Science.gov

Sample records for synthetic aperture radar

  1. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  2. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  3. Superresolution and Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    DICKEY,FRED M.; ROMERO,LOUIS; DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2001-05-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. The application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar is investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. A criterion for judging superresolution processing of an image is presented.

  4. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  5. Future of synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    The present status of the applications of Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) is reviewed, and the technology state-of-the art as represented by the Seasat-A and SIR-A SARs examined. The potential of SAR applications, and the near- and longer-term technology trends are assessed.

  6. Imaging synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Burns, Bryan L.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    A linear-FM SAR imaging radar method and apparatus to produce a real-time image by first arranging the returned signals into a plurality of subaperture arrays, the columns of each subaperture array having samples of dechirped baseband pulses, and further including a processing of each subaperture array to obtain coarse-resolution in azimuth, then fine-resolution in range, and lastly, to combine the processed subapertures to obtain the final fine-resolution in azimuth. Greater efficiency is achieved because both the transmitted signal and a local oscillator signal mixed with the returned signal can be varied on a pulse-to-pulse basis as a function of radar motion. Moreover, a novel circuit can adjust the sampling location and the A/D sample rate of the combined dechirped baseband signal which greatly reduces processing time and hardware. The processing steps include implementing a window function, stabilizing either a central reference point and/or all other points of a subaperture with respect to doppler frequency and/or range as a function of radar motion, sorting and compressing the signals using a standard fourier transforms. The stabilization of each processing part is accomplished with vector multiplication using waveforms generated as a function of radar motion wherein these waveforms may be synthesized in integrated circuits. Stabilization of range migration as a function of doppler frequency by simple vector multiplication is a particularly useful feature of the invention; as is stabilization of azimuth migration by correcting for spatially varying phase errors prior to the application of an autofocus process.

  7. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOEpatents

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  8. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  9. Contour-Mapping Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Caro, E. R.; Wu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne two-antenna synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) interferometric system provides data processed to yield terrain elevation as well as reflectedintensity information. Relative altitudes of terrain points measured to within error of approximately 25 m.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  11. Clutter free synthetic aperture radar correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1977-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar correlation system including a moving diffuser located at the image plane of a radar processor is described. The output of the moving diffuser is supplied to a lens whose impulse response is at least as wide as that of the overall processing system. A significant reduction in clutter results is given.

  12. Exploiting Decorrelations In Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Villasenor, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal decorrelation between synthetic-aperture-radar data acquired on subsequent passes along same or nearly same trajectory serves as measure of change in target scene. Based partly on mathematical models of statistics of correlations between first- and second-pass radar echoes. Also based partly on Fourier-transform relations between radar-system impulse response and decorrelation functions particularly those expressing decorrelation effects of rotation and horizontal shift of trajectories between two passes.

  13. Multibeam synthetic aperture radar for global oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar concept for large swath imaging desired for global oceanography is evaluated. Each beam iilluminates a separate range and azimuth interval, and images for different beams may be separated on the basis of the Doppler spectrum of the beams or their spatial azimuth separation in the image plane of the radar processor. The azimuth resolution of the radar system is selected so that the Doppler spectrum of each beam does not interfere with the Doppler foldover due to the finite pulse repetition frequency of the radar system.

  14. Miniature synthetic-aperture radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Wayne; Stromfors, Richard D.

    1990-11-01

    Loral Defense Systems-Arizona has developed a high-performance synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) for small aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance applications. This miniature radar, called Miniature Synthetic-Aperture Radar (MSAR), is packaged in a small volume and has low weight. It retains key features of large SAR systems, including high-resolution imaging and all-weather operation. The operating frequency of MSAR can optionally be selected to provide foliage penetration capability. Many imaging radar configurations can be derived using this baseline system. MSAR with a data link provides an attractive UAV sensor. MSAR with a real-time image formation processor is well suited to installations where onboard processing and immediate image analysis are required. The MSAR system provides high-resolution imaging for short-to-medium range reconnaissance applications.

  15. Processing for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lybanon, M.

    1973-01-01

    The data handling and processing in using synthetic aperture radar as a satellite-borne earth resources remote sensor is considered. The discussion covers the nature of the problem, the theory, both conventional and potential advanced processing techniques, and a complete computer simulation. It is shown that digital processing is a real possibility and suggests some future directions for research.

  16. Addressing Three Fallacies About Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, Don; Garron, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has long been recognized as a valuable tool for real-time environmental analysis and understanding of the Earth's geophysical properties. With its ability to see through clouds and to image day and night in all seasons, it can provide high-resolution data when optical sensors cannot. This capability has enabled SAR scientists to delineate flooding events, assess earthquake damage, map forest fires, rescue trapped icebreakers, and identify the extent of oil spills.

  17. Analytic inversion in synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed Central

    Rothaus, O S

    1994-01-01

    A method of processing synthetic aperture radar signals that avoids some of the approximations currently in use that appear to be responsible for severe phase distortions is described. As a practical matter, this method requires N3 numerical operations, as opposed to the N2 ln N currently the case, but N3 is now easily managed, for N in the range of interest. PMID:11607485

  18. Estimating vegetation biomass using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronti, Stefano; Luciani, S.; Paloscia, Simonetta; Schiavon, G.; Sigismondi, S.; Solimini, Domenico

    1994-12-01

    A significant experiment for evaluating the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in monitoring soil and vegetation parameters is being carried out on an agricultural area located in Central Italy. The site has been imaged in 1991 by NASA/JPL AIRSAR during the MAC-91 Campaign and subsequently by ESA/ERS-1 and NASDA JERS-1 in 1992. The sensitivity to vegetation biomass of backscattering coefficient measured by ERS-1 and JERS-1 radars is discussed and compared with the best results achieved using the multifrequency polarimetric AIRSAR data.

  19. Performance limits for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-02-01

    The performance of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to ''get your arms around'' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics, no matter how bright the engineer tasked to generate a system design. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall SAR system. For example, there are definite optimum frequency bands that depend on weather conditions and range, and minimum radar PRF for a fixed real antenna aperture dimension is independent of frequency. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the ''seek time''.

  20. Nonlinear synthetic aperture radar imaging using a harmonic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Nguyen, Lam H.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of linear and nonlinear targets. Data are collected using a linear/nonlinear step frequency radar. We show that it is indeed possible to produce SAR images using a nonlinear radar. Furthermore, it is shown that the nonlinear radar is able to reduce linear clutter by at least 80 dB compared to a linear radar. The nonlinear SAR images also show the system's ability to detect small electronic devices in the presence of large linear clutter. The system presented here has the ability to completely ignore a 20-inch trihedral corner reflector while detecting a RF mixer with a dipole antenna attached.

  1. Soviet oceanographic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) research

    SciTech Connect

    Held, D.N.; Gasparovic, R.F.; Mansfield, A.W.; Melville, W.K.; Mollo-Christensen, E.L.; Zebker, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Radar non-acoustic anti-submarine warfare (NAASW) became the subject of considerable scientific investigation and controversy in the West subsequent to the discovery by the Seasat satellite in 1978 that manifestations of underwater topography, thought to be hidden from the radar, were visible in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the ocean. In addition, the Seasat radar produced images of ship wakes where the observed angle between the wake arms was much smaller than expected from classical Kelvin wake theory. These observations cast doubt on the radar oceanography community's ability to adequately explain these phenomena, and by extension on the ability of existing hydrodynamic and radar scattering models to accurately predict the observability of submarine-induced signatures. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW is indeed a potentially significant tool in detecting submerged operational submarines, then the Soviet capability, as evidenced throughout this report, will be somewhat daunting. It will be shown that the Soviets have extremely fine capabilities in both theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics, that Soviet researchers have been conducting at-sea radar remote sensing experiments on a scale comparable to those of the United States for several years longer than we have, and that they have both an airborne and spaceborne SAR capability. The only discipline that the Soviet Union appears to be lacking is in the area of digital radar signal processing. If one is of the opinion that radar NAASW can have at most a minimal impact on the detection of submerged submarines, then the Soviet effort is of little consequence and poses not threat. 280 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Digital exploitation of synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, H. L.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A digital processing and analysis scheme for use with digitized synthetic aperture radar data was developed. Using data from a four channel system, the imagery is preprocessed using specially designed software and then analyzed using preexisting facilities originally intended for use with MSS type data. Geometric and radiometric correction may be performed if desired, as well as classification analysis, Fast Fourier transform, filtering and level slice and display functions. The system provides low cost output in real time, permitting interactive imagery analysis. System information flow diagrams as well as sample output products are shown.

  3. Cancellation of singularities for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caday, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In a basic model for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, one wishes to recover a function or distribution f from line integrals over circles whose centers lie on a given curve γ. In this paper, we consider the problem of recovering the singularities (wavefront set) of f given its SAR data, and specifically whether it is possible to choose a singular f whose singularities are hidden from γ, meaning that its SAR data is smooth. We show that f 's singularities can be hidden to leading order if a certain discrete reflection map is the identity, and give examples where this is the case. Finally, numerical experiments illustrate the hiding of singularities.

  4. Inverse synthetic aperture radar: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eerland, K. K.

    1982-06-01

    Theory and results of simulations, associated with inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging are discussed. A radar signal processing algorithm was developed which derives an ISAR image of an aircraft model. This algorithm assumes a straight unaccelerated flight path and an accurate measurement of the flight path parameters in order to perform proper imaging. However, in practice an aircraft may be maneuvering during the observation and also some flight path parameters may be measured in-accurately. In order to compensate for the two most frequent disturbing effects, the algorithm makes use of two specific correction methods. First, a measurement error in the target velocity is removed by means of an optimization procedure and, secondly, a compensation for a curved flight path is performed. Attention is also given to the influence of observation noise. The noise is assumed to be stationary, Gaussian and white (a uniform spectrum).

  5. Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

  6. Motion Measurement for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3 - D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000.

  7. Detection of small, slow ground targets using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis; Chapin, Elaine; Rosen, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) along-track interferometry (ATI) is a technique for sensing Earth-surface motion. The technique involves interferometrically combining data from two radar images acquired from phase centers separated along the platform flight track.

  8. Eliminating Clutter in Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    Diffusion technique reduces clutter noise in coherent SAR (synthetic-aperature radar) image signal without degrading its resolution. Technique makes radar-mapped terrain features more obvious.It also has potential application in holographic microscopy.

  9. Triangulation using synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.

    1991-01-01

    For the extraction of topographic information about Venus from stereoradar images obtained from the Magellan Mission, a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) compilation system was developed on analytical stereoplotters. The system software was extensively tested by using stereoradar images from various spacecraft and airborne radar systems, including Seasat, SIR-B, ERIM XCL, and STAR-1. Stereomodeling from radar images was proven feasible, and development is on a correct approach. During testing, the software was enhanced and modified to obtain more flexibility and better precision. Triangulation software for establishing control points by using SAR images was also developed through a joint effort with the Defense Mapping Agency. The SAR triangulation system comprises four main programs, TRIDATA, MODDATA, TRISAR, and SHEAR. The first two programs are used to sort and update the data; the third program, the main one, performs iterative statistical adjustment; and the fourth program analyzes the results. Also, input are flight data and data from the Global Positioning System and Inertial System (navigation information). The SAR triangulation system was tested with six strips of STAR-1 radar images on a VAX-750 computer. Each strip contains images of 10 minutes flight time (equivalent to a ground distance of 73.5 km); the images cover a ground width of 22.5 km. All images were collected from the same side. With an input of 44 primary control points, 441 ground control points were produced. The adjustment process converged after eight iterations. With a 6-m/pixel resolution of the radar images, the triangulation adjustment has an average standard elevation error of 81 m. Development of Magellan radargrammetry will be continued to convert both SAR compilation and triangulation systems into digital form.

  10. Weighting in digital synthetic aperture radar processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicenzo, A.

    1979-01-01

    Weighting is employed in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing to reduce the sidelobe response at the expense of peak center response height and mainlobe resolution. The weighting effectiveness in digital processing depends not only on the choice of weighting function, but on the fineness of sampling and quantization, on the time bandwidth product, on the quadratic phase error, and on the azimuth antenna pattern. The results of simulations conducted to uncover the effect of these parameters on azimuth weighting effectiveness are presented. In particular, it is shown that multilook capabilities of future SAR systems may obviate the need for consideration of the antenna pattern, and that azimuth time-bandwidth products of over 200 are probably required before the digital results begin to approach the ideal results.

  11. Georeferencing on Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeilzade, M.; Amini, J.; Zakeri, S.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the SAR1 geometry imaging, SAR images include geometric distortions that would be erroneous image information and the images should be geometrically calibrated. As the radar systems are side looking, geometric distortion such as shadow, foreshortening and layover are occurred. To compensate these geometric distortions, information about sensor position, imaging geometry and target altitude from ellipsoid should be available. In this paper, a method for geometric calibration of SAR images is proposed. The method uses Range-Doppler equations. In this method, for the image georeferencing, the DEM2 of SRTM with 30m pixel size is used and also exact ephemeris data of the sensor is required. In the algorithm proposed in this paper, first digital elevation model transmit to range and azimuth direction. By applying this process, errors caused by topography such as foreshortening and layover are removed in the transferred DEM. Then, the position of the corners on original image is found base on the transferred DEM. Next, original image registered to transfer DEM by 8 parameters projective transformation. The output is the georeferenced image that its geometric distortions are removed. The advantage of the method described in this article is that it does not require any control point as well as the need to attitude and rotational parameters of the sensor. Since the ground range resolution of used images are about 30m, the geocoded images using the method described in this paper have an accuracy about 20m (subpixel) in planimetry and about 30m in altimetry. 1 Synthetic Aperture Radar 2 Digital Elevation Model

  12. Synthetic aperture radar signal processing: Trends and technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, John C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are covered: an SAR ground data system; SAR signal processing algorithms; SAR correlator architectures; and current and future trends.

  13. Oil Slick Characterization Using Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Breivik, O.; Brekke, C.; Skrunes, S.; Holt, B.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spills are a hazard worldwide with potential of causing high impact disasters, and require an active oil spill response capability to protect personnel, the ecosystem, and the energy supply. As the amount of oil in traditionally accessible reserves decline, there will be increasing oil extraction from the Arctic and deep-water wells, both new sources with high risk and high cost for monitoring and response. Although radar has long been used for mapping the spatial extent of oil slicks, it is only since the Deepwater Horizon spill that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has been shown capable of characterizing oil properties within a slick, and therefore useful for directing response to the recoverable thicker slicks or emulsions. Here we discuss a 2015 Norwegian oil-on-water spill experiment in which emulsions of known quantity and water-to-oil ratio along with a look-alike slick of plant oil were released in the North Sea and imaged with polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) by NASA's UAVSAR instrument for several hours following release. During the experiment, extensive in situ measurements were made from ship or aircraft with meteorological instruments, released drift buoys, and optical/IR imagers. The experiment was designed to provide validation data for development of a physical model relating polarization-dependent electromagnetic scattering to the dielectric properties of oil mixed with ocean water, which is the basis for oil characterization with SAR. Data were acquired with X-, C-, and L-band satellite-based SARs to enable multi-frequency comparison of characterization capabilities. In addition, the data are used to develop methods to differentiate mineral slicks from biogenic look-alikes, and to better understand slick weathering and dispersion. The results will provide a basis for modeling oil-in-ice spills, currently a high priority for nations involved in Arctic oil exploration. Here we discuss the Norwegian experiment, the validation data, and the results of

  14. Space shuttle search and rescue experiment using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Larson, R. W.; Zelenka, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a synthetic aperture radar for search and rescue applications was demonstrated with aircraft experiments. One experiment was conducted using the ERIM four-channel radar and several test sites in the Michigan area. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system. An orbital experiment to demonstrate the application of synthetic aperture radar to search and rescue is proposed using the space shuttle.

  15. Hughes integrated synthetic aperture radar: High performance at low cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bayma, R.W.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes the background and development of the low cost high-performance Hughes Integrated Synthetic Aperture Radar (HISAR{trademark}) which has a full range of capabilities for real-time reconnaissance, surveillance and earth resource mapping. HISAR uses advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to make operationally effective images of near photo quality, day or night and in all weather conditions. This is achieved at low cost by maximizing the use of commercially available radar and signal-processing equipment in the fabrication. Furthermore, HISAR is designed to fit into an executive-class aircraft making it available for a wide range of users. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Practical synthetic aperture radar image formation based on realistic spaceborne synthetic aperture radar modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Sang Heun; Ro, Yong Man

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the practical spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data focusing method based on the realistic end-to-end spaceborne SAR simulation. Our simulation reflects main factors of the satellite SAR that induce errors to degrade the focused image severely, which are related to the sensor hardware, the antenna beam pointing, the effective velocity, and the Doppler frequency. To minimize errors due to them in the spaceborne SAR image formation, we suggest and utilize the preprocessing as the internal calibration, the analysis of orbital data of an SAR satellite, the calculation of an effective velocity and the Doppler frequency utilizing the two-way slant range equation, and the usage of the phase gradient algorithm combined with the extended chirp scaling algorithm based on the azimuth signal deramping. The processing results for realistic simulated raw data of a spaceborne SAR are presented to validate the proposed methods.

  17. Space shuttle search and rescue experiment using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Larson, R. W.; Zelenka, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Langley Research Center, NASA, is developing a concept for using a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar with passive reflectors for search and rescue applications. The feasibility of a synthetic aperture radar for search and rescue applications has been demonstrated with aircraft experiments. One experiment was conducted using the ERIM four-channel radar and several test sites in the Michigan area. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system. An orbital experiment to demonstrate the application of synthetic aperture radar to search and rescue is proposed using the space shuttle.

  18. Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) Polarimetric Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Perrine, Martin; McLinden, Matthew; Valett, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is a state-of-the-art radar system developed at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for the development and implementation of digital beamforming radar techniques. DBSAR was recently upgraded to polarimetric operation in order to enhance its capability as a science instrument. Two polarimetric approaches were carried out which will be demonstrated in upcoming flight campaigns.

  19. Interference Mitigation Effects on Synthetic Aperture Radar Coherent Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2015-07-01

    For synthetic aperture radars radio frequency interference from sources external to the radar system and techniques to mitigate the interference can degrade the quality of the image products. Usually the radar system designer will try to balance the amount of mitigation for an acceptable amount of interference to optimize the image quality. This dissertation examines the effect of interference mitigation upon coherent data products of fine resolution, high frequency synthetic aperture radars using stretch processing. Novel interference mitigation techniques are introduced that operate on single or multiple apertures of data that increase average coherence compared to existing techniques. New metrics are applied to evaluate multiple mitigation techniques for image quality and average coherence. The underlying mechanism for interference mitigation techniques that affect coherence is revealed.

  20. Synthetic aperture radar system design for random field classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    An optimum design study is carried out for synthetic aperture radar systems intended for classifying randomly reflecting areas (such as agricultural fields) characterized by a reflectivity density spectral density. The problem solution is obtained, neglecting interfield interference and assuming areas of known configuration and location, as well as a certain Gaussian signal field property. The optimum processor is nonlinear, but includes conventional matched filter processing. A set of summary design curves is plotted, and is applied to the design of a satellite synthetic aperture radar system.

  1. The US open skies synthetic aperture radar (SAROS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fortner, K.R.; Hezeltine, P.L.

    1996-11-01

    This paper discusses the Synthetic Aperture Radar for Open Skies (SAROS), an airborne side-looking synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system installed on the U.S. OC-135B Open Skies Observation Aircraft. The paper discusses in detail how the SAROS is designed to meet the performance requirements and limits of the Treaty on Open Skies. The SAROS is based on the U.S. AN/APD-12 analog radar system which has been modified to digitally record radar, motion, and annotation data on magnetic tape and has been designated as the AN/APD-14. The theoretical performance of the AN/APD-12 SAR exceeds the three meter range and azimuth resolution allowed by the Treaty. The SAROS design will limit the performance of the SAR to no better than three meter`s through reduction in transmitted frequency bandwidth, reduction in azimuth bandwidth, and decimation of azimuth sampling prior to recording of the phase history data. 5 figs.

  2. Synthetic aperture radar interferometry of Okmok volcano, Alaska: radar observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Mann, Dörte; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, David

    2000-01-01

    ERS-1/ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar interferometry was used to study the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska. First, we derived an accurate digital elevation model (DEM) using a tandem ERS-1/ERS-2 image pair and the preexisting DEM. Second, by studying changes in interferometric coherence we found that the newly erupted lava lost radar coherence for 5-17 months after the eruption. This suggests changes in the surface backscattering characteristics and was probably related to cooling and compaction processes. Third, the atmospheric delay anomalies in the deformation interferograms were quantitatively assessed. Atmospheric delay anomalies in some of the interferograms were significant and consistently smaller than one to two fringes in magnitude. For this reason, repeat observations are important to confidently interpret small geophysical signals related to volcanic activities. Finally, using two-pass differential interferometry, we analyzed the preemptive inflation, coeruptive deflation, and posteruptive inflation and confirmed the observations using independent image pairs. We observed more than 140 cm of subsidence associated with the 1997 eruption. This subsidence occurred between 16 months before the eruption and 5 months after the eruption, was preceded by ∼18 cm of uplift between 1992 and 1995 centered in the same location, and was followed by ∼10 cm of uplift between September 1997 and 1998. The best fitting model suggests the magma reservoir resided at 2.7 km depth beneath the center of the caldera, which was ∼5 km from the eruptive vent. We estimated the volume of the erupted material to be 0.055 km3 and the average thickness of the erupted lava to be ∼7.4 m. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Stereoscopic Height Estimation from Multiple Aspect Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    SciTech Connect

    DELAURENTIS,JOHN M.; DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2001-08-01

    A Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image is a two-dimensional projection of the radar reflectivity from a 3-dimensional object or scene. Stereoscopic SAR employs two SAR images from distinct flight paths that can be processed together to extract information of the third collapsed dimension (typically height) with some degree of accuracy. However, more than two SAR images of the same scene can similarly be processed to further improve height accuracy, and hence 3-dimensional position accuracy. This report shows how.

  4. Antenna dimensions of synthetic aperture radar systems on satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Design of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for a satellite must take into account the limitation in weight and dimensions of the antenna. The lower limits of the antenna area are derived from the conditions of unambiguity of the SAR system. This result is applied to estimate the antenna requirements for SARs on satellites in circular orbits of various altitudes around Earth and Venus.

  5. Synthetic Aperture Radar Image Formation in Reconfigurable Logic

    SciTech Connect

    DUDLEY,PETER A.

    2001-06-01

    This paper studies the implementation of polar format, synthetic aperture radar image formation in modern Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA's). The polar format algorithm is described in rough terms and each of the processing steps is mapped to FPGA logic. This FPGA logic is analyzed with respect to throughput and circuit size for compatibility with airborne image formation.

  6. Synthetic aperture radar processing with polar formatted subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-10-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses the motion of a small real antenna to synthesize a larger aperture, and thereby achieve very fine azimuth resolution. Efficient SAR image formation requires modelling the radar echo and compensating (focusing) the delay and phase for various positions in the target scene. Polar-Format processing is one successful algorithm developed to process large scenes at fine resolutions, but is still limited, especially at resolutions near a wavelength. This paper shows how using tiers of subapertures can overcome the limitations of Polar-Format processing and increase the focused scene size substantially while using only efficient vector multiplies and Fast Fourier Transforms.

  7. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Average radar response for L-band like polarized system appeared to be related to the watershed runoff coefficients when the viewing angle was approximately 42 deg off nadir. Four requirements for radar systems used to verify applications of active microwave for water resources were identified: (1) first generation digital data will be required; (2) radar should be calibrated both internally and externally; (3) new systems should avoid radom use; and (4) images should be geometrically rectified prior to delivery to the user.

  8. The NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Kim, Yunjin; van Zyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    None given. (From introduction): ...we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of the various radar modes, the instrument performance and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the radar. In addition, we will summarize the [rogress of the data processing effort, especially in the interferometry processing. Finally, we will address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry (XTI) data.

  9. New military uses for synthetic aperture radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reamer, Richard E.; Stockton, Wayne; Stromfors, Richard D.

    1993-02-01

    Loral Defense Systems-Arizona, holder of the original patent for the invention of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), developed SAR to meet the military's need for an all-weather, day/night sensor that could produce high quality reconnaissance imagery in adverse weather and restricted visibility conditions. These features, and the ability to image large areas with fine resolution in a relatively short period of time make this sensor useful for many military applications. To date, however, SARs for military use have been hampered by the fact that they've been large, complex, and expensive. Additionally, they have been mounted on special purpose, single mission aircraft which are costly to operate. That situation has changed. A small, modular SAR, called Miniature Synthetic Aperture Radar (MSAR) developed by Loral can be mounted with relative ease on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) or on multi-mission aircraft such as the F-16, F/A-18, or on the F-14.

  10. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar pilot study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A pilot study of a spaceborne sidelooking radar is summarized. The results of the system trade studies are given along with the electrical parameters for the proposed subsystems. The mechanical aspects, packaging, thermal control and dynamics of the proposed design are presented. Details of the data processor are given. A system is described that allows the data from a pass over the U. S. to be in hard copy form within two hours. Also included are the proposed schedule, work breakdown structure, and cost estimate.

  11. Synthetic aperture radar/LANDSAT MSS image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, H. E. (Editor); Oberholtzer, J. D. (Editor); Anuta, P. E. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms and procedures necessary to merge aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery were determined. The design of a SAR/LANDSAT data merging system was developed. Aircraft SAR images were registered to the corresponding LANDSAT MSS scenes and were the subject of experimental investigations. Results indicate that the registration of SAR imagery with LANDSAT MSS imagery is feasible from a technical viewpoint, and useful from an information-content viewpoint.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar and digital processing: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicenzo, A.

    1981-01-01

    A tutorial on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is presented with emphasis on digital data collection and processing. Background information on waveform frequency and phase notation, mixing, Q conversion, sampling and cross correlation operations is included for clarity. The fate of a SAR signal from transmission to processed image is traced in detail, using the model of a single bright point target against a dark background. Some of the principal problems connected with SAR processing are also discussed.

  13. Ionospheric effects on synthetic aperture radar at VHF

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, T.J.

    1997-02-01

    Synthetic aperture radars (SAR) operated from airplanes have been used at VHF because of their enhanced foliage and ground penetration compared to radars operated at UHF. A satellite-borne VHF SAR would have considerable utility but in order to operate with high resolution it would have to use both a large relative bandwidth and a large aperture. The presence of the ionosphere in the propagation path of the radar will cause a deterioration of the imaging because of dispersion over the bandwidth and group path changes in the imaged area over the collection aperture. In this paper we present calculations of the effects of a deterministic ionosphere on SAR imaging for a radar operated with a 100 MHz bandwidth centered at 250 MHz and over an angular aperture of 23{degrees}. The ionosphere induces a point spread function with an approximate half-width of 150 m in the slant-range direction and of 25 m in the cross-range direction compared to the nominal resolution of 1.5 m in both directions.

  14. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  15. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell`s equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ({approximately}100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  16. Probing the Martian Subsurface with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. A.; Maxwell, T. A.; Freeman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Many regions of the martian surface are covered by fine-grained materials emplaced by volcanic, fluvial, or aeolian processes. These mantling deposits likely hide ancient channel systems (particularly at smaller scale lengths) and volcanic, impact, glacial, or shoreline features. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers the capability to probe meters below the surface, with imaging resolution in the 10 s of m range, to reveal the buried terrain and enhance our understanding of Mars geologic and climate history. This presentation focuses on the practical applications of a Mars orbital SAR, methods for polarimetric and interferometric radar studies, and examples of such techniques for Mars-analog sites on the Moon and Earth.

  17. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Yunling; Kim,Yunjin; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of various radar modes, the instrument performance and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This system operates in the fully polarimetric mode in the P, L, and C band simultaneously or in the interferometric mode in both the L and C band simultaneously. We also summarize the progress of the data processing effort, especially in the interferometry processing and we address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry data.

  18. Proceedings of the Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The Third Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) Workshop was held on 23-24 May 1991 at JPL. Thirty oral presentations were made and 18 poster papers displayed during the workshop. Papers from these 25 presentations are presented which include analyses of AIRSAR operations and studies in SAR remote sensing, ecology, hydrology, soil science, geology, oceanography, volcanology, and SAR mapping and data handling. Results from these studies indicate the direction and emphasis of future orbital radar-sensor missions that will be launched during the 1990's.

  19. Speckle reduction in synthetic-aperture-radar imagery.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E R; April, G V

    1990-07-01

    Speckle appearing in synthetic-aperture-radar images degrades the information contained in these images. Speckle noise can be suppressed by adapted local processing techniques, permitting the definition of statistical parameters inside a small window centered on each pixel of the image. Two processing algorithms are examined; the first one uses the intensity as a variable, and the second one works on a homomorphic transformation of the image intensity. A statistical model for speckle noise that takes into account correlation in multilook imagery has been used to develop these processing algorithms. Several experimental results of processed Seasat-A syntheticaperture-radar images are discussed. PMID:19768064

  20. A perspective of synthetic aperture radar for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skolnik, M. I.

    1978-01-01

    The characteristics and capabilities of synthetic aperture radar are discussed so as to identify those features particularly unique to SAR. The SAR and Optical images were compared. The SAR is an example of radar that provides more information about a target than simply its location. It is the spatial resolution and imaging capability of SAR that has made its application of interest, especially from spaceborne platforms. However, for maximum utility to remote sensing, it was proposed that other information be extracted from SAR data, such as the cross section with frequency and polarization.

  1. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, T. L.; Cannella, M. E.; Jansen, R. W.; Chubb, S. R.; Carande, R. E.; Foley, E. W.; Goldstein, R. M.; Valenzuela, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) imagery brought to the ocean remote sensing field techniques used in radio astronomy. Whilst details of the interferometry differ between the two fields, the basic idea is the same: Use the phase information arising from positional differences of the radar receivers and/or transmitters to probe remote structures. The interferometric image is formed from two complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. These two images are of the same area but separated in time. Typically the time between these images is very short -- approximately 50 msec for the L-band AIRSAR (Airborne SAR). During this short period the radar scatterers on the ocean surface do not have time to significantly decorrelate. Hence the two SAR images will have the same amplitude, since both obtain the radar backscatter from essentially the same object. Although the ocean surface structure does not significantly decorrelate in 50 msec, surface features do have time to move. It is precisely the translation of scattering features across the ocean surface which gives rise to phase differences between the two SAR images. This phase difference is directly proportional to the range velocity of surface scatterers. The constant of proportionality is dependent upon the interferometric mode of operation.

  2. Autonomous system for initializing synthetic aperture radar seeker acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, P.C.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described of guiding a missile having an active seeker including a synthetic aperture radar operating in a squint mode to a target aircraft having a search radar therein the maximum range of active seeker acquisition being within said missile's maneuver capability to intercept, and the maximum range of active seeker acquisition not exceeding the capability of the active seeker, said method comprising the steps of: launching said missile in response to detection of the search radar; implementing a passive seeker mode of operation to passively guide said missile towards said target aircraft in a manner to avoid detection of said missile by said target aircraft; transferring from said passive seeker mode to an active seeker mode in response to detected shutdown of said search radar; maneuvering said missile to execute a turn angle away from said target aircraft such that the search field of said synthetic aperture radar sweeps through an entire target uncertainty volume, said turn angle being within a first preselected limit and a second preselected limit such that said target aircraft does not cross over said missile's terminal flight path; and intercepting said target aircraft within a lethal range of said missile.

  3. The SEASAT-A synthetic aperture radar design and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The SEASAT-A synthetic aperture imaging radar system is the first imaging radar system intended to be used as a scientific instrument designed for orbital use. The requirement of the radar system is to generate continuous radar imagery with a 100 kilometer swath with 25 meter resolution from an orbital altitude of 800 kilometers. These requirements impose unique system design problems and a description of the implementation is given. The end-to-end system is described, including interactions of the spacecraft, antenna, sensor, telemetry link, recording subsystem, and data processor. Some of the factors leading to the selection of critical system parameters are listed. The expected error sources leading to degradation of image quality are reported as well as estimate given of the expected performance from data obtained during a ground testing of the completed subsystems.

  4. Image simulation of geometric targets for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, J. M.

    1989-10-01

    A new technique for image simulation which comes from a synthetic aperture radar is presented. The method is based on the embedding of an artificially simulated target in a real radar image captured by an operational antenna window on a satellite (SEASAT or SIR-B). A L and C band was used for the capture. The target dimensions studied were large enough for use with long waves provided the calculation techniques used with high frequencies were for an equivalent area radar (SER). The calculation of SER allows the capture of a raw signal received from the antennas. So that the possibility of simulation is low, some restrictions are made. The results are sufficiently interesting enough to let the study of the behavior of a particular target become of use to civilians or the military, in the functional bounds of radar waves.

  5. Time-frequency analysis of synthetic aperture radar signals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.

    1996-08-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has become an important tool for remote sensing of the environment. SAR is a set of digital signal processing algorithms that are used to focus the signal returned to the radar because radar systems in themselves cannot produce the high resolution images required in remote sensing applications. To reconstruct an image, several parameters must be estimated and the quality of output image depends on the degree of accuracy of these parameters. In this thesis, we derive the fundamental SAR algorithms and concentrate on the estimation of one of its critical parameters. We show that the common technique for estimating this particular parameter can sometimes lead to erroneous results and reduced quality images. We also employ time-frequency analysis techniques to examine variations in the radar signals caused by platform motion and show how these results can be used to improve output image quality.

  6. Smart antennas for space-borne synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F.; Gao, S.; Mao, C.; Wang, Z.; Patyuchenko, A.; Younis, M.; Krieger, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses smart antennas for space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). First, some recent development in smart antennas for space-borne SAR is reviewed. Then, the paper presents a low-cost space-borne SAR system using digital beam forming on receive. The smart antenna system is also discussed, and some results are shown. The antenna system, consisting of a parabolic reflector and multi-feed array, is designed and optimized for dual-band dual-polarized digital beam-forming performance. The operating frequencies are at X and Ka bands with the center frequency of 9.6 and 35.75 GHz, respectively. The stacked dipoles and square patches with parasitic elements are employed as the feed elements at X and Ka bands. Dual-band antenna arrays are combined in the same aperture, which not only reduce the aperture of the feed array, but also coincide the center of dual-band feed arrays.

  7. Application of synthetic aperture radar remote sensing in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunxia; Deng, Fanghui; Wan, Lei; Wang, Zemin; E, Dongchen; Zhou, Yu

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) delivers high-resolution radar images day or night, and in all weather conditions. It also offers the capability for penetrating materials. These unique capabilities boost the application of SAR remote sensing techniques in Antarctica. Based on the key area of Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) - PANDA (Prydz Bay, Amery Ice Shelf and Dome A) section, this paper summarized the typical applications of SAR data, and discussed the crevasse detection with semi-variance analysis in the SAR images of the Grove Mountains area, DEM generation with InSAR pairs and ICESat GLAS data of the Grove Mountains area and nearby areas, and ice flow velocity derivation from D-InSAR and offset tracking of the Grove Mountains area and downstream areas in East Antarctica. The studies provide important information for Antarctic fieldwork and scientific researches. It is further confirmed that Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing has tremendous potential in the field of glacial geomorphology, topographic mapping and glacier dynamics, etc.

  8. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies of Alaska volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Masterlark, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging is a recently developed geodetic technique capable of measuring ground-surface deformation with centimeter to subcentimeter vertical precision and spatial resolution of tens-of-meter over a relatively large region (???104 km2). The spatial distribution of surface deformation data, derived from InSAR images, enables the construction of detailed mechanical models to enhance the study of magmatic and tectonic processes associated with volcanoes. This paper summarizes our recent InSAR studies of several Alaska volcanoes, which include Okmok, Akutan, Kiska, Augustine, Westdahl, and Peulik volcanoes.

  9. SEASAT views oceans and sea ice with synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. L.; Holt, B.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the oceans and sea ice are presented. Surface and internal waves, the Gulf Stream system and its rings and eddies, the eastern North Pacific, coastal phenomena, bathymetric features, atmospheric phenomena, and ship wakes are represented. Images of arctic pack and shore-fast ice are presented. The characteristics of the SEASAT SAR system and its image are described. Maps showing the area covered, and tables of key orbital information, and listing digitally processed images are provided.

  10. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  11. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  12. Seasat synthetic aperture radar - Ocean wave detection capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, F. I.; Beal, R. C.; Brown, W. E.; Deleonibus, P. S.; Sherman, J. W., III; Gower, J. F. R.; Lichy, D.; Ross, D. B.; Rufenach, C. L.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary assessment has been made of the capability of the Seasat synthetic aperture radar to detect ocean waves. Comparison with surface and aircraft measurements from five passes of the satellite over the Gulf of Alaska indicates agreement to within about 15 percent in wavelength and about 25 deg in wave direction. These results apply to waves 100 to 250 meters in length, propagating in a direction predominantly across the satellite track, in sea states with significant wave height in a range of 2 to 3.5 meters.

  13. Remote sensing with spaceborne synthetic aperture imaging radars: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, J. B.; Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    A review is given of remote sensing with Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR's). In 1978, a spaceborne SA was flown on the SEASAT satellite. It acquired high resulution images over many regions in North America and the North Pacific. The acquired data clearly demonstrate the capability of spaceborne SARs to: image and track polar ice floes; image ocean surface patterns including swells, internal waves, current boundaries, weather boundaries and vessels; and image land features which are used to acquire information about the surface geology and land cover. In 1981, another SAR was flown on the second shuttle flight. This Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) acquired land and ocean images over many areas around the world. The emphasis of the SIR-A experiment was mainly toward geologic mapping. Some of the key results of the SIR-A experiment are given.

  14. Simulation of synthetic aperture radar 4: Summary and recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Peter M.; Bell, Herbert H.

    1990-04-01

    Four experiments were conducted to identify digital feature data base requirements for simulating synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The results indicate that lines of communication and large areal features are the principal cues used in SAR image interpretation. The results also indicate that depiction of small, individual features is required to create a simulation with acceptable realism. These small individual features may be depicted generically without adversely affecting SAR operator task performance. This approach has been proposed by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) as the basis for a new Digital Feature Analysis Data (DFAD) product (Level 3-C) to support high-resolution radar simulation. We recommend that the Air Force accept the proposed Level 3-C DFAD specification for SAR simulation.

  15. Interference Mitigation Effects on Synthetic Aperture Radar Coherent Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrove, Cameron

    2014-05-01

    For synthetic aperture radar image products interference can degrade the quality of the images while techniques to mitigate the interference also reduce the image quality. Usually the radar system designer will try to balance the amount of mitigation for the amount of interference to optimize the image quality. This may work well for many situations, but coherent data products derived from the image products are more sensitive than the human eye to distortions caused by interference and mitigation of interference. This dissertation examines the e ect that interference and mitigation of interference has upon coherent data products. An improvement to the standard notch mitigation is introduced, called the equalization notch. Other methods are suggested to mitigation interference while improving the quality of coherent data products over existing methods.

  16. Passive synthetic aperture radar imaging of ground moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacks, Steven; Yazici, Birsen

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for imaging ground moving targets using passive synthetic aperture radar. A passive radar imaging system uses small, mobile receivers that do not radiate any energy. For these reasons, passive imaging systems result in signicant cost, manufacturing, and stealth advantages. The received signals are obtained by multiple airborne receivers collecting scattered waves due to illuminating sources of opportunity such as commercial television, radio, and cell phone towers. We describe a novel forward model and a corresponding ltered-backprojection type image reconstruction method combined with entropy optimization. Our method determines the location and velocity of multiple targets moving at dierent velocities. Furthermore, it can accommodate arbitrary imaging geometries. we present numerical simulations to verify the imaging method.

  17. Signal based motion compensation for synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    John Kirk

    1999-06-07

    The purpose of the Signal Based Motion Compensation (SBMC) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) effort is to develop a method to measure and compensate for both down range and cross range motion of the radar in order to provide high quality focused SAR imagery in the absence of precision measurements of the platform motion. Currently SAR systems require very precise navigation sensors for motion compensation. These sensors are very expensive and are often supplied in pairs for reliability. In the case of GPS they can be jammed, further degrading performance. This makes for a potentially very expensive and possibly vulnerable SAR system. SBMC can eliminate or reduce the need for these expensive navigation sensors thus reducing the cost of budget minded SAR systems. The results on this program demonstrated the capability of the SBMC approach.

  18. Data management approach to search and rescue synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, John E.; Rogers, George W.

    1997-06-01

    The NASA sponsored Search and Rescue Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) program seeks to use foliage penetrating synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to locate light plane crashes in remote areas. In addition to the hardware and pattern recognition issues, data management is recognized as a significant part of the overall problem. A single NASA/JPL AIRSAR polarimetric image in P, L, and C bands takes approximately 524 megabytes of storage. Algorithmic development efforts, as well as an eventual operational system, will likely require maintaining a large database of SAR imagery, as well as derived features and associated geographical information. The need for this much data is driven in large part by the complexity of the detection problem. A simple classification/detection algorithm does not currently seem feasible. Rather, a data driven approach that can incorporate local background characteristics as well as geographical information seems to be called for. This in turn makes data management a key issue. This paper presents a comprehensive data management framework suitable for the SAR problem, as well as other similar massive data set management problems.

  19. A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

    1996-10-01

    Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

  20. Experiment in Onboard Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Single event upsets (SEUs) are a threat to any computing system running on hardware that has not been physically radiation hardened. In addition to mandating the use of performance-limited, hardened heritage equipment, prior techniques for dealing with the SEU problem often involved hardware-based error detection and correction (EDAC). With limited computing resources, software- based EDAC, or any more elaborate recovery methods, were often not feasible. Synthetic aperture radars (SARs), when operated in the space environment, are interesting due to their relevance to NASAs objectives, but problematic in the sense of producing prodigious amounts of raw data. Prior implementations of the SAR data processing algorithm have been too slow, too computationally intensive, and require too much application memory for onboard execution to be a realistic option when using the type of heritage processing technology described above. This standard C-language implementation of SAR data processing is distributed over many cores of a Tilera Multicore Processor, and employs novel Radiation Hardening by Software (RHBS) techniques designed to protect the component processes (one per core) and their shared application memory from the sort of SEUs expected in the space environment. The source code includes calls to Tilera APIs, and a specialized Tilera compiler is required to produce a Tilera executable. The compiled application reads input data describing the position and orientation of a radar platform, as well as its radar-burst data, over time and writes out processed data in a form that is useful for analysis of the radar observations.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  2. Calibration and characterisation of spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, D. J. Q.; Hurd, D. L.; Cordey, R. A.

    1997-05-01

    Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are many and varied. The emergence of SAR as a commercially viable commodity is also focusing needs to provide services to fulfil applications at affordable prices. This then drives the need to include only features in the system that are necessary and to arrive at designs which are cost efficient to produce. The purposes of Calibration are two fold; (1) conversion of the Radar output units into predetermined reference units (2) the measurement of dynamic system characteristics which fluctuate throughout the life of the system to enable correction of the final product for such features. The first is largely application driven whereas the second is dominated by the system implementation. It is necessary that the spaceborne radar design is not too difficult to realise but this must be balanced by the burden that a simple design may impose upon the ground processing. Definitions of Calibration and Characterisation are provided and discussions of the needs in terms of applications and demands presented. The aspects of implementation for different Radar design families are presented with examples from current programmes.

  3. Characterizing Levees using Polarimetric and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbiru, L.; Aanstoos, J. V.; Mahrooghy, M.; Gokaraju, B.; Nobrega, R. A.; Younan, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring the physical condition of levees is vital in order to protect them from flooding. The dynamics of subsurface water events can cause damage on levee structures which could lead to slough slides, sand boils or through seepage. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, due to its high spatial resolution and soil penetration capability, is a good choice to identify such problem areas so that they can be treated to avoid possible catastrophic failure. The radar polarimetric and interferometric data is capable of identifying variations in soil properties of the areas which might cause levee failure. The study area encompasses portion of levees of the lower Mississippi river in the United States. The methodology of this research is mainly categorized into two streams: 1) polarimetric data analysis and classification, and 2) interferometric analysis. Two sources of SAR imagery are used: a) quad-polarized, L-band data from Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) for polarimetric classification, and b) high resolution dual-polarized Terrasar-X data for interferometric analysis. NASA's UAVSAR imagery acquired between 2009 and 2011 are used for the analysis. The polarimetric classification is performed based on the decomposition parameters: entropy (H), anisotropy (A) and alpha (α) and the results detected slough slides on the levees and potential future slides. In the interferometric approach, the Terrasar-X SAR images acquired at different times in the year 2011 are combined into pairs to exploit the phase difference of the signals. The interferometric information is used to find evidence of potential small-scale deformations which could be pre-cursors to levee failure.

  4. Use of Synthetic Aperture Radar in Cold Climate Flood Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbrough, L. D.

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite images during a cold climate disaster response event. There were 15 European Space Agency (ESA) Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar ASAR scenes, five Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) scenes, one RADARSAT2 scene, and numerous optical sensor data. These data were primarily used to indentify floodwater inundation polygons and flow vectors. However, in cold climate flooding, there are complicating factors such as frazil ice, ice jams, and snow-covered, frozen flood waters that are not present during warmer flooding events. The imagery was obtained through the International Charter "Space and Major Disasters.” The Charter aims at providing a unified system of space data acquisition and delivery to those affected by natural or man-made disasters through Authorized Users. Each member agency has committed resources to support the provisions of the Charter, and thus is helping to mitigate the effects of disasters on human life and property. On 25 March 2009, the Charter was activated in response to the flooding along the Red River of the North in the states of North Dakota and Minnesota of the United States. The delivery time of a single SAR scene from a Charter participant was less than 12 hours from the time of acquisition. This expedited service allowed additional time for creating image-based derivations, field checking and delivery to a decision maker or emergency responder. SAR-derived data sets include identification of river ice and saturated ground conditions. This data could be provided to experts in river ice engineering for use in the development of plans to reduce ice jamming, its effect on water levels and additional stresses on river infrastructure. During disaster response applications, SAR data was found to very useful in indentifying open water and the front of ice jams. Using a river

  5. Addendum to proceedings of the 1978 Synthetic Aperture Radar Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Various research projects on synthetic aperture radar are reported, including SAR calibration techniques. Slot arrays, sidelobe suppression, and wide swaths on satellite-borne radar were examined. The SAR applied to remote sensing was also considered.

  6. Optical synthetic-aperture radar processor archietecture with quadratic phase-error correction

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Mason, J.J. )

    1990-10-15

    Uncompensated phase errors limit the image quality of synthetic-aperture radar. We present an acousto-optic synthetic-aperture radar processor architecture capable of measuring the quadratic phase error. This architecture allows for the error signal to be fed back to the processor to generate the corrected image.

  7. Theory and design of interferometric synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Martin, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A derivation of the signal statistics, an optimal estimator of the interferometric phase, and the expression necessary to calculate the height-error budget are presented. These expressions are used to derive methods of optimizing the parameters of the interferometric synthetic aperture radar system (InSAR), and are then employed in a specific design example for a system to perform high-resolution global topographic mapping with a one-year mission lifetime, subject to current technological constraints. A Monte Carlo simulation of this InSAR system is performed to evaluate its performance for realistic topography. The results indicate that this system has the potential to satisfy the stringent accuracy and resolution requirements for geophysical use of global topographic data.

  8. Application of microprocessors to spacecraft synthetic aperture radar processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A ground-based digital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor capable of correlating images from raw spacecraft data at real-time rates is currently under development. The processor design requirements are particularly formidable due to (1) range migration effects resulting from planetary curvature and rotation, (2) antenna beam pointing errors, and (3) variation of the Doppler reference function with changing orbital parameters. Based upon the current effort, this paper describes a candidate real-time on-board SAR processing implementation approach that might evolve for future spacecraft applications. Key features include the use of custom large scale integration (LSI) charge-coupled device (CCD) technology to accomplish the correlation functions and microprocessor technology to effect control.

  9. Hierarchical model-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Haifeng; Dong, Zhen; Wu, Manqing

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar technology, classical image registration methods are incompetent for high-efficiency and high-accuracy masses of real data processing. Based on this fact, we propose a new method. This method consists of two steps: coarse registration that is realized by cross-correlation algorithm and fine registration that is realized by hierarchical model-based algorithm. Hierarchical model-based algorithm is a high-efficiency optimization algorithm. The key features of this algorithm are a global model that constrains the overall structure of the motion estimated, a local model that is used in the estimation process, and a coarse-to-fine refinement strategy. Experimental results from different kinds of simulated and real data have confirmed that the proposed method is very fast and has high accuracy. Comparing with a conventional cross-correlation method, the proposed method provides markedly improved performance.

  10. Semisupervised synthetic aperture radar image segmentation with multilayer superpixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Su, Weimin; Gu, Hong; Gong, Dachen

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a significant role in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing. However, SAR image segmentation is challenging due to speckle. We propose a semisupervised bipartite graph method for segmentation of an SAR image. First, the multilayer over-segmentation of the SAR image, referred to as superpixels, is computed using existing segmentation algorithms. Second, an unbalanced bipartite graph is constructed in which the correlation between pixels is replaced by the texture similarity between superpixels, to reduce the dimension of the edge matrix. To also improve efficiency, we define a new method, called the combination of the Manhattan distance and symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence, to measure texture similarity. Third, by the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix and semisupervised learning, we construct an across-affinity matrix. A quantitative evaluation using SAR images shows that the new algorithm produces significantly high-quality segmentations as compared with state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms.

  11. Topography estimation with interferometric synthetic aperture radar using fringe detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are presented for using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry data to estimate surface topography. An expression is given to relate the elevation of a ground point to the phase difference of SAR images received from two spatially separated antennas. An iterative algorithm which solves for the position and elevation of each point in the image simultaneously is developed. One of the critical issues that determines the accuracy of the terrain mapping is the phase unwrapping. An approach to the problem by fringe line detection is proposed. The algorithms are tested with two Seasat SAR images of terrain near Yellowstone National Park. The resultant elevation map is compared with a USGS terrain elevation model. The error of the SAR elevation with respect to the digital terrain map is about 8.2 percent of the total terrain variation.

  12. Performance limits for maritime Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR).

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-11-01

    The performance of an Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. In this report we specifically examine ISAR as applied to maritime targets (e.g. ships). It is often difficult to get your arms around' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall ISAR system. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the seek time'.

  13. The Rapid Terrain Visualization interferometric synthetic aperture radar sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Robert H.; Hensley, William Heydon, Jr.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2003-07-01

    The Rapid Terrain Visualization interferometric synthetic aperture radar was designed and built at Sandia National Laboratories as part of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) to 'demonstrate the technologies and infrastructure to meet the Army requirement for rapid generation of digital topographic data to support emerging crisis or contingencies.' This sensor is currently being operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Joint Precision Strike Demonstration (JPSD) Project Office to provide highly accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) for military and civilian customers, both inside and outside of the United States. The sensor achieves better than DTED Level IV position accuracy in near real-time. The system is being flown on a deHavilland DHC-7 Army aircraft. This paper outlines some of the technologies used in the design of the system, discusses the performance, and will discuss operational issues. In addition, we will show results from recent flight tests, including high accuracy maps taken of the San Diego area.

  14. Seamless Synthetic Aperture Radar Archive for Interferometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Baru, C.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Crosby, C.; Fielding, E.; Meertens, C.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.

    2014-11-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived interferometric SAR (InSAR) data products. A unified application programming interface (API) has been created to search the SAR archives at ASF and UNAVCO, 30 and 90-m SRTM DEM data available through OpenTopography, and tropospheric data from the NASA OSCAR project at JPL. The federated query service provides users a single access point to search for SAR granules, InSAR pairs, and corresponding DEM and tropospheric data products from the four archives, as well as the ability to search and download pre-processed InSAR products from ASF and UNAVCO.

  15. Perceptual compression of magnitude-detected synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, John D.; Werness, Susan A.

    1994-01-01

    A perceptually-based approach for compressing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery is presented. Key components of the approach are a multiresolution wavelet transform, a bit allocation mask based on an empirical human visual system (HVS) model, and hybrid scalar/vector quantization. Specifically, wavelet shrinkage techniques are used to segregate wavelet transform coefficients into three components: local means, edges, and texture. Each of these three components is then quantized separately according to a perceptually-based bit allocation scheme. Wavelet coefficients associated with local means and edges are quantized using high-rate scalar quantization while texture information is quantized using low-rate vector quantization. The impact of the perceptually-based multiresolution compression algorithm on visual image quality, impulse response, and texture properties is assessed for fine-resolution magnitude-detected SAR imagery; excellent image quality is found at bit rates at or above 1 bpp along with graceful performance degradation at rates below 1 bpp.

  16. Optimal sampling and quantization of synthetic aperture radar signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.

    1978-01-01

    Some theoretical and experimental results on optimal sampling and quantization of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) signals are presented. It includes a description of a derived theoretical relationship between the pixel signal to noise ratio of processed SAR images and the number of quantization bits per sampled signal, assuming homogeneous extended targets. With this relationship known, a solution may be realized for the problem of optimal allocation of a fixed data bit-volume (for specified surface area and resolution criterion) between the number of samples and the number of bits per sample. The results indicate that to achieve the best possible image quality for a fixed bit rate and a given resolution criterion, one should quantize individual samples coarsely and thereby maximize the number of multiple looks. The theoretical results are then compared with simulation results obtained by processing aircraft SAR data.

  17. An algorithm to retrieve precipitation with synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya'nan; Liu, Zhikun; An, Dawei

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a new type of rainfall retrieval algorithm, called the model-oriented statistical and Volterra integration. It is a combination of the model-oriented statistical (MOS) and Volterra integral equation (VIE) approaches. The steps involved in this new algorithm can be briefly illustrated as follows. Firstly, information such as the start point and width of the rain is obtained through pre-analysis of the data received by synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Secondly, the VIE retrieval algorithm is employed over a short distance to obtain information on the shape of the rain. Finally, the rain rate can be calculated by using the MOS retrieval algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and simple, and can lead to time savings of nearly 50% compared with MOS. An example of application of SAR data is also discussed, involving the retrieval of precipitation information over the South China Sea.

  18. Moving receive beam method and apparatus for synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems by reducing the effect of "edge losses" associated with nonuniform receiver antenna gain. By moving the receiver antenna pattern in synchrony with the apparent motion of the transmitted pulse along the ground, the maximum available receiver antenna gain can be used at all times. Also, the receiver antenna gain for range-ambiguous return signals may be reduced, in some cases, by a large factor. The beam motion can be implemented by real-time adjustment of phase shifters in an electronically-steered phased-array antenna or by electronic switching of feed horns in a reflector antenna system.

  19. SEASAT synthetic-aperture radar data user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Huneycutt, B.; Holt, B. M.; Held, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT Synthetic-Aperture Radar (SAR) system, the data processors, the extent of the image data set, and the means by which a user obtains this data are described and the data quality is evaluated. The user is alerted to some potential problems with the existing volume of SEASAT SAR image data, and allows him to modify his use of that data accordingly. Secondly, the manual focuses on the ultimate focuses on the ultimate capabilities of the raw data set and evaluates the potential of this data for processing into accurately located, amplitude-calibrated imagery of high resolution. This allows the user to decide whether his needs require special-purpose data processing of the SAR raw data.

  20. Computing Ocean Surface Currents from Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, Waqas A.

    Ocean surface currents play an important role in ocean-atmosphere interactions and global ocean circulation, and are also significant for fishing, ocean navigation, and search & rescue. Existing in-situ and remote sensing techniques for measuring ocean surface currents are limited by spatial and temporal data coverage, and thermal IR feature tracking methods are limited by clouds and weak thermal gradients. High-resolution spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) offers repeatable cloud-penetrating measurements of the ocean surface. This research explores methods for ocean surface current measurement through satellite-based SAR. The major part of this research is concerned with the development and application of a semi-automated algorithm to generate ocean surface currents at ˜1.9 km resolution from sequential spaceborne C-band SAR intensity images using the Maximum Cross-Correlation(MCC) method. The primary geographical area of study is the coastal California Current System (CCS), and nearly two years (2008-2009) of 30-min lag data from the Envisat ASAR and ERS-2 AMI SAR sensors is analyzed. The velocity wavenumber spectrum of the derived MCC SAR currents agrees with the k-2 power law as predicted by submesoscale resolution models, and also shows seasonal mesoscale variability. The derived MCC SAR currents are validated against High frequency (HF) radar currents, and the two show some agreement in vector direction, with MCC SAR vectors oriented slightly anti-clockwise relative to HF radar vectors. The unimodal mean-symmetric residual histograms indicate that errors between the two datasets are random, except for a mean positive bias of ≈ 11 cm/s in MCC SAR currents relative to HF radar currents. This magnitude difference occurs primarily in the along-shore component ( ≈ 6 cm/s) and is negligible in the cross-shore component. Doppler Centroid Cross-Track (XT) radial currents from Envisat Wide Swath Mode (WSM) scenes are compared with HF radar radial currents

  1. Gulf Stream surface convergence imaged by synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Jansen, R. W.; Valenzuela, G. R.; Trump, C. L.; Lee, J. S.; Kaiser, J. A. C.

    1994-09-01

    On July 20, 1990, the north edge of the Gulf Stream (36.7°N, 72.0°W) was sampled by the R/V Cape Henlopen and simultaneously imaged by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Hydrographic measurements show an abrupt surface front separating warm, salty Gulf Stream water in the south from a filament of cool, fresh (<33 practical salinity unit (psu)) water to the north. The filament lies within the stream and is likely water entrained from the continental shelf. The southern boundary of the filament is marked by increased surface wave breaking in a 100- to 200-m-wide zone, accumulations of Sargassum, and an orthogonal velocity change of 20 cm/s. The front is manifested in a sequence of SAR images as a narrow line having returns 1-2 dB higher than background. (A second, transient SAR line occurs near the northern filament boundary.) The observations are compared with model calculations of the surface wave hydrodynamics and radar scattering. The ocean waves are driven by southwesterly 8-m/s winds and interact with the front to produce primarily an enhancement of 2- to 3-m waves over a ≲200-m-wide region centered downwind of the front. Using a composite scattering radar model along with measured breaking-wave statistics, we show that the observed modulations in the radar backscatter can be accounted for through breaking-wave and tilted Bragg wave scattering effects. These results further show that SAR images of the ocean surface can be exploited for detailed study of particular ocean processes.

  2. Target detection beneath foliage using polarimetric synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloude, S. R.; Corr, D. G.; Williams, M. L.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how the new technology of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry can be used to enhance the detection of targets hidden beneath foliage. The key idea is to note that for random volume scattering, the interferometric coherence is invariant to changes in wave polarization. On the other hand, in the presence of a target the coherence changes with polarization. We show that under general symmetry constraints this change is linear in the complex coherence plane. These observations can be used to devise a filter to suppress the returns from foliage clutter while maintaining the signal from hidden targets. We illustrate the algorithm by applying it to coherent L-band SAR simulations of corner reflectors hidden in a forest. The simulations are performed using a voxel-based vector wave propagation and scattering code coupled to detailed structural models of tree architecture. In this way, the spatial statistics and radar signal fluctuations closely match those observed for natural terrain. We demonstrate significant improvements in the detection of hidden targets, which suggests that this technology has great potential for future foliage penetration (FOPEN) applications.

  3. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Moussally, G.J.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this applied research and development project is to develop a system known as `3-D SISAR`. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments found at DOE storage sites. Three-dimensional maps of the object locations will be produced which can assist the development of remediation strategies and the characterization of the digface during remediation operations. It is expected that the 3-D SISAR will also prove useful for monitoring hydrocarbon based contaminant migration after remediation. The underground imaging technique being developed under this contract utilizes a spotlight mode Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach which, due to its inherent stand-off capability, will permit the rapid survey of a site and achieve a high degree of productivity over large areas. When deployed from an airborne platform, the stand-off techniques is also seen as a way to overcome practical survey limitations encountered at vegetated sites.

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar: building tomorrow's tools today

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong

    2006-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system transmits electromagnetic (EM) waves at a wavelength that can range from a few millimeters to tens of centimeters. The radar wave propagates through the atmosphere and interacts with the Earth’s surface. Part of the energy is reflected back to the SAR system and recorded. Using a sophisticated image processing technique, called SAR processing (Curlander and McDonough, 1991), both the intensity and phase of the reflected (or backscattered) signal of each ground resolution element (a few meters to tens of meters) can be calculated in the form of a complex-valued SAR image representing the reflectivity of the ground surface. The amplitude or intensity of the SAR image is determined primarily by terrain slope, surface roughness, and dielectric constants, whereas the phase of the SAR image is determined primarily by the distance between the satellite antenna and the ground targets, slowing of the signal by the atmosphere, and the interaction of EM waves with ground surface. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) imaging, a recently developed remote sensing technique, utilizes the interaction of EM waves, referred to as interference, to measure precise distances. Very simply, InSAR involves the use of two or more SAR images of the same area to extract landscape topography and its deformation patterns.

  5. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression. PMID:27136551

  6. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuanghui; Liu, Yongxiang; Li, Xiang; Bi, Guoan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR) algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP) estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression. PMID:27136551

  7. Synthetic aperture radar processing system for search and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huxtable, Barton D.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Rais, Houra

    1997-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is uniquely suited to help solve the search and rescue problem since it can be utilized either day or night and through both dense fog or thick cloud cover. This paper describes the search and rescue data processing system (SARDPS) developed at Goddard Space Flight Center. SARDPS was developed for the Search and Rescue Mission Office in order to conduct research, development, and technology demonstration of SAR to quickly locate small aircraft which have crashed in remote areas. In order to effectively apply SAR to the detection of crashed aircraft several technical challenges needed to be overcome. These include full resolution SAR image formation using low frequency radar appropriate for foliage penetration, the application of autofocusing for SAR motion compensation in the processing system, and the development of sophisticated candidate crash site detection algorithms. In addition, the need to dispatch rescue teams to specific locations requires precise SAR image georectification and map registration techniques. The final end-to-end processing system allows for raw SAR phase history data to be quickly converted to georeferenced map/image products with candidate crash site locations identified.

  8. Synthetic aperture radar signal processing on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Seiler, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    Satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) sense areas of several thousand square kilometers in seconds and transmit phase history signal data several tens of megabits per second. The Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) has a variable swath of 20 to 50 km and acquired data over 100 kms along track in about 13 seconds. With the simplification of separability of the reference function, the processing still requires considerable resources; high speed I/O, large memory and fast computation. Processing systems with regular hardware take hours to process one Seasat image and about one hour for a SIR-B image. Bringing this processing time closer to acquisition times requires an end-to-end system solution. For the purpose of demonstration, software was implemented on the present Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) configuration for processing Seasat and SIR-B data. The software takes advantage of the high processing speed offered by the MPP, the large Staging Buffer, and the high speed I/O between the MPP array unit and the Staging Buffer. It was found that with unoptimized Parallel Pascal code, the processing time on the MPP for a 4096 x 4096 sample subset of signal data ranges between 18 and 30.2 seconds depending on options.

  9. Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus for synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Munson, David C

    2011-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging suffers from image focus degradation in the presence of phase errors in the received signal due to unknown platform motion or signal propagation delays. We present a new autofocus algorithm, termed Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), that is derived under a linear algebraic framework, allowing the SAR image to be focused in a noniterative fashion. Motivated by the mutichannel autofocus (MCA) approach, the proposed autofocus algorithm invokes the assumption of a low-return region, which generally is provided within the antenna sidelobes. Unlike MCA, FMCA works with the collected polar Fourier data directly and is capable of accommodating wide-angle monostatic SAR and bistatic SAR scenarios. Most previous SAR autofocus algorithms rely on the prior assumption that radar's range of look angles is small so that the phase errors can be modeled as varying along only one dimension in the collected Fourier data. And, in some cases, implicit assumptions are made regarding the SAR scene. Performance of such autofocus algorithms degrades if the assumptions are not satisfied. The proposed algorithm has the advantage that it does not require prior assumptions about the range of look angles, nor characteristics of the scene. PMID:21606028

  10. New formulation for interferometric synthetic aperture radar for terrain mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Wahl, D.E.; Eichel, P.H.; Thompson, P.A.

    1994-04-01

    The subject of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) for high-accuracy terrain elevation mapping continues to gain importance in the arena of radar signal processing. Applications to problems in precision terrain-aided guidance and automatic target recognition, as well as a variety of civil applications, are being studied by a number of researchers. Not unlike many other areas of SAR processing, the subject of IFSAR can at first glance appear to be somewhat mysterious. In this paper we show how the mathematics of IFSAR for terrain elevation mapping using a pair of spotlight mode SAR collections can be derived in a very straightforward manner. Here, we employ an approach that relies entirely on three-dimensional Fourier transforms, and utilizes no reference to range equations or Doppler concepts. The result is a simplified explanation of the fundamentals of interferometry, including an easily-seen link between image domain phase difference and terrain elevation height. The derivation builds upon previous work by the authors in which a framework for spotlight mode SAR image formation based on an analogy to three-dimensional computerized axial tomography (CAT) was developed. After outlining the major steps in the mathematics, we show how a computer simulator which utilizes three-dimensional Fourier transforms can be constructed that demonstrates all of the major aspects of IFSAR from spotlight mode collections.

  11. Augmenting synthetic aperture radar with space time adaptive processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, Michael; Potter, Lee C.; Ertin, Emre

    2013-05-01

    Wide-area persistent radar video offers the ability to track moving targets. A shortcoming of the current technology is an inability to maintain track when Doppler shift places moving target returns co-located with strong clutter. Further, the high down-link data rate required for wide-area imaging presents a stringent system bottleneck. We present a multi-channel approach to augment the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) modality with space time adaptive processing (STAP) while constraining the down-link data rate to that of a single antenna SAR system. To this end, we adopt a multiple transmit, single receive (MISO) architecture. A frequency division design for orthogonal transmit waveforms is presented; the approach maintains coherence on clutter, achieves the maximal unaliased band of radial velocities, retains full resolution SAR images, and requires no increase in receiver data rate vis-a-vis the wide-area SAR modality. For Nt transmit antennas and N samples per pulse, the enhanced sensing provides a STAP capability with Nt times larger range bins than the SAR mode, at the cost of O(log N) more computations per pulse. The proposed MISO system and the associated signal processing are detailed, and the approach is numerically demonstrated via simulation of an airborne X-band system.

  12. Unexploded ordnance detection experiments using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, Clyde C.; Marinelli, Vincent R.; Ressler, Marc A.; Ton, Tuan T.

    1998-09-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has several technology development programs that are evaluating the use of ultra- wideband synthetic aperture radar (UWB SAR) to detect and locate targets that are subsurface or concealed by foliage. Under these programs, a 1-GHz-bandwidth, low-frequency, fully polarimetric UWB SAR instrumentation system was developed to collect the data needed to support foliage and ground- penetrating radar studies. The radar was integrated onto a 150-ft-high mobile boomlift platform in 1995 and was thus named the BoomSAR. In 1997, under the sponsorship of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), ARL began a project focused on enhancing the detection and discrimination of unexploded ordnance (UXO). The program's technical approach is to collect high-quality, precision data to support phenomenological investigations of electromagnetic wave propagation through varying dielectric media, which in turn supports the development of algorithms for automatic target detection. For this project, a UXO test site was set up at the Steel Crater Test Area -- an existing test site that already contained subsurface mines, tactical vehicles, 55-gallon drums, storage containers, wires, pipes, and arms caches located at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG), Arizona. More than 600 additional pieces of inert UXO were added to the Steel Crater Test Area, including bombs (250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 lb), mortars (60 and 81 mm), artillery shells (105 and 155 mm), 2.75-in. rockets, submunitions (M42, BLU-63, M68, BLU-97, and M118), and mines (Gator, VS1.6, M12, PMN, and POM- Z). In the selection of UXO to be included at YPG, an emphasis was placed on the types of munitions that may be present at CONUS test and training ranges.

  13. New inverse synthetic aperture radar algorithm for translational motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocker, Richard P.; Henderson, Thomas B.; Jones, Scott A.; Frieden, B. R.

    1991-10-01

    Inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) is an imaging technique that shows real promise in classifying airborne targets in real time under all weather conditions. Over the past few years a large body of ISAR data has been collected and considerable effort has been expended to develop algorithms to form high-resolution images from this data. One important goal of workers in this field is to develop software that will do the best job of imaging under the widest range of conditions. The success of classifying targets using ISAR is predicated upon forming highly focused radar images of these targets. Efforts to develop highly focused imaging computer software have been challenging, mainly because the imaging depends on and is affected by the motion of the target, which in general is not precisely known. Specifically, the target generally has both rotational motion about some axis and translational motion as a whole with respect to the radar. The slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities must be first accurately estimated from the data and compensated before the image can be focused. Following slant-range motion compensation, the image is further focused by determining and correcting for target rotation. The use of the burst derivative measure is proposed as a means to improve the computational efficiency of currently used ISAR algorithms. The use of this measure in motion compensation ISAR algorithms for estimating the slant-range translational motion kinematic quantities of an uncooperative target is described. Preliminary tests have been performed on simulated as well as actual ISAR data using both a Sun 4 workstation and a parallel processing transputer array. Results indicate that the burst derivative measure gives significant improvement in processing speed over the traditional entropy measure now employed.

  14. Snow mapping in alpine regions with synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J.; Dozier, J. ); Rott, H. . Inst. for Meteorology and Geophysics)

    1994-01-01

    For climatological and hydrological investigations, the areas covered by snow and glacial ice are important parameters. Active microwave sensors can discriminate snow from other surfaces in all weather conditions, and their spatial resolution is compatible with the topographic variation in alpine regions. Using data acquired with the NASA AIRSAR in the Oetztal Alps in 1989 and 1991, the authors examine the usage of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) to map snow- and glacier-covered areas. By comparing polarimetric SAR data to images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper obtained under clear conditions one week after the SAR flight, they find that SAR data at 5.3 GHz (C-band) can discriminate between areas covered by snow from those that are ice-free. However, they are less suited to discrimination of glacier ice from snow and rock. The overall pixel-by-pixel accuracies--74% from VV polarization alone with topographic information, 76% from polarimetric SAR without any topographic information, and 79% from polarimetric SAR with topographic information--are high enough to justify the use of SAR as the data source in areas that are too cloud-covered to obtain data from the Thematic Mapper. This is especially true for snow discrimination, where accuracies exceed 80%, because mapping of a transient snow cover during a cloudy melt season is often difficult with an optical sensor. The AIRSAR survey was carried out in summer during a heavy rainstorm, when the snow surfaces were unusually rough.

  15. Mapping Boreal Wetlands Using Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K. C.; Bohn, T.; Lettenmaier, D.

    2006-12-01

    Carbon and methane emissions from wetlands and lakes can have a large impact on global climate. These ecosystems are dominant features in the northern high latitudes hence the importance of assessing their spatial and temporal extent to improve upon global net carbon exchange estimates. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an effective tool for this purpose since large inaccessible areas can be monitored on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination and it is sensitive to vegetation and standing water. We employ ERS (C-band, 100 m, VV-polarization) and JERS (L-band, 100 m, HH-polarization) in this study to map wetlands within boreal sub-regions. Large scale L-band SAR mosaics assembled over boreal regions are used with supplementary multi-temporal data for the analysis. Path to path and year to year radiometric differences due predominantly to seasonal changes were a source of confusion. Decision tree classification tools are used to alleviate this problem. Digital elevation models (where available) and derived slope aspect are used to better distinguish drainage patterns. Texture images are used to help differentiate different wetland classes (e.g. fens, bogs, swamps, marshes, and open water). Examples of validated test regions are presented. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology and the University of Washington under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation.

    PubMed

    Nitti, Davide O; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria T; Greco, Mario; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR) and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM). A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimated UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system. PMID:26225977

  17. Moving target imaging using ultrawideband synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanwei; Liang, Diannong; Wan, Yan; Huang, Xiaotao; Dong, Zhen

    2003-09-01

    Moving Target High Resolution Imaging of Foliage Penetrate Ultra-Wide Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (FOPEN UWB SAR) is of great significance for battlefield awareness of concealed target. Great range migration and strong clutter make moving target detection and imaging difficult, especially the Signal to Clutter Ration(SCR) some times is so low that the moving targets is invisible in FOPEN UWB SAR imagery. To improve SCR, the clean technique is used in range compressed data domain. The clean technique and data reconstruction help single channel of FOPEN UWB SAR suppress strong tree clutter and stationary target signal from region of interest. A new definition called General Key-Stone Transform is given, which can correct any order of range migration. FOPEN UWB SAR has long integrated time. The plane and target moving in long time lead to complex range migration. To obtain high resolution imagery of moving target, General Key-Stone transform are applied to remove the range migration and realize multiple moving target data segment. Both General Key-Stone Transform and Clean Technique are applied in real data processing of FOPEN UWB SAR. The result shows that multiple moving targets in the trees are clearly detected and high resolution imagery is formed.

  18. Quantitative statistical assessment of conditional models for synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Michael D; O'Sullivan, Joseph A

    2004-02-01

    Many applications of object recognition in the presence of pose uncertainty rely on statistical models-conditioned on pose-for observations. The image statistics of three-dimensional (3-D) objects are often assumed to belong to a family of distributions with unknown model parameters that vary with one or more continuous-valued pose parameters. Many methods for statistical model assessment, for example the tests of Kolmogorov-Smirnov and K. Pearson, require that all model parameters be fully specified or that sample sizes be large. Assessing pose-dependent models from a finite number of observations over a variety of poses can violate these requirements. However, a large number of small samples, corresponding to unique combinations of object, pose, and pixel location, are often available. We develop methods for model testing which assume a large number of small samples and apply them to the comparison of three models for synthetic aperture radar images of 3-D objects with varying pose. Each model is directly related to the Gaussian distribution and is assessed both in terms of goodness-of-fit and underlying model assumptions, such as independence, known mean, and homoscedasticity. Test results are presented in terms of the functional relationship between a given significance level and the percentage of samples that wold fail a test at that level. PMID:15376934

  19. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Nitti, Davide O.; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria T.; Greco, Mario; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR) and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM). A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimate UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system. PMID:26225977

  20. Lynx: A High-Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Pace, F.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I.; Walker, B.C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-03-08

    Lynx is a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that has been designed and built by Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA). Although Lynx may be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, it is primarily intended to be fielded on unmanned aerial vehicles. In particular, it may be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, or Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA Aeronautical Systems, Inc. The Lynx production weight is less than 120 lb. and has a slant range of 30 km (in 4 mm/hr rain). It has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode. In ground moving target indicator mode, the minimum detectable velocity is 6 knots with a minimum target cross-section of 10 dBsm. In coherent change detection mode, Lynx makes registered, complex image comparisons either of 0.1 m resolution (minimum) spotlight images or of 0.3 m resolution (minimum) strip images. The Lynx user interface features a view manager that allows it to pan and zoom like a video camera. Lynx was developed under corporate finding from GA and will be manufactured by GA for both military and commercial applications. The Lynx system architecture will be presented and some of its unique features will be described. Imagery at the finest resolutions in both spotlight and strip modes have been obtained and will also be presented.

  1. Target discrimination in synthetic aperture radar using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Principe, J C; Kim, M; Fisher, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses target discrimination in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery using linear and nonlinear adaptive networks. Neural networks are extensively used for pattern classification but here the goal is discrimination. We show that the two applications require different cost functions. We start by analyzing with a pattern recognition perspective the two-parameter constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detector which is widely utilized as a target detector in SAR. Then we generalize its principle to construct the quadratic gamma discriminator (QGD), a nonparametrically trained classifier based on local image intensity. The linear processing element of the QCD is further extended with nonlinearities yielding a multilayer perceptron (MLP) which we call the NL-QGD (nonlinear QGD). MLPs are normally trained based on the L(2) norm. We experimentally show that the L(2) norm is not recommended to train MLPs for discriminating targets in SAR. Inspired by the Neyman-Pearson criterion, we create a cost function based on a mixed norm to weight the false alarms and the missed detections differently. Mixed norms can easily be incorporated into the backpropagation algorithm, and lead to better performance. Several other norms (L(8), cross-entropy) are applied to train the NL-QGD and all outperformed the L(2) norm when validated by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. The data sets are constructed from TABILS 24 ISAR targets embedded in 7 km(2) of SAR imagery (MIT/LL mission 90). PMID:18276330

  2. Detection/tracking of moving targets with synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newstadt, Gregory E.; Zelnio, Edmund; Gorham, Leroy; Hero, Alfred O., III

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the problem of detecting and tracking targets with synthetic aperture radars is considered. A novel approach in which prior knowledge on target motion is assumed to be known for small patches within the field of view. Probability densities are derived as priors on the moving target signature within backprojected SAR images, based on the work of Jao.1 Furthermore, detection and tracking algorithms are presented to take advantage of the derived prior densities. It was found that pure detection suffered from a high false alarm rate as the number of targets in the scene increased. Thus, tracking algorithms were implemented through a particle filter based on the Joint Multi-Target Probability Density (JMPD) particle filter2 and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF)3 that could be used in a track-before-detect scenario. It was found that the PF was superior than the UKF, and was able to track 5 targets at 0.1 second intervals with a tracking error of 0.20 +/- 1.61m (95% confidence interval).

  3. Statistical assessment of model fit for synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Michael D.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.

    2001-08-01

    Parametric approaches to problems of inference from observed data often rely on assumed probabilistic models for the data which may be based on knowledge of the physics of the data acquisition. Given a rich enough collection of sample data, the validity of those assumed models can be assessed in a statistical hypothesis testing framework using any of a number of goodness-of-fit tests developed over the last hundred years for this purpose. Such assessments can be used both to compare alternate models for observed data and to help determine the conditions under which a given model breaks down. We apply three such methods, the (chi) 2 test of Karl Pearson, Kolmogorov's goodness-of-fit test, and the D'Agostino-Pearson test for normality, to quantify how well the data fit various models for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The results of these tests are used to compare a conditionally Gaussian model for complex-valued SAR pixel values, a conditionally log-normal model for SAR pixel magnitudes, and a conditionally normal model for SAR pixel quarter-power values. Sample data for these tests are drawn from the publicly released MSTAR dataset.

  4. UHF Microstrip Antenna Array for Synthetic- Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert F.; Huang, John

    2003-01-01

    An ultra-high-frequency microstrippatch antenna has been built for use in airborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR). The antenna design satisfies requirements specific to the GeoSAR program, which is dedicated to the development of a terrain-mapping SAR system that can provide information on geology, seismicity, vegetation, and other terrain-related topics. One of the requirements is for ultra-wide-band performance: the antenna must be capable of operating with dual linear polarization in the frequency range of 350 plus or minus 80 MHz, with a peak gain of 10 dB at the middle frequency of 350 MHz and a gain of at least 8 dB at the upper and lower ends (270 and 430 MHz) of the band. Another requirement is compactness: the antenna must fit in the wingtip pod of a Gulfstream II airplane. The antenna includes a linear array of microstrip-patch radiating elements supported over square cavities. Each patch is square (except for small corner cuts) and has a small square hole at its center.

  5. Model-supported exploitation of synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellappa, Rama; Kuttikkad, Shyam; Meth, Reuven; Burlina, Philippe; Shekhar, Chandra S.

    1996-02-01

    We address the application of model-supported exploitation techniques to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. The emphasis is on monitoring SAR imagery using wide area 2D and/or 3D site models along with contextual information. We consider here the following tasks useful in monitoring: (a) site model construction using segmentation and labeling techniques, (b) target detection, (c) target classification and indexing, and (d) SAR image-site model registration. The 2-D wide area site models used here for SAR image exploitation differ from typical site models developed for RADIUS applications, in that they do not model specific facilities, but constitute wide area site models of cultural features such as urban clutter areas, roads, clearings, fields, etc. These models may be derived directly from existing site models, possibly constructed from electro-optical (EO) observations. When such models are not available, a set of segmentation and labeling techniques described here can be used for the construction of 2D site models. The use of models can potentially yield critical information which can disambiguate target signatures in SAR images. We address registration of SAR and EO images to a common site model. Specific derivations are given for the case of registration within the RCDE platform. We suggest a constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection scheme and a topographic primal sketch (TPS) based classification scheme for monitoring target occurrences in SAR images. The TPS of an observed target is matched against candidate targets TPSs synthesized for the preferred target orientation, inferred from context (e.g. road or parking lot targets). Experimental results on real and synthetic SAR images are provided.

  6. Dual frequency Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission for monitoring our dynamic planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J.; Bard, S.; Key, R.; Kim, Y.; Vaze, P.; Huneycutt, B.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing technology make it possible to acquire global-scale data sets that provide unique information about the Earth's continually changing surface characteristics.

  7. Understanding Volcanic Inflation of Long Valley Caldera, California, from Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.; Hensley, S.; Rosen, P.; Langbein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The results using interferometric synthetic aperture radar(SAR) to measure the co-seismic displacement from the June 28, 1992 Landers earthquake suggest that this technique may be applicable to other problems in crustal deformation.

  8. Forest Profiling with Multiple Observation Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Chapman, B. D.; Dutra, L. V.; Dos Santos, J. R.; Goncalves, F. G.; Mura, J. C.; Freitas, C. D.; Graca, P. M.; Drake, J.

    2006-12-01

    Measurements of the vertical structure of forest vegetation bear on ecosystem state, such as biodiversity, carbon dynamics, and fire susceptibility, and the estimation of forest biomass. Global monitoring of vertical vegetation structure is one of the most important and as yet unrealized goals of forest remote sensing. The Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) phase and coherence observations are directly sensitive to the vertical distribution of electromagnetic dielectric in the forest medium. This dielectric distribution in turn depends on vegetation density as a function of the vertical coordinate. Multiple InSAR observations--multiple baseline, multiple frequency, and/or multiple polarization--must be used to uniquely estimate vegetation density profiles. This talk explains the need for multiple observation strategies and the benefits of multiple- baseline, multiple-frequency, and multiple-polarization strategies. Multiple baseline tropical forest profiles from C-band (wavelength=0.056 m) InSAR will be shown, as well as results from L-band (0.25 m) few-baseline observations over La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Both surface-deformation measurements and those relevant to vertical-vegetation structure may result from a single InSAR mission design, provided, for example, that multiple nonzero baselines are flown along with the zero-baseline configuration preferred for deformation. The possibility of mutually improving the accuracy of deformation and structure in a simultaneous- measurement scenario will be discussed. There is also potential synergy with other remote sensing missions, such as the Tandem X InSAR mission, for delivering forest structure.

  9. Ice island detection and characterization with airborne synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O.; Sackinger, W.M. )

    1990-04-15

    A 1:300,000 scale airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of an area of the Arctic Ocean adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Canadian High Arctic, is examined to determine the number and characteristics of ice islands in the image and to assess the capability of airborne and satellite SAR to detect ice islands. Twelve ice islands have been identified, and their dimensions range from as large as 5.7 km by 8.7 km to as small as 0.15 km by 0.25 km. A significant SAR characteristic of the shelf ice portions of ice islands is a return with a ribbed texture of alternating lighter and darker grey tones resulting from the indulating shelf ice surfaces of the ice islands. The appearance of the ribbed texture varies according to the ice islands' orientation relative to the illumination direction and consequently the incidence angle. Some ice islands also include extensive areas of textureless dark tone attached to the shelf ice. The weak returns correspond to (1) multiyear landfast sea ice that was attached to the front of the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf at the time of calving and which has remained attached since then and (2) multiyear pack ice that has become attached and consolidated since the calving, indicating that ice islands can increase their area and mass significantly as they drift. Ice islands are easily discernible in SAR images and for the future SAR represents a promising technique to obtain a census of ice islands in the Arctic Ocean. However, any SAR-based census probably will be conservative because ice islands smaller than 300-400 m across are likely to remain undetected, particularly in areas of heavy ice ridging which produces strong SAR clutter.

  10. Seamless Synthetic Aperture Radar Archive for Interferometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Meertens, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Crosby, C.; Fielding, E. J.; Nicoll, J.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Baru, C.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) Seamless Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Archive (SSARA) project is a 2-year collaboration between UNAVCO/WInSAR, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. terrain corrected interferograms). A seamless SAR archive increases the accessibility and the utility of SAR science data to solid Earth and cryospheric science researchers. Building on the established webs services and APIs at UNAVCO and ASF, the SSARA project will provide simple web services tools to seamlessly and effectively exchange and share space- and airborne SAR metadata, archived SAR data, and on-demand derived products between the distributed archives and individual users. Development of standard formats for data products and new QC/QA definitions will be implemented to streamline data usage and enable advanced query capabilities. The new ACCESS-developed tools will help overcome the obstacles of heterogeneous archive access protocols and data formats, data provider access policy constraints, and will also enable interoperability with key information technology development systems such as the NASA/JPL QuakeSim and ARIA projects, which provide higher level resources for geodetic data processing, data assimilation and modeling, and integrative analysis for scientific research and hazards applications. The SSARA project will significantly enhance mature IT capabilities at ASF's NASA-supported DAAC, the GEO Supersites archive, supported operationally by UNAVCO, and UNAVCO's WInSAR and EarthScope SAR archives that are supported by NASA, NSF, and the USGS in close collaboration with ESA/ESRIN.

  11. NASA-ISRO synthetic aperture radar: science and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Raj; Rosen, Paul; Misra, Tapan

    2016-05-01

    NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR), a novel SAR concept will be utilized to image wide swath at high resolution of stripmap SAR. It will have observations in L- and S-bands to understand highly spatial and temporally complex processes such as ecosystem disturbances, ice sheet changes, and natural hazards including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, and landslides. NISAR with several advanced features such as 12 days interferometric orbit, achievement of high resolution and wide swath images through SweepSAR technology and simultaneous data acquisition in dual frequency would support a host of applications. The primary objectives of NISAR are to monitor ecosystems including monitoring changes in ecosystem structure and biomass estimation, carbon flux monitoring; mangroves and wetlands characterization; alpine forest characterization and delineation of tree-line ecotone, land surface deformation including measurement of deformation due to co-seismic and inter-seismic activities; landslides; land subsidence and volcanic deformation, cryosphere studies including measurements of dynamics of polar ice sheet, ice discharge to the ocean, Himalayan snow and glacier dynamics, deep and coastal ocean studies including retrieval of ocean parameters, mapping of coastal erosion and shore-line change; demarcation of high tide line (HTL) and low tide line (LTL) for coastal regulation zones (CRZ) mapping, geological studies including mapping of structural and lithological features; lineaments and paleo-channels; geo-morphological mapping, natural disaster response including mapping and monitoring of floods, forest fires, oil spills, earthquake damage and monitoring of extreme weather events such as cyclones. In addition to the above, NISAR would support various other applications such as enhanced crop monitoring, soil moisture estimation, urban area development, weather and hydrological forecasting.

  12. The Information Content of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar: Vegetation and Underlying Surface Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper first gives a heuristic description of the sensitivity of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar to vertical vegetation distributions and underlying surface topography. A parameter estimation scenario is then described in which the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar cross-correlation amplitude and phase are the observations from which vegetation and surface topographic parameters are estimated. It is shown that, even in the homogeneous-layer model of the vegetation, the number of parameters needed to describe the vegetation and underlying topography exceeds the number of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations for single-baseline, single-frequency, single-incidence-angle, single-polarization Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar. Using ancillary ground-truth data to compensate for the underdetermination of the parameters, forest depths are estimated from the INSAR data. A recently-analyzed multibaseline data set is also discussed and the potential for stand-alone Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar parameter estimation is assessed. The potential of combining the information content of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar with that of infrared/optical remote sensing data is briefly discussed.

  13. Tundra Fire Effects Mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, L. K.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; French, N. H.; Loboda, T. V.; Chavez, M. C.; Hawkins, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Traditional electro-optical, satellite-based methods of fire detection and monitoring are severely limited in the arctic due to persistent cloud cover and short growing seasons. Radar data can provide an alternative to traditional electro-optical methods due to all-weather imaging capabilities. Previous research in boreal forests and current evaluation in the Alaskan tundra shows that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data can be used successfully to map burn perimeters and distinguish burned and unburned areas within the perimeter over a longer period of time than optical sensors. Results will be presented on the use of SAR data to measure spatial variations in the microwave signature across a fire scar as well as temporally throughout the growing season and across multiple years. The extensive historical archive of ERS-1 and -2 SAR data has been used to characterize three burned areas in the tundra regions of Alaska. These fires include the 1993 Wainwright fires in the north-western part of the North Slope (Fig 1), the 1999 Uvgoon fire in the Noatak National Preserve and 2007 Anaktuvuk River fire north of the Brooks Range in the central area of the North Slope. The data record includes pre-burn, burn, and post-burn observations until the fire scars are no longer discernible on the landscape. Our results show that burned areas are visible reliably five years post burn and then faintly apparent thereafter up to 12 or more years post-burn. Conversely, our analysis of electro-optical (Landsat) imagery shows near complete obscuration of the fire scar one year post-burn (Loboda et al. 2013). Also presented are results of an analysis of the effects of post-fire soil moisture, as measured in weather and climate datasets, on the SAR signature measured from the available image data archive. Reference: Loboda, T L, N H F French, C Hight-Harf, L Jenkins, M E Miller. 2013. Mapping fire extent and burn severity in Alaskan tussock tundra: An analysis of the spectral response of

  14. High Resolution Ionospheric Mapping Using Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Chotoo, K.; Roth, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) are imaging radar systems that utilize the Doppler history of signals acquired during satellite flyby to produce high resolution images of the Earth. With modern sensors, operating at frequencies between about 1 GHz (L-band) and 10 GHz (X-band), radar images with resolutions in the meter to sub-meter range can be produced. The presence of the ionosphere is significantly affecting the propagation properties of the microwave signals transmitted by these systems, causing distortions of signal polarization and phase. These distortions can lead to a wide range of imaging artifacts including image range shifts, interferometric phase biases, loss of image focus, change of image geometry, and Faraday rotation. While these artifacts are particularly pronounced at L-band, they are still observable in data acquired at C- or even X-band. In recent years, a wealth of methods for measuring and correcting ionospheric influence were developed. These methods are self-calibration procedures that measure ionosphere-induced distortions to infer the two-dimensional TEC maps that affected the data. These TEC maps are then removed from the data to produce high performance SAR images. Besides being effective in correcting SAR observations, these self-calibration methods are producing high quality TEC information with sub-TECU sensitivity and sub-kilometer spatial resolution. The intent of this paper is to utilize SAR-derived ionospheric information and make the case for SAR as a data source for ionospheric research. After a short summary of ionosphere-induced distortions, the concept of TEC estimation from SAR is introduced. Here, the current state-of-the-art of ionospheric TEC estimation is presented, including Faraday rotation-based, interferometric, correlation-based, and autofocus-based techniques. For every approach, performance numbers are given that quantify the achievable TEC estimation accuracy as a function of system parameters, scene

  15. Special Phenomena of the Shadow Region in the High Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar Image due to Synthetic Aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yueting; Ding, Chibiao; Chen, Hongzhen; Wang, Hongqi

    2012-10-01

    With the development of several High Resolution (HR) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems, many special phenomena appear in the SAR image, especially for the SAR image with millimeter wave. We firmly believed that every detail in the SAR image should have its own special mechanisms and these details may provide some key clues for us to build up the frame work on understanding the SAR image. The synthetic aperture is one of the important particularities about SAR, and the radar is moving during the data is collected, which leads many special phenomena in the SAR image; one of these is the shadow with blurred boundary. In this work, the effect on the shadow region in the SAR image by synthetic aperture is expanded on. The blurred boundary of the shadow is analyzed using imaging formation theory, and the Quadratic Phase Errors (QPE) brought by the synthetic aperture progress is deduced for the first time, which builds up the relationship between the parameters of the shadow caster and the behavior of the shadow in the SAR image. It is found that the QPE is approximately a linear function of the height of the shadow caster. Furthermore, an approach for shadow enhancement based on height variant phase compensation is proposed and it could provide a better effect on shadow enhancement than the traditional technique called Fixed Focus Shadow Enhancement (FFSE), which is proved by theoretical analysis and experiments. Based on the analysis, some typical application of the shadow in SAR image is designed and some mini-SAR image with Ku-band is analyzed about the shadow region. It is expected that the work in this paper could be some helpful for the SAR image understanding and the microwave imaging with high resolution.

  16. Temporal Stability of Soil Moisture and Radar Backscatter Observed by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Wolfgang; Pathe, Carsten; Doubkova, Marcela; Sabel, Daniel; Bartsch, Annett; Hasenauer, Stefan; Blöschl, Günter; Scipal, Klaus; Martínez-Fernández, José; Löw, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture is the result of atmospheric forcing and redistribution processes related to terrain, soil, and vegetation characteristics. Despite this high variability, many field studies have shown that in the temporal domain soil moisture measured at specific locations is correlated to the mean soil moisture content over an area. Since the measurements taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) instruments are very sensitive to soil moisture it is hypothesized that the temporally stable soil moisture patterns are reflected in the radar backscatter measurements. To verify this hypothesis 73 Wide Swath (WS) images have been acquired by the ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) over the REMEDHUS soil moisture network located in the Duero basin, Spain. It is found that a time-invariant linear relationship is well suited for relating local scale (pixel) and regional scale (50 km) backscatter. The observed linear model coefficients can be estimated by considering the scattering properties of the terrain and vegetation and the soil moisture scaling properties. For both linear model coefficients, the relative error between observed and modelled values is less than 5 % and the coefficient of determination (R2) is 86 %. The results are of relevance for interpreting and downscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data retrieved from active (METOP ASCAT) and passive (SMOS, AMSR-E) instruments.

  17. Model-Based Information Extraction From Synthetic Aperture Radar Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzner, Shari A.

    2011-07-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a remote sensing technology for imaging areas of the earth's surface. SAR has been successfully used for monitoring characteristics of the natural environment such as land cover type and tree density. With the advent of higher resolution sensors, it is now theoretically possible to extract information about individual structures such as buildings from SAR imagery. This information could be used for disaster response and security-related intelligence. SAR has an advantage over other remote sensing technologies for these applications because SAR data can be collected during the night and in rainy or cloudy conditions. This research presents a model-based method for extracting information about a building -- its height and roof slope -- from a single SAR image. Other methods require multiple images or ancillary data from specialized sensors, making them less practical. The model-based method uses simulation to match a hypothesized building to an observed SAR image. The degree to which a simulation matches the observed data is measured by mutual information. The success of this method depends on the accuracy of the simulation and on the reliability of the mutual information similarity measure. Electromagnetic theory was applied to relate a building's physical characteristics to the features present in a SAR image. This understanding was used to quantify the precision of building information contained in SAR data, and to identify the inputs needed for accurate simulation. A new SAR simulation technique was developed to meet the accuracy and efficiency requirements of model-based information extraction. Mutual information, a concept from information theory, has become a standard for measuring the similarity between medical images. Its performance in the context of matching a simulation image to a SAR image was evaluated in this research, and it was found to perform well under certain conditions. The factors that affect its performance

  18. Shuttle Imaging Radar-C mission operations - Technology test bed for Earth Observing System synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, J. P.; Collins, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mission operations for the Space Radar Lab (SRL), particularly in the areas of real-time replanning and science activity coordination, are presented. The two main components of SRL are the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C and the X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Earth Observing System SAR will be a multispectral, multipolarization radar satellite that will provide information over an entire decade, permitting scientists to monitor large-scale changes in the earth's environment over a long period of time.

  19. Phase correction system for automatic focusing of synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.; Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V.

    1990-01-01

    A phase gradient autofocus system for use in synthetic aperture imaging accurately compensates for arbitrary phase errors in each imaged frame by locating highlighted areas and determining the phase disturbance or image spread associated with each of these highlight areas. An estimate of the image spread for each highlighted area in a line in the case of one dimensional processing or in a sector, in the case of two-dimensional processing, is determined. The phase error is determined using phase gradient processing. The phase error is then removed from the uncorrected image and the process is iteratively performed to substantially eliminate phase errors which can degrade the image.

  20. Simulation of noise involved in synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandchamp, Myriam; Cavassilas, Jean-Francois

    1996-08-01

    The synthetic aperture radr (SAR) returns from a linear distribution of scatterers are simulated and processed in order to estimate the reflectivity coefficients of the ground. An original expression of this estimate is given, which establishes the relation between the terms of signal and noise. Both are compared. One application of this formulation consists of detecting a surface ship wake on a complex SAR image. A smoothing is first accomplished on the complex image. The choice of the integration area is determined by the preceding mathematical formulation. Then a differential filter is applied, and results are shown for two parts of the wake.

  1. The DESDynI Synthetic Aperture Radar Array-Fed Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Ghaemi, Hirad; Giersch, Louis; Harcke, Leif; Hodges, Richard; Hoffman, James; Johnson, William; Jordan, Rolando; Khayatian, Behrouz; Rosen, Paul; Sadowy, Gregory; Shaffer, Scott; Shen, Yuhsyen; Veilleux, Louise; Wu, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    DESDynI is a mission being developed by NASA with radar and lidar instruments for Earth-orbit remote sensing. This paper focuses on the design of a largeaperture antenna for the radar instrument. The antenna comprises a deployable reflector antenna and an active switched array of patch elements fed by transmit/ receive modules. The antenna and radar architecture facilitates a new mode of synthetic aperture radar imaging called 'SweepSAR'. A system-level description of the antenna is provided, along with predictions of antenna performance.

  2. Servomechanism for Doppler shift compensation in optical correlator for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constaninides, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for correcting Doppler shifts in synthetic aperture radar data is described. An optical correlator for synthetic aperture radar data has a means for directing a laser beam at a signal film having radar return pulse intensity information recorded on it. A resultant laser beam passes through a range telescope, an azimuth telescope, and a Fourier transform filter located between the range and azimuth telescopes, and forms an image for recording on an image film. A compensation means for Doppler shift in the radar return pulse intensity information includes a beam splitter for reflecting the modulated laser beam, after having passed through the Fourier transform filter, to a detection screen having two photodiodes mounted on it.

  3. Terahertz inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging using self-mixing interferometry with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Lui, H S; Taimre, T; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Dean, P; Khanna, S P; Lachab, M; Valavanis, A; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Rakić, A D

    2014-05-01

    We propose a terahertz (THz)-frequency synthetic aperture radar imaging technique based on self-mixing (SM) interferometry, using a quantum cascade laser. A signal processing method is employed which extracts and exploits the radar-related information contained in the SM signals, enabling the creation of THz images with improved spatial resolution. We demonstrate this by imaging a standard resolution test target, achieving resolution beyond the diffraction limit. PMID:24784063

  4. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contrast between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/ Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  5. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  6. A global search and rescue concept using synthetic aperture radar and passive user targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A terrestrial search and rescue concept is defined embodying the use of passive radio-frequency reflectors in conjunction with an orbiting synthetic aperture radar to detect, identify, and locate users. An airborne radar test was conducted to evaluate the basic concept. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system.

  7. Development of a synthetic aperture radar design approach for wide-swath implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jean, B. R.

    1981-01-01

    The first phase of a study program to develop an advanced synthetic aperture radar design concept is presented. Attributes of particular importance for the system design include wide swath coverage, reduced power requirements, and versatility in the selection of frequency, polarization and incident angle. The multiple beam configuration provides imaging at a nearly constant angle of incidence and offers the potential of realizing a wide range of the attributes desired for an orbital imaging radar for Earth resources applications.

  8. Registration of a synthetic aperture radar image to Thematic Mapper imagery for remote sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, S. S.; Gilbert, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Multiple Thematic Mapper multitemporal acquisitions from Landsat and one synthetic-aperture radar acquisition from Seasat have been precisely registered using Johnson Space Center registration processors. The registered images have been output in the Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The procedure to accomplish such disparate data processing tasks and the registration accuracy evaluation are discussed.

  9. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging on a Cuda-Enabled Mobile Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatica, M.; Philllips, E.

    2014-12-01

    This talk will present the details of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging on the smallest CUDA-capable platform available, the Jetson TK1. The results indicate that GPU accelerated embedded platforms have considerable potential for this type of workload and in conjunction with low power consumption, light weight and standard programming tools, could open new horizons in the embedded space.

  11. An atlas of November 1978 synthetic aperture radar digitized imagery for oil spill studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, H. E.; Oderman, W.; Crosswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A data set is described which consists of digitized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery plus correlative data and some preliminary analysis results. This data set should be of value to experimenters who are interested in the SAR instrument and its application to the detection and monitoring of oil on water and other distributed targets.

  12. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  13. Synthetic aperture radar observation of ocean roughness from rolls in an unstable marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Liu, W. T.; Weissman, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and cloud photographic observations of the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida were made from a high-altitude aircraft when there was an unstable marine boundary layer. The synthetic aperture radar images show unusual kilometer-sized features on the ocean surface which are related to clouds. The ocean near shore was cloud-free and had no radar features, while from 30 to 330 km offshore there were clouds and prominent kilometer-sized features in the SAR image. These radar features are most prominent when the radar was looking upwind, are less prominent when the radar was looking downwind, and disappear entirely when the radar was looking crosswind. Since ocean radar echo strengths are believed to be controlled primarily by ocean waves satisfying the Bragg relation, these radar features most likely resulted from local enhancements of short gravity waves with 17- to 34-cm wavelengths, which in turn are surface expressions of roll convections in a kilometer-thick unstable marine boundary layer.

  14. Waveform error analysis for bistatic synthetic aperture radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. W.; Schifani, T. M.

    The signal phase histories at the transmitter, receiver, and radar signal processor in bistatic SAR systems are described. The fundamental problem of mismatches in the waveform generators for the illuminating and receiving radar systems is analyzed. The effects of errors in carrier frequency and chirp slope are analyzed for bistatic radar systems which use linear FM waveforms. It is shown that the primary effect of a mismatch in carrier frequencies is an azimuth displacement of the image.

  15. The information content of synthetic aperture radar images of terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    A statistical model is developed that portrays an imaging radar as a noisy communication channel with multiplicative noise, and the model is used to evaluate the average amount of information that can be extracted about a target from its radar image. The average information content is also used to define a measure of radiometric resolution for radar images. It is shown that the information content and the resolution capabilities of an imaging radar reach a limit beyond which an increase in scene dynamic range does not improve the information content or the resolution. This limitation results from the multiplicative nature of the noise introduced in the imaging process.

  16. Eliminating Doppler Effects in Synthetic-Aperture Radar Optical Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantindes, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Pair of photodetectors generates correction signals. Instrument detects Doppler shifts in radar and corrects processing parameters so ambiguities caused by shifts not manifested as double or overlapping images.

  17. Synthetic aperture radar operator tactical target acquisition research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershberger, M. L.; Craig, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    A radar target acquisition research study was conducted to access the effects of two levels of 13 radar sensor, display, and mission parameters on operator tactical target acquisition. A saturated fractional-factorial screening design was employed to examine these parameters. Data analysis computed ETA squared values for main and second-order effects for the variables tested. Ranking of the research parameters in terms of importance to system design revealed four variables (radar coverage, radar resolution/multiple looks, display resolution, and display size) accounted for 50 percent of the target acquisition probability variance.

  18. Special Issue on Results from Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (Sir-C/X-SAR): Foreword

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jefferey J.

    1996-01-01

    The two flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour represent a major advance in remote sensing technology for studies of planetary surfaces.

  19. Internal wave observations made with an airborne synthetic aperture imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Apel, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Synthetic aperture L-band radar flown aboard the NASA CV-990 has observed periodic striations on the ocean surface off the coast of Alaska which have been interpreted as tidally excited oceanic internal waves of less than 500 m length. These radar images are compared to photographic imagery of similar waves taken from Landsat 1. Both the radar and Landsat images reveal variations in reflectivity across each wave in a packet that range from low to high to normal. The variations point to the simultaneous existence of two mechanisms for the surface signatures of internal waves: roughening due to wave-current interactions, and smoothing due to slick formation.

  20. User guide to the Magellan synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Stephen D.; Mcconnell, Shannon L.; Leff, Craig E.; Austin, Richard S.; Beratan, Kathi K.; Rokey, Mark J.

    1995-01-01

    The Magellan radar-mapping mission collected a large amount of science and engineering data. Now available to the general scientific community, this data set can be overwhelming to someone who is unfamiliar with the mission. This user guide outlines the mission operations and data set so that someone working with the data can understand the mapping and data-processing techniques used in the mission. Radar-mapping parameters as well as data acquisition issues are discussed. In addition, this user guide provides information on how the data set is organized and where specific elements of the set can be located.

  1. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Wuenschel, E.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the development of a system known as 3-D SISAR. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments at DOE storage sites.

  2. Effects of changing rice cultural practices on C-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter using Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar data in the Mekong River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam-Dao, Nguyen; Le Toan, Thuy; Apan, Armando; Bouvet, Alexandre; Young, Frank; Le-van, Trung

    2009-11-01

    Changes in rice cultivation systems have been observed in the Mekong River Delta, Vietnam. Among the changes in cultural practices, the change from transplanting to direct sowing, the use of water-saving technology, and the use of high production method could have impacts on radar remote sensing methods previously developed for rice monitoring. Using Envisat (Environmental Satellite) ASAR (Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar) data over the province of An Giang, this study showed that the radar backscattering behaviour is much different from that of the reported traditional rice. At the early stage of the season, direct sowing on fields with rough and wet soil surface provides very high backscatter values for HH (Horizontal transmit - Horizontal receive polarisation) and VV (Vertical transmit - Vertical receive polarisation) data, as a contrast compared to the very low backscatter of fields covered with water before emergence. The temporal increase of the backscatter is therefore not observed clearly over direct sowing fields. Hence, the use of the intensity temporal change as a rice classifier proposed previously may not apply. Due to the drainage that occurs during the season, HH, VV and HH/VV are not strongly related to biomass, in contrast with past results. However, HH/VV ratio could be used to derive the rice/non-rice classification algorithm for all conditions of rice fields in the test province. The mapping results using the HH/VV polarization ratio at a single date in the middle period of the rice season were assessed using statistical data at different districts in the province, where very high accuracy was found. The method can be applied to other regions, provided that the synthetic aperture radar data are acquired during the peak period of the rice season, and that few training fields provide adjusted threshold values used in the method.

  3. The NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yun-Jin; Lou, Yun-Ling; vanZyl, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/JPL airborne SAR (AIRSAR) system operates in the fully polarimetric mode at P-, L- and C-band simultaneously or in the interferometric mode in both L- and C-band simultaneously. The system became operational in late 1987 and flew its first mission aboard a DC-8 aircraft operated by NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Since then, the AIRSAR has flown missions every year and acquired images in North, Central and South America, Europe and Australia. In this paper, we will briefly describe the instrument characteristics, the evolution of the various radar modes, the instrument performance, and improvement in the knowledge of the positioning and attitude information of the radar. In addition, we will summarize the progress of the data processing effort especially in the interferometry processing. Finally, we will address the issue of processing and calibrating the cross-track interferometry (XTI) data.

  4. Three-dimensional, subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Moussally, G.J.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this applied research and devolpment project is to develop a system known as 3-D SISAR. This sytem consists of a gound penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments found at US DOE storage sites. Three-dimensional maps can assist the development of remdiation strategies and characterization of the digface during remediation. The system should also be useful for monitoring hydrocarbon-based contaminant migration after remediation. 5 figs.

  5. Mapping Ocean Surface Topography with a Synthetic-Aperture Interferometry Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply the technique of synthetic aperture radar interferometry to the measurement of ocean surface topography at spatial resolution approaching 1 km. The measurement will have wide ranging applications in oceanography, hydrology. and marine geophysics. The oceanographic and related societal applications are briefly discussed in the paper. To meet the requirements for oceanographic applications, the instrument must be flown in an orbit with proper sampling of ocean tides.

  6. Information extraction and transmission techniques for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Yurovsky, L.; Watson, E.; Townsend, K.; Gardner, S.; Boberg, D.; Watson, J.; Minden, G. J.; Shanmugan, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Information extraction and transmission techniques for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery were investigated. Four interrelated problems were addressed. An optimal tonal SAR image classification algorithm was developed and evaluated. A data compression technique was developed for SAR imagery which is simple and provides a 5:1 compression with acceptable image quality. An optimal textural edge detector was developed. Several SAR image enhancement algorithms have been proposed. The effectiveness of each algorithm was compared quantitatively.

  7. a Robust Change Detector for Multilook Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari; Akbari; Abkar; Sahebi; Liu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust unsupervised change detection algorithm for multilook polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data. The Hotelling-Lawley trace (HLT) statistic is used as a test statistic to measure the similarity of two covariance matrices. The generalized Kittler and Illingworth (K&I) minimum-error thresholding algorithm is then applied on the test statistic image to accurately discriminates changed and unchanged areas. The algorithm, tested on real PolSAR images, provides satisfactory results.

  8. Synthetic aperture radar images of ocean waves, theories of imaging physics and experimental tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Durden, S. L.; Smith, M. P.; Napolitano, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physical mechanism for the synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging of ocean waves is investigated through the use of analytical models. The models are tested by comparison with data sets from the SEASAT mission and airborne SAR's. Dominant ocean wavelengths from SAR estimates are biased towards longer wavelengths. The quasispecular scattering mechanism agrees with experimental data. The Doppler shift for ship wakes is that of the mean sea surface.

  9. A Dual-polarized Microstrip Subarray Antenna for an Inflatable L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, Mark; Huang, John

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable technology has been identified as a potential solution to the problem of achieving small mass, high packaging efficiency, and reliable deployment for future NASA spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) antennas. Presently, there exists a requirement for a dual-polarized L-band SAR antenna with an aperture size of 10m x 3m, a center frequency of 1.25GHz, a bandwidth of 80MHz, electronic beam scanning, and a mass of less than 100kg. The work presented below is part of the ongoing effort to develop such an inflatable antenna array.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar: The NCCS Enables Search and Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For as long as planes have gone down, dedicated men and women have used ever-improving technologies to aid their search for survivors. Nearly 2,000 general aviation crashes occur each year in U.S.-and many, like the Montana incident, occur without witnesses. On average, every day in the U.S. one airplane is reported missing. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) organizes search missions for about 100 aircraft each year. Some of these are not found before the searches called off, and are discovered only by chance long after the crash. In some cases, the crash site is never found. NASA Search and Rescue Mission is using NCCS rescues to develop tools for processing radar data that can help these effort

  11. Two antenna, two pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Ana; Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2005-06-28

    A multi-antenna, multi-pass IFSAR mode utilizing data driven alignment of multiple independent passes can combine the scaling accuracy of a two-antenna, one-pass IFSAR mode with the height-noise performance of a one-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode. A two-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode can accurately estimate the larger antenna baseline from the data itself and reduce height-noise, allowing for more accurate information about target ground position locations and heights. The two-antenna, two-pass IFSAR mode can use coarser IFSAR data to estimate the larger antenna baseline. Multi-pass IFSAR can be extended to more than two (2) passes, thereby allowing true three-dimensional radar imaging from stand-off aircraft and satellite platforms.

  12. Evaluation Digital Elevation Model Generated by Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makineci, H. B.; Karabörk, H.

    2016-06-01

    Digital elevation model, showing the physical and topographical situation of the earth, is defined a tree-dimensional digital model obtained from the elevation of the surface by using of selected an appropriate interpolation method. DEMs are used in many areas such as management of natural resources, engineering and infrastructure projects, disaster and risk analysis, archaeology, security, aviation, forestry, energy, topographic mapping, landslide and flood analysis, Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Digital elevation models, which are the fundamental components of cartography, is calculated by many methods. Digital elevation models can be obtained terrestrial methods or data obtained by digitization of maps by processing the digital platform in general. Today, Digital elevation model data is generated by the processing of stereo optical satellite images, radar images (radargrammetry, interferometry) and lidar data using remote sensing and photogrammetric techniques with the help of improving technology. One of the fundamental components of remote sensing radar technology is very advanced nowadays. In response to this progress it began to be used more frequently in various fields. Determining the shape of topography and creating digital elevation model comes the beginning topics of these areas. It is aimed in this work , the differences of evaluation of quality between Sentinel-1A SAR image ,which is sent by European Space Agency ESA and Interferometry Wide Swath imaging mode and C band type , and DTED-2 (Digital Terrain Elevation Data) and application between them. The application includes RMS static method for detecting precision of data. Results show us to variance of points make a high decrease from mountain area to plane area.

  13. Distress detection, location, and communications using advanced space technology. [satellite-borne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces a concept for low-cost, global, day-night, all-weather disaster warning and assistance. Evolving, advanced space technology with passive radio frequency reflectors in conjunction with an imaging synthetic aperture radar is employed to detect, identify, locate, and provide passive communication with earth users in distress. This concept evolved from a broad NASA research on new global search and rescue techniques. Appropriate airborne radar test results from this research are reviewed and related to potential disaster applications. The analysis indicates the approach has promise for disaster communications relative to floods, droughts, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and severe storms.

  14. Estimation of Canopy Water Content in Konza Parry Grasslands Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Measurements During FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; van Zyl, Jacob J.; Asrar, Ghassem

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an algorithm to retrieve the canopy water contents of natural grasslands and pasture from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. The development on this algorithm involves three interrelated steps: (1) calibration of SAR data for ground topographic variations, (2) development and validation of backscatter model for cross-polarized ratio. The polarimetric radar data acquired by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory AIRSAR system during the 1989 First International Satellite land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) used for this study. The SAR data have been calibrated and corrected for the topographical effects by using the digital elevation map of the study area.

  15. Synthetic aperture radar target detection, feature extraction, and image formation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian

    1994-01-01

    This report presents new algorithms for target detection, feature extraction, and image formation with the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology. For target detection, we consider target detection with SAR and coherent subtraction. We also study how the image false alarm rates are related to the target template false alarm rates when target templates are used for target detection. For feature extraction from SAR images, we present a computationally efficient eigenstructure-based 2D-MODE algorithm for two-dimensional frequency estimation. For SAR image formation, we present a robust parametric data model for estimating high resolution range signatures of radar targets and for forming high resolution SAR images.

  16. Numerical simulation of synthetic aperture radar image spectra for ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical model for predicting the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of a moving ocean surface is described, and results are presented for two SIR-B data sets collected off the coast of Chile. Wave height spectra measured by the NASA radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS) were used as inputs to this model, and results are compared with actual SIR-B image spectra from orbits 91 and 106. Additional parametric variations are presented to illustrate the effects of nonlinearities in the imaging process.

  17. A parametric study of rate of advance and area coverage rate performance of synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Hensley, William Heydon,; Burns, Bryan L.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-11-01

    The linear ground distance per unit time and ground area covered per unit time of producing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, termed rate of advance (ROA) and area coverage rate (ACR), are important metrics for platform and radar performance in surveillance applications. These metrics depend on many parameters of a SAR system such as wavelength, aircraft velocity, resolution, antenna beamwidth, imaging mode, and geometry. Often the effects of these parameters on rate of advance and area coverage rate are non-linear. This report addresses the impact of different parameter spaces as they relate to rate of advance and area coverage rate performance.

  18. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-05-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  19. X-SAR: The X-band synthetic aperture radar on board the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Marian U.

    1993-01-01

    The X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) is the German/Italian contribution to the NASA/JPL Shuttle Radar Lab missions as part of the preparation for the Earth Observation System (EOS) program. The Shuttle Radar Lab is a combination of several radars: an L-band (1.2 GHz) and a C-band (5.3 GHz) multipolarization SAR known as SIR-C (Shuttle Imaging Radar); and an X-band (9.6 GHz) vertically polarized SAR which will be operated synchronously over the same target areas to deliver calibrated multifrequency and multipolarization SAR data at multiple incidence angles from space. A joint German/Italian project office at DARA (German Space Agency) is responsible for the management of the X-SAR project. The space hardware has been developed and manufactured under industrial contract by Dornier and Alenia Spazio. Besides supporting all the technical and scientific tasks, DLR, in cooperation with ASI (Agencia Spaziale Italiano) is responsible for mission operation, calibration, and high precision SAR processing. In addition, DLR developed an airborne X-band SAR to support the experimenters with campaigns to prepare for the missions. The main advantage of adding a shorter wavelength (3 cm) radar to the SIR-C radars is the X-band radar's weaker penetration into vegetation and soil and its high sensitivity to surface roughness and associated phenomena. The performance of each of the three radars is comparable with respect to radiometric and geometric resolution.

  20. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hover, G.L.; Mastin, G.A.; Axline, R.M.; Bradley, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a detailed evaluation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a potential technology improvement over the Coast Guard's existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RD Center), Environmental Safety Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the U.S. Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the RD Center on a PC-based computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Synthetic aperture radar, Side looking airborne radar, Oil slicks.

  1. A model for forming airborne synthetic aperture radar images of underground targets

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from an airborne platform has been proposed for imaging targets beneath the earth`s surface. The propagation of the radar`s energy within the ground, however, is much different than in the earth`s atmosphere. The result is signal refraction, echo delay, propagation losses, dispersion, and volumetric scattering. These all combine to make SAR image formation from an airborne platform much more challenging than a surface imaging counterpart. This report treats the ground as a lossy dispersive half-space, and presents a model for the radar echo based on measurable parameters. The model is then used to explore various imaging schemes, and image properties. Dynamic range is discussed, as is the impact of loss on dynamic range. Modified window functions are proposed to mitigate effects of sidelobes of shallow targets overwhelming deeper targets.

  2. Method and apparatus for contour mapping using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Caro, E. R.; Wu, C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    By using two SAR antennas spaced a known distance, B, and oriented at substantially the same look angle to illuminate the same target area, pixel data from the two antennas may be compared in phase to determine a difference delta phi from which a slant angle theta is determined for each pixel point from an equation Delta phi = (2 pi B/lambda)sin(theta - alpha), where lambda is the radar wavelength and alpha is the roll angle of the aircraft. The height, h, of each pixel point from the aircraft is determined from the equation h = R cos theta, and from the known altitude, a, of the aircraft above sea level, the altitude (elevation), a', of each point is determined from the difference a - h. This elevation data may be displayed with the SAR image by, for example, quantizing the elevation at increments of 100 feet starting at sea level, and color coding pixels of the same quantized elevation. The distance, d, of each pixel from the ground track of the aircraft used for the display may be determined more accurately from the equation d = R sin theta.

  3. Remote sensing satellite formation for bistatic synthetic aperture radar observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Marco; Moccia, Antonio

    2001-12-01

    In recent years the Italian Space Agency has been proceeding to the definition and launch of small missions. In this ambit, the BISSAT mission was proposed and selected along with five other missions for a competitive Phase A study. BISSAT mission concept consists in flying a passive SAR on board a small satellite, which observes the area illuminated by an active SAR, operating on an already existing large platform. Several scientific applications of bistatic measurements can be envisaged: improvement of image classification and pattern recognition, derivation of medium-resolution digital elevation models, velocity measurements, measurements of sea-wave spectra. BISSAT payload is developed on the basis of the X-band SAR of the COSMO/SkyMed mission, while BISSAT bus is based on an upgrade of MITA. Orbit design has been performed, leading to the same orbit parameters apart from the ascending node right ascension (5.24 degree(s) shift) and the time of the passage on the ascending node (1.17s shift). A minimum distance at the passage of the orbit crossing point of about 42 km (5.7s) is computed. To maintain adequate swath overlap along the orbit, attitude maneuver or antenna electronic steering must be envisaged and traded-off taking into account radar performance and cost of hardware upgrade.

  4. NASA L-SAR instrument for the NISAR (NASA-ISRO) Synthetic Aperture Radar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Shaffer, Scott; Perkovic-Martin, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the United States and the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) have partnered to develop an Earth-orbiting science and applications mission that exploits synthetic aperture radar to map Earth's surface every 12 days or less. To meet demanding coverage, sampling, and accuracy requirements, the system was designed to achieve over 240 km swath at fine resolution, and using full polarimetry where needed. To address the broad range of disciplines and scientific study areas of the mission, a dual-frequency system was conceived, at L-band (24 cm wavelength) and S-band (10 cm wavelength). To achieve these observational characteristics, a reflector-feed system is considered, whereby the feed aperture elements are individually sampled to allow a scan-on-receive ("SweepSAR") capability at both L-band and S-band. The instrument leverages the expanding capabilities of on-board digital processing to enable real-time calibration and digital beamforming. This paper describes the mission characteristics, current status of the L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (L-SAR) portion of the instrument, and the technology development efforts in the United States that are reducing risk on the key radar technologies needed to ensure proper SweepSAR operations.

  5. Operational Use of Civil Space-Based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Donald R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a remote-sensing technology which uses the motion of the aircraft or spacecraft carrying the radar to synthesize an antenna aperture larger than the physical antenna to yield a high-spatial resolution imaging capability. SAR systems can thus obtain high-spatial resolution geophysical measurements of the Earth over wide surface areas, under all-weather, day/night conditions. This report was prepared to document the results of a six-month study by an Ad Hoc Interagency Working Group on the Operational Use of Civil (i.e., non-military) Space-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The Assistant Administrator of NOAA for Satellite and Information Services convened this working group and chaired three meetings of the group over a six-month period. This action was taken in response to a request by the Associate Administrator of NASA for Mission to Planet Earth for an assessment of operational applications of SAR to be accomplished in parallel with a separate study requested of the Committee on Earth Studies of the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council on the scientific results of SAR research missions. The representatives of participating agencies are listed following the Preface. There was no formal charter for the working group or long term plans for future meetings. However, the working group may be reconstituted in the future as a coordination body for multiagency use of operational SAR systems.

  6. Analysis coherent signal processing methods in synthetic aperture radar on small-scale viewing angles under voluntary movement aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, Sergey N.; Vishentsev, Mihail V.; Stukalova, Anna S.

    2007-02-01

    In the article realize analysis the coherent processing method which uses to form synthetic aperture antenna on a board of aircraft. The factors, which send for distortion radar image on small-scale viewing angle during high-intensity maneuvering velocity shown for considering method of synthesizing aperture antenna. A synthetic aperture antenna software model was designing and analyzing. Some results of research of the coherent processing methods for receiving earth's imagery are shown.

  7. Complex phase error and motion estimation in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, M.; Yang, H.

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to a SAR wave equation-based system model that accurately represents the interaction of the impinging radar signal with the target to be imaged. The model is used to estimate the complex phase error across the synthesized aperture from the measured corrupted SAR data by combining the two wave equation models governing the collected SAR data at two temporal frequencies of the radar signal. The SAR system model shows that the motion of an object in a static scene results in coupled Doppler shifts in both the temporal frequency domain and the spatial frequency domain of the synthetic aperture. The velocity of the moving object is estimated through these two Doppler shifts. It is shown that once the dynamic target's velocity is known, its reconstruction can be formulated via a squint-mode SAR geometry with parameters that depend upon the dynamic target's velocity.

  8. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar and the Data Collection System Digital Terrain Elevation Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidelbach, Robert; Bolus, R.; Chadwick, J.

    1994-08-01

    Digital Terrain Elevations (DTE) that can be rapidly generated, and that have better fidelity and accuracy than Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Levels 1 or 2, would be extremely beneficial to Department of Defense (DOD) military operations, civil works programs, and various commercial applications. As a result, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), along with the U.S. Army Topographic Engineering Center (TEC), are developing an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) elevation mapping capability. This system, the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar for Digital Radar Elevations (IFSARE), is capable of collecting and providing data in all weather (reasonable), in day or night scenarios, and where obscurants are present. The IFSARE, which is currently undergoing Integration and Test, will allow for rapid on-line automatic processing of the collected digital radar data into DTE and high quality imagery. The prime contractor is the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM). This paper addresses the proof of concept for civil works applications by analyzing a data set taken by the Wright Labs/ERIM Data Collection System (DCS). The objective was to demonstrate the capability of an IFSAR system to provide high fidelity, fine resolution DTE that can be employed in hydraulic models of the Mississippi River watershed. The demonstration was sponsored by ARPA and TEC.

  9. Higher order nonlinear chirp scaling algorithm for medium Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengbo; Liu, Wei; Chen, Jie; Yang, Wei; Han, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Due to the larger orbital arc and longer synthetic aperture time in medium Earth orbit (MEO) synthetic aperture radar (SAR), it is difficult for conventional SAR imaging algorithms to achieve a good imaging result. An improved higher order nonlinear chirp scaling (NLCS) algorithm is presented for MEO SAR imaging. First, the point target spectrum of the modified equivalent squint range model-based signal is derived, where a concise expression is obtained by the method of series reversion. Second, the well-known NLCS algorithm is modified according to the new spectrum and an improved algorithm is developed. The range dependence of the two-dimensional point target reference spectrum is removed by improved CS processing, and accurate focusing is realized through range-matched filter and range-dependent azimuth-matched filter. Simulations are performed to validate the presented algorithm.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to Measure Earth's Surface Topography and Its Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland; Rosen, Paul A.; Fielding, Eric J.

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) from Earth-orbiting spacecraft provides a new tool to map global topography and deformation of the Earth's surface. Radar images taken from slightly different viewing directions allow the construction of digital elevation models of meter-scale accuracy. These data sets aid in the analysis and interpretation of tectonic and volcanic landscapes. If the Earth's surface deformed between two radar image acquisitions, a map of the surface displacement with tens-of-meters resolution and subcentimeter accuracy can be constructed. This review gives a basic overview of InSAR for Earth scientists and presents a selection of geologic applications that demonstrate the unique capabilities of InSAR for mapping the topography and deformation of the Earth.

  11. Signature predictions of surface targets undergoing turning maneuvers in spotlight synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garren, David A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates methodologies for predicting the smear signatures in broadside spotlight synthetic aperture radar imagery collections due to surface targets that are undergoing turning maneuvers. This analysis examines the case of broadside geometry wherein the radar moves with constant speed and heading on a level flight path. This investigation concentrates moving target smear issues that yield some defocus in the range direction, although much smaller in magnitude than the motion induced smearing in the radar cross-range direction. This paper focuses on the case of a target that executes a turning maneuver during the SAR collection interval. The SAR simulations are shown to give excellent agreement between the moving target signatures and the predicted shapes of the central contours.

  12. Shuttle synthetic aperture radar implementation study, volume 1. [flight instrument and ground data processor system for collecting raw imaged radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlis, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    Results of an implementation study for a synthetic aperture radar for the space shuttle orbiter are described. The overall effort was directed toward the determination of the feasibility and usefulness of a multifrequency, multipolarization imaging radar for the shuttle orbiter. The radar is intended for earth resource monitoring as well as oceanographic and marine studies.

  13. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)—its past, present and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhong; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Rykhus, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Very simply, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) involves the use of two or more synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the same area to extract landscape topography and its deformation patterns. A SAR system transmits electromagnetic waves at a wavelength that can range from a few millimeters to tens of centimeters and therefore can operate during day and night under all-weather conditions. Using SAR processing technique (Curlander and McDonough, 1991), both the intensity and phase of the reflected (or backscattered) radar signal of each ground resolution element (a few meters to tens of meters) can be calculated in the form of a complex-valued SAR image that represents the reflectivity of the ground surface. The amplitude or intensity of the SAR image is determined primarily by terrain slope, surface roughness, and dielectric constants, whereas the phase of the SAR image is determined primarily by the distance between the satellite antenna and the ground targets. InSAR imaging utilizes the interaction of electromagnetic waves, referred to as interference, to measure precise distances between the satellite antenna and ground resolution elements to derive landscape topography and its subtle change in elevation.

  14. Delta K measurements with synthetic aperture radar data. [micirowavelength difference values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Klooster, A.

    1985-01-01

    Delta K measurements are obtained from the interference of two electromagnetic waves of different frequencies. Constructive interference occurs when 2pi phase differences between the two frequencies correspond to a surface wavelength. Previous Delta K measurements have used two discrete frequencies for this purpose. Range pulses and Doppler signatures of a synthetic aperture radar system were filtered to obtain a sequence of Delta K values. Those Delta K values which correspond to the wavelengths of known surfaces show maximum constructive interference. SAR data can therefore be used for Delta K measurements, indicating the possibility of selective Delta K filtering during data gathering.

  15. Ionospheric effects on a wide-bandwidth, polarimetric, space-based, synthetic-aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The earth's ionosphere consists of an ionized plasma which will interact with any electromagnetic wave propagating through it. The interaction is particularly strong at vhf and uhf frequencies but decreases for higher microwave frequencies. These interaction effects and their relationship to the operation of a wide-bandwidth, synthetic-aperture, space-based radar are examined. Emphasis is placed on the dispersion effects and the polarimetric effects. Results show that high-resolution (wide-bandwidth) and high-quality coherent polarimetrics will be very difficult to achieve below 1 GHz.

  16. Generation of topographic terrain models utilizing synthetic aperture radar and surface level data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Topographical terrain models are generated by digitally delineating the boundary of the region under investigation from the data obtained from an airborne synthetic aperture radar image and surface elevation data concurrently acquired either from an airborne instrument or at ground level. A set of coregistered boundary maps thus generated are then digitally combined in three dimensional space with the acquired surface elevation data by means of image processing software stored in a digital computer. The method is particularly applicable for generating terrain models of flooded regions covered entirely or in part by foliage.

  17. Towards a Semantic Interpretation of Urban Areas with Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, O.; Guillaso, S.; Hellwich, O.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method to detect and reconstruct building parts from tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) airborne data. Our approach extends recent works in two ways: first, the radiometric information is used to guide the extraction of geometric primitives. Second, building facades and roofs are extracted thanks to geometric classification rules. We demonstrate our method on a 3 image L-Band airborne dataset over the city of Dresden, Germany. Experiments show how our technique allows to use the complementarity between the radiometric image and the tomographic point cloud to extract buildings parts in challenging situations.

  18. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2008-06-24

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  19. Distortion-invariant filters for foliage-penetration (FOPEN) synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David P.; Cox, Westley

    1998-09-01

    New distortion-invariant filters are considered for object detection and clutter rejection in ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. Because of the foliage penetration (FOPEN) ability of this SAR sensor, the data is attractive for automatic target recognition. We detail the first use of 2D distortion-invariant filters for object detection in FOPEN data. Since FOPEN imagery of a particular target is dependent upon the foliage obscuring the object, we use filters designed using targets in an open area and test them on objects in foliage. Initial results indicate attractive distortion-invariant detection and low false alarm rates.

  20. Comparison of three different detectors applied to synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Kenneth I.; Khatri, Hiralal; Nguyen, Lam H.

    2002-08-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory has investigated the relative performance of three different target detection paradigms applied to foliage penetration (FOPEN) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The three detectors - a quadratic polynomial discriminator (QPD), Bayesian neural network (BNN) and a support vector machine (SVM) - utilize a common collection of statistics (feature values) calculated from the fully polarimetric FOPEN data. We describe the parametric variations required as part of the algorithm optimizations, and we present the relative performance of the detectors in terms of probability of false alarm (Pfa) and probability of detection (Pd).

  1. A digital system to produce imagery from SAR data. [Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a digital processing algorithm and its associated system design for producing images from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. The proposed system uses the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) approach to perform the two-dimensional correlation process. The range migration problem, which is often a major obstacle to efficient processing, can be alleviated by approximating the locus of echoes from a point target by several linear segments. SAR data corresponding to each segment is correlated separately, and the results are coherently summed to produce full-resolution images. This processing approach exhibits greatly improved computation efficiency relative to conventional digital processing methods.

  2. Measurement of hurricane winds and waves with a synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemdin, O. H.; King, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of data collected in a hurricane research program is presented. The data were collected with a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) during five aircraft flights in the Atlantic in August and September, 1976. Work was conducted in two areas. The first is an analysis of the L-band SAR data in a scatterometer mode to determine the surface windspeeds in hurricanes, in a similar manner to that done by an X-band scatterometer. The second area was to use the SAR to examine the wave patterns in hurricanes. The wave patterns in all of the storms are similar and show a marked radial asymmetry.

  3. A study of image quality for radar image processing. [synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. W.; Kaupp, V. H.; Waite, W. P.; Macdonald, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Methods developed for image quality metrics are reviewed with focus on basic interpretation or recognition elements including: tone or color; shape; pattern; size; shadow; texture; site; association or context; and resolution. Seven metrics are believed to show promise as a way of characterizing the quality of an image: (1) the dynamic range of intensities in the displayed image; (2) the system signal-to-noise ratio; (3) the system spatial bandwidth or bandpass; (4) the system resolution or acutance; (5) the normalized-mean-square-error as a measure of geometric fidelity; (6) the perceptual mean square error; and (7) the radar threshold quality factor. Selective levels of degradation are being applied to simulated synthetic radar images to test the validity of these metrics.

  4. Multibeam single frequency synthetic aperture radar processor for imaging separate range swaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar for large swath imaging is disclosed. Each beam illuminates a separate ""footprint'' (i.e., range and azimuth interval). The distinct azimuth intervals for the separate beams produce a distinct Doppler frequency spectrum for each beam. After range correlation of raw data, an optical processor develops image data for the different beams by spatially separating the beams to place each beam of different Doppler frequency spectrum in a different location in the frequency plane as well as the imaging plane of the optical processor. Selection of a beam for imaging may be made in the frequency plane by adjusting the position of an aperture, or in the image plane by adjusting the position of a slit. The raw data may also be processed in digital form in an analogous manner.

  5. Reduction and coding of synthetic aperture radar data with Fourier transforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilley, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, aboard the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL), the two roles of Fourier Transforms for ocean image synthesis and surface wave analysis have been implemented with a dedicated radar processor to significantly reduce Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ocean data before transmission to the ground. The object was to archive the SAR image spectrum, rather than the SAR image itself, to reduce data volume and capture the essential descriptors of the surface wave field. SAR signal data are usually sampled and coded in the time domain for transmission to the ground where Fourier Transforms are applied both to individual radar pulses and to long sequences of radar pulses to form two-dimensional images. High resolution images of the ocean often contain no striking features and subtle image modulations by wind generated surface waves are only apparent when large ocean regions are studied, with Fourier transforms, to reveal periodic patterns created by wind stress over the surface wave field. Major ocean currents and atmospheric instability in coastal environments are apparent as large scale modulations of SAR imagery. This paper explores the possibility of computing complex Fourier spectrum codes representing SAR images, transmitting the coded spectra to Earth for data archives and creating scenes of surface wave signatures and air-sea interactions via inverse Fourier transformations with ground station processors.

  6. Seasat synthetic aperture radar observations of wave-current and wave-topographic interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, G. A.; Tseng, Y. C.; Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    This study investigated the capability of a spaceborne, imaging radar system to detect subtle changes in the propagation characteristics of ocean wave systems. Specifically, an evolving surface gravity wave system emanating from Hurricane Ella and propagating toward Cape Hatteras, NC, formed the basis of this investigation. This wave system was successfully imaged by the Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) during revolution 974 on September 3, 1978. Estimates of the dominant wavelength and direction of the ocean waves were derived from the SAR data by using optical Fourier transforms. Environmental data of the test area, which included the surface velocity vector within the Gulf Stream, the location of Hurricane Ella, and local bathymetric information, were used in conjunction with the SAR data to form the basis of this comparative study. Favorable agreement was found between wave rays calculated by utilizing theoretical wave-current and wave-topographic interactions and SAR observed dominant wavelength and direction changes across the Gulf Stream and continental shelf.

  7. Concepts and Technologies for Synthetic Aperture Radar from MEO and Geosynchronous orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Wendy N.; Madsen, Soren; Moussessian, Alina; Chen, Curtis

    2004-01-01

    The area accessible from a spaceborne imaging radar, e.g. a synthetic aperture radar (SAR), generally increases with the elevation of the satellite while the map coverage rate is a more complicated function of platform velocity and beam agility. The coverage of a low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite is basically given by the fast ground velocity times the relatively narrow swath width. The instantaneously accessible area will be limited to some hundreds of kilometers away from the sub-satellite point. In the other extreme, the sub-satellite point of a SAR in geosynchronous orbit will move relatively slowly, while the area which can be accessed at any given time is very large, reaching thousands of kilometers from the subsatellite point. To effective1y use the accessibility provided by a high vantage point, very large antennas with electronically steered beams are required.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Digital Elevation Model of Kuwait Desert - Analysis of Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassar, H. K. Al; Rao, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Using different combinations of 29 Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) images, 43 Digital Elevations Models (DEM) were generated adopting SAR Interferometry (InSAR) technique. Due to sand movement in desert terrain, there is a poor phase correlation between different SAR images. Therefore, suitable methodology for generating DEMs of Kuwait desert terrain using InSAR technique were worked out. Time series analysis was adopted to derive the best DEM out of 43 DEMs. The problems related to phase de-correlation over desert terrain are discussed. Various errors associated with the DEM generation are discussed which include atmospheric effects, penetration into soil medium, sand movement. The DEM of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is used as a reference. The noise levels of DEM of SRTM are presented.

  9. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar detection and estimation based 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Christian D.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2006-05-01

    This paper explores three-dimensional (3D) interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) image reconstruction when multiple scattering centers and noise are present in a radar resolution cell. We introduce an IFSAR scattering model that accounts for both multiple scattering centers and noise. The problem of 3D image reconstruction is then posed as a multiple hypothesis detection and estimation problem; resolution cells containing a single scattering center are detected and the 3D location of these cells' pixels are estimated; all other pixels are rejected from the image. Detection and estimation statistics are derived using the multiple scattering center IFSAR model. A 3D image reconstruction algorithm using these statistics is then presented, and its performance is evaluated for a 3D reconstruction of a backhoe from noisy IFSAR data.

  10. Real-time implementation of frequency-modulated continuous-wave synthetic aperture radar imaging using field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, Yachao; Hu, Guibin; Xing, Mengdao

    2015-06-01

    A new miniature linear frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar which mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle is presented. It allows the accomplishment of high resolution synthetic aperture radar imaging in real-time. Only a Kintex-7 field programmable gate array from Xilinx is utilized for whole signal processing of sophisticated radar imaging algorithms. The proposed hardware architecture achieves remarkable improvement in integration, power consumption, volume, and computing performance over its predecessor designs. The realized design is verified by flight campaigns.

  11. Factors governing selection of operating frequency for subsurface- imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-12-31

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, subsurface imaging is complicated by propagation loss in the soil and surface-clutter response. Both the loss and surface-clutter response depend on the operating frequency. This paper examines several factors which provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. No distinction can be made between objects at different heights when viewed with a conventional imaging radar (which uses a one-dimensional synthetic aperture), and the return from a buried object must compete with the return from the surface clutter. Thus, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell`s equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper VIHF through UHF spectrum ({approximately}100 MHz - 1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  12. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Based on Deep Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maoguo; Zhao, Jiaojiao; Liu, Jia; Miao, Qiguang; Jiao, Licheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel change detection approach for synthetic aperture radar images based on deep learning. The approach accomplishes the detection of the changed and unchanged areas by designing a deep neural network. The main guideline is to produce a change detection map directly from two images with the trained deep neural network. The method can omit the process of generating a difference image (DI) that shows difference degrees between multitemporal synthetic aperture radar images. Thus, it can avoid the effect of the DI on the change detection results. The learning algorithm for deep architectures includes unsupervised feature learning and supervised fine-tuning to complete classification. The unsupervised feature learning aims at learning the representation of the relationships between the two images. In addition, the supervised fine-tuning aims at learning the concepts of the changed and unchanged pixels. Experiments on real data sets and theoretical analysis indicate the advantages, feasibility, and potential of the proposed method. Moreover, based on the results achieved by various traditional algorithms, respectively, deep learning can further improve the detection performance. PMID:26068879

  13. Multi-frequency synthetic-aperture imaging with a lightweight ground penetrating radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenjan, Steven K.; Allen, Curt M.; Gardner, Duane; Wong, Howard R.; Lee, Hua; Lockwood, Stephanie J.

    2000-03-01

    The detection of buried objects, particularly hazardous waste containers and unexploded ordnance (UXO), has gained significant interest in the Unites States in the late 1990s. The desire to remediate the thousands of sites worldwide has become an increasing concern and the application of radar to this problem has received renewed attention. The US Department of Energy's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL), operated by Bechtel Nevada, has developed several frequency-modulated, continuous-wave (FM-CW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) units. To meet technical requirements for higher-resolution data, STL and the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is investigating advanced GPR hardware, signal processing, and synthetic-aperture imaging with the development of an innovative system. The goal is to design and fabricate a lightweight, battery-operated unit that does not require surface contact, can be operated by a novice user, and can achieve improved resolution. The latter is accomplished by using synthetic-aperture imaging, which forms the subsurface images by fully utilizing the data sequences collectively along a scan path. We also present the backward propagation algorithm as the basic structure of the multiple-frequency tomographic imaging technique, and the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT) method which can be described as a degenerated case of the model where the computation procedure is approximated under the narrow-beam assumption.

  14. Biomass estimation of wetland vegetation in Poyang Lake area using ENVISAT advanced synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jingjuan; Shen, Guozhuang; Dong, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Biomass estimation of wetlands plays a role in understanding dynamic changes of the wetland ecosystem. Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, with an area of about 3000 km2. The lake's wetland ecosystem has a significant impact on leveraging China's environmental change. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are a good choice for biomass estimation during rainy and dry seasons in this region. In this paper, we discuss the neural network algorithms (NNAs) to retrieve wetland biomass using the alternating-polarization ENVISAT advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) data. Two field measurements were carried out coinciding with the satellite overpasses through the hydrological cycle in April to November. A radiative transfer model of forest canopy, the Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering (MIMICS) model, was modified to fit to herbaceous wetland ecosystems. With both ASAR and MIMICS simulations as input data, the NNA-estimated biomass was validated with ground-measured data. This study indicates the capability of NNA combined with a modified MIMICS model to retrieve wetland biomass from SAR imagery. Finally, the overall biomass of Poyang Lake wetland vegetation has been estimated. It reached a level of 1.09×109, 1.86×108, and 9.87×108 kg in April, July, and November 2007, respectively.

  15. Onboard Data Compression of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: Status and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimesh, Matthew A.; Moision, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments on spacecraft are capable of producing huge quantities of data. Onboard lossy data compression is commonly used to reduce the burden on the communication link. In this paper an overview is given of various SAR data compression techniques, along with an assessment of how much improvement is possible (and practical) and how to approach the problem of obtaining it. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments on spacecraft are capable of acquiring huge quantities of data. As a result, the available downlink rate and onboard storage capacity can be limiting factors in mission design for spacecraft with SAR instruments. This is true both for Earth-orbiting missions and missions to more distant targets such as Venus, Titan, and Europa. (Of course for missions beyond Earth orbit downlink rates are much lower and thus potentially much more limiting.) Typically spacecraft with SAR instruments use some form of data compression in order to reduce the storage size and/or downlink rate necessary to accommodate the SAR data. Our aim here is to give an overview of SAR data compression strategies that have been considered, and to assess the prospects for additional improvements.

  16. Swell dissipation from 10 years of Envisat advanced synthetic aperture radar in wave mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Husson, Romain; Jiang, Haoyu; Chapron, Bertrand; Collard, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Swells are found in all oceans and strongly influence the wave climate and air-sea processes. The poorly known swell dissipation is the largest source of error in wave forecasts and hindcasts. We use synthetic aperture radar data to identify swell sources and trajectories, allowing a statistically significant estimation of swell dissipation. We mined the entire Envisat mission 2003-2012 to find suitable storms with swells (13 < T < 18 s) that are observed several times along their propagation. This database of swell events provides a comprehensive view of swell extending previous efforts. The analysis reveals that swell dissipation weakly correlates with the wave steepness, wind speed, orbital wave velocity, and the relative direction of wind and waves. Although several negative dissipation rates are found, there are uncertainties in the synthetic aperture radar-derived swell heights and dissipation rates. An acceptable range of the swell dissipation rate is -0.1 to 6 × 10-7 m-1 with a median of 1 × 10-7 m-1.

  17. Synthetic aperture radar imaging algorithm customized for programmable optronic processor in the application of full-scene synthetic aperture radar image formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Hui; Gao, Yesheng; Zhu, Bingqi; Wang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xingzhao

    2015-01-01

    With the high programmability of a spatial light modulator (SLM), a newly developed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) optronic processor is capable of focusing SAR data with different parameters. The embedded SLM, encoding SAR data into light signal in the processor, has a limited loading resolution of 1920×1080. When the dimension of processed SAR data increases to tens of thousands in either range or azimuth direction, SAR data should be input and focused block by block. And then, part of the imaging results is mosaicked to offer a full-scene SAR image. In squint mode, however, Doppler centroid will shift signal spectrum in the azimuth direction and make phase filters, loaded by another SLM, unable to cover the entire signal spectrum. It brings about a poor imaging result. Meanwhile, the imaging result, shifted away from the center of light output, will cause difficulties in subsequent image mosaic. We present an SAR image formation algorithm designed to solve these problems when processing SAR data of a large volume in low-squint case. It could not only obtain high-quality imaging results, but also optimize the subsequent process of image mosaic with optimal system cost and efficiency. Experimental results validate the performance of this proposed algorithm in optical full-scene SAR imaging.

  18. Footprints of storms on the sea: A view from spaceborne synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, David

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) on board Seasat observed images of stormlike echoes on the sea in 1978. The core of these images is usually an echo-free hole which is attributed to the damping of the short (30-cm) radar detectable gravity waves by the intense rain in the storm core. Although 'the beating down of waves by rain' is consistent with observations by seafarers and with the first scientific explanation of the phenomenon by Reynolds (1875), neither theory nor experiment has provided definitive support. One experiment appears to provide the key; it shows that the kenetic energy of the rain produces sufficient turbulence in a thin fresh water layer to damp 30-cm waves in 10-20 s, thus producing the echo-free hole. A sequence of positive feedbacks then serves to damp the longer waves. The angular dependence of the sea surface echo cross sections seen by Seasat SAR outside the echo-free hole indicates winds diverging from the downdraft induced by the intense rain core. The wind-generated waves and associated echoes extend out to a sharply defined gust front. The sea surface footprint thus mimics the features of a storm microburst. The variations in surface radar cross section due to a combination of rain and wind effects impacts spaceborne measurements of surface winds by scatterometry and rainfall measurements by radar. Portions of this synthesis remain speculative but serve as hypotheses for further research.

  19. An algorithm for operational flood mapping from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, L.; Pierdicca, N.; Chini, M.; Guerriero, L.

    2011-02-01

    An algorithm developed to map flooded areas from synthetic aperture radar imagery is presented in this paper. It is conceived to be inserted in the operational flood management system of the Italian Civil Protection and can be used in an almost automatic mode or in an interactive mode, depending on the user's needs. The approach is based on the fuzzy logic that is used to integrate theoretical knowledge about the radar return from inundated areas taken into account by means of three electromagnetic scattering models, with simple hydraulic considerations and contextual information. This integration aims at allowing a user to cope with situations, such as the presence of vegetation in the flooded area, in which inundation mapping from satellite radars represents a difficult task. The algorithm is designed to work with radar data at L, C, and X frequency bands and employs also ancillary data, such as a land cover map and a digital elevation model. The flood mapping procedure is tested on an inundation that occurred in Albania on January 2010 using COSMO-SkyMed very high resolution X-band SAR data.

  20. Detection of landmines and UXO using advanced synthetic aperture radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Eric; Peichl, Markus; Dill, Stephan; Heinzel, Andreas; Bischeltsrieder, Florian

    2016-05-01

    A main problem of effective landmine and UXO decontamination is efficient and reliable detection and localization of suspicious objects in reasonable time. This requirement demands for fast sensors investigating large areas with sufficient spatial resolution and sensitivity. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a suitable tool and is considered as a complementing sensor since nearly two decades. However, most GPRs operate in very close distance to ground in a rather punctual method of operation. In contrast, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is a technique allowing fast and laminar stand-off investigation of an area. TIRAMI-SAR is imaging radar at lower microwaves for fast close-in detection of buried and unburied objects on a larger area. This allows efficient confirmation of a threat by investigating such regions of detection by other sensors. For proper object detection sufficient spatial resolution is required. Hence the SAR principle is applied. SAR for landmine/UXO detection can be applied by side-looking radar moved on safe ground along the area of interest, being typically the un-safe ground. Additionally, reliable detection of buried and unburied objects requires sufficient suppression of background clutter. For that purpose TIRAMI-SAR is using several antennas in multi-static configuration and wave polarization together with advanced SAR processing. The advantages and necessity of a multi-static antenna configuration for this kind of GPR approach is illustrated in the paper.

  1. Oil detection in a coastal marsh with polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Rangoonwala, Amina; Suzuoki, Yukihiro; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's airborne Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) was deployed in June 2010 in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. UAVSAR is a fully polarimetric L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensor for obtaining data at high spatial resolutions. Starting a month prior to the UAVSAR collections, visual observations confirmed oil impacts along shorelines within northeastern Barataria Bay waters in eastern coastal Louisiana. UAVSAR data along several flight lines over Barataria Bay were collected on 23 June 2010, including the repeat flight line for which data were collected in June 2009. Our analysis of calibrated single-look complex data for these flight lines shows that structural damage of shoreline marsh accompanied by oil occurrence manifested as anomalous features not evident in pre-spill data. Freeman-Durden (FD) and Cloude-Pottier (CP) decompositions of the polarimetric data and Wishart classifications seeded with the FD and CP classes also highlighted these nearshore features as a change in dominant scattering mechanism. All decompositions and classifications also identify a class of interior marshes that reproduce the spatially extensive changes in backscatter indicated by the pre- and post-spill comparison of multi-polarization radar backscatter data. FD and CP decompositions reveal that those changes indicate a transform of dominant scatter from primarily surface or volumetric to double or even bounce. Given supportive evidence that oil-polluted waters penetrated into the interior marshes, it is reasonable that these backscatter changes correspond with oil exposure; however, multiple factors prevent unambiguous determination of whether UAVSAR detected oil in interior marshes.

  2. Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A; Scharlemann, E

    2005-02-07

    We report a differential synthetic aperture ladar (DSAL) concept that relaxes platform and laser requirements compared to conventional SAL. Line-of-sight translation/vibration constraints are reduced by several orders of magnitude, while laser frequency stability is typically relaxed by an order of magnitude. The technique is most advantageous for shorter laser wavelengths, ultraviolet to mid-infrared. Analytical and modeling results, including the effect of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are presented. Synthetic aperture ladars are of growing interest, and several theoretical and experimental papers have been published on the subject. Compared to RF synthetic aperture radar (SAR), platform/ladar motion and transmitter bandwidth constraints are especially demanding at optical wavelengths. For mid-IR and shorter wavelengths, deviations from a linear trajectory along the synthetic aperture length have to be submicron, or their magnitude must be measured to that precision for compensation. The laser coherence time has to be the synthetic aperture transit time, or transmitter phase has to be recorded and a correction applied on detection.

  3. Ionospheric effects on synthetic aperture radar at 100 MHz to 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, Akira; Kuga, Yasuo; Liu, Jun; Kim, Yunjin; Freeman, Tony

    1999-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for measuring forest biomass. However, it is noted that conventional SAR using C-band or higher frequencies cannot penetrate into foliage, and therefore the biomass measurements require longer wavelengths, typically P-band (500 MHz). It is also known that the ionosphere is highly dispersive, causing group delay and broadening of pulses. The variance of the refractive index fluctuations due to turbulence is approximately proportional toƒ-4. In addition, the Faraday rotation due to the geomagnetic field in the ionosphere becomes significant. This paper presents an analysis with numerical examples of the following effects in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 2 GHz in order to show the frequency dependence and the effects of total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere. First, the ionospheric turbulence can reduce the coherent length below the equivalent aperture size, and the azimuthal resolution becomes greater than D/2 where D is the antenna aperture size. Second, the ionospheric dispersion causes a shift of the imagery due to the group velocity. Third, the dispersion also creates broadening of the pulse. In addition, multiple scattering due to ionospheric turbulence gives rise to pulse broadening. Fourth, we consider the Faraday rotation effect and show that the ellipticity change is negligible, but the orientation angle changes significantly at P-band. Numerical examples are shown using typical ionospheric parameters, turbulence spectrum, and TEC values.

  4. Rain effects on the hurricane observations over the ocean by C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A composite radar scattering model composed of the atmosphere radiative transfer model, and the ocean surface Bragg wave theory is developed to analyze the impact of hurricane rain on the normalized radar-backscatter cross section (NRCS) measured in the VV and cross-polarized C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) channels. The model results are validated against SAR and SFMR measured wind speeds and rain rates for two hurricane cases. The contribution of rain to the NRCS is backscatter from two parts: the atmosphere column and the ocean surface. In the atmosphere, microwave attenuation and the rain-induced volume backscattering are simulated by the model. We find that the impact of raindrops in the atmosphere is almost negligible for the VV polarization, but important for the cross polarization. On the ocean surface, comparisons between our model and other existing models without rain lead to the conclusion that the VV polarization NRCS can be simulated reasonably well without considering the non-Bragg scattering mechanisms. Similar to the wave breaking mechanism, the microwave diffraction on the craters, crowns, and stalks, produced by rain drops, is also negligible for VV polarization. However, the non-Bragg scattering is important for the cross-polarized NRCS simulations. Finally, we performed simulations to understand the VV-polarized NRCS behavior under different wind speeds at various rain rates.

  5. Contribution of multitemporal polarimetric synthetic aperture radar data for monitoring winter wheat and rapeseed crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betbeder, Julie; Fieuzal, Remy; Philippets, Yannick; Ferro-Famil, Laurent; Baup, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the contribution of multitemporal polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for winter wheat and rapeseed crops parameters [height, leaf area index, and dry biomass (DB)] estimation, during their whole vegetation cycles in comparison to backscattering coefficients and optical data. Angular sensitivities and dynamics of polarimetric indicators were also analyzed following the growth stages of these two common crop types using, in total, 14 radar images (Radarsat-2), 16 optical images (Formosat-2, Spot-4/5), and numerous ground data. The results of this study show the importance of correcting the angular effect on SAR signals especially for copolarized signals and polarimetric indicators associated to single-bounce scattering mechanisms. The analysis of the temporal dynamic of polarimetric indicators has shown their high potential to detect crop growth changes. Moreover, this study shows the high interest of using SAR parameters (backscattering coefficients and polarimetric indicators) for crop parameters estimation during the whole vegetation cycle instead of optical vegetation index. They particularly revealed their high potential for rapeseed height and DB monitoring [i.e., Shannon entropy polarimetry (r2=0.70) and radar vegetation index (r2=0.80), respectively].

  6. A new look at spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar as tomography: imaging 3-D targets.

    PubMed

    Jakowatz, C V; Thompson, P A

    1995-01-01

    A new 3D tomographic formulation of spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is developed. This extends the pioneering work of Munson et al. (1983), who first formally described SAR in terms of tomography but who made the simplifying assumption that the target scene was 2D. The present authors treat the more general and practical case in which the radar target reflectivities comprise a 3D function. The main goal is to demonstrate that the demodulated radar return data from a spotlight mode collection represent a certain set of samples of the 3D Fourier transform of the target reflectivity function and to do so using a tomographic paradigm instead of traditional range-Doppler analysis. They also show that the tomographic approach is useful in interpreting the reconstructed 2D SAR image corresponding to a 3D scene. Specifically, the well-known SAR phenomenon of layover is easily explained in terms of tomographic projections and is shown to be analogous to the projection effect in conventional optical imaging. PMID:18290021

  7. Universal multifractal scaling of synthetic aperture radar images of sea-ice

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, T.; Francis, F.; Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D.; Kerman, B.; Drinkwater, M.

    1996-07-01

    Multifrequency, multipolarization imaging radar scattering coefficient data sets, acquired by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) over sea-ice, were studied in order to reveal their scale-invariant properties. Two distinct scenes were acquired at C-band (5.6 cm) and L-band (25 cm) wavelengths for three different linear polarizations (HH, VV, and HV). These sea-ice radar scattering coefficient fields were investigated by applying both Fourier and multifractal analysis techniques. The (multi) scaling of the data is clearly exhibited in both scenes for all three polarizations at L-band and for the HV polarization at C-band. The fields presenting this symmetry were found to be well described by universal multifractals. The corresponding parameters {alpha}, C{sub 1}, and H were determined for all these fields and were found to vary little with only the parameter H (characterizing the degree of nonconservation) displaying some systematic sensitivity to polarization. The values found for the universal multifractal parameters are {alpha} {approx} 1.85 {+-} 0.05, C{sub 1} {approx} 0.0086 {+-} 0.0041, and H {approx} {minus}0.15 {+-} 0.05.

  8. On the importance of path for phase unwrapping in synthetic aperture radar interferometry.

    PubMed

    Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Dixon, Timothy H; Wdowinski, Shimon; Cabral-Cano, Enrique

    2011-07-01

    Phase unwrapping is a key procedure in interferometric synthetic aperture radar studies, translating ambiguous phase observations to topography, and surface deformation estimates. Some unwrapping algorithms are conducted along specific paths based on different selection criteria. In this study, we analyze six unwrapping paths: line scan, maximum coherence, phase derivative variance, phase derivative variance with branch-cut, second-derivative reliability, and the Fisher distance. The latter is a new path algorithm based on Fisher information theory, which combines the phase derivative with the expected variance to get a more robust path, potentially performing better than others in the case of low image quality. In order to compare only the performance of the paths, the same unwrapping function (phase derivative integral) is used. Results indicate that the Fisher distance algorithm gives better results in most cases. PMID:21743520

  9. Coherence estimation in synthetic aperture radar data based on speckle noise modeling.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Carlos; Pottier, Eric

    2007-02-01

    In the past we proposed a multidimensional speckle noise model to which we now include systematic phase variation effects. This extension makes it possible to define what is believed to be a novel coherence model able to identify the different sources of bias when coherence is estimated on multidimensional synthetic radar aperture (SAR) data. On the one hand, low coherence biases are basically due to the complex additive speckle noise component of the Hermitian product of two SAR images. On the other hand, the availability of the coherence model permits us to quantify the bias due to topography when multilook filtering is considered, permitting us to establish the conditions upon which information may be estimated independently of topography. Based on the coherence model, two coherence estimation approaches, aiming to reduce the different biases, are proposed. Results with simulated and experimental polarimetric and interferometric SAR data illustrate and validate both, the coherence model and the coherence estimation algorithms. PMID:17230249

  10. Spatial variations of ocean wave directional spectra from the Seasat synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.; Gerling, T. W.; Irvine, D. E.; Monaldo, F. M.; Tilley, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    Seasat synthetic aperture radar ocean wave spectra for a 900-km pass are analyzed and interpreted in the context of both their probable generation sources and their surface current and bathymetric modifiers. Systematic vector wavenumber variations of several times the standard error of determination (about 1.5 percent in magnitude and 0.9 deg in direction) occur along the entire 900-km pass. The large-scale spatial variation of a 200-m swell system can be accurately accounted for as a result of dispersion from a distant storm. The more local variations are qualitatively well correlated in position with known currents and bathymetry but show systematic biases that appear partly due to an environmentally dependent instrument transfer function in the regions of high current and highest sea state. There is also substantial evidence that a large angular deviation in the center of the pass is the result of a mesoscale eddy just to the east.

  11. Sea ice type maps from Alaska synthetic aperture radar facility imagery: An assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterer, Florence M.; Gineris, Denise; Kwok, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery received at the Alaskan SAR Facility is routinely and automatically classified on the Geophysical Processor System (GPS) to create ice type maps. We evaluated the wintertime performance of the GPS classification algorithm by comparing ice type percentages from supervised classification with percentages from the algorithm. The root mean square (RMS) difference for multiyear ice is about 6%, while the inconsistency in supervised classification is about 3%. The algorithm separates first-year from multiyear ice well, although it sometimes fails to correctly classify new ice and open water owing to the wide distribution of backscatter for these classes. Our results imply a high degree of accuracy and consistency in the growing archive of multiyear and first-year ice distribution maps. These results have implications for heat and mass balance studies which are furthered by the ability to accurately characterize ice type distributions over a large part of the Arctic.

  12. Multibeam single frequency synthetic aperture radar processor for imaging separate range swaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for single frequency multibeam imaging of multiple strips of range swath at high range intervals for those applications where it is desirable to cover a range swath much greater than is possible for a given interpulse interval. Data from a single frequency synthetic aperture radar (in which beam parameters are adjusted so that the return from each successive swath is received during successive interpulse periods) are separated in Dopple frequency for the return from each beam at the frequency plane of the processor. Alternatively, the image formed by each beam may be spatially separated in the azimuth direction and successively selected by positioning an appropriate slit in the recording plane of the processor.

  13. Use of Seasat synthetic aperture radar and Landsat multispectral scanner subsystem data for Alaskan glaciology studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. K.; Ormsby, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Three Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and three Landsat multispectral scanner subsystem (MSS) scenes of three areas of Alaska were analyzed for hydrological information. The areas were: the Dease Inlet in northern Alaska and its oriented or thaw lakes, the Ruth and Tokositna valley glaciers in south central Alaska, and the Malaspina piedmont glacier on Alaska's southern coast. Results for the first area showed that the location and identification of some older remnant lake basins were more easily determined in the registered data using an MSS/SAR overlay than in either SAR or MSS data alone. Separately, both SAR and MSS data were useful for determination of surging glaciers based on their distinctive medial moraines, and Landsat data were useful for locating the glacier firn zone. For the Malaspina Glacier scenes, the SAR data were useful for locating heavily crevassed ice beneath glacial debris, and Landsat provided data concerning the extent of the debris overlying the glacier.

  14. Comparison of synthetic aperture radar and impact-echo imaging for detecting delamination in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Popovics, J. S.; Ham, S.; Ghasr, M. T.; Zoughi, R.

    2014-02-18

    In this paper we evaluate the utility of microwave and mechanical wave nondestructive testing techniques to detect delamination in reinforced concrete bridge deck mock-up samples. The mechanical wave tests comprise air-coupled impact-echo measurements, while the microwave measurements comprise three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar imaging using wideband reflectometery in the frequency range of 1–4 GHz. The results of these investigations are presented in terms of images that are generated from these data. Based on a comparison of the results, we show that the two methods are complementary, in that provide distinct capabilities for defect detection. More specifically, the former approach is unable to detect depth of a delaminated region, while the latter may provide this information. Therefore, the two methods may be used in a complementary fashion (i.e., data fusion) to give more comprehensive information about the 3D location of delamination.

  15. The Use of Multiple-Polarization Data in Foliage Penetrating (FOPEN) Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    RICHARDS,JOHN A.

    2002-07-01

    Foliage penetrating (FOPEN) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are capable of producing images of targets concealed under a foliage canopy. The quality and interpretability of these images, however, is generally limited by dense foliage clutter and by fundamental foliage-induced image degradation. Use of a polarimetric SAR to provide multiple polarization channels can mitigate these effects by offering target and scene information beyond that provided by a single-polarization SAR. This paper presents the results of a literature survey to investigate the use of multiple-polarization data in conjunction with FOPEN SAR applications. The effects of foliage propagation on SAR image quality are briefly summarized. Various approaches to multiple-polarization-based FOPEN target detection are described. Although literature concerning FOPEN target recognition is scarce, the use of multiple-polarization data for in-the-clear target recognition is described. The applicability of various target detection and recognition applications for use with concealed target SAR (CTSAR) imagery is considered.

  16. Statistical-physical model for foliage clutter in ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Amit; Chellappa, Rama

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing foliage-penetrating (FOPEN) ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is a challenging problem owing to the noisy and impulsive nature of foliage clutter. Indeed, many target-detection algorithms for FOPEN SAR data are characterized by high false-alarm rates. In this work, a statistical-physical model for foliage clutter is proposed that explains the presence of outliers in the data and suggests the use of symmetric alpha-stable (SαS) distributions for accurate clutter modeling. Furthermore, with the use of general assumptions of the noise sources and propagation conditions, the proposed model relates the parameters of the SαS model to physical parameters such as the attenuation coefficient and foliage density.

  17. Statistical-physical model for foliage clutter in ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar images.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amit; Chellappa, Rama

    2003-01-01

    Analyzing foliage-penetrating (FOPEN) ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images is a challenging problem owing to the noisy and impulsive nature of foliage clutter. Indeed, many target-detection algorithms for FOPEN SAR data are characterized by high false-alarm rates. In this work, a statistical-physical model for foliage clutter is proposed that explains the presence of outliers in the data and suggests the use of symmetric alpha-stable (SalphaS) distributions for accurate clutter modeling. Furthermore, with the use of general assumptions of the noise sources and propagation conditions, the proposed model relates the parameters of the SalphaS model to physical parameters such as the attenuation coefficient and foliage density. PMID:12542316

  18. On the focusing issue of synthetic aperture radar imaging of ocean waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bruning, C. ); Alpers, W.R. ); Schroter, J.G. )

    1991-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that the imaging of ocean surface waves by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be adequately described by velocity bunching theory in conjunction with the two-scale wave model. However, it has been conjectured that this theory is incapable of explaining why, under certain conditions, the image contrast of airborne SAR imagery of ocean waves can be enhanced by defocusing the SAR processor. It this were true it would raise serious doubts about the validity of the velocity bunching theory to describe the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In this paper the velocity bunching theory is defended. It is shown that image contrast enhancement by defocusing can also be obtained by this theory, which does not require the introduction of the phase or group velocity of the long ocean waves as a basic element of the SAR imaging theory.

  19. Deep source model for Nevado del Ruiz Volcano, Colombia, constrained by interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Paul; Samsonov, Sergey V.; López Velez, Cristian Mauricio; Ordoñez, Milton

    2015-06-01

    Nevado del Ruiz is part of a large volcano complex in the northern Andes of Colombia. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations from the RADARSAT-2 satellite since 2011 show steady inflation of the volcano since 2012 at 3-4 cm/yr. The broad (>20 km) deformation pattern from both ascending and descending track data constrain source models for either point or spheroidal sources, both located at >14 km beneath the surface (mean elevation 4.2 km) and 10 km SW of Nevado del Ruiz, below nearby Santa Isabel Volcano. Stress change computations for both sources in the context of a compressive regional stress indicate that dikes propagating from the source should become trapped in sills, possibly leading to a more complex pathway to the surface and explaining the significant lateral separation of the source and Nevado del Ruiz Volcano.

  20. Study on extremizing adaptive systems and applications to synthetic aperture radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politis, D. T.

    1983-05-01

    Klopf's work on the functioning of the neuron was studied and critically examined for engineering application possibilities. Similarly, Barto's work on the implementation of Klopf's ideas in computer simulated nets/systems was studied to determine if it could provide suitable models for physical systems. The latest learning system investigated by Barto, described as "Learning with an Adaptive Critic' was considered as the most promising for engineering applications. A functional engineering model of that system has been developed and its dynamic behavior of this system is currently being investigated in order to improve our understanding of the system operation and potential applications. In parallel with this study we are looking for possible application of such learning systems in synthetic aperture radars and data exploitation. Several potential applications have already been suggested. These suggestions will be further explored and the most promising will be proposed for full investigation and possible implementation.

  1. Analysis of wideband forward looking synthetic aperture radar for sensing land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovvali, Narayan; Carin, Lawrence

    2004-08-01

    Signal processing algorithms are considered for the analysis of wideband, forward looking synthetic aperture radar data and for sensing metal and plastic land mines, with principal application to unpaved roads. Simple prescreening algorithms are considered for reduction of the search space required for a subsequent classifier. The classifier employs features based on viewing the target at multiple ranges, with classification implemented via a support vector machine and a relevance vector machine (RVM). Concerning classifier training, we consider cases for which training is performed on both mine and nonmine (clutter) data. In addition, motivated by the fact that the clutter statistics may vary significantly between the training and testing data, we also consider RVM implementation when we only train on mine data.

  2. Method and apparatus for Delta Kappa synthetic aperture radar measurement of ocean current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) employed for delta k measurement of ocean current from a spacecraft without the need for a narrow beam and long observation times. The SAR signal is compressed to provide image data for different sections of the chirp band width, equivalent to frequencies and a common area for the separate image fields is selected. The image for the selected area at each frequency is deconvolved to obtain the image signals for the different frequencies and the same area. A product of pairs of signals is formed, Fourier transformed and squared. The spectrum thus obtained from different areas for the same pair of frequencies are added to provide an improved signal to noise ratio. The shift of the peak from the center of the spectrum is measured and compared to the expected shift due to the phase velocity of the Bragg scattering wave. Any difference is a measure of current velocity v sub o (delta k).

  3. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation Synthetic Aperture Radar Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Rosen, P. A.; Dubayah, R.; Hager, B. H.; Joughin, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Indian Space Research Organisation are planning a synthetic aperture radar (currently named NISAR) mission for launch in 2020. The mission is a dual L- and S-band polarimetric SAR satellite with a 12-day interferometric orbit and 240 km wide ground swath. The 3-year mission will have a circular sun synchronous orbit (6 am and 6 pm) with a 98° inclination and 747 km altitude that will provide systematic global coverage. Its primary science objectives are to: measure solid Earth surface deformation (earthquakes, volcanic unrest, land subsidence/uplift, landslides); track and understand cryosphere dynamics (glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, and permafrost); characterize and track changes in vegetation structure and wetlands for understanding ecosystem dynamics and carbon cycle; and support global disaster response. We will describe the current mission concept: the satellite design/capabilities, spacecraft, launch vehicle, and data flow.

  4. Mesoscale Near-Surface Wind Speed Variability Mapping with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    PubMed Central

    Young, George; Sikora, Todd; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Operationally-significant wind speed variability is often observed within synthetic aperture radar-derived wind speed (SDWS) images of the sea surface. This paper is meant as a first step towards automated distinguishing of meteorological phenomena responsible for such variability. In doing so, the research presented in this paper tests feature extraction and pixel aggregation techniques focused on mesoscale variability of SDWS. A sample of twenty eight SDWS images possessing varying degrees of near-surface wind speed variability were selected to serve as case studies. Gaussian high- and low-pass, local entropy, and local standard deviation filters performed well for the feature extraction portion of the research while principle component analysis of the filtered data performed well for the pixel aggregation. The findings suggest recommendations for future research.

  5. On the soil roughness parameterization problem in soil moisture retrieval of bare surfaces from Synthetic Aperture Radar 1959

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthetic Aperture Radar has shown its large potential for retrieving soil moisture maps at regional scales. However, since the backscattered signal is determined by several surface characteristics, the retrieval of soil moisture is an ill-posed problem when using single configuration imagery. Unles...

  6. Focus of attention for millimeter and ultra wideband synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Li-Kang

    The major goal of this research is to develop efficient detectors for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, exploiting the reflectivity characteristics of targets in different radar types. Target detection is a signal processing problem whereby one attempts to detect a stationary target embedded in background clutter while minimizing the false alarm probability. In radar signal processing, the better resolution provided by the Millimeter Wave (MMW) SAR enhances the detectability of small targets. As radar technology evolves, the newly developed Ultra Wideband (UWB) SAR provides better penetration capabilities to locate concealed targets in foliage. In this thesis we demonstrate that local intensity kernel tests can be formulated based on the generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT), while preserving constant false alarm rate (CFAR) characteristics. Both the widely used two-parameter CFAR and the g -CFAR can be viewed as special cases of the local intensity tests with different intensity kernels. It is demonstrated that the first-order Gamma kernel is a good approximation for the principal eigenvector of the projected radial intensity of targets, which provides the optimal matching intensity kernel. This also explains the better performance of the g -CFAR detector over the two parameter CFAR detector. We also developed different CFAR subspace detectors for UWB images, utilizing a Laguerre function subspace. The driven response produced by natural clutter degrades the performance of these subspace detectors. In addition to the driven response, the distinguishing feature of metallic targets in UWB is the resonance response. Therefore, we further propose a two-stage detection scheme: g -CFAR detector followed by the quadratic Laguerre discriminator (QLD). We evaluate every detector and discriminator using ROC curves in a large area (about 2 km2) of imagery. The combined g -CFAR and quadratic Laguerre discriminator improve the simple Laguerre subspace detector more

  7. Operational Mapping of Soil Moisture Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: Application to the Touch Basin (France)

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadi, Nicolas; Aubert, Maelle; Cerdan, Olivier; Franchistéguy, Laurent; Viel, Christian; Martin, Eric; Zribi, Mehrez; Desprats, Jean François

    2007-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key parameter in different environmental applications, such as hydrology and natural risk assessment. In this paper, surface soil moisture mapping was carried out over a basin in France using satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired in 2006 and 2007 by C-band (5.3 GHz) sensors. The comparison between soil moisture estimated from SAR data and in situ measurements shows good agreement, with a mapping accuracy better than 3%. This result shows that the monitoring of soil moisture from SAR images is possible in operational phase. Moreover, moistures simulated by the operational Météo-France ISBA soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model in the SIM-Safran-ISBA-Modcou chain were compared to radar moisture estimates to validate its pertinence. The difference between ISBA simulations and radar estimates fluctuates between 0.4 and 10% (RMSE). The comparison between ISBA and gravimetric measurements of the 12 March 2007 shows a RMSE of about 6%. Generally, these results are very encouraging. Results show also that the soil moisture estimated from SAR images is not correlated with the textural units defined in the European Soil Geographical Database (SGDBE) at 1:1000000 scale. However, dependence was observed between texture maps and ISBA moisture. This dependence is induced by the use of the texture map as an input parameter in the ISBA model. Even if this parameter is very important for soil moisture estimations, radar results shown that the textural map scale at 1:1000000 is not appropriate to differentiate moistures zones.

  8. Polarimetric analysis of radar backscatter from ground-based scatterometers and wheat biomass monitoring with advanced synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lei; Tong, Ling; Li, Yuxia; Chen, Yan; Tan, Longfei; Guo, Caizheng

    2016-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the scattering measurements for an entire wheat growth cycle by ground-based scatterometers at a frequency of 5.3 GHz. Since wheat ears are related to wheat growth and yield, the radar backscatter of wheat was analyzed at two different periods, i.e., with and without wheat ears. Simultaneously, parameters such as wheat and soil characteristics as well as volume scattering and soil scattering were analyzed for the two periods during the entire growth cycle. Wheat ears have been demonstrated to have a great influence on radar backscatter; therefore, a modified version of water-cloud model used for retrieving biomass should consider the effect of wheat ears. This work presents two retrieval models based on the water-cloud model and adopts the advanced integral equation model to simulate the soil backscatter before the heading stage and the backscatter from the layer under wheat ears after the heading stage. The research results showed that the biomass retrieved from the advanced synthetic aperture radar (ASAR) images to agree well with the data measured in situ after setting the modified water-cloud model for the growth stages with ears. Furthermore, it was concluded that wheat ears should form an essential component of theoretical modeling as they influence the final yield.

  9. Moving Target Indication via RADARSAT-2 Multichannel Synthetic Aperture Radar Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, S.; Dragošević, M. V.

    2009-12-01

    With the recent launches of the German TerraSAR-X and the Canadian RADARSAT-2, both equipped with phased array antennas and multiple receiver channels, synthetic aperture radar, ground moving target indication (SAR-GMTI) data are now routinely being acquired from space. Defence R&D Canada has been conducting SAR-GMTI trials to assess the performance and limitations of the RADARSAT-2 GMTI system. Several SAR-GMTI modes developed for RADARSAT-2 are described and preliminary test results of these modes are presented. Detailed equations of motion of a moving target for multiaperture spaceborne SAR geometry are derived and a moving target parameter estimation algorithm developed for RADARSAT-2 (called the Fractrum Estimator) is presented. Limitations of the simple dual-aperture SAR-GMTI mode are analysed as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio and target speed. Recently acquired RADARSAT-2 GMTI data are used to demonstrate the capability of different system modes and to validate the signal model and the algorithm.

  10. On the convergence of the phase gradient autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is a class of coherent range and Doppler signal processing techniques applied to remote sensing. The aperture is synthesized by recording and processing coherent signals at known positions along the flight path. Demands for greater image resolution put an extreme burden on requirements for inertial measurement units that are used to maintain accurate pulse-to-pulse position information. The recently developed Phase Gradient Autofocus algorithm relieves this burden by taking a data-driven digital signal processing approach to estimating the range-invariant phase aberrations due to either uncompensated motions of the SAR platform or to atmospheric turbulence. Although the performance of this four-step algorithm has been demonstrated, its convergence has not been modeled mathematically. A new sensitivity study of algorithm performance is a necessary step towards this model. Insights that are significant to the application of this algorithm to both SAR and to other coherent imaging applications are developed. New details on algorithm implementation identify an easily avoided biased phase estimate. A new algorithm for defining support of the point spread function is proposed, which promises to reduce the number of iterations required even for rural scenes with low signal-to-clutter ratios.