMVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Fatemi, N.S.; Wilt, D.M.; Brinker, D.J.; Jenkins, P.P.; Scheiman, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based compound semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p-type and n-type respectively. 16% efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with V{sub oc} of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6%. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  8. High efficiency InP solar cells from low toxicity tertiarybutylphosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Brinker, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1994-05-01

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p and n type respectively. 16 percent efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with Voc of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6 percent. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  9. High Efficiency InP Solar Cells from Low Toxicity Tertiarybutylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Brinker, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p and n type respectively. 16 percent efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with Voc of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6 percent. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  10. Control of persistent photoconductivity in nanostructured InP through morphology design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaico, Ed; Postolache, V.; Borodin, E.; Ursaki, V. V.; Lupan, O.; Adelung, R.; Nielsch, K.; Tiginyanu, I. M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we show that long-duration-photoconductivity decay (LDPCD) and persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in porous InP structures fabricated by anodic etching of bulk substrates can be controlled through the modification of the sample morphology. Particularly, the PPC inherent at low temperatures to porous InP layers with the thickness of skeleton walls comparable with pore diameters is quenched in structures consisting of ultrathin walls produced at high anodization voltages. The relaxation of photoconductivity in bulk InP substrates, porous layers, and utrathin membranes is investigated as a function of temperature and excitation power density. The obtained results suggest that PPC in porous InP layers is due to porosity induced potential barriers which hinder the recombination of photoexcited carriers, while the photoconductivity relaxation processes in ultrathin membranes are governed by surface states.

  11. INPE LANDSAT-D thematic mapper computer compatible tape format specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Desouza, R. C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The format of the computer compatible tapes (CCT) which contain Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery data acquired from the LANDSAT D and D Prime satellites by the INSTITUTO DE PERSQUISAS ESPACIALS (CNPq-INPE/BRAZIL) is defined.

  12. Diffusion of micrometer-sized soft particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Benjamin; Aptowicz, Kevin

    We investigate the diffusion of micrometer sized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) gel particles in confinement. The influence of confinement on the transport of small particles is becoming increasingly important for microfluidics and bio-fluidics. Analytical solutions to this problem are limited to very unique geometries or gross approximations. Computational methods have provided more insight into the problem as well as experimental investigations. However, most research has focused on the hard-sphere problem. In this work, we will explore the diffusion of soft particles in confinement. The dynamics of the particles confined between two parallel walls is captured with video-microscopy. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to measurement confinement of particles in-situ with a precision of 1%. This poster will present some preliminary results of how confinement affects the diffusion of these soft particles. We acknowledge support from Grant DMR-1206231.

  13. Micrometer-scale porosity as a biosignature in carbonate crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Tanja; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Corsetti, Frank A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-09-01

    We formed calcite crusts in the presence and absence of the heterotrophic bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20 to investigate microbial morphological signatures in fast-accreting carbonate precipitates. Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized pores (micropores) were present and ubiquitous in the G20 crusts but absent in abiotically precipitated crusts. Bacterial micropores resemble inclusions under transmitted light, but have distinct size, biological shapes and patterns (swirling or dendritic) and are distributed differently from common fluid inclusions. We observed similar porosity in both modern and ancient carbonate crusts of putative biotic origin. Our experiments support the microbial origin of micropores and help define specific criteria whereby to recognize these features as biosignatures in the rock record.

  14. Improvement of InP MISFET characteristics using infra-red lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Y.; Okamura, M.; Hisaki, T.; Mikami, O.

    1985-08-01

    An infrared lamp-annealing technique was employed for postannealing Si ion-implanted InP substrates. The effective electron mobility (mu-eff) of SiO2-InP metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors fabricated using infrared lamp annealing is remarkably temperature-dependent. The maximum mu-eff is about 11000 sq cm/V-s at 75 K and 1500-2500 sq cm/V-s at room temperature.

  15. Enhancing optical absorption in InP and GaAs utilizing profile etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    The current state of profile etching in GaAs and InP is summarized, including data on novel geometries attainable as a function of etchant temperature, composition, and rate; substrate orientation; carrier concentration; and oxide thickness between substrate and photoresist. V-grooved solar cells were manufactured with both GaAs and InP, and the improved optical absorption was demonstrated. Preferred parameters for various applications are listed and discussed.

  16. Enhancing optical absorption in InP and GaAs utilizing profile etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    The current state of profile etching in GaAs and InP is summarized, including data on novel geometries attainable as a function of etchant temperature, composition, and rate; substrate orientation; carrier concentration; and oxide thickness between substrate and photoresist. V-grooved solar cells have been manufactured with both GaAs and InP, and the improved optical absorption demonstrated. Preferred parameters for various applications are listed and discussed.

  17. Operational training for the mission operations at the Brazilian National Institute for Space Research (INPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozenfeld, Pawel

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the selection and training process of satellite controllers and data network operators performed at INPE's Satellite Tracking and Control Center in order to prepare them for the mission operations of the INPE's first (SCD1) satellite. An overview of the ground control system and SCD1 architecture and mission is given. Different training phases are described, taking into account that the applicants had no previous knowledge of space operations requiring, therefore, a training which started from the basics.

  18. Wurtzite InP nanowire arrays grown by selective area MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hyung-Joon; Yeh, Ting-Wei; Stewart, Lawrence; Dapkus, P. Daniel

    2010-06-22

    InP nanowires are a unique material phase because this normally zincblende material forms in the wurtzite crystal structure below a critical diameter owing to the contribution of sidewalls to the total formation energy. This may allow control of the carrier transport and optical properties of InP nanowires for applications such as nano scale transistors, lasers and detectors. In this work, we describe the fabrication of InP nanowire arrays by selective area growth using MOCVD in the diameter range where the wurtzite structure is formed. The spatial growth rate in selective area growth is modeled by a diffusion model for the precursors. The proposed model achieves an average error of 9%. Electron microscopy shows that the grown InP nanowires are in the wurtzite crystal phase with many stacking faults. The threshold diameter of the crystal phase transition of InP nanowires is larger than the thermodynamic estimation. In order to explain this tendency, we propose a surface kinetics model based on a 2×2 reconstruction. This model can explain the increased tendency for wurtzite nanowire formation on InP (111)A substrates and the preferred growth direction of binary III-V compound semiconductor nanowires.

  19. Wafer-scale self-organized InP nanopillars with controlled orientation for photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Sanatinia, Reza; Berrier, Audrey; Dhaka, Veer; Perros, Alexander P; Huhtio, Teppo; Lipsanen, Harri; Anand, Srinivasan

    2015-10-16

    A unique wafer-scale self-organization process for generation of InP nanopillars is demonstrated, which is based on maskless ion-beam etching (IBE) of InP developed to obtain the nanopillars, where the height, shape, and orientation of the nanopillars can be varied by controlling the processing parameters. The fabricated InP nanopillars exhibit broadband suppression of the reflectance, 'black InP,' a property useful for solar cells. The realization of a conformal p-n junction for carrier collection, in the fabricated solar cells, is achieved by a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) overgrowth step on the fabricated pillars. The conformal overgrowth retains the broadband anti-reflection property of the InP nanopillars, indicating the feasibility of this technology for solar cells. Surface passivation of the formed InP nanopillars using sulfur-oleylamine solution resulted in improved solar-cell characteristics. An open-circuit voltage of 0.71 V and an increase of 0.13 V compared to the unpassivated device were achieved. PMID:26403979

  20. Tunable absorption resonances in the ultraviolet for InP nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Aghaeipour, Mahtab; Anttu, Nicklas; Nylund, Gustav; Samuelson, Lars; Lehmann, Sebastian; Pistol, Mats-Erik

    2014-11-17

    The ability to tune the photon absorptance spectrum is an attracting way of tailoring the response of devices like photodetectors and solar cells. Here, we measure the reflectance spectra of InP substrates patterned with arrays of vertically standing InP nanowires. Using the reflectance spectra, we calculate and analyze the corresponding absorptance spectra of the nanowires. We show that we can tune absorption resonances for the nanowire arrays into the ultraviolet by decreasing the diameter of the nanowires. When we compare our measurements with electromagnetic modeling, we generally find good agreement. Interestingly, the remaining differences between modeled and measured spectra are attributed to a crystal-phase dependence in the refractive index of InP. Specifically, we find indication of significant differences in the refractive index between the modeled zinc-blende InP nanowires and the measured wurtzite InP nanowires in the ultraviolet. We believe that such crystal-phase dependent differences in the refractive index affect the possibility to excite optical resonances in the large wavelength range of 345 < λ < 390 nm. To support this claim, we investigated how resonances in nanostructures can be shifted in wavelength by geometrical tuning. We find that dispersion in the refractive index can dominate over geometrical tuning and stop the possibility for such shifting. Our results open the door for using crystal-phase engineering to optimize the absorption in InP nanowire-based solar cells and photodetectors. PMID:25402159

  1. Photometry of 433 Eros from 0.65 to 2.2 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Bergstralh, J. T.; Johnson, T. V.

    1976-01-01

    Lightcurves of 433 Eros are reported for 11 bandpasses ranging from 0.65 to 2.2 micrometer in wavelength. The relative spectral reflectance was not seen to vary during our observations. Eros has a reflectance at 1.6 micrometers of about 1.5 and at 2.2 micrometers of about 1.7, where the spectral reflectance is scaled to unity at 0.56 micrometers. This spectral reflectance is suggestive of a mixture of silicates and material with high infrared reflectance, perhaps a metallic phase such as meteoritic 'iron'.

  2. P/N InP solar cells on Ge wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Vernon, Stanley; Burke, Edward A.

    1994-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) P-on-N one-sun solar cells were epitaxially grown using a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process on germanium (Ge) wafers. The motivation for this work is to replace expensive InP wafers, which are fragile and must be thick and therefore heavy, with less expensive Ge wafers, which are stronger, allowing use of thinner, lighter weight wafers. An intermediate InxGs1-xP grading layer starting as In(0.49)Ga(0.51) at the GaAs-coated Ge wafer surface and ending as InP at the top of the grading layer (backside of the InP cell) was used to attempt to bend some of the threading dislocations generated by lattice-mismatch between the Ge wafer and InP cell so they would be harmlessly confined in this grading layer. The best InP/Ge cell was independently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-sun 25 C AMO efficiently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-circuit photocurrent 22.6 mA/sq cm. We believe this is the first published report of an InP cell grown on a Ge wafer. Why get excited over a 9 percent InP/Ge cell? If we look at the cell weight and efficiency, a 9 percent InP cell on an 8 mil Ge wafer has about the same cell power density, 118 W/kg (BOL), as the best InP cell ever made, a 19 percent InP cell on an 18 mil InP wafer, because of the lighter Ge wafer weight. As cell panel materials become lighter, the cell weight becomes more important, and the advantage of lightweight cells to the panel power density becomes more important. In addition, although InP/Ge cells have a low beginning-of-life (BOL) efficiency due to dislocation defects, the InP/Ge cells are very radiation hard (end-of-life power similar to beginning-of-life). We have irradiated an InP/Ge cell with alpha particles to an equivalent fluence of 1.6 x 10(exp 16) 1 MeV electrons/sq cm and the efficiency is still 83 percent of its BOL value. At this fluence level, the power output of these InP/Ge cells matches the GaAs/Ge cell data tabulated in the JPL handbook. Data are presented

  3. Ultrasonic Nanocoining of Sub-micrometer Surface Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, William John, Jr.

    The goal of this work is to develop a machining process to rapidly generate large areas of sub-micrometer surface features in industrially-feasible amounts of time. These surface features, inspired by designs found in nature, can be sized to produce desired behavior including anti-reflective (AR), superhydrophobic, or syperhydrophilic properties. Current methods of producing these features produce high-fidelity replications, but often require several steps to complete and are not economically feasible in a mass-production setting. This process uses a diamond die containing thousands of subwavelength features mounted to a high speed actuator on the axis of a diamond turning machine. The die is pressed into the workpiece with an elliptical path that matches the surface speed of the moving workpiece and minimizes distortion caused by mismatches in velocity. These die indents are tiled together to create large areas of uniform features, which can then be easily transferred to pliable coatings. Because the die is small (20x20 im), the indentations must occur rapidly (40 kHz) to make nanocoining an industrially feasible process. To produce the ultrasonic 2-D motion for indenting, an actuator was designed that resonates in two orthogonal directions at the same frequency. Analytical solutions were first used to determine the approximate geometry to achieve the desired resonant behavior. Finite element analysis (FEA) is then employed to fine-tune the geometry of the device to meet amplitude requirements. Prototypes were constructed and measured to demonstrate the utility of the proposed design method. A controller is designed and implemented to automatically track the resonant frequency and maintain the desired actuator behavior to ensure the indents are formed uniformly over large areas despite piezoelectric self-heating effects and other environmental affects that impact device resonance. Other control strategies that are required for maintaining uniform spacing of

  4. Adhesion hysteresis and friction at nanometer and micrometer lengths

    SciTech Connect

    Szoszkiewicz, Robert; Bhushan, Bharat; Huey, Bryan D.; Kulik, Andrzej J.; Gremaud, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons between adhesion hysteresis and friction at nanometer and micrometer length scales were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Nanoscale adhesion hysteresis was measured using the ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) on mica, calcite, and a few metallic samples (Pt, Au, Cu, Zn, Ti, and Fe). Obtained adhesion hysteresis ranged between 4x10{sup -19} and 4x10{sup -18} J. At the microscale a similar setup with a nanoindenter was used and the same samples were investigated. Adhesion hysteresis measured at the microscale ranged between 8x10{sup -17} and 14x10{sup -17} J. Friction was investigated via lateral force microscopy, as well as by scratch tests done with the nanoindenter. Numerical simulations based on the UFM model as well as established theories of contact mechanics studied qualitative dependencies of adhesion hysteresis on experimental parameters. Quantitative relations between adhesion hysteresis and friction were obtained through an analytic model relying on elastic and adhesive properties of the contact. The model agreed with measurements and simulations.

  5. 3D active stabilization system with sub-micrometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Kursu, Olli; Tuukkanen, Tuomas; Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95% attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70% attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  6. Recent Developments for Sub-Quarter Micrometer Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseaux, F.; Haghiri-Gosnet, A. M.; Chen, Y.; Ravets, M. F.; Launois, H.

    1992-12-01

    Resolution capability of synchrotron radiation based proximity lithography has been investigated in the sub-quarter micrometer range using an advanced X-ray stepper and high resolution SiC/W X-ray masks. High resolution tungsten gratings and single lines as small as 60 nm are now currently available. Such masks were tested by contact printing in the L2M lithography station implemented at Super-ACO synchrotron facility in Orsay-France. Also, the influence of diffraction on feature sizes was studied with 30-40 μm proximity gap using various positive and negative resists: PMMA, RAY-PF, SAL 601. It was found that 0.10 to 0.12 μm linewidths can be achieved for gratings and 0.15 to 0.20 μm for isolated lines. This resolution limit can be overpassed by a double exposure technique associated with a lateral mask-stage translation. Examples of feature size down to 80 nm were readily achieved at 40 μm gap.

  7. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  8. Flow and evaporation in single micrometer and nanometer scale pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, A. E.; Yang, C.; Siwy, Z. S.; Taborek, P.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.

    2014-07-21

    We report measurements of pressure driven flow of fluids entering vacuum through a single pipe of micrometer or nanometer scale diameter. Nanopores were fabricated by etching a single ion track in polymer or mica foils. A calibrated mass spectrometer was used to measure the flow rates of nitrogen and helium through pipes with diameter ranging from 10 μm to 31 nm. The flow of gaseous and liquid nitrogen was studied near 77 K, while the flow of helium was studied from the lambda point (2.18 K) to above the critical point (5.2 K). Flow rates were controlled by changing the pressure drop across the pipe in the range 0–31 atm. When the pressure in the pipe reached the saturated vapor pressure, an abrupt flow transition was observed. A simple viscous flow model is used to determine the position of the liquid/vapor interface in the pipe. The observed mass flow rates are consistent with no slip boundary conditions.

  9. Inhomogeneous Growth of Micrometer Thick Plasma Polymerized Films.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Menges, Bernhard; Förch, Renate

    2016-05-17

    Plasma polymerization is traditionally recognized as a homogeneous film-forming technique. It is nevertheless reasonable to ask whether micrometer thick plasma polymerized structures are really homogeneous across the film thickness. Studying the properties of the interfacial, near-the-substrate (NTS) region in plasma polymer films represents particular experimental challenges due to the inaccessibility of the buried layers. In this investigation, a novel non-destructive approach has been utilized to evaluate the homogeneity of plasma polymerized acrylic acid (PPAc) and 1,7-octadiene (PPOD) films in a single measurement. Studying the variations of refractive index throughout the depth of the films was facilitated by a home-built surface plasmon resonance (SPR)/optical waveguide (OWG) spectroscopy setup. It has been shown that the NTS layer of both PPAc and PPOD films exhibits a significantly lower refractive index than the bulk of the film that is believed to indicate a higher concentration of internal voids. Our results provide new insights into the growth mechanisms of plasma polymer films and challenge the traditional view that considers plasma polymers as homogeneous and continuous structures. PMID:27111265

  10. Pneumatic System for Concentration of Micrometer-Size Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David; Cooper, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    A report describes a size-sorting method to separate and concentrate micrometer- size dust from a broad size range of particles without using sieves, fluids, or other processes that may modify the composition or the surface properties of the dust. The system consists of four processing units connected in series by tubing. Samples of dry particulates such as lunar soil are introduced into the first unit, a fluidized bed. The flow of introduced nitrogen fluidizes the particulates and preferentially moves the finer grain sizes on to the next unit, a flat plate impactor, followed by a cyclone separator, followed by a Nuclepore polycarbonate filter to collect the dust. By varying the gas flow rate and the sizes of various orifices in the system, the size of the final and intermediate particles can be varied to provide the desired products. The dust can be collected from the filter. In addition, electron microscope grids can be placed on the Nuclepore filter for direct sampling followed by electron microscope characterization of the dust without further handling.

  11. 3D Active Stabilization System with Sub-Micrometer Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Rahkonen, Timo; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Stable positioning between a measurement probe and its target from sub- to few micrometer scales has become a prerequisite in precision metrology and in cellular level measurements from biological tissues. Here we present a 3D stabilization system based on an optoelectronic displacement sensor and custom piezo-actuators driven by a feedback control loop that constantly aims to zero the relative movement between the sensor and the target. We used simulations and prototyping to characterize the developed system. Our results show that 95 % attenuation of movement artifacts is achieved at 1 Hz with stabilization performance declining to ca. 70 % attenuation at 10 Hz. Stabilization bandwidth is limited by mechanical resonances within the displacement sensor that occur at relatively low frequencies, and are attributable to the sensor's high force sensitivity. We successfully used brain derived micromotion trajectories as a demonstration of complex movement stabilization. The micromotion was reduced to a level of ∼1 µm with nearly 100 fold attenuation at the lower frequencies that are typically associated with physiological processes. These results, and possible improvements of the system, are discussed with a focus on possible ways to increase the sensor's force sensitivity without compromising overall system bandwidth. PMID:22900045

  12. The Stickiness of Micrometer-sized Water-ice Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of μm-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ~210 K), μm-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s-1, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of μm-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s-1. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  13. High-efficiency, deep-junction, epitaxial InP solar cells on (100) and (111)B InP substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubramanian, R.; Timmons, M. L.; Hutchby, J. A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the development and performance of deep-junction (approximately 0.25 micron), graded-emitter-doped, n(sup +)-p InP solar cells grown by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A novel, diffusion-transport process for obtaining lightly-doped p-type base regions of the solar cell is described. The I-V data and external quantum-efficiency response of these cells are presented. The best active-area AMO efficiency for these deep-junction cells on (100)-oriented InP substrates is 16.8 percent, with a J(sub SC) of 31.8 mA/sq cm, a V(sub OC) of 0.843 V, and a fill-factor of 0.85. By comparison, the best cell efficiency on the (111)B-oriented InP substrates was 15.0 percent. These efficiency values for deep-junction cells are encouraging and compare favorably with performance of thin-emitter (0.03 micron) epitaxial cells as well as that of deep-emitter diffused cells. The cell performance and breakdown voltage characteristics of a batch of 20 cells on each of the orientations are presented, indicating the superior breakdown voltage properties and other characteristics of InP cells on the (111)B orientation. Spectral response, dark I-V data, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements on the InP cells are presented with an analysis on the variation in J(sub SC) and V(sub OC) of the cells. It is observed, under open-circuit conditions, that lower-V(sub OC) cells exhibit higher band-edge PL intensity for both the (100) and (111)B orientations. This anomalous behavior suggests that radiative recombination in the heavily-doped n(sup +)-InP emitter may be detrimental to achieving higher V(sub OC) in n(sup +)-p InP solar cells.

  14. Measurements with Reticle Micrometer Performed by a New Double Stars Observing Group from Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskupski, Marcin; Banacka, Natalia; Cupryjak, Justyna; Malinowska, Malgorzata; Bujel, Kamil; Koltek, Zdzislaw; Mazur, Jaroslaw; Muskala, Marcin; Plotkowski, Lukasz; Prowans, Barlomiej; Szkaplewicz, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of 19 double stars using a reticle micrometer eyepiece are reported. The observational program was held in spring and summer of 2015 as an extended workshop for a new double stars observing group from Szczecin, Poland. The goal of the program was to learn how to measure position angle and separation using a reticle micrometer eyepiece.

  15. Near-infrared continuum and 3.3 micrometer(s) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon imaging of the starburst ring in the type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzarella, J. M.; Voit, G. M.; Soifer, B. T.; Matthews, K.; Graham, J. R.; Armus, L.; Shupe, D.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution near-infrared images of the type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 7469 have been obtained to probe its dusty nuclear environment. Direct J, H, and K images are relatively featureless, but residual images created by subtracting a smooth model based on best-fitting elliptical isophotes reveal a tight inner spiral whose high surface-brightness portions correspond to a previously detected 3 sec (1 kpc) diameter ring of radio continuum emission. The inner infrared spiral arms extended approximately equal to 4 sec NW and SE from the nucleus, and the NW arm joins up with large-scale spiral structure visible in the R band. The residual images also show a bar-like structure aligned with the brightest infrared/radio hotspots at PA approximately equal to 50 deg. Three infrared hotspots are detected which align remarkably well with 6 cm radio continuum sources. The near-infrared ring and the hotspots are visible in the residual images, and in a high-resolution direct K-band image restored to an effective resolution of 0.65 sec (FWHM) using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm. The infrared hotspots have luminosities of nuL(sub nu) (2.2 micrometer(s)) approximately equal to 10(exp 8) solar luminosity (M(sub k) approximately equal to -16 mag), suggesting they are either giant H II regions or individual supernovae. The two brightest regions may be associated with enhanced star formation triggered by orbit crowding of gas where spiral arms emerge from an inner bar. Narrowband (delta lambda/lambda approximately 1.5%) imaging in the 3.28 micrometer(s) dust emission feature and surrounding continuum confirms the 3 sec diameter 3.28 micrometer(s) emission region detected previously using multiaperture photometry. The extended polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission is slightly elongated and aligned with published 1O III1 line emission and 12.5 micrometer(s) continuum emission, apparently tracing the starburst. The presence of approximately equal to 25% of the total 3.28 micrometer(s

  16. Modeling and simulation of InP homojunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahia, A. H.; Wanlass, M. W.; Coutts, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of single-crystal InP homojunction solar cells has been performed using the PC-1D code. Cell design and performance have been optimized using the best available estimates of the various materials parameters. A comparison has been made of the predictions of the PC-1D model to those of other models. The optimum performance is predicted to give an efficiency approaching 21 percent at AM0. It is shown that in order to describe the performance of actual cells it is necessary to use larger values of the intrinsic carrier concentration and the surface recombination velocity (SRV) than have been reported in the literature. However, even with a near-maximum value of SRV (e.g., 10 to the 7th cm/s) it is necessary to reduce the minority carrier diffusion length in the emitter to only 0.01 micron in order to account for the relatively low quantum efficiency in the blue part of the spectrum. This indicates that improvement in the emitter bulk properties could be much more important than the SRV. Other loss mechanisms are also discussed; in particular, it is shown that recombination in the base, for good quality material, is relatively insignificant.

  17. Surface processes during purification of InP quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Emelin, Pavel; Vinokurov, Alexander; Dorofeev, Sergey; Abakumov, Artem; Kuznetsova, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recently, a new simple and fast method for the synthesis of InP quantum dots by using phosphine as phosphorous precursor and myristic acid as surface stabilizer was reported. Purification after synthesis is necessary to obtain samples with good optical properties. Two methods of purification were compared and the surface processes which occur during purification were studied. Traditional precipitation with acetone is accompanied by a small increase in photoluminescence. It occurs that during the purification the hydrolysis of the indium precursor takes place, which leads to a better surface passivation. The electrophoretic purification technique does not increase luminescence efficiency but yields very pure quantum dots in only a few minutes. Additionally, the formation of In(OH)3 during the low temperature synthesis was explained. Purification of quantum dots is a very significant part of postsynthetical treatment that determines the properties of the material. But this subject is not sufficiently discussed in the literature. The paper is devoted to the processes that occur at the surface of quantum dots during purification. A new method of purification, electrophoresis, is investigated and described in particular. PMID:25161857

  18. InP shallow-homojunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keavney, Christopher; Spitzer, Mark B.; Vernon, Stanley M.; Haven, Victor E.; Augustine, Godfrey

    1989-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells with very thin n-type emitters have been made by both ion implantation and metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Air mass zero efficiencies as high as 18.8 percent (NASA measurement) have been achieved. Although calculations show that, as is the case with GaAs, a heterostructure is expected to be required for the highest efficiencies attainable, the material properties of InP give the shallow-homojunction structure a greater potential than in the case of GaAs. The best cells, which were those made by ion implantation, show open-circuit voltage (V sub oc) of 873 mV, short-circuit current of 357 A/sq m (35.7 mA/sq cm), and fill factor of 0.829. Improvements are anticipated in all three of these parameters. Internal quantum efficiency peaks at over 90 percent in the red end of the spectrum, but drops to 54 percent in the blue end. Other cells have achieved 74 percent in the blue end. Detailed modeling of the data indicates that a high front surface recombination velocity is responsible for the low blue response, that the carrier lifetime is high enough to allow good carrier collection from both the base and the emitter, and that the voltage is base-limited.

  19. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  20. Titan's 5 micrometers spectral window: carbon monoxide and the albedo of the surface.

    PubMed

    Noll, K S; Geballe, T R; Knacke, R F; Pendleton, Y J

    1996-12-01

    We have measured the spectrum of Titan near 5 micrometers and have found it to be dominated by absorption from the carbon monoxide 1-0 vibration-rotation band. The position of the band edge allows us to constrain the abundance of CO in the atmosphere and/or the location of the reflecting layer in the atmosphere. In the most likely case, 5 micrometers radiation is reflected from the surface and the mole fraction of CO in the atmosphere is qCO=10(+10/-5) ppm, significantly lower than previous estimates for tropospheric CO. The albedo of the reflecting layer is approximately 0.07(+0.02/-0.01) in the 5 micrometers continuum outside the CO band. The 5 micrometers albedo is consistent with a surface of mixed ice and silicates similar to the icy Galilean satellites. Organic solids formed in simulated Titan conditions can also produce similar albedos at 5 micrometers. PMID:11539388

  1. Titan's 5 micrometers spectral window: carbon monoxide and the albedo of the surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, K. S.; Geballe, T. R.; Knacke, R. F.; Pendleton, Y. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the spectrum of Titan near 5 micrometers and have found it to be dominated by absorption from the carbon monoxide 1-0 vibration-rotation band. The position of the band edge allows us to constrain the abundance of CO in the atmosphere and/or the location of the reflecting layer in the atmosphere. In the most likely case, 5 micrometers radiation is reflected from the surface and the mole fraction of CO in the atmosphere is qCO=10(+10/-5) ppm, significantly lower than previous estimates for tropospheric CO. The albedo of the reflecting layer is approximately 0.07(+0.02/-0.01) in the 5 micrometers continuum outside the CO band. The 5 micrometers albedo is consistent with a surface of mixed ice and silicates similar to the icy Galilean satellites. Organic solids formed in simulated Titan conditions can also produce similar albedos at 5 micrometers.

  2. One-step large-scale synthesis of micrometer-sized silver nanosheets by a template-free electrochemical method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We have synthesized micrometer-sized Ag nanosheets via a facile, one-step, template-free electrochemical deposition in an ultra-dilute silver nitrate aqueous electrolyte. The nanosheet growth was revealed to occur in three stages: (1) formation of polygonal Ag nuclei on a substrate, (2) growth of {112}-faceted nanowire from the nuclei, and (3) anisotropic growth of (111)-planar nanosheets, approximately 20 to 50 nm in thickness and 10 μm in width, in the <112>−direction. The vertical growth of the facet nanowire was induced by the strong interface anisotropy between the deposit and electrolyte due to the ultra-dilute concentration of electrolyte and high reduction potential. The thickness of Ag nanosheets was controllable by the adjustment of the reduction/oxidation potential and frequency of the reverse-pulse potentiodynamic mode. PMID:23692676

  3. Tailoring the optical characteristics of microsized InP nanoneedles directly grown on silicon.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Sun, Hao; Ren, Fan; Ng, Kar Wei; Tran, Thai-Truong D; Chen, Roger; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale self-assembly offers a pathway to realize heterogeneous integration of III-V materials on silicon. However, for III-V nanowires directly grown on silicon, dislocation-free single-crystal quality could only be attained below certain critical dimensions. We recently reported a new approach that overcomes this size constraint, demonstrating the growth of single-crystal InGaAs/GaAs and InP nanoneedles with the base diameters exceeding 1 μm. Here, we report distinct optical characteristics of InP nanoneedles which are varied from mostly zincblende, zincblende/wurtzite-mixed, to pure wurtzite crystalline phase. We achieved, for the first time, pure single-crystal wurtzite-phase InP nanoneedles grown on silicon with bandgaps of 80 meV larger than that of zincblende-phase InP. Being able to attain excellent material quality while scaling up in size promises outstanding device performance of these nanoneedles. At room temperature, a high internal quantum efficiency of 25% and optically pumped lasing are demonstrated for single nanoneedle as-grown on silicon substrate. Recombination dynamics proves the excellent surface quality of the InP nanoneedles, which paves the way toward achieving multijunction photovoltaic cells, long-wavelength heterostructure lasers, and advanced photonic integrated circuits. PMID:24299042

  4. Nonepitaxial Thin-Film InP for Scalable and Efficient Photocathodes.

    PubMed

    Hettick, Mark; Zheng, Maxwell; Lin, Yongjing; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Ager, Joel W; Javey, Ali

    2015-06-18

    To date, some of the highest performance photocathodes of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell have been shown with single-crystalline p-type InP wafers, exhibiting half-cell solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiencies of over 14%. However, the high cost of single-crystalline InP wafers may present a challenge for future large-scale industrial deployment. Analogous to solar cells, a thin-film approach could address the cost challenges by utilizing the benefits of the InP material while decreasing the use of expensive materials and processes. Here, we demonstrate this approach, using the newly developed thin-film vapor-liquid-solid (TF-VLS) nonepitaxial growth method combined with an atomic-layer deposition protection process to create thin-film InP photocathodes with large grain size and high performance, in the first reported solar device configuration generated by materials grown with this technique. Current-voltage measurements show a photocurrent (29.4 mA/cm(2)) and onset potential (630 mV) approaching single-crystalline wafers and an overall power conversion efficiency of 11.6%, making TF-VLS InP a promising photocathode for scalable and efficient solar hydrogen generation. PMID:26266588

  5. THE STICKINESS OF MICROMETER-SIZED WATER-ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of μm-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ∼210 K), μm-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s{sup –1}, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of μm-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s{sup –1}. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  6. Portable Speech Synthesizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibfritz, Gilbert H.; Larson, Howard K.

    1987-01-01

    Compact speech synthesizer useful traveling companion to speech-handicapped. User simply enters statement on board, and synthesizer converts statement into spoken words. Battery-powered and housed in briefcase, easily carried on trips. Unit used on telephones and face-to-face communication. Synthesizer consists of micro-computer with memory-expansion module, speech-synthesizer circuit, batteries, recharger, dc-to-dc converter, and telephone amplifier. Components, commercially available, fit neatly in 17-by 13-by 5-in. briefcase. Weighs about 20 lb (9 kg) and operates and recharges from ac receptable.

  7. Oxidative stress-induced p53 activity is enhanced by a redox-sensitive TP53INP1 SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Peuget, S; Bonacci, T; Soubeyran, P; Iovanna, J; Dusetti, N J

    2014-01-01

    Tumor Protein p53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a tumor suppressor that modulates the p53 response to stress. TP53INP1 is one of the key mediators of p53 antioxidant function by promoting the p53 transcriptional activity on its target genes. TP53INP1 expression is deregulated in many types of cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in which its decrease occurs early during the preneoplastic development. In this work, we report that redox-dependent induction of p53 transcriptional activity is enhanced by the oxidative stress-induced SUMOylation of TP53INP1 at lysine 113. This SUMOylation is mediated by PIAS3 and CBX4, two SUMO ligases especially related to the p53 activation upon DNA damage. Importantly, this modification is reversed by three SUMO1-specific proteases SENP1, 2 and 6. Moreover, TP53INP1 SUMOylation induces its binding to p53 in the nucleus under oxidative stress conditions. TP53INP1 mutation at lysine 113 prevents the pro-apoptotic, antiproliferative and antioxidant effects of TP53INP1 by impairing the p53 response on its target genes p21, Bax and PUMA. We conclude that TP53INP1 SUMOylation is essential for the regulation of p53 activity induced by oxidative stress. PMID:24608790

  8. Spin reorientation transition in ultrathin Co film on InP(2x4) reconstructed surface

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yong-Sung; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Shin, Sung-Chul

    2005-05-15

    We have investigated magnetic properties of monolayer (ML)-thickness Co film deposited on InP(2x4) reconstructed surface using in situ surface magneto-optical Kerr effects (SMOKE) measurement system. InP(2x4) reconstructed surface, obtained by several cycles of sputtering-and-annealing process, was confirmed by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. Co film grown on InP(2x4) reconstructed surface shows three distinguishable thickness regions which have different magnetic properties, depending on Co film thickness. In the Co film thickness region smaller than 7 ML, no SMOKE signal was detected. In the thickness region between 8 ML and 15 ML, both longitudinal and polar Kerr hysteresis loops were observed. In the film thickness larger than 16 ML, only longitudinal SMOKE signal without polar signal was detected.

  9. Optical and structural properties of sulfur-doped ELOG InP on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yan-Ting Junesand, Carl; Metaferia, Wondwosen; Kataria, Himanshu; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Julian, Nick; Bowers, John; Pozina, Galia; Hultman, Lars

    2015-06-07

    Optical and structural properties of sulfur-doped epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELOG) InP grown from nano-sized openings on Si are studied by room-temperature cathodoluminescence and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The dependence of luminescence intensity on opening orientation and dimension is reported. Impurity enhanced luminescence can be affected by the facet planes bounding the ELOG layer. Dark line defects formed along the [011] direction are identified as the facet planes intersected by the stacking faults in the ELOG layer. XTEM imaging in different diffraction conditions reveals that stacking faults in the seed InP layer can circumvent the SiO{sub 2} mask during ELOG and extend to the laterally grown layer over the mask. A model for Suzuki effect enhanced stacking fault propagation over the mask in sulfur-doped ELOG InP is constructed and in-situ thermal annealing process is proposed to eliminate the seeding stacking faults.

  10. Single-dot optical emission from ultralow density well-isolated InP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Ugur, A.; Hatami, F.; Masselink, W. T.; Vamivakas, A. N.; Lombez, L.; Atatuere, M.

    2008-10-06

    We demonstrate a straightforward way to obtain single well-isolated quantum dots emitting in the visible part of the spectrum and characterize the optical emission from single quantum dots using this method. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultralow growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/{mu}m{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots embedded in an InGaP matrix are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Such low-density quantum dots show excitonic emission at around 670 nm with a linewidth limited by instrument resolution. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography.

  11. Modified photoresist etch mask process for InP channeled substrate lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, D.T.C.; Yan, M.F.; Wynn, J.D.; Wilt, D.P.

    1989-03-01

    The authors develop a new photoresist etch mask process to etch (001) InP wafers to obtain (111) B-faceted v-grooves for channeled substrate laser applications. They investigate the use of HCl and HF solutions to remove native oxide layers prior to v-groove etching. They also study the relationship between the photoresist mask undercutting and the bath temperature used for native oxide removal. The degree of undercutting in photoresist mask can be reduced about two times by increasing the HF bath temperature from room temperature to 48/sup 0/C during the oxide removal process. They also identify two important factors that control the mask undercutting rates as (i) the thickness of native oxide on InP surface and (ii) the chemical reaction between InP and the oxide removal bath solution.

  12. Excitonic properties of wurtzite InP nanowires grown on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Hadj Alouane, M H; Chauvin, N; Khmissi, H; Naji, K; Ilahi, B; Maaref, H; Patriarche, G; Gendry, M; Bru-Chevallier, C

    2013-01-25

    In order to investigate the optical properties of wurtzite (Wz) InP nanowires grown on Si(001) by solid source molecular beam epitaxy with the vapour-liquid-solid method, the growth temperature and V/III pressure ratio have been optimized to remove any zinc-blende insertion. These pure Wz InP nanowires have been investigated by photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL and PL excitation. Direct observation of the second and third valence band in Wz InP nanowires using PL spectroscopy at high excitation power have been reported and, from these measurements, a crystal field splitting of 74 meV and a spin-orbit interaction energy of 145 meV were extracted. Based on the study of temperature-dependent optical properties, we have performed an investigation of the thermal escape processes of carriers and the electron-phonon coupling strength. PMID:23262659

  13. InP Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor for broadband terahertz detection and imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquillat, D.; Nodjiadjim, V.; Konczykowska, A.; Dyakonova, N.; Consejo, C.; Ruffenach, S.; Teppe, F.; Riet, M.; Muraviev, A.; Gutin, A.; Shur, M.; Godin, J.; Knap, W.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents terahertz detectors based on high performance 0.7-μm InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor (DHBT) technology and reports on the analysis of their voltage responsivity over a wide frequency range of the incoming terahertz radiation. The detectors operated without any spatial antennas to couple terahertz radiation to the device and have been characterized in the 0.25 - 3.1 THz range with the responsivities (normalized to 1 W radiant power) of 5 V/W and 200 μV/W measured at 0.35 THz and 3.11 THz, respectively. The InP DHBTs also performed as the imaging single-pixels at room temperature in the raster scanned transmission mode. A set of the sub-terahertz images of plant leaves suggest potential utility of InP DHBT detectors for terahertz imaging dedicated to non-invasive testing of plants.

  14. Mass spectrometric studies of phosphine pyrolysis and OMVPE growth of InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, C. A.; Buchan, N. I.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism of PH3 decomposition was studied by using D2 as a carrier gas and analyzing the reaction products with a mass spectrometer. The effects of InP and silica surfaces were investigated. The only gaseous product below 600 C is H2. Since any gas-phase H atoms would produce HD, the reaction occurs entirely on the surface. The slow step is the unimolecular removal of the first hydrogen atom, with an activation energy of 36.0 kcal/mole on InP surfaces. The reaction on InP is first-order for PH3 concentrations as high as 15 percent, so the surface is not saturated at those conditions. When trimethylindium (TMIn) is added to the gas mixture, the mechanism changes dramatically, probably proceeding via an unstable intermediate adduct of TMIn and PH3 which eliminates CH4 upon formation. This concerted reaction lowers the pyrolysis temperatures of both PH3 and TMIn.

  15. Enhanced monolayer MoS2/InP heterostructure solar cells by graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Lin, Shisheng; Ding, Guqiao; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Zhiqian; Zhang, Shengjiao; Xu, Zhijuan; Xu, Sen; Lu, Yanghua; Xu, Wenli; Zheng, Zheyang

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate significantly improved photovoltaic response of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)/indium phosphide (InP) van der Waals heterostructure induced by graphene quantum dots (GQDs). Raman and photoluminescence measurements indicate that effective charge transfer takes place between GQDs and MoS2, which results in n-type doping of MoS2. The doping effect increases the barrier height at the MoS2/InP heterojunction, thus the averaged power conversion efficiency of MoS2/InP solar cells is improved from 2.1% to 4.1%. The light induced doping by GQD provides a feasible way for developing more efficient MoS2 based heterostructure solar cells.

  16. High performance InP ring resonator for new generation monolithically integrated optical gyroscopes.

    PubMed

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Armenise, Mario N; Soares, Francisco M; Passenberg, Wolfgang

    2013-01-14

    An InP ring resonator with an experimentally demonstrated quality factor (Q) of the order of 10(6) is reported for the first time. This Q value, typical for low loss technologies such as silica-on-silicon, is a record for the InP technology and improves the state-of-the-art of about one order of magnitude. The cavity has been designed aiming at the Q-factor maximization while keeping the resonance depth of about 8 dB. The device was fabricated using metal-organic vapour-phase-epitaxy, photolithography and reactive ion etching. It has been optically characterized and all its performance parameters have been estimated. InP waveguide loss low as 0.45 dB/cm has been measured, leading to a potential shot noise limited resolution of 10 °/h for a new angular velocity sensor. PMID:23388949

  17. Effects of rapid quenching on the impurity site location in Zn-diffused InP

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Chan, L.Y.; Leon, R.; Haller, E.E.; Jaklevic, J.M. ); Hanson, C.M. )

    1993-07-01

    The lattice locations of Zn atoms in heavily Zn-doped InP single crystal have been investigated by ion channeling techniques. The InP samples were rapidly quenched in diffusion pump oil after high-temperature Zn diffusion. Ion channeling experiments performed along various major crystal axes suggest that a large fraction (20%--30%) of the Zn atoms are in the tetrahedral interstitial position in the InP lattice. It has been found that although the maximum hole concentration is not significantly affected by the cooling rate, there is a substantial increase in the incorporation of Zn on substitutional and tetrahedral interstitial lattice locations in the rapidly cooled samples as compared to the slowly cooled samples. The consequences of these results for understanding the mechanisms leading to the saturation of the free-hole concentration in compound semiconductors are discussed.

  18. Ultrabroadband terahertz field detection by proton-bombarded InP photoconductive antennas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tze-An; Tani, Masahiko; Nakajima, Makoto; Hangyo, Masanori; Sakai, Kiyomi; Nakashima, Shin-Ichi; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2004-06-28

    Photoconductive (PC) antennas fabricated on InP bombarded with 180 keV protons of different dosages (InP:H+) all exhibit a useful bandwidth of about 30 THz, comparable to that of the LT-GaAs PC antenna. The peak signal current of the best InP: H+ device (dosage of 10;15 ions/cm;2) is slightly higher than that of the LT-GaAs one, while the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the former is about half of that of the latter due to lower resistivity. This suggests that InP: H+ can be a good substrate for THz PC antennas with proper annealing and/or implantation recipe. PMID:19483812

  19. Growth mechanisms and crystallographic structure of InP nanowires on lattice-mismatched substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moewe, Michael; Chuang, Linus C.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2008-08-01

    We present a growth model that predicts the growth phase and mechanism of InP nanowires (NWs) and the experimental verifications of the model. The NWs were grown on lattice-mismatched GaAs substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition via Au nanodrop-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth. Nanodrops with larger diameters are shown to grow longer NWs because growth is governed mainly by direct precursor impingement on the nanodrop surface. The theoretical and experimental results also show that growth phase is dependent on NW diameter. We show that InP NWs with a diameter less than a certain value exhibit coherent growth of a single crystalline wurtzite (WZ) phase, whereas larger diameter InP NWs often contain sequences of WZ and zincblende phases and stacking faults. These findings allow one to achieve coherent NW growth and WZ phases free from twinning if the NW diameter is below certain material-dependent critical diameters.

  20. Defect reaction network in Si-doped InP : numerical predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2013-10-01

    This Report characterizes the defects in the defect reaction network in silicon-doped, n-type InP deduced from first principles density functional theory. The reaction network is deduced by following exothermic defect reactions starting with the initially mobile interstitial defects reacting with common displacement damage defects in Si-doped InP until culminating in immobile reaction products. The defect reactions and reaction energies are tabulated, along with the properties of all the silicon-related defects in the reaction network. This Report serves to extend the results for intrinsic defects in SAND 2012-3313: %E2%80%9CSimple intrinsic defects in InP: Numerical predictions%E2%80%9D to include Si-containing simple defects likely to be present in a radiation-induced defect reaction sequence.

  1. Differential InP HEMT MMIC Amplifiers Embedded in Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Schlecht, Erich; Samoska, Lorene

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifiers of a type now being developed for operation at frequencies of hundreds of gigahertz contain InP high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) in a differential configuration. The differential configuration makes it possible to obtain gains greater than those of amplifiers having the single-ended configuration. To reduce losses associated with packaging, the MMIC chips are designed integrally with, and embedded in, waveguide packages, with the additional benefit that the packages are compact enough to fit into phased transmitting and/or receiving antenna arrays. Differential configurations (which are inherently balanced) have been used to extend the upper limits of operating frequencies of complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) amplifiers to the microwave range but, until now, have not been applied in millimeter- wave amplifier circuits. Baluns have traditionally been used to transform from single-ended to balanced configurations, but baluns tend to be lossy. Instead of baluns, finlines are used to effect this transformation in the present line of development. Finlines have been used extensively to drive millimeter- wave mixers in balanced configurations. In the present extension of the finline balancing concept, finline transitions are integrated onto the affected MMICs (see figure). The differential configuration creates a virtual ground within each pair of InP HEMT gate fingers, eliminating the need for inductive vias to ground. Elimination of these vias greatly reduces parasitic components of current and the associated losses within an amplifier, thereby enabling more nearly complete utilization of the full performance of each transistor. The differential configuration offers the additional benefit of multiplying (relative to the single-ended configuration) the input and output impedances of each transistor by a factor of four, so that it is possible to use large transistors that would otherwise have

  2. Label swapper device for spectral amplitude coded optical packet networks monolithically integrated on InP.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, P; García-Olcina, R; Habib, C; Chen, L R; Leijtens, X J M; de Vries, T; Robbins, D; Capmany, J

    2011-07-01

    In this paper the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of an spectral amplitude coded (SAC) optical label swapper monolithically integrated on Indium Phosphide (InP) is presented. The device has a footprint of 4.8x1.5 mm2 and is able to perform label swapping operations required in SAC at a speed of 155 Mbps. The device was manufactured in InP using a multiple purpose generic integration scheme. Compared to previous SAC label swapper demonstrations, using discrete component assembly, this label swapper chip operates two order of magnitudes faster. PMID:21747509

  3. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  4. Beyond G-band : a 235 GHz InP MMIC amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Douglas; Samoska, Lorene; Fung, A. K.; Lee, Karen; Lai, Richard; Grundbacher, Ronald; Liu, Po-Hsin; Raja, Rohit

    2005-01-01

    We present results on an InP monolithic millimeter- wave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier having 10-dB gain at 235 GHz. We designed this circuit and fabricated the chip in Northrop Grumman Space Technology's (NGST) 0.07- m InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) process. Using a WR3 (220-325 GHz) waveguide vector network analyzer system interfaced to waveguide wafer probes, we measured this chip on-wafer for -parameters. To our knowledge, this is the first time a WR3 waveguide on-wafer measurement system has been used to measure gain in a MMIC amplifier above 230 GHz.

  5. Organometallic vapor phase epitaxial growth of InP using new phosphorus sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, C. A.; Chen, C. H.; Kitamura, M.; Stringfellow, G. B.; Brown, D. W.; Robertson, A. J.

    1986-06-01

    Two organophosphorus compounds, isobutylphosphine and tertiarybutylphosphine, have been investigated for their possible use as precursors in the organometallic vapor phase epitaxy process. They are the first nonhydride compounds to be used as phosphorus sources. Pyrolysis studies show that the first decomposition products are phosphine and various organic compounds. The phosphine then pyrolyzes to give phosphorus. The materials are less pyrophoric and less toxic than phosphine, and so are safer to use. The compounds have been used to grow epitaxial layers of InP on InP and GaAs substrates. The layers exhibit photoluminescence and electrical properties which are similar to those of layers grown with phosphine.

  6. Conductivity of nanoporous InP membranes investigated using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, S. K. E.; Lloyd-Hughes, J.; Sirbu, L.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Parkinson, P.; Herz, L. M.; Johnston, M. B.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the terahertz conductivity of extrinsic and photoexcited electrons in nanoporous indium phosphide (InP) at different pore densities and orientations. The form of electronic transport in the film was found to differ significantly from that for bulk InP. While photo-generated electrons showed Drude-like transport, the behaviour for extrinsic electrons deviated significantly from the Drude model. Time-resolved photoconductivity measurements found that carrier recombination was slow, with lifetimes exceeding 1 ns for all porosities and orientations. When considered together, these findings suggest that the surfaces created by the nanopores strongly alter the dynamics of both extrinsic and photoexcited electrons.

  7. High Beginning-of-Life Efficiency p/n InP Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Ringel, Steven A.; Scheiman, David A.; Wilt, David M.; Brinker, David J.

    2004-01-01

    We have achieved a new record efficiency of 17.6%, (AM0) for a p/n InP homo-epitaxy solar cell. In addition, we have eliminated a previously observed photo-degradation of cell performance, which was due to losses in J(sub sc). Cells soaked in AM0 spectrum at one-sun intensity for an hour showed no significant change in cell performance. We have discovered carrier passivation effects when using Zn as the p-type dopant in the OMVPE growth of InP and have found a method to avoid the unexpected effects which result from typical operation of OMVPE cell growth.

  8. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma process for InP passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. Z.; Li, M.; Wang, Y.; Irene, E. A.

    1993-05-01

    In-situ ellipsometry has been used to monitor electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma oxidation of InP at room temperature in the shadow plasma between a shutter and the sample. This process leaves no detectable excess P at the InP-oxide interface. A capping layer of SiO2 was grown by ECR chemical-vapor deposition at a substrate temperature of 150 deg C. The samples were rapid-thermal annealed at 500 deg C for 1 min in an oxygen ambient. The dielectric layers were evaluated by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements on metal-oxide n-type InP capacitors.

  9. Surface recombination velocity and lifetime in InP measured by transient microwave reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothra, S.; Tyagi, S. D.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime and surface recombination velocity are determined in organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy (OMVPE)-grown InP by a contactless microwave technique. For lightly doped n-type InP, a surface recombination velocity of 5000 cm/s is measured. However, in solar cells with a heavily doped n-type emitter a surface recombination velocity of 1 x 10 to the 6th cm/s is observed. Possible reasons for this due to surface pinning are discussed. The effects of various chemical treatments and SiO on the surface recombination velocity are measured.

  10. On the Nature of the First Galaxies Selected at 350 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Sophia A.; Chanial, Pierre F.; Willner, S. P.; Pearson, Chris P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Benford, Dominic J.; Clements, David L.; Dye, Simon; Farrah, Duncan; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J. S.; Lebouteiller, V.; Le Floc'H, Emeric; Mainetti, Gabriele; Harvey Moseley, S.; Negrello, Mattia; Serjeant, Stephen; Shafer, Richard A.; Staguhn, Johannes; Sumner, Timothy J.; Vaccari, Mattia

    2009-01-01

    We present constraints on the nature of the first galaxies selected at 350 micrometers. The sample includes galaxies discovered in the deepest blank-field survey at 350 micrometers (in the Bo6tes Deep Field) and also later serendipitous detections in the Lockman Hole. In determining multiwavelength identifications, the 350 lam position and map resolution of the second generation Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera are critical, especially in the cases where multiple radio sources exist and the 24 micrometer counterparts are unresolved. Spectral energy distribution templates are fitted to identified counterparts, and the sample is found to comprise IR-luminous galaxies at 1 < z < 3 predominantly powered by star formation. The first spectrum of a 350 micrometer selected galaxy provides an additional confirmation, showing prominent dust grain features typically associated with star-forming galaxies. Compared to submillimeter galaxies selected at 850 and 1100 micrometers, galaxies selected at 350 micrometers have a similar range of far-infrared color temperatures. However, no 350 micrometer selected sources are reliably detected at 850 or 1100 micrometers. Galaxies in our sample with redshifts 1 < z < 2 show a tight correlation between the far- and mid-infrared flux densities, but galaxies at higher redshifts show a large dispersion in their mid- to far-infrared colors. This implies a limit to which the mid-IR emission traces the far-IR emission in star-forming galaxies. The 350 micrometer flux densities (15 < S(sub 350) < 40 mJy) place these objects near the Herschel/SPIRE 350 micrometer confusion threshold, with the lower limit on the star formation rate density suggesting the bulk of the 350 micrometers contribution will come from less luminous infrared sources and normal galaxies. Therefore, the nature of the dominant source of the 350 micrometers background-star-forming galaxies in the epoch of peak star formation in the universe-could be more effectively

  11. High Temperature Mechanical Behavior of Polycrystalline Alumina from Mixed Nanometer and Micrometer Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2001-01-01

    Sintered aluminum oxide materials were formed using commercial methods from mechanically mixed powders of nano-and micrometer alumina. The powders were consolidated at 1500 and 1600 C with 3.2 and 7.2 ksi applied stress in argon. The conventional micrometer sized powders failed to consolidate. While 100 percent nanometer-sized alumina and its mixture with the micrometer powders achieved less than 99 percent density. Preliminary high temperature creep behavior indicates no super-plastic strains. However high strains (less than 0.65 percent) were generated in the nanometer powder, due to cracks and linked voids initiated by cavitation.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Micrometer measurements of double stars (Ling+, 2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, J. F.; Prieto, C.

    2000-10-01

    We report 312 micrometer measurements of 155 visual double stars made with the 50 cm refractor at the Cote D'Azur observatory (Nice, France) and with the 152 cm telescope at Calar Alto observatory (Almeria, Spain). (2 data files).

  13. Some 5-13 micrometer airborne observations of Comet Wilson 1986l: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Witteborn, F. C.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Rank, D. M.; Cohen, M. C; Campins, Humberto C.

    1988-01-01

    Comet Wilson was observed from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory approximately 23.6 and 25.7 Apr. 1987, UT (approx. 3 to 5 days after perihelion) using the NASA-Ames Faint Object Grating Spectrometer. Spectrophotometric data were observed with a 21 inch aperture between 5 and 13 micrometer and with a spectral resolution of 50 to 100. Spectra of the inner coma and nucleus reveal a fairly smooth continuum with little evidence of silicate emission. The 5 to 8 micrometer color temperature of the comet was 300 + or - 15 K, approx. 15 percent higher than the equilibrium blackbody temperature. All three spectra of the nucleus show a new emission feature at approx. 12.25 micrometer approx. two channels (.22 micrometer) wide. Visual and photographic observations made during the time of these observations showed a broad faint, possible two component tail. No outburst activity was observed.

  14. Multiplexed chirp waveform synthesizer

    DOEpatents

    Dudley, Peter A.; Tise, Bert L.

    2003-09-02

    A synthesizer for generating a desired chirp signal has M parallel channels, where M is an integer greater than 1, each channel including a chirp waveform synthesizer generating at an output a portion of a digital representation of the desired chirp signal; and a multiplexer for multiplexing the M outputs to create a digital representation of the desired chirp signal. Preferably, each channel receives input information that is a function of information representing the desired chirp signal.

  15. Acid dissolution experiments - Carbonates and the 6.8-micrometer bands in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-03-01

    A chemical dissolution experiment on an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) showed that carbonates, not acid-insoluble organic compounds, were responsible for virtually all the absorption at 6.8 micrometers seen in the infrared spectra of this particle. The IDP examined had an infrared spectrum characteristic of layer-lattice silicates and belongs to a class of IDP's whose spectra resemble those of protostellar objects like W33 A, which also exhibit a band at 6.8 micrometers.

  16. Infrared images of Jupiter at 5-micrometer wavelength during the Voyager 1 encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, R. J.; Capps, R. W.; Backman, D. E.; Becklin, E. E.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Beichman, C. A.; Brown, R. H.; Westphal, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    A coordinated program to observe Jupiter at high spatial resolution in the 5-micrometer wavelength region was undertaken to support Voyager 1 imaging and infrared radiation experiment targeting. Jupiter was observed over a 5-month period from Palomar and Mauna Kea observatories. The frequency of observations allowed the selection of interesting areas for closer Voyager examination and also provided good short-term monitoring of variations in cloud morphology. Significant global changes in the 5-micrometer distribution are seen over this time period.

  17. Focusing of sub-micrometer particles and bacteria enabled by two-dimensional acoustophoresis.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, M; Muller, P B; Augustsson, P; Bruus, H; Laurell, T

    2014-08-01

    Handling of sub-micrometer bioparticles such as bacteria are becoming increasingly important in the biomedical field and in environmental and food analysis. As a result, there is an increased need for less labor-intensive and time-consuming handling methods. Here, an acoustophoresis-based microfluidic chip that uses ultrasound to focus sub-micrometer particles and bacteria, is presented. The ability to focus sub-micrometer bioparticles in a standing one-dimensional acoustic wave is generally limited by the acoustic-streaming-induced drag force, which becomes increasingly significant the smaller the particles are. By using two-dimensional acoustic focusing, i.e. focusing of the sub-micrometer particles both horizontally and vertically in the cross section of a microchannel, the acoustic streaming velocity field can be altered to allow focusing. Here, the focusability of E. coli and polystyrene particles as small as 0.5 μm in diameter in microchannels of square or rectangular cross sections, is demonstrated. Numerical analysis was used to determine generic transverse particle trajectories in the channels, which revealed spiral-shaped trajectories of the sub-micrometer particles towards the center of the microchannel; this was also confirmed by experimental observations. The ability to focus and enrich bacteria and other sub-micrometer bioparticles using acoustophoresis opens the research field to new microbiological applications. PMID:24895052

  18. Embossed Bragg Gratings Based on Organically Modified Silane Waveguides in InP.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Lam, Y L; Chan, Y C; Zhou, Y; Ooi, B S; Tan, G; Yao, J

    2000-09-20

    Considering the large variety of applications for optical glass waveguide gratings, the effective production method of embossing for micropatterning, and the unique advantages of InP-based materials, we expect that hybridization of embossed optical glass waveguide gratings and InP substrates will inevitably lead to new applications in integrated optics. We present our preliminary results of research toward the development of solgel-derived glass waveguide gratings made by embossing on InP. Theoretically, the dependence of the stop-band FWHM and transmission contrast of the grating filter on the grating length, and the relationship between the Bragg grating's reflective wavelength and the dopant concentration in the solgel waveguide, are obtained. Experimentally, using organically modified silane, we solve the problem of mismatching of SiO(2) and InP, and successfully fabricate an embossed glass grating with a second-order Bragg reflection wavelength of 1580 nm and a FWHM of 0.7 nm fabricated upon a solgel waveguide on an InP substrate. PMID:18350088

  19. Status and future directions of InP solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the current status and future directions of InP space solar cell research is provided. The scope of the paper does not allow us to discuss other recent major developments in InP cell modeling, contacts, and characterization, or developments in other solar cell materials. Solar cells made from InP and related materials are not expected to be used in the near future for terrestrial applications, but significant Air-Mass1.5 (AM1.5) cell efficiencies are given for comparison. This paper deals with the developments in single-junction cells, multijunction tandem cells, and space flight testing, including radiation effects. Concentrator InP solar cells are also discussed, since they offer the possibility of simultaneous thermal and current injection annealing. These cells also promise cost effectiveness and the concentrator elements may provide cells with extra protection from space radiation. The concluding section addresses the steps to be taken in the future and provides guidelines for further research and development.

  20. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Oxidation of InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Noboru; Ikoma, Hideaki

    1992-12-01

    InP was oxidized chemically (in boiling deionized water), thermally (dry oxygen, 260°C, 30 min) and chemically under light illumination from a xenon arc lamp. The chemical compositions and their depth distributions from the surface of these oxides as well as the InP native oxide (naturally grown) were studied by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and XPS combined with in situ Ar+ ion etching. In any oxide, indium is first oxidized to form In2O3 perhaps due to depletion of phosphorus from the InP surface induced by contact annealing, etc. InPO3 and/or InPO4 are then successively grown on an In2O3 or In2O3 rich layer. In and P atoms diffuse through the already grown In2O3 layer and react with oxidant at the surface to form InPO3 and/or InPO4. Light illumination was found to strongly enhance oxidation of InP, and substantially increase InPO3 and InPO4.

  1. Effect of Zinc Incorporation on the Performance of Red Light Emitting InP Core Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lifei; Cho, Deok-Yong; Besmehn, Astrid; Duchamp, Martial; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lam, Yeng Ming; Kardynał, Beata E

    2016-09-01

    This report presents a systematic study on the effect of zinc (Zn) carboxylate precursor on the structural and optical properties of red light emitting InP nanocrystals (NCs). NC cores were assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). When moderate Zn:In ratios in the reaction pot were used, the incorporation of Zn in InP was insufficient to change the crystal structure or band gap of the NCs, but photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) increased dramatically compared with pure InP NCs. Zn was found to incorporate mostly in the phosphate layer on the NCs. PL, PLQY, and time-resolved PL (TRPL) show that Zn carboxylates added to the precursors during NC cores facilitate the synthesis of high-quality InP NCs by suppressing nonradiative and sub-band-gap recombination, and the effect is visible also after a ZnS shell is grown on the cores. PMID:27551948

  2. A model for rapid synthesis of large volume InP melts

    SciTech Connect

    Iseler, G.; Anselmo, A.P.; Bliss, D.F.; Bryant, G.

    1996-12-31

    The rapid synthesis of InP is routinely carried out in the laboratory by subliming phosphorus into encapsulated liquid In. The authors have constructed the first model of this process by considering the equilibrium vapor pressure over red phosphorus as its temperature increases, and that over In{sub 1{minus}x}P{sub x} as its phosphorus content increases.

  3. Properties of barrier contacts with nanosize TiB{sub x} layers to InP

    SciTech Connect

    Arsentyev, I. N. Bobyl, A. V.; Tarasov, I. S.; Boltovets, N. S. Ivanov, V. N.; Belyaev, A. E.; Kamalov, A. B.; Konakova, R. V. Kudryk, Ya. Ya.; Lytvyn, O. S.; Milenin, V. V.; Russu, E. V.

    2008-07-15

    Structural and electrical properties of Au-TiB{sub x}-nn{sup +}n{sup ++}-InP and TiB{sub x}-nn{sup +}n{sup ++}-InP multilayer barrier structures on standard ('rigid') and soft ('porous')n{sup ++}-InP substrates have been studied, with the semiconductor layers deposited by vapor-phase epitaxy, metallic layers formed by magnetron sputtering, and porous substrates fabricated by electrochemical etching of the standard InP. Samples on porous substrates have the following advantages: leakage currents in their reverse current-voltage characteristics are ten times lower; the range of the exponential rise in current in the forward characteristics is an order of magnitude wider; the changes in the ideality factor and the Schottky barrier height, observed as the contact area varies by a factor of 100, are three and {approx}10 times smaller, respectively; and the structure of the layers is more stable in annealing at up to 800{sup o}C.

  4. Lasing characteristics of InAs quantum dot laers on InP substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Qiu, D.; Uhl, R.; Chacon, R.

    2003-01-01

    Single-stack InAs self-assembled quantum dots (QD) lasers based on InP substrate have been grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The narrow ridge waveguide lasers lased up to 260 K in continuous wave operation, and near room temperature in pulsed mode, with wavelengths between 1.59 to 1.74 mu m.

  5. Amphoteric substitutionality and lattice distortion of Ge in InP

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Moll, A.J.; Walukiewicz, W. ); Derhacobian, N.; Rossington, C. )

    1994-03-21

    We have studied the electrical and structural properties of InP implanted with Ge ions (2[times]10[sup 15]/cm[sup 2]). The implantation was performed at both room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). After annealing at 850 [degree]C for 5 s, both sets of samples exhibited [ital n]-type conductivity. The [ital n]-type activation efficiency in the RT implanted sample was about a factor of 2 higher than that in the LNT sample (15% and 8%, respectively). Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) shows direct evidence of the amphoteric substitutionality of the Ge atoms in InP for both samples. The ratios of Ge on In sites to Ge on P sites, derived from the EXAFS results, are consistent with the electrical behavior of the samples. The EXAFS results also reveal that the Ge---In and Ge---P bond lengths in the RT sample are very similar to their theoretical values, but are very different from the original In---P bond length. A relaxation in the Ge---In bond is observed in the LNT sample, resulting in a Ge---In bond length very similar to the original In---P bond length.

  6. Submicron gate InP power MISFET's with improved output power density at 18 and 20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, M. D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Messick, L. J.; Nguyen, R.; Schmitz, D.; Juergensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    The microwave characteristics are presented at 18 and 20 GHz of submicron gate indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFET's) for high output power density applications. InP power MISFET's were fabricated and the output power density was investigated as a function of drain-source spacing. The best output power density and gain were obtained for drain-source spacing of 3 microns. The output power density is 2.7 times greater than was previously measured for InP MISFET's at 18 and 20 GHz, and the power-added efficiency also increased.

  7. Submicron gate InP power MISFET's with improved output power density at 18 and 20 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedenbender, Michael D.; Kapoor, Vik J.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Messick, Louis J.; Nguyen, Richard; Schmitz, Dietmar; Jurgensen, Holger

    1991-01-01

    The microwave characteristics are presented at 18 and 20 GHz of submicron gate indium phosphide (InP) metal-insulator-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MISFETs) for high output power density applications. InP power MISFET's were fabricated and the output power density was investigated as a function of drain-source spacing. The best output power density and gain were obtained for drain-source spacing of 3 micron. The output power density is 2.7 times greater than was previously measured for InP MISFET's at 18 and 20 GHz, and the power-added efficiency also increased.

  8. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R. E.; Ansmann, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of number concentrations of aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (APC50, reservoir of favorable CCN) and with radius > 250 nm (APC250, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the aerosol particle surface area concentration (ASC, used in INP parameterization) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) with relative uncertainties of a factor of around 2 (APC50), and of about 25-50 % (APC250, ASC). Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to identify mineral dust particles and to distinguish and separate the aerosol properties of basic aerosol types such as mineral dust and continental pollution (haze, smoke). We investigate the relationship between AEC and APC50, APC250, and ASC for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm and main aerosol types (dust, pollution, marine). Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures of continental pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple relationship between APC50 and the CCN-reservoir particles (APCCCN) and published INP parameterization schemes (with APC250 and ASC as input) we finally compute APCCCN and INP concentration profiles. We apply the full methodology to a lidar observation of a heavy dust outbreak crossing Cyprus with dust up to 8 km height and to a case during which anthropogenic pollution dominated.

  9. Lattice location of diffused Zn atoms in GaAs and InP single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, L.Y.; Yu, K.M.; Ben-Tzur, M.; Haller, E.E.; Jaklevic, J.M.; Walukiewicz, W. ); Hanson, C.M. )

    1991-03-01

    We have investigated the saturation phenomenon of the free carrier concentration in {ital p}-type GaAs and InP single crystals doped by zinc diffusion. The free hole saturation occurs at 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3} for GaAs, but the maximum concentration for InP appears at mid 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}. The difference in the saturation hole concentrations for these materials is investigated by studying the incorporation and the lattice location of the impurity zinc, an acceptor when located on a group III atom site. Zinc is diffused into the III-V wafers in a sealed quartz ampoule. Particle-induced x-ray emission with ion-channeling techniques are employed to determine the exact lattice location of the zinc atoms. We have found that over 90% of all zinc atoms occupy Ga sites in the diffused GaAs samples, while for the InP case, the zinc substitutionality is dependent on the cooling rate of the sample after high-temperature diffusion. For the slowly cooled sample, a large fraction ({similar to}90%) of the zinc atoms form random precipitates of Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} and elemental Zn. However, when rapidly cooled only 60% of the zinc forms such precipitates while the rest occupies specific sites in the InP. We analyze our results in terms of the amphoteric native defect model. We show that the difference in the electrical activity of the Zn atoms in GaAs and InP is a consequence of the different location of the Fermi level stabilization energy in these two materials.

  10. Fabrication of Sn-3.5Ag Eutectic Alloy Powder by Annealing Sub-Micrometer Sn@Ag Powder Prepared by Citric Acid-Assisted Ag Immersion Plating.

    PubMed

    Chee, Sang-Soo; Choi, Eun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    A Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy powder has been developed by chemically synthesizing sub-micrometer Sn@Ag powder at room temperature. This synthesis was achieved by first obtaining a sub-micrometer Sn powder for the core using a modified variant of the polyol method, and then coating this with a uniformly thin and continuous Ag layer through immersion plating in 5.20 mM citric acid. The citric acid was found to play multiple roles in the Ag coating process, acting as a chelating agent, a reducing agent and a stabilizer to ensure coating uniformity; and as such, the amount used has an immense influence on the coating quality of the Ag shells. It was later verified by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis that the coated Ag layer transfers to the Sn core via diffusion to form an Ag3Sn phase at room temperature. Differential scanning calorimetry also revealed that the synthesized Sn@Ag powder is nearly transformed into Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy powder upon annealing three times at a temperature of up to 250 degrees C, as evidenced by a single melting peak at 220.5 degrees C. It was inferred from this that Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy powder can be successfully prepared through the synthesis of core Sn powders by a modified polyol method, immersion plating using citric acid, and annealing, in that order. PMID:26726525

  11. PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1963-08-01

    >An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

  12. Wisdom, Intelligence & Creativity Synthesized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    How is it that smart administrators who want to do a good job often find themselves in situations that degenerate into confrontation and, ultimately, termination? In this article, the author discusses why in terms of a model of leadership--which he refers to it as WICS, an acronym for wisdom, intelligence and creativity synthesized. He describes…

  13. Synthesized night vision goggle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haixian

    2000-06-01

    A Synthesized Night Vision Goggle that will be described int his paper is a new type of night vision goggle with multiple functions. It consists of three parts: main observing system, picture--superimposed system (or Cathode Ray Tube system) and Charge-Coupled Device system.

  14. First-principles study of the electronic properties of wurtzite, zinc-blende, and twinned InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengfeng; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei

    2010-12-17

    The electronic properties of zinc blende, wurtzite, and rotationally twinned InP nanowires were studied using first-principles calculations. The results show that all the simulated nanowires exhibit a semiconducting character, and the band gap decreases with increasing the nanowire size. The band gap difference between the zinc blende, wurtzite, and twinned InP nanowires and a bulk InP can be described by several formulas proportional to the diameter of nanowires. The valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) originate mainly from the p-orbitals of the P atoms and s-orbitals of the In atoms at the core regions of the nanowires, respectively. The hexagonal (2H) stacking inside the cubic (3C) stacking has no effect on the electronic properties of thin InP nanowires.

  15. Temperature coefficients and radiation induced DLTS spectra of MOCVD grown n(+)p InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Robert J.; Statler, Richard L.; Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of temperature and radiation on n(+)p InP solar cells and mesa diodes grown by metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were studied. It was shown that MOCVD is capable of consistently producing good quality InP solar cells with Eff greater than 19 percent which display excellent radiation resistance due to minority carrier injection and thermal annealing. It was also shown that universal predictions of InP device performance based on measurements of a small group of test samples can be expected to be quite accurate, and that the degradation of an InP device due to any incident particle spectrum should be predictable from a measurement following a single low energy proton irradiation.

  16. Direct observation of the amphoteric behavior of Ge in InP modified by P co-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Ridgway, M.C.

    1997-08-01

    We have investigated the preferred substitution of Ge in InP by altering the local stoichiometry of the InP substrate. By co-implanting P with Ge to create a group V-rich environment, we directly observed an enhancement of the Ge substituting the In sublattice. A corresponding increase in the n-type conductivity by as much as three times was also observed in the Ge and P co-implanted sample. However, due to the altered local stoichiometry, the Ge solubility in InP was reduced by a factor of 2. The residual crystalline damage in the P co-implanted InP after annealing was also decreased due to the compensation of the nonstoichiometry related damage by the excess P in the middle of the implanted region. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Observational constraints on the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune from new measurements near 10 micrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, A.T.; Caldwell, J.

    1983-10-01

    Uranus was detected at 10.3, 11.6 and 12.5 micrometers approximately 1 micrometer spectral bandpasses, with respective brightness temperatures of 74.0 + 0.9 or -1.1, 67.6 + 0.5 or -0.7, and 65.5 + 0.6 or -0.7 K and the first detection of Neptune at 10.3 micrometers with a brightness temperature of 77.5 + 0.7 or -0.9 K. We also detected Neptune at 11.36 micrometers with 2 percent spectral resolution at 81.0 + 0.8 or -0.9 K. The 10 micrometers continuous of both Uranus and Neptune may in part be due to reflected solar radiation as well as thermal emission. If all of the observed flux is reflected light, then the maximum geometric albedo of Uranus is 0.115 + or - 0.020, and that of Neptune is 0.229 + or - 0.043. In the context of previous observations in this region, the maximum stratospheric C2H6 mixing ratio is found to be 3 x 10 to the -8 power for Uranus and 3 x 10 to the -6 power for Neptune. A value for the maximum mixing ratio in the stratosphere of Neptune on the order of 1 - 0.004 appears to be consistent with the available data. Previously announced in STAR as N83-29155.

  18. Performance, defect behavior and carrier enhancement in low energy, proton irradiated p+nn+ InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Rybicki, G. C.; Vargas-Aburto, C.; Jain, R. K.; Scheiman, D.

    1994-01-01

    The highest AMO efficiency (19.1 percent) InP solar cell consisted of an n+pp+ structure epitaxially grown on a p+ InP substrate. However, the high cost and relative fragility of InP served as motivation for research efforts directed at heteroepitaxial growth of InP on more viable substrates. The highest AMO efficiency (13.7 percent) for this type of cell was achieved using a GaAs substrate. Considering only cost and fracture toughness, Si would be the preferred substrate. The fact that Si is a donor in InP introduces complexities which are necessary in order to avoid the formation of an efficiency limiting counterdiode. One method used to overcome this problem lies in employing an n+p+ tunnel junction in contact with the cell's p region. A simpler method consists of using an n+ substrate and processing the cell in the p+ nn+ configuration. This eliminates the need for a tunnel junction. Unfortunately, the p/n configuration has received relatively little attention the best cell with this geometry having achieved an efficiency of 17 percent. Irradiation of these homoepitaxial cells, with 1 Mev electrons, showed that they were slightly more radiation resistant than diffused junction n/p cells. Additional p/n InP cells have been processed by some activity aimed at diffusion. Currently, there has been some activity aimed at producing heteroepitaxial p+nn+ InP cells using n+ Ge substrates. Since, like Si, Ge is an n-dopant in InP, use of this configuration obviates the need for a tunnel junction. Obviously, before attempting to process heteroepitaxial cells, one must produce a reasonably good homoepitaxial cell. In the present case we focus our attention on homoepitaxially on an n+ Ge substrate.

  19. Growth of InP directly on Si by corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Kataria, Himanshu; Sun, Yan-Ting; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    In an attempt to achieve an InP-Si heterointerface, a new and generic method, the corrugated epitaxial lateral overgrowth (CELOG) technique in a hydride vapor phase epitaxy reactor, was studied. An InP seed layer on Si (0 0 1) was patterned into closely spaced etched mesa stripes, revealing the Si surface in between them. The surface with the mesa stripes resembles a corrugated surface. The top and sidewalls of the mesa stripes were then covered by a SiO2 mask after which the line openings on top of the mesa stripes were patterned. Growth of InP was performed on this corrugated surface. It is shown that growth of InP emerges selectively from the openings and not on the exposed silicon surface, but gradually spreads laterally to create a direct interface with the silicon, hence the name CELOG. We study the growth behavior using growth parameters. The lateral growth is bounded by high index boundary planes of {3 3 1} and {2 1 1}. The atomic arrangement of these planes, crystallographic orientation dependent dopant incorporation and gas phase supersaturation are shown to affect the extent of lateral growth. A lateral to vertical growth rate ratio as large as 3.6 is achieved. X-ray diffraction studies confirm substantial crystalline quality improvement of the CELOG InP compared to the InP seed layer. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal the formation of a direct InP-Si heterointerface by CELOG without threading dislocations. While CELOG is shown to avoid dislocations that could arise due to the large lattice mismatch (8%) between InP and Si, staking faults could be seen in the layer. These are probably created by the surface roughness of the Si surface or SiO2 mask which in turn would have been a consequence of the initial process treatments. The direct InP-Si heterointerface can find applications in high efficiency and cost-effective Si based III-V semiconductor multijunction solar cells and optoelectronics integration.

  20. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) and ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols), n100, dry (particles with dry radius > 100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN), and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius > 250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP), as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations) can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5-2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25-50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine) and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input) and available INP parameterization schemes (with n250, dry and sdry as input) we finally compute

  1. Observations of far-infrared fine structure lines: o III88.35 micrometer and oI 63.2 micrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, J. W. V.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of the O III 88.35 micrometer line and the O I63.2 micrometer were made with a far infrared spectrometer. The sources M17, NGC 7538, and W51 were mapped in the O III line with 1 arc minute resolution and the emission is found to be quite widespread. In all cases the peak of the emission coincides with the maximum radio continuum. The far infrared continuum was mapped simultaneously and in M17, NGC 7538, and W51 the continuum peak is found to be distinct from the center of ionization. The O III line was also detected in W3, W49, and in a number of positions in the Orion nebula. Upper limits were obtained on NGS 7027, NGC 6572, DR21, G29.9-0.0 and M82. The 63.2 micrometer O I line was detected in M17, M42, and marginally in DR21. A partial map of M42 in this line shows that most of the emission observed arises from the Trapezium and from the bright optical bar to the southeast.

  2. On the usage of classical nucleation theory in quantification of the impact of bacterial INP on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahyoun, Maher; Wex, Heike; Gosewinkel, Ulrich; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Nielsen, Niels W.; Finster, Kai; Sørensen, Jens H.; Stratmann, Frank; Korsholm, Ulrik S.

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial ice-nucleating particles (INP) are present in the atmosphere and efficient in heterogeneous ice-nucleation at temperatures up to -2 °C in mixed-phase clouds. However, due to their low emission rates, their climatic impact was considered insignificant in previous modeling studies. In view of uncertainties about the actual atmospheric emission rates and concentrations of bacterial INP, it is important to re-investigate the threshold fraction of cloud droplets containing bacterial INP for a pronounced effect on ice-nucleation, by using a suitable parameterization that describes the ice-nucleation process by bacterial INP properly. Therefore, we compared two heterogeneous ice-nucleation rate parameterizations, denoted CH08 and HOO10 herein, both of which are based on classical-nucleation-theory and measurements, and use similar equations, but different parameters, to an empirical parameterization, denoted HAR13 herein, which considers implicitly the number of bacterial INP. All parameterizations were used to calculate the ice-nucleation probability offline. HAR13 and HOO10 were implemented and tested in a one-dimensional version of a weather-forecast-model in two meteorological cases. Ice-nucleation-probabilities based on HAR13 and CH08 were similar, in spite of their different derivation, and were higher than those based on HOO10. This study shows the importance of the method of parameterization and of the input variable, number of bacterial INP, for accurately assessing their role in meteorological and climatic processes.

  3. Nanoscale Size-Selective Deposition of Nanowires by Micrometer Scale Hydrophilic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong; Nagashima, Kazuki; Kanai, Masaki; Meng, Gang; Zhuge, Fuwei; Rahong, Sakon; Li, Xiaomin; Kawai, Tomoji; Yanagida, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the post-growth assembly of nanowires is an important challenge in the development of functional bottom-up devices. Although various methods have been developed for the controlled assembly of nanowires, it is still a challenging issue to align selectively heterogeneous nanowires at desired spatial positions on the substrate. Here we report a size selective deposition and sequential alignment of nanowires by utilizing micrometer scale hydrophilic/hydrophobic patterned substrate. Nanowires dispersed within oil were preferentially deposited only at a water/oil interface onto the hydrophilic patterns. The diameter size of deposited nanowires was strongly limited by the width of hydrophilic patterns, exhibiting the nanoscale size selectivity of nanowires deposited onto micrometer scale hydrophilic patterns. Such size selectivity was due to the nanoscale height variation of a water layer formed onto the micrometer scale hydrophilic patterns. We successfully demonstrated the sequential alignment of different sized nanowires on the same substrate by applying this size selective phenomenon. PMID:25087699

  4. A 2.7 Micrometer Feature and Other Spectral Signatures of Asteroid 951 Gaspra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Galileo spacecraft observed asteroid 951 Gaspra on October 29, 1991 with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) at wavelengths ranging from 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers [Carlson et al., 1992]. Work is being conducted to produce a radiance calibrated spectral image of a 17 channel, 1.3 km per pixel NIMS observation of 951 Gaspra for the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). Analysis [Granahan, 2011] of this S asteroid data has yielded a detection of a 2.7 micrometer absorption feature in all of the observed surface pixels of this data set. Also measured [Granahan, 2011] were groups of spectra that possessed different band centers near 1.0 micrometers and band depths at 2.0 micrometers due to the minerals olivine and pyroxene. The 2.7 micrometer absorption feature has its strongest absorption within Yeates Regio. Yeates Regio is one of 951 Gaspra's basins [Veverka et al., 1994]. The absorption is weakest in the vicinity of the asteroid's ridges. A material that has an absorption at 2.7 micrometers is structural hydroxyl (OH). The carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Murchison contains structural hydroxyl that creates such a spectral feature [Rivkin et al., 2002]. It has also been observed in the spectra of montmorrilonite [McAdam and Hibbitts, 2011]. Updated measurements of olivine and pyroxene spectral bands were also conducted for this radiance data of 951 Gaspra. Two groups of spectra were observed to be differentiated by spectral band centers measured at 0.99 and 1.05 micrometers with corresponding differences of band depth around 2.0 micrometers. The 0.99 micrometer group of spectra possesses the larger 2.0 micrometer band depth. These families of spectra correspond to those of SI (1.05 micrometer group) and SIII (0.99 micrometer group) classes [Gaffey et al., 1993] of the S asteroids. They are distinct from ordinary chondrite meteorites and imply the occurrence of differentiation on 951 Gaspra. This 17 channel radiance spectral image is being packaged as a

  5. Total Syntheses of Perenniporides.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masao; Ohmori, Ken; Suzuki, Keisuke

    2015-11-20

    The total syntheses of perenniporide A (1) and related compounds have been achieved. Starting from 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (9), difluorodienone 6 was obtained by oxidative dearomatization, which served as a platform for the high-pressure cycloaddition and for the introduction of the C3-methoxy group. The synthesis allowed access to the natural congeners 2 and 3, enabling assignment of the absolute structures of these natural products. PMID:26555442

  6. Infrared images of jupiter at 5-micrometer wavelength during the voyager 1 encounter.

    PubMed

    Terrile, R J; Capps, R W; Backman, D E; Becklin, E E; Cruikshank, D P; Beichman, C A; Brown, R H; Westphal, J A

    1979-06-01

    A coordinated program to observe Jupiter at high spatial resolution in the 5-micrometer wavelength region was undertaken to support Voyager 1 imaging and infrared radiation experiment targeting. Jupiter was observed over a 5-month period from Palomar and Mauna Kea observatories. The frequency of observations allowed the selection of interesting areas for closer Voyager examination and also provided good short-term monitoring of variations in cloud morphology. Significant global changes in the 5-micrometer distribution are seen over this time period. PMID:17800441

  7. The Herschel ATLAS: Evolution of the 250 Micrometer Luminosity Function Out to z = 0.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, S.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Baldry, I. K.; Bamford, S.; Blain, A. W.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bremer, M.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cameron, E.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Croom, S.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Driver, S.; Dunlop, J. S.; Frayer, D.; Leeuw, L.

    2010-01-01

    We have determined the luminosity function of 250 micrometer-selected galaxies detected in the approximately equal to 14 deg(sup 2) science demonstration region of the Herschel-ATLAS project out to a redshift of z = 0.5. Our findings very clearly show that the luminosity function evolves steadily out to this redshift. By selecting a sub-group of sources within a fixed luminosity interval where incompleteness effects are minimal, we have measured a smooth increase in the comoving 250 micrometer luminosity density out to z = 0.2 where it is 3.6(sup +1.4) (sub -0.9) times higher than the local value.

  8. Wideband 1.064 micrometer detector evaluation. [for application to space laser communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S. I.

    1977-01-01

    Several types of communications detectors for use in a 400 Mbps 1.064 micrometer laser communication system were evaluated and characterized. The communication system Bit Error Rate (BER) performance was measured, and test results for the best detector of each type are summarized. The complete BER curves are presented. The 400 Mbps 1.064 micrometer communication system receiver test bed is described. The best performance levels which can be achieved by focusing the signal to diffraction limited spots on the photosensitive area are cited.

  9. A micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a resonant tunneling light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettinari, G.; Balakrishnan, N.; Makarovsky, O.; Campion, R. P.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.; Patanè, A.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the fabrication of a micrometer-size movable light emitting area in a GaAs/AlAs quantum well resonant tunneling p-i-n diode. The spatial position of the micrometer-size light emitting area shifts linearly with increasing applied bias, up to 30 μm for a bias increment of 0.2 V. Also, the simultaneous resonant tunneling injection of both electrons and holes into the quantum well states is achieved at specific positions of the diode, thus resulting in a tenfold increase of the electroluminescence intensity.

  10. Surface passivation of InP solar cells with InAlAs layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells is limited by high values of surface recombination. The effect of a lattice-matched In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layer material for InP solar cells, using the numerical code PC-1D is investigated. It was found that the use of InAlAs layer significantly enhances the p(+)n cell efficiency, while no appreciable improvement is seen for n(+)p cells. The conduction band energy discontinuity at the heterojunction helps in improving the surface recombination. An optimally designed InP cell efficiency improves from 15.4 percent to 23 percent AMO for a 10 nm thick InAlAs layer. The efficiency improvement reduces with increase in InAlAs layer thickness, due to light absorption in the window layer.

  11. Ohmic contacts to p-type InP using Be-Au metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, H.; McCoy, R. J.; Keramidas, V. G.; Bonner, W. A.

    1980-03-01

    A new contact to p-InP is reported with beryllium as the acceptor. The contact consists of a thin layer of 3 wt.% Be in Au alloy and a Au overlay sequentially deposited by e-gun evaporation. Alloying at 420 °C yields Ohmic contacts with low specific contact resistance rc⩽8×10-5 Ω cm2 for InP with NA-ND ≲1×1018 cm-3. To minimize the tendency of InP for thermal dissociation, the alloying temperature can be reduced to 375 °C by adding a thin Pd layer at the semiconductor metallization interface. This is achieved at the expense of a slight increase in resistance.

  12. Far field emission profile of pure wurtzite InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgarini, Gabriele Reimer, Michael E.; Zwiller, Val; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Lapointe, Jean

    2014-11-10

    We report on the far field emission profile of pure wurtzite InP nanowires in comparison to InP nanowires with predominantly zincblende crystal structure. The emission profile is measured on individual nanowires using Fourier microscopy. The most intense photoluminescence of wurtzite nanowires is collected at small angles with respect to the nanowire growth axis. In contrast, zincblende nanowires present a minimum of the collected light intensity in the direction of the nanowire growth. Results are explained by the orientation of electric dipoles responsible for the photoluminescence, which is different from wurtzite to zincblende. Wurtzite nanowires have dipoles oriented perpendicular to the nanowire growth direction, whereas zincblende nanowires have dipoles oriented along the nanowire axis. This interpretation is confirmed by both numerical simulations and polarization dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. Knowledge of the dipole orientation in nanostructures is crucial for developing a wide range of photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells.

  13. Minority-carrier lifetime in InP as a function of light bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Weinberg, I.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    Minority-carrier lifetime in InP is studied as a function of doping level and laser intensity using time-resolved photoluminescence. A continuous wave diode laser illuminates bulk InP and acts as a light bias, injecting a steady-state concentration of carriers. A 200 ps laser pulse produces a small transient signal on top of the steady-state luminescence, allowing lifetime to be measured directly as a function of incident intensity. For p-InP, lifetime increases with light bias up to a maximum value. Bulk recombination centers are presumably filled to saturation, allowing minority carriers to live longer. The saturation bias scales with dopant concentration for a particular dopant species. As light bias is increased for n-InP, minority-carrier lifetime increases slightly but then decreases, suggesting radiative recombination as a dominant decay mechanism.

  14. Unusual nanostructures of “lattice matched” InP on AlInAs

    SciTech Connect

    Gocalinska, A. Manganaro, M.; Juska, G.; Dimastrodonato, V.; Thomas, K.; Pelucchi, E.; Joyce, B. A.; Zhang, J.; Vvedensky, D. D.

    2014-04-07

    We show that the morphology of the initial monolayers of InP on Al{sub 0.48}In{sub 0.52}As grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy does not follow the expected layer-by-layer growth mode of lattice-matched systems, but instead develops a number of low-dimensional structures, e.g., quantum dots and wires. We discuss how the macroscopically strain-free heteroepitaxy might be strongly affected by local phase separation/alloying-induced strain and that the preferred aggregation of adatom species on the substrate surface and reduced wettability of InP on AlInAs surfaces might be the cause of the unusual (step) organization and morphology.

  15. Effect of dislocations on properties of heteroepitaxial InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Curtis, H. B.; Brinker, D. J.; Jenkins, P.; Faur, M.

    1991-01-01

    The apparently unrelated phenomena of temperature dependency, carrier removal and photoluminescence are shown to be affected by the high dislocation densities present in heteroepitaxial InP solar cells. Using homoepitaxial InP cells as a baseline, it is found that the relatively high dislocation densities present in heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs cells lead to increased volumes of dVoc/dt and carrier removal rate and substantial decreases in photoluminescence spectral intensities. With respect to dVoc/dt, the observed effect is attributed to the tendency of dislocations to reduce Voc. Although the basic cause for the observed increase in carrier removal rate is unclear, it is speculated that the decreased photoluminescence intensity is attributable to defect levels introduced by dislocations in the heteroepitaxial cells.

  16. Mechanism of lateral ordering of InP dots grown on InGaP layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bortoleto, J.R.R.; Gutierrez, H.R.; Cotta, M.A.; Bettini, J.

    2005-07-04

    The mechanisms leading to the spontaneous formation of a two-dimensional array of InP/InGaP dots grown by chemical-beam epitaxy are discussed. Samples where the InGaP buffer layer was grown at different conditions were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Our results indicate that a periodic strain field related to lateral two-dimensional compositional modulation in the InGaP buffer layer determines the dot nucleation positions during InP growth. Although the periodic strain field in the InGaP is large enough to align the InP dots, both their shape and optical properties are effectively unaltered. This result shows that compositional modulation can be used as a tool for in situ dot positioning.

  17. The effect of phosphorus and sulfur treatment on the surface properties of InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, R.; Chang, R. R.; Dubey, A.; Lile, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for InP surfaces treated by using red phosphorus as a source to create an excess overpressure of phosphorus during annealing and prior to silicon dioxide deposition. The surface has been probed by in situ photoluminescence, noncontacting remote gate C-V, and conventional high-frequency and quasi-static C-V methods. A study has also been made of the surface of sulfurized InP following heating in aqueous (NH4)2S(x). MISFETs fabricated using the benefits of these surface treatments show high transconductances and stabilities approaching those of thermal SiO2/Si with less than 5-percent variation in drain current over a 12-hr period.

  18. Temperature dependence and origin of InP(100) reflectance anisotropy down to 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visbeck, S.; Hannappel, T.; Zorn, M.; Zettler, J.-T.; Willig, F.

    2001-06-01

    InP(100) surfaces were investigated by reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) in the temperature range between 20 and 840 K. Surfaces were prepared via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) resulting in P-terminated (2×1)-like and In-terminated (2×4) reconstructions. Additionally, intermediate states of different phosphorus coverage were prepared. RA spectra were recorded both inside the MOCVD reactor and in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. At low temperatures, features in the RA spectra sharpened significantly due to the reduced lattice vibrations and electron-phonon interactions. The temperature-dependent energy shift of specific RAS features was determined between 20 and 840 K, and fitted with a model containing the Bose-Einstein occupation factor for phonons. The respective fitting parameters were compared to those of the InP bulk critical-point transitions nearby. Careful data analysis provided evidence for surface transitions and surface modified bulk transitions in the RA spectra.

  19. Chemically prepared well-ordered InP(0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tereshchenko, O. E.; Paget, D.; Chiaradia, P.; Placidi, E.; Bonnet, J. E.; Wiame, F.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.

    2006-08-01

    In the present work HCl-isopropanol treated and vacuum annealed InP(0 0 1) surfaces were studied by means of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS), and reflectance anisotropy (RAS) spectroscopies. The treatment removes the natural oxide and leaves on the surface a physisorbed overlayer containing InCl x and phosphorus. Annealing at 230 °C induces desorption of InCl x overlayer and reveals a P-rich (2 × 1) surface. Subsequent annealing at higher temperature induces In-rich (2 × 4) surface. The structural properties of chemically prepared InP(0 0 1) surfaces were found to be similar to those obtained by decapping of As/P-capped epitaxial layers.

  20. Effects of Be doping on InP nanowire growth mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, R. J.; Gibson, S. J.; Dubrovskii, V. G.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Be-doped InP nanowires were grown by the gold-assisted vapour-liquid-solid mechanism in a gas source molecular beam epitaxy system. The InP nanowire length versus diameter [L(D)] dependence revealed an unexpected transition with increasing Be dopant concentration. At Be dopant concentration below ˜1018 cm-3, nanowires exhibited the usual inverse L(D) relationship, indicating a diffusion-limited growth regime. However, as dopant concentration increased, the nanowire growth rate was suppressed for small diameters, resulting in an unusual L(D) dependence that increased before saturating in height at about 400 nm. The cause of this may be a change in the droplet chemical potential, introducing a barrier to island nucleation. We propose a model accounting for the limitations of diffusion length and monolayer nucleation to explain this behaviour.

  1. InP photonic wire waveguide using InAlAs oxide cladding layer.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Mitsuru; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2007-06-25

    We proposed a novel InP based photonic wire waveguide with an InAlAs oxide cladding. The InGaAsP/InAlAs-oxide structure in the vertical direction provides an ultrahigh index contrast waveguide, and it allows a bend radius of a few mum with no vertical leakage loss. The InP photonic wire waveguide with a 500x300-nm rectangular channel core (refractive index n ~ 3.36) and an InAlAs oxide cladding (n ~ 2.4) was numerically analyzed using the three-dimensional time-domain beam propagation method (3D TD-BPM). We predicted that the U-bend waveguide with a 3-mum bend radius can be realized with the propagation loss of < 0.5 dB. PMID:19547173

  2. Schottky Barriers Based on Nanoporous InP with Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Tetyana; Dmitruk, Mykola; Kotova, Nataliya; Mamykin, Sergii

    2016-12-01

    Schottky barrier structures based on nanoporous InP with inclusion of Au nanoparticles and evaporated semitransparent Au film have been made. The spectra of short-circuit photocurrent in the visible range and current-voltage characteristics have been measured. Prepared structures are characterized by increased photocurrent due to the microrelief interface and surface plasmon excitation in gold nanoparticles as well as increased surface recombination especially in the short wavelength region. PMID:27075341

  3. Schottky Barriers Based on Nanoporous InP with Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlas, Tetyana; Dmitruk, Mykola; Kotova, Nataliya; Mamykin, Sergii

    2016-04-01

    Schottky barrier structures based on nanoporous InP with inclusion of Au nanoparticles and evaporated semitransparent Au film have been made. The spectra of short-circuit photocurrent in the visible range and current-voltage characteristics have been measured. Prepared structures are characterized by increased photocurrent due to the microrelief interface and surface plasmon excitation in gold nanoparticles as well as increased surface recombination especially in the short wavelength region.

  4. High-efficiency ultrasmall polarization converter in InP membrane.

    PubMed

    Pello, Josselin; van der Tol, Jos; Keyvaninia, Shahram; van Veldhoven, René; Ambrosius, Huub; Roelkens, Gunther; Smit, Meint

    2012-09-01

    An ultrasmall (<10  μm length) polarization converter in InP membrane is fabricated and characterized. The device relies on the beating between the two eigenmodes of chemically etched triangular waveguides. Measurements show a very high polarization conversion efficiency of >99% with insertion losses of <-1.2  dB at a wavelength of 1.53 μm. Furthermore, our design is found to be broadband and tolerant to dimension variations. PMID:22940999

  5. Observation of edge-facets in <100> InP crystals grown by LEC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masatomo; Sasaki, Yukio; Inada, Tomoki; Kuma, Shoji

    1990-05-01

    The growth of edge-facets on <100> InP crystals has been investigated using microscopy. The solid/liquid interface in the region of edge-facets was found to have a knife-edged shape, while that of a region without facets had a smooth shape. The irregular patterns of edge-facets point to instability in the growth at the periphery of a crystal, and this instability is found to be related to the generation of twins.

  6. InP and GaAs characterization with variable stoichiometry obtained by molecular spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massies, J.; Linh, N. T.; Olivier, J.; Faulconnier, P.; Poirier, R.

    1979-01-01

    Both InP and GaAs surfaces were studied in parallel. A molecular spray technique was used to obtain two semiconductor surfaces with different superficial compositions. The structures of these surfaces were examined by electron diffraction. Electron energy loss was measured spectroscopically in order to determine surface electrical characteristics. The results are used to support conclusions relative to the role of surface composition in establishing a Schottky barrier effect in semiconductor devices.

  7. Surface characterization of InP trenches embedded in oxide using scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarino, Manuel E-mail: manuelmannarino@gmail.com; Chintala, Ravi; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Moussa, Alain; Merckling, Clement; Eyben, Pierre; Paredis, Kristof

    2015-12-14

    Metrology for structural and electrical analyses at device level has been identified as one of the major challenges to be resolved for the sub-14 nm technology nodes. In these advanced nodes, new high mobility semiconductors, such as III–V compounds, are grown in narrow trenches on a Si substrate. Probing the nature of the defects, the defect density, and the role of processing steps on the surface of such structures are prime metrology requirements. In order to enable defect analysis on a (III–V) surface, a proper sample preparation for oxide removal is of primary importance. In this work, the effectiveness of different chemical cleanings and thermal annealing procedures is investigated on both blanket InP and oxide embedded InP trenches by means of scanning probe microscopy techniques. It is found that the most effective approach is a combination of an HCl-based chemical cleaning combined with a low-temperature thermal annealing leading to an oxide free surface with atomically flat areas. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been the preferred method for such investigations on blanket films due to its intrinsic sub-nm spatial resolution. However, its application on oxide embedded structures is non-trivial. To perform STM on the trenches of interest (generally <20 nm wide), we propose a combination of non-contact atomic force microscopy and STM using the same conductive atomic force microscopy tip Our results prove that with these procedures, it is possible to perform STM in narrow InP trenches showing stacking faults and surface reconstruction. Significant differences in terms of roughness and terrace formation are also observed between the blanket and the oxide embedded InP.

  8. W-Band InP Wideband MMIC LNA with 30K Noise Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinreb, S.; Lai, R.; Erickson, N.; Gaier, T.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describe a millimeter wave low noise amplifier with extraordinary low noise, low consumption, and wide frequency range. These results are achieved utilizing state-of-the-art InP HEMT transistors coupled with CPW circuit design. The paper describes the transistor models, modeled and measured on-wafer and in-module results at both 300K am 24K operating temperatures for many samples of the device.

  9. Minority carrier diffusion length and edge surface-recombination velocity in InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1993-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used to obtain the electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) profiles in InP specimens containing a Schottky barrier perpendicular to the scanned (edge) surface. An independent technique was used to measure the edge surface-recombination velocity. These values were used in a fit of the experimental EBIC data with a theoretical expression for normalized EBIC (Donolato, 1982) to obtain the electron (minority carrier) diffusion length.

  10. Amphoteric behavior and precipitation of Ge dopants in InP

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Moll, A.J.; Walukiewicz, W.

    1996-11-01

    We have directly correlated the electrical behavior, the impurity lattice site location, ion damage, and the local bonding environments of Ge-dopant ions implanted into InP. We have found that after rapid thermal annealing the free electron concentration in the samples implanted at room temperature (RT) are always higher than those implanted at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). Although the macroscopic structure seems to be insensitive to the implantation temperature, significantly more local disorder is created in the LNT implanted amorphous layers. Moreover, the amphoteric bonding structure of the Ge atoms is found to be well established already in the as-implanted amorphous InP. After high temperature annealing ({approx_gt}800{degree}C), the Ge atoms rearrange locally with more of the Ge substituting the In site than the P site resulting in {ital n}-type conductivity. The solid solubility of Ge in the InP is measured to be {approximately}1.4{endash}1.6{times}10{sup 20}/cm{sup 3} while the free electron concentration is estimated to saturate at {approximately}3.4{times}10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. The relatively low electron concentration can be explained by Ge precipitation and the compensation of Ge{sub In} donors by Ge{sub P} acceptors in the RT implanted case. The further reduction in electron concentration in the LNT implanted samples is believed to be related to the high residual damage found in these samples. The high solubility of Ge in InP can be attributed to the availability of two possible sublattice sites for the dopant and the compensation of the local strains due to the amphoteric substitution of the Ge. The concentration ratio of the Ge{sub In} to Ge{sub P} determined in the heavily implanted material has been used to estimate the difference in the formation energy of Ge substituting those two different sites.

  11. Surface characterization of InP trenches embedded in oxide using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarino, Manuel; Chintala, Ravi; Moussa, Alain; Merckling, Clement; Eyben, Pierre; Paredis, Kristof; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2015-12-01

    Metrology for structural and electrical analyses at device level has been identified as one of the major challenges to be resolved for the sub-14 nm technology nodes. In these advanced nodes, new high mobility semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, are grown in narrow trenches on a Si substrate. Probing the nature of the defects, the defect density, and the role of processing steps on the surface of such structures are prime metrology requirements. In order to enable defect analysis on a (III-V) surface, a proper sample preparation for oxide removal is of primary importance. In this work, the effectiveness of different chemical cleanings and thermal annealing procedures is investigated on both blanket InP and oxide embedded InP trenches by means of scanning probe microscopy techniques. It is found that the most effective approach is a combination of an HCl-based chemical cleaning combined with a low-temperature thermal annealing leading to an oxide free surface with atomically flat areas. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been the preferred method for such investigations on blanket films due to its intrinsic sub-nm spatial resolution. However, its application on oxide embedded structures is non-trivial. To perform STM on the trenches of interest (generally <20 nm wide), we propose a combination of non-contact atomic force microscopy and STM using the same conductive atomic force microscopy tip Our results prove that with these procedures, it is possible to perform STM in narrow InP trenches showing stacking faults and surface reconstruction. Significant differences in terms of roughness and terrace formation are also observed between the blanket and the oxide embedded InP.

  12. Thin films of InP for photovoltaic energy conversion. Final report, July 5, 1979-July 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Manasevit, H. M.; Ruth, R. P.; Moudy, L. A.; Yang, J. J.J.; Johnson, R. E.

    1980-08-01

    Research to develop a low-cost high-efficiency thin-film InP heterojunction solar cell, using the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) technique for InP film growth on suitable substrates is reported. Heterostructure devices of CdS/InP, using InP films prepared by CO-CVD, were prepared and characterized. The research effort involved three major technical tasks: (1) materials growth; (2) materials characterization; and (3) device fabrication and characterization. The principal results achieved in the investigations are as follows: (1) temperature-activated orientation-dependent background donor doping was observed in undoped epitaxial InP films; (2) p-type epitaxial InP films were prepared by Zn and by Cd doping during growth; (3) the efficacy of Cd doping was found to vary exponentially with the reciprocal of the deposition temperature in the range 650 to 730/sup 0/C; (4) Cd doping appeared to offer no clear advantages over Zn doping for preparation of p-type InP by the MO-CVD process; (5) GaP grown by MO-CVD was investigated as a possible intermediate-layer material for growth of InP films on low-cost substrates; (6) p/sup +/GaAs polycrystalline layers (p > /sup 19/ cm/sup -3/) were successfully prepared by Zn doping during MO-CVD growth on various low-cost substrates and used as surfaces for growth of p-type polycrystalline InP:Zn layers; (7) nCdS/pInP heterojunction solar cells were prepared by vacuum deposition of CdS onto p-type InP films grown by MO-CVD as well as on InP single-crystal wafers; (8) the best polycrystalline CdS/InP cells were obtained in structures on P/sup +/GaAs:Zn layers on both Mo sheet and Corning Code 0317 Glass; and (9) structure analyses of the Cds films used in the heterojunction cells indicated the presence of polycrystalline hexagonal CdS even in films grown on single-crystal InP films or bulk-wafer substrates. (WHK)

  13. Optical reflectance studies of highly specular anisotropic nanoporous (111) InP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. A.; Lewis, R. A.; Sirbu, L.; Enachi, M.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Skuratov, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    High-precision optical angular reflectance measurements are reported for a specular anisotropic nanoporous (111) InP membrane prepared by doping-assisted wet-electrochemical etching. The membrane surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscope imaging and revealed a quasi-uniform and self-organized nanoporous network consisting of semiconductor ‘islands’ in the sub-wavelength regime. The optical response of the nanoporous InP surface was studied at 405 nm (740 THz; UV), 633 nm (474 THz; VIS) and 1064 nm (282 THz; NIR), and exhibited a retention of basic macro-dielectric properties. Refractive index determinations demonstrate an optical anisotropy for the membrane which is strongly dependent on the wavelength of incident light, and exhibits an interesting inversion (positive anisotropy to negative) between 405 and 633 nm. The inversion of optical anisotropy is attributed to a strongly reduced ‘metallic’ behaviour in the membrane when subject to above-bandgap illumination. For the simplest case of sub-bandgap incident irradiation, the optical properties of the nanoporous InP sample are analysed in terms of an effective refractive index neff and compared to effective media approximations.

  14. MOVPE growth of InP using isobutylphosphine and tert-butylphosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Larsen, C. A.; Stringfellow, G. B.; Brown, D. W.; Robertson, A. J.

    1986-09-01

    Two organophosphorus compounds, isobutylphosphine and tertiarybutylphosphine, have been investigated for their possible use as precursors in the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) process. They are the first organometallic compounds to be used as phosphorus sources. Pyrolysis studies show that the first decomposition products are phosphine and various organic compounds. The phosphine then pyrolyzes to give phosphorus. The materials are less pyrophoric and less toxic than phosphine. Since they are used as liquids in atmospheric pressure bubblers, they are much safer to use. The compounds have been used to grow epitaxial layers of InP on InP and GaAs substrates using trimethylindium in a flowing hydrogen ambient. No evidence of deleterious gas phase reaction is observed. The optimum temperature for growth using IBP is approximately 630°C. This yields excellent morphology layers with the strongest photoluminescence intensity and narrowest half-width, both of which are comparable to InP grown using PH 3. Carbon incorporation is nearly identical using IBP and PH 3. The IBP and TBP are not quite as pure as the best PH 3. The lowest carrier concentration measured was in the low 10 16 cm -3 range with room temperature mobilities as high as 2800 cm 2/V·s for TBP. Using TBP slightly higher mobilities of 3100 cm 2/V· were obtained.

  15. Ab-Initio Calculations of Electronic Properties of InP and GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozovsky, Y.; Franklin, L.; Ekuma, E. C.; Zhao, G. L.; Bagayoko, D.

    2013-06-01

    We present results from ab-initio, self-consistent local density approximation (LDA) calculations of electronic and related properties of zinc blende indium phosphide (InP) and gallium phosphide (GaP). We employed a LDA potential and implemented the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) formalism. This implementation followed the Bagayoko, Zhao and Williams (BZW) method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). This method searches for the optimal basis set that yields the minima of the occupied energies. This search entails increases of the size of the basis set and the related modifications of angular symmetry and of radial orbitals. Our calculated, direct band gap of 1.398 eV (1.40 eV), at the Γ point, is in excellent agreement with experimental values, for InP, and our preliminary result for the indirect gap of GaP is 2.135 eV, from the Γ to X high symmetry points. We have also calculated electron and hole effective masses for both InP and GaP. These calculated properties also agree with experimental findings. We conclude that the BZW-EF method could be employed in calculations of electronic properties of high-Tc superconducting materials to explain their complex properties.

  16. Ab-initio Calculations of Electronic Properties of InP and GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozovsky, Yuriy; Franklin, Lashounda; Ekuma, Chinedu; Zhao, Guang-Lin; Bagayoko, Diola

    2013-03-01

    We present results from ab-initio, self consistent local density approximation (LDA) calculations of electronic and related properties of zinc blende indium and gallium phosphides (InP & GaP) We employed a local density approximation (LDA) potential and implemented the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) formalism. This implementation followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams (BZW) method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). This method searches for the optimal basis set that yields the minima of the occupied energies. This search entails methodically increasing the size of the basis set, up to the optimal one, and the accompanying enrichment of angular symmetry and of radial orbitals. Our calculated, direct band gap of 1.398 eV (1.40 eV) for InP, at the Γ point, is in excellent agreement with experimental values. We discuss our preliminary results for the indirect band gap, from Γ to X, of GaP. We also report calculated electron and hole effective masses for both InP and GaP and the total (DOS) and partial (pDOS) densities of states. This work was funded in part by the National Science Foundation and the Louisiana Board of Regents, through LASiGMA and LS-LAMP, [EPS-1003897, No. NSF (2010-15)-RII-SUBR, and HRD-1002541] and by the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative (LONI) at SUBR.

  17. Improved nucleosome-positioning algorithm iNPS for accurate nucleosome positioning from sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizhong; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Shanshan; Green, Christopher D; Wei, Gang; Han, Jing-Dong Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Accurate determination of genome-wide nucleosome positioning can provide important insights into global gene regulation. Here, we describe the development of an improved nucleosome-positioning algorithm-iNPS-which achieves significantly better performance than the widely used NPS package. By determining nucleosome boundaries more precisely and merging or separating shoulder peaks based on local MNase-seq signals, iNPS can unambiguously detect 60% more nucleosomes. The detected nucleosomes display better nucleosome 'widths' and neighbouring centre-centre distance distributions, giving rise to sharper patterns and better phasing of average nucleosome profiles and higher consistency between independent data subsets. In addition to its unique advantage in classifying nucleosomes by shape to reveal their different biological properties, iNPS also achieves higher significance and lower false positive rates than previously published methods. The application of iNPS to T-cell activation data demonstrates a greater ability to facilitate detection of nucleosome repositioning, uncovering additional biological features underlying the activation process. PMID:25233085

  18. The electrochemical capacitance-voltage characterization of InP based p-i-n structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-wei; Lu, Yi-dan; Xu, Jin-tong; Li, Xiang-yang

    2013-09-01

    Electrochemical Capacitance-Voltage (EC-V) profiling is currently one of the most often used methods for majority carrier concentration depth profiling of semiconductors. The experiments of EC-V profiling on InP based structures were conducted by Wafer Profiler CVP21, and there are two problems in the experiments of InP based p-i-n structures : a)the experimental results of EC-V profiling of i layer were not in line with the theoretically data after the EC-V profiling of p layer, which can be measured within the error range; b) The measurements of etching depth were not very accurate. In this paper, we made comparative experiments on InP based n-i-n structures, and find out a method to deal with the first problem: firstly etch p layer before EC-V profiling, so we can gain a relatively accurate result of EC-V profiling of i layer. Besides, use back contacts instead of front contacts to do the EC-V profiling according to the instruction book of the Wafer Profiler CVP21. Then the author tried to infer the reason that results in the first problem theoretically. Meanwhile we can calibrate the etching depth through Profile-system and Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM). And there are two possible reasons which result in the second problem: the defects of the semiconductors and the electrolyte we used to etch the semiconductors.

  19. Bandgap Engineering of InP QDs Through Shell Thickness and Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Allison M.; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Piryatinski, Andrei; Park, Young-Shin; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.

    2012-06-21

    Fields as diverse as biological imaging and telecommunications utilize the unique photophysical and electronic properties of nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs). The development of new NQD compositions promises material properties optimized for specific applications, while addressing material toxicity. Indium phosphide (InP) offers a 'green' alternative to the traditional cadmium-based NQDs, but suffers from extreme susceptibility to oxidation. Coating InP cores with more stable shell materials significantly improves nanocrystal resistance to oxidation and photostability. We have investigated several new InP-based core-shell compositions, correlating our results with theoretical predictions of their optical and electronic properties. Specifically, we can tailor the InP core-shell QDs to a type-I, quasi-type-II, or type-II bandgap structure with emission wavelengths ranging from 500-1300 nm depending on the shell material used (ZnS, ZnSe, CdS, or CdSe) and the thickness of the shell. Single molecule microscopy assessments of photobleaching and blinking are used to correlate NQD properties with shell thickness.

  20. Preparation of clean InP(100) surfaces studied by synchrotron radiation photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Machuca, Francisco; Pianetta, Piero; Spicer, William E.

    2003-01-01

    The chemical cleaning of indium phosphide (InP),(100) surfaces is studied systematically by using photoemission electron spectroscopy. In order to achieve the necessary surface sensitivity and spectral resolution, synchrotron radiation with photon energies ranging from 60 to 600 eV are used to study the indium 4d, phosphorus 2p, carbon 1s, and oxygen 1s core levels, and the valence band. Typical H2SO4:H2O2:H2O solutions used to etch GaAs(100) surfaces are applied to InP(100) surfaces. It is found that the resulting surface species are significantly different from those found on GaAs(100) surfaces and that a second chemical cleaning step using a strong acid is required to remove residual surface oxide. This two-step cleaning process leaves the surface oxide free and with approximately 0.4 ML of elemental phosphorus, which is removed by vacuum annealing. The carbon coverage is also reduced dramatically from approximately 1 to about 0.05 ML. The chemical reactions are investigated, the resulting InP surface species at different cleaning stages are determined, and the optimum cleaning procedure is presented.

  1. Room-temperature annealing of Si implantation damage in InP

    SciTech Connect

    Akano, U.G.; Mitchell, I.V. . Dept. of Physics); Shepherd, F.R. )

    1991-11-11

    Spontaneous recovery at 295 K of Si implant damage in InP is reported. InP(Zn) and InP(S) wafers of (100) orientation have been implanted at room temperature with 600 keV Si{sup +} ions to doses ranging from 3.6{times}10{sup 11} to 2{times}10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}. Room-temperature annealing of the resultant damage has been monitored by the Rutherford backscattering/channeling technique. For Si doses {le}4{times}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2}, up to 70% of the initial damage (displaced atoms) annealed out over a period of {approx}85 days. The degree of recovery was found to depend on the initial level of damage. Recovery is characterized by at least two time constants {ital t}{sub 1}{lt}5 days and a longer {ital t}{sub 2}{approx}100 days. Anneal rates observed between 295 and 375 K are consistent with an activation energy of 1.2 eV, suggesting that the migration of implant-induced vacancies is associated with the reordering of the InP lattice.

  2. Synthesizing folded band chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics. PMID:17500950

  3. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-2, Fixed Gages, Dividers, Calipers, and Micrometers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology dscribes fixed gages, dividers, calipers, vernier and dial calipers, and micrometers. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (l) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  4. Micrometer scale spacings between fibronectin nanodots regulate cell morphology and focal adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horzum, Utku; Ozdil, Berrin; Pesen-Okvur, Devrim

    2014-04-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is an important process for both health and disease states. Surface protein patterns that are topographically flat, and do not introduce other chemical, topographical or rigidity related functionality and, more importantly, that mimic the organization of the in vivo extracellular matrix are desired. Previous work showed that vinculin and cytoskeletal organization are modulated by size and shape of surface nanopatterns. However, quantitative analysis on cell morphology and focal adhesions as a function of micrometer scale spacings of FN nanopatterns was absent. Here, electron beam lithography was used to pattern fibronectin nanodots with micrometer scale spacings on a K-casein background on indium tin oxide coated glass which, unlike silicon, is transparent and thus suitable for many light microscopy techniques. Exposure times were significantly reduced using the line exposure mode with micrometer scale step sizes. Micrometer scale spacings of 2, 4 and 8 μm between fibronectin nanodots proved to modulate cell adhesion through modification of cell area, focal adhesion number, size and circularity. Overall, cell behavior was shown to shift at the apparent threshold of 4 μm spacing. The findings presented here offer exciting new opportunities for cell biology research.

  5. FIB-TEM Anatomy of a Sub-Micrometer Impact Crater on a Hayabusa Grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harries, D.; Yakame, S.; Uesugi, M.; Langenhorst, F.

    2015-07-01

    We investigated Hayabusa grain RA-QD02-0265, which was found to contain a cluster of sub-micrometer-sized crater-like features. The cluster of craters is most likely due to secondary impacts of particles generated by an nearby (micro-)impact event.

  6. Efficient Single-Frequency Thulium Doped Fiber Laser Near 2-micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jihong; Wu, Jianfeng; Jiang, Shibin; Yu, Jirong

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate highly efficient diode-pumped single-frequency fiber laser with 35% slope efficiency and 50mW output power operating near 2 micrometers, which generated from a 2-cm long piece of highly Tm(3+)-doped germanate glass fiber pumped at 800nm.

  7. The Brazilian INPE-UFSM NANOSATC-BR CubeSat Development Capacity Building Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Cupertino Durao, Otavio S.

    The Brazilian INPE-UFSM NANOSATC-BR CubeSat Development Capacity Building Program (CBP) and the results of the NANOSATC-BR1, the first Brazilian CubeSat launching, expected for 2014's first semester, are presented. The CBP consists of two CubeSats, NANOSATC-BR 1 (1U) & 2 (2U) and is expected operate in orbit for at least 12 months each, with capacity building in space science, engineering and computer sciences for the development of space technologies using CubeSats satellites. The INPE-UFSM’s CBP Cooperation is basically among: (i) the Southern Regional Space Research Center (CRS), from the Brazilian INPE/MCTI, where acts the Program's General Coordinator and Projects NANOSATC-BR 1 & 2 Manager, having technical collaboration and management of the Mission’s General Coordinator for Engineering and Space Technology at INPE’s Headquarter (HQ), in São José dos Campos, São Paulo; (ii) the Santa Maria Space Science Laboratory (LACESM/CT) from the Federal University of Santa Maria - (UFSM); (iii) the Santa Maria Design House (SMDH); (iv) the Graduate Program in Microelectronics from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (MG/II/UFRGS); and (v) the Aeronautic Institute of Technology (ITA/DCTA/CA-MD). The INPE-UFSM’s CBP has the involvement of UFSM' undergraduate students and graduate students from: INPE/MCTI, MG/II/UFRGS and ITA/DCTA/CA-MD. The NANOSATC-BR 1 & 2 Projects Ground Stations (GS) capacity building operation with VHF/UHF band and S-band antennas, are described in two specific papers at this COSPAR-2014. This paper focuses on the development of NANOSATC-BR 1 & 2 and on the launching of NANOSATC-BR1. The Projects' concepts were developed to: i) monitor, in real time, the Geospace, the Ionosphere, the energetic particle precipitation and the disturbances at the Earth's Magnetosphere over the Brazilian Territory, and ii) the determination of their effects on regions such as the South American Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA) and the Brazilian sector of the

  8. InP tunnel junction for InGaAs/InP tandem solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilela, M. F.; Freundlich, A.; Bensaoula, A.; Medelci, N.; Renaud, P.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) has been shown to allow the growth of high quality materials with reproducible complex compositional and doping profiles. The main advantage of CBE compared to metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the most popular technique for InP-based photovoltaic device fabrication, is the ability to grow high purity epilayers at much lower temperatures (450-530 C). We have previously shown that CBE is perfectly suited toward the fabrication of complex photovoltaic devices such as InP/InGaAs monolithically integrated tandem solar cells, because its low process temperature preserves the electrical characteristics of the InGaAs tunnel junction commonly used as an ohmic interconnect. In this work using CBE for the fabrication of optically transparent (with respect to the bottom cell) InP tunnel diodes is demonstrated. Epitaxial growth were performed in a Riber CBE 32 system using PH3 and TMIn as III and V precursors. Solid Be (p-type) and Si (n-type) have been used as doping sources, allowing doping levels up to 2 x 10(exp -19)/cu cm and 1 x 10(exp -19)/cu cm for n and p type respectively. The InP tunnel junction characteristics and the influence of the growth's conditions (temperature, growth rate) over its performance have been carefully investigated. InP p(++)/n(++) tunnel junction with peak current densities up to 1600 A/sq cm and maximum specific resistivities (V(sub p)/I(sub p) - peak voltage to peak current ratio) in the range of 10(exp -4) Omega-sq cm were obtained. The obtained peak current densities exceed the highest results previously reported for their lattice matched counterparts, In(0.53)Ga( 0.47)As and should allow the realization of improved minimal absorption losses in the interconnect InP/InGaAs tandem devices for Space applications. Owing to the low process temperature required for the top cell, these devices exhibit almost no degradation of its characteristics after the growth of subsequent thick InP layer suggesting

  9. Programmable electronic synthesized capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A predetermined and variable synthesized capacitance which may be incorporated into the resonant portion of an electronic oscillator for the purpose of tuning the oscillator comprises a programmable operational amplifier circuit. The operational amplifier circuit has its output connected to its inverting input, in a follower configuration, by a network which is low impedance at the operational frequency of the circuit. The output of the operational amplifier is also connected to the noninverting input by a capacitor. The noninverting input appears as a synthesized capacitance which may be varied with a variation in gain-bandwidth product of the operational amplifier circuit. The gain-bandwidth product may, in turn, be varied with a variation in input set current with a digital to analog converter whose output is varied with a command word. The output impedance of the circuit may also be varied by the output set current. This circuit may provide very small ranges in oscillator frequency with relatively large control voltages unaffected by noise.

  10. SYNTH: A spectrum synthesizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, W. K.; McKinnon, A. D.; Miley, H. S.; Panisko, M. E.; Savard, R. M.

    1993-10-01

    A computer code has been written at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to synthesize the results of typical gamma ray spectroscopy experiments. The code, dubbed SYNTH, allows a user to specify physical characteristics of a gamma ray source, the quantity of the nuclides producing the radiation, the source-to-detector distance and the presence of absorbers, the type and size of the detector, and the electronic set up used to gather the data. In the process of specifying the parameters needed to synthesize a spectrum, several interesting intermediate results are produced, including a photopeak transmission function versus energy, a detector efficiency curve, and a weighted list of gamma and x rays produced from a set of nuclides. All of these intermediate results are available for graphical inspection and for printing. SYNTH runs on personal computers. It is menu driven and can be customized to user specifications. SYNTH contains robust support for coaxial germanium detectors and some support for sodium iodide detectors. SYNTH is not a finished product. A number of additional developments are planned. However, the existing code has been compared carefully to spectra obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) certified standards with very favorable results. Examples of the use of SYNTH and several spectral results are presented.