Science.gov

Sample records for system design materials

  1. Learning from systems biology: An ``Omics'' approach to materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Krishna

    2008-03-01

    An understanding of systems biology provides an excellent paradigm for the materials scientist. Ultimately one would like to take an “atoms-applications” approach to materials design. This paper describes how the concepts of genomics, proteomics, and other biological behavior which form the foundations of modern biology can be applied to materials design through materials informatics.

  2. Material Design, Selection, and Manufacturing Methods for System Sustainment

    SciTech Connect

    David Sowder, Jim Lula, Curtis Marshall

    2010-02-18

    This paper describes a material selection and validation process proven to be successful for manufacturing high-reliability long-life product. The National Secure Manufacturing Center business unit of the Kansas City Plant (herein called KCP) designs and manufactures complex electrical and mechanical components used in extreme environments. The material manufacturing heritage is founded in the systems design to manufacturing practices that support the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA). Material Engineers at KCP work with the systems designers to recommend materials, develop test methods, perform analytical analysis of test data, define cradle to grave needs, present final selection and fielding. The KCP material engineers typically will maintain cost control by utilizing commercial products when possible, but have the resources and to develop and produce unique formulations as necessary. This approach is currently being used to mature technologies to manufacture materials with improved characteristics using nano-composite filler materials that will enhance system design and production. For some products the engineers plan and carry out science-based life-cycle material surveillance processes. Recent examples of the approach include refurbished manufacturing of the high voltage power supplies for cockpit displays in operational aircraft; dry film lubricant application to improve bearing life for guided munitions gyroscope gimbals, ceramic substrate design for electrical circuit manufacturing, and tailored polymeric materials for various systems. The following examples show evidence of KCP concurrent design-to-manufacturing techniques used to achieve system solutions that satisfy or exceed demanding requirements.

  3. System design for safe robotic handling of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Wapman, W.; Fahrenholtz, J.; Kimberly, H.; Kuhlmann, J.

    1996-03-01

    Robotic systems are being developed by the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at Sandia National Laboratories to perform automated handling tasks with radioactive nuclear materials. These systems will reduce the occupational radiation exposure to workers by automating operations which are currently performed manually. Because the robotic systems will handle material that is both hazardous and valuable, the safety of the operations is of utmost importance; assurance must be given that personnel will not be harmed and that the materials and environment will be protected. These safety requirements are met by designing safety features into the system using a layered approach. Several levels of mechanical, electrical and software safety prevent unsafe conditions from generating a hazard, and bring the system to a safe state should an unexpected situation arise. The system safety features include the use of industrial robot standards, commercial robot systems, commercial and custom tooling, mechanical safety interlocks, advanced sensor systems, control and configuration checks, and redundant control schemes. The effectiveness of the safety features in satisfying the safety requirements is verified using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. This technique can point out areas of weakness in the safety design as well as areas where unnecessary redundancy may reduce the system reliability.

  4. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and pressure design. (a) Except as provided by §§ 128.230, 128.240, and... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure...

  5. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II non-vital systems—materials and...

  6. Recent progress in supercapacitors: from materials design to system construction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Xia, Yongyao

    2013-10-01

    Supercapacitors are currently attracting intensive attention because they can provide energy density by orders of magnitude higher than dielectric capacitors, greater power density, and longer cycling ability than batteries. The main challenge for supercapacitors is to develop them with high energy density that is close to that of a current rechargeable battery, while maintaining their inherent characteristics of high power and long cycling life. Consequently, much research has been devoted to enhance the performance of supercapacitors by either maximizing the specific capacitance and/or increasing the cell voltage. The latest advances in the exploration and development of new supercapacitor systems and related electrode materials are highlighted. Also, the prospects and challenges in practical application are analyzed, aiming to give deep insights into the material science and electrochemical fields. PMID:24089352

  7. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class II... a corrosion-resistant material and, if ferrous, be hot-dip galvanized or be at least of...

  8. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design. 128.220 Section 128.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.220 Class...

  9. Safety Standard for Oxygen and Oxygen Systems: Guidelines for Oxygen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage, and Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA's standard for oxygen system design, materials selection, operation, and transportation is presented. Minimum guidelines applicable to NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Installations are contained.

  10. Structural design methodologies for ceramic-based material systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary pacing items for realizing the full potential of ceramic-based structural components is the development of new design methods and protocols. The focus here is on low temperature, fast-fracture analysis of monolithic, whisker-toughened, laminated, and woven ceramic composites. A number of design models and criteria are highlighted. Public domain computer algorithms, which aid engineers in predicting the fast-fracture reliability of structural components, are mentioned. Emphasis is not placed on evaluating the models, but instead is focused on the issues relevant to the current state of the art.

  11. Evolutionary Design of a Robotic Material Defect Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Gary; Howsman, Tom; Craft, Mike; ONeil, Daniel; Steincamp, Jim; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the post-flight inspection of SSME engines, several inaccessible regions must be disassembled to inspect for defects such as cracks, scratches, gouges, etc. An improvement to the inspection process would be the design and development of very small robots capable of penetrating these inaccessible regions and detecting the defects. The goal of this research was to utilize an evolutionary design approach for the robotic detection of these types of defects. A simulation and visualization tool was developed prior to receiving the hardware as a development test bed. A small, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) robot was selected from several candidates as the proof of concept robot. The basic approach to detect the defects was to utilize Cadmium Sulfide (CdS) sensors to detect changes in contrast of an illuminated surface. A neural network, optimally designed utilizing a genetic algorithm, was employed to detect the presence of the defects (cracks). By utilization of the COTS robot and US sensors, the research successfully demonstrated that an evolutionarily designed neural network can detect the presence of surface defects.

  12. Robotic Materials Handling in Space: Mechanical Design of the Robot Operated Materials Processing System HitchHiker Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George

    1997-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Robot Operated Materials Processing System (ROMPS) that flew aboard STS-64 in September, 1994. The ROMPS robot transported pallets containing wafers of different materials from their storage racks to a furnace for thermal processing. A system of tapered guides and compliant springs was designed to deal with the potential misalignments. The robot and all the sample pallets were locked down for launch and landing. The design of the passive lockdown system, and the interplay between it and the alignment system are presented.

  13. Learning to Design and Analyze Materials Handling Systems: Developing Multimedia Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heragu, Sunderesh; Jennings, Sybillyn

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe aspects related to learning and learning assessment including pedagogy, cognition, pilot study and results from the study. This study is conducted for an educational module on "10 Principles of Materials Handling". This module along with another on "Analysis and Design of Integrated Materials Handling Systems" constitute…

  14. Materials, Processes and Manufacturing in Ares 1 Upper Stage: Integration with Systems Design and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2008-01-01

    Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage is designed and developed based on sound systems engineering principles. Systems Engineering starts with Concept of Operations and Mission requirements, which in turn determine the launch system architecture and its performance requirements. The Ares I-Upper Stage is designed and developed to meet these requirements. Designers depend on the support from materials, processes and manufacturing during the design, development and verification of subsystems and components. The requirements relative to reliability, safety, operability and availability are also dependent on materials availability, characterization, process maturation and vendor support. This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of materials and manufacturing engineering during the various phases of Ares IUS development, including design and analysis, hardware development, test and verification. Emphasis is placed how materials, processes and manufacturing support is integrated over the Upper Stage Project, both horizontally and vertically. In addition, the paper describes the approach used to ensure compliance with materials, processes, and manufacturing requirements during the project cycle, with focus on hardware systems design and development.

  15. A Data Envelopment Analysis Model for Selecting Material Handling System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fuh-Hwa Franklin; Kuo, Wan-Ting

    The material handling system under design is an unmanned job shop with an automated guided vehicle that transport loads within the processing machines. The engineering task is to select the design alternatives that are the combinations of the four design factors: the ratio of production time to transportation time, mean job arrival rate to the system, input/output buffer capacities at each processing machine, and the vehicle control strategies. Each of the design alternatives is simulated to collect the upper and lower bounds of the five performance indices. We develop a Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) model to assess the 180 designs with imprecise data of the five indices. The three-ways factorial experiment analysis for the assessment results indicates the buffer capacity and the interaction of job arrival rate and buffer capacity affect the performance significantly.

  16. The design, construction and testing of a scour monitoring system using magnetostrictive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Steven Richard

    A system for the continuous monitoring of scour has been designed, constructed and implemented. The system detects the level of scour by attaching flow to a buried post at known depths, and detecting when individual sensors become unearthed. Two bio-inspired flow sensors were designed and constructed for use on the post. The first, resembling a seal whisker, utilized the magnetostrictive materials Alfenol and Galfenol and was optimized for >0.15m/s flow. The second, resembling seaweed, used a conventional permanent magnet and was optimized for <0.15m/s flow. A small, low powered data acquisition system was designed and constructed to monitor and record the data from the sensors. A total of four scour posts were installed at two different sites; two vertically to monitor conventional scour and two horizontally to monitor lateral riverbed migration. Data from the posts was analyzed and presented and lessons learned were documented.

  17. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  18. Biological materials by design.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Dimas, Leon; Adler, David; Bratzel, Graham; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-02-19

    In this topical review we discuss recent advances in the use of physical insight into the way biological materials function, to design novel engineered materials 'from scratch', or from the level of fundamental building blocks upwards and by using computational multiscale methods that link chemistry to material function. We present studies that connect advances in multiscale hierarchical material structuring with material synthesis and testing, review case studies of wood and other biological materials, and illustrate how engineered fiber composites and bulk materials are designed, modeled, and then synthesized and tested experimentally. The integration of experiment and simulation in multiscale design opens new avenues to explore the physics of materials from a fundamental perspective, and using complementary strengths from models and empirical techniques. Recent developments in this field illustrate a new paradigm by which complex material functionality is achieved through hierarchical structuring in spite of simple material constituents. PMID:24451343

  19. Space shuttle seal material and design development for earth storable propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The results of a program to investigate and characterize seal materials suitable for space shuttle storable propellant systems are given. Two new elastomeric materials were identified as being potentially superior to existing state-of-the art materials for specific sealing applications. These materials were AF-E-124D and AF-E-411. AF-E-124D is a cured perfluorinated polymer suitable for use with dinitrogen tetroxide oxidizer, and hydrazine base fuels. AF-E-411 is an ethylene propylene terpolymer material for hydrazine base fuel service. Data are presented relative to low and high temperature characteristics as well as propellant exposure effects. Types of data included are: mechanical properties, stress strain curves, friction and wear characteristics, compression set and permeability. Sealing tests with a flat poppet-seal valve were conducted for verification of sealing capability. A bibliography includes over 200 references relating to seal design or materials and presents a concise tabulation of the more useful seal design data sources.

  20. Silicon-based elementary particle tracking system: Materials science and mechanical engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Gamble, M.T.; Thompson, T.C.; Hanlon, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Research and development of the mechanical, cooling, and structural design aspects of a silicon detector-based elementary particle tracking system has been performed. Achieving stringent system precision, stability, and mass requirements necessitated the use of graphite fiber-reinforced cyanate-ester (C-E) resins. Mechanical test results of the effects of butane, ionizing radiation, and a combination of both on the mechanical properties of these materials are presented, as well as progress on developing compression molding of an ultralightweight graphite composite ring structure and TV holography-based noninvasive evaluation.

  1. Silicon-based elementary particle tracking system: Materials science and mechanical engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Gamble, M.T.; Thompson, T.C.; Hanlon, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    Research and development of the mechanical, cooling, and structural design aspects of a silicon detector-based elementary particle tracking system has been performed. Achieving stringent system precision, stability, and mass requirements necessitated the use of graphite fiber-reinforced cyanate-ester (C-E) resins. Mechanical test results of the effects of butane, ionizing radiation, and a combination of both on the mechanical properties of these materials are presented, as well as progress on developing compression molding of an ultralightweight graphite composite ring structure and TV holography-based noninvasive evaluation.

  2. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    van Hassel, Bart A.

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the

  3. ECO-WALL SYSTEMS: USING RECYCLED MATERIAL IN THE DESIGN OF COMMERCIAL INTERIOR WALL SYSTEMS FOR BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proposal describes an interdisciplinary project involving students from several academic departments at Miami University in the design of commercial wall systems to be manufactured from recycled materials. The goal of Phase I of the project is to develop and conduct prelimi...

  4. System Design and New Materials for Reversible, Solid-Oxide, High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, J.A.

    2007-12-20

    High temperature solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer high electrical efficiency and a potential path to large scale hydrogen production. Solid oxide technology is capable of both power generation and hydrogen production. That makes it possible for the development of a reversible solid-oxide system that can respond to market conditions to produce electricity or hydrogen on demand. New high-temperature electrolyzer cell materials are needed to enable cost-effective hydrogen production system designs based on reversible steam electrolysis. Two test methods were established for the eventual development of the reversible, durable electrode materials: the button cell test and the oxygen electrode test. The button cell test is capable of evaluating the performance and degradation of full solid oxide cells with dual atmosphere of air and hydrogen-steam. The oxygen electrode test is capable of isolating the performance and degradation of the oxygen electrode. It has higher throughput and sensitivity than the button cell test.

  5. Integrating Materials, Manufacturing, Design and Validation for Sustainability in Future Transport Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. A.; Murphy, A.; Butterfield, J.; McCool, R.; Fleck, R.

    2011-05-01

    The predictive methods currently used for material specification, component design and the development of manufacturing processes, need to evolve beyond the current `metal centric' state of the art, if advanced composites are to realise their potential in delivering sustainable transport solutions. There are however, significant technical challenges associated with this process. Deteriorating environmental, political, economic and social conditions across the globe have resulted in unprecedented pressures to improve the operational efficiency of the manufacturing sector generally and to change perceptions regarding the environmental credentials of transport systems in particular. There is a need to apply new technologies and develop new capabilities to ensure commercial sustainability in the face of twenty first century economic and climatic conditions as well as transport market demands. A major technology gap exists between design, analysis and manufacturing processes in both the OEMs, and the smaller companies that make up the SME based supply chain. As regulatory requirements align with environmental needs, manufacturers are increasingly responsible for the broader lifecycle aspects of vehicle performance. These include not only manufacture and supply but disposal and re-use or re-cycling. In order to make advances in the reduction of emissions coupled with improved economic efficiency through the provision of advanced lightweight vehicles, four key challenges are identified as follows: Material systems, Manufacturing systems, Integrated design methods using digital manufacturing tools and Validation systems. This paper presents a project which has been designed to address these four key issues, using at its core, a digital framework for the creation and management of key parameters related to the lifecycle performance of thermoplastic composite parts and structures. It aims to provide capability for the proposition, definition, evaluation and demonstration of

  6. Integrating Materials, Manufacturing, Design and Validation for Sustainability in Future Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Price, M. A.; Murphy, A.; Butterfield, J.; McCool, R.; Fleck, R.

    2011-05-04

    The predictive methods currently used for material specification, component design and the development of manufacturing processes, need to evolve beyond the current 'metal centric' state of the art, if advanced composites are to realise their potential in delivering sustainable transport solutions. There are however, significant technical challenges associated with this process. Deteriorating environmental, political, economic and social conditions across the globe have resulted in unprecedented pressures to improve the operational efficiency of the manufacturing sector generally and to change perceptions regarding the environmental credentials of transport systems in particular. There is a need to apply new technologies and develop new capabilities to ensure commercial sustainability in the face of twenty first century economic and climatic conditions as well as transport market demands. A major technology gap exists between design, analysis and manufacturing processes in both the OEMs, and the smaller companies that make up the SME based supply chain. As regulatory requirements align with environmental needs, manufacturers are increasingly responsible for the broader lifecycle aspects of vehicle performance. These include not only manufacture and supply but disposal and re-use or re-cycling. In order to make advances in the reduction of emissions coupled with improved economic efficiency through the provision of advanced lightweight vehicles, four key challenges are identified as follows: Material systems, Manufacturing systems, Integrated design methods using digital manufacturing tools and Validation systems. This paper presents a project which has been designed to address these four key issues, using at its core, a digital framework for the creation and management of key parameters related to the lifecycle performance of thermoplastic composite parts and structures. It aims to provide capability for the proposition, definition, evaluation and demonstration of

  7. Integrated design and synthesis of smart material systems: an overview of the ARPA SPICES program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jack H.

    1995-05-01

    The Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures (SPICES) program is comprised of a consortium of industrial, academic and government labs to develop cost effective material processing and synthesis technologies to enable new products using active vibration suppression and control devices to be brought to market. Each team member possesses a specialty in the area of smart structures which has been focused towards the development of several actively controlled smart material systems. Since smart structures involve the integration of multiple engineering disciplines, it is the objective of the consortium to establish cost effective design processes between this multiorganizational team for future incorporation of this new technology into each members respective product lines. To accomplish this task, the disciplines of materials, manufacturing, analytical modeling, actuation, sensing, signal processing, and control had to be synthesized into a unified approach between all ten consortium members. The process developed for intelligent structural systems can truly be classified as multiorganization/multidiciplined Integrated Product Development. This process is described in detail as it applies to the SPICES development articles and smart material fabrication in general.

  8. Design and Application of The Painting Material Supply System of The Painting Robot for Steel Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Kunio; Hisayasu, Azuma; Mori, Tsunehito; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Nakashima, Yoshio

    With the increase of painting works and the decrease of skilled workers, the demand for robot painting of the large-scale steel product is rapidly increasing. But there are many technical problems in the development of the painting robot for this use. The collision between a robot and a work-piece is one of the most important problems, because the robot operates in a small space of a work-piece. Above all, the collision of the painting material supply hose with painted film on a work-piece is very serious. To avoid the hose collision, we propose an in-line type of paint supply mechanism using swivel joints. The key point in this system is the sealing performance and its durability, and we propose the piping system with compliance to strengthen the sealing performance. In this paper, the design method of this system is discussed on the basis of the analysis of the fluctuatinal elastic deformation of a O-ring in the swivel joint. We produced a prototype of the painting robot with the in-line system designed by this method. Application of this robot to the painting of ship-hull block is also discussed. Results from this application show the effectiveness of the in-line system.

  9. Designing a system for measuring the flow of material transported on belts using ultrasonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihuţ, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    Excavation tailings (scraping) and extracting the useful (lignite) in surface mine pits in Mining Basin Oltenia is achieved with technological lines of excavation - transport - dump of high productivity. A correlation of working capacity of the main components of technological lines (motor rotor, high capacity transport, car dumps) is necessary for economic reasons on electricity consumption. To achieve experience in the process was chosen excavator SRS 1400 from South Jilt career in the CET Turceni. The question of coal excavated volume has a great importance in the mine pits. At the excavation is desired a density estimate for each machine production tracking, cost estimation and tracking product unit profitability of each band on various sections zones. Permanent display size excavated volume snapshots in the excavator's cabin permits to track tape loading, eliminating unproductive times and information management to determine profitability. Another important requirement is closing the loop of the machine drive system of an excavator for a uniform deposition of carbon on the strip, thus achieving automatic control of the loading belt. Such equipment is important for the system dispatching in surface mine pits. Through a system of three ultrasound transducers to determine the smart instant of coal excavated section which, coupled with the tape speed, integrated over time will determine the amount of excavated coal. The basis of the system developed is a device for determining the volume and quantity of coal excavated acting on the march and optimize the system speed excavator working order. The device is designed primarily following the careers of lignite production: rotor excavators, rubber conveyor belts and dump facilities. Newly developed system aims to achieve the following determines: the optimum energy excavation depending on the nature of excavated material - lignite, shale, clay, etc., economic times to use the excavator bucket teeth rotor, energy

  10. Safety Standard for Hydrogen and Hydrogen Systems: Guidelines for Hydrogen System Design, Materials Selection, Operations, Storage and Transportation. Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Safety Standard, which establishes a uniform process for hydrogen system design, materials selection, operation, storage, and transportation, is presented. The guidelines include suggestions for safely storing, handling, and using hydrogen in gaseous (GH2), liquid (LH2), or slush (SLH2) form whether used as a propellant or non-propellant. The handbook contains 9 chapters detailing properties and hazards, facility design, design of components, materials compatibility, detection, and transportation. Chapter 10 serves as a reference and the appendices contained therein include: assessment examples; scaling laws, explosions, blast effects, and fragmentation; codes, standards, and NASA directives; and relief devices along with a list of tables and figures, abbreviations, a glossary and an index for ease of use. The intent of the handbook is to provide enough information that it can be used alone, but at the same time, reference data sources that can provide much more detail if required.

  11. Quantum cascade emission in the III-nitride material system designed with effective interface grading

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Alex Y. Huang, Tzu-Yung; Zah, Chung-En; Gmachl, Claire F.; Bhat, Rajaram; Wang, Jie; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-09-28

    We report the realization of quantum cascade (QC) light emission in the III-nitride material system, designed with effective interface grading (EIG). EIG induces a continuous transition between wells and barriers in the quantum confinement, which alters the eigenstate system and even delocalizes the states with higher energy. Fully transverse-magnetic spontaneous emission is observed from the fabricated III-nitride QC structure, with a center wavelength of ∼4.9 μm and a full width at half maximum of ∼110 meV, both in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. A multi-peak photo-response spectrum is also measured from the QC structure, which again agrees well with theoretical calculations and verifies the effects of EIG.

  12. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    The use of fiber-reinforced composite materials have increased in the last four decades in high technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical properties and low weight. In the automotive industry carbon fiber have become popular exclusively in luxury cars because of its high cost. However, Carbon-glass hybrid composites offer an effective alternative to designers to implement fiber-reinforced composites into several conventional applications without a considerable price increase maintaining most of their mechanical properties. A door latch system is a complex mechanism that is under high loading conditions during car accidents such as side impacts and rollovers. Therefore, the Department of Transportation in The United States developed a series of tests that every door latch system comply in order to be installed in a vehicle. The implementation of fiber-reinforced composite materials in a door latch system was studied by analyzing the material behavior during the FMVSS No. 206 transverse test using computational efforts and experimental testing. Firstly, a computational model of the current forkbolt and detent structure was developed. Several efforts were conducted in order to create an effective and time efficient model. Two simplified models were implemented with two different contact interaction approaches. 9 composite materials were studied in forkbolt and 5 in detent including woven carbon fiber, unidirectional carbon fiber, woven carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites and unidirectional carbon-glass fiber hybrid composites. The computational model results showed that woven fiber-reinforced composite materials were stiffer than the unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite materials. For instance, a forkbolt made of woven carbon fibers was 20% stiffer than a forkbolt made of unidirectional fibers symmetrically stacked in 0° and 90° alternating directions. Furthermore, Hybrid composite materials behaved as expected in forkbolt noticing a decline

  13. Design a Sculpting Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Artists have used a variety of materials over the years for sculpting. They have been quick to use unusual pieces of technology to make a vibrant and unique statement, just as painters have created and used a wide variety of colors and derived pigments for their canvases. In this article, the author discusses a design challenge that gives students…

  14. In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Odette; G. E. Lucas

    2005-11-15

    This final report on "In-Service Design & Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation" (DE-FG03-01ER54632) consists of a series of summaries of work that has been published, or presented at meetings, or both. It briefly describes results on the following topics: 1) A Transport and Fate Model for Helium and Helium Management; 2) Atomistic Studies of Point Defect Energetics, Dynamics and Interactions; 3) Multiscale Modeling of Fracture consisting of: 3a) A Micromechanical Model of the Master Curve (MC) Universal Fracture Toughness-Temperature Curve Relation, KJc(T - To), 3b) An Embrittlement DTo Prediction Model for the Irradiation Hardening Dominated Regime, 3c) Non-hardening Irradiation Assisted Thermal and Helium Embrittlement of 8Cr Tempered Martensitic Steels: Compilation and Analysis of Existing Data, 3d) A Model for the KJc(T) of a High Strength NFA MA957, 3e) Cracked Body Size and Geometry Effects of Measured and Effective Fracture Toughness-Model Based MC and To Evaluations of F82H and Eurofer 97, 3-f) Size and Geometry Effects on the Effective Toughness of Cracked Fusion Structures; 4) Modeling the Multiscale Mechanics of Flow Localization-Ductility Loss in Irradiation Damaged BCC Alloys; and 5) A Universal Relation Between Indentation Hardness and True Stress-Strain Constitutive Behavior. Further details can be found in the cited references or presentations that generally can be accessed on the internet, or provided upon request to the authors. Finally, it is noted that this effort was integrated with our base program in fusion materials, also funded by the DOE OFES.

  15. The Spacecraft Materials Selector: An Artificial Intelligence System for Preliminary Design Trade Studies, Materials Assessments, and Estimates of Environments Present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Woll, S. L. B.

    2000-01-01

    Institutions need ways to retain valuable information even as experienced individuals leave an organization. Modern electronic systems have enough capacity to retain large quantities of information that can mitigate the loss of experience. Performance information for long-term space applications is relatively scarce and specific information (typically held by a few individuals within a single project) is often rather narrowly distributed. Spacecraft operate under severe conditions and the consequences of hardware and/or system failures, in terms of cost, loss of information, and time required to replace the loss, are extreme. These risk factors place a premium on appropriate choice of materials and components for space applications. An expert system is a very cost-effective method for sharing valuable and scarce information about spacecraft performance. Boeing has an artificial intelligence software package, called the Boeing Expert System Tool (BEST), to construct and operate knowledge bases to selectively recall and distribute information about specific subjects. A specific knowledge base to evaluate the on-orbit performance of selected materials on spacecraft has been developed under contract to the NASA SEE program. The performance capabilities of the Spacecraft Materials Selector (SMS) knowledge base are described. The knowledge base is a backward-chaining, rule-based system. The user answers a sequence of questions, and the expert system provides estimates of optical and mechanical performance of selected materials under specific environmental conditions. The initial operating capability of the system will include data for Kapton, silverized Teflon, selected paints, silicone-based materials, and certain metals. For situations where a mission profile (launch date, orbital parameters, mission duration, spacecraft orientation) is not precisely defined, the knowledge base still attempts to provide qualitative observations about materials performance and likely

  16. STRUCTURAL DESIGN CRITERIA FOR TARGET/BLANKET SYSTEM COMPONENT MATERIALS FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    W. JOHNSON; R. RYDER; P. RITTENHOUSE

    2001-01-01

    The design of target/blanket system components for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) plant is dependent on the development of materials properties data specified by the designer. These data are needed to verify that component designs are adequate. The adequacy of the data will be related to safety, performance, and economic considerations, and to other requirements that may be deemed necessary by customers and regulatory bodies. The data required may already be in existence, as in the open technical literature, or may need to be generated, as is often the case for the design of new systems operating under relatively unique conditions. The designers' starting point for design data needs is generally some form of design criteria used in conjunction with a specified set of loading conditions and associated performance requirements. Most criteria are aimed at verifying the structural adequacy of the component, and often take the form of national or international standards such as the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME B and PV Code) or the French Nuclear Structural Requirements (RCC-MR). Whether or not there are specific design data needs associated with the use of these design criteria will largely depend on the uniqueness of the conditions of operation of the component. A component designed in accordance with the ASME B and PV Code, where no unusual environmental conditions exist, will utilize well-documented, statistically-evaluated developed in conjunction with the Code, and will not be likely to have any design data needs. On the other hand, a component to be designed to operate under unique APT conditions, is likely to have significant design data needs. Such a component is also likely to require special design criteria for verification of its structural adequacy, specifically accounting for changes in materials properties which may occur during exposure in the service environment. In such a situation it is common for the design criteria and

  17. Solar Energy: System Sizing, Design, and Retrofit: Student Material. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Charles; Orsak, Charles G., Jr.

    Designed for student use in "System Sizing, Design, and Retrofit," one of 11 courses in a 2-year associate degree program in solar technology, this manual provides readings, exercises, worksheets, bibliographies, and illustrations for 13 course modules. The manual, which corresponds to an instructor guide for the same course, covers the following…

  18. Advanced Aerospace Materials by Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Djomehri, Jahed; Wei, Chen-Yu

    2004-01-01

    The advances in the emerging field of nanophase thermal and structural composite materials; materials with embedded sensors and actuators for morphing structures; light-weight composite materials for energy and power storage; and large surface area materials for in-situ resource generation and waste recycling, are expected to :revolutionize the capabilities of virtually every system comprising of future robotic and :human moon and mars exploration missions. A high-performance multiscale simulation platform, including the computational capabilities and resources of Columbia - the new supercomputer, is being developed to discover, validate, and prototype next generation (of such advanced materials. This exhibit will describe the porting and scaling of multiscale 'physics based core computer simulation codes for discovering and designing carbon nanotube-polymer composite materials for light-weight load bearing structural and 'thermal protection applications.

  19. Design and simulation of a microwave powered microplasma system for local area materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, Jeffri Julliarsa

    study is to complement and understand the design, development and operation of the microwave powered microplasmas. A self-consistent model of the foreshortened cylindrical cavity and plasma discharge is presented with results compared to experimental measurements. The microplasma system is incorporated into a micromanufacturing system that integrates the plasma source with an atomic force microscope for surface measurements and nanomanipulation of the surface. Selected applications of the micromachining system demonstrated include using the microplasma as a spatially localized etcher, free radical source, and ultraviolet light source. Silicon and ultrananocrystalline (UNCD) diamond etching is performed using Ar/SF6 and Ar/O2 discharges, respectively, with etching rates of 0.2 -- 2 mum/min and 0.6 -- 2 mum/hr. Localized removal of photoresist is done by using the microplasma as a free radical source and photoresist is exposed to ultraviolet light from the microplasma source to create spatially localized patterns.

  20. Materials design - An undergraduate course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    General principles of systems engineering are applied to the design of materials to meet specific performance objectives. Results of ongoing reseach on processing/structure and structure/property relations in ultrahigh-strength steels are used to illustrate the formulation of quantitative microstructural objectives to achieve required property combinations, and the computer thermodynamics-based design of compositions responding to prescribed processing conditions. A class project addresses the conceptual design of a 7-component stainless bearing steel for a critical Space Shuttle application.

  1. Ten different hip resurfacing systems: biomechanical analysis of design and material properties

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, Jennifer A.; Menge, Michael; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2008-01-01

    This study gives an overview of the main macro- and microstructural differences of ten commercially available total hip resurfacing implants. The heads and cups of resurfacing hip implants from ten different manufacturers were analysed. The components were measured in a coordinate measuring machine. The microstructure of the heads and cups was inspected by scanning electron microscopy. The mean radial clearance was 84.86 μm (range: 49.47–120.93 μm). The implants were classified into three groups (low, medium and high clearance). All implants showed a deviation of roundness of less than 10 μm. It was shown that all implants differ from each other and a final conclusion about the ideal design and material combination cannot be given based on biomechanical data. Widespread use of specific designs can only be recommended if clinical long-term follow-up studies are performed and analysed for each design. PMID:18600323

  2. Highly Integrated Supercapacitor-Sensor Systems via Material and Geometry Design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Kershaw, Stephen V; Wang, Zifeng; Pei, Zengxia; Liu, Junyi; Huang, Yang; Li, Hongfei; Zhu, Minshen; Rogach, Andrey L; Zhi, Chunyi

    2016-07-01

    An ultimate integration strategy making use of material and geometry is applied in a proof-of-concept study. Integrated supercapacitor-sensor systems with the capability of photodetecting and strain sensing are fabricated based on multifunctional conducting polypyrrole and piezoresistive textile geometry, respectively. This integration strategy enables promising applications for self-powered smart sensory, wearable and healthcare electronics. PMID:27184071

  3. Design and implementation of a system for laser assisted milling of advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuefeng; Feng, Gaocheng; Liu, Xianli

    2016-04-01

    Laser assisted machining is an effective method to machine advanced materials with the added benefits of longer tool life and increased material removal rates. While extensive studies have investigated the machining properties for laser assisted milling(LAML), few attempts have been made to extend LAML to machining parts with complex geometric features. A methodology for continuous path machining for LAML is developed by integration of a rotary and movable table into an ordinary milling machine with a laser beam system. The machining strategy and processing path are investigated to determine alignment of the machining path with the laser spot. In order to keep the material removal temperatures above the softening temperature of silicon nitride, the transformation is coordinated and the temperature interpolated, establishing a transient thermal model. The temperatures of the laser center and cutting zone are also carefully controlled to achieve optimal machining results and avoid thermal damage. These experiments indicate that the system results in no surface damage as well as good surface roughness, validating the application of this machining strategy and thermal model in the development of a new LAML system for continuous path processing of silicon nitride. The proposed approach can be easily applied in LAML system to achieve continuous processing and improve efficiency in laser assisted machining.

  4. High-Throughput Computational Design of Advanced Functional Materials: Topological Insulators and Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kesong

    As a rapidly growing area of materials science, high-throughput (HT) computational materials design is playing a crucial role in accelerating the discovery and development of novel functional materials. In this presentation, I will first introduce the strategy of HT computational materials design, and take the HT discovery of topological insulators (TIs) as a practical example to show the usage of such an approach. Topological insulators are one of the most studied classes of novel materials because of their great potential for applications ranging from spintronics to quantum computers. Here I will show that, by defining a reliable and accessible descriptor, which represents the topological robustness or feasibility of the candidate, and by searching the quantum materials repository aflowlib.org, we have automatically discovered 28 TIs (some of them already known) in five different symmetry families. Next, I will talk about our recent research work on the HT computational design of the perovskite-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems. The 2DEG formed on the perovskite oxide heterostructure (HS) has potential applications in next-generation nanoelectronic devices. In order to achieve practical implementation of the 2DEG in the device design, desired physical properties such as high charge carrier density and mobility are necessary. Here I show that, using the same strategy with the HT discovery of TIs, by introducing a series of combinatorial descriptors, we have successfully identified a series of candidate 2DEG systems based on the perovskite oxides. This work provides another exemplar of applying HT computational design approach for the discovery of advanced functional materials.

  5. Looking for design in materials design.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, M E; Clougherty, D P

    2004-10-01

    Despite great advances in computation, materials design is still science fiction. The construction of structure-property relations on the quantum scale will turn computational empiricism into true design. PMID:15467684

  6. Looking for design in materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M. E.; Clougherty, D. P.

    2004-10-01

    Despite great advances in computation, materials design is still science fiction. The construction of structure-property relations on the quantum scale will turn computational empiricism into true design.

  7. Engineering materials-design parameters of the Mg-Li Alloy System from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counts, William; Friak, Martin; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Jorg

    2008-03-01

    Ab initio calculations are becoming increasingly useful to engineers interested in designing new alloys because these calculations are able to accurately predict basic material properties only knowing the atomic composition of the material. Fundamental physical properties (like formation energy and elastic constants) of 11 bcc magnesium-lithium alloys were calculated using density-functional theory (DFT) and compared with available experimental data. These DFT determined properties were in turn used to calculate engineering parameters like the bulk modulus/shear modulus (B/G) and Young's modulus/density (E/ρ). From these engineering parameters, alloys with optimal mechanical properties need for a light weight structural material were identified. It was found that the stiffest bcc magnesium-lithium alloys contain about 70 at.% magnesium while the most ductile alloys have 0-20 at.% magnesium. In addition, the specific modulus for alloys with 70 at.% magnesium was found to be equal to that of aluminum-magnesium alloys and slightly lower than that of aluminum-lithium alloys.

  8. Design of a linear synchronous motor with high temperature superconductor materials in the armature and in the field excitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina, J. M.; Neves, M. V.; McCulloch, M. D.; Rodrigues, A. L.

    2006-06-01

    The high diamagnetism observed in high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials lead to applications involving levitation such as the linear synchronous motor (LSM). Certain features taken into account in conventional LSM design cannot be applied in the HTS case, due to these materials characteristics, such as BSCCO stiffness, when used as armature windings. Also other design features, e.g. slot skewing, which reduces the space harmonics of the air gap magnetic flux density, thus influencing motor performance, plays an important role in final cost. These and other aspects such as the thrust force or the effect of motor control through an inverter are examined in this paper, where the analytical and numerical methodologies involved in the design optimisation of a LSM demonstrator with premagnetised YBCO pellets in the field excitation system and BSCCO armature windings are described. Simulation results are also included.

  9. System design development for microwave and millimeter-wave materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, Lambert; Thumm, Manfred

    2002-06-01

    The most notable effect in processing dielectrics with micro- and millimeter-waves is volumetric heating of these materials, offering the opportunity of very high heating rates for the samples. In comparison to conventional heating where the heat transfer is diffusive and depends on the thermal conductivity of the material, the microwave field penetrates the sample and acts as an instantaneous heat source at each point of the sample. By this unique property, microwave heating at 2.45 GHz and 915 MHz ISM (Industrial, Medical, Scientific) frequencies is established as an important industrial technology since more than 50 years ago. Successful application of microwaves in industries has been reported e.g. by food processing systems, domestic ovens, rubber industry, vacuum drying etc. The present paper shows some outlines of microwave system development at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM by transferring properties from the higher frequency regime (millimeter-waves) to lower frequency applications. Anyway, the need for using higher frequencies like 24 GHz (ISM frequency) for industrial applications has to be carefully verified with respect to special physical/engineering advantages or to limits the standard microwave technology meets for the specific problem.

  10. Classification and designation systems for materials: A report on the present situation, an inventory of the systems in use, and comments on the future possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynard, Keith W.

    1996-01-01

    The different systems that are in use for the major classes of engineering materials are summarized. The work was carried out within the scope of the Versailles project on advanced materials and standards (VAMAS). An inventory of national and international standards that give specifications for the materials and international standards are included. Comments on the increasing knowledge of, and the increasing demand for, data concerning the materials performance are included. Recommendations for future activities in the standardization of classification and designation systems are given.

  11. Battling the challenges of training nurses to use information systems through theory-based training material design.

    PubMed

    Galani, Malatsi; Yu, Ping; Paas, Fred; Chandler, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The attempts to train nurses to effectively use information systems have had mixed results. One problem is that training materials are not adequately designed to guide trainees to gradually learn to use a system without experiencing a heavy cognitive load. This is because training design often does not take into consideration a learner's cognitive ability to absorb new information in a short training period. Given the high cost and difficulty of organising training in healthcare organisations, there is an urgent need for information system trainers to be aware of how cognitive overload or information overload affect a trainee's capability to acquire new knowledge and skills, and what instructional techniques can be used to facilitate effective learning. This paper introduces the concept of cognitive load and how it affects nurses when learning to use a new health information system. This is followed by the relevant strategies for instructional design, underpinned by the principles of cognitive load theory, which may be helpful for the development of effective instructional materials and activities for training nurses to use information systems. PMID:25087524

  12. Design and characterization of an aerodynamic shoe sampling system for screening trace explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staymates, Matthew; Gillen, Greg; Grandner, Jessica; Lukow, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    As part of an ongoing effort with the Transportation Security Laboratory, the National Institute of Standards and Technology has been developing a prototype shoe sampling system that relies on aerodynamic sampling as the primary mechanism for liberating, transporting, and collecting explosive contamination. This presentation will focus on the fluid dynamics associated with the current prototype design. This design includes several air jets and air blades that are used to dislodge particles from target areas of a shoe. A large blower then draws air and liberated particles into a collection device at several hundred liters per second. Experiments that utilize optical particle counting techniques have shown that the applied shear forces from these jets are capable of liberating particles efficiently from shoe surfaces. Results from real-world contamination testing also support the effectiveness of air jet impingement in this prototype. Many examples of flow visualization will be shown. The issues associated with air spillage, particle release efficiency, and particle transport will also be discussed.

  13. Design and development of a space station hazardous material system for assessing chemical compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congo, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    As the Space Station nears reality in funding support from Congress, NASA plans to perform over a hundred different missions in the coming decade. Incrementally deployed, the Space Station will evolve into modules linked to an integral structure. Each module will have characteristic functions, such as logistics, habitation, and materials processing. Because the Space Station is to be user friendly for experimenters, NASA is anticipating that a variety of different chemicals will be taken on-board. Accidental release of these potentially toxic chemicals and their chemical compatibility is the focus of this discourse. The Microgravity Manufacturing Processing Facility (MMPF) will contain the various facilities within the U.S. Laboratory (USL). Each facility will have a characteristic purpose, such as alloy solidification or vapor crystal growth. By examining the proposed experiments for each facility, identifying the chemical constituents, their physical state and/or changes, byproducts and effluents, those payloads can be identified which may contain toxic, explosive, or reactive compounds that require processing or containment in mission peculiar waste management systems. Synergistic reactions from mixed effluent streams is of major concern. Each experiment will have it own data file, complete with schematic, chemical listing, physical data, etc. Chemical compatibility information from various databases will provide assistance in the analysis of alternate disposal techniques (pretreatment, separate storage, etc.). Along with data from the Risk Analysis of the Proposed USL Waste Management System, accidental release of potentially toxic and catastrophic chemicals would be eliminated or reduced.

  14. Electromagnetically characterizing disordered systems: Composite material design and foliage penetrating radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, William Melvin

    dependent functional effective descriptions to consistently simplify the stochastic forest structure. A realistic forest structure is obtained using Lindenmayer algorithms and measured tree parameters and then used to create a layered effective model. In the framework of this model coupling into and propagation through the forest are investigated, and the effects of each layered component are explored. This dissertation explores the applicability of effective representations of composite systems for simplification, and demonstrates the use of that simplification in describing electromagnetic propagation within foliage in order to facilitate the design of foliage penetrating radars.

  15. In situ measurements of high temperature growth of correlated systems: a materials by design scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hua

    There is great interest in developing new ways to use predictive theory to accelerate materials synthesis. We have previously shown that DFT +DMFT electronic structure calculations are successful at predicting gaps and ordered moments, even when correlations are very strong.[ 1 , 2 ] Building on these results, we set out to explore an even closer integration of theory and synthesis, aiming to discover new routes for doping Mott insulators and producing new superconductors. In situ high temperature high energy X-ray diffraction is used to determine the crystal structures of compounds just as they form from the growths, and the structural information is used as input for DFT +DMFT calculations that predict functionality, closing the synthesis loop by suggesting productive new directions. Using this approach, we have investigated the transition metal oxysulfide system Ba-Co-S-O and successfully discovered the new compound BaCoSO, and identified it as an interesting small gap Mott insulator by DFT +DMFT calculations even before any traditional crystal growth is attempted in the lab We acknowledge the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering for providing the NSSEFF funds that supported this research.

  16. Development of a Design Supporting System for Nano-Materials based on a Framework for Integrated Knowledge of Functioning-Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarumi, Shinya; Kozaki, Kouji; Kitamura, Yoshinobu; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    In the recent materials research, much work aims at realization of ``functional materials'' by changing structure and/or manufacturing process with nanotechnology. However, knowledge about the relationship among function, structure and manufacturing process is not well organized. So, material designers have to consider a lot of things at the same time. It would be very helpful for them to support their design process by a computer system. In this article, we discuss a conceptual design supporting system for nano-materials. Firstly, we consider a framework for representing functional structures and manufacturing processes of nano-materials with relationships among them. We expand our former framework for representing functional knowledge based on our investigation through discussion with experts of nano-materials. The extended framework has two features: 1) it represents functional structures and manufacturing processes comprehensively, 2) it expresses parameters of function and ways with their dependencies because they are important for material design. Next, we describe a conceptual design support system we developed based on the framework with its functionalities. Lastly, we evaluate the utility of our system in terms of functionality for design supports. For this purpose, we tried to represent two real examples of material design. And then we did an evaluation experiment on conceptual design of material using our system with the collaboration of domain experts.

  17. Materials design for new superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed here, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues.

  18. Materials by Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    As a new millennium unfolds, a Science Age of three centuries draws to a close, replaced by a Technology Age based not in scientific discovery but in a revolution in engineering design led by U.S. industry. The resulting New Economy, which we now strive to sustain, is based in technology not found in a laboratory, but deliberately created from the human mind in response to perceived needs. While we tend to be nostalgic about exploration ages, at this point in history humankind not only enjoys an unprecedented ability to create wealth from thought, but holds all the tools for a much-needed transformation from mere technology to responsible technology.

  19. Miniature LIMS system designed for sensitive in situ measurements of organic deposits in materials on solar system objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedo, Andreas; Moreno-García, Pavel; Grimaudo, Valentine; Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In situ investigation of chemical composition is of considerable interest for application in planetary missions. The possibility of bio-relevant organic chemistry on the surfaces of comets and primitive asteroids is one of the most intriguing problems of the current astrobiology. Rock-water interface existed in early small solar body history, in addition to extensive mineralogical modifications of the surface could have initiated also a rich organic and bio-organic chemistry [1]. Current space instrumentation designed for molecular detection use thermal evaporation source combined with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry [2]. Hence, it is capable of collecting data of the volatile fraction of the investigated sample. Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LD-MS) is another method for molecule detection capable of vaporisation and ionisation of molecules present on a solid substrate surface, e.g. a rock. A miniature laser ablation ionisation reflectron-type time-of-flight mass analyser (LMS) developed by our group for in situ measurements of the elemental, isotopic composition can be used also for sensitive analyses of chemical compounds present on solid surfaces with high spatial resolution [3-6]. Comparing to laser ablation laser desorption analyses are conducted at laser irradiance reduced by approximately 103-104 times. In laser ablation mode, the LMS system offers high dynamic range of at least eight orders of magnitude and allows for the detection in the ppb range for metallic- and non-metallic elements. Instrument mass resolution m/Δm is about 800 at the 56Fe mass peak when the instrument is used in ablation mode. The mass resolution is increased to m/Δm >1000 when desorption studies are conducted (at ~600 m/q). We will demonstrate the instrument performance conducting molecular desorption studies of different species, e.g. organic, biotic and abiotic. Laser ablation/ionisation studies are conducted in parallel to complement the laser desorption

  20. Ozone Exposure System Designed and Used to High-Altitude Airship Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    High-altitude airships can receive high doses of ozone over short mission durations. For example, in 1 year at an altitude of 70,000 ft, the ozone fluence (number arriving per unit area) can be as high as 1.2 1024 molecules/sq cm. Ozone exposure at these levels can embrittle materials or change the performance of solar cells. It is important to expose components and materials to the expected ozone dosage to determine if the ozone exposure could cause any mission-critical failures.

  1. Designing a HAZMAT (hazardous materials) incident management system for facilities with widely varying emergency organization structures

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.; Easterly, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently conducting a research program for the United States Air Force, the purpose of which is to assist them in their emergency planning for HAZMAT spills. This paper describes the first two tasks in the program. These tasks are oriented towards: determining the extent of the hazardous materials (HAZMAT) problem and establishing plans directed toward HAZMAT incident management.

  2. SYSTEM DESIGN FOR A CONTINUOUS PROGRESS SCHOOL--PART III, THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COGSWELL, JOHN F.; EGBERT, ROBERT L.

    THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER (IMC) OF THE CONTINUOUS PROGRESS SCHOOL WAS DESCRIBED. THE CONTINUOUS PROGRESS SCHOOL PLAN WAS DEVISED BY DR. EDWIN READ AND WAS BEING DEVELOPED AT THE LABORATORY SCHOOL OF BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY. THIS REPORT DESCRIBED HOW AN IMC MIGHT OPERATE RATHER THAN HOW ONE IS OPERATING OR IS PLANNED TO OPERATE. AS…

  3. Design and Application of a Beam Testing System for Experiential Learning in Mechanics of Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, R. Warsi; Rais-Rohani, M.

    2009-01-01

    Research shows that students can significantly improve their understanding and retention of topics presented in an engineering course when discussions of theoretical and mathematical approaches are combined with active-learning exercises involving hands-on physical experiments. In this paper, the design and application of a beam testing system…

  4. Sensing materials with a concurrent sensitivity: design, synthesis and application in multisensory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lvova, Larisa; Pomarico, Giuseppe; Spiridonov, Igor; Mednova, Olga; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Legin, Andrey; Di Natale, Corrado; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Paolesse, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    A series of novel sensing materials with concurrent sensitivity, namely the porphyrins [free-base, Mn(III) and Fe(III) complexes], functionalized with crown-ether or aza-crown (cyclam) pendant groups, were synthesized and tested as ionophores for polymeric membrane electrodes. Several aspects were studied in order to evaluate the functionality and the desired sensitivity of resulting crown-porphyrins hyphenated ionophores, among them the nature and the size of crown fragment cavity, the length of the alkyl pendant incorporating the crown-ether unit, the presence and the nature of central metal ion both in porphyrin and crown macrocycles.

  5. Algorithms and theory for the design and programming of industrial control systems materialized with PLC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya Villena, Rafael

    According to its title, the general objective of the Thesis consists in developing a clear, simple and systematic methodology for programming type PLC devices. With this aim in mind, we will use the following elements: Codification of all variables types. This section is very important since it allows us working with little information. The necessary rules are given to codify all type of phrases produced in industrial processes. An algorithm that describes process evolution and that has been called process D.F. This is one of the most important contributions, since it will allow us, together with information codification, representing the process evolution in a graphic way and with any design theory used. Theory selection. Evidently, the use of some kind of design method is necessary to obtain logic equations. For this particular case, we will use binodal theory, an ideal theory for wired technologies, since it can obtain highly reduced schemas for relatively simple automatisms, which means a minimum number of components used. User program outline algorithm (D.F.P.). This is another necessary contribution and perhaps the most important one, since logic equations resulting from binodal theory are compatible with process evolution if wired technology is used, whether it is electric, electronic, pneumatic, etc. On the other hand, PLC devices performance characteristics force the program instructions order to validate or not the automatism, as we have proven in different articles and lectures at congresses both national and international. Therefore, we will codify any information concerning the automating process, graphically represent its temporal evolution and, applying binodal theory and D.F.P (previously adapted), succeed in making logic equations compatible with the process to be automated and the device in which they will be implemented (PLC in our case)

  6. Materials design for new superconductors.

    PubMed

    Norman, M R

    2016-07-01

    Since the announcement in 2011 of the Materials Genome Initiative by the Obama administration, much attention has been given to the subject of materials design to accelerate the discovery of new materials that could have technological implications. Although having its biggest impact for more applied materials like batteries, there is increasing interest in applying these ideas to predict new superconductors. This is obviously a challenge, given that superconductivity is a many body phenomenon, with whole classes of known superconductors lacking a quantitative theory. Given this caveat, various efforts to formulate materials design principles for superconductors are reviewed here, with a focus on surveying the periodic table in an attempt to identify cuprate analogues. PMID:27214291

  7. Composite materials: Testing and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the analysis of composite structures, composite materials' impact and compression behavior, composite materials characterization methods, composite failure mechanisms, NDE methods for composites, and filament-wound and woven composite materials' fabrication. Attention is given to the automated design of a composite plate for damage tolerance, the effects of adhesive layers on composite laminate impact damage, instability-related delamination growth in thermoset and thermoplastic composites, a simple shear fatigue test for unidirectional E-glass epoxy, the growth of elliptic delaminations in laminates under cyclic transverse shear, and the mechanical behavior of braided composite materials.

  8. Design guide for composite-material flywheels: rotor dyamic considerations. Part I. System whirling and stability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, C.W.; Ramunujam, G.

    1981-09-01

    Information to designers of flywheels is provided which will enable them to predict many aspects of the dynamic behavior of their flywheel systems when spin-tested with a quill-shaft support and driven by an air turbine. Computer programs are presented for the following dynamic analysis to obtain the results indicated: free whirling for natural frequencies versus rotational speed and the associated mode shapes; rough-type stability analysis for determining the stability limits; and forced whirling analysis for estimating the response of major components of the system to flywheel mass eccentricity and initial tilt. For the first and third kinds of analyses, two different mathematical models of the generic system are investigated. One is a seven-degree-of-freedom lumped-parameter analysis, while the other is a combined distributed- and lumped-parameter analysis. When applied to an existing flywheel system, the two models yielded numerical values for the lowest first-order forward critical speed in very close agreement with each other and with experimental results obtained in spin tests. Therefore, for the second kind of analysis, only the lumped-parameter model is implemented. Qualitative discussions as to why forced retrograde whirling is not as severe as forward whirling are also presented. The analyses are applied to the multi-material ring type flywheel systems, a constant-thickness-diskring type, and a tapered-thickness-disk type. In addition, the effects of the following flywheel design parameters on system dynamics were investigated: flywheel mass; diametral and polar mass moments of inertia; location of mass center from the lower end of the quill shaft; quill shaft length; lower turbine-bearing support stiffness; equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the external damper; flywheel dead weight; and torque applied at the turbine.

  9. Ergonomic approaches to designing educational materials for immersive multi-projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takashi; Lee, JaeLin; Inoue, Tetsuri

    2014-02-01

    Rapid advances in computer and display technologies have made it possible to present high quality virtual reality (VR) environment. To use such virtual environments effectively, research should be performed into how users perceive and react to virtual environment in view of particular human factors. We created a VR simulation of sea fish for science education, and we conducted an experiment to examine how observers perceive the size and depth of an object within their reach and evaluated their visual fatigue. We chose a multi-projection system for presenting the educational VR simulation, because this system can provide actual-size objects and produce stereo images located close to the observer. The results of the experiment show that estimation of size and depth was relatively accurate when subjects used physical actions to assess them. Presenting images within the observer's reach is suggested to be useful for education in VR environment. Evaluation of visual fatigue shows that the level of symptoms from viewing stereo images with a large disparity in VR environment was low in a short time.

  10. Designed materials: what and how

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, Jyotirmoy; Dutta, Debasish; Ghosh, Amit K.; Kikuchi, Noboru

    2003-03-01

    Quest for a material to suit the service performance is almost as old as human civilization. So far materials engineers have developed a series of alloys, polymers, ceramics, and composites to serve many of the performance requirements in a modern society. However, challenges appear when one needs to satisfy more than one boundary condition. For example, a component with negative Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) using a ductile metal was almost impossible until recently. Synthesis of various technologies such as Direct Metal Deposition (DMD) Homogenization Design Method (HDM) and mutli material Computer Aided Design (CAD) was necessary to achieve this goal. Rapid fabrication of three-dimensional shapes of engineering materials such as H13 tool steel and nickel super alloys are now possible using Direct Materials Deposition (DMD) technique as well as similar techniques such as Light Engineered New Shaping (LENS) or Directed Light Fabrication (DLF). However, DMD has closed loop capability that enables better dimension and thermal cycle control. This enables one to deposit different material at different pixels with a given height directly from a CAD drawing. The feedback loop also controls the thermal cycle. H13 tool steel is one of the difficult alloys for deposition due to residual stress accumulation from martensitic transformation. However, it is the material of choice for the die and tool industry. DMD has demonstrated successful fabrication of complicated shapes and dies and tools, even with H13 alloys. This process also offers copper chill blocks and water-cooling channels as the integral part of the tool. On the other hand ZrO2 was co-deposited with nickel super alloys using DMD. Flexibility of the process is enormous and essentially it is an enabling technology to marterialize many a design. Using DMD in conjunction with HDM and multi-material CAD, one can produce components with predetermined performance such as negative co-efficient of expansion, by

  11. Designing Jammed Materials from the Particle Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskin, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Identifying which microscopic features produce a desired macroscopic behavior is a problem at the forefront of materials science. This task is materials design, and within it, new challenges have emerged from tailoring packings of particles jammed into a rigid state. For these materials, particle shape is a key parameter by which the response of a packing can be tuned. Yet designing via shape faces two unique complications: first there is no general theory that calculates the response of an aggregate given a particle shape, and second, there is no straightforward way to explore the space of all particle geometries. This talk summarizes recent results that address these challenges to design jammed materials from the particle up. It shows how simulations, experiments, and state-of-the-art optimization engines come together to form a complete system that identifies extreme materials. As examples, it will show how this system can create particle shapes that form the stiffest, softest, densest, loosest, most dissipative and strain-stiffening aggregates. Finally, it will discuss the how these results relate to the general task of materials design and the exciting possibilities associated with optimizing, tuning and rationally constructing new breeds of jammed materials.

  12. Material Fatigue Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilley, P. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for cyclicly applying a varying load to a material under test is described. It includes a load sensor which senses the magnitude of load being applied to a material, and, upon sensing a selected magnitude of loading, causes the load to be maintained for a predetermined time and then cause the system to resume cyclical loading.

  13. Emerging smart materials systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strock, H.B.

    1996-04-01

    Smart materials systems are nonliving systems that integrate the functions of sensing, actuation, logic and control to respond adaptively to changes in their condition or the environment to which they are exposed, in a useful and usually repetitive manner. Smart materials possess both sensing and actuation capability. They can adaptively respond to changing stimuli, e.g., the variable darkening of photochromic glass or plastic on exposure to sunlight. Such passively smart materials behavior has relatively limited, although marketable, functionality.

  14. Materials design for electrocatalytic carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss our philosophy for implementation of the Materials Genome Initiative through an integrated materials design strategy, exemplified here in the context of electrocatalytic capture and separation of CO2 gas. We identify for a group of 1:1 X-N graphene analogue materials that electro-responsive switchable CO2 binding behavior correlates with a change in the preferred binding site from N to the adjacent X atom as negative charge is introduced into the system. A reconsideration of conductive N-doped graphene yields the discovery that the N-dopant is able to induce electrocatalytic binding of multiple CO2 molecules at the adjacent carbon sites.

  15. Systems Design Orientation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Institutions, Social and Rehabilitation Services, Oklahoma City.

    A 40-hour course in systems design is described. The course was developed for presentation to non-data processing management personnel whose responsibilities include utilization of data processing services. All course material is included. (Author/JY)

  16. Marine Education Materials System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammisch, Sue; Gray, Kevin

    1980-01-01

    Described is a marine education materials clearinghouse, the Marine Education Materials System (MEMS). MEMS classifies marine education documents and reproduces them on microfiche for distribution. There are 25 distribution centers, each of which has a collection of documents and provides assistance on a request basis to teachers. (Author/DS)

  17. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  18. Designing Online Software for Teaching the Concept of Variable That Facilitates Mental Interaction with the Material: Systemic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Natalya A.; Thompson, Ann D.; Correia, Ana-Paula; Hagedorn, Linda Serra

    2015-01-01

    Our case study is a response to the need for research and reporting on specific strategies employed by software designers to produce effective multimedia instructional solutions. A systemic approach for identifying appropriate software features and conducting a formative evaluation that evaluates both the overall effectiveness of the multimedia…

  19. OLED microdisplay design and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Prache, Olivier; Ali, Tariq; Khayrullin, Ilyas; Ghosh, Amalkumar

    2010-04-01

    AMOLED microdisplays from eMagin Corporation are finding growing acceptance within the military display market as a result of their excellent power efficiency, wide operating temperature range, small size and weight, good system flexibility, and ease of use. The latest designs have also demonstrated improved optical performance including better uniformity, contrast, MTF, and color gamut. eMagin's largest format display is currently the SXGA design, which includes features such as a 30-bit wide RGB digital interface, automatic luminance regulation from -45 to +70°C, variable gamma control, and a dynamic range exceeding 50:000 to 1. This paper will highlight the benefits of eMagin's latest microdisplay designs and review the roadmap for next generation devices. The ongoing development of reduced size pixels and larger format displays (up to WUXGA) as well as new OLED device architecture (e.g. high-brightness yellow) will be discussed. Approaches being explored for improved performance in next generation designs such as lowpower serial interfaces, high frame rate operation, and new operational modes for reduction of motion artifacts will also be described. These developments should continue to enhance the appeal of AMOLED microdisplays for a broad spectrum of near-to-the-eye applications such as night vision, simulation and training, situational awareness, augmented reality, medical imaging, and mobile video entertainment and gaming.

  20. Computationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Dumitru; Lagowski, Jolanta; Faid, Karim

    2004-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out for different molecular systems in order to predict the binding affinities, binding energies, binding distances and the active site groups between the simulated molecular systems and different bio-ligands (theophylline and its derivatives), which have been designed and minimized using molecular simulation techniques. The first simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and functional monomer, such as methacrylic acid and its derivatives. For each pair of molecular systems, (10 monomers with a ligand and 10 monomers without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between a ligand and the corresponding monomers. The analysis of the simulated functional monomers with ligands indicates that the functional group of monomers interacting with ligands tends to be either COOH or CH2=CH. The distances between the ligand and monomer, in the most stable cases as indicated above, are between 2.0-4.5 Å. The second simulated molecular systems consisted of a ligand and a polymer. The polymers were obtained from monomers that were simulated above. And similar to monomer study, for each pair of molecular systems, (polymer with a ligand and polymer without a ligand) a total energy difference was calculated in order to estimate the binding energy between ligand and the corresponding polymer. The binding distance between the active site of a polymer and a ligand will also be discussed.

  1. Designer Nanocrystal Materials for Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Cherie

    Advances in synthetic methods allow a wide range of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to be tailored in size and shape and to be used as building blocks in the design of NC solids. However, the long, insulating ligands commonly employed in the synthesis of colloidal NCs inhibit strong interparticle coupling and charge transport once NCs are assembled into the solids state as NC arrays. We will describe the range of short, compact ligand chemistries we employ to exchange the long, insulating ligands used in synthesis and to increase interparticle coupling. These ligand exchange processes can have a dramatic influence on NC surface chemistry as well as NC organization in the solids, showing examples of short-range order. Synergistically, we use 1) thermal evaporation and diffusion and 2) wet-chemical methods to introduce extrinsic impurities and non-stoichiometry to passivate surface traps and dope NC solids. NC coupling and doping provide control over the density of states and the carrier type, concentration, mobility, and lifetime, which we characterize by a range of electronic and spectroscopic techniques. We will describe the importance of engineering device interfaces to design NC materials for solar photovoltaics.

  2. Development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, Charles A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of high temperature containerless processing equipment and the design and evaluation of associated systems required for microgravity materials processing and property measurements are discussed. Efforts were directed towards the following task areas: design and development of a High Temperature Acoustic Levitator (HAL) for containerless processing and property measurements at high temperatures; testing of the HAL module to establish this technology for use as a positioning device for microgravity uses; construction and evaluation of a brassboard hot wall Acoustic Levitation Furnace; construction and evaluation of a noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) system based on AGEMA thermal imaging camera; construction of a prototype Division of Amplitude Polarimetric Pyrometer for NCTM of levitated specimens; evaluation of and recommendations for techniques to control contamination in containerless materials processing chambers; and evaluation of techniques for heating specimens to high temperatures for containerless materials experimentation.

  3. Laser material processing system

    DOEpatents

    Dantus, Marcos

    2015-04-28

    A laser material processing system and method are provided. A further aspect of the present invention employs a laser for micromachining. In another aspect of the present invention, the system uses a hollow waveguide. In another aspect of the present invention, a laser beam pulse is given broad bandwidth for workpiece modification.

  4. Software Design Analyzer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    CRISP80 software design analyzer system a set of programs that supports top-down, hierarchic, modular structured design, and programing methodologies. CRISP80 allows for expression of design as picture of program.

  5. VLSI system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muroga, S.

    A complete picture of LSI/VLSI system design is provided, encompassing both engineering and economic considerations. The subjects discussed include: cost analysis based on production volume, yield, chip size, design manpower and other factors; bipolar and MOS logic families, logic design procedures, and mask designs; use of ROMs and PLAs in logic design, along with design algorithms; a survey of CAD used in LSI/VLSI chip design. Also covered are: full-custom and semicustom designs; microprocessor and dedicated processor chips; system design and hardware-software tradeoffs; LSI/VLSI technological trends; new products realized by LSI/VLSI technology; future production and management problems.

  6. Energy Systems Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PRESTO, a COSMIC program, handles energy system specifications and predicts design efficiency of cogeneration systems. These systems allow a company to use excess energy produced to generate electricity. PRESTO is utilized by the Energy Systems Division of Thermo Electron Corporation in the custom design of cogeneration systems.

  7. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  8. Materials informatics: a journey towards material design and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yuzuru

    2016-06-28

    Materials informatics has been gaining popularity with the rapid development of computational materials science. However, collaborations between information science and materials science have not yet reached the success. There are several issues which need to be overcome in order to establish the field of materials informatics. Construction of material big data, implementation of machine learning, and platform design for materials discovery are discussed with potential solutions. PMID:27292550

  9. Materials management information systems.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    The hospital materials management function--ensuring that goods and services get from a source to an end user--encompasses many areas of the hospital and can significantly affect hospital costs. Performing this function in a manner that will keep costs down and ensure adequate cash flow requires effective management of a large amount of information from a variety of sources. To effectively coordinate such information, most hospitals have implemented some form of materials management information system (MMIS). These systems can be used to automate or facilitate functions such as purchasing, accounting, inventory management, and patient supply charges. In this study, we evaluated seven MMISs from seven vendors, focusing on the functional capabilities of each system and the quality of the service and support provided by the vendor. This Evaluation is intended to (1) assist hospitals purchasing an MMIS by educating materials managers about the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs and (2) educate clinical engineers and information system managers about the scope of materials management within a healthcare facility. Because software products cannot be evaluated in the same manner as most devices typically included in Health Devices Evaluations, our standard Evaluation protocol was not applicable for this technology. Instead, we based our ratings on our observations (e.g., during site visits), interviews we conducted with current users of each system, and information provided by the vendor (e.g., in response to a request for information [RFI]). We divided the Evaluation into the following sections: Section 1. Responsibilities and Information Requirements of Materials Management: Provides an overview of typical materials management functions and describes the capabilities, benefits, and limitations of MMISs. Also includes the supplementary article, "Inventory Cost and Reimbursement Issues" and the glossary, "Materials Management Terminology." Section 2. The

  10. ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09

    This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

  11. Progress in material design for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitt, Mark W.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterials that interface with biological systems are used to deliver drugs safely and efficiently; to prevent, detect, and treat disease; to assist the body as it heals; and to engineer functional tissues outside of the body for organ replacement. The field has evolved beyond selecting materials that were originally designed for other applications with a primary focus on properties that enabled restoration of function and mitigation of acute pathology. Biomaterials are now designed rationally with controlled structure and dynamic functionality to integrate with biological complexity and perform tailored, high-level functions in the body. The transition has been from permissive to promoting biomaterials that are no longer bioinert but bioactive. This perspective surveys recent developments in the field of polymeric and soft biomaterials with a specific emphasis on advances in nano- to macroscale control, static to dynamic functionality, and biocomplex materials. PMID:26598696

  12. Improved 4-chlorophenol dechlorination at biocathode in bioelectrochemical system using optimized modular cathode design with composite stainless steel and carbon-based materials.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2014-08-01

    This study developed and optimized a modular biocathode materials design in bioelectrochemical system (BES) using composite metal and carbon-based materials. The 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) dechlorination could be improved with such composite materials. Results showed that stainless steel basket (SSB) filled with graphite granules (GG) and carbon brush (CB) (SSB/GG/CB) was optimum for dechlorination, followed by SSB/CB and SSB/GG, with rate constant k of 0.0418 ± 0.0002, 0.0374 ± 0.0004, and 0.0239 ± 0.0002 h(-1), respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrated that the composite materials with metal can benefit the electron transfer and decrease the charge transfer resistance to be 80.4 Ω in BES-SSB/GG/CB, much lower than that in BES-SSB (1674.3 Ω), BES-GG (387.3 Ω), and BES-CB (193.8 Ω). This modular cathode design would be scalable with successive modules for BES scale-up, and may offer useful information to guide the selection and design of BES materials towards dechlorination improvement in wastewater treatment. PMID:24926596

  13. Material constraints on high-speed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Diana; Militaru, Nicolae

    2015-02-01

    Current high-speed circuit designs with signal rates up to 100Gbps and above are implying constraints for dielectric and conductive materials and their dependence of frequency, for component elements and for production processes. The purpose of this paper is to highlight through various simulation results the frequency dependence of specific parameters like insertion and return loss, eye diagrams, group delay that are part of signal integrity analyses type. In low-power environment designs become more complex as the operation frequency increases. The need for new materials with spatial uniformity for dielectric constant is a need for higher data rates circuits. The fiber weave effect (FWE) will be analyzed through the eye diagram results for various dielectric materials in a differential signaling scheme given the fact that the FWE is a phenomenon that affects randomly the performance of the circuit on balanced/differential transmission lines which are typically characterized through the above mentioned approaches. Crosstalk between traces is also of concern due to propagated signals that have tight rise and fall times or due to high density of the boards. Criteria should be considered to achieve maximum performance of the designed system requiring critical electronic properties.

  14. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    PubMed

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1) to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2) to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3) to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4) to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems. PMID:25583299

  15. Some Thoughts on DIY Materials Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the reasons that are often given against teacher-generated English-as-a-Foreign-Language materials and presents arguments in favor of DIY (Do It Yourself) materials design. (23 references) (GLR)

  16. Materials by Design: Merging Proteins and Music

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joyce Y.; McDonald, John; Taylor-Pinney, Micki; Spivak, David I.; Kaplan, David L.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2013-01-01

    Tailored materials with tunable properties are crucial for applications as biomaterials, for drug delivery, as functional coatings, or as lightweight composites. An emerging paradigm in designing such materials is the construction of hierarchical assemblies of simple building blocks into complex architectures with superior properties. We review this approach in a case study of silk, a genetically programmable and processable biomaterial, which, in its natural role serves as a versatile protein fiber with hierarchical organization to provide structural support, prey procurement or protection of eggs. Through an abstraction of knowledge from the physical system, silk, to a mathematical model using category theory, we describe how the mechanism of spinning fibers from proteins can be translated into music through a process that assigns a set of rules that governs the construction of the system. This technique allows one to express the structure, mechanisms and properties of the ‘material’ in a very different domain, ‘music’. The integration of science and art through categorization of structure-property relationships presents a novel paradigm to create new bioinspired materials, through the translation of structures and mechanisms from distinct hierarchical systems and in the context of the limited number of building blocks that universally governs these systems. PMID:23997808

  17. Transparent materials processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hetherington, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    A zero gravity processing furnace system was designed that will allow acquisition of photographic or other visual information while the sample is being processed. A low temperature (30 to 400 C) test model with a flat specimen heated by quartz-halide lamps was constructed. A high temperature (400 to 1000 C) test model heated by resistance heaters, utilizing a cylindrical specimen and optics, was also built. Each of the test models is discussed in detail. Recommendations are given.

  18. Designing Simulation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twelker, Paul A.

    1969-01-01

    "The purpose of this paper is to outline the approach to designing instructional simulation systems developed at Teaching Research. The 13 phases of simulation design will be summarized, and an effort will be made to expose the vital decision points that confront the designer as he develops simulation experiences. (Author)

  19. Bulk material handling system

    DOEpatents

    Kleysteuber, William K.; Mayercheck, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a bulk material handling system particularly adapted for underground mining and includes a monorail supported overhead and carrying a plurality of conveyors each having input and output end portions with the output end portion of a first of the conveyors positioned above an input end portion of a second of the conveyors, a device for imparting motion to the conveyors to move the material from the input end portions toward the output end portions thereof, a device for supporting at least one of the input and output end portions of the first and second conveyors from the monorail, and the supporting device including a plurality of trolleys rollingly supported by the monorail whereby the conveyors can be readily moved therealong.

  20. Novel stable hard transparent conductors in TiO2-TiC system: Design materials from scratch

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangying; Liu, Dongyan; Dai, Xuefeng; Pan, Haijun; Wen, Xiaohong; Zuo, Liang; Qin, Gaowu

    2014-01-01

    Two new ternary compounds in the TiO2-TiC system, Ti5C2O6 and Ti3C2O2, are reported for the first time based on ab initio evolutionary algorithm. Ti5C2O6 has a tube-structure in which sp1 hybridized carbon chains run through the lattice along the b-axis; while in the Ti3C2O2 lattice, double TiO6 polyhedral are separated by the non-coplanar sp2 hybridized hexagon graphite layers along the c-axis, forming a sandwich-like structure. At ambient conditions, the two compounds are found to be mechanically and dynamically stable and intrinsic transparent conductors with high hardness (about twice harder than the conventional transparent conducting oxides). These mechanical, electronic, and optical properties make Ti5C2O6 and Ti3C2O2 ternary compounds be promising robust, hard, transparent, and conductive materials. PMID:25511583

  1. Managing Training Materials with Structured Text Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streit, Les D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes characteristics of structured text design; benefits of its use in training; benefits for developers of training materials and steps in preparing training materials. A case study illustrating how the structured text design process solved the sales training needs of the Mercedes-Benz Truck Company is presented. (MBR)

  2. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... equivalent to the standards established by the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Material, design and construction. 58.05-1 Section 58.05... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design...

  3. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... equivalent to the standards established by the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Material, design and construction. 58.05-1 Section 58.05... AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Main Propulsion Machinery § 58.05-1 Material, design...

  4. Computational design and optimization of energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Maria

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) to understand and improve energy materials for diverse applications - including energy storage, thermal management, catalysis, and photovoltaics - is widespread. The further step of using high throughput DFT calculations to design materials and has led to an acceleration in materials discovery and development. Due to various limitations in DFT, including accuracy and computational cost, however, it is important to leverage effective models and, in some cases, experimental information to aid the design process. In this talk, I will discuss efforts in design and optimization of energy materials using a combination of effective models, DFT, machine learning, and experimental information.

  5. Hazardous materials incineration system

    SciTech Connect

    Hladun, K.W.

    1982-03-23

    A hazardous materials incineration system is disclosed which includes a solid waste combustor of the inclined, oscillating or rocking type and a liquid waste combustor suitable to incinerate wastes in liquid form. The combustion products from both the solid waste combustor and the liquid waste combustor are fed to an afterburner which is equipped with burners to maintain elevated temperatures throughout the length of the afterburner chamber. The products of combustion exit the afterburner into a conditioning unit which eliminates larger particulate matter, cools the combustion products and releases certain additives into the moving gas stream prior to entry into a baghouse. All neutralized salts are withdrawn at the baghouse and the gaseous baghouse effluent is directed to a further aqueous liquor contact apparatus prior to exhausting to atmosphere through a forced draft stack system.

  6. Topology Optimization for Architected Materials Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanov, Mikhail; Guest, James K.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes provide a tremendous opportunity to fabricate materials with precisely defined architectures. To fully leverage these capabilities, however, materials architectures must be optimally designed according to the target application, base material used, and specifics of the fabrication process. Computational topology optimization offers a systematic, mathematically driven framework for navigating this new design challenge. The design problem is posed and solved formally as an optimization problem with unit cell and upscaling mechanics embedded within this formulation. This article briefly reviews the key requirements to apply topology optimization to materials architecture design and discusses several fundamental findings related to optimization of elastic, thermal, and fluidic properties in periodic materials. Emerging areas related to topology optimization for manufacturability and manufacturing variations, nonlinear mechanics, and multiscale design are also discussed.

  7. Residential photovoltaic system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    A project to develop Residential Photovoltaic Systems has begun at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory with the construction and testing of five Prototype Systems. All of these systems utilize a roof-mounted photovoltaic array and allow excess solar-generated electric energy to be fed back to the local utility grid, eliminating the need for on-site storage. Residential photovoltaic system design issues are discussed and specific features of the five Prototype Systems now under test are presented.

  8. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  9. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  10. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-30

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  11. Instructional Design: System Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Bruce R.; Sleeman, Phillip J.

    This book is intended as a source for those who desire to apply a coherent system of instructional design, thereby insuring accountability. Chapter 1 covers the instructional design process, including: instructional technology; the role of evaluation; goal setting; the psychology of teaching and learning; task analysis; operational objectives;…

  12. Computer-Aided Design Of Sheet-Material Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Paternoster, Vincent Y.; Levitt, Maureen L.; Osterloh, Mark R.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided-design system partly automates tedious process of designing and guiding assembly of small pieces of flat sheet material into large surfaces that approximate smoothly curved surfaces having complicated three-dimensional shapes. Capability provides for flexibility enabling designer to assess quickly and easily effects of changes in design in making engineering compromises among various sizes and shapes. Saves time and money in both design and fabrication. Used in rocket-engine application and other applications requiring design of sheet-material parts.

  13. Remote Systems Design & Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2009-08-28

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) to provide information and lessons learned relating to the design, development and deployment of remote systems, particularly remote arm/manipulator systems. This report reflects PNNL’s experience with remote systems and lays out the most important activities that need to be completed to successfully design, build, deploy and operate remote systems in radioactive and chemically contaminated environments. It also contains lessons learned from PNNL’s work experiences, and the work of others in the national laboratory complex.

  14. PAMTRAK: A personnel and material tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Anspach, D.A.; Anspach, J.P.; Walters, B.G.; Crain, B. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    There is a need for an automated system for protecting and monitoring sensitive or classified parts and material. Sandia has developed a real-time personnel and material tracking system (PAMTRAK) that has been installed at selected DOE facilities. It safeguards sensitive parts and material by tracking tags worn by personnel and by monitoring sensors attached to the parts or material. It includes remote control and alarm display capabilities and a complementary program in Keyhole to display measured material attributes remotely. This paper describes the design goals, the system components, current installations, and the benefits a site can expect when using PAMTRAK.

  15. Designing future photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The large scale use of photovoltaic systems to generate our electricity is a dream for the future; but if this dream is to be realized, we must understand these systems today. As a result, there has been extensive research into the design and economic tradeoffs of utility interconnected photovoltaic applications. The understanding gained in this process has shown that photovoltaic system design can be a very simple and straight-forward endeavor. This paper reviews those past studies and shows how we have reached the present state of system design evolution. The concept of the utility interactive PV system with energy value determined by the utility's avoided cost will be explored. This concept simplifies the screening of potential applications for economic viability, and we will present several rules-of-thumb for this purpose.

  16. Intelligent decision support for polymer composite material design in an integrated design environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.; McDowell, J.K.; Moy, D.; Sticklen, J.; Hawley, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Previously used routine design systems which generate multiple designs for composite materials have had a strong focus on thermosets. A natural evolution of the material designer involved an expansion of the domain knowledge for possible composite material designs, as well as a re-engineering of the problem-solving structure. This was guided by an in-depth analysis of the existing material designer. The results of these analyses enabled decisions to be made regarding the adequacy of the existing problem-solving structure and identified avenues to pursue for the re-engineering of the knowledge structuring and decision processes. This reengineering and expansion to a third generation of the material designer has been completed. The third generation material designer, COMADE (Composite Material Designer), now includes an expanded thermoset and fiber material coverage; in addition, thermoplastics and discontinuous fibers have been introduced into the knowledge base. As a result, both the variables input to the system and the outputted material designs have been modified. The inclusion of this information has substantially increased the domain coverage of possible composite material designs.

  17. Design and Development of a Sub-Zero Fluid System for Demonstration of Orion's Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Ahlstrom, Thomas D.; Le, Hung V.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle's Exploration Mission 2 is expected to loiter in Lunar orbit for a relatively long period of time. In low Lunar orbit (LLO) the thermal environment is cyclic - extremely cold in the eclipse and relatively hot near the subsolar point. Phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HXs) are the best option for long term missions in these environments. A PCM HX allows a vehicle to store excess waste energy by thawing a phase change material such as n-pentadecane wax. During portions of the orbit that are extremely cold, the excess energy is rejected, resolidifying the wax. Due to the inherent risk of compromising the heat exchanger during multiple freeze and thaw cycles, a unique payload was designed for the International Space Station to test and demonstration the functions of a PCM HX. The payload incorporates the use of a pumped fluid system and a thermoelectric heat exchanger to promote the freezing and thawing of the PCM HX. This paper shall review the design and development undertaken to build such a system.

  18. Uncertainty management in intelligent design aiding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Donald E.; Gabbert, Paula S.

    1988-01-01

    A novel approach to uncertainty management which is particularly effective in intelligent design aiding systems for large-scale systems is presented. The use of this approach in the materials handling system design domain is discussed. It is noted that, during any point in the design process, a point value can be obtained for the evaluation of feasible designs; however, the techniques described provide unique solutions for these point values using only the current information about the design environment.

  19. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E.; Carroll, W.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Encapsulation material system requirements, material selection criteria, and the status and properties of encapsulation materials and processes available are presented. Technical and economic goals established for photovoltaic modules and encapsulation systems and their status are described. Available encapsulation technology and data are presented to facilitate design and material selection for silicon flat plate photovoltaic modules, using the best materials available and processes optimized for specific power applications and geographic sites. The operational and environmental loads that encapsulation system functional requirements and candidate design concepts and materials that are identified to have the best potential to meet the cost and performance goals for the flat plate solar array project are described. Available data on encapsulant material properties, fabrication processing, and module life and durability characteristics are presented.

  20. Curriculum Materials Examination System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, David J.

    This document is a guideline for selection and evaluation of social studies curriculum materials developed by the Marin Social Studies Project. Questions are presented which will help in the examination of materials so that specific strengths and weaknesses in the materials can be determined. Consideration is given to the objectives and rationale…

  1. Reestablishing Design in the Materials Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, William L.

    1975-01-01

    Outlines one approach to the teaching of materials engineering design within the context of metallurgical engineering. This approach uses a problem solving situation and criteria for an appropriate problem are presented. (GS)

  2. Design principles for therapeutic angiogenic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briquez, Priscilla S.; Clegg, Lindsay E.; Martino, Mikaël M.; Gabhann, Feilim Mac; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research, pro-angiogenic drugs have failed to translate clinically, and therapeutic angiogenesis, which has potential in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases, remains a major challenge. Physiologically, angiogenesis — the process of blood-vessel growth from existing vasculature — is regulated by a complex interplay of biophysical and biochemical cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM), angiogenic factors and multiple cell types. The ECM can be regarded as the natural 3D material that regulates angiogenesis. Here, we leverage knowledge of ECM properties to derive design rules for engineering pro-angiogenic materials. We propose that pro-angiogenic materials should be biomimetic, incorporate angiogenic factors and mimic cooperative interactions between growth factors and the ECM. We highlight examples of material designs that demonstrate these principles and considerations for designing better angiogenic materials.

  3. Designing automatic resupply systems.

    PubMed

    Harding, M L

    1999-02-01

    This article outlines the process for designing and implementing autoresupply systems. The planning process includes determination of goals and appropriate participation. Different types of autoresupply mechanisms include kanban, breadman, consignment, systems contracts, and direct shipping from an MRP schedule. PMID:10345630

  4. Digital systems design language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, S. G.

    1979-01-01

    Digital Systems Design Language (DDL) is implemented on the SEL-32 Computer Systems. The detaileds of the language, the translator, and the simulator, and the smulator programs are given. Several example descriptions and a tutorial on hardware description languages are provided, to guide the user.

  5. Design of materials with prescribed nonlinear properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Sigmund, O.; Jensen, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    We systematically design materials using topology optimization to achieve prescribed nonlinear properties under finite deformation. Instead of a formal homogenization procedure, a numerical experiment is proposed to evaluate the material performance in longitudinal and transverse tensile tests under finite deformation, i.e. stress-strain relations and Poissons ratio. By minimizing errors between actual and prescribed properties, materials are tailored to achieve the target. Both two dimensional (2D) truss-based and continuum materials are designed with various prescribed nonlinear properties. The numerical examples illustrate optimized materials with rubber-like behavior and also optimized materials with extreme strain-independent Poissons ratio for axial strain intervals of εi∈[0.00, 0.30].

  6. Photovoltaic-module encapsulation design and materials selection: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.; Carroll, W.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R.

    1982-06-01

    Encapsulation-material system requirements, material-selection criteria, and the status and properties of encapsulation materials and processes available to the module manufacturer are presented in detail. Technical and economic goals established for photovoltaic modules and encapsulation systems and their status are described for material suppliers to assist them in assessing the suitability of materials in their product lines and the potential of new-material products. A comprehensive discussion of available encapsulation technology and data is presented to facilitate design and material selection for silicon flat-plate photovoltaic modules, using the best materials available and processes optimized for specific power applications and geographic sites. A basis is provided for specifying the operational and environmental loads that encapsulation material systems must resist. Potential deployment sites for which cost effectiveness may be achieved at a module price much greater than $0.70/W/sub p/, are also considered; data on higher-cost encapsulant materials and processes that may be in use and other material candidates that may be justified for special application are discussed. Described are encapsulation-system functional requirements and candidate design concepts and materials that have been identified and analyzed as having the best potential to meet the cost and performance goals for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project. The available data on encapsulant material properties, fabrication processing, and module life and durability characteristics are presented.

  7. Material design using surrogate optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadke, Kunal R.

    Nanocomposite ceramics have been widely studied in order to tailor desired properties at high temperatures. Methodologies for development of material design are still under effect . While finite element modeling (FEM) provides significant insight on material behavior, few design researchers have addressed the design paradox that accompanies this rapid design space expansion. A surrogate optimization model management framework has been proposed to make this design process tractable. In the surrogate optimization material design tool, the analysis cost is reduced by performing simulations on the surrogate model instead of high density finite element model. The methodology is incorporated to find the optimal number of silicon carbide (SiC) particles, in a silicon-nitride Si3N 4 composite with maximum fracture energy [2]. Along with a deterministic optimization algorithm, model uncertainties have also been considered with the use of robust design optimization (RDO) method ensuring a design of minimum sensitivity to changes in the parameters. These methodologies applied to nanocomposites design have a signicant impact on cost and design cycle time reduced.

  8. Designing Radiation Resistance in Materials for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-07-01

    Proposed fusion and advanced (Generation IV) fission energy systems require high-performance materials capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 atomic displacements per atom with large amounts of transmutant hydrogen and helium isotopes. After a brief overview of fusion reactor concepts and radiation effects phenomena in structural and functional (nonstructural) materials, three fundamental options for designing radiation resistance are outlined: Utilize matrix phases with inherent radiation tolerance, select materials in which vacancies are immobile at the design operating temperatures, or engineer materials with high sink densities for point defect recombination. Environmental and safety considerations impose several additional restrictions on potential materials systems, but reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (including thermomechanically treated and oxide dispersion-strengthened options) and silicon carbide ceramic composites emerge as robust structural materials options. Materials modeling (including computational thermodynamics) and advanced manufacturing methods are poised to exert a major impact in the next ten years.

  9. Integrated system design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The primary objective of the integrated system test phase is to demonstrate the commercial potential of a coal fueled diesel engine in its actual operating environment. The integrated system in this project is defined as a coal fueled diesel locomotive. This locomotive, shown on drawing 41D715542, is described in the separate Concept Design Report. The test locomotive will be converted from an existing oil fueled diesel locomotive in three stages, until it nearly emulates the concept locomotive. Design drawings of locomotive components (diesel engine, locomotive, flatcar, etc.) are included.

  10. Design of advanced fibrous based material systems to meet the critical challenges in water quality and carbon dioxide mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nangmenyi, Gordon

    Water purification and global warming mitigation represent two of the major challenges in the 21st century. The research presented in this dissertation will describe the development of advanced fibrous systems that exhibit excellent performance in addressing the issues of water disinfection, carbon dioxide capture, and natural organic matter (NOM) removal from water. Total eradication of E. coli was achieved with fiberglass impregnated with either silver (FG-Ag), iron oxide (Fe2O3 ) modified with Ag (FG-F2O3/Ag) or copper oxide (CuO) modified with Ag (FG-CuO/Ag). The Ag modified oligodynamic nanoparticle impregnated fiberglass displayed excellent kinetic inactivation performance with extended capacity at a much lower amount of nanoparticle loading. The results support their immediate applicability in the field from a utility and cost perspective. The polyethyleneimine coated glass fibers (PEFA) for CO2 removal displayed high capacity for CO2 adsorption, up to 440 mg-CO 2/g while providing a mechanically durable and recyclable system for CO2 capture. The system offers the potential for CO2 utilization from the adsorbed CO2 from a power plant or closed environment (submarine, space shuttles or control rooms). Aminated polyacrylonitrile activated carbon fibers (N-ACF) coated on a non-woven fiberglass mat, displayed the ability to remove NOM more efficiently than granulated activated carbon or ion exchange beads at concentrations below 50 mg/L. Electrostatic attraction was found to be the dominant mechanism of NOM adsorption for the N-ACF.

  11. EHF SATCOM system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. Jamil

    Future satellite systems will differ considerably from the current versions. The impetus for change is a result of the need for more capacity, wider bandwidth requirements for enhanced services, increasing demand for mobile communications, advances in technology, developments in satellite payload systems, and a demand for secure military communications. To a large extent all of these needs can be satisfied by the use of extremely high frequency satellite communication (EHF Satcom) systems. EHF Satcom system design, features, pros and cons of using the system, particularly for military applications, and the current status of EHF SATCOM in Canada, U.S., Europe, and Japan are examined. The demand for bandwidth will continue to increase due to the growth of communication as well as due to enhanced services for business and entertainment. The increased bandwidth needs will be met by operating at higher frequencies, and perhaps by using extremely high frequency/superhigh frequency (EHF/SHF) satellites. Design of such systems involves a consideration of numerous aspects of design, technology, cost, and services. Advances in technology will make EHF/SHF systems feasible for military applications, as well as commercial mobile terminals, and high data rate terminals. The use of higher frequencies and small antennas will aid mobile communications. On-board processing will be akin to putting a switch in the space, providing flexibility of rates, connectivity, and services.

  12. Distributed System Design Checklist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Brendan; Driscoll, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a design checklist targeted to fault-tolerant distributed electronic systems. Many of the questions and discussions in this checklist may be generally applicable to the development of any safety-critical system. However, the primary focus of this report covers the issues relating to distributed electronic system design. The questions that comprise this design checklist were created with the intent to stimulate system designers' thought processes in a way that hopefully helps them to establish a broader perspective from which they can assess the system's dependability and fault-tolerance mechanisms. While best effort was expended to make this checklist as comprehensive as possible, it is not (and cannot be) complete. Instead, we expect that this list of questions and the associated rationale for the questions will continue to evolve as lessons are learned and further knowledge is established. In this regard, it is our intent to post the questions of this checklist on a suitable public web-forum, such as the NASA DASHLink AFCS repository. From there, we hope that it can be updated, extended, and maintained after our initial research has been completed.

  13. Thermophotovoltaic emitter material selection and design

    SciTech Connect

    Saxton, P.C.; Moran, A.L.; Harper, M.J.; Lindler, K.W.

    1997-07-01

    Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is a potentially attractive direct energy conversion technology. It reduces the need for complex machinery with moving parts and maintenance. TPV generators can be run from a variety of heat sources including waste heat for smaller scale operations. The US Naval Academy`s goal was to build a small experimental thermophotovoltaic generator powered by combustion gases from a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine. The design of the generator imposes material limitations that directly affect emitter and structural materials selection. This paper details emitter material goals and requirements, and the methods used to select suitable candidate emitter materials for further testing.

  14. Design and simulation of a lithium-ion battery with a phase change material thermal management system for an electric scooter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khateeb, Siddique A.; Farid, Mohammed M.; Selman, J. Robert; Al-Hallaj, Said

    A lithium-ion battery employing a novel phase change material (PCM) thermal management system was designed for an electric scooter. Passive thermal management systems using PCM can control the temperature excursions and maintain temperature uniformity in Li-ion batteries without the use of active cooling components such as a fan, a blower or a pump found in air/liquid-cooling systems. Hence, the advantages of a compact, lightweight, and energy efficient system can be achieved with this novel form of thermal management system. Simulation results are shown for a Li-ion battery sub-module consisting of nine 18650 Li-ion cells surrounded by PCM with a melting point between 41 and 44 °C. The use of aluminum foam within the PCM and fins attached to the battery module were studied to overcome the low thermal conductivity of the PCM and the low natural convection heat transfer coefficient. The comparative results of the PCM performance in the presence of Al-foam and Al-fins are shown. The battery module is also simulated for summer and winter conditions. The effect of air-cooling on the Li-ion battery was also studied. These simulation results demonstrate the successful use of the PCM as a potential candidate for thermal management solution in electric scooter applications and therefore for other electric vehicle applications.

  15. Maglev system design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, H.T.

    1991-01-01

    Although efforts are now being made to develop magnetic levitation technologies in the United States, they have been underway for two decades in Germany and Japan. The characteristics of maglev systems being considered for implementation in the United States are speculative. A conference was held at Argonne National Laboratory on November 28--29, 1990, to discuss these characteristics and their implications for the design requirements of operational systems. This paper reviews some of the factors considered during that conference.

  16. The automated design of materials far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskin, Marc Z.

    Automated design is emerging as a powerful concept in materials science. By combining computer algorithms, simulations, and experimental data, new techniques are being developed that start with high level functional requirements and identify the ideal materials that achieve them. This represents a radically different picture of how materials become functional in which technological demand drives material discovery, rather than the other way around. At the frontiers of this field, materials systems previously considered too complicated can start to be controlled and understood. Particularly promising are materials far from equilibrium. Material robustness, high strength, self-healing and memory are properties displayed by several materials systems that are intrinsically out of equilibrium. These and other properties could be revolutionary, provided they can first be controlled. This thesis conceptualizes and implements a framework for designing materials that are far from equilibrium. We show how, even in the absence of a complete physical theory, design from the top down is possible and lends itself to producing physical insight. As a prototype system, we work with granular materials: collections of athermal, macroscopic identical objects, since these materials function both as an essential component of industrial processes as well as a model system for many non-equilibrium states of matter. We show that by placing granular materials in the context of design, benefits emerge simultaneously for fundamental and applied interests. As first steps, we use our framework to design granular aggregates with extreme properties like high stiffness, and softness. We demonstrate control over nonlinear effects by producing exotic aggregates that stiffen under compression. Expanding on our framework, we conceptualize new ways of thinking about material design when automatic discovery is possible. We show how to build rules that link particle shapes to arbitrary granular packing

  17. Performance analysis of a latent heat storage system with phase change material for new designed solar collectors in greenhouse heating

    SciTech Connect

    Benli, Hueseyin; Durmus, Aydin

    2009-12-15

    The continuous increase in the level of greenhouse gas emissions and the rise in fuel prices are the main driving forces behind the efforts for more effectively utilize various sources of renewable energy. In many parts of the world, direct solar radiation is considered to be one of the most prospective sources of energy. In this study, the thermal performance of a phase change thermal storage unit is analyzed and discussed. The storage unit is a component of ten pieced solar air collectors heating system being developed for space heating of a greenhouse and charging of PCM. CaCl{sub 2}6H{sub 2}O was used as PCM in thermal energy storage with a melting temperature of 29 C. Hot air delivered by ten pieced solar air collector is passed through the PCM to charge the storage unit. The stored heat is utilized to heat ambient air before being admitted to a greenhouse. This study is based on experimental results of the PCM employed to analyze the transient thermal behavior of the storage unit during the charge and discharge periods. The proposed size of collectors integrated PCM provided about 18-23% of total daily thermal energy requirements of the greenhouse for 3-4 h, in comparison with the conventional heating device. (author)

  18. Comparison of the marginal fit of different coping materials and designs produced by computer aided manufacturing systems.

    PubMed

    Karataşli, Ozge; Kursoğlu, Pinar; Capa, Nuray; Kazazoğlu, Ender

    2011-01-01

    In this study, marginal adaptations of different copings fabricated with CAD/CAM or MAD/CAM were analysed. Celay and Zirkonzahn groups were fabricated by MAD/CAM, LAVA and DC-Zircon groups were fabricated by CAD/CAM. Casting metal copings were used as the control group. An implant abutment that was embedded in octagonal acrylic block was used to prepare the copings. Sixteen previously established points were marked and the measurements were performed with the stereomicroscope (at × 150). The marginal fit of the samples were evaluated by calculating the mean measurements of each 16 points. The statistical analysis was performed by Tukey multiple comparisons test at 95% confidence interval. The groups can be summarized as follows in terms of marginal gap, from the lowest to highest: LAVA (24.6 ± 14.0 µm)systems may not be the most important factor for marginal adaptation. PMID:21282881

  19. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Grobstein, Toni L.; Ellis, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The overall philosophy of the research was to develop and characterize new high temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications.

  20. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, Robert H.; Grobstein, Toni L.; Ellis, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The overall philosophy of the research was to develop and characterize new high temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites for fuel containment and structural supports considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications.

  1. Computational design of fused heterocyclic energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyshevskiy, Roman; Pagoria, Philip; Batyrev, Iskander; Kuklja, Maija

    A continuous traditional search for effective energetic materials is often based on a trial and error approach. Understanding of fundamental correlations between the structure and sensitivity of the materials remains the main challenge for design of novel energetics due to the complexity of the behavior of energetic materials. State of the art methods of computational chemistry and solid state physics open new compelling opportunities in simulating and predicting a response of the energetic material to various external stimuli. Hence, theoretical and computational studies can be effectively used not only for an interpretation of sensitivity mechanisms of widely used explosives, but also for identifying criteria for material design prior to its synthesis and experimental characterization. We report here, how knowledge on thermal stability of recently synthesized materials of LLM series is used for design of novel fused heterocyclic energetic materials, including DNBTT (2,7-dinitro-4H,9H-bis([1, 2, 4"]triazolo)[1,5-b:1',5'-e][1, 2, 4, 5]tetrazine), compound with high thermal stability, which is on par or better than that of TATB. This research is supported by ONR (Grant N00014-12-1-0529), NSF XSEDE resources (Grant DMR-130077) and DOE NERSC resources (Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  2. Designing Radiation Resistance in Materials for Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Proposed fusion and advanced (Generation IV) fission energy systems require high performance materials capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 atomic displacements per atom with large amounts of transmutant hydrogen and helium isotopes. After a brief overview of fusion reactor concepts and radiation effects phenomena in structural and functional (non-structural) materials, three fundamental options for designing radiation resistance are outlined: Utilize matrix phases with inherent radiation tolerance, select materials where vacancies are immobile at the design operating temperatures, or construct high densities of point defect recombination sinks. Environmental and safety considerations impose several additional restrictions on potential materials systems, but reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (including thermomechanically treated and oxide dispersion strengthened options) and silicon carbide ceramic composites emerge as robust structural materials options. Materials modeling (including computational thermodynamics) and advanced manufacturing methods are poised to exert a major impact in the next ten years.

  3. BWID System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.C.; Rudin, M.J.; Morrison, J.L.; Richardson, J.G.

    1991-12-31

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) System Design Study is to identify and evaluate technology process options for the cradle-to-grave remediation of Transuranic (TRU)-Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Emphasis is placed upon evaluating system configuration options and associated functional and operational requirements for retrieving and treating the buried wastes. A Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter was developed to evaluate the identified remediation systems and their enabling technologies based upon system requirements and quantification of technical Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) balancing criteria. Remediation systems will also be evaluated with respect to regulatory and institutional acceptance and cost-effectiveness.

  4. BWID System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M.C.; Rudin, M.J.; Morrison, J.L.; Richardson, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    The mission of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) System Design Study is to identify and evaluate technology process options for the cradle-to-grave remediation of Transuranic (TRU)-Contaminated Waste Pits and Trenches buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Emphasis is placed upon evaluating system configuration options and associated functional and operational requirements for retrieving and treating the buried wastes. A Performance-Based Technology Selection Filter was developed to evaluate the identified remediation systems and their enabling technologies based upon system requirements and quantification of technical Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) balancing criteria. Remediation systems will also be evaluated with respect to regulatory and institutional acceptance and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Performance characterization of material identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher D.; Green, Robert L.

    2006-10-01

    In recent years a number of analytical devices have been proposed and marketed specifically to enable field-based material identification. Technologies reliant on mass, near- and mid-infrared, and Raman spectroscopies are available today, and other platforms are imminent. These systems tend to perform material recognition based on an on-board library of material signatures. While figures of merit for traditional quantitative analytical sensors are broadly established (e.g., SNR, selectivity, sensitivity, limit of detection/decision), measures of performance for material identification systems have not been systematically discussed. In this paper we present an approach to performance characterization similar in spirit to ROC curves, but including elements of precision-recall curves and specialized for the intended-use of material identification systems. Important experimental considerations are discussed, including study design, sources of bias, uncertainty estimation, and cross-validation and the approach as a whole is illustrated using a commercially available handheld Raman material identification system.

  6. Structural and Machine Design Using Piezoceramic Materials: A Guide for Structural Design Engineers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Cudney, Harley H.

    2000-01-01

    Using piezoceramic materials is one way the design engineer can create structures which have an ability to both sense and respond to their environment. Piezoceramic materials can be used to create structural sensors and structural actuators. Because piezoceramic materials have transduction as a material property, their sensing or actuation functions are a result of what happens to the material. This is different than discrete devices we might attach to the structure. For example, attaching an accelerometer to a structure will yield an electrical signal proportional to the acceleration at the attachment point on the structure. Using a electromagnetic shaker as an actuator will create an applied force at the attachment point. Active material elements in a structural design are not easily modeled as providing transduction at a point, but rather they change the physics of the structure in the areas where they are used. Hence, a designer must not think of adding discrete devices to a structure to obtain an effect, but rather must design a structural system which accounts for the physical principles of all the elements in the structure. The purpose of this manual is to provide practicing engineers the information necessary to incorporate piezoelectric materials in structural design and machine design. First, we will review the solid-state physics of piezoelectric materials. Then we will discuss the physical characteristics of the electrical-active material-structural system. We will present the elements of this system which must be considered as part of the design task for a structural engineer. We will cover simple modeling techniques and review the features and capabilities of commercial design tools that are available. We will then cover practical how-to elements of working with piezoceramic materials. We will review sources of piezoceramic materials and built-up devices, and their characteristics. Finally, we will provide two design examples using piezoceramic

  7. FOREWORD: Computational methodologies for designing materials Computational methodologies for designing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2009-02-01

    It would be fair to say that in the past few decades, theory and computer modeling have played a major role in elucidating the microscopic factors that dictate the properties of functional novel materials. Together with advances in experimental techniques, theoretical methods are becoming increasingly capable of predicting properties of materials at different length scales, thereby bringing in sight the long-sought goal of designing material properties according to need. Advances in computer technology and their availability at a reasonable cost around the world have made tit all the more urgent to disseminate what is now known about these modern computational techniques. In this special issue on computational methodologies for materials by design we have tried to solicit articles from authors whose works collectively represent the microcosm of developments in the area. This turned out to be a difficult task for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is space limitation in this special issue. Nevertheless, we gathered twenty articles that represent some of the important directions in which theory and modeling are proceeding in the general effort to capture the ability to produce materials by design. The majority of papers presented here focus on technique developments that are expected to uncover further the fundamental processes responsible for material properties, and for their growth modes and morphological evolutions. As for material properties, some of the articles here address the challenges that continue to emerge from attempts at accurate descriptions of magnetic properties, of electronically excited states, and of sparse matter, all of which demand new looks at density functional theory (DFT). I should hasten to add that much of the success in accurate computational modeling of materials emanates from the remarkable predictive power of DFT, without which we would not be able to place the subject on firm theoretical grounds. As we know and will also

  8. Intelligent design system for design automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Cirrus; Deif, Ismail; Katragadda, Prasanna; Knutson, Stanley

    2000-10-01

    In order to succeed in today's global, competitive market, companies need continuous improvements in their product development processes. These improvements should result in expending fewer resources on the design process while achieving better quality. Automating the design process reduces resources needed and allows designers to spend more time on creative aspects that improve the quality of design. For the last three decades, engineers and designers have been searching for better ways to automate the product development process. For certain classes of design problems, which cover a large portion of real world design situations, the process can be automated using knowledge-based systems. These are design problems in which the knowledge sources are known in advance. Using techniques from Knowledge-Based Engineering, knowledge is codified and inserted into a knowledge-based system. The system activates the design knowledge, automatically generating designs that satisfy the design constraints. To increase the return on investment of building automated design systems, Knowledge management methodologies and techniques are required for capturing, formalizing, storing, and searching design knowledge.

  9. Tools for Material Design and Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehage, Kristopher

    -dimensional microstructures are generated by Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) of voxelized ellipses representing the coarse grain phase. A simulated annealing algorithm is used to geometrically optimize the placement of the ellipses in the model to achieve varying user-defined configurations of spatial arrangement of the coarse grains. During the simulated annealing process, the ellipses are allowed to overlap up to a specified threshold, allowing triple junctions to form in the model. Once the simulated annealing process is complete, the remaining space is populated by smaller ellipses representing the ultra-fine grain phase. Uniform random orientations are assigned to the grains. The program generates text files that can be imported in to Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Analysis Software for stress analysis. Finally, numerical methods and programming are applied to current issues in green engineering and hazard assessment. To understand hazards associated with materials and select safer alternatives, engineers and designers need access to up-to-date hazard information. However, hazard information comes from many disparate sources and aggregating, interpreting and taking action on the wealth of data is not trivial. In light of these challenges, a Framework for Automated Hazard Assessment based on the GreenScreen list translator is presented. The framework consists of a computer program that automatically extracts data from the GHS-Japan hazard database, loads the data into a machine-readable JSON format, transforms the JSON document in to a GreenScreen JSON document using the GreenScreen List Translator v1.2 and performs GreenScreen Benchmark scoring on the material. The GreenScreen JSON documents are then uploaded to a document storage system to allow human operators to search for, modify or add additional hazard information via a web interface.

  10. Adaptive strategies for materials design using uncertainties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Xue, Dezhen; Theiler, James; Hogden, John; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-21

    Here, we compare several adaptive design strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young’s (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The design strategies are decomposed into an iterative loop with two main steps: machine learning is used to train a regressor that predicts elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions and their uncertainties to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material withmore » desired elastic properties in as few iterations as possible. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the design. We find that selectors that use information about the prediction uncertainty outperform those that don’t. Our work is a step in illustrating how adaptive design tools can guide the search for new materials with desired properties.« less

  11. Adaptive Strategies for Materials Design using Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Xue, Dezhen; Theiler, James; Hogden, John; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    We compare several adaptive design strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young’s (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The design strategies are decomposed into an iterative loop with two main steps: machine learning is used to train a regressor that predicts elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions and their uncertainties to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material with desired elastic properties in as few iterations as possible. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the design. We find that selectors that use information about the prediction uncertainty outperform those that don’t. Our work is a step in illustrating how adaptive design tools can guide the search for new materials with desired properties.

  12. Adaptive Strategies for Materials Design using Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Xue, Dezhen; Theiler, James; Hogden, John; Lookman, Turab

    2016-01-01

    We compare several adaptive design strategies using a data set of 223 M2AX family of compounds for which the elastic properties [bulk (B), shear (G), and Young’s (E) modulus] have been computed using density functional theory. The design strategies are decomposed into an iterative loop with two main steps: machine learning is used to train a regressor that predicts elastic properties in terms of elementary orbital radii of the individual components of the materials; and a selector uses these predictions and their uncertainties to choose the next material to investigate. The ultimate goal is to obtain a material with desired elastic properties in as few iterations as possible. We examine how the choice of data set size, regressor and selector impact the design. We find that selectors that use information about the prediction uncertainty outperform those that don’t. Our work is a step in illustrating how adaptive design tools can guide the search for new materials with desired properties. PMID:26792532

  13. Materials Design for Block Copolymer Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweat, Daniel Patrick

    Block copolymers (BCPs) have attracted a great deal of scientific and technological interest due to their ability to spontaneously self-assemble into dense periodic nanostructures with a typical length scale of 5 to 50 nm. The use of self-assembled BCP thin-films as templates to form nanopatterns over large-area is referred to as BCP lithography. Directed self-assembly of BCPs is now viewed as a viable candidate for sub-20 nm lithography by the semiconductor industry. However, there are multiple aspects of assembly and materials design that need to be addressed in order for BCP lithography to be successful. These include substrate modification with polymer brushes or mats, tailoring of the block copolymer chemistry, understanding thin-film assembly and developing epitaxial like methods to control long range alignment. The rational design, synthesis and self-assembly of block copolymers with large interaction parameters (chi) is described in the first part of this dissertation. Two main blocks were chosen for introducing polarity into the BCP system, namely poly(4-hydroxystyrene) and poly(2-vinylpyridine). Each of these blocks are capable of ligating Lewis acids which can increase the etch contrast between the blocks allowing for facile pattern transfer to the underlying substrate. These BCPs were synthesized by living anionic polymerization and showed excellent control over molecular weight and dispersity, providing access to sub 5-nm domain sizes. Polymer brushes consist of a polymer chain with one end tethered to the surface and have wide applicability in tuning surface energy, forming responsive surfaces and increasing biocompatibility. In the second part of the dissertation, we present a universal method to grow dense polymer brushes on a wide range of substrates and combine this chemistry with BCP assembly to fabricate nanopatterned polymer brushes. This is the first demonstration of introducing additional functionality into a BCP directing layer and opens up

  14. Materials Selection for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Cebon, David; Ashby, Mike

    2012-01-01

    A systematic design-oriented, five-step approach to material selection is described: 1) establishing design requirements, 2) material screening, 3) ranking, 4) researching specific candidates and 5) applying specific cultural constraints to the selection process. At the core of this approach is the definition performance indices (i.e., particular combinations of material properties that embody the performance of a given component) in conjunction with material property charts. These material selection charts, which plot one property against another, are introduced and shown to provide a powerful graphical environment wherein one can apply and analyze quantitative selection criteria, such as those captured in performance indices, and make trade-offs between conflicting objectives. Finding a material with a high value of these indices maximizes the performance of the component. Two specific examples pertaining to aerospace (engine blades and pressure vessels) are examined, both at room temperature and elevated temperature (where time-dependent effects are important) to demonstrate the methodology. The discussion then turns to engineered/hybrid materials and how these can be effectively tailored to fill in holes in the material property space, so as to enable innovation and increases in performance as compared to monolithic materials. Finally, a brief discussion is presented on managing the data needed for materials selection, including collection, analysis, deployment, and maintenance issues.

  15. Materials in space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H.; Moore, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Man's presence in space has been limited by the availability of reliable lightweight sources of power. Over the course of the last 30 years, a variety of space nuclear power systems have been designed and, in some cases, built and flown. Although a number of technology issues effect the overall performance of these systems, technical issues associated with the materials of construction have most often been a major limitation in obtaining the desired system performance goals. This paper will review selected materials limitations associated with the three major nuclear power systems being considered at this time: radioisotope power, nuclear power, and nuclear propulsion systems.

  16. Nanoscale control designs for systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yue

    2014-02-01

    Nanoscale control is the science of the control of objects at dimensions with 100 nm or less and the manipulation of them at this level of precision. The desired attributes of systems under nanoscale control design are extreme high resolution, accuracy, stability, and fast response. An important perspective of investigation in nanoscale control design includes system modeling and precision control devices and materials at a nanoscale dimension, i.e., design of nanopositioners. Nanopositioners are mechatronic systems with an ultraprecise resolution down to a fraction of an atomic diameter and developed to move objects over a small range in nanoscale dimension. After reviewing a lot of existing literatures for nanoscale control designs, the way to successful nanoscale control is accurate position sensing and feedback control of the motion. An overview of nanoscale identification, linear, and nonlinear control technologies, and devices that are playing a key role in improving precision, accuracy, and response of operation of these systems are introduced in this research. PMID:24749455

  17. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John M.; Strickland, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. Consisting of various database segments, MAPTIS provides the user with information such as material properties, test data derived from tests specifically conducted for qualification of materials for use in space, verification and control, project management, material information, and various administrative requirements. A recent addition to the project management segment consists of materials data derived from the LDEF flight. This tremendous quantity of data consists of both pre-flight and post-flight data in such diverse areas as optical/thermal, mechanical and electrical properties, atomic concentration surface analysis data, as well as general data such as sample placement on the satellite, A-O flux, equivalent sun hours, etc. Each data point is referenced to the primary investigator(s) and the published paper from which the data was taken. The MAPTIS system is envisioned to become the central location for all LDEF materials data. This paper consists of multiple parts, comprising a general overview of the MAPTIS System and the types of data contained within, and the specific LDEF data element and the data contained in that segment.

  18. Information and computer-aided system for structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrashevitch, Ju. G.; Nizametdinov, Sh. U.; Polkovnikov, A. V.; Rumjantzev, V. P.; Surina, O. N.; Kalinin, G. M.; Sidorenkov, A. V.; Strebkov, Ju. S.

    1992-09-01

    An information and computer-aided system for structural materials data has been developed to provide data for the fusion and fission reactor system design. It is designed for designers, industrial engineers, and material science specialists and provides a friendly interface in an interactive mode. The database for structural materials contains the master files: chemical composition, physical, mechanical, corrosion, technological properties, regulatory and technical documentation. The system is implemented on a PC/AT running the PS/2 operating system.

  19. A Bridge for Accelerating Materials by Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Potok, Thomas E.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-11-25

    Recent technical advances in the area of nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and scattering/diffraction have led to unprecedented capabilities for investigating materials structural, dynamical and functional characteristics. In addition, recent advances in computational algorithms and computer capacities that are orders of magnitude larger/faster have enabled large-scale simulations of materials properties starting with nothing but the identity of the atomic species and the basic principles of quantum- and statistical-mechanics and thermodynamics. Along with these advances, an explosion of high-resolution data has emerged. This confluence of capabilities and rise of big data offer grand opportunities for advancing materials sciences but also introduce several challenges. In this editorial we identify challenges impeding progress towards advancing materials by design (e.g., the design/discovery of materials with improved properties/performance), possible solutions, and provide examples of scientific issues that can be addressed by using a tightly integrated approach where theory and experiments are linked through big-deep data.

  20. A Bridge for Accelerating Materials by Design

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sumpter, Bobby G.; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Potok, Thomas E.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-11-25

    Recent technical advances in the area of nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and scattering/diffraction have led to unprecedented capabilities for investigating materials structural, dynamical and functional characteristics. In addition, recent advances in computational algorithms and computer capacities that are orders of magnitude larger/faster have enabled large-scale simulations of materials properties starting with nothing but the identity of the atomic species and the basic principles of quantum- and statistical-mechanics and thermodynamics. Along with these advances, an explosion of high-resolution data has emerged. This confluence of capabilities and rise of big data offer grand opportunities for advancing materials sciences but also introduce several challenges.more » In this editorial we identify challenges impeding progress towards advancing materials by design (e.g., the design/discovery of materials with improved properties/performance), possible solutions, and provide examples of scientific issues that can be addressed by using a tightly integrated approach where theory and experiments are linked through big-deep data.« less

  1. AGING SYSTEM DESIGN DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    J. Beesley

    2005-02-07

    This plan provides an overview, work to date, and the path forward for the design development strategy of the Aging cask for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository site. Waste for subsurface emplacement at the repository includes US Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE SNF, commercial fuel in dual-purpose canisters (DPCs), uncanistered bare fuel, naval fuel, and other waste types. Table 1-1 lists the types of radioactive materials that may be aged at YMP, and those materials that will not be placed in an aging cask or module. This plan presents the strategy for design development of the Aging system. The Aging system will not handle naval fuel, DOE HLW, MCOs, or DOE SNF since those materials will be delivered to the repository in a state and sequence that allows them to be placed into waste packages for emplacement. Some CSNF from nuclear reactors, especially CSNF that is thermally too hot for emplacement underground, will need to be aged at the repository.

  2. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process. PMID:25241525

  3. Design Language for Digital Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    Digital Systems Design Language (DDL) is convenient hardware description language for developing and testing digital designs and for inputting design details into design automation system. Describes digital systems at gate, register transfer, and combinational block levels. DDL-based programs written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  4. Ureteral Stents. New Materials and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Manoj

    2008-09-01

    Issues of stent migration and challenges of stent placement can be addressed adequately with current stent designs and materials, and an emphasis on precision in technique. Future changes in ureteral stents will need to maintain the current standard that has been set with existing devices in these regards. In contrast, new advances are sorely needed in encrustation and infection associated with ureteral stents. The main target for future development in ureteral stent materials lies in a biodegradable stent that degrades either on demand or degrades reliably within one-month with predictable degradation patterns that do not predispose to urinary obstruction, discomfort or need for secondary procedures. The main target for future development in ureteral stent design is improved patient comfort.

  5. Advanced composite structures. [metal matrix composites - structural design criteria for spacecraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A monograph is presented which establishes structural design criteria and recommends practices to ensure the design of sound composite structures, including composite-reinforced metal structures. (It does not discuss design criteria for fiber-glass composites and such advanced composite materials as beryllium wire or sapphire whiskers in a matrix material.) Although the criteria were developed for aircraft applications, they are general enough to be applicable to space vehicles and missiles as well. The monograph covers four broad areas: (1) materials, (2) design, (3) fracture control, and (4) design verification. The materials portion deals with such subjects as material system design, material design levels, and material characterization. The design portion includes panel, shell, and joint design, applied loads, internal loads, design factors, reliability, and maintainability. Fracture control includes such items as stress concentrations, service-life philosophy, and the management plan for control of fracture-related aspects of structural design using composite materials. Design verification discusses ways to prove flightworthiness.

  6. Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo

    2005-01-01

    The research program sponsored by this grant, "Computational Materials Program for Alloy Design", covers a period of time of enormous change in the emerging field of computational materials science. The computational materials program started with the development of the BFS method for alloys, a quantum approximate method for atomistic analysis of alloys specifically tailored to effectively deal with the current challenges in the area of atomistic modeling and to support modern experimental programs. During the grant period, the program benefited from steady growth which, as detailed below, far exceeds its original set of goals and objectives. Not surprisingly, by the end of this grant, the methodology and the computational materials program became an established force in the materials communitiy, with substantial impact in several areas. Major achievements during the duration of the grant include the completion of a Level 1 Milestone for the HITEMP program at NASA Glenn, consisting of the planning, development and organization of an international conference held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in August of 2002, finalizing a period of rapid insertion of the methodology in the research community worlwide. The conference, attended by citizens of 17 countries representing various fields of the research community, resulted in a special issue of the leading journal in the area of applied surface science. Another element of the Level 1 Milestone was the presentation of the first version of the Alloy Design Workbench software package, currently known as "adwTools". This software package constitutes the first PC-based piece of software for atomistic simulations for both solid alloys and surfaces in the market.Dissemination of results and insertion in the materials community worldwide was a primary focus during this period. As a result, the P.I. was responsible for presenting 37 contributed talks, 19 invited talks, and publishing 71 articles in peer-reviewed journals, as

  7. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Titran, R.H.; Grobstein, T.L. . Lewis Research Center); Ellis, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on monolithic refractory metal alloys and on metal matrix composites is being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in support of advanced space power systems. The overall philosophy of the research is to develop and characterize new high-temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites (Gr/Cu) for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites (W/NB) for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications.

  8. The Cam Shell: An Innovative Design With Materials and Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. Richard; Larsen, Frank M.; Kornienko, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Most of the personal audio and video recording devices currently sold on the open market all require hands to operate. Little consideration was given to designing a hands-free unit. Such a system once designed and made available to the public could greatly benefit mobile police officers, bicyclists, adventurers, street and dirt motorcyclists, horseback riders and many others. With a few design changes water sports and skiing activities could be another large area of application. The cam shell is an innovative design in which an audio and video recording device (such as palm camcorder) is housed in a body-mounted protection system. This system is based on the concept of viewing and recording at the same time. A view cam is attached to a helmet wired to a recording unit encased in a transparent body-mounted protection system. The helmet can also be controlled by remote. The operator will have full control in recording everything. However, the recording unit will be operated completely hands-free. This project will address the design considerations and their effects on material selection and manufacturing. It will enhance the understanding of the structure of materials, and how the structure affects the behavior of the material, and the role that processing play in linking the relationship between structure and properties. A systematic approach to design feasibility study, cost analysis and problem solving will also be discussed.

  9. ITER Disruption Mitigation System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, David; Lyttle, M. S.; Baylor, L. R.; Carmichael, J. R.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Combs, S. K.; Ericson, N. M.; Bull-Ezell, N. D.; Fehling, D. T.; Fisher, P. W.; Foust, C. R.; Ha, T.; Meitner, S. J.; Nycz, A.; Shoulders, J. M.; Smith, S. F.; Warmack, R. J.; Coburn, J. D.; Gebhart, T. E.; Fisher, J. T.; Reed, J. R.; Younkin, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    The disruption mitigation system for ITER is under design and will require injection of up to 10 kPa-m3 of deuterium, helium, neon, or argon material for thermal mitigation and up to 100 kPa-m3 of material for suppression of runaway electrons. A hybrid unit compatible with the ITER nuclear, thermal and magnetic field environment is being developed. The unit incorporates a fast gas valve for massive gas injection (MGI) and a shattered pellet injector (SPI) to inject a massive spray of small particles, and can be operated as an SPI with a frozen pellet or an MGI without a pellet. Three ITER upper port locations will have three SPI/MGI units with a common delivery tube. One equatorial port location has space for sixteen similar SPI/MGI units. Supported by US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  10. System design description cone penetrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The system design description documents in detail the design of the cone penetrometer system. The systems includes the cone penetrometer physical package, raman spectroscopy package and moisture sensor package. Information pertinent to the system design, development, fabrication and testing is provided.

  11. Materials challenges for nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Todd; Busby, Jeremy; Meyer, Mitch; Petti, David

    2010-11-26

    The safe and economical operation of any nuclear power system relies to a great extent, on the success of the fuel and the materials of construction. During the lifetime of a nuclear power system which currently can be as long as 60 years, the materials are subject to high temperature, a corrosive environment, and damage from high-energy particles released during fission. The fuel which provides the power for the reactor has a much shorter life but is subject to the same types of harsh environments. This article reviews the environments in which fuels and materials from current and proposed nuclear systems operate and then describes how the creation of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility is allowing researchers from across the U.S. to test their ideas for improved fuels and materials.

  12. Materials challenges for nuclear systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, Todd; Busby, Jeremy; Meyer, Mitch; Petti, David

    2010-11-26

    The safe and economical operation of any nuclear power system relies to a great extent, on the success of the fuel and the materials of construction. During the lifetime of a nuclear power system which currently can be as long as 60 years, the materials are subject to high temperature, a corrosive environment, and damage from high-energy particles released during fission. The fuel which provides the power for the reactor has a much shorter life but is subject to the same types of harsh environments. This article reviews the environments in which fuels and materials from current and proposed nuclearmore » systems operate and then describes how the creation of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility is allowing researchers from across the U.S. to test their ideas for improved fuels and materials.« less

  13. Solar optical materials for innovative window design

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1982-08-01

    New and innovative optical materials and coatings can greatly improve the efficiency of window energy systems. These potential materials and coatings increase energy efficiency by reducing radiative losses in the infrared, or reducing visible reflection losses or controlling overheating due to solar gain. Current progress in heat mirror coatings for glass and polymeric substrates is presented. Highly doped semiconducting oxides and metal/dielectric interference coatings are reviewed. Physical and optical properties are outlined for antireflection films and transparent aerogel insulation media. The potential for optical switching films as window elements includes discussions of electrochromic, photochromic and other physical switching processes.

  14. Application of New Materials in the Household Appliances Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Ren, Y.

    The widespread use of new materials in household appliances industry, not only help those products to get rid of the appearance shackles caused by original materials, but also gave the designers the freedom to open up the world of product design. This paper aims to analyze the impact of new materials for home appliances design through relevant research, to explore the application of new material in household appliances functional design, shape design, color design and emotional design, etc., so as to reveal the impact and promoting effects of new material in household appliances world, as well as the prospects of new material in future household appliances design.

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Project System Design Description for Can Loading System

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2001-02-15

    The purpose of this System Design Description (SDD) is to specify the system and component functions and requirements for the Can Loading System and provide a complete description of the system (design features, boundaries, and interfaces), principles of operation (including upsets and recovery), and the system maintenance approach. The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize up to 13 metric tons (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials.

  16. Computational design of microvascular biomimetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Alejandro Marcos

    Biomimetic microvascular materials are increasingly considered for a variety of autonomic healing, cooling and sensing applications. The microvascular material of interest in this work consists of a network of hollow microchannels, with diameters as small as 10 mum, embedded in a polymeric matrix. Recent advances in the manufacturing of this new class of materials have allowed for the creation of very complex 2D and 3D structures. The computational design of such network structures, which is the focus of this work, involves a set of particular challenges, including a large number of design variables (e.g., topology of the network, number of diameters to consider and their sizes) that define the network, and a large number of multidisciplinary objective functions and constraints that drive the optimization process. The computational design tool to be developed must be capable of capturing the trade-off between the different objective and constraint functions, as, for example, networks designed for flow efficiency are likely to have a topology that is very different from those designed for structural integrity or thermal control. In this work, we propose to design these materials using Genetic Algorithms (GAs), the most common methodology within a broader category of Evolutionary Algorithms (EAs). GAs can be combined with a Pareto-selection mechanism to create Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithms (MOGAs), which enable the optimization of an arbitrary number of objective functions. As a result, a Pareto-optimal front is obtained, where all candidates are optimal solutions to the optimization problem. Adding a procedure to deal with constraints results in a powerful tool for multi-objective constrained optimization. The method allows the use of discrete variable problems and it does not require any a priori knowledge of the optimal solution. Furthermore, GAs search the entire decision space so the optimal solutions found are likely to be global. The

  17. Imaging systems and materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Murr, L.E.

    2009-05-15

    This paper provides a broad background for the historical development and modern applications of light optical metallography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, field-ion microscopy and several forms of scanning probe microscopes. Numerous case examples illustrating especially synergistic applications of these imaging systems are provided to demonstrate materials characterization especially in the context of structure-property-performance issues which define materials science and engineering.

  18. LUTE primary mirror materials and design study report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthven, Greg

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) Primary Mirror Materials and Design Study is to investigate the feasibility of the LUTE telescope primary mirror. A systematic approach to accomplish this key goal was taken by first understanding the optical, thermal, and structural requirements and then deriving the critical primary mirror-level requirements for ground testing, launch, and lunar operations. After summarizing the results in those requirements which drove the selection of material and the design for the primary mirror are discussed. Most important of these are the optical design which was assumed to be the MSFC baseline (i.e. 3 mirror optical system), telescope wavefront error (WFE) allocations, the telescope weight budget, and the LUTE operational temperature ranges. Mechanical load levels, reflectance and microroughness issues, and options for the LUTE metering structure were discussed and an outline for the LUTE telescope sub-system design specification was initiated. The primary mirror analysis and results are presented. The six material substrate candidates are discussed and four distinct mirror geometries which are considered are shown. With these materials and configurations together with varying the location of the mirror support points, a total of 42 possible primary mirror designs resulted. The polishability of each substrate candidate was investigated and a usage history of 0.5 meter and larger precision cryogenic mirrors (the operational low end LUTE temperature of 60 K is the reason we feel a survey of cryogenic mirrors is appropriate) that were flown or tested are presented.

  19. Designing Silk-silk Protein Alloy Materials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon; Forys, Joseph; Hettinger, Jeffrey; Buchicchio, Justin; Dobbins, Tabbetha; Yang, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous proteins display different sequences and structures that have been used for various applications in biomedical fields such as biosensors, nanomedicine, tissue regeneration, and drug delivery. Designing materials based on the molecular-scale interactions between these proteins will help generate new multifunctional protein alloy biomaterials with tunable properties. Such alloy material systems also provide advantages in comparison to traditional synthetic polymers due to the materials biodegradability, biocompatibility, and tenability in the body. This article used the protein blends of wild tussah silk (Antheraea pernyi) and domestic mulberry silk (Bombyx mori) as an example to provide useful protocols regarding these topics, including how to predict protein-protein interactions by computational methods, how to produce protein alloy solutions, how to verify alloy systems by thermal analysis, and how to fabricate variable alloy materials including optical materials with diffraction gratings, electric materials with circuits coatings, and pharmaceutical materials for drug release and delivery. These methods can provide important information for designing the next generation multifunctional biomaterials based on different protein alloys. PMID:25145602

  20. Design of Material Strength Test in Lead-Bismuth Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Masatoshi Kondo; Minoru Takahashi; Koji Hata

    2002-07-01

    Liquid lead and lead-bismuth have drawn the attention as one of the candidate coolants of the fast breeder reactors (FBRs), and the accelerator driven transmutation systems (ADSs). In order to use the coolant to the systems, the physical and chemical characteristics of the heavy metals are necessary. This plan has been proposed for the strength test of materials in the liquid metal surroundings. The lead-bismuth circulation loop with the strength test has been designed, and the strength test of candidate materials has been planned. (authors)

  1. Optimum weight design of functionally graded material gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Shikai; Zhang, He; Zhou, Jingtao; Song, Guohua

    2015-11-01

    Traditional gear weight optimization methods consider gear tooth number, module, face width or other dimension parameters of gear as design variables. However, due to the complicated form and geometric features peculiar to the gear, there will be large amounts of design parameters in gear design, and the influences of gear parameters changing on gear trains, transmission system and the whole equipment have to be taken into account, which increases the complexity of optimization problem. This paper puts forward to apply functionally graded materials (FGMs) to gears and then conduct the optimization. According to the force situation of gears, the material distribution form of FGM gears is determined. Then based on the performance parameters analysis of FGMs and the practical working demands for gears, a multi-objective optimization model is formed. Finally by using the goal driven optimization (GDO) method, the optimal material distribution is achieved, which makes gear weight and the maximum deformation be minimum and the maximum bending stress do not exceed the allowable stress. As an example, the applying of FGM to automotive transmission gear is conducted to illustrate the optimization design process and the result shows that under the condition of keeping the normal working performance of gear, the method achieves in greatly reducing the gear weight. This research proposes a FGM gears design method that is able to largely reduce the weight of gears by optimizing the microscopic material parameters instead of changing the macroscopic dimension parameters of gears, which reduces the complexity of gear weight optimization problem.

  2. FNAL system patching design

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Romero, Andy; Dawson, Troy; Sieh, Connie; /Fermilab

    2004-01-01

    FNAL has over 5000 PCs running either Linux or Windows software. Protecting these systems efficiently against the latest vulnerabilities that arise has prompted FNAL to take a more central approach to patching systems. Due to different levels of existing support infrastructures, the patching solution for linux systems differs from that of windows systems. In either case, systems are checked for vulnerabilities by Computer Security using the Nessus tool.

  3. Design education in metallurgical and materials engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, Mark E.; Mikkola, Donald E.

    1993-12-01

    In general, the attendance level and interest in the discussions that took place following the presentations at each of the four sessions of the symposium suggest that educational programming at future TMS meetings has a very solid constituency. The organization of the symposium Powder Processing Education for the Year 2000 by the Materials Design & Manufacturing Division's Powder Metallurgy Committee for the 1994 TMS Annual Meeting is likely to provide further demonstration of this level of interest. As our profession continues to evolve, TMS has the opportunity to play a signal role as a conduit of information among professionals and educators wishing to improve their "product" and between educators wishing to share with others the best means of obtaining such improvement.

  4. DDL system: Design systhesis of digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, S. G.

    1983-01-01

    Digital Systems Design Language was integrated into the CADAT system environment of NASA-MSFC. The major technical aspects of this integration are summarized. Automatic hardware synthesis is now possible starting with a high level description of the system to be synthesized. The DDL system provides a high level design verification capability, thereby minimizing design changes in the later stages of the design cycle. An overview of the DDL system covering the translation, simulation and synthesis capabilities is provided. Two companion documents (the user's and programmer's manuals) are to be consulted for detailed discussions.

  5. Insertion device vacuum system designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.

    1988-05-01

    Synchrotron light source insertion device vacuum systems now in operation and systems proposed for the future are reviewed. An overview of insertion devices is given and four generic vacuum chamber designs, transition section design and pumping considerations are discussed. Examples of vacuum chamber systems are presented.

  6. Conveyor system moves material continuously

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    German technology and equipment is used in mining operations worldwide. A PHB Wesserhutte system is being used with face shovel, mobile crusher, crawler-mounted transfer conveyor, and shiftable conveyor which results in crushing and transporting the minerals to the processing plant in a continuous flow path. The entire process is controlled by a programmable logic controller (a mini-computer) and all systems are sequentially interlocked according to the material flow path. Working methods using the mobile crusher and conveying systems are illustrated.

  7. Mechatronic system design course for undergraduate programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, A.; Tutunji, T.; Al-Sharif, L.

    2011-08-01

    Technology advancement and human needs have led to integration among many engineering disciplines. Mechatronics engineering is an integrated discipline that focuses on the design and analysis of complete engineering systems. These systems include mechanical, electrical, computer and control subsystems. In this paper, the importance of teaching mechatronic system design to undergraduate engineering students is emphasised. The paper offers the collaborative experience in preparing and delivering the course material for two universities in Jordan. A detailed description of such a course is provided and a case study is presented. The case study used is a final year project, where students applied a six-stage design procedure that is described in the paper.

  8. An intelligent object-oriented database system for materials information

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.J.; Krishnamurthy, M.V.; Tripathy, S.R.; Sage, P.

    1995-12-31

    Materials information systems are used normally to provide data that is input to a separate design or test system that then computes the characteristics of some item or entity being designed or examined. This paper concerns the study of an integrated system that includes both the data and design systems together; therefore, it includes not only data on the property of materials but also knowledge on the geometry of the item being designed. In addition, it includes formulas representing the laws of physical science used to carry out the calculation needed to compute the necessary characteristics of the item. This kind of system can determine the optimum materials for the design of an item, rather than simply retrieve material properties. It may replace the simple search and retrieve systems available today, and it is argued that the complexity of such a system could only be achieved using an object-oriented methodology.

  9. FOREWORD: Computational methodologies for designing materials Computational methodologies for designing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2009-02-01

    084206 [7] Biswas P, Tafen D N, Inam F, Cai B and Drabold D A 2009 Materials modeling by design: applications to amorphous solids J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084207 [8] Rossi G and Ferrando R 2009 Searching for low-energy structures of nanoparticles: a comparison of different methods and algorithms J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084208 [9] Rogan J, Ramírez M, Muñoz V, Alejandro Valdivia J, García G, Ramírez R and Kiwi M 2009 Diversity driven unbiased search of minimum energy cluster configurations J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084209 [10] Pedersen A, Pizzagalli L and Jónsson H 2009 Finding mechanism of transitions in complex systems: formation and migration of dislocation kinks in a silicon crystal J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084210 [11] Trushin O, Jalkanen J, Granato E, Ying S C and Ala-Nissila T 2009 Atomistic studies of strain relaxation in heteroepitaxial systems J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084211 [12] Fichthorn K A, Miron R A, Wang Y and Tiwary Y 2009 Accelerated molecular dynamics of thin-film growth with the bond-boost method J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084212 [13] Kara A, Trushin O, Yildirim H and Rahman T S 2009 Off-lattice self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo: application to 2D cluster diffusion on the fcc(111) surface J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084213 [14] Nandipati G, Shim Y, Amar J G, Karim A, Kara A, Rahman T S and Trushin O 2009 Parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of Ag(111) island coarsening using a large database J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084214 [15] Hamouda A, Stasevich T J, Pimpinelli A and Einstein T L 2009 Effects of impurities on surface morphology: some examples J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084215 [16] Li M, Han Y, Thiel P A and Evans J W 2009 Formation of complex wedding-cake morphologies during homoepitaxial film growth of Ag on Ag(111): atomistic, step-dynamics, and continuum modeling J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 084216 [17] Uhlík F, Gatti R and Montalenti F 2009 A fast computational method for determining equilibrium concentration

  10. Knowledge-based optical system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Taoufik

    1992-03-01

    This work is a new approach for the design of start optical systems and represents a new contribution of artificial intelligence techniques in the optical design field. A knowledge-based optical-systems design (KBOSD), based on artificial intelligence algorithms, first order logic, knowledge representation, rules, and heuristics on lens design, is realized. This KBOSD is equipped with optical knowledge in the domain of centered dioptrical optical systems used at low aperture and small field angles. It generates centered dioptrical, on-axis and low-aperture optical systems, which are used as start systems for the subsequent optimization by existing lens design programs. This KBOSD produces monochromatic or polychromatic optical systems, such as singlet lens, doublet lens, triplet lens, reversed singlet lens, reversed doublet lens, reversed triplet lens, and telescopes. In the design of optical systems, the KBOSD takes into account many user constraints such as cost, resistance of the optical material (glass) to chemical, thermal, and mechanical effects, as well as the optical quality such as minimal aberrations and chromatic aberrations corrections. This KBOSD is developed in the programming language Prolog and has knowledge on optical design principles and optical properties. It is composed of more than 3000 clauses. Inference engine and interconnections in the cognitive world of optical systems are described. The system uses neither a lens library nor a lens data base; it is completely based on optical design knowledge.

  11. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  12. Aerothermodynamic systems engineering and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A reference source for various aspects of aerothermodynamic systems engineering and design is presented. Air conditioning load analysis is addressed, including physiological requirements, heat and cooling load equations, skin temperature computational methods, cooling loads due to radiation through transparent areas, heating and cooling loads due to internal sources, and practical considerations in the determination of overall heating and cooling loads. Refrigeration system design is considered, including air cycle systems, vapor cycle systems, combined vapor cycle and air cycle systems, and thermoelectric cooling. Heating methods is heating system design and low pressure and high pressure systems in air distribution system design are addressed. Procedures and equations commonly used for aerospace applications of these technologies are included.

  13. Software-Design-Analyzer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    CRISP-90 software-design-analyzer system, update of CRISP-80, is set of computer programs constituting software tool for design and documentation of other software and supporting top-down, hierarchical, modular, structured methodologies for design and programming. Written in Microsoft QuickBasic.

  14. Mars oxygen production system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotton, Charles E.; Pillow, Linda K.; Perkinson, Robert C.; Brownlie, R. P.; Chwalowski, P.; Carmona, M. F.; Coopersmith, J. P.; Goff, J. C.; Harvey, L. L.; Kovacs, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The design and construction phase is summarized of the Mars oxygen demonstration project. The basic hardware required to produce oxygen from simulated Mars atmosphere was assembled and tested. Some design problems still remain with the sample collection and storage system. In addition, design and development of computer compatible data acquisition and control instrumentation is ongoing.

  15. Computational materials design for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2013-03-01

    General adoption of sustainable energy technologies depends on the discovery and development of new high-performance materials. For instance, waste heat recovery and electricity generation via the solar thermal route require bulk thermoelectrics with a high figure of merit (ZT) and thermal stability at high-temperatures. Energy recovery applications (e.g., regenerative braking) call for the development of rapidly chargeable systems for electrical energy storage, such as electrochemical supercapacitors. Similarly, use of hydrogen as vehicular fuel depends on the ability to store hydrogen at high volumetric and gravimetric densities, as well as on the ability to extract it at ambient temperatures at sufficiently rapid rates. We will discuss how first-principles computational methods based on quantum mechanics and statistical physics can drive the understanding, improvement and prediction of new energy materials. We will cover prediction and experimental verification of new earth-abundant thermoelectrics, transition metal oxides for electrochemical supercapacitors, and kinetics of mass transport in complex metal hydrides. Research has been supported by the US Department of Energy under grant Nos. DE-SC0001342, DE-SC0001054, DE-FG02-07ER46433, and DE-FC36-08GO18136.

  16. Integration mockup and process material management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verble, Adas James, Jr.

    1992-02-01

    Work to define and develop a full scale Space Station Freedom (SSF) mockup with the flexibility to evolve into future designs, to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify human task allocations and support trade studies is described. This work began in early 1985 and ended in August, 1991. The mockups are presently being used at MSFC in Building 4755 as a technology and design testbed, as well as for public display. Micro Craft also began work on the Process Material Management System (PMMS) under this contract. The PMMS simulator was a sealed enclosure for testing to identify liquids, gaseous, particulate samples, and specimen including, urine, waste water, condensate, hazardous gases, surrogate gasses, liquids, and solids. The SSF would require many trade studies to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify system task allocations; it was necessary to develop a full scale mockup which would be representative of current SSF design with the ease of changing those designs as the SSF design evolved and changed. The tasks defined for Micro Craft were to provide the personnel, services, tools, and materials for the SSF mockup which would consist of four modules, nodes, interior components, and part task mockups of MSFC responsible engineering systems. This included the Engineering Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) testbed. For the initial study, the mockups were low fidelity, soft mockups of graphics art bottle, and other low cost materials, which evolved into higher fidelity mockups as the R&D design evolved, by modifying or rebuilding, an important cost saving factor in the design process. We designed, fabricated, and maintained the full size mockup shells and support stands. The shells consisted of cylinders, end cones, rings, longerons, docking ports, crew airlocks, and windows. The ECLSS required a heavier cylinder to support the ECLSS systems test program. Details of this activity will be covered. Support stands were

  17. Integration mockup and process material management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, Adas James, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Work to define and develop a full scale Space Station Freedom (SSF) mockup with the flexibility to evolve into future designs, to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify human task allocations and support trade studies is described. This work began in early 1985 and ended in August, 1991. The mockups are presently being used at MSFC in Building 4755 as a technology and design testbed, as well as for public display. Micro Craft also began work on the Process Material Management System (PMMS) under this contract. The PMMS simulator was a sealed enclosure for testing to identify liquids, gaseous, particulate samples, and specimen including, urine, waste water, condensate, hazardous gases, surrogate gasses, liquids, and solids. The SSF would require many trade studies to validate techniques for maintenance and logistics and verify system task allocations; it was necessary to develop a full scale mockup which would be representative of current SSF design with the ease of changing those designs as the SSF design evolved and changed. The tasks defined for Micro Craft were to provide the personnel, services, tools, and materials for the SSF mockup which would consist of four modules, nodes, interior components, and part task mockups of MSFC responsible engineering systems. This included the Engineering Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) testbed. For the initial study, the mockups were low fidelity, soft mockups of graphics art bottle, and other low cost materials, which evolved into higher fidelity mockups as the R&D design evolved, by modifying or rebuilding, an important cost saving factor in the design process. We designed, fabricated, and maintained the full size mockup shells and support stands. The shells consisted of cylinders, end cones, rings, longerons, docking ports, crew airlocks, and windows. The ECLSS required a heavier cylinder to support the ECLSS systems test program. Details of this activity will be covered. Support stands were

  18. Design of Responsive and Active (Soft) Materials Using Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Bukusoglu, Emre; Bedolla Pantoja, Marco; Mushenheim, Peter C; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are widely known for their use in liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Indeed, LCDs represent one of the most successful technologies developed to date using a responsive soft material: An electric field is used to induce a change in ordering of the LC and thus a change in optical appearance. Over the past decade, however, research has revealed the fundamental underpinnings of potentially far broader and more pervasive uses of LCs for the design of responsive soft material systems. These systems involve a delicate interplay of the effects of surface-induced ordering, elastic strain of LCs, and formation of topological defects and are characterized by a chemical complexity and diversity of nano- and micrometer-scale geometry that goes well beyond that previously investigated. As a reflection of this evolution, the community investigating LC-based materials now relies heavily on concepts from colloid and interface science. In this context, this review describes recent advances in colloidal and interfacial phenomena involving LCs that are enabling the design of new classes of soft matter that respond to stimuli as broad as light, airborne pollutants, bacterial toxins in water, mechanical interactions with living cells, molecular chirality, and more. Ongoing efforts hint also that the collective properties of LCs (e.g., LC-dispersed colloids) will, over the coming decade, yield exciting new classes of driven or active soft material systems in which organization (and useful properties) emerges during the dissipation of energy. PMID:26979412

  19. Designing Systems for Environmental Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Smith will describe his U.S. EPA research which involves elements of design, from systems as diverse as biofuel supply chains to recycling systems and chemical processes. Design uses models that rate performance as part of a synthesis approach, where steps of analysis and sy...

  20. REC Tracking Systems Design Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith Wingate

    2004-02-03

    OAK-B135 The Design Guide is presented in three parts. Section II describes the need for REC tracking, the two principal tracking methods available, and, in simple terms, the operation of certificate-based systems. Section III presents the major issues in the design of certificate-based tracking systems and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of alternative solutions. Finally, Section IV offers design principles or recommendations for most of these issues.

  1. Gradient-index ophthalmic lens design and polymer material studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, David Joel

    Unifocal ophthalmic lenses are conventionally designed using homogeneous glass or plastic materials and aspheric surfaces. The desired power and aberration correction are provided by selection of surface shape and refractive index. This thesis studies the design of ophthalmic lenses utilizing gradient-index (GRIN) materials for both the optical power and aberration control. This is done using geometrical optical theory and ray-tracing simulations. Progressive addition lenses (PALS) are vision correction lenses with a continuous change in power used to treat presbyopia. The power variation is typically located in the lower half of the lens. Progressive addition lenses are currently made with aspheric surfaces to achieve the focal power transition and aberration control. These surfaces have at most, mirror symmetry about the vertical axis. The possible design of progressive addition lenses with GRIN materials has not been well studied. This thesis studies PALS and identifies how gradient-index materials can be used to provide both the power progression and aberration control. The optical theory for rotationally symmetric and asymmetric power additions is given. Analytical and numerical methods for calculating the index profile are used, and the results examined using ray-tracing simulations. The theory developed for ophthalmic lenses is applied to the design of GRIN axicon. This is the first GRIN axicon manufactured, and is fabricated using ion-exchanged GRIN glass. Experimental measurements of its performance are compared and found to match theoretical predictions. This demonstrates the generality of the theory developed: it may be applied to non-visual applications, and even to non-imaging applications. Realistic implementation of GRIN technology to ophthalmic application requires the fabrication of large scale refractive index gradients in polymer material systems. The methyl-methacrylate/styrene copolymer system is studied to develop an empirical model of its

  2. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  3. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  4. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  5. 46 CFR 153.280 - Piping system design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping system design. 153.280 Section 153.280 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Piping Systems and Cargo Handling Equipment § 153.280 Piping system design. (a) Each cargo piping system must...

  6. Design Tool for Cryogenic Thermal Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Demko, Jonathan A; Fesmire, J. E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal isolation of low-temperature systems from ambient environments is a constant issue faced by practitioners of cryogenics. For energy-efficient systems and processes to be realized, thermal insulation must be considered as an integrated system, not merely an add-on element. A design tool to determine the performance of insulation systems for comparative trade-off studies of different available material options was developed. The approach is to apply thermal analysis to standard shapes (plane walls, cylinders, spheres) that are relatively simple to characterize with a one-dimensional analytical or numerical model. The user describes the system hot and cold boundary geometry and the operating environment. Basic outputs such as heat load and temperature profiles are determined. The user can select from a built-in insulation material database or input user defined materials. Existing information has been combined with the new experimental thermal conductivity data produced by the Cryogenics Test Laboratory for cryogenic and vacuum environments, including high vacuum, soft vacuum, and no vacuum. Materials in the design tool include multilayer insulation, aerogel blankets, aerogel bulk-fill, foams, powders, composites, and other insulation system constructions. A comparison of the design tool to a specific composite thermal insulation system is given.

  7. Mass of materials: the impact of designers on construction ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, John

    2012-01-01

    Many construction injuries are musculoskeletal related in the form of sprains and strains arising from the handling of materials, which are specified by designers. The paper presents the results of a study conducted among delegates attending two 'designing for H&S' (DfH&S) seminars using a questionnaire. The salient findings include: the level of knowledge relative to the mass and density of materials is limited; designers generally do not consider the mass and density of materials when designing structures and elements and specifying materials; to a degree designers appreciate that the mass and density of materials impact on construction ergonomics; designers rate their knowledge of the mass and density of materials as limited, and designers appreciate the potential of the consideration of the mass and density of materials to contribute to an improvement in construction ergonomics. Conclusions include: designers lack the requisite knowledge relative to the mass and density of materials; designers are thus precluded from conducting optimum design hazard identification and risk assessments, and tertiary built environment designer education does not enlighten designers relative to construction ergonomics. Recommendations include: tertiary built environment designer education should construction ergonomics; professional associations should raise the level of awareness relative to construction ergonomics, and design practices should include a category 'mass and density of materials' in their practice libraries. PMID:22317574

  8. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.240 Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials...

  9. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.240 Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials...

  10. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.240 Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials...

  11. 46 CFR 128.240 - Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.240 Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control—materials and pressure design. (a) Each standard piping component... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydraulic or pneumatic power and control-materials...

  12. 14 CFR 121.271 - Fire-extinguishing system materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-extinguishing system materials. 121....271 Fire-extinguishing system materials. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each component of a fire-extinguishing system that is in a designated fire zone must be made of...

  13. Support systems design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The integration of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) ground support systems with the new launch processing system and new launch vehicle provided KSC with a unique challenge in system design and analysis for the Space Transportation System. Approximately 70 support systems are controlled and monitored by the launch processing system. Typical systems are main propulsion oxygen and hydrogen loading systems, environmental control life support system, hydraulics, etc. An End-to-End concept of documentation and analysis was chosen and applied to these systems. Unique problems were resolved in the areas of software analysis, safing under emergency conditions, sampling rates, and control loop analysis. New methods of performing End-to-End reliability analyses were implemented. The systems design approach selected and the resolution of major problem areas are discussed.

  14. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  15. PEMFC MEA and System Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Knights, Shanna; Bashyam, Rajesh; He, Ping; Lauritzen, Michael; Startek, Cara; Colbow, Vesna; Cheng, Tommy; Kolodziej, Joanna; Wessel, Silvia

    2011-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are being developed and sold commercially for multiple near term markets. Ballard Power Systems is focused on the near term markets of backup power, distributed generation, materials handling, and buses. Significant advances have been made in cost and durability of fuel cell products. Improved tolerance to a wide range of system operation and environmental noises will enable increased viability across a broad range of applications. In order to apply the most effective membrane electrode assembly (MEA) design for each market, the system requirements and associated MEA failures must be well understood. The failure modes associated with the electrodes and membrane degradation are discussed with respect to associated system operation and mitigating approaches. A few key system considerations that influence MEA design include expected fuel quality, balance-of-plant materials, time under idle or open circuit operation, and start-up and shut-down conditions.

  16. 30 CFR 27.20 - Quality of material, workmanship, and design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality of material, workmanship, and design... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.20 Quality of material, workmanship, and design. (a) MSHA will test only equipment that,...

  17. 46 CFR 128.230 - Penetrations of hulls and watertight bulkheads-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and pressure design. 128.230 Section 128.230 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.230 Penetrations of hulls and watertight bulkheads—materials and pressure design. (a) Each...

  18. 46 CFR 128.230 - Penetrations of hulls and watertight bulkheads-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and pressure design. 128.230 Section 128.230 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE ENGINEERING: EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Materials and Pressure Design § 128.230 Penetrations of hulls and watertight bulkheads—materials and pressure design. (a) Each...

  19. The design and modeling of periodic materials with novel properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jonathan Bernard

    Cellular materials are ubiquitous in our world being found in natural and engineered systems as structural materials, sound and energy absorbers, heat insulators and more. Stochastic foams made of polymers, metals and even ceramics find wide use due to their novel properties when compared to monolithic materials. Properties of these so called hybrid materials, those that combine materials or materials and space, are derived from the localization of thermomechanical stresses and strains on the mesoscale as a function of cell topology. The effects of localization can only be generalized in stochastic materials arising from their inherent potential complexity, possessing variations in local chemistry, microstructural inhomogeneity and topological variations. Ordered cellular materials on the other hand, such as lattices and honeycombs, make for much easier study, often requiring analysis of only a single unit-cell. Theoretical bounds predict that hybrid materials have the potential to push design envelopes offering lighter stiffer and stronger materials. Hybrid materials can achieve very low and even negative coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) while retaining a relatively high stiffness -- properties completely unmatched by monolithic materials. In the first chapter of this thesis a two-dimensional lattice is detailed that possess near maximum stiffness, relative to the tightest theoretical bound, and low, zero and even appreciably negative thermal expansion. Its CTE and stiffness are given in closed form as a function of geometric parameters and the material properties. This result is confirmed with finite elements (FE) and experiment. In the second chapter the compressive stiffness of three-dimensional ordered foams, both closed and open cell, are predicted with FE and the results placed in property space in terms of stiffness and density. A novel structure is identified that effectively achieves theoretical bounds for Young's, shear and bulk modulus

  20. Solar Energy: Solar System Design Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system design fundamentals is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy…

  1. Computational materials design for bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xi; Shin, Yongwoo

    2013-03-01

    The adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger Hamiltonian is further developed in this work to predict the optical bandgaps of more than 200 different π-conjugated systems. Insights on the structure-property relationship of these π-conjugated systems lead to guiding rules for new photovoltaic materials design. A copolymer of parallel and perpendicular benzodithiophenes, differing only in sulfur atom locations, is proposed as a candidate to achieve the optimal 1.2 eV donor optical gap for organic photovoltaics. The charge transfer mechanisms and the exciton and charge carrier mobilities are computed and compared for various bulk-heterojunction structures to improve the overall power convention efficiency.

  2. Space Station battery system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, R. J.; Chawathe, A. K.; Van Ommering, G.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station Electric Power System will rely on nickel-hydrogen batteries in its photovoltaic power subsystem for energy storage to support eclipse and contingency operations. These 81-Ah batteries will be designed for a 5-year life capability and are configured as orbital replaceable units (ORUs), permitting replacement of worn-out batteries over the anticipated 30-year Station life. This paper describes the baseline design and the development plans for the battery assemblies, the battery ORUs and the battery system. Key elements reviewed are the cells, mechanical and thermal design of the assembly, the ORU approach and interfaces, and the electrical design of the battery system. The anticipated operational approach is discussed, covering expected performance as well as the processor-controlled charge management and discharge load allocation techniques. Development plans cover verification of materials, cells, assemblies and ORUs, as well as system-level test and analyses.

  3. Nanoscale material design for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hua

    /nanowire array solar cells. Phonon-assisted electron decay in semiconductor quantum dots is also investigated in this work. In semiconductor solar cell, a large portion of energy loss is by the fast hot electron cooling, in which a high energy electron decays to the electronic band gap by creating a series of phonons. The excessive electrical energy is then converted to heat and wasted, so that the total photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency is limited. The electron decay rate reduces in semiconductor quantum dots, due to the discrete electron energy levels created by quantum confinement. To design quantum dots with the slowest decay rate, we use the non-adiabatic molecular dynamics to perform real-time simulations of the phonon-assisted electron decay process. This method is based on time-dependent density functional theory, and can directly predict the phonon-assisted electron decay time using the initial quantum dot structure as the only input. The numerical simulation shows that the phonon-induced electron decay can be slowed down in a small PbSe quantum dot. The temperature-dependent relaxation in this quantum dot is also studied, which helps us to propose a multi-channel relaxation mechanism. This mechanism provides new insights to the understanding of electron decay process in quantum dots. The results from this study have potentially important applications in solar energy harvesting and radiative thermal management. It offers a new perspective of nanoscale engineering of materials to achieve more efficient photovoltaic energy conversion.

  4. Material for Point Design (final summary of DIME material)

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2014-02-25

    These slides summarize the motivation of the Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) project, the “point design” of the Polar Direct Drive (PDD) version of the NIF separated reactant capsule, the experimental requirements, technical achievements, and some useful backup material. These slides are intended to provide much basic material in one convenient location and will hopefully be of some use for subsequent experimental projects.

  5. Acquisition of Instructional Material Information as a Function of Manual Design and Material Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Reuben; And Others

    The study, with 52 preservice special education teachers, focused on effects of two types of teacher manual design and two levels of material complexity on comprehension of instructional materials utilization. Two materials were selected from an instructional materials collection for less complex material and for more complex material,…

  6. A design methodology for unattended monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,JAMES D.; DELAND,SHARON M.

    2000-03-01

    The authors presented a high-level methodology for the design of unattended monitoring systems, focusing on a system to detect diversion of nuclear materials from a storage facility. The methodology is composed of seven, interrelated analyses: Facility Analysis, Vulnerability Analysis, Threat Assessment, Scenario Assessment, Design Analysis, Conceptual Design, and Performance Assessment. The design of the monitoring system is iteratively improved until it meets a set of pre-established performance criteria. The methodology presented here is based on other, well-established system analysis methodologies and hence they believe it can be adapted to other verification or compliance applications. In order to make this approach more generic, however, there needs to be more work on techniques for establishing evaluation criteria and associated performance metrics. They found that defining general-purpose evaluation criteria for verifying compliance with international agreements was a significant undertaking in itself. They finally focused on diversion of nuclear material in order to simplify the problem so that they could work out an overall approach for the design methodology. However, general guidelines for the development of evaluation criteria are critical for a general-purpose methodology. A poor choice in evaluation criteria could result in a monitoring system design that solves the wrong problem.

  7. Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System

    SciTech Connect

    Radle, James E; Archer, Daniel E; Carter, Robert J; Mullens, James Allen; Mihalczo, John T; Britton Jr, Charles L; Lind, Randall F; Wright, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    The Fieldable Nuclear Material Identification System (FNMIS), funded by the NA-241 Office of Dismantlement and Transparency, provides information to determine the material attributes and identity of heavily shielded nuclear objects. This information will provide future treaty participants with verifiable information required by the treaty regime. The neutron interrogation technology uses a combination of information from induced fission neutron radiation and transmitted neutron imaging information to provide high confidence that the shielded item is consistent with the host's declaration. The combination of material identification information and the shape and configuration of the item are very difficult to spoof. When used at various points in the warhead dismantlement sequence, the information complimented by tags and seals can be used to track subassembly and piece part information as the disassembly occurs. The neutron transmission imaging has been developed during the last seven years and the signature analysis over the last several decades. The FNMIS is the culmination of the effort to put the technology in a usable configuration for potential treaty verification purposes.

  8. NASA System Engineering Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Jose

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's use of systems engineering for the complete life cycle of a project. Systems engineering is a methodical, disciplined approach for the design, realization, technical management, operations, and retirement of a system. Each phase of a NASA project is terminated with a Key decision point (KDP), which is supported by major reviews.

  9. System Design of the SWRL Financial System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Masumi

    To produce various management and accounting reports in order to maintain control of SWRL (Southwest Regional Laboratory) operational and financial activities, a computer-based SWRL financial system was developed. The system design is outlined, and various types of system inputs described. The kinds of management and accounting reports generated…

  10. General Systems Theory and Instructional Systems Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, David F.

    1990-01-01

    Describes basic concepts in the field of general systems theory (GST) and identifies commonalities that exist between GST and instructional systems design (ISD). Models and diagrams that depict system elements in ISD are presented, and two matrices that show how GST has been used in ISD literature are included. (11 references) (LRW)

  11. SP-100 Control System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Jaikaran N.; Halfen, Frank J.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Syed, Akbar; Jiang, Thomas J.; Wong, Kwok K.; Otwell, Robert L.

    1994-07-01

    Recent work in lower power generic early applications for the SP-100 have resulted in control system design simplification for a 20 kWe design with thermoelectric power conversion. This paper presents the non-mission-dependent control system features for this design. The control system includes a digital computer based controller, dual purpose control rods and drives, temperature sensors, and neutron flux monitors. The thaw system is mission dependent and can be either electrical or based on NaK trace lines. Key features of the control system and components are discussed. As was the case for higher power applications, the initial on-orbit approach to criticality involves the relatively fast withdrawal of the control-rods to a near-critical position followed by slower movement through critical and into the power range. The control system performs operating maneuvers as well as providing for automatic startup, shutdown, restart, and reactor protection.

  12. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-01-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  13. Lunar materials processing system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1992-02-01

    The theme of this paper is that governmental resources will not permit the simultaneous development of all viable lunar materials processing (LMP) candidates. Choices will inevitably be made, based on the results of system integration trade studies comparing candidates to each other for high-leverage applications. It is in the best long-term interest of the LMP community to lead the selection process itself, quickly and practically. The paper is in five parts. The first part explains what systems integration means and why the specialized field of LMP needs this activity now. The second part defines the integration context for LMP -- by outlining potential lunar base functions, their interrelationships and constraints. The third part establishes perspective for prioritizing the development of LMP methods, by estimating realistic scope, scale, and timing of lunar operations. The fourth part describes the use of one type of analytical tool for gaining understanding of system interactions: the input/output model. A simple example solved with linear algebra is used to illustrate. The fifth and closing part identifies specific steps needed to refine the current ability to study lunar base system integration. Research specialists have a crucial role to play now in providing the data upon which this refinement process must be based.

  14. Design and analysis of novel photocatalytic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppana, Venkata Bharat Ram

    The development of sustainable sources of energy to decrease our dependence on non-renewable fossil fuels and the reduction of emissions causing global warming are important technological challenges of the 21st century. Production of solar fuels by photocatalysis is one potential route to reduce the impact of those problems. The most widely applied photocatalyst is TiO2 because it is stable, non-toxic and inexpensive. Still, it cannot utilize the solar spectrum efficiently as its band gap is 3.2 eV thus able to absorb only 3% of sun light. This thesis therefore explores multiple avenues towards improving the light absorption capability of semiconductor materials without loss in activity. To achieve this objective, the valence band hybridization method of band gap reduction was utilized. This technique is based on introducing new orbitals at the top of valence band of the semiconductor that can then hybridize with existing orbitals. The hybridization then raises the maximum of the valence band thereby reducing the band gap. This technique has the added advantage of increasing the mobility of oxidizing holes in the now dispersed valence band. In practice, this can be achieved by introducing N 2p or Sn 5s orbitals in the valence band of an oxide. We initially designed novel zinc gallium oxy-nitrides, with the spinel structure and band gaps in the visible region of the solar spectrum, by nitridation of a zinc gallate precursor produced by sol-gel synthesis. These spinel oxy-nitrides have band gaps of 2.5 to 2.7 eV, surface areas of 16 to 36 m 2/g, and nitrogen content less than 1.5%. They are active towards degradation of organic molecules in visible light. Density functional theory calculations show that this band gap reduction in part is associated with hybridization between the dopant N 2p states with Zn 3d orbitals at the top of the valence band. While spinel oxy-nitrides are produced under nitridation at 550°C, at higher temperatures they are consumed to form

  15. 15 CFR 922.22 - Development of designation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Development of designation materials... Sanctuaries § 922.22 Development of designation materials. (a) In designating a National Marine Sanctuary, the... Sanctuary includes waters within the exclusive economic zone, the Secretary shall notify the...

  16. 15 CFR 922.22 - Development of designation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Development of designation materials. 922.22 Section 922.22 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... Sanctuaries § 922.22 Development of designation materials. (a) In designating a National Marine Sanctuary,...

  17. Design of Knight LED system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wen; Lou, Yuna; Xiao, Zhihong

    2010-02-01

    This design introduces a used car on the design of LED decorative light strip. This LED named Knight LED. In This system we use ATMEGA8 as the Master MCU Chip. Through the microcontroller to implement the wireless remote control receiver and the LED lights of different modes of switching, different brightness control. Also we use ULN2803 as the LED driver.

  18. Digital systems design language. Design synthesis of digital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, S. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Digital Systems Design Language (DDL) is implemented on the SEL-32 computer systems. The details of the language, translator and simulator programs are included. Several example descriptions and a tutorial on hardware description languages are provided, to guide the user.

  19. System design projects for undergraduate design education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batill, S. M.; Pinkelman, J.

    1993-01-01

    Design education has received considerable in the recent past. This paper is intended to address one aspect of undergraduate design education and that is the selection and development of the design project for a capstone design course. Specific goals for a capstone design course are presented and their influence on the project selection are discussed. The evolution of a series of projects based upon the design of remotely piloted aircraft is presented along with students' perspective on the capstone experience.

  20. Design and simulation of material-integrated distributed sensor processing with a code-based agent platform and mobile multi-agent systems.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-agent systems (MAS) can be used for decentralized and self-organizing data processing in a distributed system, like a resource-constrained sensor network, enabling distributed information extraction, for example, based on pattern recognition and self-organization, by decomposing complex tasks in simpler cooperative agents. Reliable MAS-based data processing approaches can aid the material-integration of structural-monitoring applications, with agent processing platforms scaled to the microchip level. The agent behavior, based on a dynamic activity-transition graph (ATG) model, is implemented with program code storing the control and the data state of an agent, which is novel. The program code can be modified by the agent itself using code morphing techniques and is capable of migrating in the network between nodes. The program code is a self-contained unit (a container) and embeds the agent data, the initialization instructions and the ATG behavior implementation. The microchip agent processing platform used for the execution of the agent code is a standalone multi-core stack machine with a zero-operand instruction format, leading to a small-sized agent program code, low system complexity and high system performance. The agent processing is token-queue-based, similar to Petri-nets. The agent platform can be implemented in software, too, offering compatibility at the operational and code level, supporting agent processing in strong heterogeneous networks. In this work, the agent platform embedded in a large-scale distributed sensor network is simulated at the architectural level by using agent-based simulation techniques. PMID:25690550

  1. Design and Simulation of Material-Integrated Distributed Sensor Processing with a Code-Based Agent Platform and Mobile Multi-Agent Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-agent systems (MAS) can be used for decentralized and self-organizing data processing in a distributed system, like a resource-constrained sensor network, enabling distributed information extraction, for example, based on pattern recognition and self-organization, by decomposing complex tasks in simpler cooperative agents. Reliable MAS-based data processing approaches can aid the material-integration of structural-monitoring applications, with agent processing platforms scaled to the microchip level. The agent behavior, based on a dynamic activity-transition graph (ATG) model, is implemented with program code storing the control and the data state of an agent, which is novel. The program code can be modified by the agent itself using code morphing techniques and is capable of migrating in the network between nodes. The program code is a self-contained unit (a container) and embeds the agent data, the initialization instructions and the ATG behavior implementation. The microchip agent processing platform used for the execution of the agent code is a standalone multi-core stack machine with a zero-operand instruction format, leading to a small-sized agent program code, low system complexity and high system performance. The agent processing is token-queue-based, similar to Petri-nets. The agent platform can be implemented in software, too, offering compatibility at the operational and code level, supporting agent processing in strong heterogeneous networks. In this work, the agent platform embedded in a large-scale distributed sensor network is simulated at the architectural level by using agent-based simulation techniques. PMID:25690550

  2. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot < 450°C) and mechanical loading ( P = 0 N to 104 N). The proposed instrument is able to monitor the temperature and electrical output of the TEM, the actual heat flow through the module, and its mechanical load, which can be varied during the measurement. Key components of our testing setup are (i) a measuring chamber where the TEM/material is compressed between thermally shielded heating blocks equipped with a mechanical loading system and water-cooled copper-based cooler, (ii) an electrical load system, (iii) a type K thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  3. The CCTV system design problem

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, P.E.

    1993-12-31

    There are numerous cases where CCTV system performance is less than ideal. The detection probability of a complete barrier system frequently relies upon the ability of the security operator to perform a particular visual task. This impacts directly upon the staffing costs for the response teams. This situation has given rise to the introduction of systems performance tests. The subsequent adoption of these tests for use in systems performance requirements at purchase time means that the system designer needs to be able to characterize the performance of all of the system components, and to understand the way in which each of them contribute to the performance of the whole system. Broadly this knowledge is not available. Work has been done to review the ways in which the operator performance impacts upon the specification of the different hardware components. A broader understanding of the whole system design problem has been obtained as a result of this work.

  4. Design of a Robotic Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; E.D. Larsen; D. P. Pace; R. J. Bitsoi; C. R. Tolle

    2006-08-01

    Canisters for long term storage or disposal of waste materials are normally closed by welding one or more lids to the top of the canister. This paper describes the development of a conceptual design of a control architecture for a robotic system for welding lids on canisters in a remote welding cell. This work extended over several years and included development of control systems for three machines.

  5. FFTF fuel systems design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, D.S.; Baars, R.E.; Jackson, R.J.; Weber, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to first enumerate the design considerations that were given to the fuel system, then secondly, show how these design allowances, methods, and criteria compare to the subsequent irradiation data. This comparison will show that decisions made by the design team were generally correct and, if in error, tended to be conservative. The FFTF driver fuel assemblies addressed by this paper are composed of the duct, a spacer system, and 217 fuel pins. Each of these subcomponents is described as the criteria are discussed and important parameters noted.

  6. Automatic design of IMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, U.; Reichel, R.

    During the last years, the integrated modular avionics (IMA) design philosophy became widely established at aircraft manufacturers, giving rise to a series of new design challenges, most notably the allocation of avionics functions to the various IMA components and the placement of this equipment in the aircraft. This paper presents a modelling approach for avionics that allows automation of some steps of the design process by applying an optimisation algorithm which searches for system configurations that fulfil the safety requirements and have low costs. The algorithm was implemented as a quite sophisticated software prototype, therefore we will also present detailed results of its application to actual avionics systems.

  7. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1998-11-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries.

  8. Design of Functional Materials based on Liquid Crystalline Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Wang, Xiaoguang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    This brief perspective focuses on recent advances in the design of functional soft materials that are based on confinement of low molecular weight liquid crystals (LCs) within micrometer-sized droplets. While the ordering of LCs within micrometer-sized domains has been explored extensively in polymer-dispersed LC materials, recent studies performed with LC domains with precisely defined size and interfacial chemistry have unmasked observations of confinement-induced ordering of LCs that do not follow previously reported theoretical predictions. These new findings, which are enabled in part by advances in the preparation of LCs encapsulated in polymeric shells, are opening up new opportunities for the design of soft responsive materials based on surface-induced ordering transitions. These materials are also providing new insights into the self-assembly of biomolecular and colloidal species at defects formed by LCs confined to micrometer-sized domains. The studies presented in this perspective serve additionally to highlight gaps in knowledge regarding the ordering of LCs in confined systems. PMID:24882944

  9. Design for containment of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C. ); McDonald, J.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Department of Energy, (DOE), facilities across the United States, use wind and tornado design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. In addition, other programs such as Advanced Light Water Reactors, New Production Reactors, and Individual Plant Examinations for External Events for commercial nuclear power plants utilize design and evaluation criteria based on probabilistic performance goals. The use of probabilistic performance goals is a departure from design practice for commercial nuclear power plants which have traditionally been designed utilizing a conservative specification of wind and tornado loading combined with deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits. Approaches which utilize probabilistic wind and tornado hazard curves for specification of loading and deterministic response evaluation methods and permissible behavior limits are discussed in this paper. Through the use of such design/evaluation approaches, it may be demonstrated that there is high likelihood that probabilistic performance goals can be achieved. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Materials Design On-the-Fly.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Amsler, Maximilian; Nogueira, F; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L

    2015-08-11

    The dream of any solid-state theorist is to be able to predict new materials with tailored properties from scratch, i.e., without any input from experiment. Over the past decades, we have steadily approached this goal. Recent developments in the field of high-throughput calculations focused on finding the best material for specific applications. However, a key input for these techniques still had to be obtained experimentally, namely, the crystal structure of the materials. Here, we give a step further and show that one can indeed optimize material properties using as a single starting point the knowledge of the periodic table and the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics. This is done by combining state-of-the-art methods of global structure prediction that allow us to obtain the ground-state crystal structure of arbitrary materials, with an evolutionary algorithm that optimizes the chemical composition for the desired property. As a first showcase demonstration of our method, we perform an unbiased search for superhard materials and for transparent conductors. We stress that our method is completely general and can be used to optimize any property (or combination of properties) that can be calculated in a computer. PMID:26574474

  11. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Schuller International Inc. targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites, the plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, and the joining of MoSi{sub 2} materials to metals.

  12. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  13. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  14. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  15. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  16. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  17. 14 CFR 25.613 - Material strength properties and material design values.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... individual item is tested before use to determine that the actual strength properties of that particular item... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material strength properties and material... § 25.613 Material strength properties and material design values. (a) Material strength properties...

  18. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated from LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux) and author(s) or principal investigator(s). Tne LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which has been computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. The LDEF Materials Data Base is described and step-by-step example searches using the data base are included. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  19. Elastocaloric cooling materials and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We are actively pursuing applications of thermoelastic (elastocaloric) cooling using shape memory alloys. Latent heat associated with martensitic transformation of shape memory alloys can be used to run cooling cycles with stress-inducing mechanical drives. The coefficient of performance of thermoelastic cooling materials can be as high as 11 with the directly measured DT of around 17 °C. Depending on the stress application mode, the number of cycles to fatigue can be as large as of the order of 105. Efforts to design and develop thermoelastic alloys with long fatigue life will be discussed. The current project at the University of Maryland is focused on development of building air-conditioners, and at Maryland Energy and Sensor Technologies, smaller scale commercial applications are being pursued. This work is carried out in collaboration with Jun Cui, Yiming Wu, Suxin Qian, Yunho Hwang, Jan Muehlbauer, and Reinhard Radermacher, and it is funded by the ARPA-E BEETIT program and the State of Maryland.

  20. Material, process, and product design of thermoplastic composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Heming

    Thermoplastic composites made of polypropylene (PP) and E-glass fibers were investigated experimentally as well as theoretically for two new classes of product designs. The first application was for reinforcement of wood. Commingled PP/glass yarn was consolidated and bonded on wood panel using a tie layer. The processing parameters, including temperature, pressure, heating time, cooling time, bonding strength, and bending strength were tested experimentally and evaluated analytically. The thermoplastic adhesive interface was investigated with environmental scanning electron microscopy. The wood/composite structural design was optimized and evaluated using a Graphic Method. In the second application, we evaluated use of thermoplastic composites for explosion containment in an arrester. PP/glass yarn was fabricated in a sleeve form and wrapped around the arrester. After consolidation, the flexible composite sleeve forms a solid composite shell. The composite shell acts as a protection layer in a surge test to contain the fragments of the arrester. The manufacturing process for forming the composite shell was designed. Woven, knitted, and braided textile composite shells made of commingled PP/glass yarn were tested and evaluated. Mechanical performance of the woven, knitted, and braided composite shells was examined analytically. The theoretical predictions were used to verify the experimental results.

  1. Thermal Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials: Design of Optimum Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a study of optimal experiment design applied to the measure of thermal properties in functionally graded materials. As a first step, a material with linearly-varying thermal properties is analyzed, and several different tran- sient experimental designs are discussed. An optimality criterion, based on sen- sitivity coefficients, is used to identify the best experimental design. Simulated experimental results are analyzed to verify that the identified best experiment design has the smallest errors in the estimated parameters. This procedure is general and can be applied to design of experiments for a variety of materials.

  2. Designing thin film materials — Ternary borides from first principles

    PubMed Central

    Euchner, H.; Mayrhofer, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting the mechanisms responsible for the exceptional properties of aluminum based nitride coatings, we apply ab initio calculations to develop a recipe for designing functional thin film materials based on ternary diborides. The combination of binary diborides, preferring different structure types, results in supersaturated metastable ternary systems with potential for phase transformation induced effects. For the exemplary cases of MxW1 − xB2 (with M = Al, Ti, V) we show by detailed ab initio calculations that the respective ternary solid solutions are likely to be experimentally accessible by modern depositions techniques. PMID:26082562

  3. Design guide for high pressure oxygen systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C.; Pohl, H. O.; Chaffee, N. H.; Guy, W. W.; Allton, C. S.; Johnston, R. L.; Castner, W. L.; Stradling, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A repository for critical and important detailed design data and information, hitherto unpublished, along with significant data on oxygen reactivity phenomena with metallic and nonmetallic materials in moderate to very high pressure environments is documented. This data and information provide a ready and easy to use reference for the guidance of designers of propulsion, power, and life support systems for use in space flight. The document is also applicable to designs for industrial and civilian uses of high pressure oxygen systems. The information presented herein are derived from data and design practices involving oxygen usage at pressures ranging from about 20 psia to 8000 psia equal with thermal conditions ranging from room temperatures up to 500 F.

  4. Flight Design System-1 System Design Document. Volume 9: Executive logic flow, program design language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The detailed logic flow for the Flight Design System Executive is presented. The system is designed to provide the hardware/software capability required for operational support of shuttle flight planning.

  5. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  6. Tritium glovebox stripper system seismic design evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grinnell, J. J.; Klein, J. E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of glovebox confinement at US Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities has been discussed in numerous publications. Glovebox confinement protects the workers from radioactive material (especially tritium oxide), provides an inert atmosphere for prevention of flammable gas mixtures and deflagrations, and allows recovery of tritium released from the process into the glovebox when a glovebox stripper system (GBSS) is part of the design. Tritium recovery from the glovebox atmosphere reduces emissions from the facility and the radiological dose to the public. Location of US DOE defense programs facilities away from public boundaries also aids in reducing radiological doses to the public. This is a study based upon design concepts to identify issues and considerations for design of a Seismic GBSS. Safety requirements and analysis should be considered preliminary. Safety requirements for design of GBSS should be developed and finalized as a part of the final design process.

  7. Computer-aided system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Carrie K.

    1991-01-01

    A technique has been developed for combining features of a systems architecture design and assessment tool and a software development tool. This technique reduces simulation development time and expands simulation detail. The Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS), developed at the Research Triangle Institute, is a set of computer-assisted engineering tools for the design and analysis of computer systems. The ADAS system is based on directed graph concepts and supports the synthesis and analysis of software algorithms mapped to candidate hardware implementations. Greater simulation detail is provided by the ADAS functional simulator. With the functional simulator, programs written in either Ada or C can be used to provide a detailed description of graph nodes. A Computer-Aided Software Engineering tool developed at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL CASE) automatically generates Ada or C code from engineering block diagram specifications designed with an interactive graphical interface. A technique to use the tools together has been developed, which further automates the design process.

  8. Interfacial properties and design of functional energy materials.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality and performance. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly, a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately noncovalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, for example, lithographic, approach. However, while function in simple systems such as single crystals can often be evaluated a priori, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various support substrates. Typical molecular self-assembly involves noncovalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions. These interactions remain poorly understood, due to the combination of many-body interactions compounded by local or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice and electronic structure. Progress toward unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling, and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. Theory, modeling, and simulation can accelerate the process of materials understanding and design

  9. Designing Training Materials for Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenweig, Fred

    1984-01-01

    Describes four training guides developed by the Water and Sanitation for Health Project for use in rural water supply and sanitation projects in developing countries, explains the development process, offers insights gained from the process, and presents five considerations for designing training in third world countries. (MBR)

  10. Designed porosity materials in nuclear reactor components

    DOEpatents

    Yacout, A. M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Stan, Marius

    2016-09-06

    A nuclear fuel pellet with a porous substrate, such as a carbon or tungsten aerogel, on which at least one layer of a fuel containing material is deposited via atomic layer deposition, and wherein the layer deposition is controlled to prevent agglomeration of defects. Further, a method of fabricating a nuclear fuel pellet, wherein the method features the steps of selecting a porous substrate, depositing at least one layer of a fuel containing material, and terminating the deposition when the desired porosity is achieved. Also provided is a nuclear reactor fuel cladding made of a porous substrate, such as silicon carbide aerogel or silicon carbide cloth, upon which layers of silicon carbide are deposited.

  11. Evaluating Course Design Principles for Multimedia Learning Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Bernard; Cong, Chunyu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on evaluation studies of principles of course design for interactive multimedia learning materials. Design/methodology/approach: At the Defence Academy of the UK, Cranfield University has worked with military colleagues to produce multimedia learning materials for courses on "Military Knowledge". The courses are…

  12. ATRP in the design of functional materials for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Siegwart, Daniel J.; Oh, Jung Kwon; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) is an effective technique for the design and preparation of multifunctional, nanostructured materials for a variety of applications in biology and medicine. ATRP enables precise control over macromolecular structure, order, and functionality, which are important considerations for emerging biomedical designs. This article reviews recent advances in the preparation of polymer-based nanomaterials using ATRP, including polymer bioconjugates, block copolymer-based drug delivery systems, cross-linked microgels/nanogels, diagnostic and imaging platforms, tissue engineering hydrogels, and degradable polymers. It is envisioned that precise engineering at the molecular level will translate to tailored macroscopic physical properties, thus enabling control of the key elements for realized biomedical applications. PMID:23525884

  13. Designing and modeling doubly porous polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, H.-B.; Le Droumaguet, B.; Monchiet, V.; Grande, D.

    2015-07-01

    Doubly porous organic materials based on poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) are synthetized through the use of two distinct types of porogen templates, namely a macroporogen and a nanoporogen. Two complementary strategies are implemented by using either sodium chloride particles or fused poly(methyl methacrylate) beads as macroporogens, in conjunction with ethanol as a porogenic solvent. The porogen removal respectively allows for the generation of either non-interconnected or interconnected macropores with an average diameter of about 100-200 μm and nanopores with sizes lying within the 100 nm order of magnitude, as evidenced by mercury intrusion porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Nitrogen sorption measurements evidence the formation of materials with rather high specific surface areas, i.e. higher than 140 m2.g-1. This paper also addresses the development of numerical tools for computing the permeability of such doubly porous materials. Due to the coexistence of well separated scales between nanopores and macropores, a consecutive double homogenization approach is proposed. A nanoscopic scale and a mesoscopic scale are introduced, and the flow is evaluated by means of the Finite Element Method to determine the macroscopic permeability. At the nanoscopic scale, the flow is described by the Stokes equations with an adherence condition at the solid surface. At the mesoscopic scale, the flow obeys the Stokes equations in the macropores and the Darcy equation in the permeable polymer in order to account for the presence of the nanopores.

  14. Thermal Systems and Materials Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    During my internship, I was involved in Boeing Thermal System/M&P, which handles maintenance and repairs of shuttle tiles, blankets, gap fillers, etc. One project I took part in was the revision of TPS-227, a repair process to tiles that entailed drilling out tile damage and using a cylindrical insert to fill the hole. The previous specification used minimal adhesive for application and when the adhesive cured, there would be several voids in the adhered material, causing an unsatisfactory bond. The testing compared several new methods and I analyzed the number of voids produced by each method to determine which one was most effective at eliminating void space. We revised the original process to apply a light adhesive coat to the top 25% of the borehole and a heavy coat to 100% of the insert. I was also responsible for maintaining the subnominal bond database, which records all unsatisfactory SIP (Strain Isolator Pad) bonds. I then archived each SIP physically for future referral data and statistics. In addition, I performed post-flight tile inspections for damages and wrote dispositions to have these tiles repaired. This also included writing a post-flight damage report for a section of Atlantis and creating summarized repair process guidelines for orbiter technicians.

  15. Material Development to Raise Awareness of Using Smart Boards: An Example Design and Development Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günaydin, Serpil; Karamete, Aysen

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop training material that will help raise awareness in prospective teachers regarding the benefits of using smart boards in the classroom. In this study, a Type 2 design and development research method (DDR) was used. The material was developed by applying phases of ADDIE--an instructional systems design model. The…

  16. Cross Cutting Structural Design for Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B.

    2007-01-01

    The challenge of our new National Space Policy and NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) is keyed to the development of more effective space access and transportation systems. Optimizing in-space systems through innovative cross cutting structural designs that reduce mass, combine functional requirements and improve performance can significantly advance spacecraft designs to meet the ever growing demands of our new National Space Policy. Dependence on limited structural designs is no longer an option. We must create robust materials, forms, function and evolvable systems. We must advance national policy objectives in the design, development, test and operation of multi-billion dollar new generation crew capsules by enabling them to evolve in meeting the requirements of long duration missions to the moon and mars. This paper discusses several current issues and major design drivers for consideration in structural design of advanced spacecraft systems. Approaches to addressing these multifunctional requirements is presented as well as a discussion on utilizing Functional Analysis System Technique (FAST) in developing cross cutting structural designs for future spacecraft. It will be shown how easy it is to deploy such techniques in any conceptual architecture definition or ongoing preliminary design. As experts in merging mission, safety and life support requirements of the frail human existence into robust vehicle and habitat design, we will conquer the final frontier, harness new resources and develop life giving technologies for mankind through more innovative designs. The rocket equation tells us that a reduction in mass optimizes our propulsive results. Primary and secondary structural elements provide for the containment of gases, fluids and solids; translate and sustain loads/impacts; conduct/radiate thermal energy; shield from the harmful effects of radiation; provide for grounding/bonding of electrical power systems; compartmentalize operational

  17. Harvesting bioenergy with rationally designed complex functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Liangju

    A key challenge in renewable energy is to capture, convert and store solar power with earth-abundant materials and environmentally benign technologies. The goal of this thesis is to develop rationally designed complex functional materials for bio-renewable energy applications. On one hand, photoconversion membrane proteins (MPs) are nature's nanoengineering feats for renewable energy management. Harnessing their functions in synthetic systems could help understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the nanoscale. This is particularly enticing in the post-genome era as recombinant or cell-free expression of many MPs with high yields becomes possible. However, the labile nature of lipid bilayers renders them unsuitable for use in a broad range of engineered systems. A knowledge gap exists about how to design robust synthetic nanomembranes as lipid-bilayer-mimics to support MP functions and how to direct hierarchical MP reconstitution into those membranes to form 2-D or 3-D ordered proteomembrane arrays. Our studies on proteorhodopsin (PR) and bacterial reaction center (BRC), the two light-harvesting MPs, reveal that a charge-interaction-directed reconstitution (CIDR) mechanism induces spontaneous reconstitution of detergent-solubilized MPs into various amphiphilic block copolymer membranes, many of which have far superior stability than lipid bilayers. Our preliminary data also suggest MPs are not enslaved by the biological membranes they derive from; rather, the chemically nonspecific material properties of MP-supporting membranes may act as allosteric regulators. Versatile chemical designs are possible to modulate the conformational energetics of MPs, hence their transport performance in synthetic systems. On the other hand, microalgae are widely regarded as a sustainable feedstock for biofuel production. Microalgae-derived biofuels have not been commercialized yet because current technologies for microalgae dewatering add a huge cost to the

  18. Blindness in designing intelligent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    New investigations of the foundations of artificial intelligence are challenging the hypothesis that problem solving is the cornerstone of intelligence. New distinctions among three domains of concern for humans--description, action, and commitment--have revealed that the design process for programmable machines, such as expert systems, is based on descriptions of actions and induces blindness to nonanalytic action and commitment. Design processes focusing in the domain of description are likely to yield programs like burearcracies: rigid, obtuse, impersonal, and unable to adapt to changing circumstances. Systems that learn from their past actions, and systems that organize information for interpretation by human experts, are more likely to be successful in areas where expert systems have failed.

  19. WFGD system materials cost update

    SciTech Connect

    Milobowski, M.G.

    1998-12-31

    This paper is an update of the report ``Economic Comparison of Materials of Construction of Wet FGD Absorbers and Internals`` which was presented at the 1991 EPRI/EPA/DOE SO{sub 2} Control symposium. An economic comparison of the materials standardly used for fabrication of wet FGD spray towers will be presented in this paper. Costs for various materials of construction for such absorber components as spray headers, moisture separators, and gas distribution devices will also be addressed,

  20. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  1. Concurrent materials and process selection in conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, S.D.

    1998-07-01

    The sequential manner in which materials and processes for a manufactured product are selected is inherently less than optimal. Designers` tendency to choose processes and materials with which they are familiar exacerbate this problem. A method for concurrent selection of materials and a joining process based on product requirements using a knowledge-based, constraint satisfaction approach is presented.

  2. Business System Planning Project, Preliminary System Design

    SciTech Connect

    EVOSEVICH, S.

    2000-10-30

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is currently performing many core business functions including, but not limited to, work control, planning, scheduling, cost estimating, procurement, training, and human resources. Other core business functions are managed by or dependent on Project Hanford Management Contractors including, but not limited to, payroll, benefits and pension administration, inventory control, accounts payable, and records management. In addition, CHG has business relationships with its parent company CH2M HILL, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection and other River Protection Project contractors, government agencies, and vendors. The Business Systems Planning (BSP) Project, under the sponsorship of the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Chief Information Officer (CIO), have recommended information system solutions that will support CHG business areas. The Preliminary System Design was developed using the recommendations from the Alternatives Analysis, RPP-6499, Rev 0 and will become the design base for any follow-on implementation projects. The Preliminary System Design will present a high-level system design, providing a high-level overview of the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) modules and identify internal and external relationships. This document will not define data structures, user interface components (screens, reports, menus, etc.), business rules or processes. These in-depth activities will be accomplished at implementation planning time.

  3. Testing and design life analysis of polyurea liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi Motlagh, Siavash

    Certainly, water pipes, as part of an underground infrastructure system, play a key role in maintaining quality of life, health, and wellbeing of human kind. As these potable water pipes reach the end of their useful life, they create high maintenance costs, loss of flow capacity, decreased water quality, and increased dissatisfaction. There are several different pipeline renewal techniques available for different applications, among which linings are most commonly used for the renewal of water pipes. Polyurea is a lining material applied to the interior surface of the deteriorated host pipe using spray-on technique. It is applied to structurally enhance the host pipe and provide a barrier coating against further corrosion or deterioration. The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between stress, strain and time. The results obtained from these tests were used in predicting the strength of the polyurea material during its planned 50-year design life. In addition to this, based on the 10,000 hours experimental data, curve fitting and Findley power law models were employed to predict long-term behavior of the material. Experimental results indicated that the tested polyurea material offers a good balance of strength and stiffness and can be utilized in structural enhancement applications of potable water pipes.

  4. Parachute system design, analysis, and simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, W.D.; McBride, D.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; Waye, D.E.; Hailey, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    For over twenty years designers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed various parachute simulation codes to model deployment, inflation, loading, trajectories, aircraft downwash and line sail. In addition to these codes, material property data bases have been acquired. Recently we have initiated project to integrate these codes and data bases into a single software tool entitled SPARSYS (Sandia PARachute SYstem Simulation). We have constructed a graphical user interface as the driver and framework for SPARSYS. In this paper we present a status report on SPARSYS describing progress in developing and incorporating independent modules, in developing an integrated trajectory package, and in developing a materials data base including high-rate-of-strain data.

  5. Optoelectronic inventory system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Sieradzki, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    In support of the Department of Energy`s Dismantlement Program, the Optoelectronics Characterization and Sensor Development Department 2231 at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico has developed an in situ nonintrusive Optoelectronic Inventory System (OIS) that has the potential for application wherever periodic inventory of selected material is desired. Using a network of fiber-optic links, the OIS retrieves and stores inventory signatures from data storage devices (which are permanently attached to material storage containers) while inherently providing electromagnetic pulse immunity and electrical noise isolation. Photovoltaic cells (located within the storage facility) convert laser diode optic power from a laser driver to electrical energy. When powered and triggered, the data storage devices sequentially output their digital inventory signatures through light-emitting diode/photo diode data links for retrieval and storage in a mobile data acquisition system. An item`s exact location is determined through fiber-optic network and software design. The OIS provides an on-demand method for obtaining acceptable inventory reports while eliminating the need for human presence inside the material storage facility. By using modularization and prefabricated construction with mature technologies and components, an OIS installation with virtually unlimited capacity can be tailored to the customer`s requirements.

  6. Design of materials configurations for enhanced phononic and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraio, Chiara

    The discovery of novel nonlinear dynamic and electronic phenomena is presented for the specific cases of granular materials and carbon nanotubes. This research was conducted for designing and constructing optimized macro-, micro- and nano-scale structural configurations of materials, and for studying their phononic and electronic behavior. Variation of composite arrangements of granular elements with different elastic properties in a linear chain-of-sphere, Y-junction or 3-D configurations led to a variety of novel phononic phenomena and interesting physical properties, which can be potentially useful for security, communications, mechanical and biomedical engineering applications. Mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes with different atomic arrangements and microstructures were also investigated. Electronic properties of Y-junction configured carbon nanotubes exhibit an exciting transistor switch behavior which is not seen in linear configuration nanotubes. Strongly nonlinear materials were designed and fabricated using novel and innovative concepts. Due to their unique strongly nonlinear and anisotropic nature, novel wave phenomena have been discovered. Specifically, violations of Snell's law were detected and a new mechanism of wave interaction with interfaces between NTPCs (Nonlinear Tunable Phononic Crystals) was established. Polymer-based systems were tested for the first time, and the tunability of the solitary waves speed was demonstrated. New materials with transformed signal propagation speed in the manageable range of 10-100 m/s and signal amplitude typical for audible speech have been developed. The enhancing of the mitigation of solitary and shock waves in 1-D chains were demonstrated and a new protective medium was designed for practical applications. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D strongly nonlinear system have been investigated providing a broad impact on the whole area of strongly nonlinear wave dynamics and creating experimental basis for new

  7. Orbital Maneuvering system design evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, C.; Humphries, C.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary design considerations and changes made in the baseline space shuttle orbital maneuvering system (OMS) to reduce cost and weight are detailed. The definition of initial subsystem requirements, trade studies, and design approaches are considered. Design features of the engine, its injector, combustion chamber, nozzle extension and bipropellant valve are illustrated and discussed. The current OMS consists of two identical pods that use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) propellants to provide 1000 ft/sec of delta velocity for a payload of 65,000 pounds. Major systems are pressurant gas storage and control, propellant storage supply and quantity measurement, and the rocket engine, which includes a bipropellant valve, an injector/thrust chamber, and a nozzle. The subsystem provides orbit insertion, circularization, and on orbit and deorbit capability for the shuttle orbiter.

  8. Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, Pascal

    2011-07-01

    This series of slides deal with: the goals for advanced fission reactor systems; the requirements for structural materials; a focus on two important types of materials: ODS and CMC; a focus on materials under irradiation (multiscale modelling, experimental simulation, 'smart' experiments in materials testing reactors); some concluding remarks.

  9. New design strategy for realizing multiferroic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puggioni, Danilo; Giovannetti, Gianluca; Capone, Massimo; Rondinelli, James

    Ferroelectricity is a property that only insulating materials can exhibit. For this reason, nearly all searches for new multiferroic compounds, those simultaneously exhibiting ferroelectric and magnetic order, have focused on insulating magnetic oxides. Here, we propose a different approach: Start from a conducting oxide with broken inversion symmetry and search for routes to induce long-range magnetic order. Using density-functional and dynamical mean-field theories, we investigate the electronic properties of the polar metallic oxide LiOsO3. We show that a multiferroic state can be engineered by enclosing LiOsO3 between an insulating material, LiNbO3. We predict that the 1/1 superlattice of LiOsO3 and LiNbO3 exhibits strong coupling between magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom with a ferroelectric polarization of 41.2 μCcm-2, Curie temperature of 927 K, and Néel temperature of 379 K. Our results show that one can start with polar metallic oxides to make multiferroics.

  10. Inline evenflow material distributor for pneumatic material feed systems

    DOEpatents

    Thiry, Michael J.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus for reducing clogs in a pneumatic material feed line, such as employed in abrasive waterjet machining systems, by providing an evenflow feed of material therethrough. The apparatus preferably includes a hollow housing defining a housing volume and having an inlet capable of connecting to an upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, an outlet capable of connecting to a downstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, and an air vent located between the inlet and outlet for venting excess air pressure out from the housing volume. A diverter, i.e. an impingement object, is located at the inlet and in a path of incoming material from the upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, to break up clumps of ambient moisture-ridden material impinging on the diverter. And one or more filter screens is also preferably located in the housing volume to further break up clumps and provide filtering.

  11. MAP Propulsion System Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, Carol L.

    2003-01-01

    The propulsion system of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) had stringent requirements that made the thermal design unique. To meet instrument stability requirements the system had to be designed to keep temperatures of all components within acceptable limits without heater cycling. Although the spacecraft remains at a fixed 22 sun angle at L2, the variations in solar constant, property degradation, and bus voltage range all significantly affect the temperature. Large portions of the fuel lines are external to the structure and all components are mounted to non-conductive composite structure. These two facts made the sensitivity to the MLI effective emissivity and bus temperature very high. Approximately two years prior to launch the propulsion system was redesigned to meet MAP requirements. The new design utilized hardware that was already installed in order to meet schedule constraints. The spacecraft design and the thermal requirements were changed to compensate for inadequacies of the existing hardware. The propulsion system consists of fuel lines, fill and drain lines/valve, eight thrusters, a HXCM, and a propulsion tank. A voltage regulator was added to keep critical components within limits. Software was developed to control the operational heaters. Trim resistors were put in series with each operational heater circuits and the tank survival heater. A highly sophisticated test program, which included real time model correlation, was developed to determine trim resistors sizes. These trim resistors were installed during a chamber break and verified during thermal balance testing.

  12. Cockpit control system conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meholic, Greg; Brown, Rhonda; Hall, Melissa; Harvey, Robert; Singer, Michael; Tella, Gustavo

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to provide a means for operating the ailerons, elevator, elevator trim, rudder, nosewheel steering, and brakes in the Triton primary flight trainer. The main design goals under consideration were to illustrate system and subsystem integration, control function ability, and producibility. Weight and maintenance goals were addressed.

  13. ILC cryogenic systems reference design

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.J.; Geynisman, M.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Parma, V.; Tavian, L.; /CERN

    2008-01-01

    A Global Design Effort (GDE) began in 2005 to study a TeV scale electron-positron linear accelerator based on superconducting radio-frequency (RF) technology, called the International Linear Collider (ILC). In early 2007, the design effort culminated in a reference design for the ILC, closely based on the earlier TESLA design. The ILC will consist of two 250 GeV linacs, which provide positron-electron collisions for high energy physics research. The particle beams will be accelerated to their final energy in superconducting niobium RF cavities operating at 2 kelvin. At a length of about 12 km each, the main linacs will be the largest cryogenic systems in the ILC. Positron and electron sources, damping rings, and beam delivery systems will also have a large number and variety of other superconducting RF cavities and magnets, which require cooling at liquid helium temperatures. Ten large cryogenic plants with 2 kelvin refrigeration are envisioned to cool the main linacs and the electron and positron sources. Three smaller cryogenic plants will cool the damping rings and beam delivery system components predominately at 4.5 K. This paper describes the cryogenic systems concepts for the ILC.

  14. Ilc Cryogenic Systems Reference Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, T. J.; Geynisman, M.; Klebaner, A.; Parma, V.; Tavian, L.; Theilacker, J.

    2008-03-01

    A Global Design Effort (GDE) began in 2005 to study a TeV scale electron-positron linear accelerator based on superconducting radio-frequency (RF) technology, called the International Linear Collider (ILC). In early 2007, the design effort culminated in a reference design for the ILC, closely based on the earlier TESLA design. The ILC will consist of two 250 GeV linacs, which provide positron-electron collisions for high energy physics research. The particle beams will be accelerated to their final energy in superconducting niobium RF cavities operating at 2 kelvin. At a length of about 12 km each, the main linacs will be the largest cryogenic systems in the ILC. Positron and electron sources, damping rings, and beam delivery systems will also have a large number and variety of other superconducting RF cavities and magnets, which require cooling at liquid helium temperatures. Ten large cryogenic plants with 2 kelvin refrigeration are envisioned to cool the main linacs and the electron and positron sources. Three smaller cryogenic plants will cool the damping rings and beam delivery system components predominately at 4.5 K. This paper describes the cryogenic systems concepts for the ILC.

  15. Material Compatibility with Space Storable Propellants. Design Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uney, P. E.; Fester, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    An important consideration in the design of spacecraft for interplanetary missions is the compatibility of storage materials with the propellants. Serious problems can arise because many propellants are either extremely reactive or subject to catalytic decomposition, making the selection of proper materials of construction for propellant containment and control a critical requirement for the long-life applications. To aid in selecting materials and designing and evaluating various propulsion subsystems, available information on the compatibility of spacecraft materials with propellants of interest was compiled from literature searches and personal contacts. The compatibility of both metals and nonmetals with hydrazine, monomethyl hydrazine, nitrated hydrazine, and diborance fuels and nitrogen tetroxide, fluorine, oxygen difluoride, and Flox oxidizers was surveyed. These fuels and oxidizers encompass the wide variety of problems encountered in propellant storage. As such, they present worst case situations of the propellant affecting the material and the material affecting the propellant. This includes material attack, propellant decomposition, and the formation of clogging materials.

  16. Materials, design and processing of air encapsulated MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Nathan T.

    This work uses a three-dimensional air cavity technology to improve the fabrication, and functionality of microelectronics devices, performance of on-board transmission lines, and packaging of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). The air cavity process makes use of the decomposition of a patterned sacrificial polymer followed by the diffusion of its by-products through a curing polymer overcoat to obtain the embedded air structure. Applications and research of air cavities have focused on simple designs that concentrate on the size and functionality of the particular device. However, a lack of guidelines for fabrication, materials used, and structural design has led to mechanical stability issues and processing refinements. This work investigates improved air gap cavities for use in MEMS packaging processes, resulting in fewer fabrication flaws and lower cost. The identification of new materials, such as novel photo-definable organic/inorganic hybrid polymers, was studied for increased strength and rigidity due to their glass-like structure. A novel epoxy polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) material was investigated and characterized for use as a photodefineable, permanent dielectrics with improved mechanical properties. The POSS material improved the air gap fabrication because it served as a high-selectivity etch mask for patterning sacrificial materials as well as a cavity overcoat material with improved rigidity. An investigation of overcoat thickness and decomposition kinetics provided a fundamental understanding of the properties that impart mechanical stability to cavities of different shape and volume. Metallization of the cavities was investigated so as to provide hermetic sealing and improved cavity strength. The improved air cavity, wafer-level packages were tested using resonator-type devices and chip-level lead frame packaging. The air cavity package was molded under traditional lead frame molding pressures and tested for mechanical

  17. Designing Educative Curriculum Materials: A Theoretically and Empirically Driven Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elizabeth A.; Palincsar, Annemarie Sullivan; Arias, Anna Maria; Bismack, Amber Schultz; Marulis, Loren M.; Iwashyna, Stefanie K.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue for a design process in the development of educative curriculum materials that is theoretically and empirically driven. Using a design-based research approach, they describe their design process for incorporating educative features intended to promote teacher learning into existing, high-quality curriculum…

  18. Cultivating Design Thinking in Students through Material Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renard, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Design thinking is a way of understanding and engaging with the world that has received much attention in academic and business circles in recent years. This article examines a hands-on learning model as a vehicle for developing design thinking capacity in students. An overview of design thinking grounds the discussion of the material-based…

  19. Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. -F.; Hurley, Francis X.; Huang, Jie; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    %T Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design%A C-F. Lin%A Francis X. Hurley%A Jie Huang%A F. Y. Hadaegh%J International Conference on Control and Information(psi)995%C Hong Kong%D June 1995%K aeropropulsion, control, system%U http://jpltrs.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0658.pdfAn integrated intelligent control approach is proposed to design a high performance control system for aeropropulsion systems based on advanced sensor processing, nonlinear control and neural fuzzy control integration. Our approach features the following innovations:??e complexity and uncertainty issues are addressed via the distributed parallel processing, learning, and online reoptimization properties of neural networks.??e nonlinear dynamics and the severe coupling can be naturally incorporated into the design framework.??e knowledge base and decision making logic furnished by fuzzy systems leads to a human intelligence enhanced control scheme.In addition, fault tolerance, health monitoring and reconfigurable control strategies will be accommodated by this approach to ensure stability, graceful degradation and reoptimization in the case of failures, malfunctions and damage.!.

  20. Systems and methods for treating material

    DOEpatents

    Scheele, Randall D; McNamara, Bruce K

    2014-10-21

    Systems for treating material are provided that can include a vessel defining a volume, at least one conduit coupled to the vessel and in fluid communication with the vessel, material within the vessel, and NF.sub.3 material within the conduit. Methods for fluorinating material are provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to fluorinate at least a portion of the material. Methods for separating components of material are also provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to at least partially fluorinate a portion of the material, and separating at least one fluorinated component of the fluorinated portion from the material. The materials exposed to the NF.sub.3 material can include but are not limited to one or more of U, Ru, Rh, Mo, Tc, Np, Pu, Sb, Ag, Am, Sn, Zr, Cs, Th, and/or Rb.

  1. Automating software design system DESTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovitsky, Vladimir A.; Pearce, Patricia D.

    1992-01-01

    'DESTA' is the acronym for the Dialogue Evolutionary Synthesizer of Turnkey Algorithms by means of a natural language (Russian or English) functional specification of algorithms or software being developed. DESTA represents the computer-aided and/or automatic artificial intelligence 'forgiving' system which provides users with software tools support for algorithm and/or structured program development. The DESTA system is intended to provide support for the higher levels and earlier stages of engineering design of software in contrast to conventional Computer Aided Design (CAD) systems which provide low level tools for use at a stage when the major planning and structuring decisions have already been taken. DESTA is a knowledge-intensive system. The main features of the knowledge are procedures, functions, modules, operating system commands, batch files, their natural language specifications, and their interlinks. The specific domain for the DESTA system is a high level programming language like Turbo Pascal 6.0. The DESTA system is operational and runs on an IBM PC computer.

  2. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION EXCHANGE SYSTEM-HMIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This system provides emergency response, contingency planning personnel, and others involved in the hazardous materials community with a communication mechanism. It featured workshops, symposia, instructional material and literature, toll-free telephone numbers and online databas...

  3. Materials of construction for advanced coal conversion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nangia, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    This book describes materials of construction, and materials problems for equipment used in advanced coal conversion systems. The need for cost effective industrial operation is always a prime concern, particularly in this age of energy consciousness. Industry is continually seeking improved materials for more efficient systems. The information presented here is intended to be of use in the design and planning of these systems. Coal conversion and utilization impose severe demands on construction materials because of high temperature, high pressure, corrosive/erosive, and other hostile environmental factors. Successful economic development of these processes can be achieved only to the extent that working materials can withstand increasingly more aggressive operating conditions. The book, which reviews present and past work on the behavior of materials in the environments of advanced coal conversion systems, is divided into three parts: atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal gasification and liquefaction, and advanced power systems.

  4. Center for Intelligent Fuel Cell Materials Design

    SciTech Connect

    Santurri, P.R.,; Hartmann-Thompson, C.; Keinath, S.E.

    2008-08-26

    The goal of this work was to develop a composite proton exchange membrane utilizing 1) readily available, low cost materials 2) readily modified and 3) easily processed to meet the chemical, mechanical and electrical requirements of high temperature PEM fuel cells. One of the primary goals was to produce a conducting polymer that met the criteria for strength, binding capability for additives, chemical stability, dimensional stability and good conductivity. In addition compatible, specialty nanoparticles were synthesized to provide water management and enhanced conductivity. The combination of these components in a multilayered, composite PEM has demonstrated improved conductivity at high temperatures and low humidity over commercially available polymers. The research reported in this final document has greatly increased the knowledge base related to post sulfonation of chemically and mechanically stable engineered polymers (Radel). Both electrical and strength factors for the degree of post sulfonation far exceed previous data, indicating the potential use of these materials in suitable proton exchange membrane architectures for the development of fuel cells. In addition compatible, hydrophilic, conductive nano-structures have been synthesized and incorporated into unique proton exchange membrane architectures. The use of post sulfonation for the engineered polymer and nano-particle provide cost effective techniques to produce the required components of a proton exchange membrane. The development of a multilayer proton exchange membrane as described in our work has produced a highly stable membrane at 170°C with conductivities exceeding commercially available proton exchange membranes at high temperatures and low humidity. The components and architecture of the proton exchange membrane discussed will provide low cost components for the portable market and potentially the transportation market. The development of unique components and membrane architecture

  5. Nondestructive evaluation of composite materials - A design philosophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient and reliable structural design utilizing fiber reinforced composite materials may only be accomplished if the materials used may be nondestructively evaluated. There are two major reasons for this requirement: (1) composite materials are formed at the time the structure is fabricated and (2) at practical strain levels damage, changes in the condition of the material, that influence the structure's mechanical performance is present. The fundamental basis of such a nondestructive evaluation capability is presented. A discussion of means of assessing nondestructively the material condition as well as a damage mechanics theory that interprets the material condition in terms of its influence on the mechanical response, stiffness, strength and life is provided.

  6. Characterization of elastomeric materials with application to design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, Mark V.

    1986-01-01

    Redesign of the Space Shuttle Solid Booster has necessitated re-evaluation of the material used in the field joint O-ring seals. The viscoelastic characteristics of five candidate materials were determined. The five materials are: two fluorocarbon compounds, two nitrile compounds, and a silicon compound. The materials were tested in a uniaxial compression test to determine the characteristic relaxation functions. These tests were performed at five different temperatures. A master material curve was developed for each material from the experimental data. The results are compared to tensile relaxation tests. Application of these results to the design analysis is discussed in detail.

  7. Computational Discovery, Characterization, and Design of Single-Layer Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Houlong L.; Hennig, Richard G.

    2014-03-01

    Single-layer materials open up tremendous opportunities for applications in nanoelectronic devices and energy technologies. We first review the four components of a materials science tetrahedron for single-layer materials. We then provide a theoretical perspective of characterizing single-layer materials. This leads to a general data-mining process to predict and computationally characterize emerging single-layer materials. Finally, we comment on limitations and possible improvements of current computational procedures for the discovery, characterization, and design of single-layer materials.

  8. Telecommunications Systems Design Techniques Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, R. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) increasingly supports deep space missions sponsored and managed by organizations without long experience in DSN design and operation. The document is intended as a textbook for those DSN users inexperienced in the design and specification of a DSN-compatible spacecraft telecommunications system. For experienced DSN users, the document provides a reference source of telecommunication information which summarizes knowledge previously available only in a multitude of sources. Extensive references are quoted for those who wish to explore specific areas more deeply.

  9. Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system design and flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Thermal Protection System materials, design approaches associated with each material, and the operational performance experienced during fifty-five successful flights are described. The flights to date indicate that the thermal and structural design requirements were met and that the overall performance was outstanding.

  10. Asbestos penetration test system for clothing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, O.D.; Stampfer, J.F.; Sandoval, A.N.; Heath, C.A.; Cooper, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    For hazardous work such as asbestos abatement, there is a need to assess protective clothing fabrics and seam constructions to assure an adequate barrier against hazardous material. The penetration of aerosols through fabrics usually is measured by challenging fabric samples with an aerosol stream at a constant specified airflow. To produce the specified airflow, pressure differentials across the samples often are higher than exist in a work environment. This higher airflow results in higher aerosol velocities through the fabric and, possibly, measured penetration values not representative of those actually experienced in the field. The objective of the reported work was to develop a test method that does not require these higher airflows. The authors have designed and fabricated a new system that tests fabric samples under a low, constant, specified pressure differential across the samples. This differential is adjustable from tenths of a mm Water Gauge (hundredths of an in WG) to over 25-mm WG (1-in WG). The system operates at a pressure slightly lower than its surroundings. Although designed primarily for asbestos, the system is equally applicable to the testing of other aerosols by changing the aerosol generator and detector. Through simple modification of the sample holders, the test apparatus would be capable of evaluating seam and closure constructions.

  11. ARGOS laser system mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deysenroth, M.; Honsberg, M.; Gemperlein, H.; Ziegleder, J.; Raab, W.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Gässler, W.; Borelli, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    ARGOS, a multi-star adaptive optics system is designed for the wide-field imager and multi-object spectrograph LUCI on the LBT (Large Binocular Telescope). Based on Rayleigh scattering the laser constellation images 3 artificial stars (at 532 nm) per each of the 2 eyes of the LBT, focused at a height of 12 km (Ground Layer Adaptive Optics). The stars are nominally positioned on a circle 2' in radius, but each star can be moved by up to 0.5' in any direction. For all of these needs are following main subsystems necessary: 1. A laser system with its 3 Lasers (Nd:YAG ~18W each) for delivering strong collimated light as for LGS indispensable. 2. The Launch system to project 3 beams per main mirror as a 40 cm telescope to the sky. 3. The Wave Front Sensor with a dichroic mirror. 4. The dichroic mirror unit to grab and interpret the data. 5. A Calibration Unit to adjust the system independently also during day time. 6. Racks + platforms for the WFS units. 7. Platforms and ladders for a secure access. This paper should mainly demonstrate how the ARGOS Laser System is configured and designed to support all other systems.

  12. Designing Meaningful Density Functional Theory Calculations in Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, A. E.

    2005-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) methods for calculating the quantum mechanical ground states of condensed matter systems are now a common and significant component of materials research. These methods are also increasingly used in Equation of State work, in particular in the warm dense matter regime. The growing importance of DFT reflects the development of sufficiently accurate functionals, efficient algorithms, and continuing improvements in computing capabilities. As the materials problems to which DFT is applied have become large and complex, so have the sets of calculations necessary to investigate a given problem. Highly versatile, powerful codes exist to serve the practitioner, but designing useful simulations is a complicated task, involving intricate manipulation of many variables, with many pitfalls for the unwary and the inexperienced. We give an overview of DFT and discuss several of the most important issues that go into designing a meaningful DFT calculation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Armor systems including coated core materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Henry S.; Lillo, Thomas M.; McHugh, Kevin M.

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  14. Armor systems including coated core materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Henry S; Lillo, Thomas M; McHugh, Kevin M

    2013-10-08

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  15. Intelligent Software for System Design and Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to develop a real-time, on-line database system that tracks documentation changes in NASA's propulsion test facilities, engineers at Stennis Space Center teamed with ECT International of Brookfield, WI, through the NASA Dual-Use Development Program to create the External Data Program and Hyperlink Add-on Modules for the promis*e software. Promis*e is ECT's top-of-the-line intelligent software for control system design and documentation. With promis*e the user can make use of the automated design process to quickly generate control system schematics, panel layouts, bills of material, wire lists, terminal plans and more. NASA and its testing contractors currently use promis*e to create the drawings and schematics at the E2 Cell 2 test stand located at Stennis Space Center.

  16. SIRTF Science Operations System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, William

    1999-01-01

    SIRTF Science Operations System Design William B. Green Manager, SIRTF Science Center California Institute of Technology M/S 310-6 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena CA 91125 (626) 395 8572 Fax (626) 568 0673 bgreen@ipac.caltech.edu. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will be launched in December 2001, and perform an extended series of science observations at wavelengths ranging from 20 to 160 microns for five years or more. The California Institute of Technology has been selected as the home for the SIRTF Science Center (SSC). The SSC will be responsible for evaluating and selecting observation proposals, providing technical support to the science community, performing mission planning and science observation scheduling activities, instrument calibration during operations and instrument health monitoring, production of archival quality data products, and management of science research grants. The science payload consists of three instruments delivered by instrument Principal Investigators located at University of Arizona, Cornell, and Harvard Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. The SSC is responsible for design, development, and operation of the Science Operations System (SOS) which will support the functions assigned to the SSC by NASA. The SIRTF spacecraft, mission profile, and science instrument design have undergone almost ten years of refinement. SIRTF development and operations activities are highly cost constrained. The cost constraints have impacted the design of the SOS in several ways. The Science Operations System has been designed to incorporate a set of efficient, easy to use tools which will make it possible for scientists to propose observation sequences in a rapid and automated manner. The use of highly automated tools for requesting observations will simplify the long range observatory scheduling process, and the short term scheduling of science observations. Pipeline data processing will be highly automated and data

  17. Design of meta-materials with novel thermoelastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Seth

    The development of new techniques in micro-manufacturing in recent years has enabled the fabrication of material microstructures with essentially arbitrary designs, including those with multiple constituent materials and void space in nearly any geometry. With an essentially open design space, the onus is now on the engineer to design composite materials which are optimal for their purpose. These new materials, called meta-materials or materials with architected microstructures, offer the potential to mix and match properties in a way that exceeds that of traditional composites. We concentrate on the thermal and elastic properties of isotropic meta-materials, and design microstructures with combinations of Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, and mass density which are not found among naturally-occurring or traditional composite materials. We also produce designs with thermal expansion far below other materials. We use homogenization theory to predict the material properties of a bulk meta-material comprised of a periodic lattice of unit cells, then use topology optimization to rearrange two constituent materials and void space within the unit cell in order to extremize an objective function which yields the combinations of properties we seek. This method is quite general and can be extended to consider additional properties of interest. We constrain the design space to satisfy material isotropy directly (2D), or to satisfy cubic symmetry (3D), from which point an isotropy constraint function is easily applied. We develop and use filtering, nonlinear interpolation, and thresholding methods to render the design problem well-posed, and as a result ensure our designs are manufacturable. We have written two computer implementations of this design methodology. The first is for creating two-dimensional designs, which can run on a serial computer in approximately half an hour. The second is a parallel implementation to allow

  18. Materials technology assessment for a 1050 K Stirling space engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, Coulson M.; Dreshfield, Robert L.; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Kiser, James D.; Mackay, Rebecca A.; Mcdaniels, David L.; Petrasek, Donald W.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of materials technology and proposed materials selection was made for the 1050 K (superalloy) Stirling Space Engine design. The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate previously proposed materials selections, evaluate the current state-of-the-art materials, propose potential alternate materials selections and identify research and development efforts needed to provide materials that can meet the stringent system requirements. This assessment generally reaffirmed the choices made by the contractor. However, in many cases alternative choices were described and suggestions for needed materials and fabrication research and development were made.

  19. Materials technology assessment for a 1050 K Stirling Space Engine design

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, C.M.; Dreshfield, R.L.; Gaydosh, D.J.; Kiser, J.D.; MacKay, R.A.; McDanels, D.L.; Petrasek, D.W.; Vannucci, R.D.; Bowles, K.J.; Watson, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    An assessment of materials technology and proposed materials selection was made for the 1050 K (superalloy) Stirling Space Engine design. The objectives of this assessment were to evaluate previously proposed materials selections, evaluate the current state-of-the-art materials, propose potential alternate materials selections and identify research and development efforts needed to provide materials that can meet the stringent system requirements. This assessment generally reaffirmed the choices made by the contractor; however, in many cases alternative choices were described and suggestions for needed materials and fabrication research and development were made.

  20. CRISP90 - SOFTWARE DESIGN ANALYZER SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The CRISP90 Software Design Analyzer System, an update of CRISP-80, is a set of programs forming a software design and documentation tool which supports top-down, hierarchic, modular, structured design and programming methodologies. The quality of a computer program can often be significantly influenced by the design medium in which the program is developed. The medium must foster the expression of the programmer's ideas easily and quickly, and it must permit flexible and facile alterations, additions, and deletions to these ideas as the design evolves. The CRISP90 software design analyzer system was developed to provide the PDL (Programmer Design Language) programmer with such a design medium. A program design using CRISP90 consists of short, English-like textual descriptions of data, interfaces, and procedures that are imbedded in a simple, structured, modular syntax. The display is formatted into two-dimensional, flowchart-like segments for a graphic presentation of the design. Together with a good interactive full-screen editor or word processor, the CRISP90 design analyzer becomes a powerful tool for the programmer. In addition to being a text formatter, the CRISP90 system prepares material that would be tedious and error prone to extract manually, such as a table of contents, module directory, structure (tier) chart, cross-references, and a statistics report on the characteristics of the design. Referenced modules are marked by schematic logic symbols to show conditional, iterative, and/or concurrent invocation in the program. A keyword usage profile can be generated automatically and glossary definitions inserted into the output documentation. Another feature is the capability to detect changes that were made between versions. Thus, "change-bars" can be placed in the output document along with a list of changed pages and a version history report. Also, items may be marked as "to be determined" and each will appear on a special table until the item is

  1. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K H; Fischer, Karl F F; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials. PMID:26948043

  2. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials.

  3. Designing high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through orbital engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Fischer, Karl F. F.; Zhang, Wenqing; Shi, Xun; Iversen, Bo B.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology, which possesses potential application in recycling industrial waste heat as energy, calls for novel high-performance materials. The systematic exploration of novel thermoelectric materials with excellent electronic transport properties is severely hindered by limited insight into the underlying bonding orbitals of atomic structures. Here we propose a simple yet successful strategy to discover and design high-performance layered thermoelectric materials through minimizing the crystal field splitting energy of orbitals to realize high orbital degeneracy. The approach naturally leads to design maps for optimizing the thermoelectric power factor through forming solid solutions and biaxial strain. Using this approach, we predict a series of potential thermoelectric candidates from layered CaAl2Si2-type Zintl compounds. Several of them contain nontoxic, low-cost and earth-abundant elements. Moreover, the approach can be extended to several other non-cubic materials, thereby substantially accelerating the screening and design of new thermoelectric materials. PMID:26948043

  4. Designing synthetic materials to control stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Krishanu; Pollock, Jacob F.; Schaffer, David V.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The microenvironment in which stem cells reside regulates their fate, and synthetic materials have recently been designed to emulate these regulatory processes for various medical applications. Ligands inspired by the natural extracellular matrix, cell-cell contacts, and growth factors have been incorporated into synthetic materials with precisely engineered density and presentation. Furthermore, material architecture and mechanical properties are material design parameters that provide a context for receptor-ligand interactions and thereby contribute to fate determination of uncommitted stem cells. While significant progress has been made in biomaterials development for cellular control, the design of more sophisticated and robust synthetic materials can address future challenges in achieving spatiotemporally control of cellular phenotype and in implementing histocompatible clinical therapies. PMID:17669680

  5. Composite materials for rail transit systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Guerdal, Zafer; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The potential is explored for using composite materials in urban mass transit systems. The emphasis was to identify specific advantages of composite materials in order to determine their actual and potential usage for carbody and guideway structure applications. The literature was reviewed, contacts were made with major domestic system operators, designers, and builders, and an analysis was made of potential composite application to railcar construction. Composites were found to be in use throughout the transit industry, usually in secondary or auxiliary applications such as car interior and nonstructural exterior panels. More recently, considerable activity has been initiated in the area of using composites in the load bearing elements of civil engineering structures such as highway bridges. It is believed that new and improved manufacturing refinements in pultrusion and filament winding will permit the production of beam sections which can be used in guideway structures. The inherent corrosion resistance and low maintenance characteristics of composites should result in lowered maintenance costs over a prolonged life of the structure.

  6. A domain-specific design architecture for composite material design and aircraft part redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Punch, W. F., III; Keller, K. J.; Bond, W.; Sticklen, J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composites have been targeted as a 'leapfrog' technology that would provide a unique global competitive position for U.S. industry. Composites are unique in the requirements for an integrated approach to designing, manufacturing, and marketing of products developed utilizing the new materials of construction. Numerous studies extending across the entire economic spectrum of the United States from aerospace to military to durable goods have identified composites as a 'key' technology. In general there have been two approaches to composite construction: build models of a given composite materials, then determine characteristics of the material via numerical simulation and empirical testing; and experience-directed construction of fabrication plans for building composites with given properties. The first route sets a goal to capture basic understanding of a device (the composite) by use of a rigorous mathematical model; the second attempts to capture the expertise about the process of fabricating a composite (to date) at a surface level typically expressed in a rule based system. From an AI perspective, these two research lines are attacking distinctly different problems, and both tracks have current limitations. The mathematical modeling approach has yielded a wealth of data but a large number of simplifying assumptions are needed to make numerical simulation tractable. Likewise, although surface level expertise about how to build a particular composite may yield important results, recent trends in the KBS area are towards augmenting surface level problem solving with deeper level knowledge. Many of the relative advantages of composites, e.g., the strength:weight ratio, is most prominent when the entire component is designed as a unitary piece. The bottleneck in undertaking such unitary design lies in the difficulty of the re-design task. Designing the fabrication protocols for a complex-shaped, thick section composite are currently very difficult. It is in

  7. Materials Design for Joinable, High Performance Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glamm, Ryan James

    An aluminum alloy compatible with friction stir welding is designed for automotive and aerospace structural applications. Current weldable automotive aluminum alloys do not possess the necessary strength to meet safety standards and therefore are not able to replace steel in the automotive body. Significant weight savings could be achieved if steel components are replaced with aluminum. Current aerospace alloys are not weldable, requiring machining of large pieces that are then riveted together. If an aerospace alloy could be friction stir welded, smaller pieces could be welded, reducing material waste. Using a systems approach for materials design, property goals are set from performance objectives. From previous research and computational predictions, a structure is designed for a prototype alloy containing dynamic precipitates to readily dissolve and re-precipitate and high stability precipitates to resist dissolution and coarsening in the weld region. It is found that a Ag modified Al-3.9Mg-0.04Cu (at. %) alloy enhanced the rate and magnitude of hardening during ageing, both beneficial effects for dynamic precipitation. In the same alloy, ageing at 350°C results in hardening from Al 3(Sc,Zr) precipitates. Efforts to effectively precipitate both populations simultaneously are unsuccessful. The Al3(Sc,Zr) precipitation hardened prototype is friction stir processed and no weak zones are found in the weld hardness profile. An aerospace alloy design is proposed, utilizing the dual precipitate structure shown in the prototype. The automotive alloy is designed using a basic strength model with parameters determined from the initial prototype alloy analysis. After ageing to different conditions, the alloy is put through a simulated heat affected zone thermal cycle with a computer controlled induction heater. The aged samples lose hardness from the weld cycle but recover hardness from a post weld heat treatment. Atom probe tomography and transmission electron

  8. Evaluation of materials and design modifications for aircraft brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, T. L.; Kennedy, F. E.; Peterson, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    A test program is described which was carried out to evaluate several proposed design modifications and several high-temperature friction materials for use in aircraft disk brakes. The evaluation program was carried out on a specially built test apparatus utilizing a disk brake and wheel half from a small het aircraft. The apparatus enabled control of brake pressure, velocity, and braking time. Tests were run under both constant and variable velocity conditions and covered a kinetic energy range similar to that encountered in aircraft brake service. The results of the design evaluation program showed that some improvement in brake performance can be realized by making design changes in the components of the brake containing friction material. The materials evaluation showed that two friction materials show potential for use in aircraft disk brakes. One of the materials is a nickel-based sintered composite, while the other is a molybdenum-based material. Both materials show much lower wear rates than conventional copper-based materials and are better able to withstand the high temperatures encountered during braking. Additional materials improvement is necessary since both materials show a significant negative slope of the friction-velocity curve at low velocities.

  9. Design of a lunar transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaravelu, A.; Goddard, H.; Gold, R.; Greenwell, S.; Lander, J.; Nordell, B.; Stepp, K.; Styer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a good transportation infrastructure is a major requirement for the establishment of a permanent lunar base. Transportation is characterized by the technology available in a specific time frame and the need to transport personnel and cargo between Earth and Moon, and between lunar bases. In our study, attention was first focused on developing a transportation system for the first generation lunar base. As a first step, a tracked-type multipurpose lunar transportation vehicle was considered as a possible mode of transportation and a detailed study was conducted on the various aspects of the vehicle. Since the vehicle is composed of many moving parts, exposing it to the environment of the Moon, where fine dust particles are prevalent, can cause problems associated with lubrication and friction. The vehicle also posed problems concerning weight and power. Hence, several modifications were made to the above design ideas conceptually, and a Lunar Articulated Remote Transportation System (Lunar ARTS) is proposed as a more effective alternative with the following objectives: (1) minimizing the transportation of construction material and fuel from Earth or maximizing the use of the lunar material; (2) use of novel materials and light-weight structures; (3) use of new manufacturing methods and technology such as magnetic levitation using superconducting materials; and (4) innovative concepts of effectively utilizing the exotic lunar conditions, i.e., high thermal gradients, lack of atmosphere, lower gravity, etc. To achieve the above objectives of designing transportation systems from concept to operation, the project was planned in three phases: (1) conceptual design; (2) detailed analysis and synthesis; and (3) construction, testing, evaluation, and operation. In this project, both phases 1 and 2 have been carried out and work on phase 3 is in progress. In this paper, the details of the Lunar ARTS are discussed and the future work on the vehicle are

  10. The composite materials handbook (MIL handbook 17). Volume 3: Materials usage, design, and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    The Composite Materials Handbook (MIL Handbook 17) is THE source for data and usage guidelines for current and emerging polymer matrix composite materials. It provides you with the tools you will need to design and fabricate end items from polymer matrix composite materials and offers guidelines for how these data should be generated and used. The Handbook is a comprehensive guide of composites technology and engineering, an area that is advancing and changing rapidly. Volume 3 discusses usage of the data for material procurement, quality control, design, structural analysis, and reliability. The material scope is continuous-fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites for all applications.

  11. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  12. Investigation of expert system design approaches for electronic design environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppens, Susan A.

    1987-12-01

    Various schemes were investigated that are available for the design effort of electronic systems. The information is to be incorporated into a knowledge base to determine approaches for a particular design. Various design methodologies are to be investigated for their appropriateness and application in the aforesaid design environment. The second phase is to focus on the knowledge base gathered in the design effort for electronic design. This knowledge base is to be incorporated into a rule based expert system which can be utilized by the design engineer in the design/development of functional specifications.

  13. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  14. Implications of material selection on the design of packaging machinery.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J P

    2009-01-01

    Material selection has significant implications on the design and cost of horizontal-form-fill-seal packaging machinery. To avoid excessive costs, machine redesigns and project delays, material selection must be reconciled early in the project and revisited throughout the construction of the machine. PMID:19405337

  15. Sculpture: Creative Designs with Modern Materials (Tentative Course Outline).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubocq, Edward R.

    This document reports on a course in comprehension and application of various techniques of sculpture and collage, using a contemporary point of view. Students will work with contemporary materials such as wood, metals, plaster, plastics, styrofoam, and many other cardboard basic materials suitable for creative design products. This unit will…

  16. Current Materials on Barrier-Free Design. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    An eight-page annotated bibliography contains material available from the National Easter Seal Society and current material available from other sources. The annotations are grouped under design, guides, planning resources, standards/legislation, and general. Ordering information is provided. (MLF)

  17. System LSI Design Education Program Promoted by STARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Yutaka; Kamono, Yutaka; Tsuchiya, Chikara

    This paper describes SoC (System On a Chip) design program for Japanese 51 universities and/or SoC designers promoted by STARC that is a consortium consists of Japanese major 6 semiconductor companies. The best practice of SoC design education materials are including not only expertise, but also arrangement technique overall team work designs. So, STARC has developed unique SoC design education materials from 2001, and applies it as both a course program and practice program to 51 universities through 11 years. Students will learn SoC design methodologies and/or techniques from user requirement definition to FPGA and/or CPU implementation.

  18. Computational Materials: Modeling and Simulation of Nanostructured Materials and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper provides details on the structure and implementation of the Computational Materials program at the NASA Langley Research Center. Examples are given that illustrate the suggested approaches to predicting the behavior and influencing the design of nanostructured materials such as high-performance polymers, composites, and nanotube-reinforced polymers. Primary simulation and measurement methods applicable to multi-scale modeling are outlined. Key challenges including verification and validation of models are highlighted and discussed within the context of NASA's broad mission objectives.

  19. Nanowire systems: technology and design.

    PubMed

    Gaillardon, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amarù, Luca Gaetano; Bobba, Shashikanth; De Marchi, Michele; Sacchetto, Davide; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2014-03-28

    Nanosystems are large-scale integrated systems exploiting nanoelectronic devices. In this study, we consider double independent gate, vertically stacked nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) with gate-all-around structures and typical diameter of 20 nm. These devices, which we have successfully fabricated and evaluated, control the ambipolar behaviour of the nanostructure by selectively enabling one type of carriers. These transistors work as switches with electrically programmable polarity and thus realize an exclusive or operation. The intrinsic higher expressive power of these FETs, when compared with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology, enables us to realize more efficient logic gates, which we organize as tiles to realize nanowire systems by regular arrays. This article surveys both the technology for double independent gate FETs as well as physical and logic design tools to realize digital systems with this fabrication technology. PMID:24567471

  20. Material permeance measurement system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis; Renner, Michael John

    2012-05-08

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  1. System design document for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-08

    The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements for DOE standards for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This document describes the highest level design information and user characteristics from an operational perspective. It provides guidance for developing procurement and installation specifications, interface requirements, and test plans.

  2. A sensor-based automation system for handling nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Kimberly, H.; Wapman, W.; Darras, D.

    1997-03-01

    An automated system is being developed for handling large payloads of radioactive nuclear materials in an analytical laboratory. The automation system performs unpacking and repacking of payloads from shipping and storage containers, and delivery of the payloads to the stations in the laboratory. The system uses machine vision and force/torque sensing to provide sensor-based control of the automation system in order to enhance system safety, flexibility, and robustness, and achieve easy remote operation. The automation system also controls the operation of the laboratory measurement systems and the coordination of them with the robotic system. Particular attention has been given to system design features and analytical methods that provide an enhanced level of operational safety. Independent mechanical gripper interlock and tool release mechanisms were designed to prevent payload mishandling. An extensive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the automation system was developed as a safety design analysis tool.

  3. Content of system design descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    A System Design Description (SDD) describes the requirements and features of a system. This standard provides guidance on the expected technical content of SDDs. The need for such a standard was recognized during efforts to develop SDDs for safety systems at DOE Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facilities. Existing guidance related to the corresponding documents in other industries is generally not suitable to meet the needs of DOE nuclear facilities. Across the DOE complex, different contractors have guidance documents, but they vary widely from site to site. While such guidance documents are valuable, no single guidance document has all the attributes that DOE considers important, including a reasonable degree of consistency or standardization. This standard is a consolidation of the best of the existing guidance. This standard has been developed with a technical content and level of detail intended to be most applicable to safety systems at DOE Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facilities. Notwithstanding that primary intent, this standard is recommended for other systems at such facilities, especially those that are important to achieving the programmatic mission of the facility. In addition, application of this standard should be considered for systems at other facilities, including non-nuclear facilities, on the basis that SDDs may be beneficial and cost-effective.

  4. Automated Design of Complex Dynamic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Bienstman, Peter; Dambre, Joni

    2014-01-01

    Several fields of study are concerned with uniting the concept of computation with that of the design of physical systems. For example, a recent trend in robotics is to design robots in such a way that they require a minimal control effort. Another example is found in the domain of photonics, where recent efforts try to benefit directly from the complex nonlinear dynamics to achieve more efficient signal processing. The underlying goal of these and similar research efforts is to internalize a large part of the necessary computations within the physical system itself by exploiting its inherent non-linear dynamics. This, however, often requires the optimization of large numbers of system parameters, related to both the system's structure as well as its material properties. In addition, many of these parameters are subject to fabrication variability or to variations through time. In this paper we apply a machine learning algorithm to optimize physical dynamic systems. We show that such algorithms, which are normally applied on abstract computational entities, can be extended to the field of differential equations and used to optimize an associated set of parameters which determine their behavior. We show that machine learning training methodologies are highly useful in designing robust systems, and we provide a set of both simple and complex examples using models of physical dynamical systems. Interestingly, the derived optimization method is intimately related to direct collocation a method known in the field of optimal control. Our work suggests that the application domains of both machine learning and optimal control have a largely unexplored overlapping area which envelopes a novel design methodology of smart and highly complex physical systems. PMID:24497969

  5. Multirate digital control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Martin C.; Amit, Naftali; Powell, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Methods for multirate digital control system design are discussed. A simple method for sampling rate selection based on control bandwidths is proposed. Methods for generating a discrete-time state model of a sampled-data plant and a discrete-time equivalent to an analog cost function for a sampled-data plant are described. The succesive loop closures and linear quadratic Gaussian synthesis methods are reviewed, and a constrained optimization synthesis method is introduced. The proposed sampling rate selection, discretization, and synthesis methods are applied to two example design problems. Multirate and single-rate compensators synthesized by the different methods are compared, based on closed-loop responses, with compensators having the same real-time computation load.

  6. Design Guidelines for Digital Learning Material for Food Chemistry Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diederen, Julia; Gruppen, Harry; Voragen, Alphons G. J.; Hartog, Rob; Mulder, Martin; Biemans, Harm

    This paper describes the first stage of a 4-year research project on the design, development and use of Web-based digital learning material for food chemistry education. The paper discusses design guidelines, based on principles that were selected from theories on learning and instruction, and illustrates in detail how these guidelines were used…

  7. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Luo, Fang; Ivanova, Magdalena; Sievers, Stuart A.; Wang, Wenyuan; Yaghi, Omar M.; Liu, Cong; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed amyloid fibers capable of capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas, to address the global problem of excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide. By measuring dynamic separation of carbon dioxide from nitrogen, we show that fibers with designed amino acid sequences double the carbon dioxide binding capacity of the previously reported fiber formed by VQIVYK from Tau protein. In a second application, we designed fibers that facilitate retroviral gene transfer. Finally, by measuring lentiviral transduction, we show that designed fibers exceed the efficiency of polybrene, a commonly used enhancer of transduction. The same procedures can be adapted to the design of countless other amyloid materials with a variety of properties and uses.

  8. Structure-Based Design of Functional Amyloid Materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Dan; Jones, Eric M.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Luo, Fang; Ivanova, Magdalena; Sievers, Stuart A.; Wang, Wenyuan; Yaghi, Omar M.; Liu, Cong; et al

    2014-12-04

    We report that amyloid fibers, once exclusively associated with disease, are acquiring utility as a class of biological nanomaterials. We introduce a method that utilizes the atomic structures of amyloid peptides, to design materials with versatile applications. As a model application, we designed amyloid fibers capable of capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas, to address the global problem of excess anthropogenic carbon dioxide. By measuring dynamic separation of carbon dioxide from nitrogen, we show that fibers with designed amino acid sequences double the carbon dioxide binding capacity of the previously reported fiber formed by VQIVYK from Tau protein. In amore » second application, we designed fibers that facilitate retroviral gene transfer. Finally, by measuring lentiviral transduction, we show that designed fibers exceed the efficiency of polybrene, a commonly used enhancer of transduction. The same procedures can be adapted to the design of countless other amyloid materials with a variety of properties and uses.« less

  9. Rational design of inorganic dielectric materials with expected permittivity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Congwei; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Dong; Liu, Ning; Li, Duan; Debela, Tekalign Terfa

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for rapid design of dielectric materials with appropriate permittivity for many important technological applications are urgently needed. It is found that functional structure blocks (FSBs) are helpful in rational design of inorganic dielectrics with expected permittivity. To achieve this, coordination polyhedra are parameterized as FSBs and a simple empirical model to evaluate permittivity based on these FSB parameters is proposed. Using this model, a wide range of examples including ferroelectric, high/low permittivity materials are discussed, resulting in several candidate materials for experimental follow-up. PMID:26617342

  10. Rational design of inorganic dielectric materials with expected permittivity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Congwei; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Dong; Liu, Ning; Li, Duan; Debela, Tekalign Terfa

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for rapid design of dielectric materials with appropriate permittivity for many important technological applications are urgently needed. It is found that functional structure blocks (FSBs) are helpful in rational design of inorganic dielectrics with expected permittivity. To achieve this, coordination polyhedra are parameterized as FSBs and a simple empirical model to evaluate permittivity based on these FSB parameters is proposed. Using this model, a wide range of examples including ferroelectric, high/low permittivity materials are discussed, resulting in several candidate materials for experimental follow-up. PMID:26617342

  11. Rational design of inorganic dielectric materials with expected permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Congwei; Oganov, Artem R.; Dong, Dong; Liu, Ning; Li, Duan; Debela, Tekalign Terfa

    2015-11-01

    Techniques for rapid design of dielectric materials with appropriate permittivity for many important technological applications are urgently needed. It is found that functional structure blocks (FSBs) are helpful in rational design of inorganic dielectrics with expected permittivity. To achieve this, coordination polyhedra are parameterized as FSBs and a simple empirical model to evaluate permittivity based on these FSB parameters is proposed. Using this model, a wide range of examples including ferroelectric, high/low permittivity materials are discussed, resulting in several candidate materials for experimental follow-up.

  12. Design of a californium source-driven measurement system for accountability of material recovered from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment charcoal bed

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzinger, D.L.; Perez, R.B.; Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1998-05-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility (MSRE) operated from 1965 to 1969. The fuel was a molten salt that flowed through the reactor core which consisted of uranium tetrafluoride with molten lithium and beryllium salt used as the coolant. In 1968 the fuel was switched from {sup 235}U to {sup 233}U. The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment was canceled in 1969 at which time approximately 4800 kg of salt was transferred to the fuel drain tanks. There was about 36.3 kg of uranium, 675 grams of plutonium and various fission products present in the fuel salt. The salt was allowed to solidify in the fuel drain tanks. The salt was heated on a yearly basis to recombine the fluorine gas with the uranium salt mixture. In March 1994, a gas sample was taken from the off gas system that indicated {sup 233}U had migrated from the fuel drain tank system to the off gas system. It was found that approximately 2.6 kg of uranium had migrated to the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed (ACB). The ACB is located in the concrete-lined charcoal bed cell which is below ground level located outside the MSRE building. Therefore, there was a concern for the potential of a nuclear criticality accident, although water would have to leak into the chamber for a criticality accident to occur. Unstable carbon/fluorine compounds were also formed when the fluorine reacted with the charcoal in the charcoal bed. The purpose of the proposed measurement system was to perform an accountability measurement to determine the fissile mass of {sup 233}U in the primary vessel. The contents of the primary containment assembly will then be transferred to three smaller containers for long term storage. Calculations were performed using MCNP-DSP to determine the configuration of the measurement system. The information obtained from the time signatures can then be compared to the measurement data to determine the amount of {sup 233}U present in the primary containment assembly.

  13. Design package for a solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report contains sufficient information to assemble complete tested residential flat-plate solar heating system. Descriptive material provides design, performance, and hardware specifications for utilization by architectural engineers, and contractors in procurement, installation, operation, and maintenance of similar solar applications.

  14. Computerized Adaptive Testing System Design: Preliminary Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croll, Paul R.

    A functional design model for a computerized adaptive testing (CAT) system was developed and presented through a series of hierarchy plus input-process-output (HIPO) diagrams. System functions were translated into system structure: specifically, into 34 software components. Implementation of the design in a physical system was addressed through…

  15. FORTRAN IV Digital Filter Design Programs. Digital Systems Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuss, E.; And Others

    The goals of the Digital Systems Education Project (DISE) include the development and distribution of educational/instructional materials in the digital systems area. Toward that end, this document contains three reports: (1) A FORTRAN IV Design Program for Low-Pass Butterworth and Chebychev Digital Filters; (2) A FORTRAN IV Design Program for…

  16. Development of Digital Materials Database for Design and Construction of New Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju

    2008-01-01

    To facilitate materials selection, structural design, and future maintenance of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems, an interactive, internet accessible materials property database, dubbed Gen IV Materials Handbook, has been under development with the support of the United States Department of Energy. The Handbook will provide an authoritative source of information on structural materials needed for the development of various Gen IV nuclear reactor systems along with powerful data analysis and management tools. In this paper, the background, history, framework, major features, contents, and development strategy of the Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Current development status and future plans are also elucidated.

  17. Evolution of heavy duty engine valves - materials and design

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, S.K.; Larson, J.M.; Jenkins, L.F.; Wang, Y.

    1997-12-31

    Engine poppet valves control gas flow in internal combustion engines. The combustion event and the flow of the gases formed past the valve during the intake or exhaust portion of the combustion cycle, expose heavy duty diesel valves to high temperatures, oxidizing or corroding atmospheres and high stresses from firing and seating. This paper is a review of heavy duty diesel engine valve material and design evolution over the last fifty years in North America. The primary driving forces behind the evolution have historically been the need for improved durability and more cost effective designs. However, in recent years engine emission regulatory requirements have become an equally important influence on valve material selection and design. The paper also endeavors to predict how heavy duty diesel engine valve materials and designs may change in response to these driving forces in the foreseeable future.

  18. Microstructural design of cellular materials I: Honeycomb beams and plates

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Gibson, L.J.

    1992-06-01

    Performance indices for materials describe the mechanical efficiency of a component under a given mode of loading: The higher the performance index, the lower the mass of the component for a given mechanical requirement. Material selection charts (Ashby, 1989) offer a graphical means of comparing performance indices for a wide range of materials. Performance indices are described. Micromechanical models for behaviour of cellular materials are used to suggest novel microstructural designs for cellular materials with improved performance. Three novel microstructural designs, described in companion papers, have been fabricated and tested. Results of the tests indicate that the new microstructures have higher values of some performance indices than those of the solids from which they are made.

  19. Advanced materials for thermal protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Sangvavann; Sherman, Andrew J.

    1996-03-01

    Reticulated open-cell ceramic foams (both vitreous carbon and silicon carbide) and ceramic composites (SiC-based, both monolithic and fiber-reinforced) were evaluated as candidate materials for use in a heat shield sandwich panel design as an advanced thermal protection system (TPS) for unmanned single-use hypersonic reentry vehicles. These materials were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration (CVD/CVI) and evaluated extensively for their mechanical, thermal, and erosion/ablation performance. In the TPS, the ceramic foams were used as a structural core providing thermal insulation and mechanical load distribution, while the ceramic composites were used as facesheets providing resistance to aerodynamic, shear, and erosive forces. Tensile, compressive, and shear strength, elastic and shear modulus, fracture toughness, Poisson's ratio, and thermal conductivity were measured for the ceramic foams, while arcjet testing was conducted on the ceramic composites at heat flux levels up to 5.90 MW/m2 (520 Btu/ft2ṡsec). Two prototype test articles were fabricated and subjected to arcjet testing at heat flux levels of 1.70-3.40 MW/m2 (150-300 Btu/ft2ṡsec) under simulated reentry trajectories.

  20. Design of nanostructured materials from block copolymer self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leolukman, Melvina

    We present two classes of nanostructured materials by combining the self assembly of block copolymer (BCP) with suitable small molecule chemistry, which are applicable to organic electro-optics (EO) and as etch-resistant masks for nanofabrication. The underlying principles of designing the specific interactions between BCP host and guest molecules, driving the self-assembly in bulk and thin film, and dictating domain orientation are concepts common to both of these areas. Nanostructured EO materials were created by selectively encapsulating EO chromophores by hydrogen-bonding to the pyridine groups of a linear-diblock copolymer (linear-diBCP) namely polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) [PS-b-P4VP], or a linear-dendritic-BCP. With the linear-diBCP host, we discovered that poled order in confined domains depends on domain shape, chromophore concentration within the domain, and thermal history. The linear-dendritic-BCP is an excellent host as it efficiently disperses the chromophores into small domains (5-10nm), and keeps the chromophores apart within the domains due to the dendritic architecture. These morphological effects translated into excellent film processability, increased chromophore loading, and two-fold enhancements in the EO coefficient (r 33) when compared to a corresponding homopolymer system. A new class of organic-inorganic nanostructured materials based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was synthesized as a passive template for pattern transfer. We developed a living anionic polymerization route for methacrylate-functionalized POSS and synthesized two kinds of BCPs, namely PS-b-PMAPOSS and PMMA-b-PMAPOSS. The anionic route allows high degree of polymerization, narrow polydispersity, and tunable POSS block length. These lead to well defined spherical, cylindrical, and lamellar morphologies, as well as formation of hierarchical structures upon thermal annealing. Both POSS-containing BCPs were assembled in thin film and converted to hard

  1. DDL:Digital systems design language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shival, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Hardware description languages are valuable tools in such applications as hardware design, system documentation, and logic design training. DDL is convenient medium for inputting design details into hardware-design automation system. It is suitable for describing digital systems at gate, register transfer, and major combinational block level.

  2. Materials Requirements for Advanced Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Cook, Mary Beth; Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's mission to "reach the Moon and Mars" will be obtained only if research begins now to develop materials with expanded capabilities to reduce mass, cost and risk to the program. Current materials cannot function satisfactorily in the deep space environments and do not meet the requirements of long term space propulsion concepts for manned missions. Directed research is needed to better understand materials behavior for optimizing their processing. This research, generating a deeper understanding of material behavior, can lead to enhanced implementation of materials for future exploration vehicles. materials providing new approaches for manufacture and new options for In response to this need for more robust materials, NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) has established a strategic research initiative dedicated to materials development supporting NASA's space propulsion needs. The Advanced Materials for Exploration (AME) element directs basic and applied research to understand material behavior and develop improved materials allowing propulsion systems to operate beyond their current limitations. This paper will discuss the approach used to direct the path of strategic research for advanced materials to ensure that the research is indeed supportive of NASA's future missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond.

  3. Design of Functional Materials with Hydrogen-Bonded Host Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soegiarto, Airon Cosanova

    motifs on the optical properties of the confined guests are manifested in the bathochromic shifts in the absorption and emission spectra relative to those in dilute solution. The shifts in the absorption bands were corroborated by ab initio computations (using TDDFT at the PBE0/6-311G(d,p) level) based on the structures of the host-guest aggregates observed in the crystalline state. Chapter 4 describes the inclusion of several coumarin-based laser dyes. GDS hosts with the bilayer architectures include the dye as monomers, whereas those with the brick architectures include the dye as dimers. The ability to tune the emission wavelength through choice of dye and adjustment of framework architectures enables the design of a new class of efficient laser dye crystals. Furthermore, the excited state lifetime of some of the confined dyes in the host matrix were extended by up to ten times longer than those in dilute solutions -- an important characteristic for producing efficient lasing crystals. Chapter 5 details the inclusion of a variety of TEMPO-based radicals, whose molecular arrangement can be controlled depending on the host framework architecture. GDS hosts with the simple brick architecture generate 1-D channels which organize the radical guests into a two-leg ladder, whereas GDS hosts with the zigzag brick architecture distribute the radical guests into a 2-D square-planar lattice. Although magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate long-range antiferromagnetic ordering in these materials, the ability to form 1-D or 2-D spin systems in these frameworks may allow the design of low-dimensional magnets. Collectively, this thesis demonstrates the ability of the GDS hosts to regulate the solid-state structure of functional guest molecules, which suggests a route to the design and synthesis of materials with future applications in areas as diverse as optoelectronics, magnetics, and confined reactions.

  4. Physics towards next generation Li secondary batteries materials: A short review from computational materials design perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, ChuYing; Chen, LiQuan

    2013-12-01

    The physics that associated with the performance of lithium secondary batteries (LSB) are reviewed. The key physical problems in LSB include the electronic conduction mechanism, kinetics and thermodynamics of lithium ion migration, electrode/ electrolyte surface/interface, structural (phase) and thermodynamics stability of the electrode materials, physics of intercalation and deintercalation. The relationship between the physical/chemical nature of the LSB materials and the batteries performance is summarized and discussed. A general thread of computational materials design for LSB materials is emphasized concerning all the discussed physics problems. In order to fasten the progress of the new materials discovery and design for the next generation LSB, the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) for LSB materials is a promising strategy and the related requirements are highlighted.

  5. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  6. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  7. Computer design and analysis of vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Santeler, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    A computer program has been developed for an IBM compatible personal computer to assist in the design and analysis of vacuum systems. The program has a selection of 12 major schematics with several thousand minor variants incorporating diffusion, turbomolecular, cryogenic, ion, mechanical, and sorption pumps as well as circular tubes, bends, valves, traps, and purge gas connections. The gas throughput versus the inlet pressure of the pump is presented on a log--log graphical display. The conductance of each series component is sequentially added to the graph to obtain the net system behavior Q/sub (//sub P//sub )/. The component conductances may be calculated either from the inlet area and the transmission probability or from the tube length and the diameter. The gas-flow calculations are valid for orifices, short tubes, and long tubes throughout the entire pressure range from molecular through viscous to choked and nonchoked exit flows. The roughing-pump and high-vacuum-pump characteristic curves are numerically integrated to provide a graphical presentation of the system pumpdown. Outgassing data for different materials is then combined to produce a graph of the net system ''outgassing pressure.'' Computer routines are provided for differentiating a real pumpdown curve for system analysis. The computer program is included with the American Vacuum Society course, ''Advanced Vacuum System Design and Analysis,'' or it may be purchased from Process Applications, Inc.

  8. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  9. Smart materials based on polymeric systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crowson, A.

    1995-12-01

    The science and technology of the 21st century will rely heavily on the development of new materials. Such materials are expected to be innovative with regards to structure, functionality, and design. One concept in achieving this goal is what has been termed {open_quotes}smart materials{close_quotes}. A smart material is defined as a material which has been atomically or molecularly engineered in such a way that the microstructure itself is imbued with embedded sensors, actuators, and control mechanisms, giving it the capability of sensing and responding to external stimuli in a predetermined and controlled fashion. Programs in this area have involved technological advances in a number of scientific disciplines inclusive of materials science, chemistry, biotechnology, molecular electronics, nanotechnology, etc. These have encompassed research themes into the design of polymeric materials which are capable of altering their mechanical and electrical properties when exposed to specific molecular species, the synthesis of amphiphlic molecules with easily modified ferroelectric, photochromic and nonlinear properties, the design of stress sensitive molecules capable of monitoring damage and redistributing stresses in composites, and the merging of biological and chemical technologies to create assemblies with signal transduction properties. This presentation will highlight some of these activities.

  10. Perspective: Role of structure prediction in materials discovery and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2016-05-01

    Materials informatics owes much to bioinformatics and the Materials Genome Initiative has been inspired by the Human Genome Project. But there is more to bioinformatics than genomes, and the same is true for materials informatics. Here we describe the rapidly expanding role of searching for structures of materials using first-principles electronic-structure methods. Structure searching has played an important part in unraveling structures of dense hydrogen and in identifying the record-high-temperature superconducting component in hydrogen sulfide at high pressures. We suggest that first-principles structure searching has already demonstrated its ability to determine structures of a wide range of materials and that it will play a central and increasing part in materials discovery and design.

  11. Advanced thermoplastic materials for district heating piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raske, D.T.; Karvelas, D.E.

    1988-04-01

    The work described in this report represents research conducted in the first year of a three-year program to assess, characterize, and design thermoplastic piping for use in elevated-temperature district heating (DH) systems. The present report describes the results of a program to assess the potential usefulness of advanced thermoplastics as piping materials for use in DH systems. This includes the review of design rules for thermoplastic materials used as pipes, a survey of candidate materials and available mechanical properties data, and mechanical properties testing to obtain baseline data on a candidate thermoplastic material extruded as pipe. The candidate material studied in this phase of the research was a polyetherimide resin, Ultem 1000, which has a UL continuous service temperature rating of 338/degree/F (170/degree/C). The results of experiments to determine the mechanical properties between 68 and 350/degree/F (20 and 177/degree/C) were used to establish preliminary design values for this material. Because these prototypic pipes were extruded under less than optimal conditions, the mechanical properties obtained are inferior to those expected from typical production pipes. Nevertheless, the present material in the form of 2-in. SDR 11 pipe (2.375-in. O. D. by 0.216-in. wall) would have a saturated water design pressure rating of /approximately/34 psig at 280/degree/F. 16 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. "TPSX: Thermal Protection System Expert and Material Property Database"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Thomas H.; Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Thermal Protection Branch at NASA Ames Research Center has developed a computer program for storing, organizing, and accessing information about thermal protection materials. The program, called Thermal Protection Systems Expert and Material Property Database, or TPSX, is available for the Microsoft Windows operating system. An "on-line" version is also accessible on the World Wide Web. TPSX is designed to be a high-quality source for TPS material properties presented in a convenient, easily accessible form for use by engineers and researchers in the field of high-speed vehicle design. Data can be displayed and printed in several formats. An information window displays a brief description of the material with properties at standard pressure and temperature. A spread sheet window displays complete, detailed property information. Properties which are a function of temperature and/or pressure can be displayed as graphs. In any display the data can be converted from English to SI units with the click of a button. Two material databases included with TPSX are: 1) materials used and/or developed by the Thermal Protection Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, and 2) a database compiled by NASA Johnson Space Center 9JSC). The Ames database contains over 60 advanced TPS materials including flexible blankets, rigid ceramic tiles, and ultra-high temperature ceramics. The JSC database contains over 130 insulative and structural materials. The Ames database is periodically updated and expanded as required to include newly developed materials and material property refinements.

  13. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  14. Space shuttle visual simulation system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A recommendation and a specification for the visual simulation system design for the space shuttle mission simulator are presented. A recommended visual system is described which most nearly meets the visual design requirements. The cost analysis of the recommended system covering design, development, manufacturing, and installation is reported. Four alternate systems are analyzed.

  15. Semiautomated switched capacitor filter design system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, D.

    1990-01-01

    A software system is described which reduces the time required to design monolithic switched capacitor filters. The system combines several software tools into an integrated flow. Switched capacitor technology and alternative technologies are discussed. Design time using the software system is compared to typical design time without the system.

  16. Design and Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messer, Elizabeth; Messer, Brad; Carter, Judy; Singletary, Todd; Albasini, Colby; Smith, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The Design and Data Management System (DDMS) was developed to automate the NASA Engineering Order (EO) and Engineering Change Request (ECR) processes at the Propulsion Test Facilities at Stennis Space Center for efficient and effective Configuration Management (CM). Prior to the development of DDMS, the CM system was a manual, paper-based system that required an EO or ECR submitter to walk the changes through the acceptance process to obtain necessary approval signatures. This approval process could take up to two weeks, and was subject to a variety of human errors. The process also requires that the CM office make copies and distribute them to the Configuration Control Board members for review prior to meetings. At any point, there was a potential for an error or loss of the change records, meaning the configuration of record was not accurate. The new Web-based DDMS eliminates unnecessary copies, reduces the time needed to distribute the paperwork, reduces time to gain the necessary signatures, and prevents the variety of errors inherent in the previous manual system. After implementation of the DDMS, all EOs and ECRs can be automatically checked prior to submittal to ensure that the documentation is complete and accurate. Much of the configuration information can be documented in the DDMS through pull-down forms to ensure consistent entries by the engineers and technicians in the field. The software also can electronically route the documents through the signature process to obtain the necessary approvals needed for work authorization. The workflow of the system allows for backups and timestamps that determine the correct routing and completion of all required authorizations in a more timely manner, as well as assuring the quality and accuracy of the configuration documents.

  17. Advanced turbine systems: Studies and conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, S.; Gnaedig, G.; Kreitmeier, F.

    1993-11-01

    The ABB selection for the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) includes advanced developments especially in the hot gas path of the combustion turbine and new state-of-the-art units such as the steam turbine and the HRSG. The increase in efficiency by more than 10% multiplicative compared to current designs will be based on: (1) Turbine Inlet Temperature Increase; (2) New Cooling Techniques for Stationary and Rotating Parts; and New Materials. Present, projected component improvements that will be introduced with the above mentioned issues will yield improved CCSC turbine performance, which will drive the ATS selected gas-fired reference CC power plant to 6 % LHV or better. The decrease in emission levels requires a careful optimization of the cycle design, where cooling air consumption has to be minimized. All interfaces of the individual systems in the complete CC Plant need careful checks, especially to avoid unnecessary margins in the individual designs. This study is an important step pointing out the feasibility of the ATS program with realistic goals set by DOE, which, however, will present challenges for Phase II time schedule of 18 months. With the approach outlined in this study and close cooperation with DOE, ATS program success can be achieved to deliver low emissions and low cost of electricity by the year 2002. The ABB conceptual design and step approach will lead to early component demonstration which will help accelerate the overall program objectives.

  18. Manufacturing process and material selection in concurrent collaborative design of MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Xuan F.; Du, H.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper we present knowledge of an intensive approach and system for selecting suitable manufacturing processes and materials for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices in concurrent collaborative design environment. In the paper, fundamental issues on MEMS manufacturing process and material selection such as concurrent design framework, manufacturing process and material hierarchies, and selection strategy are first addressed. Then, a fuzzy decision support scheme for a multi-criteria decision-making problem is proposed for estimating, ranking and selecting possible manufacturing processes, materials and their combinations. A Web-based prototype advisory system for the MEMS manufacturing process and material selection, WebMEMS-MASS, is developed based on the client-knowledge server architecture and framework to help the designer find good processes and materials for MEMS devices. The system, as one of the important parts of an advanced simulation and modeling tool for MEMS design, is a concept level process and material selection tool, which can be used as a standalone application or a Java applet via the Web. The running sessions of the system are inter-linked with webpages of tutorials and reference pages to explain the facets, fabrication processes and material choices, and calculations and reasoning in selection are performed using process capability and material property data from a remote Web-based database and interactive knowledge base that can be maintained and updated via the Internet. The use of the developed system including operation scenario, use support, and integration with an MEMS collaborative design system is presented. Finally, an illustration example is provided.

  19. Conceptual Design Report for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Austad

    2010-06-01

    This document describes the design at a conceptual level for the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) to be located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The IMCL is an 11,000-ft2, Hazard Category-2 nuclear facility that is designed for use as a state of the-art nuclear facility for the purpose of hands-on and remote handling, characterization, and examination of irradiated and nonirradiated nuclear material samples. The IMCL will accommodate a series of future, modular, and reconfigurable instrument enclosures or caves. To provide a bounding design basis envelope for the facility-provided space and infrastructure, an instrument enclosure or cave configuration was developed and is described in some detail. However, the future instrument enclosures may be modular, integral with the instrument, or reconfigurable to enable various characterization environments to be configured as changes in demand occur. They are not provided as part of the facility.

  20. Optimal Experiment Design for Thermal Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to investigate methods to accurately verify that designed , materials meet thermal specifications. The project involved heat transfer calculations and optimization studies, and no laboratory experiments were performed. One part of the research involved study of materials in which conduction heat transfer predominates. Results include techniques to choose among several experimental designs, and protocols for determining the optimum experimental conditions for determination of thermal properties. Metal foam materials were also studied in which both conduction and radiation heat transfer are present. Results of this work include procedures to optimize the design of experiments to accurately measure both conductive and radiative thermal properties. Detailed results in the form of three journal papers have been appended to this report.

  1. 30 CFR 27.20 - Quality of material, workmanship, and design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality of material, workmanship, and design. 27.20 Section 27.20 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.20 Quality of...

  2. 30 CFR 27.20 - Quality of material, workmanship, and design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Quality of material, workmanship, and design. 27.20 Section 27.20 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.20 Quality of...

  3. High-throughput theoretical design of lithium battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi-Gang, Ling; Jian, Gao; Rui-Juan, Xiao; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of high-throughput theoretical design schemes to discover new lithium battery materials is reviewed, including high-capacity cathodes, low-strain cathodes, anodes, solid state electrolytes, and electrolyte additives. With the development of efficient theoretical methods and inexpensive computers, high-throughput theoretical calculations have played an increasingly important role in the discovery of new materials. With the help of automatic simulation flow, many types of materials can be screened, optimized and designed from a structural database according to specific search criteria. In advanced cell technology, new materials for next generation lithium batteries are of great significance to achieve performance, and some representative criteria are: higher energy density, better safety, and faster charge/discharge speed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 51172274) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201).

  4. Soft computing in design and manufacturing of advanced materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Baaklini, George Y; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The potential of fuzzy sets and neural networks, often referred to as soft computing, for aiding in all aspects of manufacturing of advanced materials like ceramics is addressed. In design and manufacturing of advanced materials, it is desirable to find which of the many processing variables contribute most to the desired properties of the material. There is also interest in real time quality control of parameters that govern material properties during processing stages. The concepts of fuzzy sets and neural networks are briefly introduced and it is shown how they can be used in the design and manufacturing processes. These two computational methods are alternatives to other methods such as the Taguchi method. The two methods are demonstrated by using data collected at NASA Lewis Research Center. Future research directions are also discussed.

  5. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    PubMed Central

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure–property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  6. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials.

    PubMed

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C

    2015-01-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials. PMID:26323335

  7. Segmented molecular design of self-healing proteinaceous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sariola, Veikko; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun; Çetinkaya, Murat; Pacheco, Carlos; Sitti, Metin; Demirel, Melik C.

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical assembly of self-healing adhesive proteins creates strong and robust structural and interfacial materials, but understanding of the molecular design and structure-property relationships of structural proteins remains unclear. Elucidating this relationship would allow rational design of next generation genetically engineered self-healing structural proteins. Here we report a general self-healing and -assembly strategy based on a multiphase recombinant protein based material. Segmented structure of the protein shows soft glycine- and tyrosine-rich segments with self-healing capability and hard beta-sheet segments. The soft segments are strongly plasticized by water, lowering the self-healing temperature close to body temperature. The hard segments self-assemble into nanoconfined domains to reinforce the material. The healing strength scales sublinearly with contact time, which associates with diffusion and wetting of autohesion. The finding suggests that recombinant structural proteins from heterologous expression have potential as strong and repairable engineering materials.

  8. Nuclear Materials Identification System Operational Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.G.

    2001-04-10

    This report describes the operation and setup of the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) with a {sup 252}Cf neutron source at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The components of the system are described with a description of the setup of the system along with an overview of the NMIS measurements for scanning, calibration, and confirmation of inventory items.

  9. Acoustic system for material transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An object within a chamber is acoustically moved by applying wavelengths of different modes to the chamber to move the object between pressure wells formed by the modes. In one system, the object is placed in one end of the chamber while a resonant mode, applied along the length of the chamber, produces a pressure well at the location. The frequency is then switched to a second mode that produces a pressure well at the center of the chamber, to draw the object. When the object reaches the second pressure well and is still traveling towards the second end of the chamber, the acoustic frequency is again shifted to a third mode (which may equal the first model) that has a pressure well in the second end portion of the chamber, to draw the object. A heat source may be located near the second end of the chamber to heat the sample, and after the sample is heated it can be cooled by moving it in a corresponding manner back to the first end of the chamber. The transducers for levitating and moving the object may be all located at the cool first end of the chamber.

  10. Interfacial Properties and Design of Functional Energy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolai, Adrien; Meunier, V.

    2014-01-01

    The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality, such as efficient energy conversion/storage/transmission, over multiple length scales. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately non-covalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, e.g., lithographic approach. However, while function (e.g., charge mobility) in simple systems such as single crystals can often be predicted, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale (long-range) order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various substrates. Typically molecular self-assembly involves poorly understood non-covalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions compounded by local and/or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice (symmetry and/or topological features) and electronic structure. Thus, progress towards unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. In this mode, theory and simulation can greatly accelerate the

  11. Computational Design of 2D materials for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Since the successful synthesis of graphene, tremendous efforts have been devoted to two-dimensional monolayers such as boron nitride (BN), silicene and MoS2. These 2D materials exhibit a large variety of physical and chemical properties with unprecedented applications. Here we report our recent studies of computational design of 2D materials for fuel cell applications which include hydrogen storage, CO2 capture, CO conversion and O2 reduction.

  12. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  13. Concurrent materials and process selection in conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Stephen D.; Knorovsky, Gerald A.

    2000-08-16

    A method for concurrent selection of materials and a joining process based on product requirements using a knowledge-based, constraint satisfaction approach facilitates the product design and manufacturing process. Using a Windows-based computer video display and a data base of materials and their properties, the designer can ascertain the preferred composition of two parts based on various operating/environmental constraints such as load, temperature, lifetime, etc. Optimum joinder of the two parts may simultaneously be determined using a joining process data base based upon the selected composition of the components as well as the operating/environmental constraints.

  14. Reticular synthesis and the design of new materials.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Omar M; O'Keeffe, Michael; Ockwig, Nathan W; Chae, Hee K; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Kim, Jaheon

    2003-06-12

    The long-standing challenge of designing and constructing new crystalline solid-state materials from molecular building blocks is just beginning to be addressed with success. A conceptual approach that requires the use of secondary building units to direct the assembly of ordered frameworks epitomizes this process: we call this approach reticular synthesis. This chemistry has yielded materials designed to have predetermined structures, compositions and properties. In particular, highly porous frameworks held together by strong metal-oxygen-carbon bonds and with exceptionally large surface area and capacity for gas storage have been prepared and their pore metrics systematically varied and functionalized. PMID:12802325

  15. Designer disordered materials with large, complete photonic band gaps

    PubMed Central

    Florescu, Marian; Torquato, Salvatore; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We present designs of 2D, isotropic, disordered, photonic materials of arbitrary size with complete band gaps blocking all directions and polarizations. The designs with the largest band gaps are obtained by a constrained optimization method that starts from a hyperuniform disordered point pattern, an array of points whose number variance within a spherical sampling window grows more slowly than the volume. We argue that hyperuniformity, combined with uniform local topology and short-range geometric order, can explain how complete photonic band gaps are possible without long-range translational order. We note the ramifications for electronic and phononic band gaps in disordered materials. PMID:19918087

  16. Decomposing Systems Into Subsystems For Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions among systems displayed in concise format. DeMAID (Design Manager's Aide for Intelligent Decomposition) is knowledge based software system for automating sequencing of subprocesses in design process and identifying possible multilevel structure for synthesis problem. Reorders and groups modules of equipment being designed on basis of links among modules, helping design manager make design decisions early in design cycle. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  17. On the design of reversible QDCA systems.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.; Frank, Michael P. (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL); Ottavi, Marco; Frost-Murphy, Sarah E.

    2006-10-01

    This work is the first to describe how to go about designing a reversible QDCA system. The design space is substantial, and there are many questions that a designer needs to answer before beginning to design. This document begins to explicate the tradeoffs and assumptions that need to be made and offers a range of approaches as starting points and examples. This design guide is an effective tool for aiding designers in creating the best quality QDCA implementation for a system.

  18. Cellular Manufacturing System with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khannan, M. S. A.; Maruf, A.; Wangsaputra, R.; Sutrisno, S.; Wibawa, T.

    2016-02-01

    Material Handling take as important role in Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS) design. In several study at CMS design material handling was assumed per pieces or with constant lot size. In real industrial practice, lot size may change during rolling period to cope with demand changes. This study develops CMS Model with Dynamic Lot Size Material Handling. Integer Linear Programming is used to solve the problem. Objective function of this model is minimizing total expected cost consisting machinery depreciation cost, operating costs, inter-cell material handling cost, intra-cell material handling cost, machine relocation costs, setup costs, and production planning cost. This model determines optimum cell formation and optimum lot size. Numerical examples are elaborated in the paper to ilustrate the characterictic of the model.

  19. Fiber Optic Network Design Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Timothy J.; Wnek, Roy M.

    1987-05-01

    The Fiber Optic Network Design Expert System (FONDES) is an engineering tool for the specification, design, and evaluation of fiber optic transmission systems. FONDES encompasses a design rule base and a data base of specifications of system components. This package applies to fiber optic design work in two ways, as a design-to-specification tool and a system performance prediction model. The FONDES rule base embodies the logic of design engineering. It can be used to produce a system design given a requirement specification or it can be used to predict system performance given a system design. The periodically updated FONDES data base contains performance specifications, price, and availability data for current fiber optic system components. FONDES is implemented in an artificial intelligence language, TURBO-PROLOG, and runs on an IBM-PC.

  20. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines.

    PubMed

    Miskin, Marc Z; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material's configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26684770

  1. Integration of test methodology, material database, and material selection/deselection strategies for a chemical-material compatibility database system

    SciTech Connect

    Shuely, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of chemical exposure on the degradation of material properties is important to material evaluation and selection for both commercial and military products. Described here are a set of enhancements to a traditional chemical-material compatibility database that were required to support the early selection of chemically resistant materials in a concurrent engineering environment. This initial phase in the development of an integrated chemical-material compatibility system included: organization of tests into a comprehensive scheme, test selection for the initial screening tests in the scheme, the increased standardization of test procedures and reports required to support database queries, and the control of data set flow from the test laboratory directly to the database. Emphasized here is the design of modular database files based on material, chemical, and test specification descriptors that are indexed to the resulting test properties database module. ASTM Committee E49 formats were employed where available. The polymeric material documentation has been implemented by development of a menu-driven laboratory database version of ASTM Guide for the Identification of Polymers (Excludes Thermoset Elastomers) in Computerized Material Property Databases (E 1308-92). Examples are provided from the screening test found in the initial section of the test method scheme. One is able to execute a rapid paperless transfer of predictive and experimental screening results to the chemical-material compatibility database, query the results to eliminate a substantial fraction of materials and rank a more limited set of candidate materials to provide a useful ``deselection`` capability.

  2. Systems biology in vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Six, Adrien; Bellier, Bertrand; Thomas‐Vaslin, Véronique; Klatzmann, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Vaccines are the most effective tools to prevent infectious diseases and to minimize their impact on humans or animals. Despite the successful development of vaccines that are able to elicit potent and protective immune responses, the majority of vaccines have been so far developed empirically and mechanistic events leading to protective immune responses are often poorly understood. This hampers the development of new prophylactic as well as therapeutic vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer. Biological correlates of immune‐mediated protection are currently based on standard readout such as antibody titres and ELISPOT assays. The development of successful vaccines for difficult settings, such as infectious agents leading to chronic infection (HIV, HCV. . .) or cancer, calls for novel ‘readout systems’ or ‘correlates’ of immune‐mediated protection that would reliably predict immune responses to novel vaccines in vivo. Systems biology offers a new approach to vaccine design that is based upon understanding the molecular network mobilized by vaccination. Systems vaccinology approaches investigate more global correlates of successful vaccination, beyond the specific immune response to the antigens administered, providing new methods for measuring early vaccine efficacy and ultimately generating hypotheses for understanding the mechanisms that underlie successful immunogenicity. Using functional genomics, specific molecular signatures of individual vaccine can be identified and used as predictors of vaccination efficiency. The immune response to vaccination involves the coordinated induction of master transcription factors that leads to the development of a broad, polyfunctional and persistent immune response integrating all effector cells of the immune systems. PMID:22189033

  3. Artwork Interactive Design System (AIDS) program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. T.; Taylor, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    An artwork interactive design system is described which provides the microelectronic circuit designer/engineer a tool to perform circuit design, automatic layout modification, standard cell design, and artwork verification at a graphics computer terminal using a graphics tablet at the designer/computer interface.

  4. Application and design of solar photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianze, Li; Hengwei, Lu; Chuan, Jiang; Luan, Hou; Xia, Zhang

    2011-02-01

    Solar modules, power electronic equipments which include the charge-discharge controller, the inverter, the test instrumentation and the computer monitoring, and the storage battery or the other energy storage and auxiliary generating plant make up of the photovoltaic system which is shown in the thesis. PV system design should follow to meet the load supply requirements, make system low cost, seriously consider the design of software and hardware, and make general software design prior to hardware design in the paper. To take the design of PV system for an example, the paper gives the analysis of the design of system software and system hardware, economic benefit, and basic ideas and steps of the installation and the connection of the system. It elaborates on the information acquisition, the software and hardware design of the system, the evaluation and optimization of the system. Finally, it shows the analysis and prospect of the application of photovoltaic technology in outer space, solar lamps, freeways and communications.

  5. Computer Aided Control System Design (CACSD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, Frank T.

    1993-01-01

    The design of modern aerospace systems relies on the efficient utilization of computational resources and the availability of computational tools to provide accurate system modeling. This research focuses on the development of a computer aided control system design application which provides a full range of stability analysis and control design capabilities for aerospace vehicles.

  6. System for detecting special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Yordanov; Taddeucci, Terry Nicholas

    2015-07-14

    The present disclosure includes a radiological material detector having a convertor material that emits one or more photons in response to a capture of a neutron emitted by a radiological material; a photon detector arranged around the convertor material and that produces an electrical signal in response to a receipt of a photon; and a processor connected to the photon detector, the processor configured to determine the presence of a radiological material in response to a predetermined signature of the electrical signal produced at the photon detector. One or more detectors described herein can be integrated into a detection system that is suited for use in port monitoring, treaty compliance, and radiological material management activities.

  7. Force field development from first principles for materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Maria; Kinaci, Alper; Narayanan, Badri; Sen, Fatih; Gray, Stephen; Davis, Michael; Sankaranaryanan, Subramanian

    2015-03-01

    The ability to perform accurate calculations efficiently is crucial for computational materials design. In this talk, we will discuss a stream-lined approach to force field development using first principles density functional theory training data and machine learning algorithms. We will also discuss the validation of this approach on precious metal nanoparticles.

  8. Designing ICT Training Material for Chinese Language Arts Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Janet Mei-Chuen; Wu, Cheng-Chih; Chen, Hsiu-Yen

    The purpose of this research is to tailor the design of information and communications technology (ICT) training material to the needs of Chinese language arts teachers such that the training they receive will be conducive to effective integration of ICT into instruction. Eighteen experienced teachers participated in a Delphi-like survey that…

  9. Technology-Enhanced EFL Syllabus Design and Materials Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Long V.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I am going to look at the issues of TESOL from one major critical point of view: How the use of the Internet technology might influence TESOL syllabus design and materials development. The article attempts to investigate some possibilities and opportunities provided by the Internet, focusing on the World Wide Web (WWW) as credible…

  10. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... equivalent to the standards established by the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Material, design and construction. 58.05-1 Section 58.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN...

  11. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equivalent to the standards established by the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Material, design and construction. 58.05-1 Section 58.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN...

  12. 46 CFR 58.05-1 - Material, design and construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... equivalent to the standards established by the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Material, design and construction. 58.05-1 Section 58.05-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN...

  13. Design of nanoporous materials with optimal sorption capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Urita, Koki; Moriguchi, Isamu; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2015-06-01

    Modern technological advances have enabled one to manufacture nanoporous materials with a prescribed pore structure. This raises a possibility of using controllable pore-scale parameters (e.g., pore size and connectivity) to design materials with desired macroscopic properties (e.g., diffusion coefficient and adsorption capacity). By relating these two scales, the homogenization theory (or other upscaling techniques) provides a means of guiding the experimental design. To demonstrate this approach, we consider a class of nanoporous materials whose pore space consists of nanotunnels interconnected by nanotube bridges. Such hierarchical nanoporous carbons with mesopores and micropores have shown high specific electric double layer capacitances and high rate capability in an organic electrolyte. We express the anisotropic diffusion coefficient and adsorption coefficient of such materials in terms of the tunnels' properties (pore radius and inter-pore throat width) and their connectivity (spacing between the adjacent tunnels and nanotube-bridge density). Our analysis is applicable for solutes that undergo a non-equilibrium Langmuir adsorption reaction on the surfaces of fluid-filled pores, but other homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions can be handled in a similar fashion. The presented results can be used to guide the design of nanoporous materials with optimal permeability and sorption capacity.

  14. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  15. The Aerospace Vehicle Interactive Design system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    The aerospace vehicle interactive design (AVID) is a computer aided design that was developed for the conceptual and preliminary design of aerospace vehicles. The AVID system evolved from the application of several design approaches in an advanced concepts environment in which both mission requirements and vehicle configurations are continually changing. The basic AVID software facilitates the integration of independent analysis programs into a design system where the programs can be executed individually for analysis or executed in groups for design iterations and parametric studies. Programs integrated into an AVID system for launch vehicle design include geometry, aerodynamics, propulsion, flight performance, mass properties, and economics.

  16. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H. C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M. F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc; Spätig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E.

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  17. GALACSI system design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ströbele, S.; La Penna, P.; Arsenault, R.; Conzelmann, R. D.; Delabre, B.; Duchateau, M.; Dorn, R.; Fedrigo, E.; Hubin, N.; Quentin, J.; Jolley, P.; Kiekebusch, M.; Kirchbauer, J. P.; Klein, B.; Kolb, J.; Kuntschner, H.; Le Louarn, M.; Lizon, J. L.; Madec, P.-Y.; Pettazzi, L.; Soenke, C.; Tordo, S.; Vernet, J.; Muradore, R.

    2012-07-01

    GALACSI is one of the Adaptive Optics (AO) systems part of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). It will use the VLT 4-Laser Guide Stars system, high speed and low noise WaveFront Sensor cameras (<1e-, 1000Hz) the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the SPARTA Real Time Computer to sharpen images and enhance faint object detectability of the MUSE Instrument. MUSE is an Integral Field Spectrograph working at wavelengths from 465nm to 930nm. GALACSI implements 2 different AO modes; in Wide Field Mode (WFM) it will perform Ground Layer AO correction and enhance the collected energy in a 0.2" by 0.2" pixel by a factor 2 at 750nm over a Field of View (FoV) of 1' by 1'. The 4 LGSs and one tip tilt reference star (R-mag <17.5) are located outside the MUSE FoV. Key requirements are to provide this performance and a very good image stability for a 1hour long integration time. In Narrow Field Mode (NFM) Laser Tomography AO will be used to reconstruct and correct the turbulence for the center field using the 4 LGSs at 15" off axis and the Near Infra Red (NIR) light of one reference star on axis for tip tilt and focus sensing. In NFM GALACSI will provide a moderate Strehl Ratio of 5% (goal 10%) at 650nm. The NFM hosts several challenges and many subsystems will be pushed to their limits. The opto mechanical design and error budgets of GALACSI is described here.

  18. Perspective: NanoMine: A material genome approach for polymer nanocomposites analysis and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, He; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yichi; Schadler, Linda S.; Chen, Wei; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are a designer class of materials where nanoscale particles, functional chemistry, and polymer resin combine to provide materials with unprecedented combinations of physical properties. In this paper, we introduce NanoMine, a data-driven web-based platform for analysis and design of polymer nanocomposite systems under the material genome concept. This open data resource strives to curate experimental and computational data on nanocomposite processing, structure, and properties, as well as to provide analysis and modeling tools that leverage curated data for material property prediction and design. With a continuously expanding dataset and toolkit, NanoMine encourages community feedback and input to construct a sustainable infrastructure that benefits nanocomposite material research and development.

  19. Neural-network-biased genetic algorithms for materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Tarak; Meenakshisundaram, Venkatesh; Simmons, David

    Machine learning tools have been progressively adopted by the materials science community to accelerate design of materials with targeted properties. However, in the search for new materials exhibiting properties and performance beyond that previously achieved, machine learning approaches are frequently limited by two major shortcomings. First, they are intrinsically interpolative. They are therefore better suited to the optimization of properties within the known range of accessible behavior than to the discovery of new materials with extremal behavior. Second, they require the availability of large datasets, which in some fields are not available and would be prohibitively expensive to produce. Here we describe a new strategy for combining genetic algorithms, neural networks and other machine learning tools, and molecular simulation to discover materials with extremal properties in the absence of pre-existing data. Predictions from progressively constructed machine learning tools are employed to bias the evolution of a genetic algorithm, with fitness evaluations performed via direct molecular dynamics simulation. We survey several initial materials design problems we have addressed with this framework and compare its performance to that of standard genetic algorithm approaches. We acknowledge the W. M. Keck Foundation for support of this work.

  20. Turning statistical physics models into materials design engines

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Khaira, Gurdaman; de Pablo, Juan J.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the success statistical physics has enjoyed at predicting the properties of materials for given parameters, the inverse problem, identifying which material parameters produce given, desired properties, is only beginning to be addressed. Recently, several methods have emerged across disciplines that draw upon optimization and simulation to create computer programs that tailor material responses to specified behaviors. However, so far the methods developed either involve black-box techniques, in which the optimizer operates without explicit knowledge of the material’s configuration space, or require carefully tuned algorithms with applicability limited to a narrow subclass of materials. Here we introduce a formalism that can generate optimizers automatically by extending statistical mechanics into the realm of design. The strength of this approach lies in its capability to transform statistical models that describe materials into optimizers to tailor them. By comparing against standard black-box optimization methods, we demonstrate how optimizers generated by this formalism can be faster and more effective, while remaining straightforward to implement. The scope of our approach includes possibilities for solving a variety of complex optimization and design problems concerning materials both in and out of equilibrium. PMID:26684770

  1. CubeSat Material Limits for Design for Demise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Jarkey, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The CubeSat form factor of nano-satellite (a satellite with a mass between one and ten kilograms) has grown in popularity due to their ease of construction and low development and launch costs. In particular, their use as student led payload design projects has increased due to the growing number of launch opportunities. CubeSats are often deployed as secondary or tertiary payloads on most US launch vehicles or they may be deployed from the ISS. The focus of this study will be on CubeSats launched from the ISS. From a space safety standpoint, the development and deployment processes for CubeSats differ significantly from that of most satellites. For large satellites, extensive design reviews and documentation are completed, including assessing requirements associated with re-entry survivability. Typical CubeSat missions selected for ISS deployment have a less rigorous review process that may not evaluate aspects beyond overall design feasibility. CubeSat design teams often do not have the resources to ensure their design is compliant with re-entry risk requirements. A study was conducted to examine methods to easily identify the maximum amount of a given material that can be used in the construction of a CubeSats without posing harm to persons on the ground. The results demonstrate that there is not a general equation or relationship that can be used for all materials; instead a limiting value must be defined for each unique material. In addition, the specific limits found for a number of generic materials that have been previously used as benchmarking materials for re-entry survivability analysis tool comparison will be discussed.

  2. CubeSat Material Limits For Design for Demise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Jarkey, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    The CubeSat form factor of nano-satellite (a satellite with a mass between one and ten kilograms) has grown in popularity due to their ease of construction and low development and launch costs. In particular, their use as student led payload design projects has increased due to the growing number of launch opportunities. CubeSats are often deployed as secondary or tertiary payloads on most US launch vehicles or they may be deployed from the ISS. The focus of this study will be on CubeSats launched from the ISS. From a space safety standpoint, the development and deployment processes for CubeSats differ significantly from that of most satellites. For large satellites, extensive design reviews and documentation are completed, including assessing requirements associated with reentry survivability. Typical CubeSat missions selected for ISS deployment have a less rigorous review process that may not evaluate aspects beyond overall design feasibility. CubeSat design teams often do not have the resources to ensure their design is compliant with reentry risk requirements. A study was conducted to examine methods to easily identify the maximum amount of a given material that can be used in the construction of a CubeSats without posing harm to persons on the ground. The results demonstrate that there is not a general equation or relationship that can be used for all materials; instead a limiting value must be defined for each unique material. In addition, the specific limits found for a number of generic materials that have been previously used as benchmarking materials for reentry survivability analysis tool comparison will be discussed.

  3. Computerized systems to provide materials selection advice

    SciTech Connect

    Krisher, A.S.

    1996-07-01

    The rapid advance of computer science has increased the ability to store and retrieve information. These new capabilities are beginning to be applied to the problem of providing sound advice to non-specialist engineers who make materials selection decisions. This paper presents an overview of the large scale systems which exist in finished or near finished form and are (or may soon be) available for use by the public. The paper focuses on systems which transfer knowledge taking into account the many qualifications which enter into the reasoning processes of materials/corrosion specialists. The paper discusses both the strengths and limitations of each system.

  4. The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M.; Arnold, E.D.

    1998-08-01

    As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

  5. Design and development of advanced castable refractory materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert Bruce

    New formulations of castable refractory composite materials were studied. This technology is used to produce low cost composite concrete structures designed for high temperature stability, superior wear resistance and improved strength. An in situ fired, castable cement installation is a heterogeneous structure divided into three zones according to the temperature history and microstructure. The properties of each zone depend on the predominant bonding mode between constituents. Each zone has a characteristic microstructure that influences the integrity of the monolith. The hot side may have a highly dense and developed network of ceramic bonds between constituent particles while the cold side may never reach temperatures sufficient to drive off free water. The thermal, structural and tribological properties depend on the microstructure and the type of bonding that holds the monolith together. The phase distributions are defined by sets of metastable phase conditions driven by the local hydrated chemistry, nearest neighbor oxide compounds, impurities and sintering temperature. Equilibrium phase diagrams were used to select optimum compositions based on higher melting point phases. The phase diagrams were also used to target high temperature phase fields that are stable over wide temperature and stoichiometric ranges. Materials selection of candidate hydraulic clinkers, high temperature oxides, and reinforcement phases were based on requirements for high temperature stability. The calcium aluminate (CaO-Al2O3) and calcium dialuminate (CaO-(Al2O3)2) are common refractory clinkers used in castable refractory cements. The thermodynamics and kinetics of cement hydrate formation are well studied and suited to become the building block of a design for a superior refractory castable cement. The inert oxides mixed with the calcium aluminate clinkers are magnesia (MgO), alumina (Al 2O3), spinel (MgAl2O4) and chromic (Cr2O3). The bulk of the experiments concentrated in the Al

  6. e-Learning in Production Systems Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakehi, Munenori; Yamada, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Michiya; Watanabe, Ichie

    The e-Learning has been focused on not only the employee training at enterprises but also the lesson at universities in Japan. Since there are many methods of instruction such as educational software, electronic bulletin boards, and slides using computers and networks, the class content cannot be developed easily in e-Learning. Therefore, the designing class content for e-learning is more important than conventional lessons. This paper discusses class content of a production system design for e-Learning. First, the study target of this lesson is determined and the story of the whole lesson is decided. Second, the structure of the learning theme is determined. Third, the educational materials including the educational software are developed and related to the content and structure. Finally, the demonstration experiments of the lesson are carried out at universities, the results of the questionnaires and tests are analyzed, and the effectiveness of the class including the educational method and the educational materials is discussed.

  7. Mechanical design engineering. NASA/university advanced design program: Lunar Bulk Material Transport Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Paul; Griner, Stewart; Hendrix, Alan; Makarov, Chris; Martiny, Stephen; Meyhoefer, Douglas Ralph; Platt, Cody Claxton; Sivak, John; Wheeler, Elizabeth Fitch

    1988-01-01

    The design of a Lunar Bulk Material Transport Vehicle (LBMTV) is discussed. Goals set in the project include a payload of 50 cubic feet of lunar soil with a lunar of approximately 800 moon-pounds, a speed of 15 mph, and the ability to handle a grade of 20 percent. Thermal control, an articulated steering mechanism, a dump mechanism, a self-righting mechanism, viable power sources, and a probable control panel are analyzed. The thermal control system involves the use of small strip heaters to heat the housing of electronic equipment in the absence of sufficient solar radiation and multi-layer insulation during periods of intense solar radiation. The entire system uses only 10 W and weighs about 60 pounds, or 10 moon-pounds. The steering mechanism is an articulated steering joint at the center of the vehicle. It utilizes two actuators and yields a turning radius of 10.3 feet. The dump mechanism rotates the bulk material container through an angle of 100 degree using one actuator. The self-righting mechanism consists of two four bar linkages, each of which is powered by the same size actuator as the other linkages. The LBMTV is powered by rechargeable batteries. A running time of at least two hours is attained under a worst case analysis. The weight of the batteries is 100 pounds. A control panel consisting of feedback and control instruments is described. The panel includes all critical information necessary to control the vehicle remotely. The LBMTV is capable of handling many types of cargo. It is able to interface with many types of removable bulk material containers. These containers are made to interface with the three-legged walker, SKITTER. The overall vehicle is about 15 feet in length and has a weight of about 1000 pounds, or 170 lunar pounds.

  8. Mechanical design engineering. NASA/university advanced design program: Lunar Bulk Material Transport Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, Paul; Griner, Stewart; Hendrix, Alan; Makarov, Chris; Martiny, Stephen; Meyhoefer, Douglas Ralph; Platt, Cody Claxton; Sivak, John; Wheeler, Elizabeth Fitch

    1988-06-01

    The design of a Lunar Bulk Material Transport Vehicle (LBMTV) is discussed. Goals set in the project include a payload of 50 cubic feet of lunar soil with a lunar of approximately 800 moon-pounds, a speed of 15 mph, and the ability to handle a grade of 20 percent. Thermal control, an articulated steering mechanism, a dump mechanism, a self-righting mechanism, viable power sources, and a probable control panel are analyzed. The thermal control system involves the use of small strip heaters to heat the housing of electronic equipment in the absence of sufficient solar radiation and multi-layer insulation during periods of intense solar radiation. The entire system uses only 10 W and weighs about 60 pounds, or 10 moon-pounds. The steering mechanism is an articulated steering joint at the center of the vehicle. It utilizes two actuators and yields a turning radius of 10.3 feet. The dump mechanism rotates the bulk material container through an angle of 100 degree using one actuator. The self-righting mechanism consists of two four bar linkages, each of which is powered by the same size actuator as the other linkages. The LBMTV is powered by rechargeable batteries. A running time of at least two hours is attained under a worst case analysis. The weight of the batteries is 100 pounds. A control panel consisting of feedback and control instruments is described. The panel includes all critical information necessary to control the vehicle remotely. The LBMTV is capable of handling many types of cargo. It is able to interface with many types of removable bulk material containers. These containers are made to interface with the three-legged walker, SKITTER. The overall vehicle is about 15 feet in length and has a weight of about 1000 pounds, or 170 lunar pounds.

  9. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-02-04

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  10. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, R. W.

    2004-02-01

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited.

  11. New Perspectives in Thermoelectric Energy Recovery System Design Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Karri, Naveen K.; Hogan, Tim P.; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2013-07-01

    It is highly desirable to develop technologies that recover the large amounts of waste heat generated worldwide in industrial processes, automotive transportation, diesel engine exhaust, military generators, and incinerators to increase fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 production and the environmental footprint of these applications. Recent work has investigated new thermoelectric (TE) materials and systems that can operate at higher performance levels and show a viable pathway to lightweight, small-form-factor, advanced thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems to recover waste heat in many of these applications. New TE materials include nanocomposite materials such as lead-antimony-silver-telluride (LAST) and lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride (LASTT) compounds. These new materials have created opportunities for high-performance, segmented-element TE devices. New higher-performance TE devices segmenting LAST/LASTT materials with bismuth telluride have been designed and fabricated. Sectioned TEG systems using these new TE devices and materials have been designed. Integrated heat exchanger/TE device system analyses of sectioned TE system designs have been performed, creating unique efficiency-power maps that provide better understanding and comparisons of design tradeoffs and nominal and off-nominal system performance conditions. New design perspectives and mathematical foundations in optimization of sectioned TE design approaches are discussed that provide insight on how to optimize such sectioned TE systems. System performance analyses using ANSYS® TE modeling capabilities have integrated heat exchanger performance models with ANSYS® TE models to extend its analysis capabilities beyond simple constant hot-side and cold-side temperature conditions. Analysis results portray external resistance effects, matched load conditions, and maximum power versus maximum efficiency points simultaneously, and show that maximum TE power occurs at external resistances slightly

  12. Simulation, Design Abstraction, and SystemC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harcourt, Ed

    2007-01-01

    SystemC is a system-level design and simulation language based on C++. We've been using SystemC for computer organization and design projects for the past several years. Because SystemC is embedded in C++ it contains the powerful abstraction mechanisms of C++ not found in traditional hardware description languages, such as support for…

  13. Design of electro-active polymer gels as actuator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Suzana

    Smart materials, alternatively called active or adaptive, differ from passive materials in their sensing and activation capability. These materials can sense changes in environment such as: electric field, magnetic field, UV light, pH, temperature. They are capable of responding in numerous ways. Some change their stiffness properties (electro-rheological fluids), other deform (piezos, shape memory alloys, electrostrictive materials) or change optic properties (electrochromic polymers). Polymer gels are one of such materials which can change the shape, volume and even optical properties upon different applied stimuli. Due to their low stiffness property they are capable of having up to 100% of strain in a short time, order of seconds. Their motion resembles the one of biosystems, and they are often seen as possible artificial muscle materials. Despite their delicate nature, appropriate design can make them being used as actuator materials which can form controllable surfaces and mechanical switches. In this study several different groups of polymer gel material were investigated: (a) acrylamide based gels are sensitive to pH and electric field and respond in volume change, (b) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) gel is sensitive to pH and electric field and responds in axial strain and bending, (c) polyvinylalcohol (PVA) gel is sensitive to electric field and responds in axial strain and bending and (d) perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane, Nafion RTM, is sensitive to electric field and responds in bending. Electro-mechanical and chemo-mechanical behavior of these materials is a function of a variety of phenomena: polymer structure, affinity of polymer to the solvent, charge distribution within material, type of solvent, elasticity of polymer matrix, etc. Modeling of this behavior is a task aimed to identify what is driving mechanism for activation and express it in a quantitative way in terms of deformation of material. In this work behavior of the most promising material as

  14. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsell, Brian; Campbell, Michael; Fitton, Michael; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; Nakadaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    A compact fatigue testing machine that can be easily inserted into a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use has been carefully considered by limiting the size and weight of the machine, simplifying sample loading and test setup for operation via master-slave manipulator, and utilizing an efficient design to minimize maintenance. Funded from a US-Japan collaborative effort, the machine has been specifically designed to help characterize titanium material specimens. These specimens are flat cantilevered beams for initial studies, possibly utilizing samples irradiated at other sources of beam. The option to test spherically shaped samples cut from the T2K vacuum window is also available. The machine is able to test a sample to $10^7$ cycles in under a week, with options to count cycles and sense material failure. The design of this machine will be presented along with current status.

  15. Systems and methods for predicting materials properties

    DOEpatents

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Fischer, Chris; Tibbetts, Kevin; Morgan, Dane; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2007-11-06

    Systems and methods for predicting features of materials of interest. Reference data are analyzed to deduce relationships between the input data sets and output data sets. Reference data includes measured values and/or computed values. The deduced relationships can be specified as equations, correspondences, and/or algorithmic processes that produce appropriate output data when suitable input data is used. In some instances, the output data set is a subset of the input data set, and computational results may be refined by optionally iterating the computational procedure. To deduce features of a new material of interest, a computed or measured input property of the material is provided to an equation, correspondence, or algorithmic procedure previously deduced, and an output is obtained. In some instances, the output is iteratively refined. In some instances, new features deduced for the material of interest are added to a database of input and output data for known materials.

  16. Designer Nanocellular Materials for Laser Targets and Other DNT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Satcher, Jr, J H; Hsiung, L M; Baumann, T F; Maxwell, R S; Chinn, S C; Hodge, A M; Biener, J; Landingham, R L

    2005-01-07

    Overview. This document and the accompanying manuscripts summarize the technical accomplishments of our one-year LDRD-ER effort, a project that has since been incorporated into a larger LDRD-SI for FY05. The objective of this effort was to develop a predictive synthetic capability for the preparation of materials with cellular architectures (sub-micron pore or cell sizes and relative densities less than 10% of full density) not attainable by conventional methods. The ability to reliably prepare these nanocellular materials and control their bulk physical properties (e.g. mechanical strength) would be a considerable advance in the areas of porous materials and its impact would cut across many existing LLNL investments. One significant area related to the Laboratory mission that would benefit is the design of new materials for high energy density physics (HEDP) targets. Current synthetic techniques do not allow for the preparation of foams that meet all of the current and projected compositional and mechanical requirements of these experiments. This project focused on two main types of materials: inorganic sol-gel materials and nanocellular metal foams. The following sections describe the project goals for these two types of materials as well as the progress made towards these goals in FY04. These sections also provide context for the three publications that have been included in this final report.

  17. Materials by Design-A Perspective From Atoms to Structures.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J

    2013-02-01

    Biological materials are effectively synthesized, controlled, and used for a variety of purposes-in spite of limitations in energy, quality, and quantity of their building blocks. Whereas the chemical composition of materials in the living world plays a some role in achieving functional properties, the way components are connected at different length scales defines what material properties can be achieved, how they can be altered to meet functional requirements, and how they fail in disease states and other extreme conditions. Recent work has demonstrated this by using large-scale computer simulations to predict materials properties from fundamental molecular principles, combined with experimental work and new mathematical techniques to categorize complex structure-property relationships into a systematic framework. Enabled by such categorization, we discuss opportunities based on the exploitation of concepts from distinct hierarchical systems that share common principles in how function is created, linking music to materials science. PMID:24163499

  18. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  19. Rational material design for ultrafast rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Wenlong; Ma, Bing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are important electrochemical energy storage devices for consumer electronics and emerging electrical/hybrid vehicles. However, one of the formidable challenges is to develop ultrafast charging LIBs with the rate capability at least one order of magnitude (>10 C) higher than that of the currently commercialized LIBs. This tutorial review presents the state-of-the-art developments in ultrafast charging LIBs by the rational design of materials. First of all, fundamental electrochemistry and related ionic/electronic conduction theories identify that the rate capability of LIBs is kinetically limited by the sluggish solid-state diffusion process in electrode materials. Then, several aspects of the intrinsic materials, materials engineering and processing, and electrode materials architecture design towards maximizing both ionic and electronic conductivity in the electrode with a short diffusion length are deliberated. Finally, the future trends and perspectives for the ultrafast rechargeable LIBs are discussed. Continuous rapid progress in this area is essential and urgent to endow LIBs with ultrafast charging capability to meet huge demands in the near future. PMID:25857819

  20. Meteorological radar facility. Part 1: System design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brassaw, L. L., Jr.; Hamren, S. D.; Mullins, W. H.; Schweitzer, B. P.

    1976-01-01

    A compilation of information regarding systems design of space shuttles used in meteorological radar probes is presented. Necessary radar equipment is delineated, while space system elements, calibration techniques, antenna systems and other subsystems are reviewed.

  1. Sensor-based material tagging system

    SciTech Connect

    Vercellotti, L.C.; Cox, R.W.; Ravas, R.J.; Schlotterer, J.C. . Science and Technology Center)

    1991-01-01

    Electronic identification tags are being developed for tracking material and personnel. In applying electronic identification tags to radioactive materials safeguards, it is important to measure attributes of the material to ensure that the tag remains with the material. The addition of a microcontroller with an on-board analog-to-digital converter to an electronic identification tag application-specific integrated-circuit has been demonstrated as means to provide the tag with sensor data. Each tag is assembled into a housing, which serves as a scale for measuring the weight of a paint-can-sized container and its contents. Temperature rise of the can above ambient is also measured, and a piezoelectric detector detects disturbances and immediately puts the tag into its alarm and beacon mode. Radiation measurement was also considered, but the background from nearby containers was found to be excessive. The sensor-based tagging system allows tracking of the material in cans as it is stored in vaults or is moved through the manufacturing process. The paper presents details of the sensor-based material tagging system and describes a demonstration system.

  2. Sensor-based material tagging system

    SciTech Connect

    Vercellotti, L.C.; Cox, R.W.; Ravas, R.J.; Schlotterer, J.C.

    1991-12-31

    Electronic identification tags are being developed for tracking material and personnel. In applying electronic identification tags to radioactive materials safeguards, it is important to measure attributes of the material to ensure that the tag remains with the material. The addition of a microcontroller with an on-board analog-to-digital converter to an electronic identification tag application-specific integrated-circuit has been demonstrated as means to provide the tag with sensor data. Each tag is assembled into a housing, which serves as a scale for measuring the weight of a paint-can-sized container and its contents. Temperature rise of the can above ambient is also measured, and a piezoelectric detector detects disturbances and immediately puts the tag into its alarm and beacon mode. Radiation measurement was also considered, but the background from nearby containers was found to be excessive. The sensor-based tagging system allows tracking of the material in cans as it is stored in vaults or is moved through the manufacturing process. The paper presents details of the sensor-based material tagging system and describes a demonstration system.

  3. Multiobjective control design including performance robustness for gust alleviation of a wing with adaptive material actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, Jeffrey B.

    1997-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to examine the use of covariance control to directly design reduced-order multi-objective controllers for gust alleviation using adaptive materials as the control effector. It will use piezoelectric actuators as control effectors in a finite element model of a full-size wing model. More precisely, the finite element model is of the F-16 Agile Falcon/Active Flexible Wing that is modified to use piezoelectric actuators as control effectors. The paper will also examine the interacting roles of important control design constraints and objectives for designing an aeroservoelastic system. The paper will also present some results of multiobjective control design for the model, illustrating the benefits and complexity of modern practical control design for aeroservoelastic systems that use adaptive materials for actuation.

  4. Bioinspiration from fish for smart material design and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauder, G. V.; Madden, P. G. A.; Tangorra, J. L.; Anderson, E.; Baker, T. V.

    2011-09-01

    Fish are a potentially rich source of inspiration for the design of smart materials. Fish exemplify the use of flexible materials to generate forces during locomotion, and a hallmark of fish functional design is the use of body and fin deformation to power propulsion and maneuvering. As a result of nearly 500 million years of evolutionary experimentation, fish design has a number of interesting features of note to materials engineers. In this paper we first provide a brief general overview of some key features of the mechanical design of fish, and then focus on two key properties of fish: the bilaminar mechanical design of bony fish fin rays that allows active muscular control of curvature, and the role of body flexibility in propulsion. After describing the anatomy of bony fish fin rays, we provide new data on their mechanical properties. Three-point bending tests and measurement of force inputs to and outputs from the fin rays show that these fin rays are effective displacement transducers. Fin rays in different regions of the fin differ considerably in their material properties, and in the curvature produced by displacement of one of the two fin ray halves. The mean modulus for the proximal (basal) region of the fin rays was 1.34 GPa, but this varied from 0.24 to 3.7 GPa for different fin rays. The distal fin region was less stiff, and moduli for the different fin rays measured varied from 0.11 to 0.67 GPa. These data are similar to those for human tendons (modulus around 0.5 GPa). Analysis of propulsion using flexible foils controlled using a robotic flapping device allows investigation of the effect of altering flexural stiffness on swimming speed. Flexible foils with the leading edge moved in a heave show a distinct peak in propulsive performance, while the addition of pitch input produces a broad plateau where the swimming speed is relatively unaffected by the flexural stiffness. Our understanding of the material design of fish and the control of tissue

  5. Human Factors Considerations in System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. M. (Editor); Vanbalen, P. M. (Editor); Moe, K. L. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Human factors considerations in systems design was examined. Human factors in automated command and control, in the efficiency of the human computer interface and system effectiveness are outlined. The following topics are discussed: human factors aspects of control room design; design of interactive systems; human computer dialogue, interaction tasks and techniques; guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms and highly automated environments; system engineering for control by humans; conceptual models of information processing; information display and interaction in real time environments.

  6. Expert system to design communications circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, L.F.; Vahle, M.O.

    1986-07-01

    An expert system has been created to aid the design of fiber optic based communications circuits. The design system is based on an Apollo workstation, LISP and CPSL, an in-house developed expert system language. The optical circuit is taken from design specification through hardware selection and circuit routing to the production of detailed schematics and routing guides. A database containing the entire fiber optic trunk system is also maintained.

  7. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  8. Fire water systems in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sundt, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    Due to corrosion problems in fire water systems offshore there is a need for a corrosion resistant material to improve the reliability of onboard fire fighting systems. Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe is seen as a cost effective and light weight alternative to metals. Through a test program run by AMAT, Advanced Materials a/s in collaboration with the Norwegian Fire and Research Laboratory (NBL, SINTEF), GRE pipes have proved to be viable materials for offshore fire water systems. The test program included furnace testing, jetfire testing and simulated explosion testing. GRE pipes (2--12 inches) from two suppliers were fire tested and evaluated. Both adhesively bonded joints and flange connections were tested. During the course of the project, application methods of passive fire protection and nozzle attachments were improved.

  9. New Perspectives in Thermoelectric Energy Recovery System Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Karri, Naveen K.; Hogan, Tim; Cauchy, Charles J.

    2013-02-12

    Abstract: Large amounts of waste heat are generated worldwide in industrial processes, automotive transportation, diesel engine exhaust, military generators, and incinerators because 60-70% of the fuel energy is typically lost in these processes. There is a strong need to develop technologies that recover this waste heat to increase fuel efficiency and minimize fuel requirements in these industrial processes, automotive and heavy vehicle engines, diesel generators, and incinerators. There are additional requirements to reduce CO2 production and environmental footprints in many of these applications. Recent work with the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program office has investigated new thermoelectric (TE) materials and systems that can operate at higher performance levels and show a viable pathway to lightweight, small form-factor, advanced thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems to recover waste heat in many of these applications. New TE materials include nano-composite materials such as lead-antimony-silver-telluride (LAST) and lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride (LASTT) compounds. These new materials have created opportunities for high-performance, segmented-element TE devices. New higher-performance TE devices segmenting LAST/LASTT materials with bismuth telluride have been designed and fabricated. Sectioned TEG systems using these new TE devices and materials have been designed. Integrated heat exchanger/TE device system analyses of sectioned TE system designs have been performed creating unique efficiency-power maps that provide better understandings and comparisons of design tradeoffs and nominal and off-nominal system performance conditions. New design perspectives in optimization of sectioned TE design approaches are discussed that provide insight on how to optimize such sectioned TE systems. System performance analyses using ANSYS® TE modeling capabilities have integrated heat exchanger performance models with ANSYS® TE models to extend

  10. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  11. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  12. Design of easily testable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rawat, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis presents structured testability techniques that can be applied to systolic arrays. Systolic arrays for signal processing have produced processing rates far in excess of general-purpose architecture. Fast testing is considered as one of the design criteria. The main goal is to derive test vectors for one- and two-dimensional systolic arrays. The author seeks to keep the number of test vectors independent of the size of the array under a generic fault model. The testable design is based on pseudo-exhaustive testing. Conventional testing uses Level Sensitive Scan Detection (LSSD) techniques which are very time consuming for an array of systolic processors. By making the testability analysis early the logic designer will be able to make early (and repeated) design trade-offs that make design for testability a simple extension of the design process. The author shows how one-dimensional sequential systolic arrays can be designed so that the faults can be easily detected and isolated. He also considers unilateral two-dimensional sequential arrays and suggests modifications to make them easily testable. Finally, he shows how a modified carry look ahead adder of arbitrary size can be tested with just 136 test vectors. Comparisons are made against the standard LSSD technique.

  13. Biodeterioration of materials in water reclamation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Tim; Maki, James S.; Mitchell, Ralph

    1992-01-01

    The chemicals produced by the microbial processes involved in the 'biofilms' which form on the surfaces of manned spacecraft water reclamation systems encompass both metals and organic poisons; both are potential hazards to astronaut health and the growth of the plants envisioned for closed-cycle life support systems. Image analysis is here shown to be a very useful technique for the study of biofilm formation on candidate water-processor materials for Space Station Freedom. The biodeterioration of materials exposed to biofilms can be swiftly evaluated by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  14. Material Technologies for Smart Antenna in the Space Wireless System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rong

    In the space communication system, the smart antenna techniques are expected to have a significant impact on the efficient use of the spectrum, the minimization of the cost and adaption to the space environment. The features of smart antenna need to be considered early in the design phase of wireless systems, and realistic performance evaluation of smart antenna technique needs to be performed according to the critical parameters associated with systems requirements. In this article, an overview of the benefits of and advances of material technology in smart antenna is given, such as the reconfigurability in varying conditions of space environment. Mechanically reconfigurable materials have the potential to provide a large range of antenna reconfiguration with lower cost. Some smart material technologies, namely electro-active polymers and shape memory alloy actuators, are presented as potential candidates to implement mechanically reconfigurable antennas. And a approach is investigated by using PZT materials that switch into contact using voltage signals to reconfigure the structure and hence produce a tunable antenna. Meanwhile, the design of suitable simulation methodology and some proof-of-concept reconfigurable antenna prototypes using the above material technologies are presented. At last, the prospect for the applications of smart antenna materials is described.

  15. Design, chirality, and flexibility in nanoporous molecule-based materials.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, D; Claridge, J B; Cussen, E J; Prior, T J; Rosseinsky, M J

    2005-04-01

    Scientific and technological interest in porous materials with molecule-sized channels and cavities has led to an intense search for controlled chemical routes to systems with specific properties. This Account details our work on directing the assembly of open-framework structures based on molecules and investigating how the response of nanoporous examples of such materials to guests differs from classical rigid porous systems. The stabilization of chiral nanoporosity by a hierarchy of interactions that both direct and maintain a helical open-framework structure exemplifies the approach. PMID:15835874

  16. Preliminary materials assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, R.R.; Jamieson, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Presently, there are two SPS reference design concepts (one using silicon solar cells; the other using gallium arsenide solar cells). A materials assessment of both systems was performed based on the materials lists set forth in the DOE/NASA SPS Reference System Report: Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This listing identified 22 materials (plus miscellaneous and organics) used in the SPS. Tracing the production processes for these 22 materials, a total demand for over 20 different bulk materials (copper, silicon, sulfuric acid, etc.) and nealy 30 raw materials (copper ore, sand, sulfur ore, etc.) was revealed. Assessment of these SPS material requirements produced a number of potential material supply problems. The more serious problems are those associated with the solar cell materials (gallium, gallium arsenide, sapphire, and solar grade silicon), and the graphite fiber required for the satellite structure and space construction facilities. In general, the gallium arsenide SPS option exhibits more serious problems than the silicon option, possibly because gallium arsenide technology is not as well developed as that for silicon. Results are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

  17. Material Systems for Blast-Energy Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    James Schondel; Henry S. Chu

    2010-10-01

    Lightweight panels have been designed to protect buildings and vehicles from blast pressures by activating energy dissipation mechanisms under the influence of blast loading. Panels were fabricated which featured a variety of granular materials and hydraulic dissipative deformation mechanisms and the test articles were subjected to full-scale blast loading. The force time-histories transmitted by each technology were measured by a novel method that utilized inexpensive custom-designed force sensors. The array of tests revealed that granular materials can effectively dissipate blast energy if they are employed in a way that they easily crush and rearrange. Similarly, hydraulic dissipation can effectively dissipate energy if the panel features a high fraction of porosity and the panel encasement features low compressive stiffness.

  18. Phase Change Material Systems for High Temperature Heat Storage.

    PubMed

    Perraudin, David Y S; Binder, Selmar R; Rezaei, Ehsan; Ortonaa, Alberto; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, cost effective, and stable high-temperature heat storage material systems are important in applications such as high-temperature industrial processes (metal processing, cement and glass manufacturing, etc.), or electricity storage using advanced adiabatic compressed air energy storage. Incorporating phase change media into heat storage systems provides an advantage of storing and releasing heat at nearly constant temperature, allowing steady and optimized operation of the downstream processes. The choice of, and compatibility of materials and encapsulation for the phase change section is crucial, as these must guarantee good and stable performance and long lifetime at low cost. Detailed knowledge of the material properties and stability, and the coupled heat transfer, phase change, and fluid flow are required to allow for performance and lifetime predictions. We present coupled experimental-numerical techniques allowing prediction of the long-term performance of a phase change material-based high-temperature heat storage system. The experimental investigations focus on determination of material properties (melting temperature, heat of fusion, etc.) and phase change material and encapsulation interaction (stability, interface reactions, etc.). The computational investigations focus on an understanding of the multi-mode heat transfer, fluid flow, and phase change processes in order to design the material system for enhanced performance. The importance of both the experimental and numerical approaches is highlighted and we give an example of how both approaches can be complementarily used for the investigation of long-term performance. PMID:26842330

  19. Rational Design of Pathogen-Mimicking Amphiphilic Materials as Nanoadjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulery, Bret D.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; Phanse, Yashdeep; Kong, Chang Sun; Broderick, Scott R.; Kumar, Devender; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Rajan, Krishna; Wannemuehler, Michael J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2011-12-01

    An opportunity exists today for cross-cutting research utilizing advances in materials science, immunology, microbial pathogenesis, and computational analysis to effectively design the next generation of adjuvants and vaccines. This study integrates these advances into a bottom-up approach for the molecular design of nanoadjuvants capable of mimicking the immune response induced by a natural infection but without the toxic side effects. Biodegradable amphiphilic polyanhydrides possess the unique ability to mimic pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns with respect to persisting within and activating immune cells, respectively. The molecular properties responsible for the pathogen-mimicking abilities of these materials have been identified. The value of using polyanhydride nanovaccines was demonstrated by the induction of long-lived protection against a lethal challenge of Yersinia pestis following a single administration ten months earlier. This approach has the tantalizing potential to catalyze the development of next generation vaccines against diseases caused by emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  20. Exascale Co-design for Modeling Materials in Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Germann, Timothy C.

    2014-07-08

    Computational materials science has provided great insight into the response of materials under extreme conditions that are difficult to probe experimentally. For example, shock-induced plasticity and phase transformation processes in single-crystal and nanocrystalline metals have been widely studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, and many of these predictions are beginning to be tested at advanced 4th generation light sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). I will describe our simulation predictions and their recent verification at LCLS, outstanding challenges in modeling the response of materials to extreme mechanical and radiation environments, and our efforts to tackle these as part of the multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx). ExMatEx has initiated an early and deep collaboration between domain (computational materials) scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and hardware architects, in order to establish the relationships between algorithms, software stacks, and architectures needed to enable exascale-ready materials science application codes within the next decade. We anticipate that we will be able to exploit hierarchical, heterogeneous architectures to achieve more realistic large-scale simulations with adaptive physics refinement, and are using tractable application scale-bridging proxy application testbeds to assess new approaches and requirements. Such current scale-bridging strategies accumulate (or recompute) a distributed response database from fine-scale calculations, in a top-down rather than bottom-up multiscale approach.

  1. Design data brochure: Solar hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A design calculation is detailed for a single-family residence housing a family of four in a nonspecific geographical area. The solar water heater system is designed to provide 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day.

  2. Thermo-magnetic materials for use in designing intelligent actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Yoshimutsu; Yoshimura, Fumikatsu; Hatakeyama, Iwao; Ishii, Yoshikazu

    1994-12-31

    The authors present the concept of an intelligent thermal actuator designed by using thermally sensitive magnetic materials. The use of the magnetic transition of FeRh alloy is very effective in increasing the actuator functions. These functions are freedom of direction, tuning temperature, and increasing both sensitivity and power. Two new types of actuator, a remote controlled optical driven thermo-magnetic motor and a temperature sensitive spring-less valve, are proposed and experimental results are shown.

  3. Advanced Turbine Systems Program: Conceptual design and product development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Objective is to provide the conceptual design and product development plant for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000 (secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS). This report addresses the remaining 7 of the 9 subtasks in Task 8, Design and Test of Critical Components: catalytic combustion, recuperator, high- temperature turbine disc, advanced control system, and ceramic materials.

  4. Conceptual spacecraft systems design and synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L.; Deryder, D. D.; Ferebee, M. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive systems design and synthesis is performed on future spacecraft concepts using the Interactive Design and Evaluation of Advanced Systems (IDEAS) computer-aided design and analysis system. The capabilities and advantages of the systems-oriented interactive computer-aided design and analysis system are described. The synthesis of both large antenna and space station concepts, and space station evolutionary growth designs is demonstrated. The IDEAS program provides the user with both an interactive graphics and an interactive computing capability which consists of over 40 multidisciplinary synthesis and analysis modules. Thus, the user can create, analyze, and conduct parametric studies and modify earth-orbiting spacecraft designs (space stations, large antennas or platforms, and technologically advanced spacecraft) at an interactive terminal with relative ease. The IDEAS approach is useful during the conceptual design phase of advanced space missions when a multiplicity of parameters and concepts must be analyzed and evaluated in a cost-effective and timely manner.

  5. Systems design of long-life systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A long-life system is defined as a system which cannot be life-tested in its operational environment. Another restriction is that preventive maintenance and repair shall be either impossible or economically disadvantageous. Examples of such systems include planetary spacecraft, communication satellites, undersea telephone cables, and nuclear power plants. The questions discussed are related to the implementation of system functions, approaches to determine the required level of system reliability, and aspects of tradeoffs between requirements and reliability.

  6. Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

    2005-01-01

    Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

  7. Residential solar-heating system - design brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design brochure for commercially-available solar-heating system is valuable to architects, engineers, and designers. It contains information on system configuration, system sizing, and mechanical layout. Drawings and specifications of all components and typical installation details are included in appendix.

  8. Macroscopic shock plasticity of brittle material through designed void patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tailong; Yu, Yin; He, Hongliang; Li, Yongqiang; Huan, Qiang; Wu, Jiankui

    2016-03-01

    The rapid propagation and coalescence of cracks and catastrophic fractures, which occur often under shock compression, compromise a brittle material's design function and restrict its scope of practical application. The shock plasticity of brittle materials can be improved significantly by introducing and designing its microstructure, which can help reduce or delay failure. We used a lattice-spring model, which can describe elastic deformation and brittle fracture of modeled material accurately, to study the influence of void distributions (random, square, hexagonal, and triangular void patterns) on the macroscopic shock response and the mesoscopic deformation feature of brittle materials. Calculated results indicate that the void patterns dominate two inelastic deformation stages on the Hugoniot stress-strain curves (the collapse deformation stage and the slippage deformation stage). It shows that the strain localization is not strong and that the broken media are closer to a round bulk when the samples exist in random and triangular void patterns. This favors an increase in deformation during the slippage deformation stage. For the samples with square and hexagonal void patterns, the strain localization is strong and the broken media are closer to columnar bulks, which favors an increase in deformation during the collapse deformation stage.

  9. Textile materials for the design of wearable antennas: a survey.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

  10. Textile Materials for the Design of Wearable Antennas: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Rita; Loss, Caroline; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Pinho, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    In the broad context of Wireless Body Sensor Networks for healthcare and pervasive applications, the design of wearable antennas offers the possibility of ubiquitous monitoring, communication and energy harvesting and storage. Specific requirements for wearable antennas are a planar structure and flexible construction materials. Several properties of the materials influence the behaviour of the antenna. For instance, the bandwidth and the efficiency of a planar microstrip antenna are mainly determined by the permittivity and the thickness of the substrate. The use of textiles in wearable antennas requires the characterization of their properties. Specific electrical conductive textiles are available on the market and have been successfully used. Ordinary textile fabrics have been used as substrates. However, little information can be found on the electromagnetic properties of regular textiles. Therefore this paper is mainly focused on the analysis of the dielectric properties of normal fabrics. In general, textiles present a very low dielectric constant that reduces the surface wave losses and increases the impedance bandwidth of the antenna. However, textile materials are constantly exchanging water molecules with the surroundings, which affects their electromagnetic properties. In addition, textile fabrics are porous, anisotropic and compressible materials whose thickness and density might change with low pressures. Therefore it is important to know how these characteristics influence the behaviour of the antenna in order to minimize unwanted effects. This paper presents a survey of the key points for the design and development of textile antennas, from the choice of the textile materials to the framing of the antenna. An analysis of the textile materials that have been used is also presented. PMID:23202235

  11. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  12. Interstellar material in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    All the substance of the Earth and other terrestrial planets once existed in the form of interstellar grains and gas. A major aspect of solar system formation (and undoubtedly of star formation generally) is the complex series of processes that converted infalling interstellar grains into planets. A cryptic record of these processes is preserved in certain samples of planetary materials, such as chondritic meteorites, that were preserved in a relatively unchanged form since the beginning. It is to be expected that some of these primitive materials might contain or even consist of preserved presolar interstellar grains. The identification and study of such grains, the ancestors of our planetary system, is a matter of intense interest. Types of primitive material accessible or potentially accessible, and component of or relationship to presolar interstellar grains are discussed.

  13. Corrosion performance of materials for advanced combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Yanez-Herrero, M.; Fornasieri, C.

    1993-12-01

    Conceptual designs of advanced combustion systems that utilize coal as a feedstock require high-temperature furnaces and heat transfer surfaces capable of operating at more elevated temperatures than those prevalent in current coal-fired power plants. The combination of elevated temperatures and hostile combustion environments necessitates development/application of advanced ceramic materials in these designs. This report characterizes the chemistry of coal-fired combustion environments over the wide temperature range that is of interest in these systems and discusses preliminary experimental results on several materials (alumina, Hexoloy, SiC/SiC, SiC/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, ZIRCONIA, INCONEL 677 and 617) with potential for application in these systems.

  14. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1994-12-31

    The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

  15. Second generation thermal imaging system design trades modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vroombout, Leo O.

    1990-10-01

    The Night Vision Laboratory static performance model is considered for thermal viewing systems. Since the model is not initially intended to be a design tool and is not usable for conducting system or component design trades, it has to be restructured. The approach to updating the first-generation static performance model and to configuring it as a design tool is presented. Second-generation imaging systems exploit infrared focal-plane arrays, high-reliability cryogenic coolers, precision scanning devices, and high-speed digital electronics. They also use optical materials and coatings and optomechanical and electronics packaging techniques.

  16. Anatomy of a control system; a system designer`s view

    SciTech Connect

    Magyary, S.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) control system is quite unconventional in its design and implementation. This paper discusses the system design considerations, the actual implementation, hardware and software costs, and the measured performance across all layers of the system.

  17. Decentralized nuclear materials management system at SNLA

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the approach that Sandia took in deciding to implement a nuclear material control and accountability system on a stand-alone minicomputer despite the existence of a Univac 1108 and Univac 1100/82 centralized facility. The benefits which have been obtained by the decentralization and future applications are discussed.

  18. Distilled Water Distribution Systems. Laboratory Design Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, J.C.

    Factors concerning water distribution systems, including an evaluation of materials and a recommendation of materials best suited for service in typical facilities are discussed. Several installations are discussed in an effort to bring out typical features in selected applications. The following system types are included--(1) industrial…

  19. Designs and Materials for Better Coronagraph Occulting Masks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2010-01-01

    New designs, and materials appropriate for such designs, are under investigation in an effort to develop coronagraph occulting masks having broad-band spectral characteristics superior to those currently employed. These designs and materials are applicable to all coronagraphs, both ground-based and spaceborne. This effort also offers potential benefits for the development of other optical masks and filters that are required (1) for precisely tailored spatial transmission profiles, (2) to be characterized by optical-density neutrality and phase neutrality (that is, to be characterized by constant optical density and constant phase over broad wavelength ranges), and/or (3) not to exhibit optical- density-dependent phase shifts. The need for this effort arises for the following reasons: Coronagraph occulting masks are required to impose, on beams of light transmitted through them, extremely precise control of amplitude and phase according to carefully designed transmission profiles. In the original application that gave rise to this effort, the concern has been to develop broad-band occulting masks for NASA s Terrestrial Planet Finder coronagraph. Until now, experimental samples of these masks have been made from high-energy-beam-sensitive (HEBS) glass, which becomes locally dark where irradiated with a high-energy electron beam, the amount of darkening depending on the electron-beam energy and dose. Precise mask profiles have been written on HEBS glass blanks by use of electron beams, and the masks have performed satisfactorily in monochromatic light. However, the optical-density and phase profiles of the HEBS masks vary significantly with wavelength; consequently, the HEBS masks perform unsatisfactorily in broad-band light. The key properties of materials to be used in coronagraph occulting masks are their extinction coefficients, their indices of refraction, and the variations of these parameters with wavelength. The effort thus far has included theoretical

  20. Assembly design system based on engineering connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wensheng

    2016-05-01

    An assembly design system is an important part of computer-aided design systems, which are important tools for realizing product concept design. The traditional assembly design system does not record the connection information of production on the engineering layer; consequently, the upstream design idea cannot be fully used in the downstream design. An assembly design model based on the relationship of engineering connection is presented. In this model, all nodes are divided into two categories: The component and the connection. Moreover, the product is constructed on the basis of the connection relationship of the components. The model is an And/Or graph and has the ability to record all assembly schemes. This model records only the connection information that has engineering application value in the product design. In addition, this model can significantly reduce the number of combinations, and is very favorable for the assembly sequence planning in the downstream. The system contains a connection knowledge system that can be mapped to the connection node, and the connection knowledge obtained in practice can be returned to the knowledge system. Finally, VC++ 6.0 is used to develop a prototype system called Connect-based Assembly Planning (CAP). The relationship between the CAP system and the commercial assembly design system is also established.

  1. New approach to design of ceramic/polymer material compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todt, A.; Nestler, D.; Trautmann, M.; Wagner, G.

    2016-03-01

    The damage tolerance of carbon fibre-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials depends on their porosity and can be rather significant. Complex structures are difficult to produce. The integration of simple geometric structures of ceramic-matrix composite materials in complex polymer-based hybrid structures is a possible approach of realising those structures. These hybrid material compounds, produced in a cost-efficient way, combine the different advantages of the individual components in one hybrid material compound. In addition the individual parts can be designed to fit a specific application and the resulting forces. All these different advantages result in a significant reduction of not only the production costs and the production time, but also opens up new areas of application, such as the large-scale production of wear-resistant and chemically inert, energy dampening components for reactors or in areas of medicine. The low wettability of the ceramic component however is a disadvantage of this approach. During the course of this contribution, different C/C composite materials with a specific porosity were produced, while adjusting the resin/hardening agent-ratio, as well as the processing parameters. After the production, different penetration tests were conducted with a polymer component. The final part of the article is comprised of the microstructural analysis and the explanation of the mechanical relationships.

  2. Composite material systems for hydrogen management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangborn, R. N.; Queeney, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The task of managing hydrogen entry into elevated temperature structural materials employed in turbomachinery is a critical engineering area for propulsion systems employing hydrogen or decomposable hydrocarbons as fuel. Extant structural materials, such as the Inconel series, are embrittled by the ingress of hydrogen in service, leading to a loss of endurance and general deterioration of load-bearing dependability. Although the development of hydrogen-insensitive material systems is an obvious engineering option, to date insensitive systems cannot meet the time-temperature-loading service extremes encountered. A short-term approach that is both feasible and technologically sound is the development and employment of hydrogen barrier coatings. The present project is concerned with developing, analyzing, and physically testing laminate composite hydrogen barrier systems, employing Inconel 718 as the structural material to be protected. Barrier systems will include all metallic, metallic-to-ceramic, and, eventually, metallic/ceramic composites as the lamellae. Since space propulsion implies repetitive engine firings without earth-based inspection and repair, coating durability will be closely examined, and testing regimes will include repetitive thermal cycling to simulate damage accumulation. The target accomplishments include: generation of actual hydrogen permeation data for metallic, ceramic-metallic, and hybrid metallic/ceramic composition barrier systems, practically none of which is currently extant; definition of physical damage modes imported to barrier systems due to thermal cycling, both transient temperature profiles and steady-state thermal mismatch stress states being examined as sources of damage; and computational models that incorporate general laminate schemes as described above, including manufacturing realities such as porosity, and whatever defects are introduced through service and characterized during the experimental programs.

  3. Making intelligent systems team players: Overview for designers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a guide and companion to the NASA Technical Memorandum 104738, 'Making Intelligent Systems Team Players,' Volumes 1 and 2. The first two volumes of this Technical Memorandum provide comprehensive guidance to designers of intelligent systems for real-time fault management of space systems, with the objective of achieving more effective human interaction. This report provides an analysis of the material discussed in the Technical Memorandum. It clarifies what it means for an intelligent system to be a team player, and how such systems are designed. It identifies significant intelligent system design problems and their impacts on reliability and usability. Where common design practice is not effective in solving these problems, we make recommendations for these situations. In this report, we summarize the main points in the Technical Memorandum and identify where to look for further information.

  4. Engineering design aspects of the heat-pipe power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capell, B. M.; Houts, M. G.; Poston, D. I.; Berte, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Heat-pipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term, low-cost space power system designed at Los Alamos that can provide up to 1,000 kWt for many space nuclear applications. The design of the reactor is simple, modular, and adaptable. The basic design allows for the use of a variety of power conversion systems and reactor materials (including the fuel, clad, and heat pipes). This paper describes a project that was undertaken to develop a database supporting many engineering aspects of the HPS design. The specific tasks discussed in this paper are: the development of an HPS materials database, the creation of finite element models that will allow a wide variety of investigations, and the verification of past calculations.

  5. The design of laser scanning galvanometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoling; Zhou, Bin; Xie, Weihao; Zhang, Yuangeng

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we designed the laser scanning galvanometer system according to our requirements. Based on scanning range of our laser scanning galvanometer system, the design parameters of this system were optimized. During this work, we focused on the design of the f-θ field lens. An optical system of patent lens in the optical manual book, which had three glasses structure, was used in our designs. Combining the aberration theory, the aberration corrections and image quality evaluations were finished using Code V optical design software. An optimum f-θ field lens was designed, which had focal length of 434 mm, pupil diameter of 30 mm, scanning range of 160 mm × 160 mm, and half field angle of 18°×18°. At the last, we studied the influences of temperature changes on our system.

  6. Passive sensor systems for nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Boatner, L.A.; Holcomb, D.E.; McElhaney, S.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Muhs, J.D.; Roberts, M.R.; Hill, N.W.

    1993-09-01

    Passive fiber optic sensor systems capable of confirming the presence of special nuclear materials in storage or process facilities are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These sensors provide completely passive, remote measurement capability. No power supplies, amplifiers, or other active components that could degrade system reliability are required at the sensor location. ORNL, through its research programs in scintillator materials, has developed a variety of materials for use in alpha-, beta-, gamma-, and neutron-sensitive scintillator detectors. In addition to sensors for measuring radiation flux, new sensor materials have been developed which are capable of measuring weight, temperature, and source location. An example of a passive sensor for temperature measurement is the combination of a thermophosphor (e.g., rare-earth activated Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) with {sup 6}LiF (95% {sup 6}Li). This combination results in a new class of scintillators for thermal neutrons that absorb energy from the radiation particles and remit the energy as a light pulse, the decay rate of which, over a specified temperature range, is temperature dependent. Other passive sensors being developed include pressure-sensitive triboluminescent materials, weight-sensitive silicone rubber fibers, scintillating fibers, and other materials for gamma and neutron detection. The light from the scintillator materials of each sensor would be sent through optical fibers to a monitoring station, where the attribute quantity could be measured and compared with previously recorded emission levels. Confirmatory measurement applications of these technologies are being evaluated to reduce the effort, costs, and employee exposures associated with inventorying stockpiles of highly enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant.

  7. Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.

    1995-04-01

    Advanced mathematical techniques and computer simulation play a major role in providing enhanced understanding of conventional and advanced materials processing operations. Development and application of mathematical models and computer simulation techniques can provide a quantitative understanding of materials processes and will minimize the need for expensive and time consuming trial- and error-based product development. As computer simulations and materials databases grow in complexity, high performance computing and simulation are expected to play a key role in supporting the improvements required in advanced material syntheses and processing by lessening the dependence on expensive prototyping and re-tooling. Many of these numerical models are highly compute-intensive. It is not unusual for an analysis to require several hours of computational time on current supercomputers despite the simplicity of the models being studied. For example, to accurately simulate the heat transfer in a 1-m{sup 3} block using a simple computational method requires 10`2 arithmetic operations per second of simulated time. For a computer to do the simulation in real time would require a sustained computation rate 1000 times faster than that achievable by current supercomputers. Massively parallel computer systems, which combine several thousand processors able to operate concurrently on a problem are expected to provide orders of magnitude increase in performance. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in materials processing at ORNL. Continued development of computational techniques and algorithms utilizing the massively parallel computers will allow the simulation of conventional and advanced materials processes in sufficient generality.

  8. Bioreceptivity evaluation of cementitious materials designed to stimulate biological growth.

    PubMed

    Manso, Sandra; De Muynck, Willem; Segura, Ignacio; Aguado, Antonio; Steppe, Kathy; Boon, Nico; De Belie, Nele

    2014-05-15

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC), the most used binder in construction, presents some disadvantages in terms of pollution (CO2 emissions) and visual impact. For this reason, green roofs and façades have gain considerable attention in the last decade as a way to integrate nature in cities. These systems, however, suffer from high initial and maintenance costs. An alternative strategy to obtain green facades is the direct natural colonisation of the cementitious construction materials constituting the wall, a phenomenon governed by the bioreceptivity of such material. This work aims at assessing the suitability of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) materials to allow a rapid natural colonisation taking carbonated OPC samples as a reference material. For that, the aggregate size, the w/c ratio and the amount of cement paste of mortars made of both binders were modified. The assessment of the different bioreceptivities was conducted by means of an accelerated algal fouling test. MPC samples exhibited a faster fouling compared to OPC samples, which could be mainly attributed to the lower pH of the MPC binder. In addition to the binder, the fouling rate was governed by the roughness and the porosity of the material. MPC mortar with moderate porosity and roughness appears to be the most feasible material to be used for the development of green concrete walls. PMID:24602907

  9. Robust holographic storage system design.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Watanabe, Minoru

    2011-11-21

    Demand is increasing daily for large data storage systems that are useful for applications in spacecraft, space satellites, and space robots, which are all exposed to radiation-rich space environment. As candidates for use in space embedded systems, holographic storage systems are promising because they can easily provided the demanded large-storage capability. Particularly, holographic storage systems, which have no rotation mechanism, are demanded because they are virtually maintenance-free. Although a holographic memory itself is an extremely robust device even in a space radiation environment, its associated lasers and drive circuit devices are vulnerable. Such vulnerabilities sometimes engendered severe problems that prevent reading of all contents of the holographic memory, which is a turn-off failure mode of a laser array. This paper therefore presents a proposal for a recovery method for the turn-off failure mode of a laser array on a holographic storage system, and describes results of an experimental demonstration. PMID:22109441

  10. Using the Computer in Systems Engineering Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, W.

    1970-01-01

    With the aid of the programmed computer, the systems designer can analyze systems for which certain components have not yet been manufactured or even invented, and the power of solution-technique is greatly increased. (IR)

  11. Laboratory experiments designed to test the remediation properties of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J.S.; Wildeman, T.R.; Ford, K.L.

    1999-07-01

    Passive treatment systems constructed to remediate mine drainage have proven to be very successful for a wide variety of drainage compositions and volumes. The construction of an anaerobic passive treatment system requires a mixture of local materials with the objective of producing a system that allows adequate water flow while supporting the growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. These bacteria have the effect of reducing the oxidizing potential in the system causing many sulfide-forming metals in solution to precipitate. The focus of these experiments was the study of chemical characteristics of materials, individually and in mixtures, with the purpose of determining which would be best suited for incorporation into a treatment system. The materials of interest were manure (fresh and aged), alfalfa, limestone, and sawdust, which were all collected in close proximity to the construction site of the proposed treatment system. A variety of chemical and physical hypotheses were formulated prior to performing simple chemical characterization and anaerobic treatment tests. The hypotheses relating to the chemical nature of the single materials were carbon to nitrogen ratio, availability of low molecular weight organic acids, number of adsorption sites, and organic carbon content. In addition, hypotheses concerning the performance of mixtures were evaluated by looking at the relative amount of bacterial growth (and metal removal) seen in each mixture over a 4-week period. The results of the laboratory experiments confirmed hypotheses, and demonstrated that in the mixtures, the anaerobic bacteria flourish when alfalfa is present, up to a point. The best mixture that allowed proliferation of bacteria while also removing metals consisted of 50% limestone, 25% aged manure, 15% sawdust, and 10% alfalfa (% by weight).

  12. ESS Cryogenic System Process Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, P.; Hees, W.; Jurns, J.; Su, X. T.; Wang, X. L.; Weisend, J. G., II

    2015-12-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a neutron-scattering facility funded and supported in collaboration with 17 European countries in Lund, Sweden. Cryogenic cooling at ESS is vital particularly for the linear accelerator, the hydrogen target moderators, a test stand for cryomodules, the neutron instruments and their sample environments. The paper will focus on specific process design criteria, design decisions and their motivations for the helium cryoplants and auxiliary equipment. Key issues for all plants and their process concepts are energy efficiency, reliability, smooth turn-down behaviour and flexibility. The accelerator cryoplant (ACCP) and the target moderator cryoplant (TMCP) in particular need to be prepared for a range of refrigeration capacities due to the intrinsic uncertainties regarding heat load definitions. Furthermore the paper addresses questions regarding process arrangement, 2 K cooling methodology, LN2 precooling, helium storage, helium purification and heat recovery.

  13. Optmization design of zoom lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaotong; Cen, Zhaofeng

    2002-09-01

    A zoom lens system is usually composed of several components. Some of the components can be moved to change the focal length or magnification. Zoom lens system design is more complicated than fixed-focus lens design due to the moving of some components. In this paper, an optimization method that is used to design zoom lens systems is presented. Using this method, the Gaussian parameters of zoom lens systems are optimized at first, and then the initial structure parameters in each component are generated and optimized. At last the aberration balance is made using multi-configuration. In this paper the flowchart of optimization design for such complex optical systems is showed and the algorithms are described. As a conclusion, the relationship between power distribution, initial structure and the aberrations is considered at the beginning, the evaluation criteria are reliable and efficiency for designing zoom lens systems.

  14. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  15. Toward self-constructing materials: a systems chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2012-12-18

    To design the next generation of so-called "smart" materials, researchers will need to develop chemical systems that respond, adapt, and multitask. Because many of these features occur in living systems, we expect that such advanced artificial systems will be inspired by nature. In particular, these new materials should ultimately combine three key properties of life: metabolism, mutation, and self-replication. In this Account, we discuss our endeavors toward the design of such advanced functional materials. First, we focus on dynamic molecular libraries. These molecular and supramolecular chemical systems are based on mixtures of reversibly interacting molecules that are coupled within networks of thermodynamic equilibria. We will explain how the superimposition of combinatorial networks at different length scales of structural organization can provide valuable hierarchical dynamics for producing complex functional systems. In particular, our experimental results highlight why these libraries are of interest for the design of responsive materials and how their functional properties can be modulated by various chemical and physical stimuli. Then, we introduce examples in which these dynamic combinatorial systems can be coupled to kinetic feedback loops to produce self-replicating pathways that amplify a selected component from the equilibrated libraries. Finally, we discuss the discovery of highly functional self-replicating supramolecular assemblies that can transfer an electric signal in space and time. We show how these wires can be directly incorporated within an electronic nanocircuit by self-organization and functional feedback loops. Because the network topologies act as complex algorithms to process information, we present these systems in this order to provide context for their potential for extending the current generation of responsive materials. We propose a general description for a potential autonomous (self-constructing) material. Such a system

  16. Designing To Learn about Complex Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hmelo, Cindy E.; Holton, Douglas L.; Kolodner, Janet L.

    2000-01-01

    Indicates the presence of complex structural, behavioral, and functional relations to understanding. Reports on a design experiment in which 6th grade children learned about the human respiratory system by designing artificial lungs and building partial working models. Makes suggestions for successful learning from design activities. (Contains 44…

  17. Design of a scientific probe for obtaining Mars surface material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Miles; Deyerl, Eric; Gibson, Tim; Langberg, Bob; Yee, Terrance (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to return a 1 Kg Martian soil sample from the surface of Mars to a mothership in a 60 km Mars orbit. Given here is information on the mission profile, the structural design and component placement, thermal control and guidance, propulsion systems, orbital mechanics, and specialized structures.

  18. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of GIS-Based Learning Materials in an Introductory Geoscience Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall-Wallace, Michelle K.; McAuliffe, Carla M.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates student learning that occurred with a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) based module on plate tectonics and geologic hazards. Examines factors in the design and implementation of the materials that impacted student learning. Reports positive correlations between student' spatial ability and performance. Includes 17 references.…

  19. Taguchi statistical design and analysis of cleaning methods for spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Y.; Chung, S.; Kazarians, G. A.; Blosiu, J. O.; Beaudet, R. A.; Quigley, M. S.; Kern, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we have extensively tested various cleaning protocols. The variant parameters included the type and concentration of solvent, type of wipe, pretreatment conditions, and various rinsing systems. Taguchi statistical method was used to design and evaluate various cleaning conditions on ten common spacecraft materials.

  20. Design Molecular Recognition Materials for Chiral Sensors, Separtations and Catalytic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, S.; Nenoff, T.M.; Provencio, P.; Qiu, Y.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Thoma, S.G.; Zhang, J.

    1998-11-01

    The goal is the development of materials that are highly sensitive and selective for chid chemicals and biochemical (such as insecticides, herbicides, proteins, and nerve agents) to be used as sensors, catalysts and separations membranes. Molecular modeling methods are being used to tailor chiral molecular recognition sites with high affinity and selectivity for specified agents. The work focuses on both silicate and non-silicate materials modified with chirally-pure fictional groups for the catalysis or separations of enantiomerically-pure molecules. Surfactant and quaternary amine templating is being used to synthesize porous frameworks, containing mesopores of 30 to 100 angstroms. Computer molecukw modeling methods are being used in the design of these materials, especially in the chid surface- modi~ing agents. Molecular modeling is also being used to predict the catalytic and separations selectivities of the modified mesoporous materials. The ability to design and synthesize tailored asymmetric molecular recognition sites for sensor coatings allows a broader range of chemicals to be sensed with the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. Initial experiments target the selective sensing of small molecule gases and non-toxic model neural compounds. Further efforts will address designing sensors that greatly extend the variety of resolvable chemical species and forming a predictive, model-based method for developing advanced sensors.