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Sample records for syphacia obvelata pinworm

  1. Comparative analyses of the complete mitochondrial genomes of the two murine pinworms Aspiculuris tetraptera and Syphacia obvelata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Ren; Lou, Yan; Gao, Jun-Feng; Qiu, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Yuan; Chang, Qiao-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Pinworms Aspiculuris tetraptera and Syphacia obvelata are important parasitic nematodes of laboratory mice, rat and other rodents. However, the mitochondrial (mt) genome of these parasites have not been known yet. In the present study, the complete mt genomes of A. tetraptera and S. obvelata were sequenced, which were 13,669bp and 14,235bp in size, respectively. Both genomes included 12 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and one non-coding region. The mt genomes of A. tetraptera and S. obvelata preferred bases A and T, with the highest for T and the lowest for C. The mt gene arrangements of the two pinworms were the same as that of the GA8 type. Phylogenetic analysis using mtDNA data revealed that the Bayesian inference (BI) trees contained two big branches: species from Oxyuridomorpha, Rhabditomorpha and Ascaridomorpha formed one branch, and those from Spiruromorpha formed another branch with high statistical support. The two murine pinworms A. tetraptera and S. obvelata have closer relationship than to other pinworms. This study provides a foundation for studying the population genetics, systematics and molecular phylogeny of pinworms. PMID:27016298

  2. Characterization of rDNA sequences from Syphacia obvelata, Syphacia muris, and Aspiculuris tetraptera and development of a PCR-based method for identification.

    PubMed

    Parel, Joan Dee C; Galula, Jedhan U; Ooi, Hong-Kean

    2008-05-31

    To differentiate the morphologically similar pinworms of the common laboratory rodents, such as Syphacia obvelata and Syphacia muris, we amplified and sequenced the region spanning the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1), 5.8S gene, and ITS-2 of the ribosomal DNA followed by designing of species-specific primers for future use in the identification of the worms. It was observed that S. obvelata, S. muris and Aspiculuris tetraptera can be differentiated from each other based on their rDNA sequences. This is the first report of the ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 of the rDNA of the three aforementioned rodent pinworm species. The use of restriction endonucleases, AluI or RsaI, further allowed the delineation of the three species. Moreover, we also constructed species-specific primers that were designed for unique regions of the ITS-2 of the three species. This approach allowed their specific identification with no amplicons being amplified from heterogenous DNA samples, and sequencing confirmed the identity of the sequences amplified. Thus, the use of these specific primers along with PCR-RFLP can serve as useful tools for the identification of pinworms in rats, mice, and wild rodents. PMID:18374491

  3. Role of major histocompatibility complex class II in resistance of mice to naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Patricia W.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2003-01-01

    Genetics plays a substantial role in host resistance in many host-parasite interactions. We examined the prevalence of naturally acquired infection with Syphacia obvelata in a number of mouse strains housed in a non-barrier facility. These mice, which included cross-bred and congenic, inbred strains on various genetic backgrounds, differ in the loci for the immune function genes--major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII), toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4), and solute carrier family 11, member 1 (Slc11a1)--which allowed comparisons of the impact of these genes on resistance to pinworm infection. Male and female mice of various ages were sampled over an 18-month period; infection was determined by use of the cellophane tape test. Results indicated that mice that were MHCII+/+ had a significantly lower prevalence of infection than did mice that were MHCII-/-. Differences were not seen between male and female mice. Although MHCII+/+ mice had an age-associated decrease in infection prevalence, such decrease was not seen in MHCII-/- mice. In contrast, infection prevalence in mice with the normal Tlr4 gene (Tlr4(LPS-n/LPS-n)) gene did not differ significantly compared with that in mice that were homozygous for either the point mutation (Tlr4(LPS-d/LPS-d)) or deletion (Tlr4(LPS-del/LPS-del)) of that gene. Likewise, the presence (Sle11a1r/r) or absence (Slc11a1s/s) of functional alleles for Slc11a1 had no effect on the prevalence of infection with S. obvelata. In conclusion, presence of MHCII, but not Tlr4 or Slc11a1 significantly influences prevalence of naturally acquired infection with S. obvelata. These data justify further comprehensive analyses of the immune components that are involved in pinworm resistance.

  4. Syphacia obvelata (Nematode, Oxyuridae) infecting laboratory mice Mus musculus (Rodentia, Muridae): phylogeny and host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Gaber, Rewaida

    2016-03-01

    Syphacia obvelata is a pinworm nematode parasite infecting man and laboratory animals in high abundance. This parasitological study was carried out during the period of March 2014-February 2015 to investigate the helminth parasites infecting the laboratory mice Mus musculus in the Animal House at Cairo University, Egypt. The prevalence of S. obvelata in M. musculus was 75.0 %. The extent of infection with S. obvelata is analyzed according to the sex of the host mice. It was shown that the prevalence of male infection was greater than female worms. Morphological characterization revealed that the present Oxyurid species possesses a rounded cephalic end with less developed lips, esophagus divided into cylindrical corpus, and globular bulb supported internally with valvular apparatus; three mamelons are located at the ventral surface with a single chitinized spicule and a gubernaculum provided with an accessory hook in males, and ovijector apparatus opens ventrally by the vulva surrounded by protruded lips in female worms. Body of the male was 0.623-1.130 (0.830 ± 0.11) mm long and 0.092-0.130 (0.110 ± 0.01) mm wide; the esophagus was 0.164-0.280 (0.210 ± 0.01) mm long; the nerve ring and excretory pore are located at 0.035-0.132 (0.073 ± 0.01) and 0.087-0.191 (0.145 ± 0.01) mm from the anterior end, respectively, while the female measured 2.930-4.650 (3.540 ± 0.1) mm long and 0.120-0.232 (0.156 ± 0.001) mm wide; the esophagus was 0.213-0.410 (0.342 ± 0.01) mm long; the nerve ring, excretory pore, and vulval opening are located at 0.026-0.157 (0.121 ± 0.01), 0.134-0.243 (0.195 ± 0.01), and 0.323-0.632 (0.546 ± 0.11) mm from the anterior end, respectively; eggs measured 0.120-0.139 (0.129 ± 0.001) mm long and 0.030-0.052 (0.045 ± 0.001) mm wide. It compared morphometrically with other Syphacia species described previously and showed little differences in measurements. Molecular characterization based on small subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was done to confirm the obtained morphological and morphometric results. A preliminary genetic comparison between SSU rDNA of the present parasite and other species of Oxyuridae places it as a putative sister taxon to other S. obvelata. PMID:26581371

  5. Characterization of rat pinworm (Syphacia muris) epidemiology as a means to increase detection and elimination.

    PubMed

    Meade, Theresa M; Watson, Julie

    2014-11-01

    Rodent pinworms persist in many institutions, suggesting deficiencies in eradication and diagnostic processes. When pinworms are detected, treatment success is common, but false-negative test results during health surveillance or after treatment likely contribute to the continued presence of this parasite. PCR testing is not always practical, and increased information regarding the life cycle and general epidemiology of pinworm infestations could improve the sensitivity of traditional nonPCR detection methods and improve eradication efforts. We therefore investigated a pinworm (Syphacia muris) infestation in Sprague-Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus) to develop a more accurate testing strategy. In addition, we sought to determine the duration of egg viability by using an in vitro hatching protocol to assess environmental persistence. Finally, we tested the ovicidal efficacy of a disinfectant used at our institution. Eggs were shed in higher numbers in the midafternoon as compared with other times of the day, and the sex of the host had no consistent effect on egg shedding. Egg shedding showed periodicity over time, with shedding decreasing to 0 at 2- to 3-wk intervals. Neither cecal examination nor tape tests alone reliably predicted pinworm infestation, and results of the 2 tests did not necessarily coincide. Eggs aged for as long as 7 mo remained viable, indicating a potential for recontamination from the environment. Finally, gaseous chlorine dioxide was an effective ovicidal agent, with a kill rate of 99.7%. These results suggest that strategies for S. muris eradication can be optimized to increase detection and elimination. PMID:25650973

  6. Characterization of Rat Pinworm (Syphacia muris) Epidemiology as a Means to Increase Detection and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Theresa M; Watson, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Rodent pinworms persist in many institutions, suggesting deficiencies in eradication and diagnostic processes. When pinworms are detected, treatment success is common, but false-negative test results during health surveillance or after treatment likely contribute to the continued presence of this parasite. PCR testing is not always practical, and increased information regarding the life cycle and general epidemiology of pinworm infestations could improve the sensitivity of traditional nonPCR detection methods and improve eradication efforts. We therefore investigated a pinworm (Syphacia muris) infestation in Sprague–Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus) to develop a more accurate testing strategy. In addition, we sought to determine the duration of egg viability by using an in vitro hatching protocol to assess environmental persistence. Finally, we tested the ovicidal efficacy of a disinfectant used at our institution. Eggs were shed in higher numbers in the midafternoon as compared with other times of the day, and the sex of the host had no consistent effect on egg shedding. Egg shedding showed periodicity over time, with shedding decreasing to 0 at 2- to 3-wk intervals. Neither cecal examination nor tape tests alone reliably predicted pinworm infestation, and results of the 2 tests did not necessarily coincide. Eggs aged for as long as 7 mo remained viable, indicating a potential for recontamination from the environment. Finally, gaseous chlorine dioxide was an effective ovicidal agent, with a kill rate of 99.7%. These results suggest that strategies for S. muris eradication can be optimized to increase detection and elimination. PMID:25650973

  7. Sequence variability in internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA among isolates of the oxyurid nematodes Syphacia obvelata and Aspiculuris tetraptera from mice reared in laboratories in China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, J H; Lou, Y; Zhang, Y; Chang, Q C; Liu, Z X; Duan, H; Guo, D H; Gao, D Z; Yue, D M; Wang, C R

    2016-01-01

    This study examined sequence variability in internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA among Syphacia obvelata and Aspiculuris tetraptera isolates from laboratory mice from different geographical locations in China. ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 rDNA were amplified separately from adult S. obvelata and A. tetraptera individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the amplicons were subjected to sequencing from both directions. The lengths of the sequences of ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 rDNA from both nematodes were 314 bp and 456 bp, 157 bp, and 273 bp and 419 bp, respectively. The intraspecific sequence variations in S. obvelata ITS1 were 0-0.3%. For A. tetraptera they were 0-0.7% in ITS1 and 0-1.0% in ITS2. However, the interspecific sequence differences among members of the infraorder Oxyuridomorpha were significantly higher, being 54.0-65.5% for ITS1 and 55.3-64.1% for ITS2. Phylogenetic analysis based on the combined partial sequences of ITS1 and ITS2 using three inference methods - Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony - revealed that all the S. obvelata and A. tetraptera samples formed independent monophyletic groups. Syphacia obvelata was closer to Syphacia muris than to A. tetraptera, consistent with morphological classification. These results demonstrate that ITS1 and ITS2 rDNA sequences are useful markers for population genetic studies of oxyurid nematodes. PMID:26693888

  8. Development and characterization of multiplex panels of microsatellite markers for Syphacia obvelata, a parasite of the house mouse (Mus musculus), using a high throughput DNA sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Wasimuddin; ?kov, Dagmar; Ribas, Alexis; Pilek, Jaroslav; de Bellocq, Jolle Goy; Bryja, Josef

    2012-10-01

    Syphacia obvelata is a common gastro-intestinal parasitic nematode of the house mouse (Mus musculus), a prime model rodent species. Investigations of the genetic structure, variability of parasite populations and other biological aspects of this host-parasite system are limited due to the lack of genetic resources for S. obvelata. To fill this gap, we developed a set of microsatellite markers for S. obvelata, using a 454 pyrosequencing approach. We designed three multiplex panels allowing genotyping of 10 polymorphic loci and scrutinized them on 42 samples from two different regions inhabited by two different house mouse subspecies (Mus musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus). The numbers of alleles ranged from 2 to 6 with mean observed heterozygosities 0.1476 and 0.2095 for domesticus and musculus worms, respectively. The described markers will facilitate further studies on population biology and co-evolution of this host-parasite system. PMID:22820294

  9. Helminths collected from imported pet murids, with special reference to concomitant infection of the golden hamsters with three pinworm species of the genus Syphacia (Nematoda: oxyuridae).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Iwakiri, Eri; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Une, Yumi

    2008-06-01

    A total of 210 individuals of 13 species belonging to 4 subfamilies of Muridae imported into Japan as pets were examined; 5 species of Syphacia (Nematoda: Oxyuridae), Aspiculuris tetraptera (Nematoda: Heteroxynematidae), and Rodentolepis nana (Cestoidea: Hymenolepididae) were collected. Concurrent infection with 3 pinworm species, Syphacia mesocriceti, Syphacia stroma, and Syphacia peromysci, was recorded for the first time in the golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus. Syphacia mesocriceti was also identified in the desert hamster, Phodopus roborovskii, and S. peromysci was recovered from the fat-tailed gerbil, Pachyuromys duprasi, and the Cairo spiny mouse, Acomys cahirinus. From the pygmy mouse, Mus minutoides, an undetermined species closely resembling Syphacia megaloon and Syphacia ohtaorum, both parasitic in Mus spp., was collected. Females of another undetermined Syphacia sp. were observed in the greater Egyptian gerbil, Gerbillus pyramidum. All of the host-Syphacia associations, except S. mesocriceti in the golden hamsters, were recorded for the first time. It is suggested that overlapping breeding situations provided the opportunity for host switching by the pinworms. PMID:18605784

  10. Pinworms

    MedlinePlus

    Pinworms are small worms that infect the intestines. ... Pinworms are the most common worm infection in the United States. They are most common in school-age children. Pinworm eggs are spread directly from person to ...

  11. Diagnosis of the pinworm Syphacia muris in the Wistar rat Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Sousa, J E N; Carvalho, E F G; Levenhagen, M A; Chaves, L A; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare three qualitative parasitological methods for the diagnosis of Syphacia muris infection in 30 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) infected naturally. Methods of spontaneous sedimentation (Hoffman, Pons and Janer, or HPJ) and spontaneous flotation (Willis) for faecal samples and a method of taping (Graham) were performed and compared. The Graham and Willis methods were more sensitive than the HPJ method (P< 0.05). The Graham method was able to detect S. muris eggs in 100% of the samples. Eggs were detected in 83% and 60% of the samples using the Willis and HPJ methods, respectively. Method choice is important for screening for parasites of rats kept under laboratory conditions, as accurate diagnosis helps prevent future environmental contamination and infection. We concluded that the Graham method was the most efficient of those tested in this study for detection of S. muris infection in rats. This method is also rapid, inexpensive and practical, and should be implemented as a necessary measure for infection control. PMID:25327496

  12. Pinworms

    MedlinePlus

    ... household surfaces for up to 2 weeks. The infection is more common in children. Many people have ... irritable. Your health care provider can diagnose pinworm infection by finding the eggs. A common way to ...

  13. Pinworms

    MedlinePlus

    ... pinworms, you could swallow more eggs if you scratch around your bottom and put your fingers in ... your fingernails short and clean, and don't scratch around your bottom or bite your nails. Because ...

  14. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Kartika; Hasegawa, Hideo; Fitriana, Yuli Sulistya; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  15. Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Maxomys spp. (Rodentia: Muridae) from Sulawesi and Sumatra, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    DEWI, Kartika; HASEGAWA, Hideo; FITRIANA, Yuli Sulistya; ASAKAWA, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes Syphacia (Syphacia) maxomyos sp. n. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from two species of spiny rats, Maxomys musschenbroekii from Sulawesi and M. whiteheadi from Sumatra. It is characterized by a cephalic plate extending laterally with dorsoventral constriction and stumpy eggs with an operculum rim reaching pole. It is readily distinguishable by the former feature from all of hitherto known representatives of this genus in Indonesia, but it resembles parasites in Murini and Hydromyni rodents in continental Asia and Sahul. This is the first Syphacia species distributed in both the Sunda Shelf and Sulawesi with the exception of Syphacia muris, a cosmopolitan pinworm found in rodents of the of genus Rattus. It is surmised that S. maxomyos is specific to Maxomys and that it was introduced to Sulawesi by dispersal of some Maxomys from the Sunda Shelf. PMID:26062434

  16. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection) FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  17. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  18. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  19. Exposure to Chlorine Dioxide Gas for 4 Hours Renders Syphacia Ova Nonviable

    PubMed Central

    Czarra, Jane A; Adams, Joleen K; Carter, Christopher L; Hill, William A; Coan, Patricia N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of chlorine dioxide gas for environmental decontamination of Syphacia spp. ova. We collected Syphacia ova by perianal cellophane tape impression of pinworm-infected mice. Tapes with attached ova were exposed to chlorine dioxide gas for 1, 2, 3, or 4 h. After gas exposure, ova were incubated in hatching medium for 6 h to promote hatching. For controls, tapes with attached ova were maintained at room temperature for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h without exposure to chlorine dioxide gas and similarly incubated in hatch medium for 6 h. Ova viability after incubation was assessed by microscopic examination. Exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for 4 h rendered 100% of Syphacia spp. ova nonviable. Conversely, only 17% of ova on the 4-h control slide were nonviable. Other times of exposure to chlorine dioxide gas resulted in variable effectiveness. These data suggest that exposure to chlorine dioxide gas for at least 4 h is effective for surface decontamination of Syphacia spp. ova. PMID:25199091

  20. Pinworm (for Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids Up for Sports Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies ... pinworm infection, you can see worms in the anal region, especially if you look about 2 or ...

  1. Pinworm eggs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... anal opening. The sticky side of the tape picks up the pinworm eggs and the tape is then stuck to a microscope slide. The eggs can be viewed under the microscope, as seen above. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)

  2. Efficacy and security of ivermectin given orally to rats naturally infected with Syphacia spp., Giardia spp. and Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    Foletto, V R S; Vanz, F; Gazarini, L; Stern, C A J; Tonussi, C R

    2015-07-01

    The results of this study show that the oral administration of ivermectin (48 mg/L) repeatedly for 72 h used in accordance with the present protocol is a safe and highly effective treatment for Giardia spp. and Hymenolepis nana in laboratory rat colonies. The drug can be easily and safely administered using drinking water. This simple regimen should control pinworm infection (Syphacia muris), a problem that can be endemic in laboratory colonies. Experiments using healthy animals are likely to generate more consistent results, thereby requiring a reduced number of animals per group. PMID:25480657

  3. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Prevention and Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  4. The effect of Syphacia muris on nutrient digestibility in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Plachý, V; Litvinec, A; Langrová, I; Horáková, B; Sloup, V; Jankovská, I; Vadlejch, J; Čadková, Z; Borkovcová, M

    2016-02-01

    This study was carried out to investigate how pinworm infection in rats affects nutrient digestibility in the hosts. Twenty-four male outbred Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups of 12 rats each. The rats from the first group (GI) were kept in cages with bedding containing pinworm eggs, and the second (control) group (GII) were kept in a separate room in clean, uncontaminated filter-top cages. The animals were put into individual metabolic cages later. Metabolic trials lasted five days and records of animal weight, food ingestion, and faecal weight were taken daily. Based on laboratory analysis of the feed and faecal nutrient content, digestibility values were determined. On day 15 of the experiment, the animals were euthanized. Although Syphacia muris were found in all rats from the GI group, animals exhibited no clinical signs. In our experiment, S. muris infection reduced the overall digestibility of all measured nutrients (P < 0.01). The most significant differences in digestibility were observed in the case of crude fibre and mineral matter (P < 0.01). PMID:25777968

  5. Two new species of Syphacia (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in endemic murid rodents from Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dewi, K; Hasegawa, H

    2014-03-01

    Two new species of Syphacia (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) are described from endemic murids of Sulawesi, Indonesia: Syphacia (Syphacia) taeromyos sp. n. and S. (S.) paruromyos sp. n. parasitic in the caecum of Taeromys celebensis and Paruromys dominator, respectively. They are readily distinguished from all of the congeners recorded from Indonesia-Australian regions by having a round cephalic plate, vesicular lateral alae in the male, posteriorly positioned excretory pore in the male, and/or lacking cervical alae. Syphacia (S.) paruromyos differs from S. (S.) taeromyos by having a whip-like tail appendage in the male, longer relative distance between excretory pore and vulva, and larger eggs. The round cephalic plate in both sexes and developed vesicular lateral alae in the male are morphological traits common in endemic Syphacia species hitherto known from Sulawesi murids, suggesting that they have derived from a common ancestor and evolved with their hosts in the isolated insular environment. PMID:23110941

  6. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect pheromone... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the... residues of both components of the tomato pinworm insect pheromone (E)-4-tridecen-1-yl acetate and...

  10. A new species of Syphacia (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Calomys laucha (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in an agroecosystem of central Argentina.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Elba Juliana Rojas; Miño, Mariela Haydée; Notarnicola, Juliana; Robles, María del Rosario

    2011-08-01

    A new oxyurid nematode Syphacia hodarae n. sp. is described from the cecum and rectum of the cricetid rodent Calomys laucha Fischer, 1814 (Sigmodontinae, Phyllotini), captured in an agroecosystem of central Argentina. The new species is distinguished from other members of the genus mainly by the shape of the cephalic plate, presence of cervical alae in females, absence of lateral alae, and absence of deirids. Some characters are shared with Syphacia carlitosi, a parasite of Akodon azarae from the wetlands in Argentina. However, S. hodarae can be differentiated from this species by the absence of ornamentation on the accessory hook of the gubernaculum, length of spicule and gubernaculum, size of the eggs, and distance to the vulva from the anterior end. This is the first record of a Syphacia species from the tribe Phyllotini in Argentina, and the first time a Syphacia species is reported from C. laucha . PMID:21506826

  11. A new species of Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) from Sooretamys angouya Fischer, 1814 (Rodentia: Cricetidae) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Robles, María del Rosario; Panisse, Guillermo; Navone, Graciela Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Syphacia (Seuratoxyuris) hugoti n. sp. (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) is described from the cecum of Sooretamys angouya (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae: Oryzomyini) captured in Formosa Province, Argentina. The diagnosis of the subgenus is emended, and the new species is separated from eight congeners by the distribution of submedian papillae and amphids, shape of the cephalic plate, presence of deirids, absence of cervical and lateral alae, length of the spicule, structure of the accessory hook of the gubernaculum and distance of excretory pore and vulva from the anterior extremity. The analysis suggests that S. (Se.) oryzomyos should be removed from Seuratoxyuris and redesignated as S. (Syphacia) oryzomyos n. comb. To date, of the species of Syphacia found in South and North American, 7 parasitize Oryzomyini rodents, of which two are distributed in Argentina. The present study constitutes the first record of the subgenus Seuratoxyuris from Argentina and the third record of a Syphacia species from rodents of the tribe Oryzomyini. PMID:24995650

  12. 40 CFR 180.1064 - Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1064 Tomato pinworm insect pheromone; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for combined... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tomato pinworm insect...

  13. [Survey on pinworm infection and egg contamination among urban, suburban and rural pupils in Shangqiu City].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin-Huan; Wang, Chenl; Xu, Ying; Man, Na; Cui, Yue; Yang, Xia; Cui, Yan-Mei

    2012-12-30

    Seven hundred and ninety-eight preschool children and grade one pupils from three schools in the city of Shangqiu were sampled randomly in urban, suburban and rural areas. The transparent tape method was used to examine the infection of pinworm and the contamination of pinworm eggs on the environments. The average infection rate of pinworm was 9.9% (79/798). The prevalence of pinworm infection among the pupils of urban(4.6%) was statistically lower than those of suburban (11.2%) and rural (13.8%) (P < 0.01). The contamination rate of pinworm eggs from armor, fingers, bedclothes, briefs,and stationery in infected pupils are 23.8% (5/21), 18.0% (9/50), 15.8% (3/19), 12.9% (4/31) and 5.0% (2/40), respectively, which showed no statistical significance (P > 0.05). PMID:23484265

  14. Impaired intestinal electrolyte transport in rats infested with the common parasite Syphacia muris.

    PubMed

    Lbcke, R; Hutcheson, F A; Barbezat, G O

    1992-01-01

    An incidentally discovered infestation with the nematode Syphacia muris of cecum and colon in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive control (WKY) rats was investigated over a two-year period. Infestation rates in WKY were higher than in SHR, while clinical signs as well as histological changes of colonic tissues were absent in both strains. In vivo net water absorption (microliter/hr/cm2) in control worm-free SHR turned into secretion in infested rats, ie, from 74.2 +/- 23.2 to -7.5 +/- 35.0 (P less than 0.001); this corresponded with a decrease in net absorption (mumol/hr/cm2) of Na from 18.5 +/- 2.4 to 9.3 +/- 4.3 (P less than 0.001) and of Cl from 14.0 +/- 3.2 to 3.2 +/- 5.7 (P less than 0.001). In WKY, net water absorption decreased from 112.2 +/- 23.2 to 48.0 +/- 25.1 (P less than 0.001) and Na and Cl absorption from 22.3 +/- 3.1 to 16.0 +/- 4.2 (P less than 0.005) and from 19.4 +/- 2.7 to 10.9 +/- 4.7 (P less than 0.005), respectively. Antihelminthic treatment with 0.007% pyrvinium pamoate in the ration (four weeks on, six months off) eradicated Syphacia muris in both rat strains. Body weight gain of young rats on normal and pyrvinium pamoate-substituted diet studied over 18 months was similar, indicating a good tolerance of the treatment. It is concluded that results obtained during comparative intestinal transport studies between SHR and WKY may not only be impaired but also significantly distorted by Syphacia muris infestation as SHR appear to be more susceptible to effects induced by this common parasite than WKY. PMID:1728532

  15. Chimpanzee pinworm, Enterobius anthropopitheci (Nematoda: Oxyuridae), maintained for more than twenty years in captive chimpanzees in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Udono, Toshifumi

    2007-08-01

    The chimpanzee pinworm, Enterobius anthropopitheci (Gedoelst, 1916), was found in chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, reared in Kumamoto Primate Research Park, Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co., Ltd., Kumamoto, Japan, in 2006. Because the chimpanzees in this institution originated from chimpanzees imported from Africa before 1984, it is considered that E. anthropopitheci infection has persisted for more than 20 yr in the chimpanzees. Analysis of pinworm specimens preserved in the institution revealed that transition of predominant pinworm species occurred, responding to the change of anthelmintics used for pinworm treatment. Present dominance of E. anthropopitheci is surmised to be caused by fenbendazole, which has been adopted from 2002. Scarcity of mixed infection with E. anthropopitheci and Enterobius vermicularis suggests interspecific competition between the pinworms. PMID:17918364

  16. Serological cross-reactivity between Strongyloides venezuelensis and Syphacia muris in Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    de Sousa, José Eduardo N; de Carvalho, Edson Fernando G; Levenhagen, Marcelo A; de Faria, Lucas S; Gonçalves-Pires, Maria do R F; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2016-04-01

    One of the problems frequently faced in laboratory facilities is the possibility of the natural parasitic infection of lab animals, which can interfere with biomedical research results. The present study aimed to evaluate cross-reactivity among serum samples from Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) naturally infected with Syphacia muris and experimentally infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis. Forty rats were divided into four groups of ten animals each. Parasite load was evaluated by quantifying the adult worms from both helminthes species recovered from the intestines and the S. venezuelensis eggs eliminated in feces. Serological cross-reactivity by parasite-specific IgG detection was tested via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and immunoblotting. The results demonstrated that the quantity of S. venezuelensis eliminated eggs and parthenogenetic females decreased significantly in cases of co-infection with S. muris. ELISA revealed 100% cross-reactivity of serum samples from both species against the opposing antigen. IgG cross-reactivity was confirmed by IFAT using tissue sections of S. venezuelensis larvae and adult S. muris. Immunoblotting showed that IgG antibodies from the sera of animals infected with S. muris recognized eight antigenic bands from S. venezuelensis saline extract and that IgG antibodies from the sera of animals infected with S. venezuelensis recognized seven bands from S. muris saline extract. These results demonstrate the serological cross-reactivity between S. muris and S. venezuelensis in infected rats. PMID:26601618

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of rabbit pinworm Passalurus ambiguus: genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Li, Sheng; Zou, Feng-Cai; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Passalurus ambiguus (Nematda: Oxyuridae) is a common pinworm which parasitizes in the caecum and colon of rabbits. Despite its significance as a pathogen, the epidemiology, genetics, systematics, and biology of this pinworm remain poorly understood. In the present study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of P. ambiguus. The circular mt genome is 14,023bp in size and encodes of 36 genes, including 12 protein-coding, two ribosomal RNA, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The mt gene order of P. ambiguus is the same as that of Wellcomia siamensis, but distinct from that of Enterobius vermicularis. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences of 12 protein-coding genes by Bayesian inference (BI) showed that P. ambiguus was more closely related to W. siamensis than to E. vermicularis. This mt genome provides novel genetic markers for studying the molecular epidemiology, population genetics, systematics of pinworm of animals and humans, and should have implications for the diagnosis, prevention, and control of passaluriasis in rabbits and other animals. PMID:26472717

  18. The horse pinworm (Oxyuris equi) in archaeology during the Holocene: Review of past records and new data.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Benjamin; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Lepetz, Sébastien; Le Bailly, Matthieu

    2015-07-01

    This paper focuses on the horse pinworm, Oxyuris equi, in archaeology during the Holocene period, and presents an overview of past published occurrences, early mentions in texts, and new data from our paleoparasitology research. This original compilation shows that the most ancient record of the horse pinworm dates to ca. 2500 years before present (ybp) in Central Asia and to ca. 2020 ybp in Western Europe. It also shows that the parasite is not detected on the American continent until contemporary periods. The role of European migrations from 1492 (Christopher Columbus) is discussed to explain the transfer of the horse pinworm from the Old World to the Americas. The absence of any record of this parasite before ca. 2500 ybp in Eurasia could be explained by parasite ecology, unfavorable sampling and scarcity of horse archeological remains. For the Americas, the absence of horse for long periods can be an additional explanation for the absence of the parasite. PMID:25916688

  19. Pinworm Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pinworm—egg, larva (immature stage), and mature worm—takes place inside the human body and requires ... barely noticeable. The movement of egg-laden female worms from your anus to deposit their eggs will ...

  20. Pinworm test

    MedlinePlus

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... to determine if there are eggs. The tape test may need to be done on 3 separate ...

  1. False-Positive Results after Environmental Pinworm PCR Testing due to Rhabditid Nematodes in Corncob Bedding

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Mathias; Berry, Kristina; Graciano, Sandy; Becker, Brandon; Reuter, Jon D

    2014-01-01

    Modern rodent colonies are housed in individually ventilated cages to protect the animals from contamination with adventitious pathogens. Standard health monitoring through soiled-bedding sentinels does not always detect infections, especially in the context of low pathogen prevalence. Recently proposed alternatives include analyzing environmental samples from the cages or rack exhaust by PCR to improve the detection of rodent pathogens but optimal sampling strategies have not yet been established for different microorganisms. Although generally very sensitive and specific, these molecular assays are not foolproof and subject to false-positive and –negative results and should always be interpreted cautiously with an overall understanding of the intrinsic controls and all the variables that may affect the results. Here, we report a limited Aspiculuris tetraptera outbreak in a mouse barrier facility that was detected by fecal PCR in sentinels and confirmed by fecal flotation and direct cecal examination of both sentinels and colony animals. The outbreak led to a widespread survey of all facilities for pinworms by using environmental PCR from ventilated rack exhaust plenums. Environmental PCR suggested an unexpected widespread contamination of all ventilated racks holding nonautoclaved cages, but results could not be confirmed in sentinel or colony animals by fecal flotation, cecal and colonic examination, or cage PCR testing. After additional investigation, the unexpected environmental PCR results were confirmed as false-positive findings due to the nonspecificity of the assay, leading to the amplification of rhabditid nematodes, which are not infectious in rodents but which contaminated the corncob bedding. PMID:25650980

  2. Selection of processing tomato genotypes with high acyl sugar content that are resistant to the tomato pinworm.

    PubMed

    Dias, D M; Resende, J T V; Faria, M V; Camargo, L K P; Chagas, R R; Lima, I P

    2013-01-01

    Acyl sugars are allelochemicals present at high concentrations in leaves of accessions of the wild tomato Solanum pennellii; they confer resistance to a large number of arthropod pests, including the tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae). Accession 'LA716', with high contents of acyl sugars in the leaves, was used as a source of resistance to start a genetic breeding program of processing cultivated tomato, S. lycopersicum. We selected plants of the F₂ generation of an interspecific cross (S. lycopersicum cv. 'Redenção' x S. pennellii 'LA716') for extremes of concentrations (high and low) of acyl sugars in the leaves and evaluated the resistance of selected genotypes to the tomato pinworm, compared with plants of the parental and F₁ generations. The concentrations of acyl sugars present in the genotypes selected for high contents were close to those of S. pennellii 'LA 716', while the genotypes with low concentrations of acyl sugars were close to cultivar 'Redenção'. The F₁ hybrid ('Redenção' x 'LA716') had intermediate concentrations of acyl sugars, but was closer to Redenção, indicating that the inheritance of this type of character is due to a recessive major gene, along with minor genes with additive effects. There was a direct association between high contents of acyl sugars and non-preference for oviposition and suppression of larval development, indicating that the allelochemical acts through mechanisms of non-preference for oviposition and through antibiosis. Genotypes with high contents of acyl sugars were more effective in reducing the damage caused by the tomato pinworm. Genotypes RVTA-2010pl#94 and RVTA-2010pl#31, selected for high contents of acyl sugars, showed a good level of resistance to T. absoluta, similar to the wild genotype LA716. These genotypes are promising for use in a breeding program for developing commercial processing tomatoes. PMID:23420362

  3. Why museums matter: a tale of pinworms (Oxyuroidea: Heteroxynematidae) among pikas (Ochotona princeps and O. collaris) in the American west.

    PubMed

    Hoberg, E P; Pilitt, P A; Galbreath, K E

    2009-04-01

    Permanent and well-supported museum or natural history collections provide a solid foundation for the process of systematics research through creation of an empirical record which validates our understanding of the biosphere. We explore the role of museums in ongoing studies of the complex helminth fauna characteristic of pikas (Ochotona spp.) in the American west. These studies address the taxonomy for pinworms of the Labiostomatinae and the problems associated with the absence of adequate type series and vouchers and with misidentifications in original descriptions. We demonstrate that the types for Labiostomum (Labiostomum) coloradensis are identical to some specimens in the syntype series representing L. (Eugenuris) utahensis, although the published descriptions are in disagreement. Both are identical to L. (Eugenuris) talkeetnaeuris and, as a consequence, are reduced as junior synonyms. Only 2 species of large pinworms, namely L. (Labiostomum) rauschi and L. (Eugenuris) talkeetnaeuris, are widely distributed in Ochotona collaris and O. princeps. Although this serves to clarify the taxonomy for species in these genera, prior records remain confused, as representative voucher specimens from all major surveys in North America were never submitted to museum collections. We strongly suggest that type and voucher series should not be held in private or personal collections, where such are eventually lost, discarded, or destroyed through neglect due to inattention and the absence of curation. The potential to accumulate meaningful baselines for assessment of environmental change is jeopardized if materials from survey and inventory are not routinely submitted to museum collections. The capacity of museum repositories, as a focus for systematics, ecology, and evolutionary studies and for the development of resources for biodiversity informatics, continues to be undervalued and poorly utilized by a cadre of scientists who are dependant on accurate and definitive information that transcends specific disciplines. PMID:19593896

  4. Assessing European Egg Parasitoids as a Mean of Controlling the Invasive South American Tomato Pinworm Tuta absoluta

    PubMed Central

    Chailleux, Anaïs; Desneux, Nicolas; Seguret, Julien; Do Thi Khanh, Hong; Maignet, Pascal; Tabone, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The South American tomato pinworm (Tuta absoluta) has recently invaded Europe and is rapidly spreading in the Afro-Eurasian continent where it is becoming a major pest on tomato crops. Laboratory tests were undertaken to evaluate the potential of 29 European strains of Trichogramma parasitoids to control T. absoluta. In addition to the host itself, the host plant (tomato) was used during the laboratory tests in order to increase the chance of selecting the best parasitoid strains. Trichogramma females were placed with T. absoluta eggs on a tomato leaflet in tubes. We compared the parasitism of T. absoluta by the various Trichogramma species tested to the Trichogramma species currently commercially available for the pest control in Europe, i.e. Trichogramma achaeae. Thereafter, the more promising strains were tested on a larger scale, in mesocosm (i.e. cages in greenhouses) and in greenhouse compartments to evaluate efficiency of laboratory selected strains under cropping conditions. The most efficient strain from the laboratory screening trials did not perform as efficiently under the greenhouse conditions. We discuss differences in parasitism levels among species and strains and among the different scales tested in the experiments, as well as implications of these results for further screening for biocontrol agents. PMID:23144727

  5. Assessing European egg parasitoids as a mean of controlling the invasive South American tomato pinworm Tuta absoluta.

    PubMed

    Chailleux, Anaïs; Desneux, Nicolas; Seguret, Julien; Do Thi Khanh, Hong; Maignet, Pascal; Tabone, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    The South American tomato pinworm (Tuta absoluta) has recently invaded Europe and is rapidly spreading in the Afro-Eurasian continent where it is becoming a major pest on tomato crops. Laboratory tests were undertaken to evaluate the potential of 29 European strains of Trichogramma parasitoids to control T. absoluta. In addition to the host itself, the host plant (tomato) was used during the laboratory tests in order to increase the chance of selecting the best parasitoid strains. Trichogramma females were placed with T. absoluta eggs on a tomato leaflet in tubes. We compared the parasitism of T. absoluta by the various Trichogramma species tested to the Trichogramma species currently commercially available for the pest control in Europe, i.e. Trichogramma achaeae. Thereafter, the more promising strains were tested on a larger scale, in mesocosm (i.e. cages in greenhouses) and in greenhouse compartments to evaluate efficiency of laboratory selected strains under cropping conditions. The most efficient strain from the laboratory screening trials did not perform as efficiently under the greenhouse conditions. We discuss differences in parasitism levels among species and strains and among the different scales tested in the experiments, as well as implications of these results for further screening for biocontrol agents. PMID:23144727

  6. Can Interactions Between an Omnivorous Hemipteran and an Egg Parasitoid Limit the Level of Biological Control for the Tomato Pinworm?

    PubMed

    Cabello, Tomas; Bonfil, Francisco; Gallego, Juan R; Fernandez, Francisco J; Gamez, Manuel; Garay, Jozsef

    2015-02-01

    Relationships between the omnivorous predator Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) and the egg parasitoid Trichogramma achaeae Nagaraja and Nagarkatti were studied in the laboratory (no-choice and choice assays, and functional responses) and in a greenhouse experiment. Both natural enemies are utilized in the biological control of tomato pinworm on greenhouse-grown tomato crops. Three different food items were offered to the predator: nonparasitized prey, prey parasitized for less than 4 d by T. achaeae, and prey parasitized for more than 4 d by the parasitoid. There were significant differences in consumption of food types, with highest consumption for nonparasitized prey, followed by parasitized (<4 d) and then parasitized (>4 d), both in no-choice and choice trials. At the same time, the predator causes a significant mortality in the prey (over 80%) regardless of previous parasitism, resulting in a very coincidental intraguild predation detrimental to the parasitoid. It has also been observed that there was a change in the functional response by the predator from Type II in presence of nonparasitized prey to Type I when there was a combination of parasitized and nonparasitized prey. This represents an increase of instantaneous search rate (a') and a decrease of handling time (Th), which indicates a change in feeding behavior on the two prey types. Under greenhouse conditions, the intraguild predation reduced the percentage of parasitism by T. achaeae in just over 20%. However, when both natural enemies were present, a better control of pest Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) was achieved than in the case of application of any of them alone. PMID:26308802

  7. Pinworm detection in mice with immunodeficient (NOD SCID) and immunocompetent (CD-1 and Swiss) soiled bedding sentinels in individually ventilated cage systems.

    PubMed

    Eguíluz, C; Rossi, M; Viguera, E

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel exposure to soiled bedding is frequently used for health monitoring of mice housed in individually ventilated cage systems (IVCS). Despite its advantages, the use of soiled bedding sentinels (SBSs) is far for being a reliable method. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of immunodeficient SBSs NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/NCrHsd (NOD SCID) against two immunocompetent outbred strains, Hsd:ICR (CD-1) and RjOr1:Swiss (Swiss) to pinworm detection in IVCS-housing. Four different diagnostic methods were used: perianal tape test, fecal flotation, plate method and histology. Positivity was considered if at least one of the techniques used was positive. In the first study NOD SCID were more sensitive than CD-1 SBSs (P < 0.05), and except for the fecal flotation test performed at week 6, all the diagnostic methods were more sensitive with NOD SCID mice (P < 0.05). In the second study differences between the Swiss and NOD SCID mice were less obvious (P = 0.08). When compared separately, the different diagnostic methods, except for the fecal flotation test, were all more sensitive in the NOD SCID mice (P < 0.05). In addition, the anal tape test in the Swiss SBSs was more sensitive at week 7 than at week 15 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, combining various diagnostic techniques and samplings at week 7 post-exposure with non-invasive methods increases the rate of pinworm detection. Immunodeficient SBSs showed higher sensitivity than immunocompetent ones. Thus, use of immunodeficient SBSs is highly recommended in health control protocols. PMID:25667226

  8. Total IgE as a Serodiagnostic Marker to Aid Murine Fur Mite Detection

    PubMed Central

    Roble, Gordon S; Boteler, William; Riedel, Elyn; Lipman, Neil S

    2012-01-01

    Mites of 3 generaMyobia, Myocoptes, and Radfordiacontinue to plague laboratory mouse facilities, even with use of stringent biosecurity measures. Mites often spread before diagnosis, predominantly because of detection difficulty. Current detection methods have suboptimal sensitivity, are time-consuming, and are costly. A sensitive serodiagnostic technique would facilitate detection and ease workload. We evaluated whether total IgE increases could serve as a serodiagnostic marker to identify mite infestations. Variables affecting total IgE levels including infestation duration, sex, age, mite species, soiled-bedding exposure, and ivermectin treatment were investigated in Swiss Webster mice. Strain- and pinworm-associated effects were examined by using C57BL/6 mice and Swiss Webster mice dually infested with Syphacia obvelata and Aspiculuris tetraptera, respectively. Mite infestations led to significant increases in IgE levels within 2 to 4 wk. Total IgE threshold levels and corresponding sensitivity and specificity values were determined along the continuum of a receiver-operating characteristic curve. A threshold of 81 ng/mL was chosen for Swiss Webster mice; values above this point should trigger screening by a secondary, more specific method. Sex-associated differences were not significant. Age, strain, and infecting parasite caused variability in IgE responses. Mice exposed to soiled bedding showed a delayed yet significant increase in total IgE. Treatment with ivermectin reduced total IgE levels within 2 wk. Our data suggest that increases in total IgE in Swiss Webster and C57BL/6 mice warrant investigation, especially because mite infestations can rapidly elevate total IgE levels. We propose that using total IgE levels routinely in serologic panels will enhance biosecurity. PMID:22776120

  9. Transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis: pinworm or cysts?

    PubMed

    Clark, C Graham; Röser, Dennis; Stensvold, C Rune

    2014-03-01

    Recently, conflicting evidence has been published on the mode of transmission of the trichomonad Dientamoeba fragilis. Detection of D. fragilis DNA inside Enterobius vermicularis eggs agrees with the prediction of Dobell in 1940 that the eggs of a nematode act as a vector for transmission. However, the identification of a cyst stage of D. fragilis in the stool of rodents infected with a human isolate has also been reported, and this implies a life cycle similar to those of most other intestinal protistan parasites. Herein we discuss the recent data, identify gaps in the experimental evidence, and propose a method for determining which view of the life cycle of this organism is correct. PMID:24492020

  10. Effect of Cage-Wash Temperature on the Removal of Infectious Agents from Caging and the Detection of Infectious Agents on the Filters of Animal Bedding-Disposal Cabinets by PCR Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Susan R; Macy, James D

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, effective cage decontamination and the detection of infection are important to sustainable biosecurity within animal facilities. This study compared the efficacy of cage washing at 110 and 180 °F on preventing pathogen transmission. Soiled cages from mice infected with mouse parvovirus (MPV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) were washed at 110 or 180 °F or were not washed. Sentinels from washed cages did not seroconvert to either virus, whereas sentinels in unwashed cages seroconverted to both agents. Soiled cages from mice harboring MPV, Helicobacter spp., Mycoplasma pulmonis, Syphacia obvelata, and Myocoptes musculinus were washed at 110 or 180 °F or were not washed. Sentinels from washed cages remained pathogen-free, whereas most sentinels in unwashed cages became infected with MPV and S. obvelata. Therefore washing at 110 or 180 °F is sufficient to decontaminate caging and prevent pathogen transmission. We then assessed whether PCR analysis of debris from the bedding disposal cabinet detected pathogens at the facility level. Samples were collected from the prefilter before and after the disposal of bedding from cages housing mice infected with both MPV and MHV. All samples collected before bedding disposal were negative for parvovirus and MHV, and all samples collected afterward were positive for these agents. Furthermore, all samples obtained from the prefilter before the disposal of bedding from multiply infected mice were pathogen-negative, and all those collected afterward were positive for parvovirus, M. pulmonis, S. obvelata, and Myocoptes musculinus. Therefore the debris on the prefilter of bedding-disposal cabinets is useful for pathogen screening. PMID:26632784

  11. Intestinal nematodes from small mammals captured near the demilitarized zone, Gyeonggi province, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Gyu; Park, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Lip; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Jeon, Sarah Jiyoun; Lim, Hyemi; Lee, Mi Youn; Shin, Eun-Hee; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Chong, Sung-Tae; Song, Jin-Won; Baek, Luck-Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2015-02-01

    A total of 1,708 small mammals (1,617 rodents and 91 soricomorphs), including Apodemus agrarius (n = 1,400), Microtus fortis (167), Crocidura lasiura (91), Mus musculus (32), Myodes (= Eothenomys) regulus (9), Micromys minutus (6), and Tscherskia (= Cricetulus) triton (3), were live-trapped at US/Republic of Korea (ROK) military training sites near the demilitarized zone (DMZ) of Paju, Pocheon, and Yeoncheon, Gyeonggi Province from December 2004 to December 2009. Small mammals were examined for their intestinal nematodes by necropsy. A total of 1,617 rodents (100%) and 91 (100%) soricomorphs were infected with at least 1 nematode species, including Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Syphacia obvelata, Heterakis spumosa, Protospirura muris, Capillaria spp., Trichuris muris, Rictularia affinis, and an unidentified species. N. brasiliensis was the most common species infecting small mammals (1,060; 62.1%) followed by H. polygyrus (617; 36.1%), S. obvelata (370; 21.7%), H. spumosa (314; 18.4%), P. muris (123; 7.2%), and Capillaria spp. (59; 3.5%). Low infection rates (0.1-0.8%) were observed for T. muris, R. affinis, and an unidentified species. The number of recovered worms was highest for N. brasiliensis (21,623 worms; mean 20.4 worms/infected specimen) followed by S. obvelata (9,235; 25.0 worms), H. polygyrus (4,122; 6.7 worms), and H. spumosa (1,160; 3.7 worms). A. agrarius demonstrated the highest prevalence for N. brasiliensis (70.9%), followed by M. minutus (50.0%), T. triton (33.3%), M. fortis (28.1%), M. musculus (15.6%), C. lasiura (13.2%), and M. regulus (0%). This is the first report of nematode infections in small mammals captured near the DMZ in ROK. PMID:25748722

  12. Cutaneous mastocytosis exacerbated by pinworms in a young boy.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, Annalisa; Virdi, Annalucia; Neri, Iria

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous mastocytosis in children has an indolent course and undergoes spontaneous regression. Many triggering factors may cause mast cell degranulation and clinical manifestations. Knowledge of these factors is important for patients and their families. We report a case of exacerbation of urticaria pigmentosa due to mast cell degranulation caused by Enterobius vermicularis, which has not been reported before as a triggering factor. PMID:21906155

  13. Microbiological survey of mice (Mus musculus) purchased from commercial pet shops in Kanagawa and Tokyo, Japan

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHIMOTO, Nobuhito; MORITA, Hanako; ISHIDA, Tomoko; UCHIDA, Ritsuki; TANAKA, Mai; OZAWA, Midori; YASUDA, Masahiko; ITOH, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Information regarding the prevalence of infectious agents in mice in pet shops in Japan is scarce. This information is particularly useful for minimizing the risk of potential transmission of infections to laboratory mice. Therefore, we surveyed infectious agents in mice from pet shops in Kanagawa and Tokyo, Japan. The survey was conducted in 28 mice from 5 pet shops to screen for 47 items (17 viruses, 22 bacteria and fungi, 10 parasites) using culture tests, serology, PCR, and microscopy. The most common viral agent detected was murine norovirus (17 mice; 60.7%), followed by Theilers murine encephalomyelitis virus (13 mice; 46.4%), and mouse hepatitis virus (12 mice; 42.8%). The most common agent amongst the bacteria and fungi was Pasteurella pneumotropica (10 mice; 35.7%), followed by Helicobacter ganmani and Pneumocystis murina (8 mice; 28.5%, for both). Tritrichomonas muris was the most common parasite (19 mice; 67.8%), followed by Spironucleus muris (13 mice; 46.4%), Aspiculuris tetraptera, and Syphacia obvelata (8 mice each; 28.5%). Remarkably, a zoonotic agent, Hymenolepis nana, was found in 7 mice (25%). Given these results, we suggest that the workers in laboratory animal facilities should recognize again the potential risks of mice outside of the laboratory animal facilities as an infectious source, and avoid keeping mice as pets or as feed for carnivorous reptiles as much as possible for risk management. PMID:25502736

  14. Immune responses in children infected with the pinworm Enterobius vermicularis in central Greece.

    PubMed

    Patsantara, G G; Piperaki, E-T; Tzoumaka-Bakoula, C; Kanariou, M G

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested an immunomodulatory and even protective role for Enterobius vermicularis, the least pathogenic human intestinal helminth. Here, in a study using haematological and serological parameters, we tested a total of 215 children from central Greece, with a mean age of 8.39, of whom 105 (48.84%) were infected with E. vermicularis and 110 (51.16%) were matched healthy controls. In particular, we analysed eosinophil counts (EO), serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), total and specific serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and the ECP/EO ratio. The atopic status and the potential occurrence of clinically expressed allergic diseases were both taken into account. Eosinophils, ECP and IgE were found to be higher in infected than in uninfected children, indicating a type-2 immune response activation during infection. Atopic infected children exhibited higher IgE levels compared to non-atopic ones. EO and ECP were found to be lower in atopic children who had a history of allergic disease than in those with no such history. The type-2 oriented immune response elicited against E. vermicularis could contribute to a balanced activation of the immune system in the examined children. Interestingly, although the atopic children showed a stronger activation, they did not exhibit any symptoms and, moreover, there seemed to be some indication of immunosuppression in those children with a positive history of allergic disease. PMID:25989836

  15. Pinworm and TNKS inhibitors, an eccentric duo to derail the oncogenic WNT pathway.

    PubMed

    Ouelaa-Benslama, Radia; Emami, Shahin

    2011-09-01

    The WNT/?-catenin pathway underlies many human cancers through mutations in the APC, ?-catenin, and Axin genes. Activation of WNT signalling can also occur due to the localization of glycogen synthase kinase 3?(GSK3?) to the multivesicular bodies, which prevents the degradation of ?-catenin. This leads to accumulation of ?-catenin within the cytoplasmic matrix and nucleus of cancer cells, which triggers the transactivation of genes involved in cell proliferation, including various oncogenes. Recent research into the mechanistic regulations of molecule homeostasis and identification of new small-targeted inhibitors has provided further insights into the WNT signalling pathway and its role in human cancers. Novel WNT inhibitors target unsuspected cellular enzymes, such as tankyrases, or casein kinase 1?/?, which controls the destruction of ?-catenin and GSK3?. These could lead to the identification of new biomarkers and WNT-targeted inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:21782548

  16. Repurposing the FDA-approved pinworm drug pyrvinium as a novel chemotherapeutic agent for intestinal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Flaveny, Colin A; Giambelli, Camilla; Fei, Dennis Liang; Han, Lu; Hang, Brian I; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Nose, Vania; Burlingame, Oname; Capobianco, Anthony J; Orton, Darren; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the WNT-pathway regulator ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI (APC) promote aberrant activation of the WNT pathway that is responsible for APC-associated diseases such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and 85% of spontaneous colorectal cancers (CRC). FAP is characterized by multiple intestinal adenomas, which inexorably result in CRC. Surprisingly, given their common occurrence, there are few effective chemotherapeutic drugs for FAP. Here we show that the FDA-approved, anti-helminthic drug Pyrvinium attenuates the growth of WNT-dependent CRC cells and does so via activation of CK1?. Furthermore, we show that Pyrvinium can function as an in vivo inhibitor of WNT-signaling and polyposis in a mouse model of FAP: APCmin mice. Oral administration of Pyrvinium, a CK1? agonist, attenuated the levels of WNT-driven biomarkers and inhibited adenoma formation in APCmin mice. Considering its well-documented safe use for treating enterobiasis in humans, our findings suggest that Pyrvinium could be repurposed for the clinical treatment of APC-associated polyposes. PMID:25003333

  17. Repurposing the FDA-Approved Pinworm Drug Pyrvinium as a Novel Chemotherapeutic Agent for Intestinal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Giambelli, Camilla; Fei, Dennis Liang; Han, Lu; Hang, Brian I.; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Nose, Vania; Burlingame, Oname; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Orton, Darren; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the WNT-pathway regulator ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI (APC) promote aberrant activation of the WNT pathway that is responsible for APC-associated diseases such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and 85% of spontaneous colorectal cancers (CRC). FAP is characterized by multiple intestinal adenomas, which inexorably result in CRC. Surprisingly, given their common occurrence, there are few effective chemotherapeutic drugs for FAP. Here we show that the FDA-approved, anti-helminthic drug Pyrvinium attenuates the growth of WNT-dependent CRC cells and does so via activation of CK1α. Furthermore, we show that Pyrvinium can function as an in vivo inhibitor of WNT-signaling and polyposis in a mouse model of FAP: APCmin mice. Oral administration of Pyrvinium, a CK1α agonist, attenuated the levels of WNT-driven biomarkers and inhibited adenoma formation in APCmin mice. Considering its well-documented safe use for treating enterobiasis in humans, our findings suggest that Pyrvinium could be repurposed for the clinical treatment of APC-associated polyposes. PMID:25003333

  18. Recurrent paediatric pinworm infection of the vagina as a potential reservoir for Enterobius vermicularis.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, B; Samantray, J C; Kumar, S; Jhamb, R; Singh, A K; Kaur, I R

    2014-09-01

    Enterobius vermicularis infection remains one of the most common parasitic infections, particularly prevalent in children. Enterobiasis, although not usually dangerous, may cause significant morbidity. Elimination of the parasite from a family or an institution often poses problems, either because of an incomplete cure or re-infection. While there have been limited reports of ectopic enterobiasis throughout the world, ours is probably one of the rarest reports of recurrent vaginal E. vermicularis infection in the absence of any gastrointestinal symptoms despite complete treatment. A 4-year-old girl presented with recurrent episodes of vulval itching on 3-4 occasions over 2 years. There was no pruritis ani nor urinary/gastrointestinal complaints. The vulva was inflamed with 4-5 living worms, 6-7 mm in length, emerging from the anterior vaginal fornix, but with no vaginal discharge. Direct microscopic examination of vaginal swabs revealed adult worms of Enterobius but no eggs. Repeated stool samples from the patient, parents and a sibling were negative. The patient was treated orally with 100 mg of mebendazole for 3 days followed by two more courses at 3-week intervals over a period of 3 months. Recurrent vaginal enterobiasis despite complete treatment and in the absence of any gastrointestinal involvement suggests that the vagina is a potential reservoir for E. vermicularis, which supports the theory of rare ectopic enterobiasis through the ascending pathway of the female genital tract. PMID:23721910

  19. FLOTAC for diagnosis of endo-parasites in pet squirrels in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    d'Ovidio, D; Rinaldi, L; Ianniello, D; Donnelly, T M; Pepe, P; Capasso, M; Cringoli, G

    2014-02-24

    The present study investigated the occurrence of endoparasites in pet squirrels in southern Italy. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 50 asymptomatic pet squirrels belonging to five different species (Callosciurus finlaysonii, n=6, C. prevosti, n=6; Tamias striatus, n=26, T. sibiricus, n=10; Sciurus carolinensis, n=2) housed both in pet shops and/or in private residences. All fecal samples were processed using the FLOTAC pellet technique to identify and count helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts/oocysts. In addition, to detect Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. the samples were analyzed by the Remel Xpect(®) immunoassay. Helminth eggs were detected in 9 out of 50 squirrels. Specifically, eggs of Dicrocoelium dendriticum were found in 5 squirrels (C. finlaysonii, n=2; C. prevosti, n=2; T. striatus, n=1); eggs of the pinworm Syphacia spp. in 3 squirrels (C. prevosti, n=2; T. striatus, n=1); and eggs of gastrointestinal nematoda (Nippostrongylus-like) were found in 1 subject (C. prevosti). Finally, two squirrels (C. prevosti) had multiple parasitic infections with D. dendriticum and Capillaria hepatica, and with D. dendriticum and Strongyloides spp., respectively. None of the samples were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. or Giardia spp. or any other protozoa (e.g. Eimeria). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a D. dendriticum natural infection in pet rodents. PMID:24389007

  20. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) per 500 pounds body weight; removal of large strongyles, pinworms, and bots, 1 bolus per 250 pounds...), large strongyles (Strongylus spp.) bots (Gastrophilus spp.), small strongyles, and pinworms...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) per 500 pounds body weight; removal of large strongyles, pinworms, and bots, 1 bolus per 250 pounds...), large strongyles (Strongylus spp.) bots (Gastrophilus spp.), small strongyles, and pinworms...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) per 500 pounds body weight; removal of large strongyles, pinworms, and bots, 1 bolus per 250 pounds...), large strongyles (Strongylus spp.) bots (Gastrophilus spp.), small strongyles, and pinworms...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) per 500 pounds body weight; removal of large strongyles, pinworms, and bots, 1 bolus per 250 pounds...), large strongyles (Strongylus spp.) bots (Gastrophilus spp.), small strongyles, and pinworms...

  4. WHY MUSEUMS MATTER: A TALE OF PINWORMS (OXYUROIDEA: HETEROXYNEMATIDAE) AMONG PIKAS (OCHOTONA PRINCEPS AND O. COLLARIS) IN THE AMERICAN WEST.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permanent and well supported museum collections provide a solid foundation for the process of systematics research through creation of an empirical record which validates our understanding of the biosphere. We explore the role of museums in ongoing studies of the complex helminth fauna characterist...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1326b - Mebendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (Gastrophilus intestinalis and G. nasalis), large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), large strongyles (Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus, S. vulgaris), small strongyles, and pinworms (Oxyuris equi). (3) Limitations. Do...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1326b - Mebendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (Gastrophilus intestinalis and G. nasalis), large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), large strongyles (Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus, S. vulgaris), small strongyles, and pinworms (Oxyuris equi). (3) Limitations. Do...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2044 - Pyrantel pamoate paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... control of infections from the following mature parasites: large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); small strongyles; pinworms (Oxyuris equi); and large roundworms (Parascaris...

  8. 21 CFR 520.903a - Febantel paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (2) Indications for use. For removal of large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); ascarids (Parascaris equorum— sexually mature and immature); pinworms (Oxyuris equi— adult...

  9. 21 CFR 520.903a - Febantel paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (2) Indications for use. For removal of large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); ascarids (Parascaris equorum— sexually mature and immature); pinworms (Oxyuris equi— adult...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1326b - Mebendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (Gastrophilus intestinalis and G. nasalis), large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), large strongyles (Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus, S. vulgaris), small strongyles, and pinworms (Oxyuris equi). (3) Limitations. Do...

  11. 21 CFR 520.903a - Febantel paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (2) Indications for use. For removal of large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); ascarids (Parascaris equorum— sexually mature and immature); pinworms (Oxyuris equi— adult...

  12. 21 CFR 520.903a - Febantel paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (2) Indications for use. For removal of large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); ascarids (Parascaris equorum— sexually mature and immature); pinworms (Oxyuris equi— adult...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2044 - Pyrantel pamoate paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... control of infections from the following mature parasites: large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); small strongyles; pinworms (Oxyuris equi); and large roundworms (Parascaris...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1326b - Mebendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (Gastrophilus intestinalis and G. nasalis), large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), large strongyles (Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus, S. vulgaris), small strongyles, and pinworms (Oxyuris equi). (3) Limitations. Do...

  15. 21 CFR 520.2044 - Pyrantel pamoate paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... control of infections from the following mature parasites: large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); small strongyles; pinworms (Oxyuris equi); and large roundworms (Parascaris...

  16. 21 CFR 520.2044 - Pyrantel pamoate paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... control of infections from the following mature parasites: large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, S. edentatus, S. equinus); small strongyles; pinworms (Oxyuris equi); and large roundworms (Parascaris...

  17. 21 CFR 520.905b - Fenbendazole granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... large strongyles (Strongylus edentatus, S. equinus, S. vulgaris), small strongyles, pinworms (Oxyuris equi), and ascarids (Parascaris equorum). (iii) Limitations. Sprinkle the appropriate amount of drug...

  18. Distribution of Thelastomatoid Nematodes (Nematoda: Oxyurida) in Endemic and Introduced Cockroaches on the Galpagos Island Archipelago, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, Devinn; Carreno, Ramon A; Herrera, Henri

    2015-08-01

    The thelastomatoid pinworm fauna (Nematoda: Oxyurida: Thelastomatoidea) was surveyed in 3 endemic species and 6 introduced species of cockroach hosts (Insecta: Blattaria) in the Galpagos Islands, Ecuador. A total of 658 host specimens were examined from preserved collections that had been collected between 1966 and 2003 from 7 islands in the archipelago. Eight species of pinworms were identified from these cockroach hosts, including the dominant species Cephalobellus ovumglutinosus and a Severianoia sp. as well as Leidynema appendiculata, Hammerschmidtiella diesingi, an unidentified Cephalobellus species resembling Cephalobellus magalhaesi, an unidentified Protrellus species closely resembling Protrellus shamimi, and an undescribed Blattophila sp. Five new host records are identified for C. ovumglutinosus including the endemic Galpagos cockroaches Chorisoneura carpenteri, Ischnoptera snodgrassii, and Ischnoptera santacruzensis. These endemics were also infected with an undescribed Blatticola sp. Other species recorded resemble known pinworms from other hosts around the world. Prevalence between islands and between host species was variable, but total prevalence for individual pinworm species was consistently low (<10%). A single host specimen examined was infected with more than 1 pinworm species; otherwise only a single species was observed in each infected host. At least 1 introduced pinworm species carried to the islands via invasive cockroach hosts was present in endemic host species, but several globally widespread introduced pinworm species were absent from endemic cockroaches. Santa Cruz was inhabited by the greatest number of pinworm species, likely due to a higher rate of invasive host introduction. This survey, the first from this region, showed that the distribution and transmission of pinworms in the Galpagos Islands is complex and may provide future models of invertebrate dispersal and speciation in an ecosystem already rich with examples of evolution. PMID:25962095

  19. 21 CFR 520.2045 - Pyrantel tartrate powder; pyrantel tartrate pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the following mature parasites: Large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema spp., Triodontophorus), pinworms (Oxyuris), and large... (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2045 - Pyrantel tartrate powder; pyrantel tartrate pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the following mature parasites: Large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema spp., Triodontophorus), pinworms (Oxyuris), and large... (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2045 - Pyrantel tartrate powder; pyrantel tartrate pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the following mature parasites: Large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema spp., Triodontophorus), pinworms (Oxyuris), and large... (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2045 - Pyrantel tartrate powder; pyrantel tartrate pellets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the following mature parasites: Large strongyles (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema spp., Triodontophorus), pinworms (Oxyuris), and large... (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, Strongylus equinus), small strongyles (Trichonema...

  3. Trypanoxyuris atelis and T. atelophora (Nematoda: Oxyuridae) in wild spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in tropical rain forest in Mexico: Morphological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Solórzano-García, Brenda; Nadler, Steven A; de León, Gerardo Pérez Ponce

    2015-10-01

    Two species of pinworms, Trypanoxyuris atelis and Trypanoxyuris atelophora were collected from the black-handed spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) in several localities across southeastern Mexico, representing the first record for both species in Mexican primates. Identification of pinworm species was based on morphological and molecular data. These pinworms are distinguished from other congeners, and from each other, by the buccal structure, the lateral alae, and the morphology of the oesophagus. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene placed T. atelis as the sister species of Trypanoxyuris minutus, a parasite of the howler monkey Alouatta palliata, and T. atelophora as the sister species of T. microon, a parasite of the night monkey, Aotus azarae. These relationships were supported with high posterior probability values by Bayesian inference. Comparisons of additional pinworm taxa from Neotropical primates are needed to assess oxyurid diversity, and to better understand the evolutionary relationships among these nematodes and their primate hosts. PMID:25748278

  4. Itching

    MedlinePlus

    ... or wool) Dry skin Hives Insect bites and stings Parasites such as pinworm , body lice , head lice , ... the skin will help you identify any bites, stings, rashes, dry skin, or irritation. Often the cause ...

  5. Mebendazole

    MedlinePlus

    Mebendazole, an antiworm medication, kills parasites. It is used to treat roundworm, hookworm, pinworm, whipworm, and other ... Mebendazole comes as a chewable tablet. It usually is taken twice a day, in the morning and ...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1802b - Piperazine-carbon disulfide complex boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...), large strongyles (Strongylus spp.) bots (Gastrophilus spp.), small strongyles, and pinworms (Oxyuris equi).1 (3) Limitations. Withhold feed overnight or for 8 to 10 hours. Give water just before...

  7. Dipylidium caninum in a 4-month old male.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Tabitha; Zitzmann, Michele B

    2011-01-01

    Dipylidium caninum, known as the double-pored dog tapeworm, is a parasite that commonly infects dogs and cats worldwide. Humans may be an accidental host if the infective stage, the cysticercoid larva, is ingested. Although rare, it is more commonly seen in infants and children. This case study involves an infant misdiagnosed with pinworm infection twice before a laboratory evaluation was able to confirm Dipylidium caninum. Accurate diagnosis is important, as treatment for pinworm infection will not eliminate Dipylidium caninum. PMID:22288218

  8. Transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis: evaluation of the role of Enterobius vermicularis.

    PubMed

    Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Kurt, Ozgür; Kilimcioğlu, Ali A; Ok, Ulgen Z

    2008-03-01

    The role of Enterobius vermicularis in the transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis has been evaluated in two groups of patients admitted to the Parasitology Laboratory of Celal Bayar University: one group with E. vermicularis infection (n=187, Pinworm Group), and the other with D. fragilis infection (n=126, Dientamoeba Group). The presence of the other parasite, pinworm or Dientamoeba, was investigated with the microscopic examination of cellophane tape and stool samples for three consecutive days. In the Pinworm Group, 9.6% of the patients were found to be coinfected with D. fragilis, while 25.4% of the patients in the Dientamoeba Group were found to be coinfected with pinworms. The coincidence rates of D. fragilis and E. vermicularis, higher than the prevalence of each parasite in similar populations, suggest a common relation between these two parasites, possibly in entering the human body. E. vermicularis infection was found to be significantly more common in younger children (p<0.001), indicating that younger children may also be at higher risk for D. fragilis infection. These findings also raise the question of whether the unrelated symptoms of the pinworm infected patients such as abdominal pain and diarrhea may actually be due to overlooked Dientamoeba infections. PMID:17921047

  9. DNA of Dientamoeba fragilis detected within surface-sterilized eggs of Enterobius vermicularis.

    PubMed

    Röser, Dennis; Nejsum, Peter; Carlsgart, Anne Josefine; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2013-01-01

    With no evidence of a cyst stage, the mode of transmission of Dientamoeba fragilis, an intestinal protozoon of common occurrence and suggested pathogenicity, is incompletely known. Numerous studies have suggested that eggs of intestinal nematodes, primarily Enterobius vermicularis (pinworm), can serve as vectors for D. fragilis, although attempts to culture D. fragilis from pinworm eggs have been unsuccessful and data from epidemiological studies on D. fragilis/pinworm co-infection have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate whether we could detect D. fragilis DNA from pinworm eggs collected from routine diagnostic samples (cellophane tape) and surface-sterilised by hypochlorite. DNA was extracted from individual eggs and tested by PCR using D. fragilis- and E. vermicularis-specific primers; amplicons were sequenced for confirmation. In cellophane tape samples from 64 patients with unknown D. fragilis status we detected D. fragilis DNA in 12/238 (5%) eggs, and in a patient known to harbour D. fragilis we detected D. fragilis DNA in 39/99 (39%) eggs. The finding of D. fragilis DNA within eggs of E. vermicularis strongly supports the hypothesis of D. fragilis-transmission by pinworm and has implications for antimicrobial intervention as well as control and public health measures. PMID:23116599

  10. Negligible Egg Positive Rate of Enterobius vermicularis and No Detection of Head Lice among Orphanage Children in Busan and Ulsan, Korea (2014).

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Son, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Sang Hwa; Park, Mi Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Sang Kyun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Park, Jung Ha; Yu, Hak-Sun

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether pinworm infections and head lice infestations spread among children in orphanages, 117 children from 4 orphanages in Busan-si and Ulsan-si, Korea, were examined for enterobiasis and head lice infestation between January and February 2014. The overall rate of Enterobius vermicularis egg positivity was 0.85%, whereas none of the children had head lice infestations. The rate of pinworm infection was much lower among the orphanage children compared to the rates observed in previous studies among kindergarten and primary school students. Moreover, the risk factors for enterobiasis were less frequent among these subjects than previously reported. The personal hygiene and health of the orphanage children were supervised by a regular, employed nurse through a health education program. In conclusion, pinworm infection was efficiently controlled among the children in orphanages, and this might be related to good personal hygiene practices in Korea. PMID:26323851

  11. Negligible Egg Positive Rate of Enterobius vermicularis and No Detection of Head Lice among Orphanage Children in Busan and Ulsan, Korea (2014)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Son, Hyun-Mi; Lee, Sang Hwa; Park, Mi Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Sang Kyun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Park, Jung Ha; Yu, Hak-Sun

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether pinworm infections and head lice infestations spread among children in orphanages, 117 children from 4 orphanages in Busan-si and Ulsan-si, Korea, were examined for enterobiasis and head lice infestation between January and February 2014. The overall rate of Enterobius vermicularis egg positivity was 0.85%, whereas none of the children had head lice infestations. The rate of pinworm infection was much lower among the orphanage children compared to the rates observed in previous studies among kindergarten and primary school students. Moreover, the risk factors for enterobiasis were less frequent among these subjects than previously reported. The personal hygiene and health of the orphanage children were supervised by a regular, employed nurse through a health education program. In conclusion, pinworm infection was efficiently controlled among the children in orphanages, and this might be related to good personal hygiene practices in Korea. PMID:26323851

  12. Efficacy of pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin paste formulations against naturally acquired Oxyuris equi infections in horses.

    PubMed

    Reinemeyer, Craig R; Prado, Julio C; Nichols, Eric C; Marchiondo, Alan A

    2010-07-15

    In recent years, numerous veterinary practitioners have reported anecdotal episodes in which anthelmintic treatment did not appear to deliver the expected efficacy against equine pinworms (Oxyuris equi). Anthelmintic resistance has not been demonstrated formally in equine pinworms, so a clinical study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of paste formulations of pyrantel pamoate or ivermectin against naturally acquired infections with O. equi. Twenty-one horses (>4 months to 15 years of age) with patent, naturally acquired pinworm infections were blocked by source of origin and allocated randomly to one of three treatment groups: horses (n=7) assigned to Group 1 were treated orally with pyrantel pamoate paste at a dosage of 13.2 mg/kg (2x label dosage), Group 2 horses (n=7) were untreated controls, and horses (n=7) assigned to Group 3 were treated orally with ivermectin paste at a dosage of 200 microg/kg. Fourteen days after treatment, horses were euthanatized, necropsied, and large intestinal contents were processed for recovery of adult pinworms. In addition, duplicate 1% aliquots of intestinal contents from the cecum, ventral colon, dorsal colon, and small colon were collected, preserved, and examined for recovery and enumeration of fourth-stage larval O. equi. Anthelmintic efficacy against pinworms was evaluated by comparing the post-treatment worm counts of Groups 1 and 3 to those of control animals. Mean numbers of O. equi adults recovered postmortem were significantly decreased by both pyrantel pamoate (P=0.0366) and ivermectin (P=0.0137) treatment, with respective efficacies of 91.2% and 96.0%. In addition, both products demonstrated >99% efficacy against fourth-stage O. equi larvae. The current study demonstrated acceptable adulticidal and larvicidal efficacy of both pyrantel pamoate and ivermectin paste formulations against O. equi and did not support the existence of macrocyclic lactone or pyrimidine resistance in the pinworm populations evaluated. PMID:20307935

  13. Vaginal itching and discharge - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... considered and addressed. A foreign body such as toilet paper or a crayon a young girl may place in the vagina. An infection with a discharge may occur if the foreign object remains in the vagina. Pinworms (a parasite infection mainly affecting children)

  14. Infectious Diseases: Current Issues in School and Community Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Wilma; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Some children in American schools have known and unknown communicable diseases, including herpes, cytomegalovirus, AIDS, mononucleosis, pinworms, and hepatitis. This article examines major public health issues, school responsibility, preventative measures (like basic hygiene), and the need for more effective community education programs. A disease

  15. Infectious Diseases: Current Issues in School and Community Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Wilma; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Some children in American schools have known and unknown communicable diseases, including herpes, cytomegalovirus, AIDS, mononucleosis, pinworms, and hepatitis. This article examines major public health issues, school responsibility, preventative measures (like basic hygiene), and the need for more effective community education programs. A disease…

  16. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  17. 21 CFR 520.1194 - Ivermectin meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults): Trichostrongylus axei.... including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Dictyocaulus...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1192 - Ivermectin paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Petrovinema poculatum; Small Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults...): Gasterophilus spp. including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1192 - Ivermectin paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Petrovinema poculatum; Small Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults...): Gasterophilus spp. including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1194 - Ivermectin meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults): Trichostrongylus axei.... including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Dictyocaulus...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1192 - Ivermectin paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Petrovinema poculatum; Small Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults...): Gasterophilus spp. including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1192 - Ivermectin paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Petrovinema poculatum; Small Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults...): Gasterophilus spp. including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1194 - Ivermectin meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults): Trichostrongylus axei.... including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Dictyocaulus...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1192 - Ivermectin paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Petrovinema poculatum; Small Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults...): Gasterophilus spp. including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1194 - Ivermectin meal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Strongyles (fourth-stage larvae); Pinworms (adults and fourth stage larvae): Oxyuris equi; Ascarids (adults and third- and fourth-stage larvae): Parascaris equorum; Hairworms (adults): Trichostrongylus axei.... including G. intestinalis and G. nasalis; Lungworms (adults and fourth-stage larvae): Dictyocaulus...

  6. Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Enterobius vermicularis and Development of an 18S Ribosomal DNA-Targeted Diagnostic PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Zelck, Ulrike E.; Bialek, Ralf; Weiß, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We genetically characterized pinworms obtained from 37 children from different regions of Germany and established new species-specific molecular diagnostic tools. No ribosomal DNA diversity was found; the phylogenetic position of Enterobius vermicularis within the Oxyurida order and its close relationship to the Ascaridida and Spirurida orders was confirmed. PMID:21248085

  7. Worms: transmission from animals to man.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G R

    1977-05-01

    It is useful to know that household pets are not involved in the life cycles of some worms, for example, pinworms. Some worms require a household pet in their cycles: the dog and cat roundworms, heartworms, and the dog and cat hookworms, the larvae of which are responsible for cutaneous larva migrans. Strongyloides (threadworm) infestation is sometimes difficult to diagnose and may be traced directly to the family dog. PMID:16475

  8. The helminthic parasites of rodents in Dakahlia Governorate, with reference to their Egyptian helminth fauna.

    PubMed

    el Shazly, A M; Morsy, T A; el Kady, G A; Ragheb, D A; Handousa, A E; Ahmed, M M; Younis, T A; Habib, K S

    1994-08-01

    No doubt, rodents are among the most important reservoirs of zoonotic diseases. This paper aimed to survey the helminth fauna of the different species of rodents in Dakahlia Governorate. Eight species of rodents were encountered in the different centers examined. A total of fifteen species of helminthic parasites were found. They belong to four classes: Trematoda five species: H. heterophyes, H. pumilio, H. yokogawai, S. tridactyla and E. callawayensis, Cestoidea three species: H diminuta, H. nana and T. taeniaeformis, Nematoda six species: A. cantonensis, T. muris, C. hepatica, S. obvelata, S. muris, S. ratti, and Archiacanthocephala one species: M. moniliformis. The medical and/or veterinary importance of these parasites were discussed. It was concluded that rodents are the most serious source of zoonotic parasites. PMID:8077761

  9. Growth of Enterobius vermicularis in a chimpanzee after anthelmintic treatment.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tadao; Murata, Koichi; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Hasegawa, Hideo

    2003-06-01

    The growth of Enterobius vermicularis in a chimpanzee was investigated by observing worms discharged in feces after administration of pyrantel pamoate. Just after the final molting, immature adult male pinworms developed to a fully mature stage in 2 wk, after passing through a stage corresponding to the so-called Enterobius gregorii, which was surmised to be a younger adult form of E. vermicularis. The frequency distribution of body length forms 2 peaks in both male and female pinworms, with a depression in the transitional forms from the immature to the fully mature stage. This depression seems to be the result of more rapid growth or lower susceptibility to the drug in this transitional stage. Pyrantel pamoate effectively eradicated mature males, but gravid females were continuously observed in the feces after treatment. The complete eradication of pinworm infection by pyrantel pamoate could be achieved by repeated treatment at intervals shorter than 2 wk. This treatment would eradicate male worms first, resulting in females producing only unfertilized eggs, from which only males might hatch. PMID:12880239

  10. Parasites found from the feces of Bornean orangutans in Danum Valley, Sabah, Malaysia, with a redescription of Pongobius hugoti and the description of a new species of Pongobius (Nematoda: Oxyuridae).

    PubMed

    Kuze, Noko; Kanamori, Tomoko; Malim, Titol Peter; Bernard, Henry; Zamma, Koichiro; Kooriyama, Takanori; Morimoto, Azusa; Hasegawa, Hideo

    2010-10-01

    In order to obtain basic data on parasitic infections of Bornean orangutans, Pongo pygmaeus morio (Owen, 1837), in Danum Valley, Sabah, Malaysia, fecal examinations were conducted. Based on a total of 73 fecal samples from 25 individuals, cysts of Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba spp., and Chilomastix mesnili, cysts and trophozoites of Balantidium coli, and eggs of Trichuris sp. or spp., unknown strongylid(s), Strongyloides fuelleborni, and an unknown oxyurid, plus a rhabditoid larva of Strongyloides sp., were found. Mature and immature worms of Pongobius hugoti Baruš et al., 2007 and Pongobius foitovae n. sp. (Oxyuridae: Enterobiinae) were recovered from fecal debris and described. Pongobius foitovae is readily distinguished from P. hugoti by having a much longer esophageal corpus, a longer and distally hooked spicule in males, and a more posteriorly positioned vulva in female. Presence of plural species of non- Enterobius pinworms is a remarkable feature of the orangutan-pinworm relationship, which may reflect speciation process of the orangutans, host switching, and coevolution by pinworms. PMID:20950104

  11. Pin Worms Presenting as Suspected Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saffar, Farah; Najjar, Nimeh; Ibrahim, Saif; Clark, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 24 Final Diagnosis: Pinworms infection Symptoms: Abdominal pain • bloating Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Colonoscopy and biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is well recognized in developed countries and is generally among the differential diagnoses of young patients presenting with refractory diarrhea once other more common etiologies have been excluded. Pinworm infections, on the other hand, are not as common among adults in the United States. Case Report: Based on computed tomography features, a 24-year-old female patient with a history of multiple autoimmune disorders presented with abdominal pain and was diagnosed recently with Crohn’s disease. Colonoscopy was significant for pinworms seen throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy was negative for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related changes. Conclusions: The diagnosis of IBD is a serious label that requires biopsy confirmation before committing to possibly lifelong treatment and possible adverse effects. Even in the most typical patient and when the presentation and imaging are classical, uncommon conditions (like Enterobius infection in this case) may preclude appropriate diagnosis and management. PMID:26471462

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Oxyuris equi: Comparison with other closely related species and phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Wen-Wen; Guo, Dong-Hui; Liu, Ze-Xuan; Duan, Hong; Su, Xin; Fu, Xue; Yue, Dong-Mei; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Chun-Ren

    2015-12-01

    The equine pinworm Oxyuris equi (Nematoda: Oxyuridomorpha) is the most common horse nematode, has a worldwide distribution, and causes major economic losses. In the present study, the complete O. equi mitochondrial (mt) genome was sequenced, and the mt genome structure and organization were compared with those of other closely related pinworm species, Enterobius vermicularis and Wellcomia siamensis. The O. equi mt genome is a 13,641-bp circular DNA molecule that encodes 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs, and two rRNAs) and one non-coding region, which is slightly shorter than that of E. vermicularis and W. siamensis. The O. equi mt gene arrangement was consistent with that of GA13-type E. vermicularis but it differs from GA12-type W. siamensis. Phylogenetic analyses using concatenated amino acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes with three different computational algorithms (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference) revealed that there were two distinct clades in Chromadorea nematodes that reflected infraorder. Spiruromorpha formed one clade, whereas Rhabditomorpha, Ascaridomorpha, and Oxyuridomorpha formed another clade. O. equi, E. vermicularis, and W. siamensis represent distinct but closely related species, which indicated that Oxyuridomorpha is paraphyletic. Sequencing the O. equi mt genome provides novel genetic markers for studying the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of pinworms. PMID:26452611

  13. Evaluation of anthelmintic treatment of Enterobius vermicularis infection in highly endemic population by prolonged observation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung Yull; Ahn, Young Rak; Ryang, Yong Suk; Seo, Byong Seol

    1977-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of anthelmintic treatment of Enterobius vermicularis in highly endemic population, total 82 children in two orphanage institutes were divided into 4 groups and treated with placebo, 5 mg/kg of pyrvinium pamoate, 100 mg of mebendazole and 10 mg/kg of pyrantel pamoate respectively. Total 4 anal swabs were taken from each child before treatment and the even distributions of positive rate and consecutive results between groups were considered. Follow-up swabs were taken 8 times up to the 40th day after treatment. After remarkable and significant reduction of positive rates up to 19-27th day after treatment in respective groups, the remarkable egg positive conversions were observed 3-4 weeks after treatment. The positive conversion was the earliest and the most remarkable in pyrantel-treated children and the slowest and the least remarkable in mebendazole-treated cases. Also found was that the figures of negative conversion were different with statistical significance between two categories of cases, consecutively positive and alternately positive cases of pre-treatment swabs. This means that the conventional indices of cure rate in E. vermicularis infection may be variable by the selection of subjected cases. Above results mean that the spectrum of susceptible pinworms according to the developmental stages are different between currently available drugs, and the ability to remove pinworms completely in certain developmental stage are also different between chemotherapeutics. These results suggest the need of interval chemotherapy of Enterobius vermicularis infection in heavily infected cases of in highly endemic population to achieve the complete eradication of whole range of pinworms in intestine. PMID:12913423

  14. Dientamoeba fragilis. An unusual intestinal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Butler, W P

    1996-09-01

    This is a case report of a gastrointestinal infection caused by Dientamoeba fragilis. It is a flagellate protozoan that is an uncommon etiology of gastrointestinal disease. Primarily characterized by diarrhea and abdominal pain, other symptoms such as flatulence, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, malaise, and weight loss occur. Diagnosis is made using multiple fresh stool samples that are preserved and permanently stained looking for the typical binucleate trophozoite. Since there is a distinct association with Enterobius vermicularis (possibly the mode of protozoan transmission), the human pinworm is also sought. Treatment of choice consists of diiodohydroxyquin in adults and metronidazole in children. PMID:8794799

  15. Helminth parasites in black rats (Rattus rattus) and brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) from different environments in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Frits; Swart, Arno; van Knapen, Frans; van der Giessen, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Background Rattus norvegicus (brown rat) and Rattus rattus (black rat) are known carriers of bacteria, viruses, and parasites of zoonotic and veterinary importance. Moreover, rats may play a role in the transmission of muscle larvae of the zoonotic nematode Trichinella spiralis to farm animals. We aimed to study the intestinal and intramuscular helminths in wild rats from three different environments to assess the relevance of rats as carrier of zoonotic parasites for public health. Materials and methods Wild brown rats (117 individuals) and black rats (44 individuals) were captured at farms, in suburban and in rural environments in the Netherlands. Intestinal helminths were isolated and identified morphologically. Artificial digestion was used to isolate muscle larvae. Results and discussion Morphological analysis of rat intestinal contents yielded six nematode species (Syphacia muris, Heterakis spumosa, Aonchotheca murissylvatici, Trichuris muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, and Strongyloides sp.), three cestode species (Hymenolepis diminuta, H. nana and Hymenolepis (=Rodentolepis) fraterna), and four trematode species (Plagiorchis muris, Plagiorchis proximus, Echinostoma chloropodis, and Notocotylus imbricatus). Black rats at farms displayed the lowest intestinal helminth species variation (six species) and carried overall on average 0.93 species simultaneously. In comparison, brown rats at farms carried seven helminth species and 1.91 species simultaneously. Brown rats from suburban environments displayed the highest species variation (11 species) at 1.82 simultaneous helminth species. Absence of trematodes from rats at farms may suggest limited exchange of rats between farms and surrounding wet rural environments. We report four species of veterinary (Syphacia muris) or zoonotic relevance (Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana and Plagiorchis muris). We did not find Trichinella muscle larvae, consistent with long-term prevalence in Dutch wild rats. PMID:27193418

  16. [Survey on human soil-borne nematode infection in Xining City].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sheng-Hu; Han, Xiu-Min; Lei, Wen

    2013-02-01

    Five fields were selected from Xining City by stratified cluster sampling method for the survey. 4589 people above 3 years old were examined for nematode infections using Kato-Katz method and children under 12 years old were detected for pinworm infection using transparent tape method from June to August in 2011. The results showed that the total nematode infection rate was 3.0% (136/4 589) with the highest of 3.8% (123/3284) in rural area. The major species was Ascaris lumbricoides, and the infection rate in 15-20 age group was 1.5% (4/264), which was significantly lower than that of the age groups of 60-70 (6.9%, 23/335), above 70 (5.3%, 6/114) and of 10-15 (5.1%, 19/372)(P<0.05). The prevalence of A. lumbricoides among the preschool children (9.5%, 12/127) was statistically higher than those in other occupation groups (P<0.05), and the infection rate showed no statistical significance by gender, ethnic and degree of education (P>0.05). Pinworm infection in children under 12 years old was only 0.5% (2/437). PMID:24812844

  17. [Investigation of Soil-Transmitted Nematode Infections in Xuchang City of Henan Province in 2012].

    PubMed

    PENG, Jin-hua

    2015-10-01

    The Weidu District, Yanling County and Yuzhou City were selected in Xuchang City for investigation of the status of soil-transmitted nematode infections in 2012, in accordance with the National Monitoring Program for Soil-Transmitted Nematodiasis (2011 Revised Edition). Kato-Katz technique was used to detect soil- transmitted nematodes in feces of residents over 3 years old, and the cellophane tape peri-anal swab method was used to detect pinworm eggs in children between 3-12 years. A total of 2 991 fecal samples were examined. The total infection rate of soil-transmitted nematodiasis was 4.3%(128/2 991), decreased by 63.0% and 55.1% when compared with that in 2010 (11.6%) and that in Henan Province in 2004 (9.5%) respectively. The infection rates of roundworms, whipworms, hookworms and pinworms were 3.7%(110/2 991), 0.3%(9/2 991) , 0.1%(3/2 991) , and 0.2% ( 6/2 991) , respectively, all showing mild intensity of infection. The infection rate of soil-transmitted nematodiasis was highest in farmers (5.5%, 113/2 059), followed by children (3.1%, 3/98). PMID:26931049

  18. [Effects of tomato genotypes and aqueous extracts of Melia azedarach leaves and Azadirachta indica seeds on Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae)].

    PubMed

    Brunherotto, Rogério; Vendramim, José D; de G Oriani, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    Insecticide plants are an important tool among the new alternatives for pest control in IPM systems because they reduce the use of synthetic insecticides, preserving human health and the environment. We investigated the effects of aqueous extracts of Melia azedarach leaves and Azadirachta indica seeds and three tomato genotypes, 'Santa Clara', 'IPA-5'--Solanum lycopersicum (=Lycopersicon esculentum Mill), and LA444-1--S. peruvianum (=L. peruvianum), on the development, reproduction and longevity of the tomato pinworm Tuta absoluta (Meyrick), under laboratory conditions. The trials were set up in a completely randomized design, with nine treatments [three genotypes x two extracts (M. azedarach and A. indica) and control]. The replication consisted on five tubes, each with three newly hatched larvae, totalizing 90 individuals per treatment. The larvae were fed with tomato leaves treated with aqueous extracts at 0.1% concentration or distilled water (control) and daily observed until adults' emergence. Larval and pupal development and mortality, pupal weight, longevity and fecundity were evaluated. The accession LA444-1 negatively affected the development and reproduction of T. absoluta; the tomato pinworm had similar development and reproduction on 'IPA-5' and 'Santa Clara' (the susceptible control). The association of resistant tomato genotypes and extracts of M. azedarach leaves and neem seeds did not result in synergistic or antagonistic effects on T. absoluta. PMID:21120389

  19. Critical tests with oxibendazole against gastrointestinal parasites of ponies.

    PubMed

    Nawalinski, T; Theodorides, V J

    1976-04-01

    Twenty ponies were allotted to 4 groups of 5 ponies each, and oxibendazole was orally administered at dose levels of 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg. In the 3 groups of ponies given the largest doses, efficacy against 3 species of Strongylus was between 92 and 100% and that against small strongylids of the genera Cyathostomum, Cylicocyclus, Cylicodontophorus, and Cylicostephanus was more than 99%. All adults and 95 to 100% of larvae of the pinworm Oxyuris equi were removed. In the group of ponies given 5 mg/kg, 86 to 100% of the large strongylids and 84 to 100% of the small strongylids were removed, as were all larval and adult pinworms. Trichostrongylus axei was found only in 4 of the 5 ponies given 5 mg/kg; results were encouraging, but not consistent. Almost all of the Parascaris equorum were found in this group of ponies; no anthelmintic activity was detected at this dose level. Oxibendazole removed approximately 99% of small strongylid 4th-stage larvae. No efficacy against the larval stages of Gasterophilus intestinalis and against Habronema spp and Setaria equina was observed. PMID:1267243

  20. Macrocyclic lactones for parasite control in equids.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C

    2012-05-01

    Macrocyclic lactones (MLs) revolutionized parasite control in horses and other animals. They are unique in that they are effective against arthropods and nematodes. The first of the widely used avermectins was ivermectin. In 1983, it was marketed for use in horses as an injectable formulation but was withdrawn in 1984 after about a year and half on the market because of adverse problems. It was replaced by a paste formulation and an oral/stomach tube liquid formulation. Ivermectin is highly active on bots, ascarids, large and small strongyles, pinworms, strongyloides, stomach worms, and some other internal parasite species. Another ML, moxidectin, became available in 1997 as a gel formulation for oral administration. The parasiticidal activity of this compound is similar to ivermectin except efficacy is less on the common bot (Gastrophilus intestinalis) but high on encysted small strongyles. Recently however lower than initial activity on ascarids and small strongyles has been found for both ivermectin and moxidectin. PMID:22039797

  1. Prospects for the biological control of Tuta absoluta in tomatoes of the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Urbaneja, Alberto; González-Cabrera, Joel; Arnó, Judit; Gabarra, Rosa

    2012-09-01

    Since its detection in the Mediterranean basin at the end of 2006 and later in other European countries, the South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick), has become a serious threat to tomato crops. In newly infested areas, it is especially problematic during the first years of its presence. Nevertheless, after 2-3 years, the incidence of T. absoluta has become less severe in certain areas. There are several factors contributing to this decline, such as the increase in growers' knowledge of pest behaviour and biology and the correct application of integrated pest control strategies. The impact of opportunistic native natural enemies (fortuitous biological control) should be considered as one of the key factors in this decline. In this review, available information on indigenous natural enemies is updated, and the current pest management approaches used against T. absoluta are addressed. Finally, future scenarios for biological control of this pest are discussed. PMID:22730076

  2. Enterobius vermicularis infection of the liver in a patient with colorectal carcinoma with suspected liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Furnée, Edgar J B; Spoto, Clothaire; de Graaf, Melanie J; Smakman, Niels

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man diagnosed with cT3N2 adenocarcinoma of the rectum presented with a synchronous solitary liver metastasis on CT scan. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was started to downstage the primary tumour. Resection of the rectal tumour followed 3 months after the last radiotherapy session and primary resection of the isolated liver lesion was performed in the intervening period. Histopathological assessment of the liver lesion, however, showed no malignancy, but did reveal a necrotic infection due to Enterobius vermicularis. This parasite is frequently found in the intestines, but only rarely infects the liver. The patient was subsequently treated with the anthelmintic drug mebendazole 100 mg once a week for 2 weeks. Histopathological assessment of the rectal specimen showed complete regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy without evidence of remaining E. vermicularis, suggesting pinworm eradication. The patient recovered promptly after both surgical procedures. PMID:26546623

  3. Critical tests of anthelmintic activity of a paste formulation of thiabendazole in horses.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Drudge, J H; Tolliver, S C

    1976-06-01

    Critical tests of the activity on large strongyles, ascarids, mature pinworms, and bots were carried out in 11 horses intraorally treated with a paste formulation of thiabendazole. The dose level of 44 mg/kg was administered to 3 horses, and the dose level of 88 mg/kg to 8 horses. Removals of Strongylus vulgaris and mature Oxyuris equi were 100% at the 2 dose levels, and efficacy against Strongylus edentatus varied from 95 to 99% and 89 to 100% for the 44- and the 88-mg/kg dose levels, respectively. Strongylus equinus was completely removed from the 1 infected horse treated at the dose level of 88 mg/kg. Activity of the smaller dose against Parascaris equorum was 46%, and that of the larger dose varied from 32 to 100%. The drug was inactive on Gasterophilus intestinalis and Gasterophilus nasalis. PMID:937790

  4. Oxibendazole: critical anthelmintic trials in equids.

    PubMed

    Kates, K C; Colglazier, M L; Enzie, F D

    1975-12-01

    The efficacy of oxibendazole against gastrointestinal parasites of horses was evaluated by the critical test method. Naturally infected ponies of various ages were given single oral doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg-kg of bodyweight. The drug was highly effective against adult large strongylids (Strongylus vulgaris, S edentatus, S equins), adult small strongylids (especially species of the genera Cylicostephanus, Cylicocyclus, Cyaathostomum, and Triodontophorus), and adult and larval stages of the large pinworm, Oxyuris equi. There was no apparent dose-related differences in efficacy. Oxibendazole was less effective against fourth-stage small strongylid larvae than it was against adults. The drug was inactive against stomach bots (Gasterophilus spp), tapeworms (Anoplocephala magna and A perfoliata), lungworms (Dictyocaulus arnfieldi), abdominal worms )Setaria equina), and mature or immature nematodes in locations other than the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:1216434

  5. Shutting down a working vivarium for decontamination.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Jori; Wallace, Michelle; Tackett, Jamie; Jiron, Ursula; Collins, Jan; Warder, Char; Richardson, Laura; Bell, Lorraine; Russell, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    Handling a rodent disease outbreak in a facility can be a challenge. After the University of Colorado Denver Office of Laboratory Animal Resources enhanced its sentinel monitoring program, > 90% of the animal colonies housed in a vivarium at the Anschutz Medical Campus (with an area of 50,000 net ft(2)), serving the labs of > 250 principal investigators, tested positive for multiple infective agents including mouse parvovirus, fur mites, pinworms and epizootic diarrhea of infant mice. The authors detail the process by which they planned and executed a shutdown and a decontamination of the facility, which involved the rederivation or cryopreservation of > 400 unique genetically modified mouse lines. The authors discuss the aspects of the project that were successful as well as those that could have been improved. PMID:25050729

  6. Morphological Observation Of Enterobius Vermicularis Expelled By Various Anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung Yull; Hong, Sung Tae; Kang, Shin Yong; Song, Chul Yong

    1981-08-01

    When enterobiasis cases were treated with anthelmintics only for one time, the interval to recurrence was variable by different drugs used. And this phenomenon is supposedly connected with biological or developmental cycle of the worm and the consequent efficacy of the different anthelmintics. This study was undertaken to confirm this fact by studying the expelled worms morphologically to correlate the anthelmintics efficacy and stage of worm development in Enterobius vermicularis. A total of 131 children in 3 orphanages was examined by 4 anal swabs (mean positive rate, 80%). They were randomized into 5 experimental groups. Each group was treated with placebo, mebendazole, pyrantel, pyrvinium, and piperazine (70 mg/kg, single dose) respectively. After treatment, all stool were collected for 3 days to get the expelled Enterobius. A total of 6,165 pinworms was studied under the microscope. The sex was discriminated and the length was individually measured. A number of male pinworms was collected in all groups. Females of 2~11 mm in length were also collected in 5 groups. However, significantly larger number of short females was observed in mebendazole group compared with other groups. Twenty-one days after the first treatment, all children were again treated with mebendazole. Once more stool were examined. A total of 1,853 worms was collected. In mebendazole group, there were no females longer than 8.74 mm in the second treatment. In pyrvinium group, 8.31mm in lenght was the longest for female. However in control, pyrantel and piperazine groups, females of 2~11 mm in length were collected. From above results, one could conclude that the removing ability of mebendazole and pyrvinium was satisfactory for the worms in the early stage of development in Enterobius. Pyrantel and single dose of piperazine showed less effective in worm reduction ability especially on those at the early stages. PMID:12902715

  7. Efficacy of Direct Detection of Pathogens in Naturally Infected Mice by Using a High-Density PCR Array

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Kenneth S; Perkins, Cheryl L; Havens, Richard B; Kelly, Mee-Jin E; Francis, Brian C; Dole, Vandana S; Shek, William R

    2013-01-01

    We used a high-density array of real-time PCR assays for commonly reported rodent infectious agents (PRIA) to test naturally infected index mice and sentinel mice exposed by contact and soiled-bedding transfer. PRIA detected 14 pathogensincluding viruses, bacteria, fur mites, pinworms, and enteric protozoain 97.2% of 28 pooled fecal samples, furperianal swabs, and oral swabs from 4 cages containing a total of 10 index mice. Among these pathogens, PRIA (like conventional health monitoring methods) failed to detect Mycoplasma pulmonis, Pasteurella pneumotropica, and Giardia spp. in all of the 9 contact and 9 soiled-bedding sentinels. PRIA demonstrated murine adenovirus and Cryptosporidium and Spironucleus spp. in contact but not soiled-bedding sentinels and detected Helicobacter and pinworms in fewer than half of the soiled-bedding sentinels. Of the 4 species of Helicobacter that species-specific PCR assays identified in index mice, only H. ganmani was found in soiled-bedding and contact sentinels. PRIA detected all of the pathogens in sentinels that were identified by conventional methods. Myobia musculi was detected by PCR in index and sentinel mice but missed by conventional parasitologic examinations. In summary, PRIA reproducibly detected diverse pathogens in heavily pooled specimens collected noninvasively from infected index mice antemortem. The inability of PRIA and conventional health monitoring methods (that is, parasitology, microbiology, and serology) to demonstrate transmission of some pathogens to contact sentinels and the inefficient transmission of others to soiled-bedding sentinels underscores the importance of direct PCR testing to determine the pathogen status of rodents in quarantine and during routine colony surveillance. PMID:24351765

  8. Gastrointestinal helminth parasites of the black rat (Rattus rattus) in Abeokuta, southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Mafiana, C F; Osho, M B; Sam-Wobo, S

    1997-09-01

    A survey of 612 black rats, Rattus rattus (282 mates and 330 females), for infections with helminth parasites was carried out in Abeokuta, in southwest Nigeria. Three hundred and ninety six (64.7%) were infected with one or more of seven species of helminths comprising three cestodes (Hymenolepis diminuta, Taenia taeniaeformis (cyst) and Raillietina sp.) three nematodes (Mastophorus muris, Trichuris muris and Syphacia sp.) and one acanthocephalan (Moniliformis moniliformis). Although the prevalence of infection in males (76.6%) was more than in females (54.5%) (P<0.01), there was no difference in the mean intensity of infection, MI, (males=11.6+/-0.94, females=11.1+/-1.56). Among the different weight classes, rats of 100-130 g were more infected (893%) and had the highest mean intensity (MI=21.6) than those that weighed <100 g (47.1%, MI=6.4) and >130 g (73.9%, MI=9.3). Moniliformis moniliformis was the most common species encountered (39.2%) and had the highest mean intensity in both sexes (x=7.4+/-0.74). Considering the rat-man proximity, this finding has considerable public health implications. PMID:9705679

  9. The helminth community of the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus from the Erro River valley, Navarre, Spain.

    PubMed

    Debenedetti, A L; Sainz-Elipe, S; Sáez-Durán, S; Galicia, D; Imaz, A; Galán-Puchades, M T; Fuentes, M V

    2015-11-01

    The helminth fauna of the wood mouse, Apodemus sylvaticus, in the Erro River valley (Navarre, Spain) was investigated from a total of 150 mice between February 2001 and July 2002. An overall prevalence of 90.7% was recorded and up to 14 helminth species identified. The most prevalent species was the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus (78.0%), whereas Syphacia stroma was the species with the highest median abundance (19.8). The detection of Calodium hepaticum, Rodentolepis straminea and the larvae of Hydatigera taeniaeformis are significant, since these helminth species could be considered potential human parasites. The helminth infracommunity comprised no more than five species. A significant predominance of monoxenous species was detected. Statistically significant differences were also found between prevalences, helminth abundance, species richness and helminth diversity of sub-populations of the wood mouse determined by host age and season of capture, which agree with most of the studies carried out on this host. This study will shed light on the helminth community of the wood mouse from a region of Spain which has not previously been documented. PMID:25007313

  10. Infectious microorganisms in mice (Mus musculus) purchased from commercial pet shops in Germany.

    PubMed

    Dammann, P; Hilken, G; Hueber, B; Köhl, W; Bappert, M T; Mähler, M

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of infectious microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi and eukaryotic parasites) in mice from different pet shops in Germany; such animals may compromise the hygienic integrity of laboratory animal vivaria if private pet holders act as unintended vectors of infections carried by them. House mice sold as pets or feed specimens were purchased from different pet shops and tested for a comprehensive panel of unwanted microorganisms. We found a number of microorganisms in these pet shop mice, the most prevalent of which were Helicobacter species (92.9%), mouse parvovirus (89.3%), mouse hepatitis virus (82.7%), Pasteurella pneumotropica (71.4%) and Syphacia species (57.1%). Several microorganisms (e.g. mouse parvovirus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, pneumonia virus of mice, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Clostridium piliforme) had considerably higher prevalences than those reported in similar studies on wild mice from North America, Europe or Australia. Our study shows that direct contact with pet shop mice may constitute a risk for laboratory animal vivaria if hygienic precautions are not taken. However, even relatively simple precautions seem effective enough to hold the risk at bay. PMID:21508117

  11. Long-term spatiotemporal stability and dynamic changes in helminth infracommunities of bank voles (Myodes glareolus) in NE Poland.

    PubMed

    Grzybek, Maciej; Bajer, Anna; Bednarska, Małgorzata; Al-Sarraf, Mohammed; Behnke-Borowczyk, Jolanta; Harris, Philip D; Price, Stephen J; Brown, Gabrielle S; Osborne, Sarah-Jane; Siński, Edward; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2015-12-01

    Parasites are considered to be an important selective force in host evolution but ecological studies of host-parasite systems are usually short-term providing only snap-shots of what may be dynamic systems. We have conducted four surveys of helminths of bank voles at three ecologically similar woodland sites in NE Poland, spaced over a period of 11 years, to assess the relative importance of temporal and spatial effects on helminth infracommunities. Some measures of infracommunity structure maintained relative stability: the rank order of prevalence and abundance of Heligmosomum mixtum, Heligmosomoides glareoli and Mastophorus muris changed little between the four surveys. Other measures changed markedly: dynamic changes were evident in Syphacia petrusewiczi which declined to local extinction, while the capillariid Aonchotheca annulosa first appeared in 2002 and then increased in prevalence and abundance over the remaining three surveys. Some species are therefore dynamic and both introductions and extinctions can be expected in ecological time. At higher taxonomic levels and for derived measures, year and host-age effects and their interactions with site are important. Our surveys emphasize that the site of capture is the major determinant of the species contributing to helminth community structure, providing some predictability in these systems. PMID:26442655

  12. Infection levels of intestinal helminths in two commensal rodent species from rural households in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Panti-May, J A; Hernández-Betancourt, S F; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Robles, M R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to calculate the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminths in the house mouse (Mus musculus) and the black rat (Rattus rattus) trapped in rural households of Yucatan, Mexico. Sampling was conducted during the rainy season from October to December 2011 and the dry season from January to March 2012. A total of 154 M. musculus and 46 R. rattus were examined, with 84.2% of M. musculus being infected with helminths compared with a significantly lower prevalence of 52.2% in R. rattus (P< 0.01). Adult M. musculus were more likely to be infected with helminths (89%) than subadults (63%) (P< 0.01). Four helminth species were identified: Taenia taeniaeformis larvae, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia muris and Trichuris muris. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis was present more frequently in M. musculus than in R. rattus (P< 0.01) and in adult mice compared to subadults (P< 0.01). Trichuris muris was present only in adult mice. This is the first report of N. brasiliensis, S. muris and T. muris in Yucatan, Mexico, as well as the first to report the presence of N. brasiliensis in M. musculus from Mexico. The helminth fauna of commensal rodents present in households appears to constitute a low potential health risk to local inhabitants; however, it would be advisable to conduct further studies to better understand the public health risk posed by these rodent intestinal helminths. PMID:24000977

  13. Helminth communities from two urban rat populations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of parasitic infections among commensal animals such as black and brown rats in many tropical countries is high and in comparison with studies on rodents in temperate climates, little is known about the community structure of their parasites. Rodent borne parasites pose threats to human health since people living in close proximity to rodent populations can be exposed to infection. Methods The helminth community structures of two urban rat populations in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were investigated. The rats were from two contrasting sites in the city caught over a period of 21 months in 2000-2002. Results Eleven species of helminth parasites comprising seven nematodes (Heterakis spumosum, Mastophorus muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia muris, Pterygodermatites tani/whartoni, Gongylonema neoplasticum, Angiostrongylus malaysiensis), three cestodes (Hymenolepis (Rodentolepis) nana, H. diminuta and Taenia taeniaeformis) and one acanthocephalan (Moniliformis moniliformis) were recovered from 346 Rattus rattus and 104 R. norvegicus from two urban sites, Bangsar and Chow Kit, during 2000-2002. Rattus rattus harboured over 60% of all helminths compared with R. norvegicus, although both host species played a dominant role in the different sites with, for example R. norvegicus at Bangsar and R. rattus at Chow Kit accounting for most of the nematodes. Overall 80% of rats carried at least one species of helminth, with the highest prevalences being shown by H. diminuta (35%), H. spumosum (29.8%) and H. nana (28.4%). Nevertheless, there were marked differences in prevalence rates between sites and hosts. The influence of extrinsic (year, season and site) and intrinsic (species, sex and age) factors affecting infracommunity structure (abundance and prevalence of infection) and measures of component community structure were analyzed. Conclusions Since at least two species of rat borne helminths in Kuala Lumpur have the potential to infect humans, and these showed high prevalences in the rats, the assessment and regular monitoring of infections carried by wild rodents have important roles to play in public health. PMID:22397763

  14. Epidemiological differences of lower urinary tract symptoms among female subpopulations and group level interventions

    PubMed Central

    Avasarala, Kameswararao Atchuta; Ahmed, Syed Meraj; Nandagiri, Sujatha; Tadisetty, Swati

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: 1) To study the risk factor profiles of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) among adolescent girls, housewives and working women and its socioeconomic and quality of life losses. 2) To undertake risk factor modifications using the adolescent girls. Design and Setting: Cross-sectional descriptive study followed by educational intervention. Statistical Methods: Cluster sampling, Proportions, confidence intervals, Chi square and t-Tests and Logistic regression. Materials and Methods: House to house survey was done in two villages and one urban ward. Seventy-five housewives, 75 working women and 180 adolescent girls were asked about the risk factors and losses due to LUTS. Three teams of adolescent girls were utilized to bring about behavioral modifications. Impact was measured through user perspectives obtained from the participants. Results: Risk factors, social, economic and quality of life losses were different among the three female populations. Overall prevalence of LUTS among the three groups is 61(18.5%). Improper anal washing technique, malnutrition, presence of vaginal discharge, use of unsanitary menstrual pads, pinworm infestation and use of bad toilets were the significant causes among girls. Presence of sexually transmitted diseases was a contributing factor among housewives and working women. Prolonged sitting the posture was also contributing to LUTS among working women. Seventy-four per cent of beneficiaries expressed that intervention is useful. Conclusions: The causes for LUTS and their consequences were differing among the three female subpopulations. Specific group level interventions using trained girls were successful. PMID:19468505

  15. Ozone-induced changes in host-plant suitability: interactions of Keiferia lycopersicella and Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, J.T.; Hare, J.D.; Musselman, R.C.; McCool, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    Tomato pinworms, Keiferia lycopersicella (Walsingham), survived better and developed faster on tomato plants, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., damaged by ozone than on plants not subjected to ozone fumigation. Other measures of fitness, including survival during pupation, sex ratio of adults, female longevity, and fecundity, were not affected. Analyses of ozonated foliage at zero, two and seven days following fumigation demonstrated a transient but significant increase (18-24%) in soluble protein concentration. Although the concentration of the total free amino acids in ozonated foliage did not increase significantly, significant changes were observed in at least 10 specific amino acids, some of which are critical for either insect development or the production of plant defensive chemicals. A reduction in total nitrogen in ozonated foliage at seven days postfumigation indicated that nitrogen was being translocated to other portions of the plant. The implications of increases in assimilable forms of nitrogen in ozonated foliage, which lead to improved host-plant suitability for insect herbivores, are discussed both in relation to some current ecological theories and in regard to pest-management strategies. 59 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. Clinical trial of efficacy of ivermectin pour-on against gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes in silvopasturing horses.

    PubMed

    Francisco, I; Snchez, J A; Cortias, F J; Francisco, R; Mochales, E; Arias, M; Mula, P; Surez, J L; Morrondo, P; Dez-Baos, P; Snchez-Andrade, R; Paz-Silva, A

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, by a clinical trial, the efficacy of an ivermectin-based pour-on treatment against gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes in naturally infected horses using 2 groups of mature indigenous Pura Raza Galega grazing mares. Faecal and blood samples were collected individually over a 21 week period. Faeces were analysed by the coprological flotation, sedimentation and migration techniques. Changes in circulating blood cells were monitored over the study period. The administration of the ivermectin suppressed the egg-elimination of ascarids and pinworms throughout the study and no strongyle-eggs were observed in the treatment group between the 3rd and 10th weeks. The numbers of red cells increased significantly after the anthelmintic therapy, and a statistical reduction in circulating leucocytes was recorded. No side effects were observed. The pour-on ivermectin formulation was highly successful against gastrointestinal nematodes and appears to be a useful therapeutic routine for large groups of horses. PMID:19927592

  17. Dientamoeba fragilis in Denmark: epidemiological experience derived from four years of routine real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Röser, D; Simonsen, J; Nielsen, H V; Stensvold, C R; Mølbak, K

    2013-10-01

    The intestinal protozoon Dientamoeba fragilis remains a clinical entity of dubious significance. While several previous studies address questions of epidemiology, only a handful have systematically employed and reported on the results from real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the best currently available diagnostic modality, and the comparison of results from different studies is, therefore, difficult. Since 2007, Statens Serum Institut (Denmark) has utilised qPCR for D. fragilis as routine diagnostic work-up for intestinal parasitosis, testing more than 22,000 samples from 2008 through 2011, and the aim of this study was to report on the results and experiences gained in the process. We demonstrate a staggeringly high proportion (43%) of investigated patients positive for D. fragilis, ranging from 12 to 71% depending on age group, showing a bimodal age distribution peaking in children and adults of parental age, as well as a clear association between exposure to children and risk of D. fragilis infection. We discuss these findings in light of the pinworm egg vector hypothesis and substantiate further our knowledge of risk factors pertaining to D. fragilis carriage. PMID:23609513

  18. Emerging from obscurity: biological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eugene H; Windsor, Jeffrey J; Clark, C Graham

    2004-07-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence. PMID:15258093

  19. Emerging from Obscurity: Biological, Clinical, and Diagnostic Aspects of Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eugene H.; Windsor, Jeffrey J.; Clark, C. Graham

    2004-01-01

    Ever since its first description in 1918, Dientamoeba fragilis has struggled to gain recognition as a significant pathogen. There is little justification for this neglect, however, since there exists a growing body of case reports from numerous countries around the world that have linked this protozoal parasite to clinical manifestations such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and anorexia. A number of studies have even incriminated D. fragilis as a cause of irritable bowel syndrome, allergic colitis, and diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus patients. Although D. fragilis is most commonly identified using permanently stained fecal smears, recent advances in culturing techniques are simplifying as well as improving the ability of investigators to detect this organism. However, there are limitations in the use of cultures since they cannot be performed on fecal samples that have been fixed. Significant progress has been made in the biological classification of this organism, which originally was described as an ameba. Analyses of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences have clearly demonstrated its close relationship to Histomonas, and it is now known to be a trichomonad. How the organism is transmitted remains a mystery, although there is some evidence that D. fragilis might be transmitted via the ova of the pinworm, Enterobius vermicularis. Also, it remains to be answered whether the two distinct genotypes of D. fragilis recently identified represent organisms with differing virulence. PMID:15258093

  20. Dientamoeba fragilis: the unflagellated human flagellate.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J J; Johnson, E H

    1999-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a pathogenic protozoan parasite with a world-wide distribution. Although originally described as an amoeboid organism, it has been reclassified as a flagellate, on the basis of a number of electron microscopic and immunological findings. Except for its lack of a flagellum, D. fragilis closely resembles Histomonas and Trichomonas. Interestingly, a resistant cyst stage has not been demonstrated and it is unlikely that its trophozoites can survive successfully outside the human host. As a consequence of its higher than anticipated coincidence of infection with Enterobius vermicularis, transmission may occur via ova of this pinworm. D. fragilis infection may be acute or chronic, and has been reported in both children and adults. The most common clinical symptoms include abdominal pain, persistent diarrhoea, loss of appetite, weight loss and flatulence. Occasionally, eosinophilia, urticaria and pruritus have been described. Demonstration of the characteristic nuclear structure of D. fragilis, needed for a definitive diagnosis, cannot be achieved in unstained faecal material; therefore, permanently stained smears are essential. Treatment is recommended in symptomatic cases, and iodoquinol, tetracycline and metronidazole have been used successfully. PMID:10795375

  1. Intestinal parasites of the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) from eight populations in Georgia.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jessica L; Miller, Elizabeth A; Norton, Terry M; Raphael, Bonnie L; Spratt, Jeffrey S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    The gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), one of five tortoise species endemic in the USA, was recently classified as a candidate for federal listing as a threatened species. Fecal samples collected from 117 tortoises from eight sites in Georgia were examined for endoparasites using a combination of sedimentation and flotation. Samples from an island population were examined for parasitic oocysts and ova only by flotation, protozoan cysts by trichrome-stained direct smear, and Cryptosporidium by direct immunofluorescence assay and ProSpecT rapid assay. A total of 99 tortoises (85, range 0-100%) was infected with pinworms (Alaeuris spp.), 47 (40, 0-86%) with cestodes (Oochorstica sp.), 34 (41, 0-74%) with Chapiniella spp., 2 (3, 0-33%) with Eimeria paynei, and a single tortoise each with a capillarid and ascarid (1%). On the island, Entamoeba was detected in one tortoise (2%) while Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in eight (17%). In conclusion, at least eight species of parasites were detected including Cryptosporidium, a possible pathogen of tortoises. Interestingly, we detected spatial variation in the distribution of several parasites among populations suggesting additional work should be conducted across a gradient of tortoise densities, land use, and habitat characteristics. PMID:24072334

  2. Environmental Factors Related to Enterobiasis in a Southeast Region of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Cho, Min Kyoung; Park, Mi Kyung; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Bo Young; Park, Sang Kyun

    2013-01-01

    Pinworm infection can occur through contact with contaminated surfaces followed by ingestion or even through inhalation of infective eggs. We have limited information regarding environmental contamination by eggs of Enterobius vermicularis. In order to determine environmental risk factors associated with the rate of E. vermicularis infection, we investigated possible environmental risk factors using a questionnaire from 46 kindergartens in 3 different cities of the southeast area of Korea. In total, using the cellotape anal swab technique, 3,422 children were examined for E. vermicularis infection. We evaluated E. vermicularis egg of books, educational materials, toys, room door handles, dusts of window edges, desks, chairs, tables, and dusts of classrooms. The overall egg-positive rate for E. vermicularis was 6.0%, and the prevalence of enterobiasis in each kindergarten ranged between 0% and 16.9%. We found that 78.9% of egg positive kindergartens were managed by private foundations, which was significantly higher, compared with kindergartens managed by public foundations or the nation. Compared with public or national kindergartens, most private kindergartens were located in residential areas and the number of children in these areas was significantly higher. In conclusion, numbers of children in kindergartens was found to be an environmental risk factor associated with transmission of enterobiasis in Korea. PMID:23468007

  3. Palaeopathology and genes: investigating the genetics of infectious diseases in excavated human skeletal remains and mummies from past populations.

    PubMed

    Anastasiou, Evilena; Mitchell, Piers D

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the use of genetics in palaeomicrobiology, and to highlight the importance of understanding past diseases. Palaeomicrobiology is the study of disease pathogens in skeletal and mummified remains from archaeological contexts. It has revolutionarised our understanding of health in the past by enabling a deeper knowledge of the origins and evolution of many diseases that have shaped us as a species. Bacterial diseases explored include tuberculosis, leprosy, bubonic plague, typhoid, syphilis, endemic and epidemic typhus, trench fever, and Helicobacter pylori. Viral diseases discussed include influenza, hepatitis B, human papilloma virus (HPV), human T-cell lymphotrophic virus (HTLV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Parasitic diseases investigated include malaria, leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease, roundworm, whipworm, pinworm, Chinese liver fluke, fleas and lice. Through a better understanding of disease origins and their evolution, we can place into context how many infectious diseases are changing over time, and so help us estimate how they may change in the future. PMID:23792062

  4. Influence of habitat modification on the intestinal helminth community ecology of cottontail rabbit populations.

    PubMed

    Boggs, J F; McMurry, S T; Leslie, D M; Engle, D M; Lochmiller, R L

    1990-04-01

    The influence of five brush management treatments using the herbicides tebuthiuron and triclopyr, with or without prescribed burning, on the intestinal helminth community of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) was studied in 1987 on the Cross Timbers Experimental Range in Payne County, Oklahoma (USA). Six helminth species were found (Dermatoxys veligera, Trichostrongylus calcaratus, Passalurus nonanulatus, Wellcomia longejector, Taenia pisiformis cystercercus, and Mosgovoyia pectinata americana) in 102 rabbits (88 adult and 14 juveniles) collected over two seasons (winter and summer). Prevalence of M. pectinata americana in cottontail rabbits was significantly greater in untreated control pastures than herbicide treated pastures in winter, while prevalence of T. pisiformis was significantly greater in burned than unburned pastures. Abundances of helminth species in the intestinal tract of cottontail rabbits were unaffected by brush treatments. Mosgovoyia pectinata americana abundance demonstrated a highly significant increase from winter to summer; conversely, abundance of all oxyurid pinworms combined (D. veligera, P. nonanulatus, W. longejector) was significantly higher in winter than summer. Helminth community dynamics were significantly influenced by season, but were unaffected by brush treatments. Habitat modification could have influenced cestode transmission by altering the ecology of invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. PMID:2338720

  5. Effects of Fenbendazole on Routine Immune Response Parameters of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cray, Carolyn; Villar, David; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2008-01-01

    Fenbendazole (FBZ) is an anthelmintic drug widely used to treat and prevent pinworm outbreaks in laboratory rodents. Although data in nonrodent species indicate possible effects of fenbendazole on the bone marrow and lymphocyte proliferation and function, little has been reported regarding possible effects on the rodent immune system. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of a therapeutic regimen of FBZ on immune parameters in BALB/c mice. Both 9-wk on–off and 5-wk continuous medicated feed protocols were assessed. No significant differences between normal and FBZ diet treated mice were observed in the following parameters: complete blood count, blood chemistry, quantitation of major T and B cell markers in spleen, quantitation of T cell markers in the thymus, spleen cell proliferation to T and B cell mitogens, bone marrow colony-forming cell assays, skin graft rejection, and primary and secondary humoral immune responses. These data indicate that FBZ treatment does not affect many standard broad measures of immune function. PMID:19049250

  6. Antiparasitic mebendazole shows survival benefit in 2 preclinical models of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ren-Yuan; Staedtke, Verena; Aprhys, Colette M; Gallia, Gary L; Riggins, Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain cancer, and despite treatment advances, patient prognosis remains poor. During routine animal studies, we serendipitously observed that fenbendazole, a benzimidazole antihelminthic used to treat pinworm infection, inhibited brain tumor engraftment. Subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments with benzimidazoles identified mebendazole as the more promising drug for GBM therapy. In GBM cell lines, mebendazole displayed cytotoxicity, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 µM. Mebendazole disrupted microtubule formation in GBM cells, and in vitro activity was correlated with reduced tubulin polymerization. Subsequently, we showed that mebendazole significantly extended mean survival up to 63% in syngeneic and xenograft orthotopic mouse glioma models. Mebendazole has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for parasitic infections, has a long track-record of safe human use, and was effective in our animal models with doses documented as safe in humans. Our findings indicate that mebendazole is a possible novel anti-brain tumor therapeutic that could be further tested in clinical trials. PMID:21764822

  7. Critical anthelmintic trials in ponies with oxfendazole and caviphos and concomitant studies on the spontaneous elimination of small strongylids.

    PubMed

    Colglazier, M L

    1979-03-01

    The efficacy of the benzimidazole, oxfendazole, and the organophosphate, caviphos, against gastrointestinal parasites of ponies was evaluated by the critcial test method. Oxfendazole (10 mg/kg of body weight) given in single oral doses was 100% effective against adult large strongylids (Strongylus vulgaris, Strongylus edentatus, and Strongylus equinus), 99% effective against adult small strongylids, and 97% effective against 4th-stage small strongylids (genera identified in order of frequency: Cylicostephanus, Cyathostomum, Cylicocyclus, Triodontophorus, Poteriostomum, Oesophagodontus, Cylicodontophorus, Gyalocephalus, and Craterostomum). Caviphos (40 mg/kg of body weight) admixed in the grain ration (horse crunch) was 89% effective against adult large strongylids (S vulgaris and S edentatus) and 99% effective against adult small strongylids (genera identified earlier in order of frequency above), but only 35% effective against 4th-stage small strongylids. Both drugs were effective (100%) against adult and immature pinworms (Oxyuris equi) but ineffective against Habronema spp and Draschia megastoma. Oxfendazole was only 11% effective against stomach bots (Gasterophilus spp); caviphos was 73% effective against these species. During a three-day pretreatment interval, about 34% of the total population of small strongylids was lost spontaneously from the 29 ponies. PMID:475090

  8. Molecular characterization of Thelastomatoidea (Nematoda: Oxyurida) from cockroaches in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jex, A R; Hu, M; Rose, H A; Schneider, M; Cribb, T H; Gasser, R B

    2006-07-01

    A molecular approach was used to genetically characterize 5 species (Aoruroides queenslandensis, Blattophila sphaerolaima, Cordonicola gibsoni, Desmicola ornata and Leidynemella fusiformis) belonging to the superfamily Thelastomatoidea (Nematoda: Oxyurida), a group of pinworms that parasitizes terrestrial arthropods. The D3 domain of the large subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA (LSU) was sequenced for individual specimens, and the analysis of the sequence data allowed the genetic relationships of the 5 species to be studied. The sequence variation in the D3 domain within individual species (0-1.8%) was significantly less than the differences among species (4.3-12.4%). Phylogenetic analyses, using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and neighbour-joining, tree-building methods, established relationships among the 5 species of Thelastomatoidea and Oxyuris equi (a species of the order Oxyurida). The molecular approach employed provides the prospect for developing DNA tools for the specific identification of the Thelastomatoidea, irrespective of developmental stage and sex, as a basis for systematic, ecological and/or population genetic investigations of members within this superfamily. PMID:16563200

  9. Assessing the Health Impact of the following Measures in Schools in Maradi (Niger): Construction of Latrines, Clean Water Supply, Establishment of Hand Washing Stations, and Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Tohon, Zilahatou

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effect on health of the following measures in schools in Maradi (Niger): clean water supply, construction of latrines, establishment of hand washing stations, and health education. Methodology. It was a “before and after” intervention study on a sample of school children aged 7 to 12 years in the Maradi region. The interventions included building of latrines, supplying clean water, setting up hand washing stations, and teaching health education lessons. An individual questionnaire, analysis of stool samples, and a group questionnaire were administered to children and teachers, respectively. The threshold for significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. A statistically significant reduction in cases of diarrhoea and abdominal pains was noted after the project. Overall, carriage of at least one parasite increased from 7.5% before the project to 10.2% after it (P = 0.04). In the programme group schools, there was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of Hymenolepis nana, from 0 to 1.9 (P = 0.02). Pinworm prevalence remained stable in this group but increased significantly in the control group. Conclusions. Putting health infrastructure in place in schools obviously had an impact on hygiene-related habits in the beneficiary schools and communities. PMID:24563779

  10. Tribendimidine: Mode of Action and nAChR Subtype Selectivity in Ascaris and Oesophagostomum

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Alan P.; Puttachary, Sreekanth; Buxton, Samuel K.; Martin, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The cholinergic class of anthelmintic drugs is used for the control of parasitic nematodes. One of this class of drugs, tribendimidine (a symmetrical diamidine derivative, of amidantel), was developed in China for use in humans in the mid-1980s. It has a broader-spectrum anthelmintic action against soil-transmitted helminthiasis than other cholinergic anthelmintics, and is effective against hookworm, pinworms, roundworms, and Strongyloides and flatworm of humans. Although molecular studies on C. elegans suggest that tribendimidine is a cholinergic agonist that is selective for the same nematode muscle nAChR as levamisole, no direct electrophysiological observations in nematode parasites have been made to test this hypothesis. Also the hypothesis that levamisole and tribendimine act on the same receptor, does not explain why tribendimidine is effective against some nematode parasites when levamisole is not. Here we examine the effects of tribendimidine on the electrophysiology and contraction of Ascaris suum body muscle and show that tribendimidine produces depolarization antagonized by the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine, and that tribendimidine is an agonist of muscle nAChRs of parasitic nematodes. Further pharmacological characterization of the nAChRs activated by tribendimidine in our Ascaris muscle contraction assay shows that tribendimidine is not selective for the same receptor subtypes as levamisole, and that tribendimidine is more selective for the B-subtype than the L-subtype of nAChR. In addition, larval migration inhibition assays with levamisole-resistant Oesophagostomum dentatum isolates show that tribendimidine is as active on a levamisole-resistant isolate as on a levamisole-sensitive isolate, suggesting that the selectivity for levamisole and tribendimidine is not the same. It is concluded that tribendimidine can activate a different population of nematode parasite nAChRs than levamisole, and is more like bephenium. The different nAChR subtype selectivity of tribendimidine may explain why the spectrum of action of tribendimidine is different to that of other cholinergic anthelmintics like levamisole. PMID:25679515

  11. Acute Appendicitis: Are we Over Diagnosing it?

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, V; Jadhav, V

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Appendicectomy is by far the commonest major emergency general surgical operation and laparoscopic appendicectomy is now becoming common. The question of whether a normal-looking appendix should be removed laparoscopically is more pertinent than ever before. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective study was undertaken to review the histopathology results and compare macroscopic with microscopic descriptions of all patients who underwent an appendicectomy, either by open surgery or laparoscopically, over a 1-year period from 1 September 2004 to 31 August 2005. RESULTS A total of 199 appendicectomies were carried out in the year of which histopathology results for 190 could be retrieved. Of the 190 who had an appendicectomy, 110 (57.9%) were female and 80 (42.1%) were male. While appendicitis was confirmed histologically in 65 of 80 (81.2%) male patients, it could only be confirmed histologically in 57 of 110 (51.8%) female patients. However, in a large number of female patients in whom macroscopically normal appendices had been removed, other findings were noted including fibro-obliterative changes in 10, luminal inflammation in 6, serositis in 5, lymphoid hyperplasia in 3, feacoliths in 2, and pinworm in 1, making another abdominal pathology a possibility. CONCLUSIONS The number of macroscopically normal appendices removed was much larger in female patients. However in 27 of 49 normal looking appendices in females, findings such as serositis, luminal inflammation, lymphoid hyperplasia, etc. were noted on histology, suggesting that another abdominal pathology may have been missed or the appendix may still have been the cause for pain. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed at least in all female patients before an appendicectomy; if no other findings are noted on laparoscopy, it is likely to be worthwhile to remove the appendix. PMID:17999817

  12. Biological control strategies for the South American tomato moth (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in greenhouse tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Tomas; Gallego, Juan R; Fernandez, Francisco J; Gamez, Manuel; Vila, Enric; Del Pino, Modesto; Hernandez-Suarez, Estrella

    2012-12-01

    The South American tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) has been introduced into new geographic areas, including the Mediterranean region, where it has become a serious threat to tomato production. Three greenhouse trials conducted in tomato crops during 2009 and 2010 explored control strategies using the egg-parasitoid Trichogramma achaeae Nagaraja and Nagarkatti compared with chemical control. The effectiveness of the predator Nesidiocoris tenuis (Reuter) was also tested. In greenhouses with early pest infestations (discrete generations), periodic inundative releases (eight releases at a rate of 50 adults/m2, twice a week) were necessary to achieve an adequate parasitism level (85.63 +/- 5.70%) early in the growing season. However, only one inoculative release (100 adults/m2) was sufficient to achieve a comparatively high parasitism level (91.03 +/- 12.58%) under conditions of high pest incidence and overlapping generations. Some intraguild competition was observed between T. achaeae and the predator, N. tenuis. This mirid species is commonly used in Mediterranean greenhouse tomato crops for the control of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Tomato cultivars were also observed to influence the activity of natural enemies, mainly N. tenuis (whose average numbers ranged between 0.17 +/- 0.03 and 0.41 +/- 0.05 nymphs per leaf depending on the cultivar). This may be because of differences in plant nutrients in different cultivars, which may affect the feeding of omnivorous insects. In contrast, cultivar effects on T. achaeae were less apparent or possibly nonexistent. Nevertheless, there was an indirect effect in as much as T. achaeae was favored in cultivars not liked by N. tenuis. PMID:23356074

  13. Pyrvinium attenuates Hedgehog signaling downstream of smoothened.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Fei, Dennis Liang; Flaveny, Colin A; Dahmane, Nadia; Baubet, Valrie; Wang, Zhiqiang; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Hang, Brian; Orton, Darren; Han, Lu; Wang, Baolin; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway represents an important class of emerging developmental signaling pathways that play critical roles in the genesis of a large number of human cancers. The pharmaceutical industry is currently focused on developing small molecules targeting Smoothened (Smo), a key signaling effector of the HH pathway that regulates the levels and activity of the Gli family of transcription factors. Although one of these compounds, vismodegib, is now FDA-approved for patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma, acquired mutations in Smo can result in rapid relapse. Furthermore, many cancers also exhibit a Smo-independent activation of Gli proteins, an observation that may underlie the limited efficacy of Smo inhibitors in clinical trials against other types of cancer. Thus, there remains a critical need for HH inhibitors with different mechanisms of action, particularly those that act downstream of Smo. Recently, we identified the FDA-approved anti-pinworm compound pyrvinium as a novel, potent (IC50, 10 nmol/L) casein kinase-1? (CK1?) agonist. We show here that pyrvinium is a potent inhibitor of HH signaling, which acts by reducing the stability of the Gli family of transcription factors. Consistent with CK1? agonists acting on these most distal components of the HH signaling pathway, pyrvinium is able to inhibit the activity of a clinically relevant, vismodegib -resistant Smo mutant, as well as the Gli activity resulting from loss of the negative regulator suppressor of fused. We go on to demonstrate the utility of this small molecule in vivo, against the HH-dependent cancer medulloblastoma, attenuating its growth and reducing the expression of HH biomarkers. PMID:24994715

  14. Pyrvinium attenuates Hedgehog signaling downstream of Smoothened

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Fei, Dennis Liang; Flaveny, Colin A.; Dahmane, Nadia; Baubet, Valrie; Wang, Zhiqiang; Bai, Feng; Pei, Xin-Hai; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Hang, Brian; Orton, Darren; Han, Lu; Wang, Baolin; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Lee, Ethan; Robbins, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway represents an important class of emerging developmental signaling pathways that play critical roles in the genesis of a large number of human cancers. The pharmaceutical industry is currently focused on developing small molecules targeting Smoothened (Smo), a key signaling effector of the HH pathway that regulates the levels and activity of the Gli family of transcription factors. Although one of these compounds vismodegib is now FDA-approved for advanced basal cell carcinoma patients, acquired mutations in Smo can result in rapid relapse. Furthermore, many cancers also exhibit a Smo-independent activation of Gli proteins, an observation that may underlie the limited efficacy of Smo inhibitors in clinical trials against other types of cancer. Thus, there remains a critical need for HH inhibitors with different mechanisms of action, in particularly those that act downstream of Smo. Recently, we identified the FDA-approved anti-pinworm compound pyrvinium as a novel, potent (IC50 ~ 10nM) Casein Kinase-1? (CK1?) agonist. We show here that pyrvinium is a potent inhibitor of HH signaling, which acts by reducing the stability of the Gli family of transcription factors. Consistent with CK1? agonists acting on these most distal components of the HH signaling pathway, pyrvinium is able to inhibit the activity of a clinically relevant, vismodegib resistant Smo mutant, as well as the Gli activity resulting from loss of the negative regulator Suppressor of fused. We go on to demonstrate the utility of this small-molecule in vivo, against the HH dependent cancer medulloblastoma, attenuating its growth and reducing the expression of HH biomarkers. PMID:24994715

  15. Infectious Diseases in Wild Mice (Mus musculus) Collected on and around the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) Campus

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Sharon E; Malone, Sarah; Bunte, Ralph M; Smith, Abigail L

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory mice serve as important models in biomedical research. Monitoring these animals for infections and infestations and excluding causative agents requires extensive resources. Despite advancements in detection and exclusion over the last several years, these activities remain challenging for many institutions. The infections and infestations present in laboratory mouse colonies are well documented, but their mode of introduction is not always known. One possibility is that wild rodents living near vivaria somehow transmit infections to and between the colonies. This study was undertaken to determine what infectious agents the wild mice on the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) campus were carrying. Wild mice were trapped and evaluated for parasites, viruses, and selected bacteria by using histopathology, serology, and PCR-based assays. Results were compared with known infectious agents historically circulating in the vivaria housing mice on campus and were generally different. Although the ectoparasitic burdens found on the 2 populations were similar, the wild mice had a much lower incidence of endoparasites (most notably pinworms). The seroprevalence of some viral infections was also different, with a low prevalence of mouse hepatitis virus among wild mice. Wild mice had a high prevalence of murine cytomegalovirus, an agent now thought to be confined to wild mouse populations. Helicobacter DNA was amplified from more than 90% of the wild mice (59% positive for H. hepaticus). Given the results of this study, we conclude that wild mice likely are not a source of infection for many of the agents that are detected in laboratory mouse colonies at the University of Pennsylvania. PMID:19887025

  16. Survey and comparison of major intestinal flora in captive and wild ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) populations.

    PubMed

    Villers, Lynne M; Jang, Spencer S; Lent, Cheryl L; Lewin-Koh, Sock-Cheng; Norosoarinaivo, Jeanne Aimée

    2008-02-01

    A survey to identify the major intestinal species of aerobic bacteria, protozoa and helminths was conducted on captive and wild populations of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Samples were collected from 50 captive lemurs at 11 zoological institutions in the United States. In Madagascar, 98 aerobic bacteria samples and 99 parasite samples were collected from eight sites chosen to cover a variety of populations across the species range. Identical collection, preservation and lab techniques were used for captive and wild populations. The predominant types of aerobic bacteria flora were identified via five separate tests. The tests for parasites conducted included flotation, sedimentation and FA/GC. Twenty-seven bacteria unique to either the captive or wild populations were cultured with eight of these being statistically significantly different. Fourteen bacteria common to both populations were cultured, of which six differed significantly. Entamoeba coli was the only parasite common to both the captive and wild populations. Giardia spp., Isospora spp., strongyles-type ova, Entamoeba spp. and Entamoeba polecki were found only in captive samples. Cryptosporidium, Balantidium coli, pinworm-type ova, and two fluke-like ova were seen only in wild samples. In addition, samples were compared for both bacteria and parasites from three unique field sites in Madagascar. In this three-site comparison, six types of bacteria were statistically significantly different. No significant differences regarding parasites were seen. Significant differences were found between the captive and wild populations, whereas fewer differences were found between sites within Madagascar. Although we isolated Campylobacter and Giardia, all animals appeared clinically healthy. PMID:17854057

  17. Age-Associated Variability in Susceptibility of Swiss Webster Mice to MPV and Other Excluded Murine Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Kristina A; Smith, Peter C; Booth, Carmen J; Compton, Susan R

    2012-01-01

    Detection of mouse parvovirus (MPV) and other murine pathogens in research colonies is dependent on the transmissibility of the agents and the sensitivity of sentinels to those agents. Transmissibility is based on several agent-dependent properties including mode of transmission, infectivity, and environmental stability, whereas host susceptibility can vary according to mouse age, strain, and sex. In this study, 4-wk-old, 12-wk-old, and aged Swiss Webster female sentinel mice were compared for their ability to detect infectious agents by using a standardized health surveillance program, to determine whether sentinels should be replaced more frequently to improve the efficiency of detection of infectious agents within a murine colony. Both experimentally and naturally infected mice were used to transmit MPV and other infectious agents from index mice to sentinels. First, Swiss Webster mice were inoculated with MPV, and transmission to 4-, 12-, and 24-wk-old contact and soiled-bedding sentinels was determined. Second, mice naturally infected with 9 infectious agents were obtained from 2 local pet stores, and transmission to 4-wk-old contact sentinels and 4-, 12-, and 44-wk-old soiled-bedding sentinels was determined. For agents that were transmitted via soiled bedding (MPV, mouse hepatitis virus, murine norovirus, Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus, and pinworms), transmission did not differ in regard to the age of the sentinels. In conclusion, susceptibility to several infectious agents did not differ according to sentinel age in a health-surveillance protocol that used mice older than 12 wk. PMID:23294885

  18. Transmission of some species of internal parasites in horses born in 1990, 1991, and 1992 in the same pasture on a farm in central Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Stamper, S; Drudge, J H; Granstrom, D E; Collins, S S

    1994-04-01

    Studies were conducted on transmission of natural infections of several species of internal parasites in horses born and kept on the same pasture on a farm in central Kentucky. Data for the first year (1989) of a 4 year study on this farm have been published recently. The present research represents the second (1990), third (1991), and fourth (1992) years of the investigation. The number of animals (n = 28) examined varied from eight born in 1990 to ten each born in 1991 and 1992. For each year, examination was made of one horse per month, beginning in June of the year of birth and extending through January (1990) or March (1991 and 1992) the following year. Ages of the horses at necropsy ranged from 87 to 251 days. Major parasites present and months of recovery were: bots--Gasterophilus intestinalis in the mouth September-January and in the stomach August-March; stomach worms--Trichostrongylus axei in August and November, Habronema spp. (immature) in July-November and January, and Habronema muscae in October, January, and February; ascarids--Parascaris equorum in the small intestine and lungs all months; intestinal threadworms--Strongyloides westeri in all months except February; large strongyles--Strongylus vulgaris in the large intestine in all months except July and August and in the cranial mesenteric artery in all months, and Strongylus edentatus in the large intestine in January and in the ventral abdominal wall in all months; pinworms--Oxyuris equi in June and January-March; tapeworms--Anoplocephala perfoliata in August-October and December-March; and eyeworms--Thelazia lacrymalis August-February. Yearly differences and similarities of infections in the horses are discussed. The value of this type of research is mentioned. PMID:8073609

  19. Prevalence of internal parasites in horses in critical tests of activity of parasiticides over a 28-year period (1956-1983) in Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Tolliver, S C; Lyons, E T; Drudge, J H

    1987-02-01

    The prevalence and number of naturally acquired gastrointestinal parasites were compiled for horses used in critical tests of activity of parasiticides over a 28-year period (1956-1983). Data are presented as follows: n = number of horses examined; % = mean prevalence; number in parentheses after % = aggregate mean number of parasites in infected horses. Parasites found were: bots (n = 513) - Gasterophilus intestinalis, 2nd instar, 61%(58); 3rd instar, 94%(168); G. nasalis, 2nd instar, 36%(28); 3rd instar, 81%(51); stomach worms (n = 200) - Habronema muscae, 65%(179); Draschia megastoma, 29%(95); Trichostrongylus axei, 46%(3000); ascarids (n = 513) - Parascaris equorum, mature, 50%(25); immature, 23%(33); tapeworms (n = 513), Anoplocephala perfoliata, 17%(15); A. magna, 14%(10); large strongyles (n = 487), Strongylus vulgaris, 84%(80); S. edentatus, 79%(101); S. equinus, 6%(14); small strongyles (n = 210), 100%(142,000); pinworms (Oxyuris equi), immature (n = 210), 78%(9000); mature (n = 506), 40%(62); Probstmayria vivipara (n = 210), 12%(10(7]; S. vulgaris in cranial mesenteric artery (n = 472), 89%(57). The majority of the horses examined were mixed lighthorse type but several Thoroughbreds were included. Ages varied from about 4 months to 20 years old, with most being approximately 1-3 years old. They probably had either no or infrequent previous treatment with parasiticides. Most of the horses were selected for presence of certain internal parasites, usually large strongyles, prior to usage in the critical tests. PMID:3564356

  20. Parasites, pets, and people.

    PubMed

    Marx, M B

    1991-03-01

    It is important for the family physician to understand that patients' relationships with their pets play an important role in helping maintain mental and physical health yet provide the potential for causing illness in the patient. Toxocara canis (dog roundworm) and Toxocara cati (cat roundworm) are the ascarids most commonly responsible for VLM and ocular larva migrans in humans. These roundworms live in their adult stage in the small intestine of the dog and cat where their eggs are passed in the feces. The eggs containing the infective larva are very sticky, thus an infant crawling around on the floor can easily pick these up on fingers that almost invariably end up in the mouth. Infections are usually mild and asymptomatic but with a persistent eosinophilia. Ocular larva migrans is the form usually occurring in older children and adults. Some public health veterinarians recommend that a puppy or kitten should not be obtained as a companion for a child who is not old enough to read, thus bypassing the crawling and toddler stages. Hookworm eggs, shed in the feces of infected dogs or cats, develop into the infective second stage within a week. Humans are usually infected when bare areas of skin such as bare feet or the torso come in contact with soil contaminated with the larvae. The second-stage larvae are able to penetrate the intact skin of humans and the foot pads of dogs and cats. In the United States, the common dog hookworm, A. caninum, is a widespread parasite. Human intestinal ancylostomiasis caused by this species is rare, with only six cases recorded in the literature. Infection in humans or animals by the common tapeworm of dogs and cats (Dipylidium caninum) requires ingestion of the intermediate host, the dog or cat flea containing the larva (cysticercoids) of the agent. Many cases in humans are asymptomatic. Dipylidiasis affects mainly infants and young children who may swallow a flea that hops up while the infant is crawling on the floor or fondling the family pet. Humans appear to be highly resistant to the infection, given the high frequency of flea infestation on dogs and cats and the relative rarity of human disease. Pinworms of animal hosts are not transmissible to humans. Humans become an accidental host of dirofilaria when bitten by an infected mosquito, although the microfilaria will not mature to the adult form in humans. Radio-opaque coin-type lung lesions can be noted on radiographs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2011635

  1. Critical tests and safety studies on trichlorfon as an antiparasitic agent in the horse.

    PubMed

    Drudge, J H; Lyons, E T; Taylor, E L

    1976-02-01

    Three series of critical tests were completed on a combined total of 46 horses to determine the efficacy of single doses of trichlorfon against bots, ascarids, pinworms, and large strongyles. Different formulations of trichlorfon were administered by tubing intragastrically, mixing with the daily grain ration, injecting intramuscularly, or pouring on the back at dose rates between 20 and 100 mg/kg. Administration by feeding tended to be more efficacious for removal of bots and less toxic to the horese than administration by stomach tube. In many of the tests, trichlorfon was given in the grain ration at the dose rate of 40 mg/kg of body weight, and the aggregate average removals of 2nd and 3rd instars of Gastrophilus intestinalis and Gasterophilus nasalis in the 3 series of tests were between 97 and 100%. Removal of Parascaris equorum was equally efficacious with both the intubation and the grain feeding methods of dosing, and at the dose rate of 40 mg/kg, the aggregate averages were 99 and 100% in the 3 series. Removal of Oxyuris equi was variable--aggregate averages were between 11 (1 infected horse in the initial series) and 96 (5 infected horses in the 3rd series) to 100% (7 infected horses in the 2nd series). Large strongyles, Strongylus vulgaris and Strongylus edentatus were almost completely refractory to the 40-mg/kg dose rate of trichlorfon. Dose rates of 40 mg/kg and less were generally well tolerated by the critical test horses. Higher dose rates (60 and 80 mg/kg) administered by stomach tube induced moderately severe to severe colic and diarrhea, whereas a dose of 80 mg/kg given in the feed resulted in only a transient softening of the feces. Likewise, 5 consecutive doses, 1 week between doses, of a bolus formulation given at the rate of 80 mg/kg to 4 horses were well tolerated. Clinical trials involving a total of 2,294 treatments of trichlorfon at dose rate of 35 to 40 mg/kg in pregnant and nonpregnant mares, stallions, suckling and weanling foals, yearlings, and horses in training on 38 farms in central Kentucky did not cause notable adverse clinical effects. PMID:1259212

  2. Probable reason why small strongyle EPG counts are returning "early" after ivermectin treatment of horses on a farm in Central Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C; Collins, S S

    2009-02-01

    Critical tests were carried out in 2008 in four yearling horses (H-2, H-4, H-10, and H-11) born and raised together on a farm (MC) in Central Kentucky. These horses were treated intraorally with ivermectin paste at the dose rate of 200 microg/kg. The main interest was to try and determine more precisely, from posttreatment (PT) worm count data, the current activity of ivermectin against small strongyles in a horse herd. These horses had been treated repeatedly with this compound and counts of small strongyle eggs per gram of feces (EPGs) of these parasites have been returning sooner than previously in field tests (Lyons et al. Parasitol Res 103:209-215, 2008a). Data from the four horses revealed that a total of 3237 (nonfactored number) specimens of small strongyles was recovered from aliquot samples of feces passed PT and in the large intestinal contents at necropsy; all specimens were examined and identified. Thirteen species of adult small strongyles were recorded. Cylicocyclus (Cyc.) insigne was the predominant species. Three of the yearlings (H-2, H-4, and H-11) were necropsied at 6 days PT with ivermectin, and removals of small strongyles were: 50%, 80%, and 36% of fourth stages (L4), respectively, and 100%, 99%, and 100% of adults, respectively. As indicated, the only incomplete removal of adults from the three horses was for H-4. They consisted of two species: (1) young Cyc. insigne (those passed in the feces were fully developed); removal of this species was 89% and (2) fully developed Cylicostephanus longibursatus; 99% were removed. The fourth yearling (H-10), necropsied at 25 days PT, harbored 19,150 adult small strongyles in the large intestinal contents. Most of the species were Cyc. insigne; all were fifth stage but not sexually mature. Comparing the percentage of adult small strongyles found at necropsy relative to the total number present (those passed in the feces and at necropsy), only 0% to 1% were in the contents of the large intestines of the three horses at 6 days PT but in 26% for horse H-10 at 25 days PT. As mentioned earlier, only a few adults were found in one horse and several L(4) in the three horses at necropsy at 6 days PT. Therefore, in horse H-10, most adults found at 25 days PT presumably developed from "young" specimens not removed by ivermectin. Thus, data from the present critical tests indicate the probable cause of the "early" return of small strongyle EPG values after ivermectin treatment in the horses in field tests on Farm MC. It seems this was the result of incomplete removal of luminal specimens (L(4) and possibly young adults), some of which matured and began laying eggs by about 4 weeks PT (Lyons et al. Parasitol Res 103:209-215, 2008a). The research also showed that ivermectin was highly effective on adult small strongyles. At necropsy, the following other species of parasites (adult) were found, but none was recovered from the feces. These were (n = number of horses infected): (1) ascarids (Parascaris equorum-n = 1), (2) tapeworms (Anoplocephala perfoliata-n = 4), and (3) pinworms (Oxyuris equi-n = 3). Immature (L4) O. equi were present in two horses and removals were 0% in one horse and 39% in the other. Eyeworms (Thelazia lacrymalis) were found in one horse at necropsy. Even though a small number of horses were used in the present research, the commonality of their background made them ideal candidates as a group for this study. This aspect helps strengthen the validity of the interpretation of the findings. PMID:18931857