Science.gov

Sample records for system verification pilot

  1. Verification testing of advanced environmental monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J.; Riggs, K.B.; Fuerst, R.G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper describes the Advanced Monitoring Systems (AMS) pilot project, one of 12 pilots comprising the US EPA`s Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The aim of ETV is to promote the acceptance of environmental technologies in the marketplace, through objective third-party verification of technology performance.

  2. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-12

    This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

  3. Verification of Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui; Vassev, Emil; Hinchey, Mike; Rouff, Christopher; Buskens, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance for them. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

  4. ETV PILOT FOR SOURCE WATER PROTECTION TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, a five-year pilot, provides technology purchasers, permitters and developers with objective, quality assured performance data on new and/or improved technologies. EPA has partnered with the National Sanitation Foundation (...

  5. Pilot study on verification of effectiveness on operability of assistance system for robotic tele-surgery using simulation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Yo; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2010-01-01

    Tele-surgery enables medical care even in remote regions, and has been accomplished in clinical cases by means of dedicated communication lines. To make tele-surgery a more widespread method of providing medical care, a surgical environment needs to be made available using public lines of communication, such as the Internet. Moreover, a support system during surgery is required, as the use of surgical tools is performed in an environment subject to delay. In our research, we focus on the operability of specific tasks conducted by surgeons during a medical procedure, with the aim of clarifying, by means of a simulation, the optimum environment for robotic tele-surgery. In the study, we set up experimental systems using our proposed simulation system. In addition, we investigate the mental workloads on subjects and verify the effect of visual-assistance information as a pilot study. The operability of the task of gripping soft tissue was evaluated using a subjective workload assessment tool, the NASA Task Load Index. Results show that the tasks were completed, but the workload did not improve to less than 300ms and 400ms in the simulated environment. Verifying the effect of the support system was an important task under a more-than 200ms delay using this experiment, and future studies will evaluate the operability of the system under varying conditions of comfort. In addition, an intra-operative assistance system will be constructed using a simulation. PMID:21096798

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM. NERL-LV PILOT FOR MONITORING AND CHARACTERIZATION - ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - GROUNDWATER SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES - QED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS INC. WELL WIZARD DEDICATED SAMPLING SYSTEM-PUBLISHED REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ...

  7. Automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.; Haidt, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    An Automated Pilot Advisory System (APAS) was developed and operationally tested to demonstrate the concept that low cost automated systems can provide air traffic and aviation weather advisory information at high density uncontrolled airports. The system was designed to enhance the see and be seen rule of flight, and pilots who used the system preferred it over the self announcement system presently used at uncontrolled airports.

  8. Pilot-scale verification test for Hanford grout

    SciTech Connect

    Bagaasen, L.M.; Powell, W.J.

    1993-02-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) at Hanford, Washington will process the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes on the Hanford Site, to produce a cementitious waste form. This facility, which is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford), mixes liquid wastes with cementitious materials and pumps the resulting grout slurry into large [5,300 cubic meters (m{sup 3})] concrete vaults. Once in the vault, the grout cures to produce a waste form that immobilizes radioactive and hazardous constituents through chemical reactions and/or microencapsulation. Although this disposal scheme has several advantages, pouring grout into large vaults raises concerns about how to handle the heat generated from the exothermic hydration reactions that occur as the grout cures. WHC`s current strategy for addressing the problem of hydration heat is to fill the vault in stages and use forced ventilation in the airspace above the grout to speed heat removal. The varying composition of Hanford tank waste requires that each tank be processed in a separate campaign using a grout formulation specifically designed for that waste. The next tank scheduled for treatment is DST 241-AN-106. A four-phase process for developing the grout formulation development process is used to assure that the formulation will meet various processing and waste form requirements. These phases are: (1) laboratory formulation development studies and modeling with simulated wastes, (2) laboratory variability studies with simulated waste, (3) pilot-scale verification tests with simulated wastes, and (4) laboratory verification tests with actual waste. This paper presents an overview of the pilot-scale verification tests conducted as part of the grout formulation development for the 241-AN-106 tank waste. The paper specifically discusses results dealing with (1) the grout slurry critical flow rate and (2) the ability to handle grout hydration heat with forced ventilation.

  9. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  10. OVERVIEW OF SOURCE WATER PROTECTION (SWP) AND WET-WEATHER FLOW (WWF) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PILOT PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program objectives, goals and benefits were described in detail in the presentation for the ETV Package Drinking Water Treatment System pilot earlier in this session. As mentioned in the presentation, three of the twelve piul...

  11. A verification system of RMAP protocol controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanov, V. Kh; Shakhmatov, A. V.; Chekmarev, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The functional verification problem of IP blocks of RMAP protocol controller is considered. The application of the verification method using fully- functional models of the processor and the internal bus of a system-on-chip is justified. Principles of construction of a verification system based on the given approach are proposed. The practical results of creating a system of verification of IP block of RMAP protocol controller is presented.

  12. Automatic verification methods for finite state systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sifakis, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a workshop devoted to the verification of finite state systems. The workshop focused on the development and use of methods, tools and theories for automatic verification of finite state systems. The goal at the workshop was to compare verification methods and tools to assist the applications designer. The papers review verification techniques for finite state systems and evaluate their relative advantages. The techniques considered cover various specification formalisms such as process algebras, automata and logics. Most of the papers focus on exploitation of existing results in three application areas: hardware design, communication protocols and real-time systems.

  13. Pilot climate data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A usable data base, the Pilot climate Data System (PCDS) is described. The PCDS is designed to be an interactive, easy-to-use, on-line generalized scientific information system. It efficiently provides uniform data catalogs; inventories, and access method, as well as manipulation and display tools for a large assortment of Earth, ocean and atmospheric data for the climate-related research community. Researchers can employ the PCDS to scan, manipulate, compare, display, and study climate parameters from diverse data sets. Software features, and applications of the PCDS are highlighted.

  14. The Ontogeny of the Verification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, M. Michael; Guillory, Andrea W.

    1983-01-01

    Young children found it difficult to verify negative statements, but found affirmative statements, affirmative questions, and negative questions equally easy to deal with. It is proposed that children acquire the answering system earlier than the verification system, and use answering to verify statements before acquiring the verification system.…

  15. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  16. HDM/PASCAL Verification System User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hare, D.

    1983-01-01

    The HDM/Pascal verification system is a tool for proving the correctness of programs written in PASCAL and specified in the Hierarchical Development Methodology (HDM). This document assumes an understanding of PASCAL, HDM, program verification, and the STP system. The steps toward verification which this tool provides are parsing programs and specifications, checking the static semantics, and generating verification conditions. Some support functions are provided such as maintaining a data base, status management, and editing. The system runs under the TOPS-20 and TENEX operating systems and is written in INTERLISP. However, no knowledge is assumed of these operating systems or of INTERLISP. The system requires three executable files, HDMVCG, PARSE, and STP. Optionally, the editor EMACS should be on the system in order for the editor to work. The file HDMVCG is invoked to run the system. The files PARSE and STP are used as lower forks to perform the functions of parsing and proving.

  17. Income Verification Pilot Project (Phase II): Results of Quality Assurance Evaluation, 1982-83 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Presented in this report are selected findings of the Income Verification Pilot Project (IVPP), an investigation examining misreporting of applicant income and family size on applications for government-sponsored school meal benefits. As reported here, Phase II of the project provided for a comprehensive assessment of specific quality assurance…

  18. The PASCAL-HDM Verification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The PASCAL-HDM verification system is described. This system supports the mechanical generation of verification conditions from PASCAL programs and HDM-SPECIAL specifications using the Floyd-Hoare axiomatic method. Tools are provided to parse programs and specifications, check their static semantics, generate verification conditions from Hoare rules, and translate the verification conditions appropriately for proof using the Shostak Theorem Prover, are explained. The differences between standard PASCAL and the language handled by this system are explained. This consists mostly of restrictions to the standard language definition, the only extensions or modifications being the addition of specifications to the code and the change requiring the references to a function of no arguments to have empty parentheses.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: PHASE 1-ADI PILOT TEST UNIT NO. 2002-09 WITH MEDIA G2®

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrity verification testing of the ADI International Inc. Pilot Test Unit No. 2002-09 with MEDIA G2® arsenic adsorption media filter system was conducted at the Hilltown Township Water and Sewer Authority (HTWSA) Well Station No. 1 in Sellersville, Pennsylvania from October 8...

  20. Pilot field-verification studies of the sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate treatment process. Final report, September 1987-May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Wiloff, P.M.; Suciu, D.F.; Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Loyd, F.S.

    1988-09-01

    In previous project, jar and dynamic testing showed that the sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate process was a viable method for reducing hexavalent chromium and removing heavy metals from the Tinker AFB industrial wastewater with significant decrease in sludge production and treatment costs. In this phase, pilot-plant field verification studies were conducted to evaluate the chemical and physical parameters of the chromium reduction process, the precipitation and clarification process, and the activated-sludge system. Sludge production was evaluated and compared to the sulfuric acid/sulfur dioxide/lime process.

  1. An Interactive System for Graduation Verification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Y.; Dasarathy, B.

    1981-01-01

    This description of a computerized graduation verification system developed and implemented at the University of South Carolina at Columbia discusses the "table-driven" feature of the programs and details the implementation of the system, including examples of the Extended Backus Naur Form (EBNF) notation used to represent the system language…

  2. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-08-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  3. User computer system pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Eimutis, E.C.

    1989-09-06

    The User Computer System (UCS) is a general purpose unclassified, nonproduction system for Mound users. The UCS pilot project was successfully completed, and the system currently has more than 250 users. Over 100 tables were installed on the UCS for use by subscribers, including tables containing data on employees, budgets, and purchasing. In addition, a UCS training course was developed and implemented.

  4. Electric power system test and verification program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rylicki, Daniel S.; Robinson, Frank, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Space Station Freedom's (SSF's) electric power system (EPS) hardware and software verification is performed at all levels of integration, from components to assembly and system level tests. Careful planning is essential to ensure the EPS is tested properly on the ground prior to launch. The results of the test performed on breadboard model hardware and analyses completed to date have been evaluated and used to plan for design qualification and flight acceptance test phases. These results and plans indicate the verification program for SSF's 75-kW EPS would have been successful and completed in time to support the scheduled first element launch.

  5. Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Design Verification

    SciTech Connect

    YANOCHKO, R.M.

    2000-01-27

    This document was prepared as part of an independent review to explain design verification activities already completed, and to define the remaining design verification actions for the Fuel Retrieval System. The Fuel Retrieval Subproject was established as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) to retrieve and repackage the SNF located in the K Basins. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) construction work is complete in the KW Basin, and start-up testing is underway Design modifications and construction planning are also underway for the KE Basin. An independent review of the design verification process as applied to the K Basin projects was initiated in support of preparation for the SNF Project operational readiness review (ORR).

  6. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  7. Verification of NASA Emergent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Vanderbilt, Amy K. C. S.; Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    NASA is studying advanced technologies for a future robotic exploration mission to the asteroid belt. This mission, the prospective ANTS (Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm) mission, will comprise of 1,000 autonomous robotic agents designed to cooperate in asteroid exploration. The emergent properties of swarm type missions make them powerful, but at the same time are more difficult to design and assure that the proper behaviors will emerge. We are currently investigating formal methods and techniques for verification and validation of future swarm-based missions. The advantage of using formal methods is their ability to mathematically assure the behavior of a swarm, emergent or otherwise. The ANT mission is being used as an example and case study for swarm-based missions for which to experiment and test current formal methods with intelligent swam. Using the ANTS mission, we have evaluated multiple formal methods to determine their effectiveness in modeling and assuring swarm behavior.

  8. Validation and verification of expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilstrap, Lewey

    1991-01-01

    Validation and verification (V&V) are procedures used to evaluate system structure or behavior with respect to a set of requirements. Although expert systems are often developed as a series of prototypes without requirements, it is not possible to perform V&V on any system for which requirements have not been prepared. In addition, there are special problems associated with the evaluation of expert systems that do not arise in the evaluation of conventional systems, such as verification of the completeness and accuracy of the knowledge base. The criticality of most NASA missions make it important to be able to certify the performance of the expert systems used to support these mission. Recommendations for the most appropriate method for integrating V&V into the Expert System Development Methodology (ESDM) and suggestions for the most suitable approaches for each stage of ESDM development are presented.

  9. Verification of Autonomous Systems for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, G.; Denney, E.; Giannakopoulou, D.; Frank, J.; Jonsson, A.

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous software, especially if it is based on model, can play an important role in future space applications. For example, it can help streamline ground operations, or, assist in autonomous rendezvous and docking operations, or even, help recover from problems (e.g., planners can be used to explore the space of recovery actions for a power subsystem and implement a solution without (or with minimal) human intervention). In general, the exploration capabilities of model-based systems give them great flexibility. Unfortunately, it also makes them unpredictable to our human eyes, both in terms of their execution and their verification. The traditional verification techniques are inadequate for these systems since they are mostly based on testing, which implies a very limited exploration of their behavioral space. In our work, we explore how advanced V&V techniques, such as static analysis, model checking, and compositional verification, can be used to gain trust in model-based systems. We also describe how synthesis can be used in the context of system reconfiguration and in the context of verification.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM: QUALITY AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR THE PILOT PERIOD (1995-2000)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based upon the structure and specifications in ANSI/ASQC E4-1994, Specifications and Guidelines for Quality Systems for Environmental Data Collection and Environmental Technology Programs, the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program Quality and Management Plan (QMP) f...

  11. Verification system for postoperative autologous blood retransfusion.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeki; Kimura, Eizen; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishihara, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Medical staff members should match blood products with patients using a barcode authentication system for blood transfusion to prevent medical accidents. However, our hospital only verifies the blood products of the Japanese Red Cross Society and the preserved autologous blood, not the autologous blood salvaged during the operation or from the oxygenator. In this study, we developed the barcode medication administration system and mobile device for verification. This system will prevent blood transfusion errors in the ward setting. PMID:23920751

  12. National Verification System of National Meteorological Center , China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinyan; Wei, Qing; Qi, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Product Quality Verification Division for official weather forecasting of China was founded in April, 2011. It is affiliated to Forecast System Laboratory (FSL), National Meteorological Center (NMC), China. There are three employees in this department. I'm one of the employees and I am in charge of Product Quality Verification Division in NMC, China. After five years of construction, an integrated realtime National Verification System of NMC, China has been established. At present, its primary roles include: 1) to verify official weather forecasting quality of NMC, China; 2) to verify the official city weather forecasting quality of Provincial Meteorological Bureau; 3) to evaluate forecasting quality for each forecasters in NMC, China. To verify official weather forecasting quality of NMC, China, we have developed : • Grid QPF Verification module ( including upascale) • Grid temperature, humidity and wind forecast verification module • Severe convective weather forecast verification module • Typhoon forecast verification module • Disaster forecast verification • Disaster warning verification module • Medium and extend period forecast verification module • Objective elements forecast verification module • Ensemble precipitation probabilistic forecast verification module To verify the official city weather forecasting quality of Provincial Meteorological Bureau, we have developed : • City elements forecast verification module • Public heavy rain forecast verification module • City air quality forecast verification module. To evaluate forecasting quality for each forecasters in NMC, China, we have developed : • Off-duty forecaster QPF practice evaluation module • QPF evaluation module for forecasters • Severe convective weather forecast evaluation module • Typhoon track forecast evaluation module for forecasters • Disaster warning evaluation module for forecasters • Medium and extend period forecast evaluation module The further

  13. The AdaptiV Approach to Verification of Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rouff, Christopher; Buskens, Richard; Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui; Hinchey, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive systems are critical for future space and other unmanned and intelligent systems. Verification of these systems is also critical for their use in systems with potential harm to human life or with large financial investments. Due to their nondeterministic nature and extremely large state space, current methods for verification of software systems are not adequate to provide a high level of assurance. The combination of stabilization science, high performance computing simulations, compositional verification and traditional verification techniques, plus operational monitors, provides a complete approach to verification and deployment of adaptive systems that has not been used before. This paper gives an overview of this approach.

  14. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    SciTech Connect

    Tuite, K.; Winberg, M.R.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy through the National Low-Level Waste Management Program and WMG Inc. have entered into a joint development effort to design, build, and demonstrate the Packaged Low-Level Waste Verification System. Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste disposal site operators have no method to independently verify the radionuclide content of packaged low-level waste that arrives at disposal sites for disposition. At this time, the disposal site relies on the low-level waste generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to ensure that low-level waste received meets the site`s waste acceptance criteria. The subject invention provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of low-level waste shipping records to ensure that the site`s waste acceptance criteria are being met. The objective of the prototype system is to demonstrate a mobile system capable of independently verifying the content of packaged low-level waste.

  15. Systems Approach to Arms Control Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, K; Neimeyer, I; Listner, C; Stein, G; Chen, C; Dreicer, M

    2015-05-15

    Using the decades of experience of developing concepts and technologies for verifying bilateral and multilateral arms control agreements, a broad conceptual systems approach is being developed that takes into account varying levels of information and risk. The IAEA has already demonstrated the applicability of a systems approach by implementing safeguards at the State level, with acquisition path analysis as the key element. In order to test whether such an approach could also be implemented for arms control verification, an exercise was conducted in November 2014 at the JRC ITU Ispra. Based on the scenario of a hypothetical treaty between two model nuclear weapons states aimed at capping their nuclear arsenals at existing levels, the goal of this exercise was to explore how to use acquisition path analysis in an arms control context. Our contribution will present the scenario, objectives and results of this exercise, and attempt to define future workshops aimed at further developing verification measures that will deter or detect treaty violations.

  16. HRAF PILOT- Prototype Facility for Verification & Validation of Robotics & Autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, R.; Reed, S.; Monchieri, E.; Martelli, A.; Biggio, A.; Schroeven-Deceuninck, H.

    2014-08-01

    The development of complex autonomous landed robotic systems will be critical for future planetary exploration missions. Such missions will encounter dynamically changing environments with high levels of uncertainty and will require the use of specialist test facilities including mock planetary surfaces, simulated software environments and field trials. However these same facilities can also have practical applications for terrestrial users in fields such as agriculture, automotive, first response, mining, oil and gas exploration [1]. This paper presents the progress of the project to develop a Core Infrastruture Protoype of HRAF conducted on behalf of the European Space Agency (ESA) by a consortium composed of SCISYS, Astrium UK, Thales Alenia Space, Joanneum Research and the Virtutal Engineering Centre.

  17. Design for Verification: Enabling Verification of High Dependability Software-Intensive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlitz, Peter C.; Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Strategies to achieve confidence that high-dependability applications are correctly implemented include testing and automated verification. Testing deals mainly with a limited number of expected execution paths. Verification usually attempts to deal with a larger number of possible execution paths. While the impact of architecture design on testing is well known, its impact on most verification methods is not as well understood. The Design for Verification approach considers verification from the application development perspective, in which system architecture is designed explicitly according to the application's key properties. The D4V-hypothesis is that the same general architecture and design principles that lead to good modularity, extensibility and complexity/functionality ratio can be adapted to overcome some of the constraints on verification tools, such as the production of hand-crafted models and the limits on dynamic and static analysis caused by state space explosion.

  18. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    SciTech Connect

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  19. Formal Verification of Large Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, Xiang; Knight, John

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a scalable proof structure to facilitate formal verification of large software systems. In our approach, we mechanically synthesize an abstract specification from the software implementation, match its static operational structure to that of the original specification, and organize the proof as the conjunction of a series of lemmas about the specification structure. By setting up a different lemma for each distinct element and proving each lemma independently, we obtain the important benefit that the proof scales easily for large systems. We present details of the approach and an illustration of its application on a challenge problem from the security domain

  20. Pilot Evaluations of Runway Status Light System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, R. Marshall

    1996-01-01

    This study focuses on use of the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) Simulator at the Langley Research Center to obtain pilot opinion and input on the Federal Aviation Administration's Runway Status Light System (RWSL) prior to installation in an operational airport environment. The RWSL has been designed to reduce the likelihood of runway incursions by visually alerting pilots when a runway is occupied. Demonstrations of the RWSL in the TSRV Simulator allowed pilots to evaluate the system in a realistic cockpit environment.

  1. The pilot climate data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reph, M. G.; Treinish, L. A.; Smith, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    The Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) is an interactive scientific information management system for locating, obtaining, manipulating, and displaying climate-research data. The PCDS was developed to manage a large collection of data of interest to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) research community and currently provides such support for approximately twenty data sets. In order to provide the PCDS capabilities, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) has integrated the capabilities of several general-purpose software packages with specialized software for reading and reformatting the supported data sets. These capabilities were integrated in a manner which allows the PCDS to be easily expanded, either to provide support for additional data sets or to provide additional functional capabilities. This also allows the PCDS to take advantage of new technology as it becomes available, since parts of the system can be replaced with more powerful components without significantly affecting the user interface.

  2. Verification and validation of control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, J.K. Jr.; Kisner, R.A. ); Bhadtt, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The following guidelines are proposed for verification and validation (V V) of nuclear power plant control system software: (a) use risk management to decide what and how much V V is needed; (b) classify each software application using a scheme that reflects what type and how much V V is needed; (c) maintain a set of reference documents with current information about each application; (d) use Program Inspection as the initial basic verification method; and (e) establish a deficiencies log for each software application. The following additional practices are strongly recommended: (a) use a computer-based configuration management system to track all aspects of development and maintenance; (b) establish reference baselines of the software, associated reference documents, and development tools at regular intervals during development; (c) use object-oriented design and programming to promote greater software reliability and reuse; (d) provide a copy of the software development environment as part of the package of deliverables; and (e) initiate an effort to use formal methods for preparation of Technical Specifications. The paper provides background information and reasons for the guidelines and recommendations. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Global positioning system supported pilot's display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Erdogan, Temel; Schwalb, Andrew P.; Curley, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The hardware, software, and operation of the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS) Flight Inspection System Pilot's Display is discussed. The Pilot's Display is used in conjunction with flight inspection tests that certify the Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System used at Space Shuttle landing facilities throughout the world. The Pilot's Display was developed for the pilot of test aircraft to set up and fly a given test flight path determined by the flight inspection test engineers. This display also aids the aircraft pilot when hazy or cloud cover conditions exist that limit the pilot's visibility of the Shuttle runway during the flight inspection. The aircraft position is calculated using the Global Positioning System and displayed in the cockpit on a graphical display.

  4. The future of large optical system verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary

    2005-08-01

    As optical systems grow in size, there becomes a point in which traditional system verification prior to launch will become impossible. This implies that observatory ground testing will not be completed. Our history does not support this premise and therefore results in an unacceptable programmatic risk. But, if the dream of building 20-30 meter systems is ever to become true, these realities must be accepted. To make this possible, new and better analytical tools and processes must be developed and certified on programs that can be tested on the ground. This change in paradigm does not eliminate critical testing; it just does it at different assembly levels and most likely adds alignment flexibility to correct optical errors after launch. This paper provides ideas on how the hardware, analysis tools, and testing may evolve to support these ambitious future programs.

  5. Verification issues for rule-based expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris; Riley, Gary; Savely, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Verification and validation of expert systems is very important for the future success of this technology. Software will never be used in non-trivial applications unless the program developers can assure both users and managers that the software is reliable and generally free from error. Therefore, verification and validation of expert systems must be done. The primary hindrance to effective verification and validation is the use of methodologies which do not produce testable requirements. An extension of the flight technique panels used in previous NASA programs should provide both documented requirements and very high levels of verification for expert systems.

  6. Fingerprint verification on medical image reporting system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Tsai, Ming-Dar; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Chiu, Jainn-Shiun; Chong, Chee-Fah

    2008-03-01

    The healthcare industry is recently going through extensive changes, through adoption of robust, interoperable healthcare information technology by means of electronic medical records (EMR). However, a major concern of EMR is adequate confidentiality of the individual records being managed electronically. Multiple access points over an open network like the Internet increases possible patient data interception. The obligation is on healthcare providers to procure information security solutions that do not hamper patient care while still providing the confidentiality of patient information. Medical images are also part of the EMR which need to be protected from unauthorized users. This study integrates the techniques of fingerprint verification, DICOM object, digital signature and digital envelope in order to ensure that access to the hospital Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) or radiology information system (RIS) is only by certified parties. PMID:18178287

  7. Developing a monitoring and verification plan with reference to the Australian Otway CO2 pilot project

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, K.; Daley, T.; Freifeld, B.; Urosevic, M.; Kepic, A.; Sharma, S.

    2009-05-01

    The Australian Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) is currently injecting 100,000 tons of CO{sub 2} in a large-scale test of storage technology in a pilot project in southeastern Australia called the CO2CRC Otway Project. The Otway Basin, with its natural CO{sub 2} accumulations and many depleted gas fields, offers an appropriate site for such a pilot project. An 80% CO{sub 2} stream is produced from a well (Buttress) near the depleted gas reservoir (Naylor) used for storage (Figure 1). The goal of this project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} can be safely transported, stored underground, and its behavior tracked and monitored. The monitoring and verification framework has been developed to monitor for the presence and behavior of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface reservoir, near surface, and atmosphere. This monitoring framework addresses areas, identified by a rigorous risk assessment, to verify conformance to clearly identifiable performance criteria. These criteria have been agreed with the regulatory authorities to manage the project through all phases addressing responsibilities, liabilities, and to assure the public of safe storage.

  8. CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.; Bunting, M.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia`s Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, top-level, modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM`s unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection) and location accuracy of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system`s performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. This report describes version 1.2 of IVSEM.

  9. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  10. Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) recently entered into a nonexclusive license agreement with Applied Cryogenic Solutions (ACS), Inc. (Galveston, TX) to commercialize its Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System technology. This technology, developed by KSC, is a critical component of processes being developed and commercialized by ACS to replace current mechanical and chemical cleaning and descaling methods used by numerous industries. Pilot trials on heat exchanger tubing components have shown that the ACS technology provides for: Superior cleaning in a much shorter period of time. Lower energy and labor requirements for cleaning and de-scaling uper.ninih. Significant reductions in waste volumes by not using water, acidic or basic solutions, organic solvents, or nonvolatile solid abrasives as components in the cleaning process. Improved energy efficiency in post-cleaning heat exchanger operations. The ACS process consists of a spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, a source of liquid gas; a novel, proprietary pumping system that permits pumping liquid nitrogen, liquid air, or supercritical carbon dioxide to pressures in the range of 20,000 to 60,000 psi; and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. The size and number of nozzles can be varied so the system can be built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. The system also can be used to verify if a part has been adequately cleaned.

  11. Knowledge-based system verification and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this task is to develop and evaluate a methodology for verification and validation (V&V) of knowledge-based systems (KBS) for space station applications with high reliability requirements. The approach consists of three interrelated tasks. The first task is to evaluate the effectiveness of various validation methods for space station applications. The second task is to recommend requirements for KBS V&V for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The third task is to recommend modifications to the SSF to support the development of KBS using effectiveness software engineering and validation techniques. To accomplish the first task, three complementary techniques will be evaluated: (1) Sensitivity Analysis (Worchester Polytechnic Institute); (2) Formal Verification of Safety Properties (SRI International); and (3) Consistency and Completeness Checking (Lockheed AI Center). During FY89 and FY90, each contractor will independently demonstrate the user of his technique on the fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) KBS or the manned maneuvering unit (MMU), a rule-based system implemented in LISP. During FY91, the application of each of the techniques to other knowledge representations and KBS architectures will be addressed. After evaluation of the results of the first task and examination of Space Station Freedom V&V requirements for conventional software, a comprehensive KBS V&V methodology will be developed and documented. Development of highly reliable KBS's cannot be accomplished without effective software engineering methods. Using the results of current in-house research to develop and assess software engineering methods for KBS's as well as assessment of techniques being developed elsewhere, an effective software engineering methodology for space station KBS's will be developed, and modification of the SSF to support these tools and methods will be addressed.

  12. Automatic Verification of Timing Constraints for Safety Critical Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Javier; Parra, Pablo; Sanchez Prieto, Sebastian; Polo, Oscar; Bernat, Guillem

    2015-09-01

    In this paper is presented an automatic process of verification. We focus in the verification of scheduling analysis parameter. This proposal is part of process based on Model Driven Engineering to automate a Verification and Validation process of the software on board of satellites. This process is implemented in a software control unit of the energy particle detector which is payload of Solar Orbiter mission. From the design model is generated a scheduling analysis model and its verification model. The verification as defined as constraints in way of Finite Timed Automatas. When the system is deployed on target the verification evidence is extracted as instrumented points. The constraints are fed with the evidence, if any of the constraints is not satisfied for the on target evidence the scheduling analysis is not valid.

  13. 14 CFR 29.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 29.1329 Section 29... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 27.1329 Section 27... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 29.1329 Section 29... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 27.1329 Section 27... pilot system. (a) Each automatic pilot system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be sufficiently overpowered by one pilot to allow control of the rotorcraft; and (2) Be readily and...

  17. Entropy Measurement for Biometric Verification Systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, Meng-Hui; Yuen, Pong C

    2016-05-01

    Biometric verification systems are designed to accept multiple similar biometric measurements per user due to inherent intrauser variations in the biometric data. This is important to preserve reasonable acceptance rate of genuine queries and the overall feasibility of the recognition system. However, such acceptance of multiple similar measurements decreases the imposter's difficulty of obtaining a system-acceptable measurement, thus resulting in a degraded security level. This deteriorated security needs to be measurable to provide truthful security assurance to the users. Entropy is a standard measure of security. However, the entropy formula is applicable only when there is a single acceptable possibility. In this paper, we develop an entropy-measuring model for biometric systems that accepts multiple similar measurements per user. Based on the idea of guessing entropy, the proposed model quantifies biometric system security in terms of adversarial guessing effort for two practical attacks. Excellent agreement between analytic and experimental simulation-based measurement results on a synthetic and a benchmark face dataset justify the correctness of our model and thus the feasibility of the proposed entropy-measuring approach. PMID:26054080

  18. System simulation and verification facility (SSVF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, M. M.; Bégin, M.-E.; Eickhoff, J.; de Kruyf, J.

    2002-07-01

    Systems engineering tools can be used in conjunction with concurrent engineering techniques to significantly reduce the cost, schedule and risk of space mission design, development and operation. This paper describes the System Simulation and Verification Facility (SSVF) project performed by the VEGA Group PLC and ASTRIUM GmbH (formerly Dornier Satellitesysteme GmbH) for the European Space Agency's European Space Technology Centre (ESTEC). The SSVF concept integrates a high fidelity hard real-time simulator, a checkout system and control system and a common mission information-base. These components are highly configurable to enable them to support different parts of the mission lifecycle. An SSVF simulator incorporates environment, dynamics and equipment models, and interfaces to hardware, onboard software algorithms, the onboard software itself and onboard processors. SSVF is able to support what-if analyses during design and development activities, and allows the overall system hardware and software design to be validated much earlier in the mission development lifecycle than is currently the case. SSVF also supports hybrid simulations: part software models and part real hardware (breadboard, engineering or flight models). As they become available, these can be tested and validated in a high-fidelity simulated environment. The SSVF project has been performed in two phases.

  19. Integrated safety management system verification: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, R.F.

    1998-08-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, commits to institutionalization of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) throughout the DOE complex. The DOE Acquisition Regulations (DEAR, 48 CFR 970) requires contractors to manage and perform work in accordance with a documented Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). Guidance and expectations have been provided to PNNL by incorporation into the operating contract (Contract DE-ACM-76FL0 1830) and by letter. The contract requires that the contractor submit a description of their ISMS for approval by DOE. PNNL submitted their proposed Safety Management System Description for approval on November 25,1997. RL tentatively approved acceptance of the description pursuant to a favorable recommendation from this review. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification is a review of the adequacy of the ISMS description in fulfilling the requirements of the DEAR and the DOE Policy. The purpose of this review is to provide the Richland Operations Office Manager with a recommendation for approval of the ISMS description of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory based upon compliance with the requirements of 49 CFR 970.5204(-2 and -78); and to verify the extent and maturity of ISMS implementation within the Laboratory. Further the review will provide a model for other DOE laboratories managed by the Office of Assistant Secretary for Energy Research.

  20. Space transportation system payload interface verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everline, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper considers STS payload-interface verification requirements and the capability provided by STS to support verification. The intent is to standardize as many interfaces as possible, not only through the design, development, test and evaluation (DDT and E) phase of the major payload carriers but also into the operational phase. The verification process is discussed in terms of its various elements, such as the Space Shuttle DDT and E (including the orbital flight test program) and the major payload carriers DDT and E (including the first flights). Five tools derived from the Space Shuttle DDT and E are available to support the verification process: mathematical (structural and thermal) models, the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the Shuttle Manipulator Development Facility, and interface-verification equipment (cargo-integration test equipment).

  1. Systems analysis - independent analysis and verification

    SciTech Connect

    DiPietro, J.P.; Skolnik, E.G.; Badin, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Hydrogen Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds a portfolio of activities ranging from conceptual research to pilot plant testing. The long-term research projects support DOE`s goal of a sustainable, domestically based energy system, and the development activities are focused on hydrogen-based energy systems that can be commercially viable in the near-term. Energetics develops analytic products that enable the Hydrogen Program Manager to assess the potential for near- and long-term R&D activities to satisfy DOE and energy market criteria. This work is based on a pathway analysis methodology. The authors consider an energy component (e.g., hydrogen production from biomass gasification, hybrid hydrogen internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle) within a complete energy system. The work involves close interaction with the principal investigators to ensure accurate representation of the component technology. Comparisons are made with the current cost and performance of fossil-based and alternative renewable energy systems, and sensitivity analyses are conducted to determine the effect of changes in cost and performance parameters on the projects` viability.

  2. Verification and Validation of Adaptive and Intelligent Systems with Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Larson, Richard R.

    2009-01-01

    F-15 IFCS project goals are: a) Demonstrate Control Approaches that can Efficiently Optimize Aircraft Performance in both Normal and Failure Conditions [A] & [B] failures. b) Advance Neural Network-Based Flight Control Technology for New Aerospace Systems Designs with a Pilot in the Loop. Gen II objectives include; a) Implement and Fly a Direct Adaptive Neural Network Based Flight Controller; b) Demonstrate the Ability of the System to Adapt to Simulated System Failures: 1) Suppress Transients Associated with Failure; 2) Re-Establish Sufficient Control and Handling of Vehicle for Safe Recovery. c) Provide Flight Experience for Development of Verification and Validation Processes for Flight Critical Neural Network Software.

  3. 14 CFR 23.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 23.1329 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1329 Automatic pilot system. If an automatic pilot system is installed, it must meet the following: (a) Each system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be quickly and...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1329 - Automatic pilot system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic pilot system. 23.1329 Section 23...: Installation § 23.1329 Automatic pilot system. If an automatic pilot system is installed, it must meet the following: (a) Each system must be designed so that the automatic pilot can— (1) Be quickly and...

  5. Space telescope observatory management system preliminary test and verification plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, J. S.; Kaldenbach, C. F.; Williams, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    The preliminary plan for the Space Telescope Observatory Management System Test and Verification (TAV) is provided. Methodology, test scenarios, test plans and procedure formats, schedules, and the TAV organization are included. Supporting information is provided.

  6. Ada(R) Test and Verification System (ATVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strelich, Tom

    1986-01-01

    The Ada Test and Verification System (ATVS) functional description and high level design are completed and summarized. The ATVS will provide a comprehensive set of test and verification capabilities specifically addressing the features of the Ada language, support for embedded system development, distributed environments, and advanced user interface capabilities. Its design emphasis was on effective software development environment integration and flexibility to ensure its long-term use in the Ada software development community.

  7. NES++: number system for encryption based privacy preserving speaker verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Feng, Tao; Zhao, Xi; Shi, Weidong

    2014-05-01

    As speech based operation becomes a main hand-free interaction solution between human and mobile devices (i.e., smartphones, Google Glass), privacy preserving speaker verification receives much attention nowadays. Privacy preserving speaker verification can be achieved through many different ways, such as fuzzy vault and encryption. Encryption based solutions are promising as cryptography is based on solid mathematic foundations and the security properties can be easily analyzed in a well established framework. Most current asymmetric encryption schemes work on finite algebraic structures, such as finite group and finite fields. However, the encryption scheme for privacy preserving speaker verification must handle floating point numbers. This gap must be filled to make the overall scheme practical. In this paper, we propose a number system that meets the requirements of both speaker verification and the encryption scheme used in the process. It also supports addition homomorphic property of Pailliers encryption, which is crucial for privacy preserving speaker verification. As asymmetric encryption is expensive, we propose a method of packing several numbers into one plain-text and the computation overhead is greatly reduced. To evaluate the performance of this method, we implement Pailliers encryption scheme over proposed number system and the packing technique. Our findings show that the proposed solution can fulfill the gap between speaker verification and encryption scheme very well, and the packing technique improves the overall performance. Furthermore, our solution is a building block of encryption based privacy preserving speaker verification, the privacy protection and accuracy rate are not affected.

  8. Expert system verification and validation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Scott W.; Hamilton, David

    1992-01-01

    Five workshops on verification and validation (V&V) of expert systems (ES) where taught during this recent period of performance. Two key activities, previously performed under this contract, supported these recent workshops (1) Survey of state-of-the-practice of V&V of ES and (2) Development of workshop material and first class. The first activity involved performing an extensive survey of ES developers in order to answer several questions regarding the state-of-the-practice in V&V of ES. These questions related to the amount and type of V&V done and the successfulness of this V&V. The next key activity involved developing an intensive hands-on workshop in V&V of ES. This activity involved surveying a large number of V&V techniques, conventional as well as ES specific ones. In addition to explaining the techniques, we showed how each technique could be applied on a sample problem. References were included in the workshop material, and cross referenced to techniques, so that students would know where to go to find additional information about each technique. In addition to teaching specific techniques, we included an extensive amount of material on V&V concepts and how to develop a V&V plan for an ES project. We felt this material was necessary so that developers would be prepared to develop an orderly and structured approach to V&V. That is, they would have a process that supported the use of the specific techniques. Finally, to provide hands-on experience, we developed a set of case study exercises. These exercises were to provide an opportunity for the students to apply all the material (concepts, techniques, and planning material) to a realistic problem.

  9. Industrial methodology for process verification in research (IMPROVER): toward systems biology verification

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Pablo; Hoeng, Julia; Rice, J. Jeremy; Norel, Raquel; Sprengel, Jörg; Stolle, Katrin; Bonk, Thomas; Corthesy, Stephanie; Royyuru, Ajay; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Analyses and algorithmic predictions based on high-throughput data are essential for the success of systems biology in academic and industrial settings. Organizations, such as companies and academic consortia, conduct large multi-year scientific studies that entail the collection and analysis of thousands of individual experiments, often over many physical sites and with internal and outsourced components. To extract maximum value, the interested parties need to verify the accuracy and reproducibility of data and methods before the initiation of such large multi-year studies. However, systematic and well-established verification procedures do not exist for automated collection and analysis workflows in systems biology which could lead to inaccurate conclusions. Results: We present here, a review of the current state of systems biology verification and a detailed methodology to address its shortcomings. This methodology named ‘Industrial Methodology for Process Verification in Research’ or IMPROVER, consists on evaluating a research program by dividing a workflow into smaller building blocks that are individually verified. The verification of each building block can be done internally by members of the research program or externally by ‘crowd-sourcing’ to an interested community. www.sbvimprover.com Implementation: This methodology could become the preferred choice to verify systems biology research workflows that are becoming increasingly complex and sophisticated in industrial and academic settings. Contact: gustavo@us.ibm.com PMID:22423044

  10. Integrated testing and verification system for research flight software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. N.

    1979-01-01

    The MUST (Multipurpose User-oriented Software Technology) program is being developed to cut the cost of producing research flight software through a system of software support tools. An integrated verification and testing capability was designed as part of MUST. Documentation, verification and test options are provided with special attention on real-time, multiprocessing issues. The needs of the entire software production cycle were considered, with effective management and reduced lifecycle costs as foremost goals.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: PAINT OVERSPRAY ARRESTOR, ATI OSM 200 SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paint overspray arrestors (POAs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the particle filtration efficiency as a function of size for particles smaller than...

  12. PILOT: An intelligent distributed operations support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Arthur N.

    1993-01-01

    The Real-Time Data System (RTDS) project is exploring the application of advanced technologies to the real-time flight operations environment of the Mission Control Centers at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The system, based on a network of engineering workstations, provides services such as delivery of real time telemetry data to flight control applications. To automate the operation of this complex distributed environment, a facility called PILOT (Process Integrity Level and Operation Tracker) is being developed. PILOT comprises a set of distributed agents cooperating with a rule-based expert system; together they monitor process operation and data flows throughout the RTDS network. The goal of PILOT is to provide unattended management and automated operation under user control.

  13. HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS OBSERVING SYSTEM PILOT PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HABSOS Pilot Project is being developed through a partnership of federal, state and academic organizations as proof-of-concept for a coastal observing system in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal is to design a HAB data management system and develop the regional communication infra...

  14. VESTA: a system-level verification environment based on C++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahdadpuri, Mahendra V.; Sosa, Javier; Navarro, H. éctor; Montiel-Nelson, Juan A.; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2003-04-01

    System verification is an important issue to do at every design step to ensure the complete system correctness. The verification effort is becoming more time-consuming due to the increase in design complexity. New environments are necessary to reduce the complexity of this task and, most importantly, reduce the time to develop it. Among the languages used in verification, C++ is powerful enough for encapsulating the necessary concepts in a set of classes and templates. This work introduces a framework that allows describing and verifying highly complex systems in a user-friendly and speedy way with C++ classes. These encapsulate hardware description and verification concepts and can be reused throughout a project and also in various development projects. Furthermore, the resulting libraries provide an easy-to-use interface for describing systems and writing test benches in C++, with a transparent connection to an HDL simulator. VESTA includes an advanced memory management with an extremely versatile linked list. The linked list access mode can change on-fly to a FIFO, a LIFO or a memory array access mode, among others. Experimental results demonstrate that the basic types provided by our verification environment excel the features of non-commercial solutions as Openvera or TestBuilder and commercial solutions such as 'e' language. Besides, the results achieved have shown significant productivity gain in creating reusable testbenches and in debugging simulation runs.

  15. Applying Formal Verification Techniques to Ambient Assisted Living Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benghazi, Kawtar; Visitación Hurtado, María; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Noguera, Manuel

    This paper presents a verification approach based on timed traces semantics and MEDISTAM-RT [1] to check the fulfillment of non-functional requirements, such as timeliness and safety, and assure the correct functioning of the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) systems. We validate this approach by its application to an Emergency Assistance System for monitoring people suffering from cardiac alteration with syncope.

  16. IMRT verification using a radiochromic/optical-CT dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark; Guo, Pengyi; Gluckman, Gary; Adamovics, John

    2006-12-01

    This work represents our first experiences relating to IMRT verification using a relatively new 3D dosimetry system consisting of a PRESAGETM dosimeter (Heuris Inc, Pharma LLC) and an optical-CT scanning system (OCTOPUSTM TM MGS Inc). This work builds in a step-wise manner on prior work in our lab.

  17. Verification and Validation for Flight-Critical Systems (VVFCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Sharon S.; Jacobsen, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    On March 31, 2009 a Request for Information (RFI) was issued by NASA s Aviation Safety Program to gather input on the subject of Verification and Validation (V & V) of Flight-Critical Systems. The responses were provided to NASA on or before April 24, 2009. The RFI asked for comments in three topic areas: Modeling and Validation of New Concepts for Vehicles and Operations; Verification of Complex Integrated and Distributed Systems; and Software Safety Assurance. There were a total of 34 responses to the RFI, representing a cross-section of academic (26%), small & large industry (47%) and government agency (27%).

  18. Reactive system verification case study: Fault-tolerant transputer communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, D. Francis; Hamory, Philip J.

    1993-01-01

    A reactive program is one which engages in an ongoing interaction with its environment. A system which is controlled by an embedded reactive program is called a reactive system. Examples of reactive systems are aircraft flight management systems, bank automatic teller machine (ATM) networks, airline reservation systems, and computer operating systems. Reactive systems are often naturally modeled (for logical design purposes) as a composition of autonomous processes which progress concurrently and which communicate to share information and/or to coordinate activities. Formal (i.e., mathematical) frameworks for system verification are tools used to increase the users' confidence that a system design satisfies its specification. A framework for reactive system verification includes formal languages for system modeling and for behavior specification and decision procedures and/or proof-systems for verifying that the system model satisfies the system specifications. Using the Ostroff framework for reactive system verification, an approach to achieving fault-tolerant communication between transputers was shown to be effective. The key components of the design, the decoupler processes, may be viewed as discrete-event-controllers introduced to constrain system behavior such that system specifications are satisfied. The Ostroff framework was also effective. The expressiveness of the modeling language permitted construction of a faithful model of the transputer network. The relevant specifications were readily expressed in the specification language. The set of decision procedures provided was adequate to verify the specifications of interest. The need for improved support for system behavior visualization is emphasized.

  19. 76 FR 50715 - Briefing on Partner Vetting System Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Agency for International Development Briefing on Partner Vetting System Pilot Program... briefing. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a briefing on the Partner Vetting System (PVS) pilot...

  20. System verification and validation: a fundamental systems engineering task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansorge, Wolfgang R.

    2004-09-01

    Systems Engineering (SE) is the discipline in a project management team, which transfers the user's operational needs and justifications for an Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) -or any other telescope-- into a set of validated required system performance characteristics. Subsequently transferring these validated required system performance characteris-tics into a validated system configuration, and eventually into the assembled, integrated telescope system with verified performance characteristics and provided it with "objective evidence that the particular requirements for the specified intended use are fulfilled". The latter is the ISO Standard 8402 definition for "Validation". This presentation describes the verification and validation processes of an ELT Project and outlines the key role System Engineering plays in these processes throughout all project phases. If these processes are implemented correctly into the project execution and are started at the proper time, namely at the very beginning of the project, and if all capabilities of experienced system engineers are used, the project costs and the life-cycle costs of the telescope system can be reduced between 25 and 50 %. The intention of this article is, to motivate and encourage project managers of astronomical telescopes and scientific instruments to involve the entire spectrum of Systems Engineering capabilities performed by trained and experienced SYSTEM engineers for the benefit of the project by explaining them the importance of Systems Engineering in the AIV and validation processes.

  1. Verification and Validation of Model-Based Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecheur, Charles; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a three year project (FY99 to FY01) on the verification and validation of model based autonomous systems. The topics include: 1) Project Profile; 2) Model-Based Autonomy; 3) The Livingstone MIR; 4) MPL2SMV; 5) Livingstone to SMV Translation; 6) Symbolic Model Checking; 7) From Livingstone Models to SMV Models; 8) Application In-Situ Propellant Production; 9) Closed-Loop Verification Principle; 10) Livingstone PathFinder (LPF); 11) Publications and Presentations; and 12) Future Directions. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  2. Approaches to the verification of rule-based expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris; Riley, Gary; Savely, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Expert systems are a highly useful spinoff of artificial intelligence research. One major stumbling block to extended use of expert systems is the lack of well-defined verification and validation (V and V) methodologies. Since expert systems are computer programs, the definitions of verification and validation from conventional software are applicable. The primary difficulty with expert systems is the use of development methodologies which do not support effective V and V. If proper techniques are used to document requirements, V and V of rule-based expert systems is possible, and may be easier than with conventional code. For NASA applications, the flight technique panels used in previous programs should provide an excellent way to verify the rules used in expert systems. There are, however, some inherent differences in expert systems that will affect V and V considerations.

  3. 7 CFR 272.13 - Prisoner verification system (PVS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Prisoner verification system (PVS). 272.13 Section 272.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  4. 7 CFR 272.13 - Prisoner verification system (PVS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prisoner verification system (PVS). 272.13 Section 272.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING...

  5. Failure of automatic capture verification in an epicardial pacemaker system.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Leonardo; Hordof, Allan J; Hsu, Daphne S; Pass, Robert H

    2005-09-01

    Epicardial pacing is frequently used in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. Automatic threshold determination has been reported to be safe in epicardial lead systems. We report a case of falsely low ventricular thresholds determined by automatic capture verification in a patient with complete loss of capture due to a lead fracture. PMID:16177851

  6. A software engineering approach to expert system design and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.; Goodwin, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    Software engineering design and verification methods for developing expert systems are not yet well defined. Integration of expert system technology into software production environments will require effective software engineering methodologies to support the entire life cycle of expert systems. The software engineering methods used to design and verify an expert system, RENEX, is discussed. RENEX demonstrates autonomous rendezvous and proximity operations, including replanning trajectory events and subsystem fault detection, onboard a space vehicle during flight. The RENEX designers utilized a number of software engineering methodologies to deal with the complex problems inherent in this system. An overview is presented of the methods utilized. Details of the verification process receive special emphasis. The benefits and weaknesses of the methods for supporting the development life cycle of expert systems are evaluated, and recommendations are made based on the overall experiences with the methods.

  7. Psychiatric Residents' Attitudes toward and Experiences with the Clinical-Skills Verification Process: A Pilot Study on U.S. and International Medical Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Nyapati R.; Kodali, Rahul; Mian, Ayesha; Ramtekkar, Ujjwal; Kamarajan, Chella; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on a pilot study of the experiences and perceptions of foreign international medical graduate (F-IMG), United States international medical graduate (US-IMG), and United States medical graduate (USMG) psychiatric residents with the newly mandated Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) process. The goal was to identify and…

  8. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E.

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  9. Initial performance of the advanced inventory verification sample system (AVIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, Johnna B; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Menlove, Howard O; Rael, Carlos D

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements, design and initial performance of the Advanced Inventory Verification Sample System (AVIS) a non-destructive assay (NDA) system to measure small samples of bulk mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) materials (powders and pellets). The AVIS design has evolved from previously developed conceptual physics and engineering designs for the Inventory Sample Verification System (INVS), a safeguards system for nondestructive assay of small samples. The AVIS is an integrated gamma-neutron system. Jointly designed by the Nuclear Material Control Center (NMCC) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), AVIS is intended to meet a performance specification of a total measurement uncertainty of less than 0.5% in the neutron ({sup 240}Pu{sub effective}) measurement. This will allow the AVIS to replace destructive chemical analysis for many samples, with concomitant cost, exposure and waste generation savings for the facility. Data taken to date confirming the performance of the AVIS is presented.

  10. Practical mask inspection system with printability and pattern priority verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Hideo; Ozaki, Fumio; Takahara, Kenichi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kikuiri, Nobutaka

    2011-05-01

    Through the four years of study in Association of Super-Advanced Electronics Technologies (ASET) on reducing mask manufacturing Turn Around Time (TAT) and cost, we have been able to establish a technology to improve the efficiency of the review process by applying a printability verification function that utilizes computational lithography simulations to analyze defects detected by a high-resolution mask inspection system. With the advent of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) and other technologies that extend the life of existing optical lithography, it is becoming extremely difficult to judge a defect only by the shape of a mask pattern, while avoiding pseudo-defects. Thus, printability verification is indispensable for filtering out nuisance defects from high-resolution mask inspection results. When using computational lithography simulations to verify printability with high precision, the image captured by the inspection system must be prepared with extensive care. However, for practical applications, this preparation process needs to be simplified. In addition, utilizing Mask Data Rank (MDR) to vary the defect detection sensitivity according to the patterns is also useful for simultaneously inspecting minute patterns and avoiding pseudo-defects. Combining these two technologies, we believe practical mask inspection for next generation lithography is achievable. We have been improving the estimation accuracy of the printability verification function through discussion with several customers and evaluation of their masks. In this report, we will describe the progress of these practical mask verification functions developed through customers' evaluations.

  11. 7 CFR 272.8 - State income and eligibility verification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false State income and eligibility verification system. 272... PARTICIPATING STATE AGENCIES § 272.8 State income and eligibility verification system. (a) General. (1) State agencies may maintain and use an income and eligibility verification system (IEVS), as specified in...

  12. 7 CFR 272.8 - State income and eligibility verification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false State income and eligibility verification system. 272... PARTICIPATING STATE AGENCIES § 272.8 State income and eligibility verification system. (a) General. (1) State agencies may maintain and use an income and eligibility verification system (IEVS), as specified in...

  13. 7 CFR 272.8 - State income and eligibility verification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false State income and eligibility verification system. 272... PARTICIPATING STATE AGENCIES § 272.8 State income and eligibility verification system. (a) General. (1) State agencies may maintain and use an income and eligibility verification system (IEVS), as specified in...

  14. 7 CFR 272.8 - State income and eligibility verification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false State income and eligibility verification system. 272... PARTICIPATING STATE AGENCIES § 272.8 State income and eligibility verification system. (a) General. (1) State agencies may maintain and use an income and eligibility verification system (IEVS), as specified in...

  15. Verification and validation guidelines for high integrity systems. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Dinsmore, G.; Hecht, S.; Tang, D.

    1995-03-01

    High integrity systems include all protective (safety and mitigation) systems for nuclear power plants, and also systems for which comparable reliability requirements exist in other fields, such as in the process industries, in air traffic control, and in patient monitoring and other medical systems. Verification aims at determining that each stage in the software development completely and correctly implements requirements that were established in a preceding phase, while validation determines that the overall performance of a computer system completely and correctly meets system requirements. Volume I of the report reviews existing classifications for high integrity systems and for the types of errors that may be encountered, and makes recommendations for verification and validation procedures, based on assumptions about the environment in which these procedures will be conducted. The final chapter of Volume I deals with a framework for standards in this field. Volume II contains appendices dealing with specific methodologies for system classification, for dependability evaluation, and for two software tools that can automate otherwise very labor intensive verification and validation activities.

  16. Verification of heterogeneous multi-agent system using MCMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyoung; Kim, Seungkeun; Tsourdos, Antonios

    2015-03-01

    The focus of the paper is how to model autonomous behaviours of heterogeneous multi-agent systems such that it can be verified that they will always operate within predefined mission requirements and constraints. This is done by using formal methods with an abstraction of the behaviours modelling and model checking for their verification. Three case studies are presented to verify the decision-making behaviours of heterogeneous multi-agent system using a convoy mission scenario. The multi-agent system in a case study has been extended by increasing the number of agents and function complexity gradually. For automatic verification, model checker for multi-agent systems (MCMAS) is adopted due to its novel capability to accommodate the multi-agent system and successfully verifies the targeting behaviours of the team-level autonomous systems. The verification results help retrospectively the design of decision-making algorithms improved by considering additional agents and behaviours during three steps of scenario modification. Consequently, the last scenario deals with the system composed of a ground control system, two unmanned aerial vehicles, and four unmanned ground vehicles with fault-tolerant and communication relay capabilities.

  17. Evaluation of the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects, Volume IV: Analysis of Pilot Operations and Costs. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-04-AV6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Tasse, Tania; Ohls, James

    2004-01-01

    This report is the forth in the series of evaluations of the National School Lunch Program. The findings presented here are the result of an analysis of pilot project operations and costs for two alternatives to the current application-based certification process--Up-Front Documentation and Graduated Verification--that were tested in 12 public…

  18. Low-level waste vitrification pilot-scale system need report

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.F.; Whitney, L.D.

    1996-03-01

    This report examines the need for pilot-scale testing in support of the low-level vitrification facility at Hanford. In addition, the report examines the availability of on-site facilities to contain a pilot-plant. It is recommended that a non-radioactive pilot-plant be operated for extended periods. In addition, it is recommended that two small-scale systems, one processing radioactive waste feed and one processing a simulated waste feed be used for validation of waste simulants. The actual scale of the pilot-plant will be determined from the technologies included in conceptual design of the plant. However, for the purposes of this review, a plant of 5 to 10 metric ton/day of glass production was assumed. It is recommended that a detailed data needs package and integrated flowsheet be developed in FY95 to clearly identify data requirements and identify relationships with other TWRS elements. A pilot-plant will contribute to the reduction of uncertainty in the design and initial operation of the vitrification facility to an acceptable level. Prior to pilot-scale testing, the components will not have been operated as an integrated system and will not have been tested for extended operating periods. Testing for extended periods at pilot-scale will allow verification of the flowsheet including the effects of recycle streams. In addition, extended testing will allow evaluation of wear, corrosion and mechanical reality of individual components, potential accumulations within the components, and the sensitivity of the process to operating conditions. Also, the pilot facility will provide evidence that the facility will meet radioactive and nonradioactive environmental release limits, and increase the confidence in scale-up. The pilot-scale testing data and resulting improvements in the vitrification facility design will reduce the time required for cold chemical testing in the vitrification facility.

  19. Advanced NSTS propulsion system verification study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1989-01-01

    The merits of propulsion system development testing are discussed. The existing data base of technical reports and specialists is utilized in this investigation. The study encompassed a review of all available test reports of propulsion system development testing for the Saturn stages, the Titan stages, and the Space Shuttle main propulsion system. The knowledge on propulsion system development and system testing available from specialists and managers was also 'tapped' for inclusion.

  20. Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Jiang, Wei

    2008-03-31

    This document provides the algorithms for CHP system performance monitoring and commissioning verification (CxV). It starts by presenting system-level and component-level performance metrics, followed by descriptions of algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, using the metric presented earlier. Verification of commissioning is accomplished essentially by comparing actual measured performance to benchmarks for performance provided by the system integrator and/or component manufacturers. The results of these comparisons are then automatically interpreted to provide conclusions regarding whether the CHP system and its components have been properly commissioned and where problems are found, guidance is provided for corrections. A discussion of uncertainty handling is then provided, which is followed by a description of how simulations models can be used to generate data for testing the algorithms. A model is described for simulating a CHP system consisting of a micro-turbine, an exhaust-gas heat recovery unit that produces hot water, a absorption chiller and a cooling tower. The process for using this model for generating data for testing the algorithms for a selected set of faults is described. The next section applies the algorithms developed to CHP laboratory and field data to illustrate their use. The report then concludes with a discussion of the need for laboratory testing of the algorithms on a physical CHP systems and identification of the recommended next steps.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, CATALYTICA COMBUSTION SYSTEMS, INC., XONON FLAMELESS COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Xonon Cool Combustion System manufactured by Catalytica Energy Systems, Inc., formerly Catalytica Combustion Systems, Inc., to control NOx emissions from gas turbines that operate wit...

  2. Pilot-Tone System for Mobile Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davarian, F.

    1986-01-01

    In mobile communication system called tone-calibrated technique, pilot tone provides phase- and amplitude-calibration reference to enable coherent demodulation of signal at receiver despite fading. Signal received by or from mobile terminal faded due to motion of terminal and propagation of signal along multiple paths. Fading introduces random amplitude modulation and phase modulation with bandwidth of twice Doppler frequency shift. Degrading effects of multipath fading reduced. Tonecalibrated technique for use with phase-modulated data or telephony systems using Manchester digital pulse-code modulation.

  3. Systems analysis-independent analysis and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Badin, J.S.; DiPietro, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Program is supporting research, development, and demonstration activities to overcome the barriers to the integration of hydrogen into the Nation`s energy infrastructure. Much work is required to gain acceptance of hydrogen energy system concepts and to develop them for implementation. A systems analysis database has been created that includes a formal documentation of technology characterization profiles and cost and performance information. Through a systematic and quantitative approach, system developers can understand and address important issues and thereby assure effective and timely commercial implementation. This project builds upon and expands the previously developed and tested pathway model and provides the basis for a consistent and objective analysis of all hydrogen energy concepts considered by the DOE Hydrogen Program Manager. This project can greatly accelerate the development of a system by minimizing the risk of costly design evolutions, and by stimulating discussions, feedback, and coordination of key players and allows them to assess the analysis, evaluate the trade-offs, and to address any emerging problem areas. Specific analytical studies will result in the validation of the competitive feasibility of the proposed system and identify system development needs. Systems that are investigated include hydrogen bromine electrolysis, municipal solid waste gasification, electro-farming (biomass gasifier and PEM fuel cell), wind/hydrogen hybrid system for remote sites, home electrolysis and alternate infrastructure options, renewable-based electrolysis to fuel PEM fuel cell vehicle fleet, and geothermal energy used to produce hydrogen. These systems are compared to conventional and benchmark technologies. Interim results and findings are presented. Independent analyses emphasize quality, integrity, objectivity, a long-term perspective, corporate memory, and the merging of technical, economic, operational, and programmatic expertise.

  4. Verification System: First System-Wide Performance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernobay, I.; Zerbo, L.

    2006-05-01

    System-wide performance tests are essential for the development, testing and evaluation of individual components of the verification system. In addition to evaluating global readiness it helps establishing the practical and financial requirements for eventual operations. The first system-wide performance test (SPT1) was conducted in three phases: - A preparatory phase in May-June 2004 - A performance testing phase in April-June 2005 - An evaluation phase in the last half of 2005. The preparatory phase was developmental in nature. The main objectives for the performance testing phase included establishment of performance baseline under current provisional mode of operation (CTBT/PC- 19/1/Annex II, CTBT/WGB-21/1), examination of established requirements and procedures for operation and maintenance. To establish a system-wide performance baseline the system configuration was fixed for April-May 2005. The third month (June 2005) was used for implementation of 21 test case scenarios to examine either particular operational procedures or the response of the system components to the failures simulated under controlled conditions. A total of 163 stations and 5 certified radionuclide laboratories of International Monitoring System (IMS) participated in the performance testing phase - about 50% of the eventual IMS network. 156 IMS facilities and 40 National Data Centres (NDCs) were connected to the International Data Centre (IDC) via Global Communication Infrastructure (GCI) communication links. In addition, 12 legacy stations in the auxiliary seismic network sent data to the IDC over the Internet. During the performance testing phase, the IDC produced all required products, analysed more than 6100 seismic events and 1700 radionuclide spectra. Performance of all system elements was documented and analysed. IDC products were compared with results of data processing at the NDCs. On the basis of statistics and information collected during the SPT1 a system-wide performance

  5. Enrichment Assay Methods Development for the Integrated Cylinder Verification System

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Curtis, Michael M.

    2009-10-22

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility's entire product-cylinder inventory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a concept to automate the verification of enrichment plant cylinders to enable 100 percent product-cylinder verification and potentially, mass-balance calculations on the facility as a whole (by also measuring feed and tails cylinders). The Integrated Cylinder Verification System (ICVS) could be located at key measurement points to positively identify each cylinder, measure its mass and enrichment, store the collected data in a secure database, and maintain continuity of knowledge on measured cylinders until IAEA inspector arrival. The three main objectives of this FY09 project are summarized here and described in more detail in the report: (1) Develop a preliminary design for a prototype NDA system, (2) Refine PNNL's MCNP models of the NDA system, and (3) Procure and test key pulse-processing components. Progress against these tasks to date, and next steps, are discussed.

  6. An expert system development methodology which supports verification and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris; Riley, Gary; Savely, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Expert systems have demonstrated commercial viability in a wide range of applications, but still face some obstacles to widespread use. A major stumbling block is the lack of well defined verification and validation (V and V) techniques. The primary difficulty with expert system V and V is the use of development methodologies which do not support V and V. As with conventional code, the key to effective V and V is the development methodology. An expert system development methodology is described which is based upon a panel review approach, that allows input from all parties concerned with the expert system.

  7. Modeling, analysis and verification of a partial shunt system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Spacecraft power system modeling, analysis and verification techniques using the electronic circuit simulation programs such as SPICE and SABER are presented. Partial shunt control system dynamics including the loop gain and bus impedance are derived. A typical partial shunt system is modeled and the loop gain of the system is simulated using an electronic circuit simulator. To confirm the circuit model simulation results prior to expensive hardware testing, they should be compared with the results simulated from a transfer function model derived from circuit equations. The spacecraft test results finally verify the modeling and analysis.

  8. Voice activity detection for speaker verification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Complex algorithm for speech activity detection was presented in this article. It is based on speech enhancement, features extraction and final detection algorithm. The first one was published in ETSI standard as a module of "Advanced front-end feature extraction algorithm" in distributed speech recognition system. It consists of two main parts, noise estimatiom and Wiener filtering. For the final detection modified linear prediction coefficients and spectral entropy features are extracted form denoised signal.

  9. Verification test report on a solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information is provided on the development, qualification and acceptance verification of commercial solar heating and hot water systems and components. The verification includes the performances, the efficiences and the various methods used, such as similarity, analysis, inspection, test, etc., that are applicable to satisfying the verification requirements.

  10. Apollo experience report: Communications system flight evaluation and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Travis, D.; Royston, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Flight tests of the synergetic operation of the spacecraft and earth based communications equipment were accomplished during Apollo missions AS-202 through Apollo 12. The primary goals of these tests were to verify that the communications system would adequately support lunar landing missions and to establish the inflight communications system performance characteristics. To attain these goals, a communications system flight verification and evaluation team was established. The concept of the team operations, the evolution of the evaluation processes, synopses of the team activities associated with each mission, and major conclusions and recommendations resulting from the performance evaluation are represented.

  11. Instrument Systems Analysis and Verification Facility (ISAVF) users guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. F.; Thomason, J. O.; Wolfgang, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The ISAVF facility is primarily an interconnected system of computers, special purpose real time hardware, and associated generalized software systems, which will permit the Instrument System Analysts, Design Engineers and Instrument Scientists, to perform trade off studies, specification development, instrument modeling, and verification of the instrument, hardware performance. It is not the intent of the ISAVF to duplicate or replace existing special purpose facilities such as the Code 710 Optical Laboratories or the Code 750 Test and Evaluation facilities. The ISAVF will provide data acquisition and control services for these facilities, as needed, using remote computer stations attached to the main ISAVF computers via dedicated communication lines.

  12. A Runtime Verification Framework for Control System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ciraci, Selim; Fuller, Jason C.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Callahan, Charles D.

    2014-08-02

    n a standard workflow for the validation of a control system, the control system is implemented as an extension to a simulator. Such simulators are complex software systems, and engineers may unknowingly violate constraints a simulator places on extensions. As such, errors may be introduced in the implementation of either the control system or the simulator leading to invalid simulation results. This paper presents a novel runtime verification approach for verifying control system implementations within simulators. The major contribution of the approach is the two-tier specification process. In the first tier, engineers model constraints using a domain-specific language tailored to modeling a controller’s response to changes in its input. The language is high-level and effectively hides the implementation details of the simulator, allowing engineers to specify design-level constraints independent of low-level simulator interfaces. In the second tier, simulator developers provide mapping rules for mapping design-level constraints to the implementation of the simulator. Using the rules, an automated tool transforms the design-level specifications into simulator-specific runtime verification specifications and generates monitoring code which is injected into the implementation of the simulator. During simulation, these monitors observe the input and output variables of the control system and report changes to the verifier. The verifier checks whether these changes follow the constraints of the control system. We describe application of this approach to the verification of the constraints of an HVAC control system implemented with the power grid simulator GridLAB-D.

  13. Image integrity verification in medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Lenti, Jozsef; Lovanyi, Istvan

    2003-01-01

    In nowadays it is a major objective to protect healthcare information against unauthorized access. Comparing conventional and electronic management of medical images the later one demands much more complex security measures. We propose a new scenario for watermark data buildup and embedding which is independent from the applied watermarking technology. In our proposed method the embedded watermark data is dependant on image and patient information too. The proposed watermark buildup method provides watermark information where it is small in size and represents a unique digest of the image and image related data. The embedded data can be considered unique with high probability even if the same algorithm was used in different medical information systems. Described procedures ensure new, more secure links between image and related data, offering further perspectives in smartcard implementations. PMID:14664001

  14. Experimental results on constructed wetland pilot system.

    PubMed

    González, J M; Ansola, G; Luis, E

    2001-01-01

    Research into a constructed wetland for wastewater treatment using M.H.E.A. (Hierarchical Mosaic of Artificial Ecosystems) pilot system was carried out over a vegetative period in 8 different flow and vegetable composition series. The system consisted of a free water pond as a first step working as primary treatment followed by a zone with Typha sp. and surface flow and finally a woody zone with a subsurface flow and planted with ligneous species (Salixsp., Populus sp., Fraxinus sp. and Alnus sp.). Removal efficiency in the study reflects an optimal result: 80-99% total suspended matter removal, 82-98% organic matter removal, 70-98% nutrients removal and up to 99.9% faecal bacterial disinfecting. Effluent characteristics were in accordance with European Union legislation criteria for wastewater treatment systems. PMID:11804123

  15. Rule groupings: An approach towards verification of expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Mala

    1991-01-01

    Knowledge-based expert systems are playing an increasingly important role in NASA space and aircraft systems. However, many of NASA's software applications are life- or mission-critical and knowledge-based systems do not lend themselves to the traditional verification and validation techniques for highly reliable software. Rule-based systems lack the control abstractions found in procedural languages. Hence, it is difficult to verify or maintain such systems. Our goal is to automatically structure a rule-based system into a set of rule-groups having a well-defined interface to other rule-groups. Once a rule base is decomposed into such 'firewalled' units, studying the interactions between rules would become more tractable. Verification-aid tools can then be developed to test the behavior of each such rule-group. Furthermore, the interactions between rule-groups can be studied in a manner similar to integration testing. Such efforts will go a long way towards increasing our confidence in the expert-system software. Our research efforts address the feasibility of automating the identification of rule groups, in order to decompose the rule base into a number of meaningful units.

  16. Verification of autonomous systems using embedded behavior auditors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Daniel; Tailor, Eric

    1999-01-01

    The prospect of highly autonomous spacecraft and rovers is exciting for what they can do with onboard decision making, but also troubling for what they might do [improperly] without human-in-the-loop oversight. The single biggest obstacle to acceptance of highly autonomous software control systems is doubt about their trustworthiness as a replacement for human analysis and decision-making. Such doubts can be addressed with a comprehensive system verification effort, but techniques suitable for conventional sequencer-based systems are inadequate for reactive systems. This paper highlights some of the key features that distinguish autonomous systems from their predecessors and then focuses on one approach to aid in their verification using a ``lightweight'' formal method. Specifically, we present a little language that enables system engineers and designers to specify expected behavior in the form of invariants, state machines, episodes, and resource constraints, and a way of compiling such specifications and linking them into the operational code as embedded behavior auditors. Such auditors become part of the overall fault-detection design, checking system behavior in real-time, not only in the test-bed but also in flight.

  17. Expert system verification and validation survey. Delivery 2: Survey results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the state-of-the-practice in Verification and Validation (V and V) of Expert Systems (ESs) on current NASA and industry applications. This is the first task of the series which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate ES V and V tools and techniques are available for Space Station Knowledge Based Systems development. The strategy for determining the state-of-the-practice is to check how well each of the known ES V and V issues are being addressed and to what extent they have impacted the development of ESs.

  18. Verification Test of Power Fluctuation Suppression System for Large PV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noro, Yasuhiro; Naoi, Shinya; Toba, Koji; Kimura, Misao; Minegishi, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Masanao; Aoki, Shinichi; Okuda, Yasuo

    The large scale photovoltaic (PV) generation station is expected to spread in the future. However, output power of renewable energy sources such as PV is affected by weather conditions and their output tends to be unstable. As a result, the penetration of PV power station makes it difficult to maintain frequency of power system in allowable range. The authors have developed a suppression system to stabilize output power fluctuation of a large PV generation station. To reduce short term fluctuation, storage batteries applying SCiBTM are used. In this paper, verification test results are explained and simulation results to improve control performance are also shown.

  19. Expert system verification and validation survey. Delivery 3: Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the state-of-the-practice in Verification and Validation (V and V) of Expert Systems (ESs) on current NASA and Industry applications. This is the first task of a series which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate ES V and V tools and techniques are available for Space Station Knowledge Based Systems development. The strategy for determining the state-of-the-practice is to check how well each of the known ES V and V issues are being addressed and to what extent they have impacted the development of ESs.

  20. Expert system verification and validation survey. Delivery 5: Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the state-of-the-practice in Verification and Validation (V and V) of Expert Systems (ESs) on current NASA and Industry applications. This is the first task of a series which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate ES V and V tools and techniques are available for Space Station Knowledge Based Systems development. The strategy for determining the state-of-the-practice is to check how well each of the known ES V and V issues are being addressed and to what extent they have impacted the development of ESs.

  1. Expert system verification and validation survey, delivery 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the state-of-the-practice in Verification and Validation (V and V) of Expert Systems (ESs) on current NASA and Industry applications. This is the first task of a series which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate ES V and V tools and techniques are available for Space Station Knowledge Based Systems development. The strategy for determining the state-of-the-practice is to check how well each of the known ES V and V issues are being addressed and to what extent they have impacted the development of ESs.

  2. Rule Systems for Runtime Verification: A Short Tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barringer, Howard; Havelund, Klaus; Rydeheard, David; Groce, Alex

    In this tutorial, we introduce two rule-based systems for on and off-line trace analysis, RuleR and LogScope. RuleR is a conditional rule-based system, which has a simple and easily implemented algorithm for effective runtime verification, and into which one can compile a wide range of temporal logics and other specification formalisms used for runtime verification. Specifications can be parameterized with data, or even with specifications, allowing for temporal logic combinators to be defined. We outline a number of simple syntactic extensions of core RuleR that can lead to further conciseness of specification but still enabling easy and efficient implementation. RuleR is implemented in Java and we will demonstrate its ease of use in monitoring Java programs. LogScope is a derivation of RuleR adding a simple very user-friendly temporal logic. It was developed in Python, specifically for supporting testing of spacecraft flight software for NASA’s next 2011 Mars mission MSL (Mars Science Laboratory). The system has been applied by test engineers to analysis of log files generated by running the flight software. Detailed logging is already part of the system design approach, and hence there is no added instrumentation overhead caused by this approach. While post-mortem log analysis prevents the autonomous reaction to problems possible with traditional runtime verification, it provides a powerful tool for test automation. A new system is being developed that integrates features from both RuleR and LogScope.

  3. Study of techniques for redundancy verification without disrupting systems, phases 1-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The problem of verifying the operational integrity of redundant equipment and the impact of a requirement for verification on such equipment are considered. Redundant circuits are examined and the characteristics which determine adaptability to verification are identified. Mutually exclusive and exhaustive categories for verification approaches are established. The range of applicability of these techniques is defined in terms of signal characteristics and redundancy features. Verification approaches are discussed and a methodology for the design of redundancy verification is developed. A case study is presented which involves the design of a verification system for a hypothetical communications system. Design criteria for redundant equipment are presented. Recommendations for the development of technological areas pertinent to the goal of increased verification capabilities are given.

  4. Design for Verification: Using Design Patterns to Build Reliable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlitz, Peter C.; Penix, John; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Components so far have been mainly used in commercial software development to reduce time to market. While some effort has been spent on formal aspects of components, most of this was done in the context of programming language or operating system framework integration. As a consequence, increased reliability of composed systems is mainly regarded as a side effect of a more rigid testing of pre-fabricated components. In contrast to this, Design for Verification (D4V) puts the focus on component specific property guarantees, which are used to design systems with high reliability requirements. D4V components are domain specific design pattern instances with well-defined property guarantees and usage rules, which are suitable for automatic verification. The guaranteed properties are explicitly used to select components according to key system requirements. The D4V hypothesis is that the same general architecture and design principles leading to good modularity, extensibility and complexity/functionality ratio can be adapted to overcome some of the limitations of conventional reliability assurance measures, such as too large a state space or too many execution paths.

  5. Digital data storage systems, computers, and data verification methods

    DOEpatents

    Groeneveld, Bennett J.; Austad, Wayne E.; Walsh, Stuart C.; Herring, Catherine A.

    2005-12-27

    Digital data storage systems, computers, and data verification methods are provided. According to a first aspect of the invention, a computer includes an interface adapted to couple with a dynamic database; and processing circuitry configured to provide a first hash from digital data stored within a portion of the dynamic database at an initial moment in time, to provide a second hash from digital data stored within the portion of the dynamic database at a subsequent moment in time, and to compare the first hash and the second hash.

  6. Model Checking for Verification of Interactive Health IT Systems

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Keith A.; Mercer, Eric; Bahrami, Ali; Tao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous methods for design and verification of health IT systems have lagged far behind their proliferation. The inherent technical complexity of healthcare, combined with the added complexity of health information technology makes their resulting behavior unpredictable and introduces serious risk. We propose to mitigate this risk by formalizing the relationship between HIT and the conceptual work that increasingly typifies modern care. We introduce new techniques for modeling clinical workflows and the conceptual products within them that allow established, powerful modeling checking technology to be applied to interactive health IT systems. The new capability can evaluate the workflows of a new HIT system performed by clinicians and computers to improve safety and reliability. We demonstrate the method on a patient contact system to demonstrate model checking is effective for interactive systems and that much of it can be automated. PMID:26958166

  7. Design and performance verification of a passive propellant management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, D. A.; Regnier, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the design and verification testing of a reusable passive propellant management system. The system was designed to acquire propellant in low- or zero-g environments and also retain this propellant under high axially directed accelerations that may be experienced during launch and orbit-to-orbit transfer. The system design requirements were established to satisfy generally the requirements for a large number of potential NASA and military applications, such as orbit-to-orbit shuttles and satellite vehicles. The resulting concept was a multicompartmented tank with independent surface tension acquisition channels in each compartment. The tank was designed to provide a minimum expulsion efficiency of 98 percent when subjected to the simultaneous conditions of acceleration, vibration, and outflow. The system design has the unique capability to demonstrate low-g performance in a 1-g test environment, and the test program summarized was structured around this capability.

  8. Concept for an optionally piloted vehicle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucks, Kenneth W.

    1993-02-01

    A concept for an optionally piloted vehicle (OPV) is currently in development using a platform that is a derivative of an all-composite, long endurance manned aircraft. This paper describes the challenges and basic advantages of an OPV when compared to the exclusively unmanned operation of conventional Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The paper focuses on system reliability and Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) issues that must be resolved to ensure aircraft recoverability and safety-of-flight when flown in air-traffic controlled airspace, including full autonomous landing and takeoff. A practical approach using a unique arrangement of redundant off-the-shelf systems incorporating artificial intelligence and utilizing Global Positioning, Microwave Landing, and Joint Tactical Information Data Systems is described. OPV applications to a wide-range of payloads and operational missions are described, including electro-optical/radar imaging, environmental, SIGINT, and communication systems. In addition, the platform is seen as the forerunner to an in-flight refuelable UAV, that would enable world-wide non-stop deployments and extended on-station times.

  9. Pilot climate data system user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reph, M. G.; Treinish, L. A.; Bloch, L.

    1984-01-01

    Instructions for using the Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS), an interactive, scientific data management system for locating, obtaining, manipulating, and displaying climate-research data are presented. The PCDS currently provides this supoort for approximately twenty data sets. Figures that illustrate the terminal displays which a user sees when he/she runs the PCDS and some examples of the output from this system are included. The capabilities which are described in detail allow a user to perform the following: (1) obtain comprehensive descriptions of a number of climate parameter data sets and the associated sensor measurements from which they were derived; (2) obtain detailed information about the temporal coverage and data volume of data sets which are readily accessible via the PCDS; (3) extract portions of a data set using criteria such as time range and geographic location, and output the data to tape, user terminal, system printer, or online disk files in a special data-set-independent format; (4) access and manipulate the data in these data-set-independent files, performing such functions as combining the data, subsetting the data, and averaging the data; and (5) create various graphical representations of the data stored in the data-set-independent files.

  10. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Potable Water System Verification Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie; DeVera, Jean; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Nik; Steele, John; Gazda, Daniel; Roberts, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), also known as Orion, will ferry a crew of up to six astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), or a crew of up to four astronauts to the moon. The first launch of CEV is scheduled for approximately 2014. A stored water system on the CEV will supply the crew with potable water for various purposes: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain quality of the water transferred from the Orbiter to the ISS and stored in Contingency Water Containers (CWCs). In the CEV water system, the ionic silver biocide is expected to be depleted from solution due to ionic silver plating onto the surfaces of the materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide. Since the biocide depletion is expected to occur within a short amount of time after loading the water into the CEV water tanks at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), an additional microbial control is a 0.1 micron point of use filter that will be used at the outlet of the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD). Because this may be the first time NASA is considering a stored water system for longterm missions that does not maintain a residual biocide, a team of experts in materials compatibility, biofilms and point of use filters, surface treatment and coatings, and biocides has been created to pinpoint concerns and perform testing to help alleviate those concerns related to the CEV water system. Results from the test plans laid out in the paper presented to SAE last year (Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Potable Water System Verification Coordination, 2008012083) will be detailed in this paper. Additionally, recommendations for the CEV verification will be described for risk mitigation in meeting the physicochemical and microbiological requirements on the CEV PWS.

  11. Techniques for Improving Pilot Recovery from System Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.

    2001-01-01

    This project examined the application of intelligent cockpit systems to aid air transport pilots at the tasks of reacting to in-flight system failures and of planning and then following a safe four dimensional trajectory to the runway threshold during emergencies. Two studies were conducted. The first examined pilot performance with a prototype awareness/alerting system in reacting to on-board system failures. In a full-motion, high-fidelity simulator, Army helicopter pilots were asked to fly a mission during which, without warning or briefing, 14 different failures were triggered at random times. Results suggest that the amount of information pilots require from such diagnostic systems is strongly dependent on their training; for failures they are commonly trained to react to with a procedural response, they needed only an indication of which failure to follow, while for 'un-trained' failures, they benefited from more intelligent and informative systems. Pilots were also found to over-rely on the system in conditions were it provided false or mis-leading information. In the second study, a proof-of-concept system was designed suitable for helping pilots replan their flights in emergency situations for quick, safe trajectory generation. This system is described in this report, including: the use of embedded fast-time simulation to predict the trajectory defined by a series of discrete actions; the models of aircraft and pilot dynamics required by the system; and the pilot interface. Then, results of a flight simulator evaluation with airline pilots are detailed. In 6 of 72 simulator runs, pilots were not able to establish a stable flight path on localizer and glideslope, suggesting a need for cockpit aids. However, results also suggest that, to be operationally feasible, such an aid must be capable of suggesting safe trajectories to the pilot; an aid that only verified plans entered by the pilot was found to have significantly detrimental effects on performance and

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT: TRITON SYSTEMS, LLC SOLID BOWL CENTRIFUGE, MODEL TS-5000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Triton Systems, LLC Solid Bowl Centrifuge Model TS-5000 (TS-5000) was conducted at the Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory Swine Educational Unit in Raleigh, North Carolina. The TS-5000 was 48" in diameter and 30" deep, with a bowl capacity of 16 ft3. ...

  13. Real-Time System Verification by Kappa-Induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Lee S.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first formal verification of a reintegration protocol for a safety-critical, fault-tolerant, real-time distributed embedded system. A reintegration protocol increases system survivability by allowing a node that has suffered a fault to regain state consistent with the operational nodes. The protocol is verified in the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL), where bounded model checking and decision procedures are used to verify infinite-state systems by k-induction. The protocol and its environment are modeled as synchronizing timeout automata. Because k-induction is exponential with respect to k, we optimize the formal model to reduce the size of k. Also, the reintegrator's event-triggered behavior is conservatively modeled as time-triggered behavior to further reduce the size of k and to make it invariant to the number of nodes modeled. A corollary is that a clique avoidance property is satisfied.

  14. Formal Verification for Embedded Systems Design Based on MDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, Francisco Assis Moreira; da Silva Oliveira, Marcio Ferreira; Wagner, Flávio Rech

    This work presents a Model Driven Engineering (MDE) approach for the automatic generation of a network of timed automata from the functional specification of an embedded application described using UML class and sequence diagrams. By means of transformations on the UML model of the embedded system, a MOF-based representation for the network of timed automata is automatically obtained, which can be used as input to formal verification tools, as the Uppaal model checker, in order to validate desired functional and temporal properties of the embedded system specification. Since the network of timed automata is automatically generated, the methodology can be very useful for the designer, making easier the debugging and formal validation of the system specification. The paper describes the defined transformations between models, which generate the network of timed automata as well as the textual input to the Uppaal model checker, and illustrates the use of the methodology with a case study to show the effectiveness of the approach.

  15. Integrated guidance, navigation and control verification plan primary flight system. [space shuttle avionics integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The verification process and requirements for the ascent guidance interfaces and the ascent integrated guidance, navigation and control system for the space shuttle orbiter are defined as well as portions of supporting systems which directly interface with the system. The ascent phase of verification covers the normal and ATO ascent through the final OMS-2 circularization burn (all of OPS-1), the AOA ascent through the OMS-1 burn, and the RTLS ascent through ET separation (all of MM 601). In addition, OPS translation verification is defined. Verification trees and roadmaps are given.

  16. Pilot climate data system: User's guide for charts subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of the Pilot Climate Data System's (PCDS) CHARTS Subsystem is described. This facility is an interactive software system for the graphical production and enhancement of text and viewgraph displays.

  17. Data-link alternatives for the NASA pilot data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likens, W. C.; Zichterman, G.

    1985-01-01

    There are several preliminary, or pilot, efforts for developing data systems for supporting NASA science research. The Pilot Data Systems consist of the Pilot Land Data System (PLDS), the Pilot Ocean Data System (PODS), the Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS), and the Pilot Planetary Data System (PPDS). The PLDS is likely to have the greatest communication needs of the various pilots. Communications issues and requirements are examined in the context of the mature PLDS as it may exist by 1990. The PLDS is seen as a distributed processing system linking resources at a number of NASA research centers and outside universities. Large image data sets, including LANDSAT scenes, are a major data type to be moved along the PLDS communications network. The unusually large size of these data files requires examining new technologies that may allow efficient and affordable communication at rates of up to 60 megabits per second. Potentially useful developments include portable satellite ground stations, and time division multiple access for sharing high-speed satellite links. Further pooling of communications for the various data systems into a single network would reduce costs and may make economic justification of access to the required data rates possible.

  18. Technology verification phase. Dynamic isotope power system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, D.G.

    1982-03-10

    The Phase I requirements of the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) program were to make a detailed Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) for an isotope fueled organic Rankine cycle power system and to build and test a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) which simulated as closely as possible the operational characteristics of the FSCD. The activities and results of Phase II, the Technology Verification Phase, of the program are reported. The objectives of this phase were to increase system efficiency to 18.1% by component development, to demonstrate system reliability by a 5000 h endurance test and to update the flight system design. During Phase II, system performance was improved from 15.1% to 16.6%, an endurance test of 2000 h was performed while the flight design analysis was limited to a study of the General Purpose Heat Source, a study of the regenerator manufacturing technique and analysis of the hardness of the system to a laser threat. It was concluded from these tests that the GDS is basically prototypic of a flight design; all components necessary for satisfactory operation were demonstrated successfully at the system level; over 11,000 total h of operation without any component failure attested to the inherent reliability of this type of system; and some further development is required, specifically in the area of performance. (LCL)

  19. Video-based cargo fire verification system with fuzzy inference engine for commercial aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadok, Mokhtar; Zakrzewski, Radek; Zeliff, Bob

    2005-02-01

    Conventional smoke detection systems currently installed onboard aircraft are often subject to high rates of false alarms. Under current procedures, whenever an alarm is issued the pilot is obliged to release fire extinguishers and to divert to the nearest airport. Aircraft diversions are costly and dangerous in some situations. A reliable detection system that minimizes false-alarm rate and allows continuous monitoring of cargo compartments is highly desirable. A video-based system has been recently developed by Goodrich Corporation to address this problem. The Cargo Fire Verification System (CFVS) is a multi camera system designed to provide live stream video to the cockpit crew and to perform hotspot, fire, and smoke detection in aircraft cargo bays. In addition to video frames, the CFVS uses other sensor readings to discriminate between genuine events such as fire or smoke and nuisance alarms such as fog or dust. A Mamdani-type fuzzy inference engine is developed to provide approximate reasoning for decision making. In one implementation, Gaussian membership functions for frame intensity-based features, relative humidity, and temperature are constructed using experimental data to form the system inference engine. The CFVS performed better than conventional aircraft smoke detectors in all standardized tests.

  20. Design, analysis, and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Minning, C.

    1982-01-01

    Design sensitivities are established for the development of photovoltaic module criteria and the definition of needed research tasks. The program consists of three phases. In Phase I, analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical, and structural analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate systems will be selected for qualification testing during Phase II. Additionally, during Phase II, test specimens of various types will be constructed and tested to determine the validity of the analysis methodology developed in Phase I. In Phse III, a finalized optimum design based on knowledge gained in Phase I and II will be developed. All verification testing was completed during this period. Preliminary results and observations are discussed. Descriptions of the thermal, thermal structural, and structural deflection test setups are included.

  1. Verification and validation in railway signalling engineering - an application of enterprise systems techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangxian; Wang, Dong; Huang, Hai; Wang, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Verification and validation of a railway signalling system is a crucial part of the workflow in railway signalling enterprises. Typically, the verification and validation of this type of safety-critical system is performed by means of an on-site test, which leads to a low efficiency and high costs. A novel method for the verification and validation of a railway signalling system is proposed as an application of the enterprise information system (EIS) technique. In this application, the EIS and the simulation test platform are combined together, which enhances the coherence and consistency of the information exchange between the system development and the system verification, to improve the work efficiency. The simulation and auto-test technology used in the system verification also lowers the human and financial costs.

  2. Verification of geomechanical integrity and prediction of long-term mineral trapping for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    .1 %, respectively. We verified the mechanical integrity of the storage system during site operation and predicted the trapping mechanisms for the Ketzin pilot site based on a time-dependent integration of relevant processes for a time period of 16,000 years. Supported by our coupled modelling results, we conclude that CO2 storage at the Ketzin site is safe and reliable on the pilot scale. References [1] Martens, S., Kempka, T., Liebscher, A., Lüth, S., Möller, F., Myrttinen, A., Norden, B., Schmidt-Hattenberger, C., Zimmer, M., Kühn, M. Europe's longest-operating on-shore CO2 storage site at Ketzin, Germany: a progress report after three years of injection. Environmental Earth Sciences 2012 67(2): 323-334. [2] Kempka, T., Kühn, M. Numerical simulations of CO2 arrival times and reservoir pressure coincide with observations from the Ketzin pilot site, Germany. Environmental Earth Sciences 2013 70(8): 3675-3685. [3] Kempka, T., Klein, E., De Lucia, M., Tillner, E., Kühn, M. Assessment of Long-term CO2 Trapping Mechanisms at the Ketzin Pilot Site (Germany) by Coupled Numerical Modelling. Energy Procedia 2013 37: 5419-5426. [4] Klein, E., De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., Kühn, M. Evaluation of long-term mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage: An integrative approach using geochemical modelling and reservoir simulation. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 2013 19: 720-730.

  3. Computer aided production planning - SWZ system of order verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenczyk, D.; Skolud, B.

    2015-11-01

    SWZ (System of order verification) is a computer implementation of the methodology that support fast decision making on the acceptability of a production order, which allows to determine not the best possible solution, but admissible solution that is possible to find in an acceptable time (feasible solution) and acceptable due to the existing constraints. The methodology uses the propagation of constraints techniques and reduced to test a sequence of arbitrarily selected conditions. Fulfilment of all the conditions (the conjunction) provides the ability to perform production orders. In the paper examples of the application of SWZ system comprising the steps of planning and control is presented. The obtained results allowing the determination of acceptable production flow in the system - determination of the manufacturing system parameters those that ensure execution of orders in time under the resource constraints. SWZ also allows to generate the dispatching rules as a sequence of processing operations for each production resource, performed periodically during the production flow in the system. Furthermore the example of SWZ and simulation system integration is shown. SWZ has been enhanced with a module generating files containing the script code of the system model using the internal language of simulation and visualization system.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT; ULTRASONIC AQUEOUS CLEANING SYSTEMS, SMART SONIC CORPORATION, SMART SONIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is a product of the U.S. EPA's Environmental Technoloy Verification (ETV) Program and is focused on the Smart Sonics Ultrasonic Aqueous Cleaning Systems. The verification is based on three main objectives. (1) The Smart Sonic Aqueous Cleaning Systems, Model 2000 and...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM: Stormwater Source Area Treatment Device - Arkal Pressurized Stormwater Filtration System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance verification testing of the Arkal Pressurized Stormwater Filtration System was conducted under EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program on a 5.5-acre parking lot and grounds of St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The system consists of a water sto...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS AND GIARDIA CYSTS IN DRINKING WATER PALL CORPORATION WPM-1 MICROFILTRATION SYSTEM AT PITTSBURGH, PA - NSF 00/09/EPADW395

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Pall Corporation WPM-1 Microfiltration Pilot System was conducted from February 3 to March 5, 1999. The Pall WPM-1 membrane is a hollow fiber type microfiltration membrane made of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF). It has a 0.1 micrometer ( m) nominal por...

  7. Development of Sample Verification System for Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; McKinney, Colin; Jackson, Shannon P.; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Manohara, Harish

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a proof of-concept sample verification system (SVS) for in-situ mass measurement of planetary rock and soil sample in future robotic sample return missions. Our proof-of-concept SVS device contains a 10 cm diameter pressure sensitive elastic membrane placed at the bottom of a sample canister. The membrane deforms under the weight of accumulating planetary sample. The membrane is positioned in proximity to an opposing substrate with a narrow gap. The deformation of the membrane makes the gap to be narrower, resulting in increased capacitance between the two nearly parallel plates. Capacitance readout circuitry on a nearby printed circuit board (PCB) transmits data via a low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) interface. The fabricated SVS proof-of-concept device has successfully demonstrated approximately 1pF/gram capacitance change

  8. Reliability-Based Decision Fusion in Multimodal Biometric Verification Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryszczuk, Krzysztof; Richiardi, Jonas; Prodanov, Plamen; Drygajlo, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    We present a methodology of reliability estimation in the multimodal biometric verification scenario. Reliability estimation has shown to be an efficient and accurate way of predicting and correcting erroneous classification decisions in both unimodal (speech, face, online signature) and multimodal (speech and face) systems. While the initial research results indicate the high potential of the proposed methodology, the performance of the reliability estimation in a multimodal setting has not been sufficiently studied or evaluated. In this paper, we demonstrate the advantages of using the unimodal reliability information in order to perform an efficient biometric fusion of two modalities. We further show the presented method to be superior to state-of-the-art multimodal decision-level fusion schemes. The experimental evaluation presented in this paper is based on the popular benchmarking bimodal BANCA database.

  9. Verification of Emergent Behaviors in Swarm-based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Vanderbilt, Amy; Hinchey, Mike; Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James

    2004-01-01

    The emergent properties of swarms make swarm-based missions powerful, but at the same time more difficult to design and to assure that the proper behaviors will emerge. We are currently investigating formal methods and techniques for verification and validation of swarm-based missions. The Autonomous Nano-Technology Swarm (ANTS) mission is being used as an example and case study for swarm-based missions to experiment and test current formal methods with intelligent swarms. Using the ANTS mission, we have evaluated multiple formal methods to determine their effectiveness in modeling and assuring swarm behavior. This paper introduces how intelligent swarm technology is being proposed for NASA missions, and gives the results of a comparison of several formal methods and approaches for specifying intelligent swarm-based systems and their effectiveness for predicting emergent behavior.

  10. Documentation requirements for Applications Systems Verification and Transfer projects (ASVTs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suchy, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    NASA's Application Systems Verification and Transfer Projects (ASVTs) are deliberate efforts to facilitate the transfer of applications of NASA-developed space technology to users such as federal agencies, state and local governments, regional planning groups, public service institutions, and private industry. This study focused on the role of documentation in facilitating technology transfer both to primary users identified during project planning and to others with similar information needs. It was understood that documentation can be used effectively when it is combined with informal (primarily verbal) communication within each user community and with other formal techniques such as organized demonstrations and training programs. Documentation examples from eight ASVT projects and one potential project were examined to give scope to the investigation.

  11. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) Flight Configuration Verification and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagar, William

    2000-01-01

    The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is a precision spaceflight instrument designed to measure and characterize the microgravity environment existing in the US Lab Module of the International Space Station. Both vibratory and quasi-steady triaxial acceleration data are acquired and provided to an Ethernet data link. The MAMS Double Mid-Deck Locker (DMDL) EXPRESS Rack payload meets all the ISS IDD and ICD interface requirements as discussed in the paper which also presents flight configuration illustrations. The overall MAMS sensor and data acquisition performance and verification data are presented in addition to a discussion of the Command and Data Handling features implemented via the ISS, downlink and the GRC Telescience Center displays.

  12. Digital video system for on-line portal verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynski, Konrad W.; Shalev, Shlomo; Cosby, N. Scott

    1990-07-01

    A digital system has been developed for on-line acquisition, processing and display of portal images during radiation therapy treatment. A metal/phosphor screen combination is the primary detector, where the conversion from high-energy photons to visible light takes place. A mirror angled at 45 degrees reflects the primary image to a low-light-level camera, which is removed from the direct radiation beam. The image registered by the camera is digitized, processed and displayed on a CRT monitor. Advanced digital techniques for processing of on-line images have been developed and implemented to enhance image contrast and suppress the noise. Some elements of automated radiotherapy treatment verification have been introduced.

  13. A new approach for the verification of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Umair; Aravantinos, Vincent; Tahar, Sofiène

    2013-09-01

    Optical systems are increasingly used in microsystems, telecommunication, aerospace and laser industry. Due to the complexity and sensitivity of optical systems, their verification poses many challenges to engineers. Tra­ditionally, the analysis of such systems has been carried out by paper-and-pencil based proofs and numerical computations. However, these techniques cannot provide perfectly accurate results due to the risk of human error and inherent approximations of numerical algorithms. In order to overcome these limitations, we propose to use theorem proving (i.e., a computer-based technique that allows to express mathematical expressions and reason about them by taking into account all the details of mathematical reasoning) as an alternative to computational and numerical approaches to improve optical system analysis in a comprehensive framework. In particular, this paper provides a higher-order logic (a language used to express mathematical theories) formalization of ray optics in the HOL Light theorem prover. Based on the multivariate analysis library of HOL Light, we formalize the notion of light ray and optical system (by defining medium interfaces, mirrors, lenses, etc.), i.e., we express these notions mathematically in the software. This allows us to derive general theorems about the behavior of light in such optical systems. In order to demonstrate the practical effectiveness, we present the stability analysis of a Fabry-Perot resonator.

  14. ETV REPORT AND VERIFICATION STATEMENT; EVALUATION OF LOBO LIQUIDS RINSE WATER RECOVERY SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lobo Liquids Rinse Water Recovery System (Lobo Liquids system) was tested, under actual production conditions, processing metal finishing wastewater, at Gull Industries in Houston, Texas. The verification test evaluated the ability of the ion exchange (IX) treatment system t...

  15. ETV REPORT AND VERIFICATION STATEMENT - KASELCO POSI-FLO ELECTROCOAGULATION TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kaselco Electrocoagulation Treatment System (Kaselco system) in combination with an ion exchange polishing system was tested, under actual production conditions, processing metal finishing wastewater at Gull Industries in Houston, Texas. The verification test evaluated the a...

  16. Information transfer in pilots' use of a collision avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Scott, Barry C.; Billings, Charles E.

    1987-01-01

    A flight simulator study of pilots' use of the Traffic-alert and Collision Avoidance System is described. Three levels of information on the location of other air traffic were presented to different groups of airline pilots. The amount of informtion on the location of other traffic had little effect on pilots' performance of the maneuvers commanded by the collision avoidance system. Measured crew responses were similar with no presentation of traffic location, with limited information, and with continuous traffic information. No learning effects were observed, and differences in flight experience did not contribute to the performance difference found.

  17. Design, analysis, and test verification of advanced encapsulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A.; Minning, C.

    1981-01-01

    Procurement of 4 in x 4 in polycrystalline solar cells were proceeded with some delays. A total of 1200 cells were procured for use in both the verification testing and qualification testing. Additional thermal structural analyses were run and the data are presented. An outline of the verification testing is included with information on test specimen construction.

  18. Design and Realization of Controllable Ultrasonic Fault Detector Automatic Verification System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing-Feng; Liu, Hui-Ying; Guo, Hui-Juan; Shu, Rong; Wei, Kai-Li

    The ultrasonic flaw detection equipment with remote control interface is researched and the automatic verification system is developed. According to use extensible markup language, the building of agreement instruction set and data analysis method database in the system software realizes the controllable designing and solves the diversification of unreleased device interfaces and agreements. By using the signal generator and a fixed attenuator cascading together, a dynamic error compensation method is proposed, completes what the fixed attenuator does in traditional verification and improves the accuracy of verification results. The automatic verification system operating results confirms that the feasibility of the system hardware and software architecture design and the correctness of the analysis method, while changes the status of traditional verification process cumbersome operations, and reduces labor intensity test personnel.

  19. NASA study of an automated Pilot Advisory System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A Pilot Advisory System (PAS) concept for high-density uncontrolled airports is discussed where the general aviation pilots will be provided with automatic audio voice airport and air traffic advisories within two minute intervals and with mid-air collision warnings whenever such situations arise. Free of manual inputs, the PAS includes the options of fixed-base operator runway select, automatic restart and self-test, and remote inquiry of system status and messages.

  20. OAP- OFFICE AUTOMATION PILOT GRAPHICS DATABASE SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerson, T.

    1994-01-01

    The Office Automation Pilot (OAP) Graphics Database system offers the IBM PC user assistance in producing a wide variety of graphs and charts. OAP uses a convenient database system, called a chartbase, for creating and maintaining data associated with the charts, and twelve different graphics packages are available to the OAP user. Each of the graphics capabilities is accessed in a similar manner. The user chooses creation, revision, or chartbase/slide show maintenance options from an initial menu. The user may then enter or modify data displayed on a graphic chart. The cursor moves through the chart in a "circular" fashion to facilitate data entries and changes. Various "help" functions and on-screen instructions are available to aid the user. The user data is used to generate the graphics portion of the chart. Completed charts may be displayed in monotone or color, printed, plotted, or stored in the chartbase on the IBM PC. Once completed, the charts may be put in a vector format and plotted for color viewgraphs. The twelve graphics capabilities are divided into three groups: Forms, Structured Charts, and Block Diagrams. There are eight Forms available: 1) Bar/Line Charts, 2) Pie Charts, 3) Milestone Charts, 4) Resources Charts, 5) Earned Value Analysis Charts, 6) Progress/Effort Charts, 7) Travel/Training Charts, and 8) Trend Analysis Charts. There are three Structured Charts available: 1) Bullet Charts, 2) Organization Charts, and 3) Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Charts. The Block Diagram available is an N x N Chart. Each graphics capability supports a chartbase. The OAP graphics database system provides the IBM PC user with an effective means of managing data which is best interpreted as a graphic display. The OAP graphics database system is written in IBM PASCAL 2.0 and assembler for interactive execution on an IBM PC or XT with at least 384K of memory, and a color graphics adapter and monitor. Printed charts require an Epson, IBM, OKIDATA, or HP Laser

  1. Verification and Validation of Flight-Critical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in many years, the NASA budget presented to congress calls for a focused effort on the verification and validation (V&V) of complex systems. This is mostly motivated by the results of the VVFCS (V&V of Flight-Critical Systems) study, which should materialize as a a concrete effort under the Aviation Safety program. This talk will present the results of the study, from requirements coming out of discussions with the FAA and the Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) to technical plan addressing the issue, and its proposed current and future V&V research agenda, which will be addressed by NASA Ames, Langley, and Dryden as well as external partners through NASA Research Announcements (NRA) calls. This agenda calls for pushing V&V earlier in the life cycle and take advantage of formal methods to increase safety and reduce cost of V&V. I will present the on-going research work (especially the four main technical areas: Safety Assurance, Distributed Systems, Authority and Autonomy, and Software-Intensive Systems), possible extensions, and how VVFCS plans on grounding the research in realistic examples, including an intended V&V test-bench based on an Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) architecture and hosted by Dryden.

  2. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.; Chu, Y. Y.; Greenstein, J. S.; Walden, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made of interaction between a human pilot and automated on-board decision making systems. Research was initiated on the topic of pilot problem solving in automated and semi-automated flight management systems and attempts were made to develop a model of human decision making in a multi-task situation. A study was made of allocation of responsibility between human and computer, and discussed were various pilot performance parameters with varying degrees of automation. Optimal allocation of responsibility between human and computer was considered and some theoretical results found in the literature were presented. The pilot as a problem solver was discussed. Finally the design of displays, controls, procedures, and computer aids for problem solving tasks in automated and semi-automated systems was considered.

  3. Model-Based Systems Engineering Pilot Program at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipavetz, Kevin G.; Murphy, Douglas G.; Infeld, Samatha I.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center conducted a pilot program to evaluate the benefits of using a Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) approach during the early phase of the Materials International Space Station Experiment-X (MISSE-X) project. The goal of the pilot was to leverage MBSE tools and methods, including the Systems Modeling Language (SysML), to understand the net gain of utilizing this approach on a moderate size flight project. The System Requirements Review (SRR) success criteria were used to guide the work products desired from the pilot. This paper discusses the pilot project implementation, provides SysML model examples, identifies lessons learned, and describes plans for further use on MBSE on MISSE-X.

  4. Study of space shuttle orbiter system management computer function. Volume 2: Automated performance verification concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings are presented of investigations on concepts and techniques in automated performance verification. The investigations were conducted to provide additional insight into the design methodology and to develop a consolidated technology base from which to analyze performance verification design approaches. Other topics discussed include data smoothing, function selection, flow diagrams, data storage, and shuttle hydraulic systems.

  5. Language Universal and Language Specific Aspects in the Acquisition of the Verification System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, M. Michael; And Others

    Three experiments were conducted to conceptualize how structural differences between English and Japanese affect the way in which young children acquire the verification system. Linguistic characteristics that may distinguish between English and Japanese verifications are described along with the possible responses to four types of statement: true…

  6. 75 FR 4100 - Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System-Debts Owed to PHAs and Terminations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System-Debts Owed to PHAs and Terminations AGENCY.... This Notice Also Lists the Following Information Title of Proposal: Enterprise Income Verification...

  7. Automated hardware-software system for LED's verification and certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Peretyagin, Vladimir S.; Vakulenko, Anatolii D.

    2012-10-01

    Scientific and technological progress of recent years in the production of the light emitting diodes (LEDs) has led to the expansion of areas of their application from the simplest systems to high precision lighting devices used in various fields of human activity. However, for all technology development at the present time it is very difficult to choose one or another brand of LEDs for realization of concrete devices designed for the implementation of high precision spatial and color measurements of various objects. In the world there are many measurement instruments for determining the various parameters of LEDs, but none of them are not capable to estimate comprehensively the LEDs spatial, spectral, and color parameters with the necessary accuracy and speed. This problem can be solved by using an automated hardware-software system for LED's verification and certification, developed by specialists of the OEDS chair of National Research University ITMO in Russia. The paper presents the theoretical aspects of the analysis of LED's spatial, spectral and color parameters by using mentioned of automated hardware-software system. The article also presents the results of spatial, spectral, and color parameters measurements of some LEDs brands.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT ANR PIPELINE COMPANY PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of a gaseous-emissions monitoring system for large, natural-gas-fired internal combustion engines. The device tested is the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR ...

  9. Optical Verification Laboratory Demonstration System for High Security Identification Cards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javidi, Bahram

    1997-01-01

    Document fraud including unauthorized duplication of identification cards and credit cards is a serious problem facing the government, banks, businesses, and consumers. In addition, counterfeit products such as computer chips, and compact discs, are arriving on our shores in great numbers. With the rapid advances in computers, CCD technology, image processing hardware and software, printers, scanners, and copiers, it is becoming increasingly easy to reproduce pictures, logos, symbols, paper currency, or patterns. These problems have stimulated an interest in research, development and publications in security technology. Some ID cards, credit cards and passports currently use holograms as a security measure to thwart copying. The holograms are inspected by the human eye. In theory, the hologram cannot be reproduced by an unauthorized person using commercially-available optical components; in practice, however, technology has advanced to the point where the holographic image can be acquired from a credit card-photographed or captured with by a CCD camera-and a new hologram synthesized using commercially-available optical components or hologram-producing equipment. Therefore, a pattern that can be read by a conventional light source and a CCD camera can be reproduced. An optical security and anti-copying device that provides significant security improvements over existing security technology was demonstrated. The system can be applied for security verification of credit cards, passports, and other IDs so that they cannot easily be reproduced. We have used a new scheme of complex phase/amplitude patterns that cannot be seen and cannot be copied by an intensity-sensitive detector such as a CCD camera. A random phase mask is bonded to a primary identification pattern which could also be phase encoded. The pattern could be a fingerprint, a picture of a face, or a signature. The proposed optical processing device is designed to identify both the random phase mask and the

  10. Verification of component mode techniques for flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiens, Gloria J.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations were conducted in the modeling aspects of flexible multibodies undergoing large angular displacements. Models were to be generated and analyzed through application of computer simulation packages employing the 'component mode synthesis' techniques. Multibody Modeling, Verification and Control Laboratory (MMVC) plan was implemented, which includes running experimental tests on flexible multibody test articles. From these tests, data was to be collected for later correlation and verification of the theoretical results predicted by the modeling and simulation process.

  11. The Galileo IOV Dispenser System- Design, Development & Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. P.; Andersson, G.; Davies, W.; Plaza, M. A.

    2012-07-01

    On October 21st, 2011, lifting off from the ELS launch site in French Guiana, a Soyuz ST-B and FREGAT upper stage, carried the first two Galileo IOV spacecraft on a 3-hour 49-minute flight and successfully injected the 2 Galileo Navigation spacecraft into a circular medium-Earth orbit. The Dispenser System, the subject of this paper, is the equipped launch vehicle hardware mated directly to the FREGAT upper stage and built specifically to carry 2 Galileo IOV spacecraft during all ground and flight operations up to the moment of separation. The Dispenser System was purposely built for the Galileo IOV missions under European Space Agency and Arianespace contract. The prime contractor was selected to be RUAG Space in Sweden (Linköping) for all Dispenser “System and Management” activities and with subcontracts placed to RUAG Space in Switzerland (Zurich) for the Dispenser “Structure” and EADS CASA Spain (Madrid) for the “Hold Down and Release System” (HRS) hardware. The “Structure” is designed to transfer ground and flight loads between the spacecraft and the Launch Vehicle. The upper part, an aluminium sandwich box-type structure, interfaces with the satellites, whereas the lower part transitions to a lower frame, via a CFRP strut arrangement, to interface with the FREGA T upper stage. The spacecraft separation sub-system is composed of two sets of four low- shock “HRS” units and four “pushers” enabling to firmly hold the satellites during ground and flight operations and to release them when ordered by the Launch Vehicle. The Dispenser System also comprises an electrical sub-system and MLI. This paper summarises the overall Design, Development and Verification activities leading to the Qualification of the Dispenser System hardware. This will include the Structure and HRS contribution to the overall System Qualification. An overview of the System hardware will be described along with DDV logic, some key analysis performed and several of the

  12. Analysis of large system black box verification test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, Kenneth C.; Iyer, Ravishankar Krishnan

    1993-01-01

    Issues regarding black box, large systems verification are explored. It begins by collecting data from several testing teams. An integrated database containing test, fault, repair, and source file information is generated. Intuitive effectiveness measures are generated using conventional black box testing results analysis methods. Conventional analysts methods indicate that the testing was effective in the sense that as more tests were run, more faults were found. Average behavior and individual data points are analyzed. The data is categorized and average behavior shows a very wide variation in number of tests run and in pass rates (pass rates ranged from 71 percent to 98 percent). The 'white box' data contained in the integrated database is studied in detail. Conservative measures of effectiveness are discussed. Testing efficiency (ratio of repairs to number of tests) is measured at 3 percent, fault record effectiveness (ratio of repairs to fault records) is measured at 55 percent, and test script redundancy (ratio of number of failed tests to minimum number of tests needed to find the faults) ranges from 4.2 to 15.8. Error prone source files and subsystems are identified. A correlational mapping of test functional area to product subsystem is completed. A new adaptive testing process based on real-time generation of the integrated database is proposed.

  13. Verification of Triple Modular Redundancy Insertion for Reliable and Trusted Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    If a system is required to be protected using triple modular redundancy (TMR), improper insertion can jeopardize the reliability and security of the system. Due to the complexity of the verification process and the complexity of digital designs, there are currently no available techniques that can provide complete and reliable confirmation of TMR insertion. We propose a method for TMR insertion verification that satisfies the process for reliable and trusted systems.

  14. Modeling Pilot State in Next Generation Aircraft Alert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, Alan S.; Alexander, Amy L.; Schurr, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System will introduce new, advanced sensor technologies into the cockpit that must convey a large number of potentially complex alerts. Our work focuses on the challenges associated with prioritizing aircraft sensor alerts in a quick and efficient manner, essentially determining when and how to alert the pilot This "alert decision" becomes very difficult in NextGen due to the following challenges: 1) the increasing number of potential hazards, 2) the uncertainty associated with the state of potential hazards as well as pilot slate , and 3) the limited time to make safely-critical decisions. In this paper, we focus on pilot state and present a model for anticipating duration and quality of pilot behavior, for use in a larger system which issues aircraft alerts. We estimate pilot workload, which we model as being dependent on factors including mental effort, task demands. and task performance. We perform a mathematically rigorous analysis of the model and resulting alerting plans. We simulate the model in software and present simulated results with respect to manipulation of the pilot measures.

  15. ANIMAL WASTE IMPACT ON SOURCE WATERSAIDED BY EPA/NSF ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) SOURCE WATER PROTECTION PILOT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) was established in 1995 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to encourage the development and commercialization of new environmental technologies through third part testing and reporting of performance data. By ensur...

  16. NPL freeform artefact for verification of non-contact measuring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael B.; Brown, Stephen B.; Evenden, Anthony; Robinson, Andy D.

    2011-03-01

    For decades three-dimensional (3D) measurements of engineering components have been made using fixed metrologyroom based coordinate measuring machines (CMMs) fitted most commonly with single point or to a much lesser extent, scanning tactile probes. Over the past decade there has been a rapid uptake in development and subsequent use of portable optical-based 3D coordinate measuring systems. These optical based systems capture vast quantities of point data in a very short time, often permitting freeform surfaces to be digitised. Documented standards for the verification of fixed CMMs fitted with tactile probes are now widely available, whereas verification procedures and more specifically verification artefacts for optical-based systems are still in their infancy. To assist industry in the verification of optical based coordinates systems, this paper describes a freeform verification artefact that has been developed, calibrated and used to support a measurement intercomparison between a fixed CMM and a number of optical based systems. These systems employ technologies involving laser triangulation scanning, photogrammetry and fringe projection. The NPL freeform verification artefact is presented and a measurement intercomparison is reported which identifies that the accuracy of the optical-based systems tested is not as good as tactile probing systems.

  17. 75 FR 4101 - Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System User Access Authorization Form and Rules of Behavior...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System User Access Authorization Form and Rules.... This notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Enterprise Income...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: NEW CONDENSATOR, INC.--THE CONDENSATOR DIESEL ENGINE RETROFIT CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested New Condensator Inc.'s Condensator Diesel Engine Retrofit Crankcase Ventilation System. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), the ratio of engine fuel consumption to the engine power output, was evaluated for engine...

  19. 75 FR 38765 - Domestic Origin Verification System Questionnaire and Regulations Governing Inspection and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ..., container number, country of origin, customs entry number, bill of lading number, broker reference number... Agricultural Marketing Service Domestic Origin Verification System Questionnaire and Regulations Governing... submitting the comments will be made public. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``Domestic Origin...

  20. Verification of the Space Shuttle entry GN&C system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoften, J. D. A.; Moyles, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The certification procedures for the initial Shuttle flight are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the entry guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) verification, comprising tests, analysis, demonstration, inspection, and simulation. Flow diagrams for the verification and operational flight sequences are provided, along with a block diagram of the GNC circuitry interfaces. The development of the test matrix software for the GNC is outlined, noting the constant interplay between software verification and spacecraft reconfiguration to meet simulated performance requirements. Comparison of GNC performance predictions with actual entry flight data showed a good match in all performance areas except for sideslip excursions, bank overshoots, an area of transonic buffet, and an increased lift/drag ratio in the preflare to landing flight phase.

  1. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form PILOT, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all...

  2. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form PILOT, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all...

  3. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form PILOT, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all...

  4. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form PILOT, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all...

  5. 17 CFR 249.821 - Form PILOT, information required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting Form PILOT, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... required of self-regulatory organizations operating pilot trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this... trading systems pursuant to § 240.19b-5 of this chapter. This form shall be used by all...

  6. PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Step feed, plug flow and complete mix activated sludge systems were compared on a pilot plant scale under similar operating conditions with the same municipal wastewater. The process loading to each system was varied over a wide range during the course of the investigation. Exten...

  7. Modeling and verification of distributed systems with labeled predicate transition nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloret, Jean-Christophe

    Two main steps in the design of distributed systems are modeling and verification. Petri nets and CCS are two basic formal models. CCS is a modular language supporting compositional verification. Conversely, the petri net theory requires an accurate description of parallelism and focuses on property global verification. A structuring technique based on CCS concepts is introduced for predicate/transition nets. It consists of a high level petri net that permits expression of communication with value passing. In particular, a petri net composition operator, that can be interpreted as a multi-rendezvous between communicating systems, is defined. The multi rendezvous allows abstract modeling, with small state graphs. The developed formalism is highly convenient for refining abstract models relative to less abstract levels. Based on this work, a software tool, supporting distributed system design and verification, is developed. The advantage of this approach is shown in many research and industrial applications.

  8. Verification of Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) Insertion for Reliable and Trusted Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, Melanie; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for TMR insertion verification that satisfies the process for reliable and trusted systems. If a system is expected to be protected using TMR, improper insertion can jeopardize the reliability and security of the system. Due to the complexity of the verification process, there are currently no available techniques that can provide complete and reliable confirmation of TMR insertion. This manuscript addresses the challenge of confirming that TMR has been inserted without corruption of functionality and with correct application of the expected TMR topology. The proposed verification method combines the usage of existing formal analysis tools with a novel search-detect-and-verify tool. Field programmable gate array (FPGA),Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR),Verification, Trust, Reliability,

  9. Evaluation of the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects: Volume I: Impacts on Deterrence, Barriers, and Accuracy. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-04-AV1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Gleason, Philip; Sinclair, Michael; Cohen, Rhoda; Hulsey, Lara; Milliner-Waddell, Julita

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) sponsored the NSLP Application/Verification Pilot Projects to test ways to improve the process for certifying students for free or reduced-price meals. This report presents findings on the impacts of two alternatives to the current application based certification process--Up-Front Documentation and…

  10. Evaluation of the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects: Volume II: Data Collection, Study Methods and Supplementary Tables on Certification Impacts. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-04-AV2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Gleason, Philip; Sinclair, Michael; Cohen, Rhoda; Hulsey, Lara; Milliner-Waddell, Julita

    2004-01-01

    This is Volume II of the report on the evaluation of the NSLP Application Verification Pilot Projects. It supplements Volume I, which presents the evaluation findings. Volume II has two objectives: (1) to provide a detailed description of the methods used to conduct the study; and (2) to present tabulations that supplement and extend the analyses…

  11. The Yes-No Question Answering System and Statement Verification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiyama, M. Michael; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the relationship of verification to the answering of yes-no questions. Subjects verified simple statements or answered simple questions. Various proposals concerning the relative difficulty of answering questions and verifying statements were considered, and a model was proposed. (SW)

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION PROGRAM - ADVANCED MONITORING SYSTEMS OUTREACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technology performance information must be effectively communicated if it is to be of value to prospective users. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has provided funding to the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program to provide a plan to verify the environmen...

  13. Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Bibliography. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.A.; Hayes, J.E.; Mirsky, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    This volume contains all of the technical references found in Volumes 1-7 concerning the development of guidelines for the verification and validation of expert systems, knowledge-based systems, other AI systems, object-oriented systems, and conventional systems.

  14. TeleOperator/telePresence System (TOPS) Concept Verification Model (CVM) development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimamoto, Mike S.

    1993-01-01

    The development of an anthropomorphic, undersea manipulator system, the TeleOperator/telePresence System (TOPS) Concept Verification Model (CVM) is described. The TOPS system's design philosophy, which results from NRaD's experience in undersea vehicles and manipulator systems development and operations, is presented. The TOPS design approach, task teams, manipulator, and vision system development and results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: ADI INTERNATIONAL INC. ADI PILOT TEST UNIT NO. 2002-09 WITH MEDIA G2®; PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the ADI International Inc. Unit No. 2002-09 with MEDIA G2® arsenic adsorption media filter system was conducted at the Hilltown Township Water and Sewer Authority (HTWSA) Well Station No. 1 in Sellersville, Pennsylvania from October 8, 2003 through May 28,...

  16. Verification and validation of rulebased systems for Hubble Space Telescope ground support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, Shon; Lindenmayer, Kelly

    1988-01-01

    As rulebase systems become more widely used in operational environments, the focus is on the problems and concerns of maintaining expert systems. In the conventional software model, the verification and validation of a system have two separate and distinct meanings. To validate a system means to demonstrate that the system does what is advertised. The verification process refers to investigating the actual code to identify inconsistencies and redundancies within the logic path. In current literature regarding maintaining rulebased systems, little distinction is made between these two terms. In fact, often the two terms are used interchangeably. Verification and validation of rulebased systems are discussed as separate but equally important aspects of the maintenance phase. Also described are some of the tools and methods that were developed at the Space Telescope Science Institute to aid in the maintenance of the rulebased system.

  17. DOE handbook: Integrated safety management systems (ISMS) verification team leader`s handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    The primary purpose of this handbook is to provide guidance to the ISMS verification Team Leader and the verification team in conducting ISMS verifications. The handbook describes methods and approaches for the review of the ISMS documentation (Phase I) and ISMS implementation (Phase II) and provides information useful to the Team Leader in preparing the review plan, selecting and training the team, coordinating the conduct of the verification, and documenting the results. The process and techniques described are based on the results of several pilot ISMS verifications that have been conducted across the DOE complex. A secondary purpose of this handbook is to provide information useful in developing DOE personnel to conduct these reviews. Specifically, this handbook describes methods and approaches to: (1) Develop the scope of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 review processes to be consistent with the history, hazards, and complexity of the site, facility, or activity; (2) Develop procedures for the conduct of the Phase 1 review, validating that the ISMS documentation satisfies the DEAR clause as amplified in DOE Policies 450.4, 450.5, 450.6 and associated guidance and that DOE can effectively execute responsibilities as described in the Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual (FRAM); (3) Develop procedures for the conduct of the Phase 2 review, validating that the description approved by the Approval Authority, following or concurrent with the Phase 1 review, has been implemented; and (4) Describe a methodology by which the DOE ISMS verification teams will be advised, trained, and/or mentored to conduct subsequent ISMS verifications. The handbook provides proven methods and approaches for verifying that commitments related to the DEAR, the FRAM, and associated amplifying guidance are in place and implemented in nuclear and high risk facilities. This handbook also contains useful guidance to line managers when preparing for a review of ISMS for radiological

  18. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, John M.; Wan, C. Yoon; Vasandani, Vijay

    1987-01-01

    The current research is focused on detection of human error and protection from its consequences. A program for monitoring pilot error by comparing pilot actions to a script was described. It dealt primarily with routine errors (slips) that occurred during checklist activity. The model to which operator actions were compared was a script. Current research is an extension along these two dimensions. The ORS fault detection aid uses a sophisticated device model rather than a script. The newer initiative, the model-based and constraint-based warning system, uses an even more sophisticated device model and is to prevent all types of error, not just slips or bad decision.

  19. General Aviation Pilot Advisory and Training System (GAPATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, John; Ward, Donald T.; Kelly, Wallace; Crump, John W.; Phillips, Ron; Trang, Jeff; Lee, Kris; Branham, Paul A.; Krishnamurthy, Karthik; Alcorn, William P., Jr.; Robbins, Andrew P.; Yu, Ren-Jye

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this project is to achieve a validated General Aviation Pilot Advisor and Training System (GAPATS) engineering prototype, implemented according to commercial software standards and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issues of certification. Phase 2 builds on progress during Phase 1, which exceeded proposed objectives. The basic technology has been transferred from previous NASA research (1989 to 1994). We anticipate a commercially licensable prototype, validated by pilots in a flight simulator and in a light twin-engine research aircraft for FAA certification, by January 1998.

  20. MPI support in the DIRAC Pilot Job Workload Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Hamar, V.

    2012-12-01

    Parallel job execution in the grid environment using MPI technology presents a number of challenges for the sites providing this support. Multiple flavors of the MPI libraries, shared working directories required by certain applications, special settings for the batch systems make the MPI support difficult for the site managers. On the other hand the workload management systems with Pilot Jobs became ubiquitous although the support for the MPI applications in the Pilot frameworks was not available. This support was recently added in the DIRAC Project in the context of the GISELA Latin American Grid Initiative. Special services for dynamic allocation of virtual computer pools on the grid sites were developed in order to deploy MPI rings corresponding to the requirements of the jobs in the central task queue of the DIRAC Workload Management System. Pilot Jobs using user space file system techniques install the required MPI software automatically. The same technique is used to emulate shared working directories for the parallel MPI processes. This makes it possible to execute MPI jobs even on the sites not supporting them officially. Reusing so constructed MPI rings for execution of a series of parallel jobs increases dramatically their efficiency and turnaround. In this contribution we describe the design and implementation of the DIRAC MPI Service as well as its support for various types of MPI libraries. Advantages of coupling the MPI support with the Pilot frameworks are outlined and examples of usage with real applications are presented.

  1. Helmet-mounted pilot night vision systems: Human factors issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Helmet-mounted displays of infrared imagery (forward-looking infrared (FLIR)) allow helicopter pilots to perform low level missions at night and in low visibility. However, pilots experience high visual and cognitive workload during these missions, and their performance capabilities may be reduced. Human factors problems inherent in existing systems stem from three primary sources: the nature of thermal imagery; the characteristics of specific FLIR systems; and the difficulty of using FLIR system for flying and/or visually acquiring and tracking objects in the environment. The pilot night vision system (PNVS) in the Apache AH-64 provides a monochrome, 30 by 40 deg helmet-mounted display of infrared imagery. Thermal imagery is inferior to television imagery in both resolution and contrast ratio. Gray shades represent temperatures differences rather than brightness variability, and images undergo significant changes over time. The limited field of view, displacement of the sensor from the pilot's eye position, and monocular presentation of a bright FLIR image (while the other eye remains dark-adapted) are all potential sources of disorientation, limitations in depth and distance estimation, sensations of apparent motion, and difficulties in target and obstacle detection. Insufficient information about human perceptual and performance limitations restrains the ability of human factors specialists to provide significantly improved specifications, training programs, or alternative designs. Additional research is required to determine the most critical problem areas and to propose solutions that consider the human as well as the development of technology.

  2. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation 2: An experimental study of pilots' model and awareness of the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Technological developments have made it possible to automate more and more functions on the commercial aviation flight deck and in other dynamic high-consequence domains. This increase in the degrees of freedom in design has shifted questions away from narrow technological feasibility. Many concerned groups, from designers and operators to regulators and researchers, have begun to ask questions about how we should use the possibilities afforded by technology skillfully to support and expand human performance. In this article, we report on an experimental study that addressed these questions by examining pilot interaction with the current generation of flight deck automation. Previous results on pilot-automation interaction derived from pilot surveys, incident reports, and training observations have produced a corpus of features and contexts in which human-machine coordination is likely to break down (e.g., automation surprises). We used these data to design a simulated flight scenario that contained a variety of probes designed to reveal pilots' mental model of one major component of flight deck automation: the Flight Management System (FMS). The events within the scenario were also designed to probe pilots' ability to apply their knowledge and understanding in specific flight contexts and to examine their ability to track the status and behavior of the automated system (mode awareness). Although pilots were able to 'make the system work' in standard situations, the results reveal a variety of latent problems in pilot-FMS interaction that can affect pilot performance in nonnormal time critical situations.

  3. Use of metaknowledge in the verification of knowledge-based systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Larry J.

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge-based systems are modeled as deductive systems. The model indicates that the two primary areas of concern in verification are demonstrating consistency and completeness. A system is inconsistent if it asserts something that is not true of the modeled domain. A system is incomplete if it lacks deductive capability. Two forms of consistency are discussed along with appropriate verification methods. Three forms of incompleteness are discussed. The use of metaknowledge, knowledge about knowledge, is explored in connection to each form of incompleteness.

  4. Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

    2007-07-01

    This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

  5. Mutation Testing for Effective Verification of Digital Components of Physical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushik, N. G.; Evtushenko, N. V.; Torgaev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Digital components of modern physical systems are often designed applying circuitry solutions based on the field programmable gate array technology (FPGA). Such (embedded) digital components should be carefully tested. In this paper, an approach for the verification of digital physical system components based on mutation testing is proposed. The reference description of the behavior of a digital component in the hardware description language (HDL) is mutated by introducing into it the most probable errors and, unlike mutants in high-level programming languages, the corresponding test case is effectively derived based on a comparison of special scalable representations of the specification and the constructed mutant using various logic synthesis and verification systems.

  6. Pilot's Automated Weather Support System (PAWSS) concepts demonstration project. Phase 1: Pilot's weather information requirements and implications for weather data systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crabill, Norman L.; Dash, Ernie R.

    1991-01-01

    The weather information requirements for pilots and the deficiencies of the current aviation weather support system in meeting these requirements are defined. As the amount of data available to pilots increases significantly in the near future, expert system technology will be needed to assist pilots in assimilating that information. Some other desirable characteristics of an automation-assisted system for weather data acquisition, dissemination, and assimilation are also described.

  7. Development and Verification of the Charring Ablating Thermal Protection Implicit System Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Calvert, Nathan D.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2010-01-01

    The development and verification of the Charring Ablating Thermal Protection Implicit System Solver is presented. This work concentrates on the derivation and verification of the stationary grid terms in the equations that govern three-dimensional heat and mass transfer for charring thermal protection systems including pyrolysis gas flow through the porous char layer. The governing equations are discretized according to the Galerkin finite element method with first and second order implicit time integrators. The governing equations are fully coupled and are solved in parallel via Newton's method, while the fully implicit linear system is solved with the Generalized Minimal Residual method. Verification results from exact solutions and the Method of Manufactured Solutions are presented to show spatial and temporal orders of accuracy as well as nonlinear convergence rates.

  8. An integrated user-oriented laboratory for verification of digital flight control systems: Features and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defeo, P.; Doane, D.; Saito, J.

    1982-01-01

    A Digital Flight Control Systems Verification Laboratory (DFCSVL) has been established at NASA Ames Research Center. This report describes the major elements of the laboratory, the research activities that can be supported in the area of verification and validation of digital flight control systems (DFCS), and the operating scenarios within which these activities can be carried out. The DFCSVL consists of a palletized dual-dual flight-control system linked to a dedicated PDP-11/60 processor. Major software support programs are hosted in a remotely located UNIVAC 1100 accessible from the PDP-11/60 through a modem link. Important features of the DFCSVL include extensive hardware and software fault insertion capabilities, a real-time closed loop environment to exercise the DFCS, an integrated set of software verification tools, and a user-oriented interface to all the resources and capabilities.

  9. Development and Verification of the Charring, Ablating Thermal Protection Implicit System Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amar, Adam J.; Calvert, Nathan; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2011-01-01

    The development and verification of the Charring Ablating Thermal Protection Implicit System Solver (CATPISS) is presented. This work concentrates on the derivation and verification of the stationary grid terms in the equations that govern three-dimensional heat and mass transfer for charring thermal protection systems including pyrolysis gas flow through the porous char layer. The governing equations are discretized according to the Galerkin finite element method (FEM) with first and second order fully implicit time integrators. The governing equations are fully coupled and are solved in parallel via Newton s method, while the linear system is solved via the Generalized Minimum Residual method (GMRES). Verification results from exact solutions and Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) are presented to show spatial and temporal orders of accuracy as well as nonlinear convergence rates.

  10. Survey of piloting factors in V/STOL aircraft with implications for flight control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Craig, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flight control system design factors involved for pilot workload relief are identified. Major contributors to pilot workload include configuration management and control and aircraft stability and response qualities. A digital fly by wire stability augmentation, configuration management, and configuration control system is suggested for reduction of pilot workload during takeoff, hovering, and approach.

  11. 24 CFR 5.233 - Mandated use of HUD's Enterprise Income Verification (EIV) System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Project-based Voucher program under 24 CFR part 983; (v) Project-based Section 8 programs under 24 CFR... noncompliance. Failure to use the EIV system in its entirety may result in the imposition of sanctions and/or... Income Verification (EIV) System. 5.233 Section 5.233 Housing and Urban Development Office of...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, HONEYWELL POWER SYSTEMS, INC. PARALLON 75 KW TURBOGENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Parallon 75kW Turbogenerator manufactured by Honeywell Power Systems, Inc., formerly AlliedSignal Power Systems, Inc. The unit uses a natural-gas-fired turbine to power an electric ge...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATER GENERATED DURING DECONTAMINATION ACTIVITIES - ULTRASTRIP SYSTEMS, INC., MOBILE EMERGENCY FILTRATION SYSTEM (MEFS) - 04/14/WQPC-HS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance verification testing of the UltraStrip Systems, Inc., Mobile Emergency Filtration System (MEFS) was conducted under EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program at the EPA Test and Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, during November, 2003, thr...

  14. Verification of the FtCayuga fault-tolerant microprocessor system. Volume 1: A case study in theorem prover-based verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivas, Mandayam; Bickford, Mark

    1991-01-01

    The design and formal verification of a hardware system for a task that is an important component of a fault tolerant computer architecture for flight control systems is presented. The hardware system implements an algorithm for obtaining interactive consistancy (byzantine agreement) among four microprocessors as a special instruction on the processors. The property verified insures that an execution of the special instruction by the processors correctly accomplishes interactive consistency, provided certain preconditions hold. An assumption is made that the processors execute synchronously. For verification, the authors used a computer aided design hardware design verification tool, Spectool, and the theorem prover, Clio. A major contribution of the work is the demonstration of a significant fault tolerant hardware design that is mechanically verified by a theorem prover.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - GROUNDWATER SAMPLING TECHNOLOGIES - QED ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS INC. WELL WIZARD DEDICATED SAMPLING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV) to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. The goal of the ...

  16. [ROLE OF THE SYMPATHOADRENOMEDULLARY SYSTEM IN FORMATION OF PILOT'S ADAPTATION TO FLIGHT LOADS].

    PubMed

    Sukhoterin, A F; Pashchenko, P S; Plakhov, N N; Zhuravlev, A G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the work was to evaluate the sympathoadrenomedullary functions and associated psychophysiological reactions of pilots as a function of flight hours on highly maneuverable aircraft. Volunteers to the investigation were 78 pilots (41 pilots of maneuverable aircraft and 37 pilots of bombers and transporters). Selected methods were to enable comprehensive evaluation of the body functioning against flight loads. Our results evidence that piloting of high maneuverable aircraft but not of bombing and transporting aircrafts activates the sympathoadrenomedullary system significantly. This is particularly common to young pilots with the total flying time less than 1000 hours. Adaptive changes to flight factors were noted to develop with age and experience. PMID:26738308

  17. Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Waked, R. Ryan; Granzow, Howard N.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Moreover, plutonium gloveboxes present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials; these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. Several studies have been conducted to determine the robustness of selfcontained fire extinguishers in plutonium gloveboxes in a nuclear facility, verification tests must be performed. These tests include activation and mass loss calorimeter tests. In addition, compatibility issues with chemical components of the self-contained fire extinguishers need to be addressed. Our study presents activation and mass loss calorimeter test results. After extensive studies, no critical areas of concern have been identified for the plutonium glovebox application of Fire Foe™, except for glovebox operations that use large quantities of bulk plutonium or uranium metal such as metal casting and pyro-chemistry operations.

  18. Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Waked, R. Ryan; Granzow, Howard N.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Moreover, plutonium gloveboxes present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials; these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. Several studies have been conducted to determine the robustness of selfcontained fire extinguishers in plutonium gloveboxes in a nuclear facility, verification tests must be performed. These tests include activation and mass loss calorimeter tests. In addition, compatibility issues with chemical components of the self-contained fire extinguishers need to be addressed. Our study presents activation andmore » mass loss calorimeter test results. After extensive studies, no critical areas of concern have been identified for the plutonium glovebox application of Fire Foe™, except for glovebox operations that use large quantities of bulk plutonium or uranium metal such as metal casting and pyro-chemistry operations.« less

  19. Methods for identification and verification using vacuum XRF system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Fred (Inventor); Kaiser, Bruce (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Apparatus and methods in which one or more elemental taggants that are intrinsically located in an object are detected by x-ray fluorescence analysis under vacuum conditions to identify or verify the object's elemental content for elements with lower atomic numbers. By using x-ray fluorescence analysis, the apparatus and methods of the invention are simple and easy to use, as well as provide detection by a non line-of-sight method to establish the origin of objects, as well as their point of manufacture, authenticity, verification, security, and the presence of impurities. The invention is extremely advantageous because it provides the capability to measure lower atomic number elements in the field with a portable instrument.

  20. Evaluation of an electrocardiograph-based PICC tip verification system.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gemma; Jones, Matt

    Performing a chest x-ray after insertion of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is recognised as the gold standard for checking that the tip of the catheter is correctly positioned in the lower third of the superior vena cava at the right atrial junction; however, numerous problems are associated with this practice. A recent technological advancement has been developed that utilises changes in a patient's electrocardiograph (ECG) recorded from the tip of the PICC as a more reliable method. This evaluation discusses how a vascular access team in a large acute NHS Trust safely and successfully incorporated the use of ECG guidance technology for verification of PICC tip placement into their practice. PMID:24261004

  1. Cognitive Bias in the Verification and Validation of Space Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive bias is generally recognized as playing a significant role in virtually all domains of human decision making. Insight into this role is informally built into many of the system engineering practices employed in the aerospace industry. The review process, for example, typically has features that help to counteract the effect of bias. This paper presents a discussion of how commonly recognized biases may affect the verification and validation process. Verifying and validating a system is arguably more challenging than development, both technically and cognitively. Whereas there may be a relatively limited number of options available for the design of a particular aspect of a system, there is a virtually unlimited number of potential verification scenarios that may be explored. The probability of any particular scenario occurring in operations is typically very difficult to estimate, which increases reliance on judgment that may be affected by bias. Implementing a verification activity often presents technical challenges that, if they can be overcome at all, often result in a departure from actual flight conditions (e.g., 1-g testing, simulation, time compression, artificial fault injection) that may raise additional questions about the meaningfulness of the results, and create opportunities for the introduction of additional biases. In addition to mitigating the biases it can introduce directly, the verification and validation process must also overcome the cumulative effect of biases introduced during all previous stages of development. A variety of cognitive biases will be described, with research results for illustration. A handful of case studies will be presented that show how cognitive bias may have affected the verification and validation process on recent JPL flight projects, identify areas of strength and weakness, and identify potential changes or additions to commonly used techniques that could provide a more robust verification and validation of

  2. Verification of Space Station Secondary Power System Stability Using Design of Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Kamiar J.; Booker, Andrew J.; Mong, Alvin C.; Manners, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods used in verification of large DC power systems with applications to the International Space Station (ISS). Large DC power systems contain many switching power converters with negative resistor characteristics. The ISS power system presents numerous challenges with respect to system stability such as complex sources and undefined loads. The Space Station program has developed impedance specifications for sources and loads. The overall approach to system stability consists of specific hardware requirements coupled with extensive system analysis and testing. Testing of large complex distributed power systems is not practical due to size and complexity of the system. Computer modeling has been extensively used to develop hardware specifications as well as to identify system configurations for lab testing. The statistical method of Design of Experiments (DoE) is used as an analysis tool for verification of these large systems. DOE reduces the number of computer runs which are necessary to analyze the performance of a complex power system consisting of hundreds of DC/DC converters. DoE also provides valuable information about the effect of changes in system parameters on the performance of the system. DoE provides information about various operating scenarios and identification of the ones with potential for instability. In this paper we will describe how we have used computer modeling to analyze a large DC power system. A brief description of DoE is given. Examples using applications of DoE to analysis and verification of the ISS power system are provided.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT HYDRO COMPLIANCE MANAGEMENT, INC. HYDRO-KLEEN FILTRATION SYSTEM, 03/07/WQPC-SWP, SEPTEMBER 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Hydro-Kleen(TM) Filtration System, a catch-basin filter designed to reduce hydrocarbon, sediment, and metals contamination from surface water flows, was conducted at NSF International in Ann Arbor, Michigan. A Hydro-Kleen(TM) system was fitted into a ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT, PERFORMANCE OF INDUCTION MIXERS FOR DISINFECTION OF WET WEATHER FLOWS, US FILTER/STRANCO PRODUCTS WATER CHAMP R F SERIES CHEMICAL INDUCTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Wet-Weather Flow Technologies Pilot of the EPA's Technology Verification (ETV) Program under a partnership with NSF International has verified the performawnce of the USFilter/Stranco Products chemical induction mixer used for disinfection of wet-weather flows. The USFilter t...

  5. Expert system verification and validation study. Delivery 3A and 3B: Trip summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Scott

    1991-01-01

    Key results are documented from attending the 4th workshop on verification, validation, and testing. The most interesting part of the workshop was when representatives from the U.S., Japan, and Europe presented surveys of VV&T within their respective regions. Another interesting part focused on current efforts to define industry standards for artificial intelligence and how that might affect approaches to VV&T of expert systems. The next part of the workshop focused on VV&T methods of applying mathematical techniques to verification of rule bases and techniques for capturing information relating to the process of developing software. The final part focused on software tools. A summary is also presented of the EPRI conference on 'Methodologies, Tools, and Standards for Cost Effective Reliable Software Verification and Validation. The conference was divided into discussion sessions on the following issues: development process, automated tools, software reliability, methods, standards, and cost/benefit considerations.

  6. A flight test evaluation of the pilot interface with a digital advanced avionics system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A flight study was conducted to study pilot workload and the pilot interface with high levels of avionics capability and automation. The study was done in the context of general aviation, single-pilot IFR operations and utilized an experimental, digital, integrated avionics system. Results indicate that such advanced systems can provide improved information to the pilot and increased functional capability. The results also indicate that additional research is needed to increase the knowledge base required to design the pilot interfaces with highly capable systems. A CRT-based moving map display format tested provided excellent navigational situational awareness but was inferior to an HSI for manual path tracking. The complexity of navigation data management, autopilot management, and maintaining awareness of system status contributed to pilot workload and errors. Suggested guidelines for the design of the pilot/avionics interface for advanced avionics systems are given.

  7. Towards the Formal Verification of a Distributed Real-Time Automotive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endres, Erik; Mueller, Christian; Shadrin, Andrey; Tverdyshev, Sergey

    2010-01-01

    We present the status of a project which aims at building, formally and pervasively verifying a distributed automotive system. The target system is a gate-level model which consists of several interconnected electronic control units with independent clocks. This model is verified against the specification as seen by a system programmer. The automotive system is implemented on several FPGA boards. The pervasive verification is carried out using combination of interactive theorem proving (Isabelle/HOL) and model checking (LTL).

  8. Test/QA Plan for Verification of Semi-Continuous Ambient Air Monitoring Systems - Second Round

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test/QA Plan for Verification of Semi-Continuous Ambient Air Monitoring Systems - Second Round. Changes reflect performance of second round of testing at new location and with various changes to personnel. Additional changes reflect general improvements to the Version 1 test/QA...

  9. VERIFICATION TESTING OF PACKAGE DRINKING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMALL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Drinking Water Systems (DWS) Center is one of several US EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Centers dedicated to producing credible environmental performance data. The EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) leads the ETV Program.

    On October 1, 2000,...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT STORMFILTER® TREATMENT SYSTEM USING PERLITE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Stormwater Management, Inc. StormFilter® Using Perlite Filter Media was conducted on a 0.7 acre drainage basin near downtown Griffin, Georgia. The system consists of an inlet bay, flow spreader, cartridge bay, overflow baffle, and outlet bay, housed in...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: STORMWATER SOURCE AREA TREATMENT DEVICE - VORTECHNICS INC., VORTECHS® SYSTEM, MODEL 1000

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Vortechnics, Inc. Vortechs® System, Model 1000 was conducted on a 0.25 acre portion of an elevated highway near downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The Vortechs is designed to remove settable and floatable pollutants from stormwater runoff. The Vortechs® ...

  12. Software Verification and Validation Test Report for the HEPA filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-09-05

    The HEPA Filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System PLC ladder logic software was tested using a Software Verification and Validation (V&V) Test Plan as required by the ''Computer Software Quality Assurance Requirements''. The purpose of his document is to report on the results of the software qualification.

  13. 7 CFR 272.8 - State income and eligibility verification system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State income and eligibility verification system. 272.8 Section 272.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATING STATE AGENCIES § 272.8 State income...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: STORMWATER SOURCE AREA TREATMENT DEVICE: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT INC., STORMSCREEN� TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification Testing of the Stormwater Management, Inc. StormScreen treatment technology was performed during a 12-month period starting in May, 2003. The system was previously installed in a city-owned right-of-way near downtown Griffin, GA., and is a device for removing trash,...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT-INGERSOLL-RAND ENERGY SYSTEMS IR POWERWORKS(TM) 70 KW MICROTURBINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the IR PowerWorks 70kW Microturbine System manufactured by Ingersoll-Rand Energy Systems. This system is a 70 kW electrical generator that puts out 480 v AC at 60 Hz and that is driven by...

  16. Dose Verification of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia with Presage 3D Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Thomas, A.; Newton, J.; Ibbott, G.; Deasy, J.; Oldham, M.

    2010-11-01

    Achieving adequate verification and quality-assurance (QA) for radiosurgery treatment of trigeminal-neuralgia (TGN) is particularly challenging because of the combination of very small fields, very high doses, and complex irradiation geometries (multiple gantry and couch combinations). TGN treatments have extreme requirements for dosimetry tools and QA techniques, to ensure adequate verification. In this work we evaluate the potential of Presage/Optical-CT dosimetry system as a tool for the verification of TGN distributions in high-resolution and in 3D. A TGN treatment was planned and delivered to a Presage 3D dosimeter positioned inside the Radiological-Physics-Center (RPC) head and neck IMRT credentialing phantom. A 6-arc treatment plan was created using the iPlan system, and a maximum dose of 80Gy was delivered with a Varian Trilogy machine. The delivered dose to Presage was determined by optical-CT scanning using the Duke Large field-of-view Optical-CT Scanner (DLOS) in 3D, with isotropic resolution of 0.7mm3. DLOS scanning and reconstruction took about 20minutes. 3D dose comparisons were made with the planning system. Good agreement was observed between the planned and measured 3D dose distributions, and this work provides strong support for the viability of Presage/Optical-CT as a highly useful new approach for verification of this complex technique.

  17. Verification of Faulty Message Passing Systems with Continuous State Space in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilotto, Concetta; White, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    We present a library of Prototype Verification System (PVS) meta-theories that verifies a class of distributed systems in which agent commu nication is through message-passing. The theoretic work, outlined in, consists of iterative schemes for solving systems of linear equations , such as message-passing extensions of the Gauss and Gauss-Seidel me thods. We briefly review that work and discuss the challenges in formally verifying it.

  18. Design of a flight director/configuration management system for piloted STOL approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, R. H.; Klein, R. H.; Johnson, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a flight director for V/STOL aircraft are discussed. A configuration management system for piloted STOL approaches is described. The individual components of the overall system designed to reduce pilot workload to an acceptable level during curved, decelerating, and descending STOL approaches are defined. The application of the system to augmentor wing aircraft is analyzed. System performance checks and piloted evaluations were conducted on a flight simulator and the results are summarized.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT: UV DISINFECTION FOR REUSE APPLICATIONS, ONDEO DEGREMONT, INC., AQUARAY® 40 HO VLS DISINFECTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Ondeo Degremont, Inc. Aquaray® 40 HO VLS Disinfection System to develop the UV delivered dose flow relationship was conducted at the Parsippany-Troy Hills wastewater treatment plant test site in Parsippany, New Jersey. Three reactor modules were m...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT; UV DISINFECTION FOR REUSE APPLICATION, AQUIONICS, INC. BERSONINLINE 4250 UV SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Aquionics, Inc. bersonInLine® 4250 UV System to develop the UV delivered dose flow relationship was conducted at the Parsippany-Troy Hills Wastewater Treatment Plant test site in Parsippany, New Jersey. Two full-scale reactors were mounted in series. T...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT FOR AMMONIA RECOVERY PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technology Verification report describes the nature and scope of an environmental evaluation of ThermoEnergy Corporation’s Ammonia Recovery Process (ARP) system. The information contained in this report represents data that were collected over a 3-month pilot study. The ti...

  2. Verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy beams using a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petric, Martin Peter

    This thesis describes the development and implementation of a novel method for the dosimetric verification of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields with several advantages over current techniques. Through the use of a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator sheet viewed by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, this method provides a truly tissue equivalent dosimetry system capable of efficiently and accurately performing field-by-field verification of IMRT plans. This work was motivated by an initial study comparing two IMRT treatment planning systems. The clinical functionality of BrainLAB's BrainSCAN and Varian's Helios IMRT treatment planning systems were compared in terms of implementation and commissioning, dose optimization, and plan assessment. Implementation and commissioning revealed differences in the beam data required to characterize the beam prior to use with the BrainSCAN system requiring higher resolution data compared to Helios. This difference was found to impact on the ability of the systems to accurately calculate dose for highly modulated fields, with BrainSCAN being more successful than Helios. The dose optimization and plan assessment comparisons revealed that while both systems use considerably different optimization algorithms and user-control interfaces, they are both capable of producing substantially equivalent dose plans. The extensive use of dosimetric verification techniques in the IMRT treatment planning comparison study motivated the development and implementation of a novel IMRT dosimetric verification system. The system consists of a water-filled phantom with a tissue equivalent plastic scintillator sheet built into the top surface. Scintillation light is reflected by a plastic mirror within the phantom towards a viewing window where it is captured using a CCD camera. Optical photon spread is removed using a micro-louvre optical collimator and by deconvolving a glare kernel from the raw images. Characterization of this

  3. Optical/digital identification/verification system based on digital watermarking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrigel, Alexander; Voloshynovskiy, Sviatoslav V.; Hrytskiv, Zenon D.

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the secure integrity verification of driver licenses, passports or other analogue identification documents. The system embeds (detects) the reference number of the identification document with the DCT watermark technology in (from) the owner photo of the identification document holder. During verification the reference number is extracted and compared with the reference number printed in the identification document. The approach combines optical and digital image processing techniques. The detection system must be able to scan an analogue driver license or passport, convert the image of this document into a digital representation and then apply the watermark verification algorithm to check the payload of the embedded watermark. If the payload of the watermark is identical with the printed visual reference number of the issuer, the verification was successful and the passport or driver license has not been modified. This approach constitutes a new class of application for the watermark technology, which was originally targeted for the copyright protection of digital multimedia data. The presented approach substantially increases the security of the analogue identification documents applied in many European countries.

  4. Analytical Verifications in Cryogenic Testing of NGST Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Ramona; Levine, Marie; VanBuren, Dave; Kegley, Jeff; Green, Joseph; Hadaway, James; Presson, Joan; Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground based testing is a critical and costly part of component, assembly, and system verifications of large space telescopes. At such tests, however, with integral teamwork by planners, analysts, and test personnel, segments can be included to validate specific analytical parameters and algorithms at relatively low additional cost. This paper opens with strategy of analytical verification segments added to vacuum cryogenic testing of Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) assemblies. These AMSD assemblies incorporate material and architecture concepts being considered in the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) design. The test segments for workmanship testing, cold survivability, and cold operation optical throughput are supplemented by segments for analytical verifications of specific structural, thermal, and optical parameters. Utilizing integrated modeling and separate materials testing, the paper continues with support plan for analyses, data, and observation requirements during the AMSD testing, currently slated for late calendar year 2002 to mid calendar year 2003. The paper includes anomaly resolution as gleaned by authors from similar analytical verification support of a previous large space telescope, then closes with draft of plans for parameter extrapolations, to form a well-verified portion of the integrated modeling being done for NGST performance predictions.

  5. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III; Kallis, J. M.; Trucker, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and structural analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate encapsulation systems were selected for qualification testing.

  6. A tracking and verification system implemented in a clinical environment for partial HIPAA compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bing; Documet, Jorge; Liu, Brent; King, Nelson; Shrestha, Rasu; Wang, Kevin; Huang, H. K.; Grant, Edward G.

    2006-03-01

    The paper describes the methodology for the clinical design and implementation of a Location Tracking and Verification System (LTVS) that has distinct benefits for the Imaging Department at the Healthcare Consultation Center II (HCCII), an outpatient imaging facility located on the USC Health Science Campus. A novel system for tracking and verification of patients and staff in a clinical environment using wireless and facial biometric technology to monitor and automatically identify patients and staff was developed in order to streamline patient workflow, protect against erroneous examinations and create a security zone to prevent and audit unauthorized access to patient healthcare data under the HIPAA mandate. This paper describes the system design and integration methodology based on initial clinical workflow studies within a clinical environment. An outpatient center was chosen as an initial first step for the development and implementation of this system.

  7. Expert system verification and validation study. Phase 2: Requirements Identification. Delivery 2: Current requirements applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The second phase of a task is described which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate Expert Systems (ESs) Verification and Validation (V and V) tools and techniques are available for Space Station Freedom Program Knowledge Based Systems development. The purpose of this phase is to recommend modifications to current software V and V requirements which will extend the applicability of the requirements to NASA ESs.

  8. Piloted Simulation of a Model-Predictive Automated Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, James (Yuan); Litt, Jonathan; Sowers, T. Shane; Owens, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes a model-predictive automatic recovery system for aircraft on the verge of a loss-of-control situation. The system determines when it must intervene to prevent an imminent accident, resulting from a poor approach. It estimates the altitude loss that would result from a go-around maneuver at the current flight condition. If the loss is projected to violate a minimum altitude threshold, the maneuver is automatically triggered. The system deactivates to allow landing once several criteria are met. Piloted flight simulator evaluation showed the system to provide effective envelope protection during extremely unsafe landing attempts. The results demonstrate how flight and propulsion control can be integrated to recover control of the vehicle automatically and prevent a potential catastrophe.

  9. Quality assurance and verification of the MACCS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System) code, Version 1. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbe, C.A.; Carlson, E.R.; Marshall, N.H.; Marwil, E.S.; Tolli, J.E. )

    1990-02-01

    An independent quality assurance (QA) and verification of Version 1.5 of the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS) was performed. The QA and verification involved examination of the code and associated documentation for consistent and correct implementation of the models in an error-free FORTRAN computer code. The QA and verification was not intended to determine either the adequacy or appropriateness of the models that are used MACCS 1.5. The reviews uncovered errors which were fixed by the SNL MACCS code development staff prior to the release of MACCS 1.5. Some difficulties related to documentation improvement and code restructuring are also presented. The QA and verification process concluded that Version 1.5 of the MACCS code, within the scope and limitations process concluded that Version 1.5 of the MACCS code, within the scope and limitations of the models implemented in the code is essentially error free and ready for widespread use. 15 refs., 11 tabs.

  10. Safety Verification of a Fault Tolerant Reconfigurable Autonomous Goal-Based Robotic Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braman, Julia M. B.; Murray, Richard M; Wagner, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Fault tolerance and safety verification of control systems are essential for the success of autonomous robotic systems. A control architecture called Mission Data System (MDS), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, takes a goal-based control approach. In this paper, a method for converting goal network control programs into linear hybrid systems is developed. The linear hybrid system can then be verified for safety in the presence of failures using existing symbolic model checkers. An example task is simulated in MDS and successfully verified using HyTech, a symbolic model checking software for linear hybrid systems.

  11. Damage Detection and Verification System (DDVS) for In-Situ Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Lewis, Mark; Szafran, J.; Shelton, C.; Ludwig, L.; Gibson, T.; Lane, J.; Trautwein, T.

    2015-01-01

    Project presentation for Game Changing Program Smart Book Release. Detection and Verification System (DDVS) expands the Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS) sensory panels damage detection capabilities and includes an autonomous inspection capability utilizing cameras and dynamic computer vision algorithms to verify system health. Objectives of this formulation task are to establish the concept of operations, formulate the system requirements for a potential ISS flight experiment, and develop a preliminary design of an autonomous inspection capability system that will be demonstrated as a proof-of-concept ground based damage detection and inspection system.

  12. Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Tracking Systems: Costs & Verification Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.

    2013-10-01

    This document provides information on REC tracking systems: how they are used in the voluntary REC market, a comparison of REC systems fees and information regarding how they treat environmental attributes.

  13. Prototype test article verification of the Space Station Freedom active thermal control system microgravity performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, I. Y.; Ungar, E. K.; Lee, D. Y.; Beckstrom, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    To verify the on-orbit operation of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) two-phase external Active Thermal Control System (ATCS), a test and verification program will be performed prior to flight. The first system level test of the ATCS is the Prototype Test Article (PTA) test that will be performed in early 1994. All ATCS loops will be represented by prototypical components and the line sizes and lengths will be representative of the flight system. In this paper, the SSF ATCS and a portion of its verification process are described. The PTA design and the analytical methods that were used to quantify the gravity effects on PTA operation are detailed. Finally, the gravity effects are listed, and the applicability of the 1-g PTA test results to the validation of on-orbit ATCS operation is discussed.

  14. Fluor Hanford Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Vol 1 & Vol 2

    SciTech Connect

    PARSONS, J.E.

    2000-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting work efficiently and in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, public, and environment. DOE policy mandates that safety management systems be used to systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels while accomplishing mission goals in an effective and efficient manner. The purpose of the Fluor Hanford (FH) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) verification was to determine whether FH's ISM system and processes are sufficiently implemented to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of the DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) verification was to determine whether RL has established processes that adequately describe RL's role in safety management and if those processes are sufficiently implemented.

  15. Technical experiences of implementing a wireless tracking and facial biometric verification system for a clinical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent; Lee, Jasper; Documet, Jorge; Guo, Bing; King, Nelson; Huang, H. K.

    2006-03-01

    By implementing a tracking and verification system, clinical facilities can effectively monitor workflow and heighten information security in today's growing demand towards digital imaging informatics. This paper presents the technical design and implementation experiences encountered during the development of a Location Tracking and Verification System (LTVS) for a clinical environment. LTVS integrates facial biometrics with wireless tracking so that administrators can manage and monitor patient and staff through a web-based application. Implementation challenges fall into three main areas: 1) Development and Integration, 2) Calibration and Optimization of Wi-Fi Tracking System, and 3) Clinical Implementation. An initial prototype LTVS has been implemented within USC's Healthcare Consultation Center II Outpatient Facility, which currently has a fully digital imaging department environment with integrated HIS/RIS/PACS/VR (Voice Recognition).

  16. Formal modeling and verification of fractional order linear systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunna; Shi, Likun; Guan, Yong; Li, Xiaojuan; Shi, Zhiping

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a formalization of a fractional order linear system in a higher-order logic (HOL) theorem proving system. Based on the formalization of the Grünwald-Letnikov (GL) definition, we formally specify and verify the linear and superposition properties of fractional order systems. The proof provides a rigor and solid underpinnings for verifying concrete fractional order linear control systems. Our implementation in HOL demonstrates the effectiveness of our approach in practical applications. PMID:27126601

  17. Abstractions for Fault-Tolerant Distributed System Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Lee S.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Miner, Paul S.; Geser, Alfons

    2004-01-01

    Four kinds of abstraction for the design and analysis of fault tolerant distributed systems are discussed. These abstractions concern system messages, faults, fault masking voting, and communication. The abstractions are formalized in higher order logic, and are intended to facilitate specifying and verifying such systems in higher order theorem provers.

  18. Pilot factors guidelines for the operational inspection of navigation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, J. F.; Boucek, G. P.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized human engineered inspection technique is developed for use by FAA inspectors in evaluating the pilot factors aspects of aircraft navigation systems. The short title for this project is Nav Handbook. A menu-driven checklist, computer program and data base (Human Factors Design Criteria) were developed and merged to form a self-contained, portable, human factors inspection checklist tool for use in a laboratory or field setting. The automated checklist is tailored for general aviation navigation systems and can be expanded for use with other aircraft systems, transports or military aircraft. The Nav Handbook inspection concept was demonstrated using a lap-top computer and an Omega/VLF CDU. The program generates standardized inspection reports. Automated checklists for LORAN/C and R NAV were also developed. A Nav Handbook User's Guide is included.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT STORMWATER MANAGEMENT INC., STORMFILTER SYSTEM WITH ZPG MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Stormwater Management, Inc. StormFilter Using ZPG Filter Media was conducted on a 0.19 acre portion of the eastbound highway surface of Interstate 794, at an area commonly referred to as the "Riverwalk" site near downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin...

  20. Effects of mixing system and pilot fuel quality on diesel-biogas dual fuel engine performance.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Iván Darío; Arrieta, Andrés Amell; Cadavid, Francisco Javier

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes results obtained from CI engine performance running on dual fuel mode at fixed engine speed and four loads, varying the mixing system and pilot fuel quality, associated with fuel composition and cetane number. The experiments were carried out on a power generation diesel engine at 1500 m above sea level, with simulated biogas (60% CH(4)-40% CO(2)) as primary fuel, and diesel and palm oil biodiesel as pilot fuels. Dual fuel engine performance using a naturally aspirated mixing system and diesel as pilot fuel was compared with engine performance attained with a supercharged mixing system and biodiesel as pilot fuel. For all loads evaluated, was possible to achieve full diesel substitution using biogas and biodiesel as power sources. Using the supercharged mixing system combined with biodiesel as pilot fuel, thermal efficiency and substitution of pilot fuel were increased, whereas methane and carbon monoxide emissions were reduced. PMID:19683439

  1. Generic experimental cockpit for evaluating pilot assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toebben, Helmut H.; Doehler, Hans-Ullrich; Hecker, Peter

    2002-07-01

    The workload of aircraft crews, especially during taxiing, take-off, approach and landing under adverse weather conditions has heavily increased due to the continuous growth of air traffic. New pilot assistance systems can improve the situational awareness of the aircrew and consequently increase the safety and reduce the workload. For demonstration and human factor evaluation of such new systems the DLR has built a Generic Experimental Cockpit Simulator equipped with a modern glass-cockpit collimated display. The Primary Flight Display (PFD), the human machine interface for an Advanced Flight Management System (AFMS), a Taxi Guidance System called Taxi and Ramp Management and Control (TARMAC) and an Enhanced Vision System (EVS) based on real time simulation of MMWR and FLIR sensors are integrated into the cockpit on high resolution TFT touch screens. The situational awareness is further enhanced by the integration of a raster/stroke capable Head-Up Display (HUD). It prevents the pilot's eye from permanent accommodation between the Head-Down Displays and the outside view. This contribution describes the technical implementation of the PFD, the Taxi Guidance System and the EVS onto the HUD. The HUD is driven by a normal PC, which provides the Arinc data for the stroke generator and the video signal for the raster image. The PFD uses the built-in stroke generator and is working under all operations. During taxi operations the cleared taxi route and the positions of other aircraft are displayed via raster. The images of the real time simulation of the MMWR and FLIR Sensors are presented via raster on demand. During approach and landing a runway symbol or a 3D wire frame database is shown which exactly matches the outside view and obstacles on the runway are highlighted. The runway position is automatically calculated from the MMWR Sensor as reported in previous contributions.

  2. Verification and Validation of Neural Networks for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; Nelson, Stacy; Schumman, Johann; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center V&V working group and NASA Ames Research Center Automated Software Engineering (ASE) group collaborated to prepare this report. The purpose is to describe V&V processes and methods for certification of neural networks for aerospace applications, particularly adaptive flight control systems like Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS) that use neural networks. This report is divided into the following two sections: 1) Overview of Adaptive Systems; and 2) V&V Processes/Methods.

  3. Verification and Validation of Neural Networks for Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; Nelson, Stacy; Schumann, Johann

    2002-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center V&V working group and NASA Ames Research Center Automated Software Engineering (ASE) group collaborated to prepare this report. The purpose is to describe V&V processes and methods for certification of neural networks for aerospace applications, particularly adaptive flight control systems like Intelligent Flight Control Systems (IFCS) that use neural networks. This report is divided into the following two sections: Overview of Adaptive Systems and V&V Processes/Methods.

  4. Unmanned Aerial Systems in the Process of Juridical Verification of Cadastral Border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, M.; van Hinsbergh, W. H. M.; Witteveen, W.; ten Buuren, G. H. M.; Schakelaar, G. A.; Poppinga, G.; van Persie, M.; Ladiges, R.

    2013-08-01

    Quite often in the verification of cadastral borders, owners of the parcels involved are not able to make their attendance at the appointed moment in time. New appointments have to be made in order to complete the verification process, and as a result often costs and throughput times grow beyond what is considered to be acceptable. To improve the efficiency of the verification process an experiment was set up that refrains from the conventional terrestrial methods for border verification. The central research question was formulated as "How useful are Unmanned Aerial Systems in the juridical verification process of cadastral borders of ownership at het Kadaster in the Netherlands?". For the experiment, operational evaluations were executed at two different locations. The first operational evaluation took place at the Pyramid of Austerlitz, a flat area with a 30 m high pyramid built by troops of Napoleon, with low civilian attendance. Two subsequent evaluations were situated in a small neighbourhood in the city of Nunspeet, where the cadastral situation recently changed, resulting from twenty new houses that were build. Initially a mini-UAS of the KLPD was used to collect photo datasets with less than 1 cm spatial resolution. In a later stage the commercial service provider Orbit Gis was hired. During the experiment four different software packages were used for processing the photo datasets into accurate geo-referenced ortho-mosaics. In this article more details will be described on the experiments carried out. Attention will be paid to the mini-UAS platforms (AscTec Falcon 8, Microdrone MD-4), the cameras used, the photo collection plan, the usage of ground control markers and the calibration of the camera's. Furthermore the results and experiences of the different used SFM software packages (Visual SFM/Bundler, PhotoScan, PhotoModeler and the Orbit software) will be shared.

  5. Thermal System Verification and Model Validation for NASA's Cryogenic Passively Cooled James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Paul E.; Parrish, Keith A.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough and unique thermal verification and model validation plan has been developed for NASA s James Webb Space Telescope. The JWST observatory consists of a large deployed aperture optical telescope passively cooled to below 50 Kelvin along with a suite of several instruments passively and actively cooled to below 37 Kelvin and 7 Kelvin, respectively. Passive cooling to these extremely low temperatures is made feasible by the use of a large deployed high efficiency sunshield and an orbit location at the L2 Lagrange point. Another enabling feature is the scale or size of the observatory that allows for large radiator sizes that are compatible with the expected power dissipation of the instruments and large format Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) detector arrays. This passive cooling concept is simple, reliable, and mission enabling when compared to the alternatives of mechanical coolers and stored cryogens. However, these same large scale observatory features, which make passive cooling viable, also prevent the typical flight configuration fully-deployed thermal balance test that is the keystone to most space missions thermal verification plan. JWST is simply too large in its deployed configuration to be properly thermal balance tested in the facilities that currently exist. This reality, when combined with a mission thermal concept with little to no flight heritage, has necessitated the need for a unique and alternative approach to thermal system verification and model validation. This paper describes the thermal verification and model validation plan that has been developed for JWST. The plan relies on judicious use of cryogenic and thermal design margin, a completely independent thermal modeling cross check utilizing different analysis teams and software packages, and finally, a comprehensive set of thermal tests that occur at different levels of JWST assembly. After a brief description of the JWST mission and thermal architecture, a detailed description

  6. Progress of the AVNG System - Attribute Verification System with Information Barriers for Mass Isotopics Measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Budnikov, D.; Bulatov, M.; Jarikhine, I.; Lebedev, B.; Livke, A.; Modenov, A.; Morkin, A.; Razinkov, S.; Tsaregorodtsev, D.; Vlokh, A.; Yakovleva, S.; Elmont, T. H.; Langner, D. C.; MacArthur, D. W.; Mayo, D. R.; Smith, M. K.; Luke, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency @ 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC{sup PLUS}. The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 {sup 3}He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  7. PROGRESS OF THE AVNG SYSTEM - ATTRIBUTE VERIFICATION SYSTEM WITH INFORMATION BARRIERS FOR MASS AND ISOTOPICS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Budnikov, D; Bulatov, M; Jarikhine, I; Lebedev, B; Livke, A; Modenov, A; Morkin, A; Razinkov, S; Safronov, S; Tsaregorodtsev, D; Vlokh, A; Yakovleva, S; Elmont, T; Langner, D; MacArthur, D; Mayo, D; Smith, M; Luke, S J

    2005-05-27

    An attribute verification system (AVNG) with information barriers for mass and isotopics measurements has been designed and its fabrication is nearly completed. The AVNG is being built by scientists at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, with support of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Such a system could be used to verify the presence of several unclassified attributes of classified material with no classified information release. The system is comprised of a neutron multiplicity counter and gamma-spectrometry system based on a high purity germanium gamma detector (nominal relative efficiency {at} 1332 keV 50%) and digital gamma-ray spectrometer DSPEC{sup PLUS}. The neutron multiplicity counter is a three ring counter with 164 {sup 3}He tubes. The system was designed to measure prototype containers 491 mm in diameter and 503 mm high. This paper provides a brief history of the project and documents the progress of this effort with drawings and photographs.

  8. A formal approach to validation and verification for knowledge-based control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castore, Glen

    1987-01-01

    As control systems become more complex in response to desires for greater system flexibility, performance and reliability, the promise is held out that artificial intelligence might provide the means for building such systems. An obstacle to the use of symbolic processing constructs in this domain is the need for verification and validation (V and V) of the systems. Techniques currently in use do not seem appropriate for knowledge-based software. An outline of a formal approach to V and V for knowledge-based control systems is presented.

  9. 30 CFR 75.902-2 - Approved ground check systems not employing pilot check wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approved ground check systems not employing... Low- and Medium-Voltage Alternating Current Circuits § 75.902-2 Approved ground check systems not employing pilot check wires. Ground check systems not employing pilot check wires will be approved only...

  10. 30 CFR 77.902-2 - Approved ground check systems not employing pilot check wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Approved ground check systems not employing... Approved ground check systems not employing pilot check wires. Ground check systems not employing pilot... includes a fail safe design causing the circuit breaker to open when ground continuity is broken....

  11. A gamma-ray verification system for special nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, R.G.; Prindle, A.L.; Friensehner, A.V.; Buckley, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a gamma-ray screening system for use by the Materials Management Section of the Engineering Sciences Division at LLNL for verifying the presence or absence of special nuclear material (SNM) in a sample. This system facilitates the measurements required under the ``5610`` series of US Department of Energy orders. MMGAM is an intelligent, menu driven software application that runs on a personal computer and requires a precalibrated multi-channel analyzer and HPGe detector. It provides a very quick and easy-to-use means of determining the presence of SNM in a sample. After guiding the operator through a menu driven set-up procedure, the system provides an on-screen GO/NO-GO indication after determining the system calibration status. This system represents advances over earlier used systems in the areas of ease-of use, operator training requirements, and quality assurance. The system records the gamma radiation from a sample using a sequence of measurements involving a background measurement followed immediately by a measurement of the unknown sample. Both spectra are stored and available for analysis or output. In the current application, the presence of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 208}Tl isotopes are indicated by extracting, from the stored spectra, four energy ``windows`` preset around gamma-ray lines characteristic of the radioactive decay of these nuclides. The system is easily extendible to more complicated problems.

  12. System and Method for Providing Model-Based Alerting of Spatial Disorientation to a Pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, Kevin J (Inventor); Mathan, Santosh (Inventor); Johnson, Steve (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and method monitor aircraft state parameters, for example, aircraft movement and flight parameters, applies those inputs to a spatial disorientation model, and makes a prediction of when pilot may become spatially disoriented. Once the system predicts a potentially disoriented pilot, the sensitivity for alerting the pilot to conditions exceeding a threshold can be increased and allow for an earlier alert to mitigate the possibility of an incorrect control input.

  13. Orbiter S-band direct link system verification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, B. K.

    1980-01-01

    Space-to-ground S-band communications system compatibility and performance tests were performed for the various radio frequency links. These tests consisted of the various uplink and downlink signal combinations (data rates) for the phase modulation system and both realtime and playback data rates for the frequency modulated downlink systems. In addition, tests involving encryption/decryption, Doppler, and acquisition were performed. Results show that the S-band transponder for the space shuttle orbiter is compatible with the S-band equipment of the AFSCF/RTS (Air Force Satellite Control Facility/Remote Tracking Station). It is also concluded that the performance of the orbiter-AFSCF/RTS direct link exceeds the required performance and that this communications link will meet the system requirements of the Space Transportation System.

  14. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation - Operational experiences with the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of two studies on the potential effect of cockpit automation on the pilot's performance, which provide data on pilots' difficulties with understanding and operating one of the core systems of cockpit automation, the Flight Management System (FMS). The results of both studies indicate that, although pilots do become proficient in standard FMS operations through ground training and subsequent flight experience, they still have difficulties tracking the FMS status and behavior in certain flight contexts and show gaps in the understanding of the functional structure of the system. The results suggest that design-related factors such as opaque interfaces contribute to these difficulties, which can affect the pilot's situation awareness.

  15. Computer modeling and experimental verification of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Mulcahey, T.M.; Rote, D.M.; Kelly, T.

    1994-12-01

    This report discusses the computer modeling and experimental verification of the magnetic forces associated with a figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension system. A set of computer codes called COILGDWY, were developed on the basis of the dynamic circuit model and verified by means of a laboratory model. The experimental verification was conducted with a rotating PVC drum, the surface of which held various types of figure-eight-shaped null-flux coils that interacted with a stationary permanent magnet. The transient and dynamic magnetic forces between the stationary magnet and the rotating conducting coils were measured and compared with results obtained from the computer model. Good agreement between the experimental results and computer simulations was obtained. The computer model can also be used to calculate magnetic forces in a large-scale magnetic-levitation system.

  16. Robotic 3D vision solder joint verification system evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, M.A.

    1992-02-01

    A comparative performance evaluation was conducted between a proprietary inspection system using intelligent 3D vision and manual visual inspection of solder joints. The purpose was to assess the compatibility and correlation of the automated system with current visual inspection criteria. The results indicated that the automated system was more accurate (> 90%) than visual inspection (60--70%) in locating and/or categorizing solder joint defects. In addition, the automated system can offer significant capabilities to characterize and monitor a soldering process by measuring physical attributes, such as solder joint volumes and wetting angles, which are not available through manual visual inspection. A more in-depth evaluation of this technology is recommended.

  17. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A.; Minning, C.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and structural analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. Qualification testing, specimens of various types, and a finalized optimum design are projected.

  18. Advanced orbiting systems test-bedding and protocol verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noles, James; De Gree, Melvin

    1989-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) has begun the development of a set of protocol recommendations for Advanced Orbiting Systems (SOS). The AOS validation program and formal definition of AOS protocols are reviewed, and the configuration control of the AOS formal specifications is summarized. Independent implementations of the AOS protocols by NASA and ESA are discussed, and cross-support/interoperability tests which will allow the space agencies of various countries to share AOS communication facilities are addressed.

  19. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System: Verification for the Pressurized Mating Adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Pressurized Mating Adapters (PMAs) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of three subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). PMA 1 and PMA 2 flew to ISS on Flight 2A and PMA 3 flew to ISS on Flight 3A. This paper provides a summary of the PMAs ECLS design and the detailed Element Verification methodologies utilized during the Qualification phase for the PMAs.

  20. Changes in Pilot Behavior with Predictive System Status Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    1998-01-01

    Research has shown a strong pilot preference for predictive information of aircraft system status in the flight deck. However, changes in pilot behavior associated with using this predictive information have not been ascertained. The study described here quantified these changes using three types of predictive information (none, whether a parameter was changing abnormally, and the time for a parameter to reach an alert range) and three initial time intervals until a parameter alert range was reached (ITIs) (1 minute, 5 minutes, and 15 minutes). With predictive information, subjects accomplished most of their tasks before an alert occurred. Subjects organized the time they did their tasks by locus-of-control with no predictive information and for the 1-minute ITI, and by aviatenavigate-communicate for the time for a parameter to reach an alert range and the 15-minute conditions. Overall, predictive information and the longer ITIs moved subjects to performing tasks before the alert actually occurred and had them more mission oriented as indicated by their tasks grouping of aviate-navigate-communicate.

  1. Accuracy verification of the Lynx Mobile Mapper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, I.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2013-02-01

    LiDAR technology is one of the most effective and reliable means of data collection. Given the increasing use of LiDAR data for close range metrology applications such as deformation monitoring and infrastructure inspection, it becomes necessary to test the relative accuracy, boresight calibration of both LiDAR sensors and performance of navigation solution (or absolute accuracy) of any mobile laser scanning system employed for this purpose. Therefore, the paper's primary contribution is a set of tests for the characterization and evaluation of any mobile laser scanning system based on two LiDAR sensors. We present experimental results of the Lynx Mobile Mapper system from Optech Inc. Employing a low-cost calibration standard, we demonstrated sub-cm accuracy of targets at distances up to 10 m. Also, we introduce boresighting results derived from the Lynx system. Moreover, the global system's accuracy is tested with a series of rigorous experiments operated at a maximum scan frequency of 200 Hz, pulse repetition frequency of 500 kHz per sensor and a 360° scanning field of view. Assuring good GPS conditions, we proved a good global performance of the system, which makes it suitable for very accurate applications.

  2. Crew Exploration Vehicle Potable Water System Verification Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George; Peterson, Laurie J.; Vega, Leticia M.

    2010-01-01

    A stored water system on the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) will supply the crew with potable water for: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain the quality of the water, transferred from the orbiter to the International Space Station, stored in contingency water containers. In the CEV water system, a depletion of the ionic silver biocide is expected due to ionic silver-plating onto the surfaces of materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide. Because this may be the first time NASA is considering a stored water system for long-term missions that do not maintain a residual biocide, a team of experts in materials compatibility, biofilms and point-of-use filters, surface treatment and coatings, and biocides has been created to pinpoint concerns and perform the testing that will help alleviate concerns related to the CEV water system.

  3. Safety Verification of the Small Aircraft Transportation System Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor; Munoz, Cesar

    2005-01-01

    A critical factor in the adoption of any new aeronautical technology or concept of operation is safety. Traditionally, safety is accomplished through a rigorous process that involves human factors, low and high fidelity simulations, and flight experiments. As this process is usually performed on final products or functional prototypes, concept modifications resulting from this process are very expensive to implement. This paper describe an approach to system safety that can take place at early stages of a concept design. It is based on a set of mathematical techniques and tools known as formal methods. In contrast to testing and simulation, formal methods provide the capability of exhaustive state exploration analysis. We present the safety analysis and verification performed for the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Concept of Operations (ConOps). The concept of operations is modeled using discrete and hybrid mathematical models. These models are then analyzed using formal methods. The objective of the analysis is to show, in a mathematical framework, that the concept of operation complies with a set of safety requirements. It is also shown that the ConOps has some desirable characteristic such as liveness and absence of dead-lock. The analysis and verification is performed in the Prototype Verification System (PVS), which is a computer based specification language and a theorem proving assistant.

  4. Color information verification system based on singular value decomposition in gyrator transform domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuturab, Muhammad Rafiq

    2014-06-01

    A new color image security system based on singular value decomposition (SVD) in gyrator transform (GT) domains is proposed. In the encryption process, a color image is decomposed into red, green and blue channels. Each channel is independently modulated by random phase masks and then separately gyrator transformed at different parameters. The three gyrator spectra are joined by multiplication to get one gray ciphertext. The ciphertext is separated into U, S, and V parts by SVD. All the three parts are individually gyrator transformed at different transformation angles. The three encoded information can be assigned to different authorized users for highly secure verification. Only when all the authorized users place the U, S, and V parts in correct multiplication order in the verification system, the correct information can be obtained with all the right keys. In the proposed method, SVD offers one-way asymmetrical decomposition algorithm and it is an optimal matrix decomposition in a least-square sense. The transformation angles of GT provide very sensitive additional keys. The pre-generated keys for red, green and blue channels are served as decryption (private) keys. As all the three encrypted parts are the gray scale ciphertexts with stationary white noise distributions, which have camouflage property to some extent. These advantages enhance the security and robustness. Numerical simulations are presented to support the viability of the proposed verification system.

  5. Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.

    1993-08-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

  6. Biomedical support systems. [use and verification of biomedical hardware in altitude test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockett, R. M.; Ferguson, J. M.; Luczkowski, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Biomedical support hardware for SMEAT consisted basically of two systems, the inflight medical support system, and the operational bioinstrumentation system. The former is essentially a diagnostic and therapeutic kit; the latter is a belt equipped with sensors worn by the crewman to permit monitoring of his vital signs. Special attention was given during to the use and verification of the items in the systems so that changes required in the equipment could be pinpointed and effected prior to the Skylab mission. During the in-chamber testing, evaluations were made of the effectiveness of the proposed microbiology procedures, techniques, equipment, and the stability of media and reagents over the extended period of storage.

  7. Verification of Security Policy Enforcement in Enterprise Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Puneet; Stoller, Scott D.

    Many security requirements for enterprise systems can be expressed in a natural way as high-level access control policies. A high-level policy may refer to abstract information resources, independent of where the information is stored; it controls both direct and indirect accesses to the information; it may refer to the context of a request, i.e., the request’s path through the system; and its enforcement point and enforcement mechanism may be unspecified. Enforcement of a high-level policy may depend on the system architecture and the configurations of a variety of security mechanisms, such as firewalls, host login permissions, file permissions, DBMS access control, and application-specific security mechanisms. This paper presents a framework in which all of these can be conveniently and formally expressed, a method to verify that a high-level policy is enforced, and an algorithm to determine a trusted computing base for each resource.

  8. [A universal verification and protocol system for teletherapy].

    PubMed

    Brasching, H P; Franz, H; Geyer, P; Lehmann, D; Lorenz, J; Röthig, H; Theilig, B; Voigtmann, L

    1990-01-01

    To increase the quality of radiotherapy a verify and record system (VPS) was developed for teletherapy equipments, that takes control of manually adjusted irradiation parameters and of recording all relevant data of radiotherapy. The VPS can be adapted to special wishes of the user and it lends itself to application on different irradiation equipments. In the represented paper especially the extent of efficiency of the system is shown which is characterized by high operating comfort, flexible reacting to exceptional cases and by high date and operating security. The testing phase on an accelerator model has been brought to a close, actually the system is installed to an electron linear accelerator "Neptun 10p" and led to clinical trial. PMID:2277832

  9. Geometric verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Present LANDSAT data formats are reviewed to clarify how the geodetic location and registration capabilities were defined for P-tape products and RBV data. Since there is only one geometric model used in the master data processor, geometric location accuracy of P-tape products depends on the absolute accuracy of the model and registration accuracy is determined by the stability of the model. Due primarily to inaccuracies in data provided by the LANDSAT attitude management system, desired accuracies are obtained only by using ground control points and a correlation process. The verification of system performance with regards to geodetic location requires the capability to determine pixel positions of map points in a P-tape array. Verification of registration performance requires the capability to determine pixel positions of common points (not necessarily map points) in 2 or more P-tape arrays for a given world reference system scene. Techniques for registration verification can be more varied and automated since map data are not required. The verification of LACIE extractions is used as an example.

  10. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1982-01-01

    An analytical methodology for advanced encapsulation designs was developed. From these methods design sensitivities are established for the development of photovoltaic module criteria and the definition of needed research tasks. Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate systems were selected for qualification testing. Additionally, test specimens of various types are constructed and tested to determine the validity of the analysis methodology developed. Identified deficiencies and/or discrepancies between analytical models and relevant test data are corrected. Prediction capability of analytical models is improved. Encapsulation engineering generalities, principles, and design aids for photovoltaic module designers is generated.

  11. Validation and verification of expert systems using evidence flow graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Lee A.; Green, Peter E.; Duckworth, R. James; Bhatnagar, Jayant

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing investigation into the use of evidence flow graph techniques for performing V&V of expert systems. This method involves translating a rule-base into an evidence flow graph, a representation originally developed for real-time intelligent systems in distributed environments, and then running simulations of the evidence flow graph. Certain errors can be found during the translation process. The simulations can detect output sensitivity to rule firing order, to order of presentation of inputs, and to small changes in input values.

  12. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) VERIFICATION GUIDELINE SERIES: ANR Pipeline Company PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS) VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR Pipeline Company, a subsidiary of Coastal Corporation, now El Paso Corporation. The PEMS predicts carbon doixide (CO2...

  13. How Nasa's Independent Verification and Validation (IVandV) Program Builds Reliability into a Space Mission Software System (SMSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Marcus S.; Northey, Jeffrey; Stanton, William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to outline how the NASA Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Program helps to build reliability into the Space Mission Software Systems (SMSSs) that its customers develop.

  14. Verification of Gamma Knife extend system based fractionated treatment planning using EBT2 film

    SciTech Connect

    Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Bisht, Raj Kishor

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents EBT2 film verification of fractionated treatment planning with the Gamma Knife (GK) extend system, a relocatable frame system for multiple-fraction or serial multiple-session radiosurgery.Methods: A human head shaped phantom simulated the verification process for fractionated Gamma Knife treatment. Phantom preparation for Extend Frame based treatment planning involved creating a dental impression, fitting the phantom to the frame system, and acquiring a stereotactic computed tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan (Siemens, Emotion 6) of the phantom was obtained with following parameters: Tube voltage—110 kV, tube current—280 mA, pixel size—0.5 × 0.5 and 1 mm slice thickness. A treatment plan with two 8 mm collimator shots and three sectors blocking in each shot was made. Dose prescription of 4 Gy at 100% was delivered for the first fraction out of the two fractions planned. Gafchromic EBT2 film (ISP Wayne, NJ) was used as 2D verification dosimeter in this process. Films were cut and placed inside the film insert of the phantom for treatment dose delivery. Meanwhile a set of films from the same batch were exposed from 0 to 12 Gy doses for calibration purposes. An EPSON (Expression 10000 XL) scanner was used for scanning the exposed films in transparency mode. Scanned films were analyzed with inhouse written MATLAB codes.Results: Gamma index analysis of film measurement in comparison with TPS calculated dose resulted in high pass rates >90% for tolerance criteria of 1%/1 mm. The isodose overlay and linear dose profiles of film measured and computed dose distribution on sagittal and coronal plane were in close agreement.Conclusions: Through this study, the authors propose treatment verification QA method for Extend frame based fractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery using EBT2 film.

  15. Urine monitoring system failure analysis and operational verification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glanfield, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Failure analysis and testing of a prototype urine monitoring system (UMS) are reported. System performance was characterized by a regression formula developed from volume measurement test data. When the volume measurement test data. When the volume measurement data was imputted to the formula, the standard error of the estimate calculated using the regression formula was found to be within 1.524% of the mean of the mass of the input. System repeatability was found to be somewhat dependent upon the residual volume of the system and the evaporation of fluid from the separator. The evaporation rate was determined to be approximately 1cc/minute. The residual volume in the UMS was determined by measuring the concentration of LiCl in the flush water. Observed results indicated residual levels in the range of 9-10ml, however, results obtained during the flushing efficiency test indicated a residual level of approximately 20ml. It is recommended that the phase separator pumpout time be extended or the design modified to minimize the residual level.

  16. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Potable Water System Verification Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie; DeVera, Jean; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Nik; Steele, John; Rector, Tony; Gazda, Daniel; Roberts, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), also known as Orion, will ferry a crew of up to six astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), or a crew of up to four astronauts to the moon. The first launch of CEV is scheduled for approximately 2014. A stored water system on the CEV will supply the crew with potable water for various purposes: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain quality of the water transferred from the Orbiter to the ISS and stored in Contingency Water Containers (CWCs). In the CEV water system, the ionic silver biocide is expected to be depleted from solution due to ionic silver plating onto the surfaces of the materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide. Since the biocide depletion is expected to occur within a short amount of time after loading the water into the CEV water tanks at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), an additional microbial

  17. Simulator verification techniques study. Integrated simulator self test system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, G.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    Software and hardware requirements for implementing hardware self tests are presented in support of the development of training and procedures development simulators for the space shuttle program. Self test techniques for simulation hardware and the validation of simulation performance are stipulated. The requirements of an integrated simulator self system are analyzed. Readiness tests, fault isolation tests, and incipient fault detection tests are covered.

  18. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1983-01-01

    The analytical methodology for advanced encapsulation designs for the development of photovoltaic modules is presented. Analytical models are developed to test optical, thermal, electrical and structural properties of the various encapsulation systems. Model data is compared to relevant test data to improve model accuracy and develop general principles for the design of photovoltaic modules.

  19. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The following tasks are included in this project: Commercialization; Power plant development; Manufacturing facilities development; Test facility development; Stack research; and Advanced research and technology development. This report briefly describes the subtasks still to be completed: Power plant system test with reformed natural gas; Upgrading of existing, US government-owned, test facilities; and Advanced MCFC component research.

  20. A Nonlinear Propulsion System Simulation Technique for Piloted Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihaloew, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, propulsion system simulations used in flight simulators have been extremely simple. This resulted in a loss of simulation realism since significant engine and aircraft interactions were neglected and important internal engine parameters were not computed. More detailed propulsion system simulators are needed to permit evaluations of modern aircraft propulsion systems in a simulated flight environment. A real time digital simulation technique has been developed which provides the capabilities needed to evaluate propulsion system performance and aircraft system interaction on manned flight simulators. A parameter correlation technique is used with real and pseudo dynamics in a stable integration convergence loop. The technique has been applied to a multivariable propulsion system for use in a piloted NASA flight simulator program. Cycle time is 2.0 ms on a Univac 1110 computer and 5.7 ms on the simulator computer, a Xerox Sigma 8. The model is stable and accurate with time steps up to 50 ms. The program evaluated the simulation technique and the propulsion system digital control. The simulation technique and model used in that program are described and results from the simulation are presented.

  1. Coarsening in Solid Liquid Systems: A Verification of Fundamental Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, John D.

    Coarsening is a process that occurs in nearly all multi-phase materials in which the total energy of a system is reduced through the reduction of total interfacial energy. The theoretical description of this process is of central importance to materials design, yet remains controversial. In order to directly compare experiment to theoretical predictions, low solid volume fraction PbSn alloys were coarsened in a microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Coarsening in Solid Liquid Mixtures (CSLM) project. PbSn samples with solid volume fractions of 15%, 20% and 30% were characterized in 2D and 3D using mechanical serial sectioning. The systems were observed in the self-similar regime predicted by theory and the particle size and particle density obeyed the temporal power laws predicted by theory. However, the magnitudes of the rate constants governing those temporal laws as well as the forms of the particle size distributions were not described well by theoretical predictions. Additionally, in the 30% solid volume fraction system, the higher volume fraction results in a non-spherical particle shape and a more closely packed spatial distribution. The presence of slow particle motion induced by vibrations on the ISS is presented as an explanation for this discrepancy. To model the effect of this particle motion, the Akaiwa-Voorhees multiparticle diffusion simulations are modified to treat coarsening in the presence of a small convection term, such as that of sedimentation, corresponding to low Peclet numbers. The simulations indicate that the particle size dependent velocity of the sedimentation increases the rate at which the system coarsens. This is due to the larger particles traveling farther than normal, resulting in them encountering more small particles, which favors their growth. Additionally, sedimentation resulted in broader PSDs with a peak located at the average particle size. When the simulations are modified to

  2. Overview of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux-Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Gunson, Michael R.; Jucks, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    NASA's space-based observations of physical, chemical and biological parameters in the Earth System along with state-of-the-art modeling capabilities provide unique capabilities for analyses of the carbon cycle. The Carbon Monitoring System is developing an exploratory framework for detecting carbon in the environment and its changes, with a view towards contributing to national and international monitoring activities. The Flux-Pilot Project aims to provide a unified view of land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere carbon exchange, using observation-constrained models. Central to the project is the application of NASA's satellite observations (especially MODIS), the ACOS retrievals of the JAXA-GOSAT observations, and the "MERRA" meteorological reanalysis produced with GEOS-S. With a primary objective of estimating uncertainty in computed fluxes, two land- and two ocean-systems are run for 2009-2010 and compared with existing flux estimates. An transport model is used to evaluate simulated CO2 concentrations with in-situ and space-based observations, in order to assess the realism of the fluxes and how uncertainties in fluxes propagate into atmospheric concentrations that can be more readily evaluated. Finally, the atmospheric partial CO2 columns observed from space are inverted to give new estimates of surface fluxes, which are evaluated using the bottom-up estimates and independent datasets. The focus of this presentation will be on the science goals and current achievements of the pilot project, with emphasis on how policy-relevant questions help focus the scientific direction. Examples include the issue of what spatio-temporal resolution of fluxes can be detected from polar-orbiting satellites and whether it is possible to use space-based observations to separate contributions to atmospheric concentrations of (say) fossil-fuel and biological activity

  3. Energy management and control system verification study. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, K.E.; Williamson, G.C.

    1983-09-01

    Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS) are being installed and operated throughout the Air Force. Millions of dollars have been spent on EMCS, but no study has conclusively proved that EMCS has actually saved the Air Force energy. This thesis used the Regression subprogram of Statistical Packages for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to determine if these systems are indeed saving the Air Force energy. Previous studies have shown that Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) is the best statistical predictor of base energy consumption. Eight bases were selected that had an operational EMCS. Two EMCS bases were compared with one control base for each of four CONUS winter heating zones. The results indicated small (less than 2%) energy savings have occurred at half of the EMCS bases studied. Therefore, this study does not conclusively prove that EMCS's have saved energy on Air Force bases. However, the methodology developed in this report could be applied on a broader scale to develop a more conclusive result.

  4. Simulated coal gas MCFC power plant system verification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The objective of the main project is to identify the current developmental status of MCFC systems and address those technical issues that need to be resolved to move the technology from its current status to the demonstration stage in the shortest possible time. The specific objectives are separated into five major tasks as follows: Stack research; Power plant development; Test facilities development; Manufacturing facilities development; and Commercialization. This Final Report discusses the M-C power Corporation effort which is part of a general program for the development of commercial MCFC systems. This final report covers the entire subject of the Unocal 250-cell stack. Certain project activities have been funded by organizations other than DOE and are included in this report to provide a comprehensive overview of the work accomplished.

  5. Development experience with a simple expert system demonstrator for pilot emergency procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannorman, M.; Mackall, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Expert system techniques, a major application area of artificial intelligence (AI), are examined in the development of pilot associate to handle aircraft emergency procedures. The term pilot associate is used to describe research involving expert systems that can assist the pilot in the cockpit. The development of expert systems for the electrical system and flight control system emergency procedures are discussed. A simple, high-level expert system provides the means to choose which knowledge domain is needed. The expert systems were developed on a low-cost, FORTH-based package, using a personal computer.

  6. APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

    2005-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), along with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Pubic Service (APS), is monitoring the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant to determine the costs to produce hydrogen fuels (including 100% hydrogen as well as hydrogen and compressed natural gas blends) for use by fleets and other operators of advanced-technology vehicles. The hydrogen fuel cost data will be used as benchmark data by technology modelers as well as research and development programs. The Pilot Plant can produce up to 18 kilograms (kg) of hydrogen per day by electrolysis. It can store up to 155 kg of hydrogen at various pressures up to 6,000 psi. The dispenser island can fuel vehicles with 100% hydrogen at 5,000 psi and with blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas at 3,600 psi. The monitoring system was designed to track hydrogen delivery to each of the three storage areas and to monitor the use of electricity on all major equipment in the Pilot Plant, including the fuel dispenser island. In addition, water used for the electrolysis process is monitored to allow calculation of the total cost of plant operations and plant efficiencies. The monitoring system at the Pilot Plant will include about 100 sensors when complete (50 are installed to date), allowing for analysis of component, subsystems, and plant-level costs. The monitoring software is mostly off-the-shelve, with a custom interface. The majority of the sensors input to the Programmable Automation Controller as 4- to 20-mA analog signals. The plant can be monitored over of the Internet, but the control functions are restricted to the control room equipment. Using the APS general service plan E32 electric rate of 2.105 cents per kWh, during a recent eight-month period when 1,200 kg of hydrogen was produced and the plant capacity factor was 26%, the electricity cost to produce one kg of hydrogen was $3.43. However, the

  7. Dosimetric verification of a commercial inverse treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lei; Curran, Bruce; Hill, Robert; Holmes, Tim; Ma, Lijun; Forster, Kenneth M.; Boyer, Arthur L.

    1999-02-01

    A commercial three-dimensional (3D) inverse treatment planning system, Corvus (Nomos Corporation, Sewickley, PA), was recently made available. This paper reports our preliminary results and experience with commissioning this system for clinical implementation. This system uses a simulated annealing inverse planning algorithm to calculate intensity-modulated fields. The intensity-modulated fields are divided into beam profiles that can be delivered by means of a sequence of leaf settings by a multileaf collimator (MLC). The treatments are delivered using a computer-controlled MLC. To test the dose calculation algorithm used by the Corvus software, the dose distributions for single rectangularly shaped fields were compared with water phantom scan data. The dose distributions predicted to be delivered by multiple fields were measured using an ion chamber that could be positioned in a rotatable cylindrical water phantom. Integrated charge collected by the ion chamber was used to check the absolute dose of single- and multifield intensity modulated treatments at various spatial points. The measured and predicted doses were found to agree to within 4% at all measurement points. Another set of measurements used a cubic polystyrene phantom with radiographic film to record the radiation dose distribution. The films were calibrated and scanned to yield two-dimensional isodose distributions. Finally, a beam imaging system (BIS) was used to measure the intensity-modulated x-ray beam patterns in the beam's-eye view. The BIS-measured images were then compared with a theoretical calculation based on the MLC leaf sequence files to verify that the treatment would be executed accurately and without machine faults. Excellent correlation (correlation coefficients ) was found for all cases. Treatment plans generated using intensity

  8. The SAMS: Smartphone Addiction Management System and verification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyoung; Ahn, Heejune; Choi, Samwook; Choi, Wanbok

    2014-01-01

    While the popularity of smartphones has given enormous convenience to our lives, their pathological use has created a new mental health concern among the community. Hence, intensive research is being conducted on the etiology and treatment of the condition. However, the traditional clinical approach based surveys and interviews has serious limitations: health professionals cannot perform continual assessment and intervention for the affected group and the subjectivity of assessment is questionable. To cope with these limitations, a comprehensive ICT (Information and Communications Technology) system called SAMS (Smartphone Addiction Management System) is developed for objective assessment and intervention. The SAMS system consists of an Android smartphone application and a web application server. The SAMS client monitors the user's application usage together with GPS location and Internet access location, and transmits the data to the SAMS server. The SAMS server stores the usage data and performs key statistical data analysis and usage intervention according to the clinicians' decision. To verify the reliability and efficacy of the developed system, a comparison study with survey-based screening with the K-SAS (Korean Smartphone Addiction Scale) as well as self-field trials is performed. The comparison study is done using usage data from 14 users who are 19 to 50 year old adults that left at least 1 week usage logs and completed the survey questionnaires. The field trial fully verified the accuracy of the time, location, and Internet access information in the usage measurement and the reliability of the system operation over more than 2 weeks. The comparison study showed that daily use count has a strong correlation with K-SAS scores, whereas daily use times do not strongly correlate for potentially addicted users. The correlation coefficients of count and times with total K-SAS score are CC = 0.62 and CC =0.07, respectively, and the t-test analysis for the

  9. Signature verification by only single genuine sample in offline and online systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamski, Marcin; Saeed, Khalid

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents innovatory methods and algorithms with experimental results on signature verification. It is mainly focused on applications where there is only one reference signature available for comparison. Such restriction is often present in practice and requires selection of specific methods. In this context, both offline and online approaches are investigated. In offline approach, binary image of the signature is initially thinned to obtain a one pixel-wide line. Then, a sampling technique is applied in order to form the signature feature vector. The identification and verification processes are based on comparing the reference feature vector with the questioned samples using Shape Context algorithm. In the case of online data, the system makes use of dynamic information such as trajectory, pen pressure, pen azimuth and pen altitude collected at the time of signing. After further preprocessing, these functional features are verified by means of Dynamic Time Warping method.

  10. A token-flow paradigm for verification of rule-based expert systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, C H; Lee, S J

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to the verification of rule-based systems (RBSs). A graph structure, called the rule-dependency graph (RDG), is introduced to describe the dependency relationship among the rules of an RBS, in which each type of improper knowledge forms a specific topological structure. Knowledge verification is then performed by searching for such topological structures through a token-flow paradigm. An algorithm is provided, which automatically generates a minimally sufficient set of literals as test tokens in the detection procedure. The proposed scheme can be applied to rules of non-Horn clause form in both propositional and first-order logic, and restrictions imposed by other graph-based approaches can be avoided. Furthermore, explicit and potential anomalies of RBSs can be correctly found, and efficient run-time validation is made possible. PMID:18252394

  11. Integrated testing and verification system for research flight software design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. N.; Merilatt, R. L.; Osterweil, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center is developing the MUST (Multipurpose User-oriented Software Technology) program to cut the cost of producing research flight software through a system of software support tools. The HAL/S language is the primary subject of the design. Boeing Computer Services Company (BCS) has designed an integrated verification and testing capability as part of MUST. Documentation, verification and test options are provided with special attention on real time, multiprocessing issues. The needs of the entire software production cycle have been considered, with effective management and reduced lifecycle costs as foremost goals. Capabilities have been included in the design for static detection of data flow anomalies involving communicating concurrent processes. Some types of ill formed process synchronization and deadlock also are detected statically.

  12. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Pilot non-conformance to alerting system commands has been noted in general and to a TCAS-like collision avoidance system in a previous experiment. This paper details two experiments studying collision avoidance during closely-spaced parallel approaches in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), and specifically examining possible causal factors of, and design solutions to, pilot non-conformance.

  13. European activities in civil applications of drones: an overview of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutzburg, Reiner

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of recent research, development and civil application of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) in Europe. It describes a European strategy for the development of civil applications of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) and reflects most of the contents of the European staff working document SWD(2012) 259 final.

  14. Requirements Verification Report AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System for Project W-314 Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations

    SciTech Connect

    MCGREW, D.L.

    1999-09-28

    This Requirements Verification Report (RVR) for Project W-314 ''AN Farm to 200E Waste Transfer System'' package provides documented verification of design compliance to all the applicable Project Development Specification (PDS) requirements. Additional PDS requirements verification will be performed during the project's procurement, construction, and testing phases, and the RVR will be updated to reflect this information as appropriate.

  15. A Pilot System for Environmental Monitoring Through Domestic Animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwabe, Calvin W.; Sawyer, John; Martin, Wayne

    1971-01-01

    A pilot system for environmental monitoring is in its early phases of development in Northern California. It is based upon the existing nation wide Federal-State Market Cattle Testing (14CT) program for brucellosis in cattle. This latter program depends upon the collection of blood program at the time of identified cattle. As the cattle Population of California is broadly distributed throughout the state, we intend to utilize these blood samples to biologically monitor the distribution and intensity of selected environmental pollutants. In a 2-year preliminary trial, the feasibility of retrieving, utilizing for a purpose similar to this, and tracing back to their geographic areas of origin of MCT samples have been demonstrated.

  16. Expert system verification and validation study. Phase 2: Requirements identification. Delivery 1: Updated survey report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to report the state-of-the-practice in Verification and Validation (V and V) of Expert Systems (ESs) on current NASA and Industry applications. This is the first task of a series which has the ultimate purpose of ensuring that adequate ES V and V tools and techniques are available for Space Station Knowledge Based Systems development. The strategy for determining the state-of-the-practice is to check how well each of the known ES V and V issues are being addressed and to what extent they have impacted the development of Expert Systems.

  17. A system for EPID-based real-time treatment delivery verification during dynamic IMRT treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C.; O’Connor, Daryl J.; Uytven, Eric van; McCurdy, Boyd M. C.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To design and develop a real-time electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based delivery verification system for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) which enables detection of gross treatment delivery errors before delivery of substantial radiation to the patient.Methods: The system utilizes a comprehensive physics-based model to generate a series of predicted transit EPID image frames as a reference dataset and compares these to measured EPID frames acquired during treatment. The two datasets are using MLC aperture comparison and cumulative signal checking techniques. The system operation in real-time was simulated offline using previously acquired images for 19 IMRT patient deliveries with both frame-by-frame comparison and cumulative frame comparison. Simulated error case studies were used to demonstrate the system sensitivity and performance.Results: The accuracy of the synchronization method was shown to agree within two control points which corresponds to approximately ∼1% of the total MU to be delivered for dynamic IMRT. The system achieved mean real-time gamma results for frame-by-frame analysis of 86.6% and 89.0% for 3%, 3 mm and 4%, 4 mm criteria, respectively, and 97.9% and 98.6% for cumulative gamma analysis. The system can detect a 10% MU error using 3%, 3 mm criteria within approximately 10 s. The EPID-based real-time delivery verification system successfully detected simulated gross errors introduced into patient plan deliveries in near real-time (within 0.1 s).Conclusions: A real-time radiation delivery verification system for dynamic IMRT has been demonstrated that is designed to prevent major mistreatments in modern radiation therapy.

  18. Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and documentation of expert system verification and validation methodologies. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Groundwater, E.H.; Miller, L.A.; Mirsky, S.M.

    1995-03-01

    This report is the third volume in the final report for the Expert System Verification and Validation (V&V) project which was jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ultimate objective is the formulation of guidelines for the V&V of expert systems for use in nuclear power applications. The purpose of this activity was to survey and document techniques presently in use for expert system V&V. The survey effort included an extensive telephone interviewing program, site visits, and a thorough bibliographic search and compilation. The major finding was that V&V of expert systems is not nearly as established or prevalent as V&V of conventional software systems. When V&V was used for expert systems, it was almost always at the system validation stage after full implementation and integration usually employing the non-systematic dynamic method of {open_quotes}ad hoc testing.{close_quotes} There were few examples of employing V&V in the early phases of development and only weak sporadic mention of the possibilities in the literature. There is, however, a very active research area concerning the development of methods and tools to detect problems with, particularly, rule-based expert systems. Four such static-testing methods were identified which were not discovered in a comprehensive review of conventional V&V methods in an earlier task.

  19. Discrete Abstractions of Hybrid Systems: Verification of Safety and Application to User-Interface Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Meeko; Tomlin, Claire; Degani, Asaf

    2003-01-01

    Human interaction with complex hybrid systems involves the user, the automation's discrete mode logic, and the underlying continuous dynamics of the physical system. Often the user-interface of such systems displays a reduced set of information about the entire system. In safety-critical systems, how can we identify user-interface designs which do not have adequate information, or which may confuse the user? Here we describe a methodology, based on hybrid system analysis, to verify that a user-interface contains information necessary to safely complete a desired procedure or task. Verification within a hybrid framework allows us to account for the continuous dynamics underlying the simple, discrete representations displayed to the user. We provide two examples: a car traveling through a yellow light at an intersection and an aircraft autopilot in a landing/go-around maneuver. The examples demonstrate the general nature of this methodology, which is applicable to hybrid systems (not fully automated) which have operational constraints we can pose in terms of safety. This methodology differs from existing work in hybrid system verification in that we directly account for the user's interactions with the system.

  20. Verification of the accuracy of BNCT treatment planning system THORplan.

    PubMed

    Li, H S; Liu, Y-W H; Lee, C Y; Lin, T Y; Hsu, F Y

    2009-07-01

    THORplan is a treatment planning system developed at Tsing Hua University, Taiwan, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) purpose. It is recently developed with user-friendly interface using Interactive Data Language. In this article the accuracy of THORplan is verified by comparing results of Snyder phantom calculation with the analytical model results of MCNP. Neutron source from THOR epithermal neutron beam is used as the source for the calculation. The thermal neutron flux calculated by THORplan is very close to the reference results. SERA overestimates thermal neutron flux by 2-5%. NCTPlan underestimates thermal neutron flux by 4-9% in most locations. The total weighted dose calculated by THORplan is accurate to within 3% except at the tissue interface. SERA overestimates the total weighted dose at depth >1.5 cm by 2-5%. NCTPlan underestimates the total weighted dose by approximately 10% at depth >1cm. PMID:19386507

  1. Model verification of large structural systems. [space shuttle model response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. T.; Hasselman, T. K.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program for the application of parameter identification on the structural dynamic models of space shuttle and other large models with hundreds of degrees of freedom is described. Finite element, dynamic, analytic, and modal models are used to represent the structural system. The interface with math models is such that output from any structural analysis program applied to any structural configuration can be used directly. Processed data from either sine-sweep tests or resonant dwell tests are directly usable. The program uses measured modal data to condition the prior analystic model so as to improve the frequency match between model and test. A Bayesian estimator generates an improved analytical model and a linear estimator is used in an iterative fashion on highly nonlinear equations. Mass and stiffness scaling parameters are generated for an improved finite element model, and the optimum set of parameters is obtained in one step.

  2. Robust control design verification using the modular modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.M.; Ben-Abdennour, A.; Lee, K.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The Modular Modeling System (B W MMS) is being used as a design tool to verify robust controller designs for improving power plant performance while also providing fault-accommodating capabilities. These controllers are designed based on optimal control theory and are thus model based controllers which are targeted for implementation in a computer based digital control environment. The MMS is being successfully used to verify that the controllers are tolerant of uncertainties between the plant model employed in the controller and the actual plant; i.e., that they are robust. The two areas in which the MMS is being used for this purpose is in the design of (1) a reactor power controller with improved reactor temperature response, and (2) the design of a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) robust fault-accommodating controller for a deaerator level and pressure control problem.

  3. System Verification of MSL Skycrane Using an Integrated ADAMS Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Christopher; Antoun, George; Brugarolas, Paul; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Peng, Chia-Yen; Phan, Linh; San Martin, Alejandro; Sell, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will use the Skycrane architecture to execute final descent and landing maneuvers. The Skycrane phase uses closed-loop feedback control throughout the entire phase, starting with rover separation, through mobility deploy, and through touchdown, ending only when the bridles have completely slacked. The integrated ADAMS simulation described in this paper couples complex dynamical models created by the mechanical subsystem with actual GNC flight software algorithms that have been compiled and linked into ADAMS. These integrated simulations provide the project with the best means to verify key Skycrane requirements which have a tightly coupled GNC-Mechanical aspect to them. It also provides the best opportunity to validate the design of the algorithm that determines when to cut the bridles. The results of the simulations show the excellent performance of the Skycrane system.

  4. Verification of ARES transport code system with TAKEDA benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Penghe; Chen, Mengteng; Zhao, Jingchang; Zhang, Shun; Chen, Yixue

    2015-10-01

    Neutron transport modeling and simulation are central to many areas of nuclear technology, including reactor core analysis, radiation shielding and radiation detection. In this paper the series of TAKEDA benchmarks are modeled to verify the critical calculation capability of ARES, a discrete ordinates neutral particle transport code system. SALOME platform is coupled with ARES to provide geometry modeling and mesh generation function. The Koch-Baker-Alcouffe parallel sweep algorithm is applied to accelerate the traditional transport calculation process. The results show that the eigenvalues calculated by ARES are in excellent agreement with the reference values presented in NEACRP-L-330, with a difference less than 30 pcm except for the first case of model 3. Additionally, ARES provides accurate fluxes distribution compared to reference values, with a deviation less than 2% for region-averaged fluxes in all cases. All of these confirms the feasibility of ARES-SALOME coupling and demonstrate that ARES has a good performance in critical calculation.

  5. Activities of the Pilot Land Data System project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sircar, J. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The University of Maryland's Remote Sensing Systems Laboratory submitted to NASA/Goddard an interim progress report on the work being conducted within its Pilot Land Data System IPLDS project. The Remote Sensing Systems Laboratory addressed the following tasks: (1) identify data types and data sources needed to describe the selected test sites in collaboration with Goddard's Hydrological Sciences Branch; (2) define the procedures necessary to access/acquire this data; (3) conduct meetings with the PLDS Systems Engineering Group to identify functional specification priorities for PLDS development; (4) assemble documentation on historical remotely sensed imagery and transfer of such information to the PLDS Data Management Group; (5) collect data identified by Goodard's Hydrological Sciences Branch for data set inventory in PLD; (6) develop a Workstation-PLDS system interface over high speed lines, (7) develop and test through a Phase 1 demonstration of a micro workstation to access PLDS; and (8) establish interdepartmental agreement of development of computer link for electronic access of water resources data from USGS.

  6. Verification of the dual integral glow analysis dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Eric Christopher

    2000-10-01

    The Dual Integral Glow Analysis (DINGA) method is a unique approach to the determination of the low-LET dose deposited within a thermoluminescent personnel dosimeter. DINGA creates its estimate of the dose deposited by utilizing the integrals of a sub-section of the glow curves obtained from opposite sides of one or more thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and knowledge of the TLDs thermophysical parameters. The performance of DINGA is evaluated with computational simulations for a variety of heating methods and error tolerance is also examined by introducing errors into the inputs the DINGA code. It has been found that DINGA's dose estimates are off approximately, in the worst case, the same percentage as the input parameter was varied. Experimental measurements are performed using a hot-gas heating method for large personnel doses and a laser heating method for smaller personnel doses with LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters. The dosimeters are exposed to select radiation fields generated by either certified sources or fields characterized by certified equipment. The DINGA dosimetry system is found to correctly report shallow and deep dose well within the limits required for certification by the National Voluntary Accreditation Program. The worst performance quotient is 0.19, well below the strictest limit of 0.30.

  7. A data integration methodology for systems biology: Experimental verification

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Daehee; Smith, Jennifer J.; Leslie, Deena M.; Weston, Andrea D.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ramsey, Stephen; de Atauri, Pedro; Siegel, Andrew F.; Bolouri, Hamid; Aitchison, John D.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-01-01

    The integration of data from multiple global assays is essential to understanding dynamic spatiotemporal interactions within cells. In a companion paper, we reported a data integration methodology, designated Pointillist, that can handle multiple data types from technologies with different noise characteristics. Here we demonstrate its application to the integration of 18 data sets relating to galactose utilization in yeast. These data include global changes in mRNA and protein abundance, genome-wide protein–DNA interaction data, database information, and computational predictions of protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. We divided the integration task to determine three network components: key system elements (genes and proteins), protein–protein interactions, and protein–DNA interactions. Results indicate that the reconstructed network efficiently focuses on and recapitulates the known biology of galactose utilization. It also provided new insights, some of which were verified experimentally. The methodology described here, addresses a critical need across all domains of molecular and cell biology, to effectively integrate large and disparate data sets. PMID:16301536

  8. The terminal area simulation system. Volume 2: Verification cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, F. H.

    1987-01-01

    The numerical simulation of five case studies are presented and are compared with available data in order to verify the three-dimensional version of the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS). A spectrum of convective storm types are selected for the case studies. Included are: a High-Plains supercell hailstorm, a small and relatively short-lived High-Plains cumulonimbus, a convective storm which produced the 2 August 1985 DFW microburst, a South Florida convective complex, and a tornadic Oklahoma thunderstorm. For each of the cases the model results compared reasonably well with observed data. In the simulations of the supercell storms many of their characteristic features were modeled, such as the hook echo, BWER, mesocyclone, gust fronts, giant persistent updraft, wall cloud, flanking-line towers, anvil and radar reflectivity overhang, and rightward veering in the storm propagation. In the simulation of the tornadic storm a horseshoe-shaped updraft configuration and cyclic changes in storm intensity and structure were noted. The simulation of the DFW microburst agreed remarkably well with sparse observed data. The simulated outflow rapidly expanded in a nearly symmetrical pattern and was associated with a ringvortex. A South Florida convective complex was simulated and contained updrafts and downdrafts in the form of discrete bubbles. The numerical simulations, in all cases, always remained stable and bounded with no anomalous trends.

  9. Design, analysis, and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A.; Minning, C.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal, optical, structural, and electrical isolation analyses are decribed. Major factors in the design of terrestrial photovoltaic modules are discussed. Mechanical defects in the different layers of an encapsulation system, it was found, would strongly influence the minimum pottant thickness required for electrical isolation. Structural, optical, and electrical properties, a literature survey indicated, are hevily influenced by the presence of moisture. These items, identified as technology voids, are discussed. Analyses were based upon a 1.2 meter square module using 10.2 cm (4-inch) square cells placed 1.3 mm apart as shown in Figure 2-2. Sizing of the structural support member of a module was determined for a uniform, normal pressure load of 50 psf, corresponding to the pressure difference generated between the front and back surface of a module by a 100 mph wind. Thermal and optical calculations were performed for a wind velocity of 1 meter/sec parallel to the ground and for module tilt (relative to the local horizontal) of 37 deg. Placement of a module in a typical array field is illustrated.

  10. Income Verification Pilot Project (IVPP): The Development of an Error-Prone Model for the School Meal Programs. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This report describes efforts made in 1981-82 to develop an error-prone model (EPM) to help judge the extent of misreporting of income and family size on applications for government-sponsored school meal benefits. (EPM's are statistical formulas that produce scoring systems used to distinguish applications likely to result in excess benefits from…

  11. System design and verification of the precession electron diffraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Own, Christopher Su-Yan

    2005-07-01

    Bulk structural crystallography is generally a two-part process wherein a rough starting structure model is first derived, then later refined to give an accurate model of the structure. The critical step is the determination of the initial model. As materials problems decrease in length scale, the electron microscope has proven to be a versatile and effective tool for studying many problems. However, study of complex bulk structures by electron diffraction has been hindered by the problem of dynamical diffraction. This phenomenon makes bulk electron diffraction very sensitive to specimen thickness, and expensive equipment such as aberration-corrected scanning transmission microscopes or elaborate methodology such as high resolution imaging combined with diffraction and simulation are often required to generate good starting structures. The precession electron diffraction technique (PED), which has the ability to significantly reduce dynamical effects in diffraction patterns, has shown promise as being a "philosopher's stone" for bulk electron diffraction. However, a comprehensive understanding of its abilities and limitations is necessary before it can be put into widespread use as a standalone technique. This thesis aims to bridge the gaps in understanding and utilizing precession so that practical application might be realized. Two new PED systems have been built, and optimal operating parameters have been elucidated. The role of lens aberrations is described in detail, and an alignment procedure is given that shows how to circumvent aberration in order to obtain high-quality patterns. Multislice simulation is used for investigating the errors inherent in precession, and is also used as a reference for comparison to simple models and to experimental PED data. General trends over a large sampling of parameter space are determined. In particular, we show that the primary reflection intensity errors occur near the transmitted beam and decay with increasing angle and

  12. The Namibia Early Flood Warning System, A CEOS Pilot Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Sohlberg, Robert; Handy, Matthew; Grossman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year few years, an international collaboration has developed a pilot project under the auspices of Committee on Earth Observation Satellite (CEOS) Disasters team. The overall team consists of civilian satellite agencies. For this pilot effort, the development team consists of NASA, Canadian Space Agency, Univ. of Maryland, Univ. of Colorado, Univ. of Oklahoma, Ukraine Space Research Institute and Joint Research Center(JRC) for European Commission. This development team collaborates with regional , national and international agencies to deliver end-to-end disaster coverage. In particular, the team in collaborating on this effort with the Namibia Department of Hydrology to begin in Namibia . However, the ultimate goal is to expand the functionality to provide early warning over the South Africa region. The initial collaboration was initiated by United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs and CEOS Working Group for Information Systems and Services (WGISS). The initial driver was to demonstrate international interoperability using various space agency sensors and models along with regional in-situ ground sensors. In 2010, the team created a preliminary semi-manual system to demonstrate moving and combining key data streams and delivering the data to the Namibia Department of Hydrology during their flood season which typically is January through April. In this pilot, a variety of moderate resolution and high resolution satellite flood imagery was rapidly delivered and used in conjunction with flood predictive models in Namibia. This was collected in conjunction with ground measurements and was used to examine how to create a customized flood early warning system. During the first year, the team made use of SensorWeb technology to gather various sensor data which was used to monitor flood waves traveling down basins originating in Angola, but eventually flooding villages in Namibia. The team made use of standardized interfaces such as those articulated

  13. Human Performance Considerations for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, R. Jay; Hobbs, Alan; Lyall, Beth; Rorie, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Successful integration of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) into civil airspace will not only require solutions to technical challenges, but will also require that the design and operation of RPAS take into account human limitations and capabilities. Human factors can affect overall system performance whenever the system relies on people to interact with another element of the system. Four types of broad interactions can be described. These are (1) interactions between people and hardware, such as controls and displays; (2) human use of procedures and documentation; (3) impact of the task environment, including lighting, noise and monotony; and lastly, (4) interactions between operational personnel, including communication and coordination. In addition to the human factors that have been identified for conventional aviation, RPAS operations introduce a set of unique human challenges. The purpose of document is to raise human factors issues for consideration by workgroups of the ICAO RPAS panel as they work to develop guidance material and additions to ICAO annexes. It is anticipated that the content of this document will be revised and updated as the work of the panel progresses.

  14. VerifEYE: a real-time meat inspection system for the beef processing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocak, Donna M.; Caimi, Frank M.; Flick, Rick L.; Elharti, Abdelmoula

    2003-02-01

    Described is a real-time meat inspection system developed for the beef processing industry by eMerge Interactive. Designed to detect and localize trace amounts of contamination on cattle carcasses in the packing process, the system affords the beef industry an accurate, high speed, passive optical method of inspection. Using a method patented by United States Department of Agriculture and Iowa State University, the system takes advantage of fluorescing chlorophyll found in the animal's diet and therefore the digestive track to allow detection and imaging of contaminated areas that may harbor potentially dangerous microbial pathogens. Featuring real-time image processing and documentation of performance, the system can be easily integrated into a processing facility's Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point quality assurance program. This paper describes the VerifEYE carcass inspection and removal verification system. Results indicating the feasibility of the method, as well as field data collected using a prototype system during four university trials conducted in 2001 are presented. Two successful demonstrations using the prototype system were held at a major U.S. meat processing facility in early 2002.

  15. Analysis, Simulation, and Verification of Knowledge-Based, Rule-Based, and Expert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Mike; Rash, James; Erickson, John; Gracanin, Denis; Rouff, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Mathematically sound techniques are used to view a knowledge-based system (KBS) as a set of processes executing in parallel and being enabled in response to specific rules being fired. The set of processes can be manipulated, examined, analyzed, and used in a simulation. The tool that embodies this technology may warn developers of errors in their rules, but may also highlight rules (or sets of rules) in the system that are underspecified (or overspecified) and need to be corrected for the KBS to operate as intended. The rules embodied in a KBS specify the allowed situations, events, and/or results of the system they describe. In that sense, they provide a very abstract specification of a system. The system is implemented through the combination of the system specification together with an appropriate inference engine, independent of the algorithm used in that inference engine. Viewing the rule base as a major component of the specification, and choosing an appropriate specification notation to represent it, reveals how additional power can be derived from an approach to the knowledge-base system that involves analysis, simulation, and verification. This innovative approach requires no special knowledge of the rules, and allows a general approach where standardized analysis, verification, simulation, and model checking techniques can be applied to the KBS.

  16. Verification of hyperbolicity for attractors of some mechanical systems with chaotic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey P.; Kruglov, Vyacheslav P.

    2016-03-01

    Computer verification of hyperbolicity is provided based on statistical analysis of the angles of intersection of stable and unstable manifolds for mechanical systems with hyperbolic attractors of Smale-Williams type: (i) a particle sliding on a plane under periodic kicks, (ii) interacting particles moving on two alternately rotating disks, and (iii) a string with parametric excitation of standing-wave patterns by a modulated pump. The examples are of interest as contributing to filling the hyperbolic theory of dynamical systems with physical content.

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR PERFORMANCE CONFIRMATION WASTE ISOLATION VERIFICATION/VALIDATION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Salzman

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) performance confirmation waste isolation verification/validation system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMF 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

  18. A simulation evaluation of a pilot interface with an automatic terminal approach system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The pilot-machine interface with cockpit automation is a critical factor in achieving the benefits of automation and reducing pilot blunders. To improve this interface, an automatic terminal approach system (ATAS) was conceived that can automatically fly a published instrument approach by using stored instrument approach data to automatically tune airplane radios and control an airplane autopilot and autothrottle. The emphasis in the ATAS concept is a reduction in pilot blunders and work load by improving the pilot-automation interface. A research prototype of an ATAS was developed and installed in the Langley General Aviation Simulator. A piloted simulation study of the ATAS concept showed fewer pilot blunders, but no significant change in work load, when compared with a baseline heading-select autopilot mode. With the baseline autopilot, pilot blunders tended to involve loss of navigational situational awareness or instrument misinterpretation. With the ATAS, pilot blunders tended to involve a lack of awareness of the current ATAS mode state or deficiencies in the pilots' mental model of how the system operated. The ATAS display provided adequate approach status data to maintain situational awareness.

  19. Formal specification and verification of a fault-masking and transient-recovery model for digital flight-control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1991-01-01

    The formal specification and mechanically checked verification for a model of fault-masking and transient-recovery among the replicated computers of digital flight-control systems are presented. The verification establishes, subject to certain carefully stated assumptions, that faults among the component computers are masked so that commands sent to the actuators are the same as those that would be sent by a single computer that suffers no failures.

  20. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy Ruth; Hansman, R. John; Corker, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Cockpit alerting systems monitor potentially hazardous situations, both inside and outside the aircraft. When a hazard is projected to occur, the alerting system displays alerts and/or command decisions to the pilot. However, pilots have been observed to not conform to alerting system commands by delaying their response or by not following the automatic commands exactly. This non-conformance to the automatic alerting system can reduce its benefit. Therefore, a need exists to understand the causes and effects of pilot non-conformance in order to develop automatic alerting systems whose commands the pilots are more likely to follow. These considerations were examined through flight simulator evaluations of the collision avoidance task during closely spaced parallel approaches. This task provided a useful case-study because the effects of non-conformance can be significant, given the time-critical nature of the task. A preliminary evaluation of alerting systems identified non-conformance in over 40% of the cases and a corresponding drop in collision avoidance performance. A follow-on experiment found subjects' alerting and maneuver selection criteria were consistent with different strategies than those used by automatic systems, indicating the pilot may potentially disagree with the alerting system if the pilot attempts to verify automatic alerts and commanded avoidance maneuvers. A final experiment found supporting automatic alerts with the explicit display of its underlying criteria resulted in more consistent subject reactions. In light of these experimental results, a general discussion of pilot non-conformance is provided. Contributing factors in pilot non-conformance include a lack of confidence in the automatic system and mismatches between the alerting system's commands and the pilots' own decisions based on the information available to them. The effects of non-conformance on system performance are discussed. Possible methods of reconciling mismatches are

  1. A piloted simulation of the backup control system engagement for the YAH-64

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, C. L.; Aiken, E. W.; Merrill, R. K.; Ross, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    A piloted simulator experiment, designed to evaluate and optimize certain backup control system (BUCS) engagement parameters and to provide pilot familiarization with aircraft response prior to flight test of the BUCS in the YAH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter, is described. Key elements of the simulation were the representation of a control system jam, the pilot's breaking of a shear pin in the jammed control, and the resultant BUCS engagement. To minimize the excursions in aircraft motion which could result from the pilot's control inputs after shear pin breakage, the BUCS control function is blended in gradually. The experiment's results indicate that optimum time to full control authority after shear pin breakage is three seconds in all axes for certain critical tasks. Special pilot training in the recovery from a control system jam may be necessary to minimize unacceptably large aircraft transients in the off-axis.

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Pilot Element in a Statewide Career Education Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Texas State Univ., Denton.

    The purpose of this project was to determine the effectiveness of a pilot element of a statewide delivery system for career education as a method for preparing secondary teachers to be effective agents of world of work economic education information dissemination and attitudinal change. The primary objectives were: (1) To develop a pilot element…

  3. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training: Systems Integration. Final Report (February 1972-March 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, D. F.; Terry, C.

    The Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) was designed to investigate the role of simulation in the future Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) program. The problem addressed in this report was one of integrating two unlike components into one synchronized system. These two components were the Basic T-37 Simulators and their…

  4. International Youth Foundation Program Identification System. Pilot Study One: Analysis and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss (William L.) and Associates, Ltd., Alexandria, VA.

    An evaluation of Round One of a pilot study of a system for identifying effective youth organizations around the world is presented in this report. The report begins with a page of general observations about the successes and shortcomings of the pilot study, indicating that in general the study accomplished its objectives but that a need for…

  5. Laboratory evaluation of a pilot cell battery protection system for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.; Thomas, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    An energy storage method for the 3.5 kW battery power system was investigated. The Pilot Cell Battery Protection System was tested for use in photovoltaic power systems and results show that this is a viable method of storage battery control. The method of limiting battery depth of discharge has the following advantages: (1) temperature sensitivity; (2) rate sensitivity; and (3) state of charge indication. The pilot cell concept is of interest in remote stand alone photovoltaic power systems. The battery can be protected from damaging overdischarge by using the proper ratio of pilot cell capacities to main battery capacity.

  6. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study exhibit C. Volume 3: Experimental verification definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An environmentally oriented microwave technology exploratory research program aimed at reducing the uncertainty associated with microwave power system critical technical issues is described. Topics discussed include: (1) Solar Power Satellite System (SPS) development plan elements; (2) critical technology issues related to the SPS preliminary reference configuration; (3) pilot plant to demonstrate commercial viability of the SPS system; and (4) research areas required to demonstrate feasibility of the SPS system. Progress in the development of advanced GaAs solar cells is reported along with a power distribution subsystem.

  7. Status of verification and validation of AREVA's ARCADIA{sup R} code system for PWR applications

    SciTech Connect

    Porsch, D.; Leberig, M.; Kuch, S.; Magat, P.; Segard, K.

    2012-07-01

    In March 2010 the submittal of Topical Reports for ARCADIA{sup R} and COBRA-FLX, the thermal-hydraulic module of ARCADIA{sup R}, to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded a major step in the development of AREVA's new code system for core design and safety analyses. This submittal was dedicated to the application of the code system to uranium fuel in pressurized water reactors. The submitted information comprised results for plants operated in the US (France)) and Germany and provided uncertainties for in-core measuring systems with traveling in-core detectors and for the aero-ball system of the EPR. A reduction of the uncertainties in the prediction of F{sub AH} and F{sub Q} of > 1 % (absolute) was derived compared to the current code systems. This paper extents the verification and validation base for uranium based fuel and demonstrates the basic capabilities of ARCADIA{sup R} of describing MOX. The achieved status of verification and validation is described in detail. All applications followed the same standard without any specific calibration. The paper gives also insight in the new capability of 3D full core steady-state and transient pin-by-pin/sub-channel-by-sub-channel calculations and the opportunities offered by this feature. The gain of margins with increasing detail of the representation is outlined. Currently, the strategies for worldwide implementation of ARCADIA{sup R} are developed. (authors)

  8. A comprehensive and real-time fingerprint verification system for embedded devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Hoi Wo; Moon, Yiu Sang; Chen, Jiansheng; Chan, Fai; Ng, Yuk Man; Chung, Hin Shun; Pun, Kwok Ho

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes an embedded multi-user login system based on fingerprint recognition. The system, built using the Sitsang development board and embedded Linux, implements all fingerprint acquisition, preprocessing, minutia extraction, match, identification, user registration, and template encryption on the board. By careful analysis of the accuracy requirement as well as the arithmetic precision to be used, we optimized the algorithms so that the whole system can work in real-time in the embedded environment based on Intel(R) PXA255 processor. The fingerprint verification, which is the core part of the system, is fully tested on a fingerprint database consists of 1149 fingerprint images. The result shows that we can achieve an accuracy of more than 95%. Field testing of 20 registered users has further proved the reliability of our system. The core part of our system, then embedded fingerprint authentication, can also be applied in many different embedded applications concerning security problems.

  9. Composition and Verification Experiment for Indoor Positioning System using Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Masaki; Sunaga, Hikaru; Ioroi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    Positioning systems that use ultrasonic sensors can measure position with a high degree of accuracy. For this reason, they are an attractive option for use in indoors, where the level of accuracy required is higher than that needed outdoors. This study aims to make possible a practical ultrasonic positioning system based on what is called an inverse GPS method. To be practical, positioning systems should be able to cover a wide area and identify the positions of multiple objects. This paper discusses the positioning methodology and system structure to achieve these objectives. It presents the results of verification tests with static and moving objects conducted using an experimental model. It was confirmed that the positioning error is less than 100 mm, and that the proposed system satisfies the required accuracy. In addition, as a possible application of the method, an experiment in ‘pedestrian navigation’ was conducted using a moving robot, and the effectiveness of the proposed system was confirmed.

  10. Pilot Non-Conformance to Alerting System Commands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy

    1997-01-01

    This research project examined the effects of consonance between cockpit displays and alerting system as a technique to encourage pilots to conform to alerting system commands. An experiment used the task of collision avoidance during closely spaced parallel approaches as a case study, building upon previous experiments which identified instances of non-conformance and conflicts between the alerting criteria preferred by pilots, compared to that used by alerting systems. Using a workstation based, part-task simulator, each of 45 subjects completed 45 experiment runs. In each run, the subjects were told they were flying an approach. Their primary task was to keep their wings level despite turbulence through the use of a sidestick. The sidestick commands did not affect the path of the aircraft, however, so that consistent approach paths were be followed. Their secondary task was to indicate when an aircraft on a parallel approach is blundering towards them, as evidenced by the traffic display. Subjects were asked to press different buttons indicating whether they feel an avoidance maneuver is required by the traffic situation or not. At the completion of each run, subjects were asked to rate their confidence in their decision and, if appropriate, to rate the timeliness of automatic alerts when had been given. Three different automatic alert conditions were tested. The "No Automatic Alerts Given" condition is self-explanatory. In the "Automatic Alerts Based on NTZ Criteria" condition, an automatic alert was given when the NTZ criteria was triggered; this criteria is consistent with subject reactions in other studies, in which subjects were found to react, on average, when the other aircraft was 1350 min to the side of the own aircraft. In the "Automatic Alerts Based on MIT Criteria" condition, an automatic alert was given when the MIT criteria was triggered; this criteria was developed by Carpenter and Kuchar for parallel approaches to have better performance, at the

  11. High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS): Pilot Knowledge, Skills and Abilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the initial work accomplished by the ACCESS 5 Human System Integration (HSI) team to identify Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Pilot Knowledge, Skill and Ability (KSA), Training and Medical requirements. To derive this information the following tasks were accomplished: a) Mission and Function analyses were performed; b) Applicable FARs and FAA Advisory Circulars (ACs) were reviewed; c) Meetings were conducted with NASA and FAA Human Factors personnel; d) Surveys were completed by ACCESS 5 HSI Working group UA Pilots; e) Coordination meetings were conducted with the ACCESS 5 Policy IPT. The results of these efforts were used to develop a summary of the current qualifications. for an individual to function as a Pilot In Command (PIC) for UAs currently flown by UNITE companies, to develop preliminary Pilot KSAs for each phase of flight, and to delineate preliminary Pilot Training and Medical requirements. These results are to be provided to the Policy IPT to support their development of recommendations for UA Pilot Rating Criteria, training and medical qualifications. It is expected that the initially an instrument rated pilot will be required to serve as the PIC. However, as operational experience is gained, and automation is applied to accomplish various system functions, it is expected that pilot rating criteria could be lessened.

  12. Validation of a quick three-dimensional dose verification system for pre-treatment IMRT QA.

    PubMed

    Nakaguchi, Yuji; Araki, Fujio; Ono, Takeshi; Tomiyama, Yuki; Maruyama, Masato; Nagasue, Nozomu; Shimohigashi, Yoshinobu; Kai, Yudai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the dosimetric performance of the three-dimensional (3D) dose verification system, COMPASS version 3 (IBA Dosimetry, GmbH, Germany). The COMPASS has the function of a dedicated beam modeling and dose calculation. It is able to reconstruct 3D dose distributions on patient CT images, using the incident fluence from a linear accelerator measured with the MatriXX 2D array (IBA Dosimetry). The dose profiles measured with various multi-leaf collimator (MLC) test patterns for the COMPASS were checked by comparison with those of EDR2 (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY) films and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The COMPASS was also used for dose verification in clinical intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for head and neck cases. The dose distributions were compared with those measured by 3DVH (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) and MC. In addition, the quality assurance (QA) times among the COMPASS, 3DVH, and EDR2 were compared. For MLC test patterns, the COMPASS dose profiles agreed within 3 % with those of EDR2 films and MC simulations. The physical resolution of the COMPASS detectors was lower than that of film, but the dose resolution for MLC patterns was comparable to that of film. In clinical plans, the dose-volume-histograms were equal for all systems. The average QA times of the COMPASS, 3DVH, and EDR2 film were 40.1, 59.4, and 121.4 min, respectively. The COMPASS system provides fast and reliable 3D dose verification for clinical IMRT QA. The COMPASS QA process does not require phantom plans. Therefore, it allows a simple QA workflow. PMID:25261343

  13. Evaluation and verification of a short-range ensemble precipitation prediction system over Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. L..; Santos-Muñoz, D.; Valero, F.; Pascual, A.; Sebastian, L. I.

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study is the evaluation and verification of a Short-Range Ensemble Prediction System (SREPS) built with five different model physical process parameterization schemes and two different initial conditions from global models, allowing to construct several versions of the non-hydrostatic mesoscale MM5 model for a 1-month period of October 2006. From the SREPS, flow-dependent probabilistic forecasts are provided by means of predictive probability distributions over the Iberian Peninsula down to a 10-km grid spacing. In order to carry out the verification, 25 km grid of observational precipitation records over Spain from the Spanish Climatic Network has been used to evaluate the ensemble accuracy together with the mean model performance and forecast variability by means of comparisons between such records and the ensemble forecasts. This verification has been carried out upscaling the 10 km probabilistic forecast to the observational data grid. Temporal evolution of precipitation forecasts for both mean ensemble members and the ensemble mean is shown, illustrating the consistency of the SREPS. Such evolutions, also named spaghetti diagrams, summarize the SREPS information, showing the different isolines for each of the members as well as the ensemble mean. Additionally, the probabilistic meteogram of the spatial daily mean precipitation values shows the range of forecast values, providing discrete probability information in different quantile intervals. The epsgram shows different daily distributions, indicating the predictability of each day. Moreover, the Talagrand derived from the SREPS results shows underdispersion which indicates some bias behaviour. The ROC curve shows a very outstanding area, indicating potential usefulness of the forecasting system. Additionally, the reliability diagram also depicts a good ensemble system performance, illustrating in general good agreement between forecast probability and the mean observed frequency.

  14. Pilot-aircraft system reponse to wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, B. S.; Frost, W.

    1980-01-01

    The nonlinear aircraft motion and automatic control model is expanded to incorporate the human pilot into simulations of aircraft response to wind to wind shear. The human pilot is described by a constant gains lag filter. Two runs are carried out using pilot transfer functions. Fixed-stick, autopilot, and manned computer simulations are made with an aircraft having characteristics of a small commuter type aircraft flown through longitudinal winds measured by a Doppler radar beamed along the glide slope. Simulations are also made flying an aircraft through sinusoidal head wind and tail wind shears at the phugoid frequency to evaluate the response of manned aircraft in thunderstorm wind environments.

  15. Development and validation of MCNPX-based Monte Carlo treatment plan verification system

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Iraj; Monadi, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    A Monte Carlo treatment plan verification (MCTPV) system was developed for clinical treatment plan verification (TPV), especially for the conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. In the MCTPV, the MCNPX code was used for particle transport through the accelerator head and the patient body. MCTPV has an interface with TiGRT planning system and reads the information which is needed for Monte Carlo calculation transferred in digital image communications in medicine-radiation therapy (DICOM-RT) format. In MCTPV several methods were applied in order to reduce the simulation time. The relative dose distribution of a clinical prostate conformal plan calculated by the MCTPV was compared with that of TiGRT planning system. The results showed well implementation of the beams configuration and patient information in this system. For quantitative evaluation of MCTPV a two-dimensional (2D) diode array (MapCHECK2) and gamma index analysis were used. The gamma passing rate (3%/3 mm) of an IMRT plan was found to be 98.5% for total beams. Also, comparison of the measured and Monte Carlo calculated doses at several points inside an inhomogeneous phantom for 6- and 18-MV photon beams showed a good agreement (within 1.5%). The accuracy and timing results of MCTPV showed that MCTPV could be used very efficiently for additional assessment of complicated plans such as IMRT plan. PMID:26170554

  16. Orion GN&C Fault Management System Verification: Scope And Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Denise; Weiler, David; Flanary, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure long-term ability to meet mission goals and to provide for the safety of the public, ground personnel, and any crew members, nearly all spacecraft include a fault management (FM) system. For a manned vehicle such as Orion, the safety of the crew is of paramount importance. The goal of the Orion Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) fault management system is to detect, isolate, and respond to faults before they can result in harm to the human crew or loss of the spacecraft. Verification of fault management/fault protection capability is challenging due to the large number of possible faults in a complex spacecraft, the inherent unpredictability of faults, the complexity of interactions among the various spacecraft components, and the inability to easily quantify human reactions to failure scenarios. The Orion GN&C Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) team has developed a methodology for bounding the scope of FM system verification while ensuring sufficient coverage of the failure space and providing high confidence that the fault management system meets all safety requirements. The methodology utilizes a swarm search algorithm to identify failure cases that can result in catastrophic loss of the crew or the vehicle and rare event sequential Monte Carlo to verify safety and FDIR performance requirements.

  17. An integrated Monte Carlo dosimetric verification system for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Mizowaki, T.; Miyabe, Y.; Takegawa, H.; Narita, Y.; Yano, S.; Nagata, Y.; Teshima, T.; Hiraoka, M.

    2007-04-01

    An integrated Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, MCRTV (Monte Carlo for radiotherapy treatment plan verification), has been developed for clinical treatment plan verification, especially for routine quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The MCRTV system consists of the EGS4/PRESTA MC codes originally written for particle transport through the accelerator, the multileaf collimator (MLC), and the patient/phantom, which run on a 28-CPU Linux cluster, and the associated software developed for the clinical implementation. MCRTV has an interface with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and reads the information needed for MC computation transferred in DICOM-RT format. The key features of MCRTV have been presented in detail in this paper. The phase-space data of our 15 MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac 2300C/D have been developed and several benchmarks have been performed under homogeneous and several inhomogeneous conditions (including water, aluminium, lung and bone media). The MC results agreed with the ionization chamber measurements to within 1% and 2% for homogeneous and inhomogeneous conditions, respectively. The MC calculation for a clinical prostate IMRT treatment plan validated the implementation of the beams and the patient/phantom configuration in MCRTV.

  18. Personal authentication in video surveillance systems using an on-line signature verification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Cheng-Chang; Han, Chin-Chuan; Lin, Su-Ming

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, a novel on-line signature verification approach is proposed for personal authentication in video surveillance systems. As we know, digit password-based authentication is the most popular manner in many network-based applications. However, if the passwords were leaked, the monitoring data are easily falsified. Biometric-based authentication using signature features is a natural and friendly approach to remedy this problem. In this study, a signature-based authentication is proposed to identify the individuals by using the template matching strategy. Some experimental results were conducted to show the effectiveness of our proposed methods.

  19. Design of the software development and verification system (SWDVS) for shuttle NASA study task 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drane, L. W.; Mccoy, B. J.; Silver, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    An overview of the Software Development and Verification System (SWDVS) for the space shuttle is presented. The design considerations, goals, assumptions, and major features of the design are examined. A scenario that shows three persons involved in flight software development using the SWDVS in response to a program change request is developed. The SWDVS is described from the standpoint of different groups of people with different responsibilities in the shuttle program to show the functional requirements that influenced the SWDVS design. The software elements of the SWDVS that satisfy the requirements of the different groups are identified.

  20. Space Shuttle production verification motor 1 (PV-1) field joint protection system, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of the field joint protection system (FJPS) of the Space Shuttle Production Verification Motor 1 (PV-1), as evaluated by postfire hardware inspection. Compliance with the specifications is shown for the FJPS assembly and components. The simplified FJPS and field joint heaters performed nominally, maintaining all joint seal temperatures within the required range. One anomally was noted on the igniter-to-case joint heater during postfire inspection. The heater buckled off the surface in two areas, resulting in two hot spots on the heater and darkened heater insulation. The condition did not affect heater performance during ignition countdown and all igniter seals were maintained within required temperature limits.

  1. Evidence flow graph methods for validation and verification of expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Lee A.; Green, Peter G.; Bhatnagar, Jayant

    1988-01-01

    This final report describes the results of an investigation into the use of evidence flow graph techniques for performing validation and verification of expert systems. This was approached by developing a translator to convert horn-clause rule bases into evidence flow graphs, a simulation program, and methods of analysis. These tools were then applied to a simple rule base which contained errors. It was found that the method was capable of identifying a variety of problems, for example that the order of presentation of input data or small changes in critical parameters could effect the output from a set of rules.

  2. Evidence flow graph methods for validation and verification of expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Lee A.; Green, Peter G.; Bhatnagar, Jayant

    1989-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the use of evidence flow graph techniques for performing validation and verification of expert systems are given. A translator to convert horn-clause rule bases into evidence flow graphs, a simulation program, and methods of analysis were developed. These tools were then applied to a simple rule base which contained errors. It was found that the method was capable of identifying a variety of problems, for example that the order of presentation of input data or small changes in critical parameters could affect the output from a set of rules.

  3. Specification of Selected Performance Monitoring and Commissioning Verification Algorithms for CHP Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2006-10-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Distributed Energy (DE) Program by developing advanced control algorithms that would lead to development of tools to enhance performance and reliability, and reduce emissions of distributed energy technologies, including combined heat and power technologies. This report documents phase 2 of the program, providing a detailed functional specification for algorithms for performance monitoring and commissioning verification, scheduled for development in FY 2006. The report identifies the systems for which algorithms will be developed, the specific functions of each algorithm, metrics which the algorithms will output, and inputs required by each algorithm.

  4. Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2005-12-21

    This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, HONEYWELL POWER SYSTEMS, INC. PARALLON 75 KW TURBOGENERATOR WITH CO EMISSIONS CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Greenhouse Gas Technology Center (GHG Center), one of six verification organizations under the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program, evaluated the performance of the Parallon 75 kW Turbogenerator (Turbogenerator) with carbon monoxide (CO) emissions control syst...

  6. RIACS Workshop on the Verification and Validation of Autonomous and Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecheur, Charles; Visser, Willem; Simmons, Reid

    2001-01-01

    The long-term future of space exploration at NASA is dependent on the full exploitation of autonomous and adaptive systems: careful monitoring of missions from earth, as is the norm now, will be infeasible due to the sheer number of proposed missions and the communication lag for deep-space missions. Mission managers are however worried about the reliability of these more intelligent systems. The main focus of the workshop was to address these worries and hence we invited NASA engineers working on autonomous and adaptive systems and researchers interested in the verification and validation (V&V) of software systems. The dual purpose of the meeting was to: (1) make NASA engineers aware of the V&V techniques they could be using; and (2) make the V&V community aware of the complexity of the systems NASA is developing.

  7. Hybrid Decompositional Verification for Discovering Failures in Adaptive Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Sarah; Davies, Misty D.; Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems hold tremendous promise for maintaining the safety of a damaged aircraft and its passengers. However, most currently proposed adaptive control methodologies rely on online learning neural networks (OLNNs), which necessarily have the property that the controller is changing during the flight. These changes tend to be highly nonlinear, and difficult or impossible to analyze using standard techniques. In this paper, we approach the problem with a variant of compositional verification. The overall system is broken into components. Undesirable behavior is fed backwards through the system. Components which can be solved using formal methods techniques explicitly for the ranges of safe and unsafe input bounds are treated as white box components. The remaining black box components are analyzed with heuristic techniques that try to predict a range of component inputs that may lead to unsafe behavior. The composition of these component inputs throughout the system leads to overall system test vectors that may elucidate the undesirable behavior

  8. Effects of visual and motion simulation cueing systems on pilot performance during takeoffs with engine failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parris, B. L.; Cook, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Data are presented that show the effects of visual and motion during cueing on pilot performance during takeoffs with engine failures. Four groups of USAF pilots flew a simulated KC-135 using four different cueing systems. The most basic of these systems was of the instrument-only type. Visual scene simulation and/or motion simulation was added to produce the other systems. Learning curves, mean performance, and subjective data are examined. The results show that the addition of visual cueing results in significant improvement in pilot performance, but the combined use of visual and motion cueing results in far better performance.

  9. Development of 1000kW-class MCFC pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ooue, M.; Yasue, H.; Takasu, K.; Tsuchitori, T.

    1996-12-31

    This pilot plant is a part of the New Sunshine Program which has proceeded by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. MCFC Research Association is entrusted with the development of the pilot plant, and constructing it at Kawagoe site. Following items will be verified by this pilot plant operation. (a) Development of 250kW class stack and confirmation of stack performance and decay rate. (b) System verification such as basic process, control system and operation characteristics, toward commercialization. (c) To get design data for demonstration plant.

  10. Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform: Design and Verification of the Remote Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartori, John

    2005-01-01

    The Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform (MSAP) represents an effort to bolster efficiency in the spacecraft design process. By incorporating essential spacecraft functionality into a modular, expandable system, the MSAP provides a foundation on which future spacecraft missions can be developed. Once completed, the MSAP will provide support for missions with varying objectives, while maintaining a level of standardization that will minimize redesign of general system components. One subsystem of the MSAP, the Remote Engineering Unit (REU), functions by gathering engineering telemetry from strategic points on the spacecraft and providing these measurements to the spacecraft's Command and Data Handling (C&DH) subsystem. Before the MSAP Project reaches completion, all hardware, including the REU, must be verified. However, the speed and complexity of the REU circuitry rules out the possibility of physical prototyping. Instead, the MSAP hardware is designed and verified using the Verilog Hardware Definition Language (HDL). An increasingly popular means of digital design, HDL programming provides a level of abstraction, which allows the designer to focus on functionality while logic synthesis tools take care of gate-level design and optimization. As verification of the REU proceeds, errors are quickly remedied, preventing costly changes during hardware validation. After undergoing the careful, iterative processes of verification and validation, the REU and MSAP will prove their readiness for use in a multitude of spacecraft missions.

  11. Pilot Mental Workload with Predictive System Status Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    1998-01-01

    Research has shown a strong pilot preference for predictive information of aircraft system status in the flight deck. However, the mental workload associated with using this predictive information has not been ascertained. The study described here attempted to measure mental workload. In this simulator experiment, three types of predictive information (none, whether a parameter was changing abnormally, and the time for a parameter to reach an alert range) and four initial times to a parameter alert range (1 minute, 5 minutes, 15 minutes, and ETA+45 minutes) were tested to determine their effects on subjects mental workload. Subjective workload ratings increased with increasing predictive information (whether a parameter was changing abnormally or the time for a parameter to reach an alert range). Subjective situation awareness decreased with more predictive information but it became greater with increasing initial times to a parameter alert range. Also, subjective focus changed depending on the type of predictive information. Lastly, skin temperature fluctuated less as the initial time to a parameter alert range increased.

  12. A pilot study of a digital drainage system in pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Tunnicliffe, Georgia; Draper, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years there has been increasing usage of digital systems within cardiothoracic surgery to quantify air leaks and aid in clinical decision-making regarding the removal of chest drains postoperatively. The literature suggests improved agreement on timing of removal of chest drains and a reduced length of stay of patients. It could be that such devices could be useful tools for the clinician managing cases of pneumothorax. Methods This pilot study recruited adults admitted under the medical team with a pneumothorax requiring a chest drain. Participants had the underwater seal device changed for a digital device (Thopaz) which allowed continuous monitoring of the air leak. Drains were removed when either there was no ongoing air leak and the lung had expanded, or surgery was deemed necessary. Results Thirteen patients with pneumothorax (four primary, nine secondary) used the device during their admission including one patient treated in the community (the device has internal suction). Data were used to aid the clinician in management of the pneumothorax including the timing of surgery/ removal of drain and commencement of suction. Discussion Digital devices appear to be safe and effective and may prove to be a useful tool in the management of pneumothorax. PMID:25478182

  13. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Information System (Public Access)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a DOE facility located in the desert outside Carlsbad, New Mexico. Its mission is to safely dispose of defense-related transuranic radioactive waste. Disposal ôroomsö are carved out of the Permian Salt Formation deep below the desertÆs surface. The WIPP Waste Information Service (WWIS) was established in accordance with an Agreement between the United States Department of Energy and the New Mexico Environment Department, dated February 11, 2005, Docket Number HWB 04-07 (CO). The service provides information the containers emplaced at WIPP and the waste products they hold. The public may query by shipment number, location of waste stream or location of the container after it is placed at WIPP, date placed, and Haz Codes or other information about the waste stream profiles. For example, choosing the waste stream identified as ID-SDA-SLUDGE reveals that it may contain more than 20 chemical waste products, including arsenic, spent halogenated solvents, potassium cyanide, and chloroform. The system then tells you each numbered container that has this kind of sludge. Container data is available within 14 days after the containerÆs emplacement in the WIPP Repository.

  14. THRIVE: threshold homomorphic encryption based secure and privacy preserving biometric verification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabat, Cagatay; Kiraz, Mehmet Sabir; Erdogan, Hakan; Savas, Erkay

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new biometric verification and template protection system which we call THRIVE. The system includes novel enrollment and authentication protocols based on threshold homomorphic encryption where a private key is shared between a user and a verifier. In the THRIVE system, only encrypted binary biometric templates are stored in a database and verification is performed via homomorphically randomized templates, thus, original templates are never revealed during authentication. Due to the underlying threshold homomorphic encryption scheme, a malicious database owner cannot perform full decryption on encrypted templates of the users in the database. In addition, security of the THRIVE system is enhanced using a two-factor authentication scheme involving user's private key and biometric data. Using simulation-based techniques, the proposed system is proven secure in the malicious model. The proposed system is suitable for applications where the user does not want to reveal her biometrics to the verifier in plain form, but needs to prove her identity by using biometrics. The system can be used with any biometric modality where a feature extraction method yields a fixed size binary template and a query template is verified when its Hamming distance to the database template is less than a threshold. The overall connection time for the proposed THRIVE system is estimated to be 336 ms on average for 256-bit biometric templates on a desktop PC running with quad core 3.2 GHz CPUs at 10 Mbit/s up/down link connection speed. Consequently, the proposed system can be efficiently used in real-life applications.

  15. A systematic approach to advanced cockpit warning systems for air transport operations: Line pilot preferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. H.; Simpson, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Line pilots (fifty captains, first officers, and flight engineers) from 8 different airlines were administered a structured questionnaire relating to future warning system design and solutions to current warning system problems. This was followed by a semantic differential to obtain a factor analysis of 18 different cockpit warning signals on scales such as informative/distracting, annoying/soothing. Half the pilots received a demonstration of the experimental text and voice synthesizer warning systems before answering the questionnaire and the semantic differential. A control group answered the questionnaire and the semantic differential first, thus providing a check for the stability of pilot preferences with and without actual exposure to experimental systems. Generally, the preference data obtained revealed much consistency and strong agreement among line pilots concerning advance cockpit warning system design.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: CREDIBLE PERFORMANCE DATA FOR TECHNOLOGY USERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes accomplishments of EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, discusses lessons learned during the pilot period, briefly notes the restructuring of the pilot programs into six centers beginning in late 2000, and discusses in detail the Air Pol...

  17. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  18. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  19. Graphical Weather Information System Evaluation: Usability, Perceived Utility, and Preferences from General Aviation Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.; Chamberlain, James P.

    2002-01-01

    Weather is a significant factor in General Aviation (GA) accidents and fatality rates. Graphical Weather Information Systems (GWISs) for the flight deck are appropriate technologies for mitigating the difficulties GA pilots have with current aviation weather information sources. This paper describes usability evaluations of a prototype GWIS by 12 GA pilots after using the system in flights towards convective weather. We provide design guidance for GWISs and discuss further research required to support weather situation awareness and in-flight decision making for GA pilots.

  20. Software verification and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    General procedures for software verification and validation are provided as a guide for managers, programmers, and analysts involved in software development. The verification and validation procedures described are based primarily on testing techniques. Testing refers to the execution of all or part of a software system for the purpose of detecting errors. Planning, execution, and analysis of tests are outlined in this document. Code reading and static analysis techniques for software verification are also described.

  1. CHLORINE DECAY AND BIOFILM STUDIES IN A PILOT SCALE DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION DEAD END PIPE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine decay experiments using a pilot-scale water distribution dead end pipe system were conducted to define relationships between chlorine decay and environmental factors. These included flow rate, biomass concentration and biofilm density, and initial chlorine concentrations...

  2. A guide to NASA's Pilot Land Data System (PLDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Pilot Land Data System (PLDS) is a distributed information management system designed to support NASA's land science community. The PLDS provides a wide range of services including management of information about scientific data, access to a library of scientific data, a data ordering capability, communications, connection to data analysis facilities, and electronic mail. The PLDS provides these services by offering the scientist the capability to search for and order data, and to communicate electronically with other scientists and computers. Three functions enable scientists to find what data are available and where they reside. The first two, Find data summaries and Read detailed descriptions give summary and detailed descriptions about data sets or groups of related data sets, science, projects, and institutions which archive land data. The third, gives information about specific pieces of data. This last function has two components, Search systemwide inventory and Search local inventory. The first component enables the user to find data elements (images, geological samples, transects, maps, etc.) that exist anywhere in the PLDS while the second has only information about data at the local site. The first enables the user to find pieces of data from several different data sets with the same temporal and spatial coverage and other elements common to most data sets, while the second allows the user to select a data set based on these descriptors and on those that are unique to a data set. The PLDS provides capabilities that enable electronic file transfers, intercomputer connection, and electronic mail. Both TCP/IP and DECnet protocols are supported via the NASA Science Internet (NIS). Access is also available through Telenet.

  3. The grout/glass performance assessment code system (GPACS) with verification and benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Piepho, M.G.; Sutherland, W.H.; Rittmann, P.D.

    1994-12-01

    GPACS is a computer code system for calculating water flow (unsaturated or saturated), solute transport, and human doses due to the slow release of contaminants from a waste form (in particular grout or glass) through an engineered system and through a vadose zone to an aquifer, well and river. This dual-purpose document is intended to serve as a user`s guide and verification/benchmark document for the Grout/Glass Performance Assessment Code system (GPACS). GPACS can be used for low-level-waste (LLW) Glass Performance Assessment and many other applications including other low-level-waste performance assessments and risk assessments. Based on all the cses presented, GPACS is adequate (verified) for calculating water flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated-zone sediments and for calculating human doses via the groundwater pathway.

  4. Bay of Fundy verification of a system for multidate Landsat measurement of suspended sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.; Afoldi, T. T.; Amos, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    A system for automated multidate Landsat CCT MSS measurement of suspended sediment concentration (S) has been implemented and verified on nine sets (108 points) of data from the Bay of Fundy, Canada. The system employs 'chromaticity analysis' to provide automatic pixel-by-pixel adjustment of atmospheric variations, permitting reference calibration data from one or several dates to be spatially and temporally extrapolated to other regions and to other dates. For verification, each data set was used in turn as test data against the remainder as a calibration set: the average absolute error was 44 percent of S over the range 1-1000 mg/l. The system can be used to measure chlorophyll (in the absence of atmospheric variations), Secchi disk depth, and turbidity.

  5. A Multitier System for the Verification, Visualization and Management of CHIMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Lingerfelt, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Osborne, James A; Budiardja, R. D.; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. Given CHIMERA s complexity and pace of ongoing development, a new support system, Bellerophon, has been designed and implemented to perform automated verification, visualization and management tasks while integrating with other workflow systems utilized by CHIMERA s development group. In order to achieve these goals, a multitier approach has been adopted. By integrating supercomputing platforms, visualization clusters, a dedicated web server and a client-side desktop application, this system attempts to provide an encapsulated, end-to-end solution to these needs.

  6. Vibratory response modeling and verification of a high precision optical positioning system.

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    1999-06-18

    A generic vibratory-response modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. Based on multibody dynamics theory, the system is modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear elastic elements, such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Utilizing this program, the theoretical and experimental verification of the vibratory behavior of a double-multilayer monochromator support and positioning system is presented. Results of parametric design studies that investigate the influence of support floor dynamics and highlight important design issues are also presented. Overall, good matches between theory and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the program as a dynamic modeling tool.

  7. Use of separate-effects experiments in verification of system thermal-hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, P.

    1982-01-01

    In recent years, a number of advanced, best-estimate systems codes such as TRAC and RELAP5 have been developed in order to accurately predict the consequences of various postulated accidents and transients in Light Water Reactor (LWR) systems. Although these codes had to go through some verification or assessment during the developmental stage, it has been recognized that an independent assessment of these codes is necessary before they should be applied to any decision making process. The USNRC is, therefore, sponsoring such efforts at several national laboratories including BNL. The overall assessment matrix includes separate-effects, integral and plant tests. However, this paper will focus on how the separate-effects tests can be utilized in verifying the thermal-hydraulic models that control the various stages of postulated accidents and/or transients in a LWR system.

  8. Research on simulation and verification system of satellite remote sensing camera video processor based on dual-FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fei; Liu, Qi; Cui, Xuenan

    2014-09-01

    To satisfy the needs for testing video processor of satellite remote sensing cameras, a design is provided to achieve a simulation and verification system of satellite remote sensing camera video processor based on dual-FPGA. The correctness of video processor FPGA logic can be verified even without CCD signals or analog to digital convertor. Two Xilinx Virtex FPGAs are adopted to make a center unit, the logic of A/D digital data generating and data processing are developed with VHDL. The RS-232 interface is used to receive commands from the host computer, and different types of data are generated and outputted depending on the commands. Experimental results show that the simulation and verification system is flexible and can work well. The simulation and verification system meets the requirements of testing video processors for several different types of satellite remote sensing cameras.

  9. DFM flow by using combination between design based metrology system and model based verification at sub-50nm memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-kyun; Kim, Jungchan; Choi, Jaeseung; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Kim, Jinwoong

    2007-03-01

    As the minimum transistor length is getting smaller, the variation and uniformity of transistor length seriously effect device performance. So, the importance of optical proximity effects correction (OPC) and resolution enhancement technology (RET) cannot be overemphasized. However, OPC process is regarded by some as a necessary evil in device performance. In fact, every group which includes process and design, are interested in whole chip CD variation trend and CD uniformity, which represent real wafer. Recently, design based metrology systems are capable of detecting difference between data base to wafer SEM image. Design based metrology systems are able to extract information of whole chip CD variation. According to the results, OPC abnormality was identified and design feedback items are also disclosed. The other approaches are accomplished on EDA companies, like model based OPC verifications. Model based verification will be done for full chip area by using well-calibrated model. The object of model based verification is the prediction of potential weak point on wafer and fast feed back to OPC and design before reticle fabrication. In order to achieve robust design and sufficient device margin, appropriate combination between design based metrology system and model based verification tools is very important. Therefore, we evaluated design based metrology system and matched model based verification system for optimum combination between two systems. In our study, huge amount of data from wafer results are classified and analyzed by statistical method and classified by OPC feedback and design feedback items. Additionally, novel DFM flow would be proposed by using combination of design based metrology and model based verification tools.

  10. On the pilot's behavior of detecting a system parameter change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morizumi, N.; Kimura, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reaction of a human pilot, engaged in compensatory control, to a sudden change in the controlled element's characteristics is described. Taking the case where the change manifests itself as a variance change of the monitored signal, it is shown that the detection time, defined to be the time elapsed until the pilot detects the change, is related to the monitored signal and its derivative. Then, the detection behavior is modeled by an optimal controller, an optimal estimator, and a variance-ratio test mechanism that is performed for the monitored signal and its derivative. Results of a digital simulation show that the pilot's detection behavior can be well represented by the model proposed here.

  11. An independent system for real-time dynamic multileaf collimation trajectory verification using EPID.

    PubMed

    Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Woodruff, Henry C; Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; O'Connor, Daryl J; Middleton, Richard H; Greer, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    A new tool has been developed to verify the trajectory of dynamic multileaf collimators (MLCs) used in advanced radiotherapy techniques using only the information provided by the electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) measured image frames. The prescribed leaf positions are resampled to a higher resolution in a pre-processing stage to improve the verification precision. Measured MLC positions are extracted from the EPID frames using a template matching method. A cosine similarity metric is then applied to synchronise measured and planned leaf positions for comparison. Three additional comparison functions were incorporated to ensure robust synchronisation. The MLC leaf trajectory error detection was simulated for both intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (prostate) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) (head-and-neck) deliveries with anthropomorphic phantoms in the beam. The overall accuracy for MLC positions automatically extracted from EPID image frames was approximately 0.5 mm. The MLC leaf trajectory verification system can detect leaf position errors during IMRT and VMAT with a tolerance of 3.5 mm within 1 s. PMID:24334552

  12. Pilot-in-the-loop analysis of propulsive-only flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Hwei-Lan; Biezad, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Longitudinal control system architectures which directly couple flight stick motions to throttle commands for a multi-engine aircraft are presented. This coupling enables positive attitude control with complete failure of the flight control system. The architectures chosen vary from simple feedback gains to classical lead-lag compensators with and without prefilters. Each architecture is reviewed for its appropriateness for piloted flight. The control systems are then analyzed with pilot-in-the-loop metrics related to bandwidth required for landing. Results indicate that current and proposed bandwidth requirements should be modified for throttles-only flight control. Pilot ratings consistently showed better ratings than predicted by analysis. Recommendations are made for more robust design and implementation. The use of quantitative feedback theory for compensator design is discussed. Although simple and effective augmented control can be achieved in a wide variety of failed configurations, a few configuration characteristics are dominant for pilot-in-the-loop control.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, C. LEE COOK DIVISION, DOVER CORPORATION, STATIC PAC (TM) SYSTEM, PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Static Pac System, Phase II, natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by the C. Lee Cook Division, Dover Corporation. The Static Pac System is designed to seal th...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: STORMWATER SOURCE AREA TREATMENT DEVICE — BAYSAVER TECHNOLOGIES, INC. BAYSAVER SEPARATION SYSTEM, MODEL 10K

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the BaySaver Separation System, Model 10K was conducted on a 10 acre drainage basin near downtown Griffin, Georgia. The system consists of two water tight pre-cast concrete manholes and a high-density polyethylene BaySaver Separator Unit. The BaySaver Mod...

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F3 Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-047

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-04-26

    The 1607-F3 waste site is the former location of the sanitary sewer system that supported the 182-F Pump Station, the 183-F Water Treatment Plant, and the 151-F Substation. The sanitary sewer system included a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipeline, all in use between 1944 and 1965. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  16. Requirement Assurance: A Verification Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Requirement Assurance is an act of requirement verification which assures the stakeholder or customer that a product requirement has produced its "as realized product" and has been verified with conclusive evidence. Product requirement verification answers the question, "did the product meet the stated specification, performance, or design documentation?". In order to ensure the system was built correctly, the practicing system engineer must verify each product requirement using verification methods of inspection, analysis, demonstration, or test. The products of these methods are the "verification artifacts" or "closure artifacts" which are the objective evidence needed to prove the product requirements meet the verification success criteria. Institutional direction is given to the System Engineer in NPR 7123.1A NASA Systems Engineering Processes and Requirements with regards to the requirement verification process. In response, the verification methodology offered in this report meets both the institutional process and requirement verification best practices.

  17. A Tool for Verification and Validation of Neural Network Based Adaptive Controllers for High Assurance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pramod; Schumann, Johann

    2004-01-01

    High reliability of mission- and safety-critical software systems has been identified by NASA as a high-priority technology challenge. We present an approach for the performance analysis of a neural network (NN) in an advanced adaptive control system. This problem is important in the context of safety-critical applications that require certification, such as flight software in aircraft. We have developed a tool to measure the performance of the NN during operation by calculating a confidence interval (error bar) around the NN's output. Our tool can be used during pre-deployment verification as well as monitoring the network performance during operation. The tool has been implemented in Simulink and simulation results on a F-15 aircraft are presented.

  18. Verification and Validation Plan for Flight Performance Requirements on the CEV Parachute Assembly System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Aaron L.; Olson, Leah M.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is engaged in a multi-year design and test campaign aimed at qualifying a parachute recovery system for human use on the Orion Spacecraft. Orion has parachute flight performance requirements that will ultimately be verified through the use of Monte Carlo multi-degree of freedom flight simulations. These simulations will be anchored by real world flight test data and iteratively improved to provide a closer approximation to the real physics observed in the inherently chaotic inflation and steady state flight of the CPAS parachutes. This paper will examine the processes necessary to verify the flight performance requirements of the human rated spacecraft. The focus will be on the requirements verification and model validation planned on CPAS.

  19. Expert system verification and validation study: ES V/V Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Scott; Hamilton, David

    1992-01-01

    The primary purpose of this document is to build a foundation for applying principles of verification and validation (V&V) of expert systems. To achieve this, some V&V as applied to conventionally implemented software is required. Part one will discuss the background of V&V from the perspective of (1) what is V&V of software and (2) V&V's role in developing software. Part one will also overview some common analysis techniques that are applied when performing V&V of software. All of these materials will be presented based on the assumption that the reader has little or no background in V&V or in developing procedural software. The primary purpose of part two is to explain the major techniques that have been developed for V&V of expert systems.

  20. A Pilot - An On-Line Library Acquisition System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spigai, Frances; And Others

    This report presents documentation of files, of file organization, and of 42 of the modular program subroutines used in a pilot project devised by the Oregon State University (OSU) Computer Center to simulate procedures in the Acquisitions Department of the OSU Library. A total of 224 bibliographically verified requests for monographs, 30 vender…

  1. Pilot interaction with automated airborne decision making systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouse, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the pilot and crew for future aircraft is discussed. Fifteen formal experimental studies and the development of a variety of models of human behavior based on queueing history, pattern recognition methods, control theory, fuzzy set theory, and artificial intelligence concepts are presented. L.F.M.

  2. Real-time pilot guidance system for improved flight-test maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E. T.; Meyer, R. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The real-time pilot display uplink development at the Dryden Flight Research Facility is described, with a focus on recent F-104 studies. A nose boom gathers data on the Mach number, pressure altitude, and angle of attack. The system provides the pilot with guidance to improve maneuver accuracy and fly more complex trajectories. The uplink presents the pilot with computed differences between a reference flight path and actual flight state conditions, using a downlink to the ground where engineering computations are performed, feedback is transmitted, and corrections are applied. Details of the flight test trajectories and data from test results are provided for level turns, constant thrust turns, dynamic pressure trajectories, constant radar altitude accelerations and decelerations, and a Reynolds number trajectory. The system has proved capable of reducing pilot workload and saving fuel by decreasing the flight time necessary to obtain specific data.

  3. Automated pilot advisory system test and evaluation at Manassas Municipal Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA developed an experimental automated pilot advisory system (APAS) to provide airport and air traffic advisories at high density uncontrolled airports. The APAS concept is to utilize low cost automated systems to provide the necessary information for pilots to more safely plan and execute approach and landing at uncontrolled high density airports. The system is designed to be a natural extension of the procedural visual flight rules system used at uncontrolled airports and, as an advisory system, will enhance the "see-and-be-seen" rule and an evaluation of the APAS concept was obtained from pilots who used the system at the Manassas, Virginia airport. These evaluations and the system performance are presented.

  4. Translating expert system rules into Ada code with validation and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Lee; Duckworth, R. James; Green, Peter; Michalson, Bill; Gosselin, Dave; Nainani, Krishan; Pease, Adam

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this ongoing research and development program is to develop software tools which enable the rapid development, upgrading, and maintenance of embedded real-time artificial intelligence systems. The goals of this phase of the research were to investigate the feasibility of developing software tools which automatically translate expert system rules into Ada code and develop methods for performing validation and verification testing of the resultant expert system. A prototype system was demonstrated which automatically translated rules from an Air Force expert system was demonstrated which detected errors in the execution of the resultant system. The method and prototype tools for converting AI representations into Ada code by converting the rules into Ada code modules and then linking them with an Activation Framework based run-time environment to form an executable load module are discussed. This method is based upon the use of Evidence Flow Graphs which are a data flow representation for intelligent systems. The development of prototype test generation and evaluation software which was used to test the resultant code is discussed. This testing was performed automatically using Monte-Carlo techniques based upon a constraint based description of the required performance for the system.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: Reduction of Nitrogen in Domestic Wastewater from Individual Residential Homes. BioConcepts, Inc. ReCip® RTS ~ 500 System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the ReCip® RTS-500 System was conducted over a 12-month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC) located on Otis Air National Guard Base in Bourne, Massachusetts. A nine-week startup period preceded the verification test t...

  6. Standard artifact for the geometric verification of terrestrial laser scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Armesto, J.; Arias, P.

    2011-10-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners are geodetic instruments with applications in areas such as architecture, civil engineering or environment. Although it is common to receive the technical specifications of the systems from their manufacturers, there are not any solutions for data verification in the market available for the users. This work proposes a standard artifact and a methodology to perform, in a simple way, the metrology verification of laser scanners. The artifact is manufactured using aluminium and delrin, materials that make the artifact robust and portable. The system consists of a set of five spheres situated at equal distances to one another, and a set of seven cubes of different sizes. A coordinate measuring machine with sub-millimetre precision is used for calibration purposes under controlled environmental conditions. After its calibration, the artifact can be used for the verification of metrology specifications given by manufacturers of laser scanners. The elements of the artifact are destinated to test different metrological characteristics, such as accuracy, precision and resolution. The distance between centres of the spheres is used to obtain the accuracy data, the standard deviation of the top face of the largest cube is used to establish the precision (repeatability) and the error in the measurement of the cubes provides the resolution value in axes X, Y and Z. Methodology for the evaluation is mainly supported by least squares fitting algorithms developed using Matlab programming. The artifact and methodology proposed were tested using a terrestrial laser scanner Riegl LMSZ-390i at three different ranges (10, 30 and 50 m) and four stepwidths (0.002°, 0.005°, 0.010° and 0.020°), both for horizontal and vertical displacements. Results obtained are in agreement with the accuracy and precision data given by the manufacturer, 6 and 4 mm, respectively. On the other hand, important influences between resolution and range and between resolution and

  7. Verification and intercomparison of mesoscale ensemble prediction systems in the Beijing 2008 Olympics Research and Development Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, Masaru; Saito, Kazuo; Seko, Hiromu; Hara, Masahiro; Hara, Tabito; Yamaguchi, Munehiko; Gong, Jiandong; Charron, Martin; Du, Jun; Wang, Yong; Chen, Dehui

    2011-05-01

    During the period around the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, the Beijing 2008 Olympics Research and Development Project (B08RDP) was conducted as part of the World Weather Research Program short-range weather forecasting research project. Mesoscale ensemble prediction (MEP) experiments were carried out by six organizations in near-real time, in order to share their experiences in the development of MEP systems. The purpose of this study is to objectively verify these experiments and to clarify the problems associated with the current MEP systems through the same experiences. Verification was performed using the MEP outputs interpolated into a common verification domain with a horizontal resolution of 15 km. For all systems, the ensemble spreads grew as the forecast time increased, and the ensemble mean improved the forecast errors compared with individual control forecasts in the verification against the analysis fields. However, each system exhibited individual characteristics according to the MEP method. Some participants used physical perturbation methods. The significance of these methods was confirmed by the verification. However, the mean error (ME) of the ensemble forecast in some systems was worse than that of the individual control forecast. This result suggests that it is necessary to pay careful attention to physical perturbations.

  8. Tank waste remediation system FSAR hazard identification/facility configuration verification report

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, D.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-01

    This document provides the results of the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report (TWRS FSAR) hazards identification/facility configuration activities undertaken from the period of March 7, 1996 to May 31, 1996. The purpose of this activity was to provide an independent overview of the TWRS facility specific hazards and configurations that were used in support of the TWRS FSAR hazards and accident analysis development. It was based on a review of existing published documentation and field inspections. The objective of the verification effort was to provide a `snap shot` in time of the existing TWRS facility hazards and configurations and will be used to support hazards and accident analysis activities.

  9. Modeling and verification of a lithium iron phosphate battery pack system for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin

    In recent years, Lithium chemistry based batteries have gained popularity with all automotive manufacturers. Thousands of battery cells are put into a battery pack to satisfy the need of power consumption of vehicles using electric traction. Managing the battery pack for hybrid and electric vehicles is a challenging problem. Despite the advantage of power density and charge retaining capabilities, Lithium ion batteries do not handle over-charge and over-discharge very well compared to other battery chemistries. Therefore, creating an accurate model to predict the battery pack behavior is essential in research and development for battery management systems. This work presents a general technique to extend accepted modeling methodologies for single cells to models for large packs. The theoretical framework is accompanied by parameter identification process based on the circuit model, and experimental verification procedures supporting the validity of this approach.

  10. Speaker verification system using acoustic data and non-acoustic data

    DOEpatents

    Gable, Todd J.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Holzrichter, John F.; Burnett, Greg C.

    2006-03-21

    A method and system for speech characterization. One embodiment includes a method for speaker verification which includes collecting data from a speaker, wherein the data comprises acoustic data and non-acoustic data. The data is used to generate a template that includes a first set of "template" parameters. The method further includes receiving a real-time identity claim from a claimant, and using acoustic data and non-acoustic data from the identity claim to generate a second set of parameters. The method further includes comparing the first set of parameters to the set of parameters to determine whether the claimant is the speaker. The first set of parameters and the second set of parameters include at least one purely non-acoustic parameter, including a non-acoustic glottal shape parameter derived from averaging multiple glottal cycle waveforms.

  11. Expert system verification and validation study. ES V/V guidelines/workshop conference summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Scott W.; Hamilton, David

    1992-01-01

    The intent of the workshop was to start moving research on the verification and validation (V&V) of knowledge based systems (KBSs) in the direction of providing tangible 'products' that a KBS developer could use. In the near term research will focus on identifying the kinds of experiences encountered during KBS development of 'real' KBSs. These will be stored in a repository and will serve as the foundation for the rest of the activities described here. One specific approach to be pursued is 'benchmarking'. With this approach, a KBS developer can use either 'canned' KBSs with seeded errors or existing KBSs with known errors to evaluate a given tool's ability to satisfactorily identify errors.

  12. Study of Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) and Velocity-vector Based Command Augmentation System (V-CAS) on Pilot Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Dahai; Goodrich, Ken; Peak, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of synthetic vision system (SVS) concepts and advanced flight controls on single pilot performance (SPP). Specifically, we evaluated the benefits and interactions of two levels of terrain portrayal, guidance symbology, and control-system response type on SPP in the context of lower-landing minima (LLM) approaches. Performance measures consisted of flight technical error (FTE) and pilot perceived workload. In this study, pilot rating, control type, and guidance symbology were not found to significantly affect FTE or workload. It is likely that transfer from prior experience, limited scope of the evaluation task, specific implementation limitations, and limited sample size were major factors in obtaining these results.

  13. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Command, Control, and Communications (C3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The document provides the Human System Integration(HSI) high-level functional C3 HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot. Description includes (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge C3 system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain C3 information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate C3 technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how C3 operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary C3 functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for C3 are partitioned into three categories: (1) Pilot-Air Traffic Control (ATC) Voice Communications (2) Pilot-ATC Data Communications, and (3) command and control of the unmanned aircraft (UA). Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING THE PLUG POWER SU1 FUEL CELL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Plug Power SU1 Fuel Cell System manufactured by Plug Power. The SU1 is a proton exchange membrane fuel cell that requires hydrogen (H2) as fuel. H2 is generally not available, so the ...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT-A AND A ENVIRONMENTAL SEALS, INC., SEAL ASSIST SYSTEM (SAS) PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of Seal Assist System (SAS) for natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by A&A Environmental Seals, Inc. The SAS uses a secondary containment gland to collect natural g...

  16. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE INDUSTRIAL TEST SYSTEM, INC. CYANIDE REAGENTSTRIP™ TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide can be present in various forms in water. The cyanide test kit evaluated in this verification study (Industrial Test System, Inc. Cyanide Regent Strip ™ Test Kit) was designed to detect free cyanide in water. This is done by converting cyanide in water to cyanogen...

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, SWINE WASTE ELECTRIC POWER AND HEAT PRODUCTION--CAPSTONE 30KW MICROTURBINE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification program, which provides objective and scientific third party analysis of new technology that can benefit the environment, a combined heat and power system was evaluated based on the Capstone 30kW Microturbine developed by Cain Ind...

  18. glideinWMS - A generic pilot-based Workload Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Sfiligoi, Igor; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The Grid resources are distributed among hundreds of independent Grid sites, requiring a higher level Workload Management System (WMS) to be used efficiently. Pilot jobs have been used for this purpose by many communities, bringing increased reliability, global fair share and just in time resource matching. GlideinWMS is a WMS based on the Condor glidein concept, i.e. a regular Condor pool, with the Condor daemons (startds) being started by pilot jobs, and real jobs being vanilla, standard or MPI universe jobs. The glideinWMS is composed of a set of Glidein Factories, handling the submission of pilot jobs to a set of Grid sites, and a set of VO Frontends, requesting pilot submission based on the status of user jobs. This paper contains the structural overview of glideinWMS as well as a detailed description of the current implementation and the current scalability limits.

  19. Pilot-based blind phase estimation for coherent optical OFDM system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebing; Li, Jianping; Li, Chao; Luo, Ming; Li, Haibo; He, Zhixue; Yang, Qi; Lu, Chao; Li, Zhaohui

    2014-09-22

    A pilot-based blind (PBB) phase estimation method for the coherent optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (CO-OFDM) system is demonstrated in this paper. Instead of inserting the pilot-subcarriers that are loaded with the already known information in the OFDM signal, the unknown and specially designed signal is used to replace the signal on the pilot subcarriers to decrease the waste of spectrum and has demonstrated good performance in the phase noise compensation. Therefore, the spectral efficiency (SE) is further improved compared with the conventional pilot-aided (PA) phase noise estimation method. Both the proposed PBB and conventional PA estimation methods are compared in a CO-OFDM transmission experiment, which is modulated by 4 quadrature amplitude modulation (4-QAM) formats and transmitted over 1760-km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) without optical dispersion compensation. The experimental results show that the proposed PBB method can achieve the similar performance as the conventional PA method. PMID:25321759

  20. Concepts for pilot interaction with an automated NOE obstacle-avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppenbarger, R. A.; Cheng, V. H. L.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of providing an appropriate method by which a human pilot interacts with an automated nap-of-the-Earth rotorcraft guidance and control system is addressed. This problem is closely related to the broader question of what level and degree of automation is effective at reducing pilot workload during low-altitude flight missions requiring obstacle avoidance. A systematic approach for establishing the possible combinations of manual versus automatic authority over relevant guidance and control functions is first presented. From these possibilities, three candidate concepts are selected; selection is based upon their potential for practical implementation and reduction in pilot workload. This paper describes the selection of these three pilot-interaction concepts and the mathematical models for their implementation.

  1. glideinWMS—a generic pilot-based workload management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfiligoi, I.

    2008-07-01

    The Grid resources are distributed among hundreds of independent Grid sites, requiring a higher level Workload Management System (WMS) to be used efficiently. Pilot jobs have been used for this purpose by many communities, bringing increased reliability, global fair share and just in time resource matching. glideinWMS is a WMS based on the Condor glidein concept, i.e. a regular Condor pool, with the Condor daemons (startds) being started by pilot jobs, and real jobs being vanilla, standard or MPI universe jobs. The glideinWMS is composed of a set of Glidein Factories, handling the submission of pilot jobs to a set of Grid sites, and a set of VO Frontends, requesting pilot submission based on the status of user jobs. This paper contains the structural overview of glideinWMS as well as a detailed description of the current implementation and the current scalability limits.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION AND INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses environmental technology verification and indoor air. RTI has responsibility for a pilot program for indoor air products as part of the U.S. EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. The program objective is to further the development of sel...

  3. Test/QA Plan (TQAP) for Verification of Semi-Continuous Ambient Air Monitoring Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the semi-continuous ambient air monitoring technology (or MARGA) test and quality assurance plan is to specify procedures for a verification test applicable to commercial semi-continuous ambient air monitoring technologies. The purpose of the verification test is ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, JCH FUEL SOLUTIONS, INC., JCH ENVIRO AUTOMATED FUEL CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The verification testing was conducted at the Cl facility in North Las Vegas, NV, on July 17 and 18, 2001. During this period, engine emissions, fuel consumption, and fuel quality were evaluated with contaminated and cleaned fuel.

    To facilitate this verification, JCH repre...

  5. Controlling state explosion during automatic verification of delay-insensitive and delay-constrained VLSI systems using the POM verifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, D.; Jensen, L.

    1991-01-01

    Delay-insensitive VLSI systems have a certain appeal on the ground due to difficulties with clocks; they are even more attractive in space. We answer the question, is it possible to control state explosion arising from various sources during automatic verification (model checking) of delay-insensitive systems? State explosion due to concurrency is handled by introducing a partial-order representation for systems, and defining system correctness as a simple relation between two partial orders on the same set of system events (a graph problem). State explosion due to nondeterminism (chiefly arbitration) is handled when the system to be verified has a clean, finite recurrence structure. Backwards branching is a further optimization. The heart of this approach is the ability, during model checking, to discover a compact finite presentation of the verified system without prior composition of system components. The fully-implemented POM verification system has polynomial space and time performance on traditional asynchronous-circuit benchmarks that are exponential in space and time for other verification systems. We also sketch the generalization of this approach to handle delay-constrained VLSI systems.

  6. Mountain Search and Rescue with Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvagni, Mario; Tonoli, Andrea; Zenerino, Enrico; Chiaberge, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) also known as Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are nowadays becoming more and more popular in several applications. Even though a complete regulation is not yet available all over the world, researches, tests and some real case applications are wide spreading. These technologies can bring many benefits also to the mountain operations especially in emergencies and harsh environmental conditions, such as Search and Rescue (SAR) and avalanche rescue missions. In fact, during last decade, the number of people practicing winter sports in backcountry environment is increased and one of the greatest hazards for recreationists and professionals are avalanches. Often these accidents have severe consequences leading, mostly, to asphyxia-related death, which is confirmed by the hard drop of survival probability after ten minutes from the burying. Therefore, it is essential to minimize the time of burial. Modern avalanche beacon (ARTVA) interface guides the rescuer during the search phase reducing its time. Even if modern avalanche beacons are valid and reliable, the seeking range influences the rescue time. Furthermore, the environment and morphologic conditions of avalanches usually complicates the rescues. The recursive methodology of this kind of searching offers the opportunity to use automatic device like drones (RPAS). These systems allow performing all the required tasks autonomously, with high accuracy and without exposing the rescuers to additional risks due to secondary avalanches. The availability of highly integrated electronics and subsystems specifically meant for the applications, better batteries, miniaturized payload and, in general, affordable prices, has led to the availability of small RPAS with very good performances that can give interesting application opportunities in unconventional environments. The present work is one of the outcome from the experience made by the authors in RPAS fields and in Mechatronics

  7. Observation and Confirmation of Six Strong Lensing Systems in The Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Nord, B.; et al.

    2015-12-09

    We report the observation and confirmation of the first group- and cluster-scale strong gravitational lensing systems found in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. Through visual inspection of data from the Science Verification (SV) season, we identified 53 candidate systems. We then obtained spectroscopic follow-up of 21 candidates using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini South telescope and the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) at the Magellan/Baade telescope. With this follow-up, we confirmed six candidates as gravitational lenses: Three of the systems are newly discovered, and the remaining three were previously known. Of the 21 observed candidates, the remaining 15 were either not detected in spectroscopic observations, were observed and did not exhibit continuum emission (or spectral features), or were ruled out as lensing systems. The confirmed sample consists of one group-scale and five galaxy cluster-scale lenses. The lensed sources range in redshift z ~ 0.80-3.2, and in i-band surface brightness i_{SB} ~ 23-25 mag/sq.-arcsec. (2" aperture). For each of the six systems, we estimate the Einstein radius and the enclosed mass, which have ranges ~ 5.0 - 8.6" and ~ 7.5 x 10^{12} - 6.4 x 10^{13} solar masses, respectively.

  8. Verification and validation guidelines for high integrity systems: Appendices A--D, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, H,; Hecht, M.; Dinsmore, G.; Hecht, S.; Tang, D.

    1995-03-01

    The following material is furnished as an experimental guide for the use of risk based classification for nuclear plant protection systems. As shown in Sections 2 and 3 of this report, safety classifications for the nuclear field are application based (using the function served as the primary criterion), whereas those in use by the process industry and the military are risk based. There are obvious obstacles to the use of risk based classifications (and the associated integrity levels) for nuclear power plants, yet there are also many potential benefits, including: it considers all capabilities provided for dealing with a specific hazard, thus assigning a lower risk where multiple protection is provided (either at the same or at lower layers); this permits the plant management to perform trade-offs between systems that meet the highest qualification levels or multiple diverse systems at lower qualification levels; it motivates the use (and therefore also the development) of protection systems with demonstrated low failure probability; and it may permit lower cost process industry equipment of an established integrity level to be used in nuclear applications (subject to verification of the integrity level and regulatory approval). The totality of these benefits may reduce the cost of digital protection systems significantly an motivate utilities to much more rapid upgrading of the capabilities than is currently the case. Therefore the outline of a risk based classification is presented here, to serve as a starting point for further investigation and possible trial application.

  9. A pilot scale electrical infrared dry-peeling system for tomatoes: design and performance evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pilot scale infrared dry-peeling system for tomatoes was designed and constructed. The system consisted of three major sections including the IR heating, vacuum, and pinch roller sections. The peeling performance of the system was examined under different operational conditions using tomatoes with...

  10. Development of a Consensus Standard for Verification and Validation of Nuclear System Thermal-Fluids Software

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Richard R. Schultz; Ryan L. Crane

    2011-12-01

    With the resurgence of nuclear power and increased interest in advanced nuclear reactors as an option to supply abundant energy without the associated greenhouse gas emissions of the more conventional fossil fuel energy sources, there is a need to establish internationally recognized standards for the verification and validation (V&V) of software used to calculate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of advanced reactor designs for both normal operation and hypothetical accident conditions. To address this need, ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Standards and Certification has established the V&V 30 Committee, under the jurisdiction of the V&V Standards Committee, to develop a consensus standard for verification and validation of software used for design and analysis of advanced reactor systems. The initial focus of this committee will be on the V&V of system analysis and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for nuclear applications. To limit the scope of the effort, the committee will further limit its focus to software to be used in the licensing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. In this framework, the Standard should conform to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other regulatory practices, procedures and methods for licensing of nuclear power plants as embodied in the United States (U.S.) Code of Federal Regulations and other pertinent documents such as Regulatory Guide 1.203, 'Transient and Accident Analysis Methods' and NUREG-0800, 'NRC Standard Review Plan'. In addition, the Standard should be consistent with applicable sections of ASME NQA-1-2008 'Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications (QA)'. This paper describes the general requirements for the proposed V&V 30 Standard, which includes; (a) applicable NRC and other regulatory requirements for defining the operational and accident domain of a nuclear system that must be considered if the system is to be licensed, (b) the corresponding calculation domain of

  11. Software Verification & Validation Report for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect

    YEH, T.

    2002-11-20

    This document reports on the analysis, testing and conclusions of the software verification and validation for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization ventilation system. Automation control system will use the Allen-Bradley software tools for programming and programmable logic controller (PLC) configuration. The 244-AR Interim Stabilization Ventilation System will be used to control the release of radioactive particles to the environment in the containment tent, located inside the canyon of the 244-AR facility, and to assist the waste stabilization efforts. The HVAC equipment, ducts, instruments, PLC hardware, the ladder logic executable software (documented code), and message display terminal are considered part of the temporary ventilation system. The system consists of a supply air skid, temporary ductwork (to distribute airflow), and two skid-mounted, 500-cfm exhausters connected to the east filter building and the vessel vent system. The Interim Stabilization Ventilation System is a temporary, portable ventilation system consisting of supply side and exhaust side. Air is supplied to the containment tent from an air supply skid. This skid contains a constant speed fan, a pre-filter, an electric heating coil, a cooling coil, and a constant flow device (CFD). The CFD uses a passive component that allows a constant flow of air to pass through the device. Air is drawn out of the containment tent, cells, and tanks by two 500-cfm exhauster skids running in parallel. These skids are equipped with fans, filters, stack, stack monitoring instrumentation, and a PLC for control. The 500CFM exhaust skids were fabricated and tested previously for saltwell pumping activities. The objective of the temporary ventilation system is to maintain a higher pressure to the containment tent, relative to the canyon and cell areas, to prevent contaminants from reaching the containment tent.

  12. A limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Lei Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhang, You

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Currently, no 3D or 4D volumetric x-ray imaging techniques are available for intrafraction verification of target position during actual treatment delivery or in-between treatment beams, which is critical for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. This study aims to develop a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system to use prior information, deformation models, and limited angle kV-MV projections to verify target position intrafractionally. Methods: The LIVE system acquires limited-angle kV projections simultaneously during arc treatment delivery or in-between static 3D/IMRT treatment beams as the gantry moves from one beam to the next. Orthogonal limited-angle MV projections are acquired from the beam's eye view (BEV) exit fluence of arc treatment beam or in-between static beams to provide additional anatomical information. MV projections are converted to kV projections using a linear conversion function. Patient prior planning CT at one phase is used as the prior information, and the on-board patient volume is considered as a deformation of the prior images. The deformation field is solved using the data fidelity constraint, a breathing motion model extracted from the planning 4D-CT based on principal component analysis (PCA) and a free-form deformation (FD) model. LIVE was evaluated using a 4D digital extended cardiac torso phantom (XCAT) and a CIRS 008A dynamic thoracic phantom. In the XCAT study, patient breathing pattern and tumor size changes were simulated from CT to treatment position. In the CIRS phantom study, the artificial target in the lung region experienced both size change and position shift from CT to treatment position. Varian Truebeam research mode was used to acquire kV and MV projections simultaneously during the delivery of a dynamic conformal arc plan. The reconstruction accuracy was evaluated by calculating the 3D volume percentage difference (VPD) and the center of

  13. Hybrid Verification of an Interface for an Automatic Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oishi, Meeko; Mitchell, Ian; Bayen, Alexandre; Tomlin, Claire; Degani, Asaf; Kega, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Modern commercial aircraft have extensive automation which helps the pilot by performing computations, obtaining data, and completing procedural tasks. The pilot display must contain enough information so that the pilot can correctly predict the aircraft's behavior, while not overloading the pilot with unnecessary information. Human-automation interaction is currently evaluated through extensive simulation. In this paper, using both hybrid and discrete-event system techniques, we show how one could mathematically verify that an interface contains enough information for the pilot to safely and unambiguously complete a desired maneuver. We first develop a nonlinear, hybrid model for the longitudinal dynamics of a large civil jet aircraft in an autoland/go-around maneuver. We find the largest controlled subset of the aircraft's flight envelope for which we can guarantee both safe landing and safe go-around. We abstract a discrete procedural model using this result, and verify a discrete formulation of the pilot display against it. An interface which fails this verification could result in nondeterministic or unpredictable behavior from the pilot's point of view.

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  15. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  16. Validation and Verification of Future Integrated Safety-Critical Systems Operating under Off-Nominal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control remains one of the largest contributors to aircraft fatal accidents worldwide. Aircraft loss-of-control accidents are highly complex in that they can result from numerous causal and contributing factors acting alone or (more often) in combination. Hence, there is no single intervention strategy to prevent these accidents and reducing them will require a holistic integrated intervention capability. Future onboard integrated system technologies developed for preventing loss of vehicle control accidents must be able to assure safe operation under the associated off-nominal conditions. The transition of these technologies into the commercial fleet will require their extensive validation and verification (V and V) and ultimate certification. The V and V of complex integrated systems poses major nontrivial technical challenges particularly for safety-critical operation under highly off-nominal conditions associated with aircraft loss-of-control events. This paper summarizes the V and V problem and presents a proposed process that could be applied to complex integrated safety-critical systems developed for preventing aircraft loss-of-control accidents. A summary of recent research accomplishments in this effort is also provided.

  17. Applications of a Fast Neutron Detector System to Verification of Special Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Douglas R.; Byrd, Roger C.; Ensslin, Norbert; Krick, Merlyn S.; Mercer, David J.; Miller, Michael C.; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Russo, Phyllis A.

    1998-04-01

    An array of boron-loaded plastic optically coupled to bismuth germanate scintillators has been developed to detect neutrons for measurement of special nuclear materials. The phoswiched detection system has the advantage of a high neutron detection efficiency and short die-away time. This is achieved by mixing the moderator (plastic) and the detector (^10B) at the molecular level. Simulations indicate that the neutron capture probabilities equal or exceed those of the current thermal neutron multiplicity techniques which have the moderator (polyethylene) and detectors (^3He gas proportional tubes) macroscopically separate. Experiments have been performed to characterize the response of these detectors and validate computer simulations. The fast neutron detection system may be applied to the quantitative assay of plutonium in high (α,n) backgrounds, with emphasis on safeguards and enviromental scenarios. Additional applications of the insturment, in a non-quantative mode, has been tested for possible verification activities involving dismantlement of nuclear weapons. A description of the detector system, simulations and preliminary data will be presented.

  18. Well Clear: General Aviation and Commercial Pilots' Perceptioin of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This research explored how different pilots perceived the concept of the Well Clear Boundary (WCB) and observed if that boundary changed when dealing with manned versus unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), and the effects of other variables. Pilots' WCB perceptions were collected objectively through simulator recordings and subjectively through questionnaires. Objectively, significant differences were found in WCB perception between two pilot types (general aviation [GA], and Airline Transport Pilots [ATPs]), and significant WCB differences were evident when comparing two intruder types (manned versus unmanned aircraft). Differences were dependent on other manipulated variables (intruder approach angle, ownship speed, and background traffic levels). Subjectively, there were differences in WCB perception across pilot types; GA pilots trusted UAS aircraft higher than the more experienced ATPs. Conclusions indicate pilots' WCB mental models are more easily perceived as time-based boundaries in front of ownship, and more easily perceived as distance-based boundaries to the rear of ownship.

  19. A Verification Method of Inter-Task Cooperation in Embedded Real-time Systems and its Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Toshio

    In software development process of embedded real-time systems, the design of the task cooperation process is very important. The cooperating process of such tasks is specified by task cooperation patterns. Adoption of unsuitable task cooperation patterns has fatal influence on system performance, quality, and extendibility. In order to prevent repetitive work caused by the shortage of task cooperation performance, it is necessary to verify task cooperation patterns in an early software development stage. However, it is very difficult to verify task cooperation patterns in an early software developing stage where task program codes are not completed yet. Therefore, we propose a verification method using task skeleton program codes and a real-time kernel that has a function of recording all events during software execution such as system calls issued by task program codes, external interrupts, and timer interrupt. In order to evaluate the proposed verification method, we applied it to the software development process of a mechatronics control system.

  20. Spacecraft-level verification of the Van Allen Probes' RF communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowne, M. J.; Srinivasan, D.; Royster, D.; Weaver, G.; Matlin, D.; Mosavi, N.

    This paper presents the verification process, lessons learned, and selected test results of the radio frequency (RF) communication system of the Van Allen Probes, formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). The Van Allen Probes mission is investigating the doughnut-shaped regions of space known as the Van Allen radiation belts where the Sun interacts with charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Understanding this dynamic area that surrounds our planet is important to improving our ability to design spacecraft and missions for reliability and astronaut safety. The Van Allen Probes mission features two nearly identical spacecraft designed, built, and operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RF communication system features the JHU/APL Frontier Radio. The Frontier Radio is a software-defined radio (SDR) designed for spaceborne communications, navigation, radio science, and sensor applications. This mission marks the first spaceflight usage of the Frontier Radio. RF ground support equipment (RF GSE) was developed using a ground station receiver similar to what will be used in flight and whose capabilities provided clarity into RF system performance that was previously not obtained until compatibility testing with the ground segments. The Van Allen Probes underwent EMC, acoustic, vibration, and thermal vacuum testing at the environmental test facilities at APL. During this time the RF communication system was rigorously tested to ensure optimal performance, including system-level testing down to threshold power levels. Compatibility tests were performed with the JHU/APL Satellite Communication Facility (SCF), the Universal Space Network (USN), and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Successful completion of this program as described in this paper validated the design of the system and demonstrated that it will be able to me

  1. Step 1: Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Contingency Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document involves definition of technology interface requirements for Contingency Management. This was performed through a review of Contingency Management-related, HSI requirements documents, standards, and recommended practices. Technology concepts in use by the Contingency Management Work Package were considered. Beginning with HSI high-level functional requirements for Contingency Management, and Contingency Management technology elements, HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot were identified. Results of the analysis describe (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge of system failures and associated contingency procedures, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain system status and procedure information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate Contingency Management technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how Contingency Management operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary Contingency Management functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for Contingency Management are partitioned into four categories: (1) Health and Status and (2) Contingency Management. Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  2. A Flexible Pilot-Scale Setup for Real-Time Studies in Process Systems Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panjapornpon, Chanin; Fletcher, Nathan; Soroush, Masoud

    2006-01-01

    This manuscript describes a flexible, pilot-scale setup that can be used for training students and carrying out research in process systems engineering. The setup allows one to study a variety of process systems engineering concepts such as design feasibility, design flexibility, control configuration selection, parameter estimation, process and…

  3. Report of the Pilot Test for the National Reporting System for Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condelli, Larry; Padilla, Vince; Angeles, January

    The National Reporting System project was designed to establish an outcome-based accountability system for the state-administered, federally funded adult education program. In the pilot test, volunteer states and their local programs compared the feasibility and costs of these three data collection models: (1) local programs collect all the…

  4. HABITAT QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF TWO WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS IN MISSISSIPPI - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of wetland treatment systems (WTS), or constructed wetlands, for treating municipal wastewater is increasing in the United States, but little is known about the ability of these systems to duplicate or sustain wetland functions. he pilot study was designed to examine meth...

  5. HABITAT QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF TWO WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS IN THE ARID WEST A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of wetland treatment systems (WTS) for treating municipal wastewater is increasing in the United States, but little is known about the ability of these systems to duplicate or sustain wetland functions. his pilot study was designed to examine methods and the usefulness of...

  6. Voluntary reporting system for occupational disease: pilot project, evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Seixas, N S; Rosenman, K D

    1986-01-01

    For 18 months (1983-84), a pilot program was set up to promote the reporting of occupational disease by physicians to a local health agency. The objectives of the program were to increase the awareness among physicians of occupational disease in their practice, assist physicians in the diagnosis and management of the cases, and to provide a mechanism for public health intervention in hazardous working conditions. After discussions with leaders in the medical community, the program was initiated by a letter from the State Health Commissioner to physicians in the pilot county. A single-page reporting form was included with the letter. A bimonthly newsletter to primary care physicians was also begun. Additional educational activity included presentation of grand rounds and a one-day medical conference on the recognition of occupational disease at the single hospital in the county. All physicians reporting occupational disease received copies of all industrial hygiene reports as well as relevant medical literature from the industrial hygienist assigned to investigate all reports by physicians. Only six reports of occupational disease were received. However, three of the six reports resulted in significant intervention. A questionnaire evaluation of the program indicated that there was resistance to involvement in reporting occupational disease, although physicians do recognize occupational disease in their practices regularly. PMID:3086920

  7. Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and assessment of conventional software verification and validation methods. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, S.M.; Groundwater, E.H.; Hayes, J.E.; Miller, L.A.

    1995-03-01

    By means of a literature survey, a comprehensive set of methods was identified for the verification and validation of conventional software. The 153 methods so identified were classified according to their appropriateness for various phases of a developmental life-cycle -- requirements, design, and implementation; the last category was subdivided into two, static testing and dynamic testing methods. The methods were then characterized in terms of eight rating factors, four concerning ease-of-use of the methods and four concerning the methods` power to detect defects. Based on these factors, two measurements were developed to permit quantitative comparisons among methods, a Cost-Benefit metric and an Effectiveness Metric. The Effectiveness Metric was further refined to provide three different estimates for each method, depending on three classes of needed stringency of V&V (determined by ratings of a system`s complexity and required-integrity). Methods were then rank-ordered for each of the three classes by terms of their overall cost-benefits and effectiveness. The applicability was then assessed of each for the identified components of knowledge-based and expert systems, as well as the system as a whole.

  8. A BrachyPhantom for verification of dose calculation of HDR brachytherapy planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Campos, C. A. T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a calibration phantom for {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy units that renders possible the direct measurement of absorbed dose to water and verification of treatment planning system.Methods: A phantom, herein designated BrachyPhantom, consists of a Solid Water™ 8-cm high cylinder with a diameter of 14 cm cavity in its axis that allows the positioning of an A1SL ionization chamber with its reference measuring point at the midheight of the cylinder's axis. Inside the BrachyPhantom, at a 3-cm radial distance from the chamber's reference measuring point, there is a circular channel connected to a cylindrical-guide cavity that allows the insertion of a 6-French flexible plastic catheter from the BrachyPhantom surface. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to calculate a factor, P{sub sw}{sup lw}, to correct the reading of the ionization chamber to a full scatter condition in liquid water. The verification of dose calculation of a HDR brachytherapy treatment planning system was performed by inserting a catheter with a dummy source in the phantom channel and scanning it with a CT. The CT scan was then transferred to the HDR computer program in which a multiple treatment plan was programmed to deliver a total dose of 150 cGy to the ionization chamber. The instrument reading was then converted to absorbed dose to water using the N{sub gas} formalism and the P{sub sw}{sup lw} factor. Likewise, the absorbed dose to water was calculated using the source strength, S{sub k}, values provided by 15 institutions visited in this work.Results: A value of 1.020 (0.09%, k= 2) was found for P{sub sw}{sup lw}. The expanded uncertainty in the absorbed dose assessed with the BrachyPhantom was found to be 2.12% (k= 1). To an associated S{sub k} of 27.8 cGy m{sup 2} h{sup −1}, the total irradiation time to deliver 150 cGy to the ionization chamber point of reference was 161.0 s. The deviation between the absorbed doses to water assessed with the Brachy

  9. Developing a Pilot Indicator System for U.S. Climate Changes, Impacts, Vulnerabilities, and Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, M. A.; Janetos, A.; Arndt, D. S.; Pouyat, R. V.; Aicher, R.; Lloyd, A.; Malik, O.; Reyes, J. J.; Anderson, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    The National Climate Indicators System is being developed as part of sustained assessment activities associated with the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA). The NCA is conducted under the U.S. Global Change Research Program, which is required to provide a report to Congress every 4 years. The National Climate Indicators System is a set of physical, ecological, and societal indicators that communicate key aspects of the physical climate, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness for the purpose of informing both decision makers and the public with scientifically valid information. The Indicators System will address questions important to multiple audiences including (but not limited to) nonscientists (e.g., Congress, U.S. citizens, students), resource managers, and state and municipal planners in a conceptually unified framework. The physical, ecological, and societal indicators will be scalable, to provide information for indicators at national, state, regional, and local scales. The pilot system is a test of the Indicators System for evaluation purposes to assess the readiness of indicators and usability of the system. The National Climate Indicator System has developed a pilot given the recommendations of over 150+ scientists and practitioners and 14 multidisciplinary teams, including, for example, greenhouse gases, forests, grasslands, water, human health, oceans and coasts, and energy. The pilot system of indicators includes approximately 20 indicators that are already developed, scientifically vetted, and implementable immediately. Specifically, the pilot indicators include a small set of global climate context indicators, which provide context for the national or regional indicators, as well as a set of nationally important U.S. natural system and human sector indicators. The purpose of the pilot is to work with stakeholder communities to evaluate the system and the individual indicators using a robust portfolio of evaluation studies, which

  10. Resource Allocation Support System (RASS): Summary report of the 1992 pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Buehring, W.A.; Whitfield, R.G.; Wolsko, T.D.; Kier, P.H.; Absil, M.J.G.; Jusko, M.J.; Sapinski, P.F.

    1993-02-01

    The Resource Allocation Support System (RASS) is a decision-aiding system being developed to assist the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Waste Management in program and budget decision making. Four pilot studies were conducted at DOE field offices in summer 1992 to evaluate and improve the RASS design. This report summarizes the combined results of the individual field office pilot studies. Results are presented from different perspectives to illustrate the type of information that would be available from RASS. Lessons learned and directions for future RASS developments are also presented.

  11. Requirements for ongoing development of the Pilot Land Data System (PLDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, S. W.; Newcomer, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Pilot Land Data System being developed to address the information processing needs of the NASA land sciences research community is presented. The objective of the pilot program is to establish a limited-scale, distributed information system for the archival, location, transfer, integration, and manipulation of data across multiple sites connected by a high-speed communications network. Functional capabilities required for users to create, access, and maintain local and distributed data bases containing various types of data in support of land sciences research are summarized.

  12. Development of a remote digital augmentation system and application to a remotely piloted research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    A cost-effective approach to flight testing advanced control concepts with remotely piloted vehicles is described. The approach utilizes a ground based digital computer coupled to the remotely piloted vehicle's motion sensors and control surface actuators through telemetry links to provide high bandwidth feedback control. The system was applied to the control of an unmanned 3/8-scale model of the F-15 airplane. The model was remotely augmented; that is, the F-15 mechanical and control augmentation flight control systems were simulated by the ground-based computer, rather than being in the vehicle itself. The results of flight tests of the model at high angles of attack are discussed.

  13. In situ timing and pointing verification of the ICESat altimeter using a ground-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, L.; Silverberg, E.; Webb, C.; Schutz, B.

    2005-11-01

    To provide validation of the ICESat laser altimeter time of measurement and geolocation, a ground-based technique was implemented at White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH), during the Laser 2a and 3a operational periods. The activities used an electro-optical detection system and a passive array of corner cube retro reflectors (CCR). The detectors and the CCRs were designed to provide an independent assessment of the laser footprint location, while the detectors also provide timing verification. This ground-based system unambiguously validated the elevation product time tag to 3 μsec +/- 1 μsec. In addition, the ground equipment provided in situ geolocations of the laser pulse. Comparing the in situ results to the ICESat GLA14 data product the positions differ by 10.6 m +/- 4.5 m for Laser 2a (Release 21) operations and 7.5 m +/- 6.6 m for Laser 3a (Release 23). These comparisons correlate to pointing validations at this site, for the specific overflight configurations.

  14. WTS-4 system verification unit for wind/hydroelectric integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) initiated a study to investigate the concept of integrating 100 MW of wind energy from megawatt-size wind turbines with the Federal hydroelectric system. As a part of the study, one large wind turbine was purchased through the competitive bid process and is now being installed to serve as a system verification unit (SVU). Reclamation negotiated an agreement with NASA to provide technical management of the project for the design, fabrication, installation, testing, and initial operation. Hamilton Standard was awarded a contract to furnish and install its WTS-4 wind turbine rated at 4 MW at a site near Medicine Bow, Wyoming. The purposes for installing the SVU are to fully evaluate the wind/hydro integration concept, make technical evaluation of the hardware design, train personnel in the technology, evaluate operation and maintenance aspects, and evaluate associated environmental impacts. The SVU will be operational in June 1982. Data from the WTS-4 and from a second SVU, Boeing's MOD-2, will be used to prepare a final design for a 100-MW farm if Congress authorizes the project.

  15. Experimental validation of a commercial 3D dose verification system for intensity-modulated arc therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggula, Ramesh; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Mueller, Lutz; Birkner, Mattias; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stieler, Florian; Steil, Volker; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-10-01

    We validate the dosimetric performance of COMPASS®, a novel 3D quality assurance system for verification of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans that can correlate the delivered dose to the patient's anatomy, taking into account the tissue inhomogeneity. The accuracy of treatment delivery was assessed by the COMPASS® for 12 VMAT plans, and the resulting assessments were evaluated using an ionization chamber and film measurements. Dose-volume relationships were evaluated by the COMPASS® for three additional treatment plans and these were used to verify the accuracy of treatment planning dose calculations. The results matched well between COMPASS® and measurements for the ionization chamber (<=3%) and film (73-99% for gamma(3%/3 mm) < 1 and 98-100% for gamma(5%/5 mm) < 1) for the phantom plans. Differences in dose-volume statistics for the average dose to the PTV were within 2.5% for three treatment plans. For the structures located in the low-dose region, a maximum difference of <9% was observed. In its current implementation, the system could measure the delivered dose with sufficient accuracy and could project the 3D dose distribution directly on the patient's anatomy. Slight deviations were found for large open fields. These could be minimized by improving the COMPASS® in-built beam model.

  16. WTS-4 system verification unit for wind/hydroelectric integration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. W.

    The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) initiated a study to investigate the concept of integrating 100 MW of wind energy from megawatt-size wind turbines with the Federal hydroelectric system. As a part of the study, one large wind turbine was purchased through the competitive bid process and is now being installed to serve as a system verification unit (SVU). Reclamation negotiated an agreement with NASA to provide technical management of the project for the design, fabrication, installation, testing, and initial operation. Hamilton Standard was awarded a contract to furnish and install its WTS-4 wind turbine rated at 4 MW at a site near Medicine Bow, Wyoming. The purposes for installing the SVU are to fully evaluate the wind/hydro integration concept, make technical evaluation of the hardware design, train personnel in the technology, evaluate operation and maintenance aspects, and evaluate associated environmental impacts. The SVU will be operational in June 1982. Data from the WTS-4 and from a second SVU, Boeing's MOD-2, will be used to prepare a final design for a 100-MW farm if Congress authorizes the project.

  17. Integrated Modeling and Simulation Verification, Validation, and Accreditation Strategy for Exploration Systems Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    Models and simulations (M&S) are critical resources in the exploration of space. They support program management, systems engineering, integration, analysis, test, and operations and provide critical information and data supporting key analyses and decisions (technical, cost and schedule). Consequently, there is a clear need to establish a solid understanding of M&S strengths and weaknesses, and the bounds within which they can credibly support decision-making. Their usage requires the implementation of a rigorous approach to verification, validation and accreditation (W&A) and establishment of formal process and practices associated with their application. To ensure decision-making is suitably supported by information (data, models, test beds) from activities (studies, exercises) from M&S applications that are understood and characterized, ESMD is establishing formal, tailored W&A processes and practices. In addition, to ensure the successful application of M&S within ESMD, a formal process for the certification of analysts that use M&S is being implemented. This presentation will highlight NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) management approach for M&S W&A to ensure decision-makers receive timely information on the model's fidelity, credibility, and quality.

  18. Verification of fault-tolerant clock synchronization systems. M.S. Thesis - College of William and Mary, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Paul S.

    1993-01-01

    A critical function in a fault-tolerant computer architecture is the synchronization of the redundant computing elements. The synchronization algorithm must include safeguards to ensure that failed components do not corrupt the behavior of good clocks. Reasoning about fault-tolerant clock synchronization is difficult because of the possibility of subtle interactions involving failed components. Therefore, mechanical proof systems are used to ensure that the verification of the synchronization system is correct. In 1987, Schneider presented a general proof of correctness for several fault-tolerant clock synchronization algorithms. Subsequently, Shankar verified Schneider's proof by using the mechanical proof system EHDM. This proof ensures that any system satisfying its underlying assumptions will provide Byzantine fault-tolerant clock synchronization. The utility of Shankar's mechanization of Schneider's theory for the verification of clock synchronization systems is explored. Some limitations of Shankar's mechanically verified theory were encountered. With minor modifications to the theory, a mechanically checked proof is provided that removes these limitations. The revised theory also allows for proven recovery from transient faults. Use of the revised theory is illustrated with the verification of an abstract design of a clock synchronization system.

  19. A Modeling and Verification Study of Summer Precipitation Systems Using NASA Surface Initialization Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jonathan L. Case; Kumar, Sujay V.; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most challenging weather forecast problems in the southeastern U.S. is daily summertime pulse-type convection. During the summer, atmospheric flow and forcing are generally weak in this region; thus, convection typically initiates in response to local forcing along sea/lake breezes, and other discontinuities often related to horizontal gradients in surface heating rates. Numerical simulations of pulse convection usually have low skill, even in local predictions at high resolution, due to the inherent chaotic nature of these precipitation systems. Forecast errors can arise from assumptions within parameterization schemes, model resolution limitations, and uncertainties in both the initial state of the atmosphere and land surface variables such as soil moisture and temperature. For this study, it is hypothesized that high-resolution, consistent representations of surface properties such as soil moisture, soil temperature, and sea surface temperature (SST) are necessary to better simulate the interactions between the surface and atmosphere, and ultimately improve predictions of summertime pulse convection. This paper describes a sensitivity experiment using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Interpolated land and ocean surface fields from a large-scale model are replaced with high-resolution datasets provided by unique NASA assets in an experimental simulation: the Land Information System (LIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) SSTs. The LIS is run in an offline mode for several years at the same grid resolution as the WRF model to provide compatible land surface initial conditions in an equilibrium state. The MODIS SSTs provide detailed analyses of SSTs over the oceans and large lakes compared to current operational products. The WRF model runs initialized with the LIS+MODIS datasets result in a reduction in the overprediction of rainfall areas; however, the skill is almost equally as low in both experiments using

  20. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TESTING OF FOUR DIOXIN EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, beginning as an initiative of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1995, verifies the performance of commercially available, innovative technologies that can be used to measure environmental quality. The ETV p...

  1. Design, analysis, and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems. [low cost solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A.; Minning, C.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of optical and electrical verification test coupons is detailed. Testing of these coupons was completed and the results are presented. Additionally, a thermal simulation of roof mounted array conditions was done and the results documented.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - PORTABLE GAS CHROMATOGRAPH - SENTEX SYSTEMS, INC. SCENTOGRAPH PLUS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, through the Environmental Technology Verification Program, is working to accelerate the acceptance and use of innovative technologies that improve the way the United States manages its environmental problems. This report documents demons...

  3. PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF ADVANCED MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR AIR, WATER, AND SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, beginning as an initiative of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1995, verifies the performance of commercially available, innovative technologies that can be used to assess environmental quality. The ETV p...

  4. On-Orbit Verification Status of the Payload Supply System and the Sensor Bus System Onboard TET-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurni, Andreas; Pellowski, Frank; Tiefenbeck, Christoph; Heyer, Heinz-Volker; Lemke, Norbert M. K.

    2013-08-01

    The TET-1 satellite was successfully launched on the 22nd of July 2012 and is now flying in its destined orbit of about 510 km. After the LEOP and commissioning phase the spacecraft is performing the on-orbit verification of the eleven experimental payloads. New and innovative satellite technologies have been tested in a space environment over a period of one year to demonstrate their capabilities for the use in future satellites. As system prime, Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) is responsible for the definition and management of the spacecraft and the ground control. In the current payload operation phase, the data of the implemented Payload Supply System (PSS) developed by KT will be evaluated and verified. The PSS builds the interface between the satellite bus and the payloads which all have different requirements concerning power, communication and operation. The PSS operates and supports the payloads very satisfactorily for their verification. Based on this success the PSS has the opportunity to be implemented in the next TET platform based satellites. Furthermore KT developed the Sensor Bus System (SBS) payload for testing an electrical sensor bus network with digital temperature sensors. The sensors and parts of the payload's data handling unit were assembled with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components to verify its applicability in a low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. This paper should give an overview of the ongoing TET-1 mission focusing on the implemented PSS and SBS. Gathered data of this two systems will be analyzed and discussed in order to verify its functionality and applicability inside future TET or similar LEO satellites.

  5. Step 1: Human System Integration Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Weather Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document involves definition of technology interface requirements for Hazardous Weather Avoidance. Technology concepts in use by the Access 5 Weather Management Work Package were considered. Beginning with the Human System Integration (HIS) high-level functional requirement for Hazardous Weather Avoidance, and Hazardous Weather Avoidance technology elements, HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot were identified. Results of the analysis describe (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge of hazardous weather, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain hazardous weather information. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate Hazardous Weather Avoidance technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how Hazardous Weather Avoidance operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary Weather Management functionality to the UA-pilot system. Requirements and guidelines for Hazardous Weather Avoidance are partitioned into four categories: (1) Planning En Route (2) Encountering Hazardous Weather En Route, (3) Planning to Destination, and (4) Diversion Planning Alternate Airport. Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  6. Lessons learned from pilot errors using automated systems in advanced technology aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Byers, J.C.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.; Reece, W.J.

    1993-04-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate pilot errors that occur during interaction with automated systems in advanced technology (``glass cockpit``) aircraft. In particular, we investigated the causes and potential corrective measures for pilot errors that resulted in altitude deviation incidents (i.e. failure to capture or maintain the altitude assigned by air traffic control). To do this, we analyzed altitude deviation events that have been reported in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), NASA`s data base of incidents self-reported by pilots and air traffic controllers. We developed models of the pilot tasks that are performed to capture and maintain altitude. Two types of models were developed to provide complementary perspectives of these tasks: sequential models and functional models. Both types of models show the errors that occur in actual altitude deviation events in advanced technology aircraft. Then, errors from the ASRS data base were categorized according to the models, to help understand the potential causes of the different error types. This paper summarizes the methodology used to analyze pilot errors, the lessons learned from the study of altitude deviation errors, and the application of these results for the introduction of advanced technology in nuclear power plants.

  7. Lessons learned from pilot errors using automated systems in advanced technology aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Byers, J.C.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.; Reece, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate pilot errors that occur during interaction with automated systems in advanced technology ( glass cockpit'') aircraft. In particular, we investigated the causes and potential corrective measures for pilot errors that resulted in altitude deviation incidents (i.e. failure to capture or maintain the altitude assigned by air traffic control). To do this, we analyzed altitude deviation events that have been reported in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), NASA's data base of incidents self-reported by pilots and air traffic controllers. We developed models of the pilot tasks that are performed to capture and maintain altitude. Two types of models were developed to provide complementary perspectives of these tasks: sequential models and functional models. Both types of models show the errors that occur in actual altitude deviation events in advanced technology aircraft. Then, errors from the ASRS data base were categorized according to the models, to help understand the potential causes of the different error types. This paper summarizes the methodology used to analyze pilot errors, the lessons learned from the study of altitude deviation errors, and the application of these results for the introduction of advanced technology in nuclear power plants.

  8. Step 1:Human System Integration (HSI) FY05 Pilot-Technology Interface Requirements for Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This document provides definition of technology human interface requirements for Collision Avoidance (CA). This was performed through a review of CA-related, HSI requirements documents, standards, and recommended practices. Technology concepts in use by the Access 5 CA work package were considered... Beginning with the HSI high-level functional requirement for CA, and CA technology elements, HSI requirements for the interface to the pilot were identified. Results of the analysis describe (1) the information required by the pilot to have knowledge CA system status, and (2) the control capability needed by the pilot to obtain CA information and affect an avoidance maneuver. Fundamentally, these requirements provide the candidate CA technology concepts with the necessary human-related elements to make them compatible with human capabilities and limitations. The results of the analysis describe how CA operations and functions should interface with the pilot to provide the necessary CA functionality to the UA-pilot system .Requirements and guidelines for CA are partitioned into four categories: (1) General, (2) Alerting, (3) Guidance, and (4) Cockpit Display of Traffic Information. Each requirement is stated and is supported with a rationale and associated reference(s).

  9. A Preliminary Study of In-House Monte Carlo Simulations: An Integrated Monte Carlo Verification System

    SciTech Connect

    Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Saito, Susumu; Yasunaga, Masayoshi; Takegawa, Hidek; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Numasaki, Hodaka; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To develop an infrastructure for the integrated Monte Carlo verification system (MCVS) to verify the accuracy of conventional dose calculations, which often fail to accurately predict dose distributions, mainly due to inhomogeneities in the patient's anatomy, for example, in lung and bone. Methods and Materials: The MCVS consists of the graphical user interface (GUI) based on a computational environment for radiotherapy research (CERR) with MATLAB language. The MCVS GUI acts as an interface between the MCVS and a commercial treatment planning system to import the treatment plan, create MC input files, and analyze MC output dose files. The MCVS consists of the EGSnrc MC codes, which include EGSnrc/BEAMnrc to simulate the treatment head and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc to calculate the dose distributions in the patient/phantom. In order to improve computation time without approximations, an in-house cluster system was constructed. Results: The phase-space data of a 6-MV photon beam from a Varian Clinac unit was developed and used to establish several benchmarks under homogeneous conditions. The MC results agreed with the ionization chamber measurements to within 1%. The MCVS GUI could import and display the radiotherapy treatment plan created by the MC method and various treatment planning systems, such as RTOG and DICOM-RT formats. Dose distributions could be analyzed by using dose profiles and dose volume histograms and compared on the same platform. With the cluster system, calculation time was improved in line with the increase in the number of central processing units (CPUs) at a computation efficiency of more than 98%. Conclusions: Development of the MCVS was successful for performing MC simulations and analyzing dose distributions.

  10. An automatic dose verification system for adaptive radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiaohu; Chen, Mingli; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    verification system that quantifies treatment doses, and provides necessary information for adaptive planning without impeding clinical workflows.

  11. Integrating Fingerprint Verification into the Smart Card-Based Healthcare Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Daesung; Chung, Yongwha; Pan, Sung Bum; Park, Jin-Won

    2009-12-01

    As VLSI technology has been improved, a smart card employing 32-bit processors has been released, and more personal information such as medical, financial data can be stored in the card. Thus, it becomes important to protect personal information stored in the card. Verification of the card holder's identity using a fingerprint has advantages over the present practices of Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) and passwords. However, the computational workload of fingerprint verification is much heavier than that of the typical PIN-based solution. In this paper, we consider three strategies to implement fingerprint verification in a smart card environment and how to distribute the modules of fingerprint verification between the smart card and the card reader. We first evaluate the number of instructions of each step of a typical fingerprint verification algorithm, and estimate the execution time of several cryptographic algorithms to guarantee the security/privacy of the fingerprint data transmitted in the smart card with the client-server environment. Based on the evaluation results, we analyze each scenario with respect to the security level and the real-time execution requirements in order to implement fingerprint verification in the smart card with the client-server environment.

  12. Dosimetric verification of IMAT delivery with a conventional EPID system and a commercial portal dose image prediction tool

    SciTech Connect

    Iori, Mauro; Cagni, Elisabetta; Paiusco, Marta; Munro, Peter; Nahum, Alan E.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a system for checking the patient setup; as a result of its integration with the linear accelerator and software customized for dosimetry, it is increasingly used for verification of the delivery of fixed-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In order to extend such an approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), the combined use of an EPID system and a portal dose image prediction (PDIP) tool has been investigated. Methods: The dosimetric behavior of an EPID system, mechanically reinforced to maintain its positional stability during the accelerator gantry rotation, has been studied to assess its ability to measure portal dose distributions for IMAT treatment beams. In addition, the PDIP tool of a commercial treatment planning system, commonly used for static IMRT dosimetry, has been validated for simulating the PDIs of IMAT treatment fields. The method has been applied to the delivery verification of 23 treatment fields that were measured in their dual mode of IMRT and IMAT modalities. Results: The EPID system has proved to be appropriate for measuring the PDIs of IMAT fields; additionally the PDIP tool was able to simulate these accurately. The results are quite similar to those obtained for static IMRT treatment verification, although it was necessary to investigate the dependence of the EPID signal and of the accelerator monitor chamber response on variable dose rate. Conclusions: Our initial tests indicate that the EPID system, together with the PDIP tool, is a suitable device for the verification of IMAT plan delivery; however, additional tests are necessary to confirm these results.

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF NITROGEN IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER FROM INDIVIDUAL HOMES, F. R. MAHONEY & ASSOC., AMPHIDROME SYSTEM FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES - 02/05/WQPC-SWP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the F.R. Mahoney Amphidrome System was conducted over a twelve month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC) located at the Otis Air National Guard Base in Borne, MA. Sanitary Sewerage from the base residential housing w...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: JOINT (NSDF-EPA) VERIFICATION STATEMENT AND REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF NITROGEN IN DOMESTIC WASTEWATER FROM INDIVIDUAL HOMES, SEPTITECH, INC. MODEL 400 SYSTEM - 02/04/WQPC-SWP

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the SeptiTech Model 400 System was conducted over a twelve month period at the Massachusetts Alternative Septic System Test Center (MASSTC) located at the Otis Air National Guard Base in Borne, MA. Sanitary Sewerage from the base residential housing was u...

  15. Formal Methods Specification and Verification Guidebook for Software and Computer Systems. Volume 1; Planning and Technology Insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Formal Methods Specification and Verification Guidebook for Software and Computer Systems describes a set of techniques called Formal Methods (FM), and outlines their use in the specification and verification of computer systems and software. Development of increasingly complex systems has created a need for improved specification and verification techniques. NASA's Safety and Mission Quality Office has supported the investigation of techniques such as FM, which are now an accepted method for enhancing the quality of aerospace applications. The guidebook provides information for managers and practitioners who are interested in integrating FM into an existing systems development process. Information includes technical and administrative considerations that must be addressed when establishing the use of FM on a specific project. The guidebook is intended to aid decision makers in the successful application of FM to the development of high-quality systems at reasonable cost. This is the first volume of a planned two-volume set. The current volume focuses on administrative and planning considerations for the successful application of FM.

  16. Operational water management of Rijnland water system and pilot of ensemble forecasting system for flood control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwan, Rene

    2013-04-01

    The Rijnland water system is situated in the western part of the Netherlands, and is a low-lying area of which 90% is below sea-level. The area covers 1,100 square kilometres, where 1.3 million people live, work, travel and enjoy leisure. The District Water Control Board of Rijnland is responsible for flood defence, water quantity and quality management. This includes design and maintenance of flood defence structures, control of regulating structures for an adequate water level management, and waste water treatment. For water quantity management Rijnland uses, besides an online monitoring network for collecting water level and precipitation data, a real time control decision support system. This decision support system consists of deterministic hydro-meteorological forecasts with a 24-hr forecast horizon, coupled with a control module that provides optimal operation schedules for the storage basin pumping stations. The uncertainty of the rainfall forecast is not forwarded in the hydrological prediction. At this moment 65% of the pumping capacity of the storage basin pumping stations can be automatically controlled by the decision control system. Within 5 years, after renovation of two other pumping stations, the total capacity of 200 m3/s will be automatically controlled. In critical conditions there is a need of both a longer forecast horizon and a probabilistic forecast. Therefore ensemble precipitation forecasts of the ECMWF are already consulted off-line during dry-spells, and Rijnland is running a pilot operational system providing 10-day water level ensemble forecasts. The use of EPS during dry-spells and the findings of the pilot will be presented. Challenges and next steps towards on-line implementation of ensemble forecasts for risk-based operational management of the Rijnland water system will be discussed. An important element in that discussion is the question: will policy and decision makers, operator and citizens adapt this Anticipatory Water

  17. Advanced Simulation in Undergraduate Pilot Training: Automatic Instructional System. Final Report for the Period March 1971-January 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faconti, Victor; Epps, Robert

    The Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT) was designed to investigate the role of simulation in the future Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT) program. The Automated Instructional System designed for the ASUPT simulator was described in this report. The development of the Automated Instructional System for ASUPT was based upon…

  18. REDD+ readiness: early insights on monitoring, reporting and verification systems of project developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Shijo; Herold, Martin; Sunderlin, William D.; Verchot, Louis V.

    2013-09-01

    A functional measuring, monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) system is essential to assess the additionality and impact on forest carbon in REDD+ (reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation) projects. This study assesses the MRV capacity and readiness of project developers at 20 REDD+ projects in Brazil, Peru, Cameroon, Tanzania, Indonesia and Vietnam, using a questionnaire survey and field visits. Nineteen performance criteria with 76 indicators were formulated in three categories, and capacity was measured with respect to each category. Of the 20 projects, 11 were found to have very high or high overall MRV capacity and readiness. At the regional level, capacity and readiness tended to be highest in the projects in Brazil and Peru and somewhat lower in Cameroon, Tanzania, Indonesia and Vietnam. Although the MRV capacities of half the projects are high, there are capacity deficiencies in other projects that are a source of concern. These are not only due to limitations in technical expertise, but can also be attributed to the slowness of international REDD+ policy formulation and the unclear path of development of the forest carbon market. Based on the study results, priorities for MRV development and increased investment in readiness are proposed.

  19. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  20. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  1. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  2. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F4 Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-131

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-12-03

    The 1607-F4 waste site is the former location of the sanitary sewer system that serviced the former 115-F Gas Recirculation Building. The system included a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipeline that were in use from 1944 to 1965. The 1607-F4 waste site received unknown amounts of sanitary sewage from the 115-F Gas Recirculation Building and may have potentially contained hazardous and radioactive contamination. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  3. The Naturalistic Flight Deck System: An Integrated System Concept for Improved Single-Pilot Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul C.; Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Cox, David E.; Jackson, Bruce; Palmer, Michael T.; Pope, Alan T.; Schlecht, Robin W.; Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Trujillo, Anna C.; Williams, Ralph A.; Kinney, J. Bryan; Barry, John S., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews current and emerging operational experiences, technologies, and human-machine interaction theories to develop an integrated flight system concept designed to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of single-pilot operations in an increasingly accommodating but stringent national airspace system. This concept, know as the Naturalistic Flight Deck (NFD), uses a form of human-centered automation known as complementary-automation (or complemation) to structure the relationship between the human operator and the aircraft as independent, collaborative agents having complimentary capabilities. The human provides commonsense knowledge, general intelligence, and creative thinking, while the machine contributes specialized intelligence and control, extreme vigilance, resistance to fatigue, and encyclopedic memory. To support the development of the NFD, an initial Concept of Operations has been created and selected normal and non-normal scenarios are presented in this document.

  4. Complexity of analysis and verification problems for communicating automata and discrete dynamical systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, H. B.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Barrett, C. L.; Marathe, M. V.; Ravi, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    We identify several simple but powerful concepts, techniques, and results; and we use them to characterize the complexities of a number of basic problems II, that arise in the analysis and verification of the following models M of communicating automata and discrete dynamical systems: systems of communicating automata including both finite and infinite cellular automata, transition systems, discrete dynamical systems, and succinctly-specified finite automata. These concepts, techniques, and results are centered on the following: (1) reductions Of STATE-REACHABILITY problems, especially for very simple systems of communicating copies of a single simple finite automaton, (2) reductions of generalized CNF satisfiability problems [Sc78], especially to very simple communicating systems of copies of a few basic acyclic finite sequential machines, and (3) reductions of the EMPTINESS and EMPTINESS-OF-INTERSECTION problems, for several kinds of regular set descriptors. For systems of communicating automata and transition systems, the problems studied include: all equivalence relations and simulation preorders in the Linear-time/Branching-time hierarchies of equivalence relations and simulation preorders of [vG90, vG93], both without and with the hiding abstraction. For discrete dynamical systems, the problems studied include the INITIAL and BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS (denoted IVPs and BVPs, respectively), for nonlinear difference equations over many different algebraic structures, e.g. all unitary rings, all finite unitary semirings, and all lattices. For succinctly specified finite automata, the problems studied also include the several problems studied in [AY98], e.g. the EMPTINESS, EMPTINESS-OF-INTERSECTION, EQUIVALENCE and CONTAINMENT problems. The concepts, techniques, and results presented unify and significantly extend many of the known results in the literature, e.g. [Wo86, Gu89, BPT91, GM92, Ra92, HT94, SH+96, AY98, AKY99, RH93, SM73, Hu73, HRS76, HR78], for

  5. COMPLEXITY OF ANALYSIS & VERIFICATION PROBLEMS FOR COMMUNICATING AUTOMATA & DISCRETE DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. HUNT; D. J. ROSENKRANTS; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    We identify several simple but powerful concepts, techniques, and results; and we use them to characterize the complexities of a number of basic problems II, that arise in the analysis and verification of the following models M of communicating automata and discrete dynamical systems: systems of communicating automata including both finite and infinite cellular automata, transition systems, discrete dynamical systems, and succinctly-specified finite automata. These concepts, techniques, and results are centered on the following: (i) reductions Of STATE-REACHABILITY problems, especially for very simple systems of communicating copies of a single simple finite automaton, (ii) reductions of generalized CNF satisfiability problems [Sc78], especially to very simple communicating systems of copies of a few basic acyclic finite sequential machines, and (iii) reductions of the EMPTINESS and EMPTINESS-OF-INTERSECTION problems, for several kinds of regular set descriptors. For systems of communicating automata and transition systems, the problems studied include: all equivalence relations and simulation preorders in the Linear-time/Branching-time hierarchies of equivalence relations and simulation preorders of [vG90, vG93], both without and with the hiding abstraction. For discrete dynamical systems, the problems studied include the INITIAL and BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS (denoted IVPs and BVPS, respectively), for nonlinear difference equations over many different algebraic structures, e.g. all unitary rings, all finite unitary semirings, and all lattices. For succinctly-specified finite automata, the problems studied also include the several problems studied in [AY98], e.g. the EMPTINESS, EMPTINESS-OF-INTERSECTION, EQUIVALENCE and CONTAINMENT problems. The concepts, techniques, and results presented unify and significantly extend many of the known results in the literature, e.g. [Wo86, Gu89, BPT91, GM92, Ra92, HT94, SH+96, AY98, AKY99, RH93, SM73, Hu73, HRS76, HR78], for

  6. Pilot/Controller Coordinated Decision Making in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Miller, Ronald c.; Orasanu, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: NextGen technologies promise to provide considerable benefits in terms of enhancing operations and improving safety. However, there needs to be a thorough human factors evaluation of the way these systems will change the way in which pilot and controllers share information. The likely impact of these new technologies on pilot/controller coordinated decision making is considered in this paper using the "operational, informational and evaluative disconnect" framework. Method: Five participant focus groups were held. Participants were four experts in human factors, between x and x research students and a technical expert. The participant focus group evaluated five key NextGen technologies to identify issues that made different disconnects more or less likely. Results: Issues that were identified were: Decision Making will not necessarily improve because pilots and controllers possess the same information; Having a common information source does not mean pilots and controllers are looking at the same information; High levels of automation may lead to disconnects between the technology and pilots/controllers; Common information sources may become the definitive source for information; Overconfidence in the automation may lead to situations where appropriate breakdowns are not initiated. Discussion: The issues that were identified lead to recommendations that need to be considered in the development of NextGen technologies. The current state of development of these technologies provides a good opportunity to utilize recommendations at an early stage so that NextGen technologies do not lead to difficulties in resolving breakdowns in coordinated decision making.

  7. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and

  8. Verification and Validation of NASA-Supported Enhancements to the Near Real Time Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Hall, Calllie; McPherson, Terry; Spiering, Bruce; Brown, Richard; Estep, Lee; Lunde, Bruce; Guest, DeNeice; Navard, Andy; Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    This report discusses verification and validation (V&V) assessment of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ocean data products contributed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Applied Coherent Technologies (ACT) Corporation to National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration s (NOAA) Near Real Time (NRT) Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS). HABSOS is a maturing decision support tool (DST) used by NOAA and its partners involved with coastal and public health management.

  9. SFO compensation by pilot-aided channel estimation for real-time DDO-OFDM system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Rui; He, Jing; Chen, Ming; Chen, Lin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrated a pilot-aided and linear interpolated channel estimation technique in the real-time direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) system using a cost-effective directly modulated laser (DML). It has been verified that the pilot-aided and linear interpolated channel estimation technique can help to compensate the sampling frequency offset (SFO) effect. The experimental results show that, based on the pilot-aided and linear interpolated channel estimation technique, even at a SFO of 170 ppm, a 16-QAM-OFDM signal can be successfully transmitted over 100-km SSMF under the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold with a bit error rate of 3.8×10-3. And the effect of up to ~25 ppm SFO can be negligible.

  10. Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, Scott F.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

  11. A Pilot Study of Integrated Listening Systems for Children with Sensory Processing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Sarah A.; Miller, Lucy J.; Sullivan, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study explored the effects of Integrated Listening Systems (iLs) Focus Series on individualized parent goals for children with sensory processing impairments. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline, repeated measure across participants, single-case study design was employed (n = 7). The 40-session intervention was delivered at home and in…

  12. REBURNING THERMAL AND CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL PILOT-SCALE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes an experimental investigation of the thermal and chemical processes influencing NOx reduction by natural gas reburning in a two-dimensional pilot-scale combustion system. Reburning effectiveness for initial NOx levels of 50-500 ppm and reburn stoichiometric ra...

  13. SHIRCO PILOT-SCALE INFRARED INCINERATION SYSTEM AT THE ROSE TOWNSHIP DEMODE ROAD SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation or SITE Program, an evaluation was made of the Shirco Pilot-Scale Infrared Incineration System during 17 separate test runs under varying operating conditions. The tests were conducted at the Demode Road Superfund site in Ros...

  14. Pasteurization of strawberry puree using a pilot plant pulsed electric fields (PEF) system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The processing of strawberry puree by pulsed electric fields (PEF) in a pilot plant system has never been evaluated. In addition, a method does not exist to validate the exact number and shape of the pulses applied during PEF processing. Both buffered peptone water (BPW) and fresh strawberry puree (...

  15. SYSTEMS RELIABILITY AND PERFORMANCE: PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF CHLORINATED BENZENES AT THE COMBUSTION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of 34 test burns was conducted between August 1983 and January 1984 in the pilot-scale rotary kiln incineration system at the USEPA Combustion Research Facility (CRF), using chlorinated benzenes as surrogate Principal Organic Hazardous Components (POHCs), over a range of...

  16. Pilot Clinical Application of an Adaptive Robotic System for Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekele, Esubalew; Crittendon, Julie A.; Swanson, Amy; Sarkar, Nilanjan; Warren, Zachary E.

    2014-01-01

    It has been argued that clinical applications of advanced technology may hold promise for addressing impairments associated with autism spectrum disorders. This pilot feasibility study evaluated the application of a novel adaptive robot-mediated system capable of both administering and automatically adjusting joint attention prompts to a small…

  17. Piloting a Web-Based Homework System in Developmental Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dass, Wendi E.

    2012-01-01

    This Capstone project studied a pilot of the web-based homework system "Hawkes" in developmental mathematics classes at a mid-sized community college. The purpose of the study was to investigate how three instructors of developmental mathematics courses incorporated "Hawkes" in their classes, what obstacles they encountered,…

  18. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH, ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) (ATMOSPHERIC PROTECTION BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program consists of pilot projects, one of which is climate change technology verification. ETV was established on the assumption that numerous technologies suitable for mitigating a variety of environmental problems are currently...

  19. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  20. Continuous verification using multimodal biometrics.

    PubMed

    Sim, Terence; Zhang, Sheng; Janakiraman, Rajkumar; Kumar, Sandeep

    2007-04-01

    Conventional verification systems, such as those controlling access to a secure room, do not usually require the user to reauthenticate himself for continued access to the protected resource. This may not be sufficient for high-security environments in which the protected resource needs to be continuously monitored for unauthorized use. In such cases, continuous verification is needed. In this paper, we present the theory, architecture, implementation, and performance of a multimodal biometrics verification system that continuously verifies the presence of a logged-in user. Two modalities are currently used--face and fingerprint--but our theory can be readily extended to include more modalities. We show that continuous verification imposes additional requirements on multimodal fusion when compared to conventional verification systems. We also argue that the usual performance metrics of false accept and false reject rates are insufficient yardsticks for continuous verification and propose new metrics against which we benchmark our system. PMID:17299225