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1

A systematic review of publications studies on medical tourism  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Medical tourism for any study area is complex. Materials and Methods: Using full articles from other databases, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Science Direct, Emerald, Oxford, Magiran, and Scientific Information Database (SID), to examine systematically published articles about medical tourism in the interval 2000-2011 paid. Articles were obtained using descriptive statistics and content analysis categories were analyzed. Results: Among the 28 articles reviewed, 11 cases were a kind of research articles, three cases were case studies in Mexico, India, Hungary, Germany, and Iran, and 14 were case studies, review documents and data were passed. The main topics of study included the definition of medical tourism, medical tourists’ motivation and development of medical tourism, ethical issues in medical tourism, and impact on health and medical tourism marketing. Conclusion: The findings indicate the definition of medical tourism in various articles, and medical tourists are motivated. However, most studies indicate the benefits of medical tourism in developing countries and more developed countries reflect the consequences of medical tourism. PMID:24251287

Masoud, Ferdosi; Alireza, Jabbari; Mahmoud, Keyvanara; Zahra, Agharahimi

2013-01-01

2

Optimizing Medication Adherence in Older Patients: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective: To review the literature on strategies to optimize medication adherence in community-dwelling older adults and to make recommendations for clinical practice. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and EMBASE databases for randomized controlled trials examining strategies to optimize medication adherence in patients aged 65 or older prescribed long-term medication regimens. Additional studies were found by examining the reference lists of systematic reviews and selected papers. 34 papers reporting on 33 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in this review. Results: Improvement in adherence was mixed across the studies examining educational interventions, with only 12 of the 28 studies showing improvement in adherence; most were delivered by pharmacists. Effect sizes for the statistically significant educational interventions ranged from Cohen's d = 0.14 to 4.93. Four of the 5 interventions using memory aids and cues, some in conjunction with newer technologies, improved adherence. Effect sizes for the statistically significant interventions using memory aids and cues ranged from Cohen's d = 0.26 to 2.72. Conclusion: The evidence from this review does not clearly support one single intervention to optimize medication adherence in older patients. Future studies should explore suggestive strategies, such as tailored interventions involving ongoing contact, and should endeavor to correct methodologic weaknesses found in the literature. PMID:19424450

Schlenk, Elizabeth A.; Bernardo, Lisa Marie; Organist, Linda A.; Klem, Mary Lou; Engberg, Sandra

2009-01-01

3

Medical students as peer tutors: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background While Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) has long occurred informally in medical education, in the past ten years, there has been increasing international interest in formally organised PAL, with many benefits for both the students and institutions. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to establish why and how PAL has been implemented, focussing on the recruitment and training process for peer tutors, the benefits for peer tutors, and the competency of peer tutors. Method A literature search was conducted in three electronic databases. Selection of titles and abstracts were made based on pre-determined eligibility criteria. We utilized the ‘AMEE Peer assisted learning: a planning and implementation framework: AMEE Guide no. 30’ to assist us in establishing the review aims in a systematic review of the literature between 2002 and 2012. Six key questions were developed and used in our analysis of particular aspects of PAL programs within medical degree programs. Results We found nineteen articles that satisfied our inclusion criteria. The PAL activities fell into three broad categories of teacher training, peer teaching and peer assessment. Variability was found in the reporting of tutor recruitment and training processes, tutor outcomes, and tutor competencies. Conclusion Results from this review suggest that there are many perceived learning benefits for student tutors. However, there were mixed results regarding the accuracy of peer assessment and feedback, and no substantial evidence to conclude that participation as a peer tutor improves one’s own examination performance. Further research into PAL in medicine is required if we are to better understand the relative impact and benefits for student tutors. PMID:24912500

2014-01-01

4

Physical activity counseling in medical school education: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Despite a large evidence base to demonstrate the health benefits of regular physical activity (PA), few physicians incorporate PA counseling into office visits. Inadequate medical training has been cited as a cause for this. This review describes curricular components and assesses the effectiveness of programs that have reported outcomes of PA counseling education in medical schools. Methods The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and ERIC databases for articles published in English from 2000 through 2012 that met PICOS inclusion criteria of medical school programs with PA counseling skill development and evaluation of outcomes. An initial search yielded 1944 citations, and 11 studies representing 10 unique programs met criteria for this review. These studies were described and analyzed for study quality. Strength of evidence for six measured outcomes shared by multiple studies was also evaluated, that is, students’ awareness of benefits of PA, change in students’ attitudes toward PA, change in personal PA behaviors, improvements in PA counseling knowledge and skills, self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling, and change in attitude toward PA counseling. Results Considerable heterogeneity of teaching methods, duration, and placement within the curriculum was noted. Weak research designs limited an optimal evaluation of effectiveness, that is, few provided pre-/post-intervention assessments, and/or included control comparisons, or met criteria for intervention transparency and control for risk of bias. The programs with the most evidence of improvement indicated positive changes in students’ attitudes toward PA, their PA counseling knowledge and skills, and their self-efficacy to conduct PA counseling. These programs were most likely to follow previous recommendations to include experiential learning, theoretically based frameworks, and students’ personal PA behaviors. Conclusions Current results provide some support for previous recommendations, and current initiatives are underway that build upon these. However, evidence of improvements in physician practices and patient outcomes is lacking. Recommendations include future directions for curriculum development and more rigorous research designs. PMID:25062944

Dacey, Marie L.; Kennedy, Mary A.; Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M.

2014-01-01

5

A systematic review of self-medication practices among adolescents.  

PubMed

The purpose was to systematically review the global trends and factors influencing self-medication (SM) among adolescents. Databases (Medline/Pubmed, Ingenta, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINAHL, Proquest, Scopus, and Google Scholar) were searched for peer-reviewed research published between January 2000 and December 2013 on SM among adolescents aged 13-18 years. Articles were scrutinized for country of origin, sample size, recall period, prevalence rates and associations, influencing factors, medicines used, self-medicated health complaints, sources of drug information, recommendation and procurement, knowledge about medicines, and adverse drug reactions. One hundred and sixty-three publications met the inclusion criteria. SM prevalence ranged from 2% to 92% in different countries. The most frequently self-medicated over-the-counter and prescription-only medicines were analgesics and antibiotics, respectively. Headache, allergies, and fever were the most common self-medicated health complaints reported. Misuse of both over-the-counter and prescription-only medicines reflected a risky trend. Female gender, older age, maternal education, and familial practices were associated with SM among adolescents. The primary sources of drug information, recommendation, and procurement included pharmacists, parents, and friends. High-risk practices such as diversion of prescription medicines and utilization of previous prescriptions were also reported. Most studies revealed gaps in drug knowledge, although adolescents self-rated it as satisfactory. However, few adverse drug reactions were reported, probably because of lack of awareness about the potential harmful effects of medicines. Recommendations for "responsible SM" have been made to minimize the adverse effects of SM. Understanding the links between various factors promoting SM can be helpful in deriving strategies aimed at reducing drug-related health risks among adolescents. Moreover, these will aid in creating awareness among adolescents about the potential risks of using drugs without proper information and consultation. Studies need to be designed to assess the changing trend and identify new correlates of self-medication practices among adolescents, which pose fresh challenges to monitor the menace. PMID:25245937

Shehnaz, Syed Ilyas; Agarwal, Anoop Kumar; Khan, Nelofer

2014-10-01

6

Barcode Medication Administration System (BCMA) Errors A Systematic Review Rupa Mitra1  

E-print Network

Barcode Medication Administration System (BCMA) Errors ­ A Systematic Review Rupa Mitra1 1 IU School of Informatics Implementation of Barcode Medication Administration (BCMA) improves the accuracy of administration of medication. These systems can improve medication safety by ensuring that correct medication

Zhou, Yaoqi

7

Chapter 4: effective search strategies for systematic reviews of medical tests.  

PubMed

This article discusses techniques that are appropriate when developing search strategies for systematic reviews of medical tests. This includes general advice for searching for systematic reviews and issues specific to systematic reviews of medical tests. Diagnostic search filters are currently not sufficiently developed for use when searching for systematic reviews. Instead, authors should construct a highly sensitive search strategy that uses both controlled vocabulary and text words. A comprehensive search should include multiple databases and sources of grey literature. A list of subject-specific databases is included in this article. PMID:22648672

Relevo, Rose

2012-06-01

8

Disaster-Driven Evacuation and Medication Loss: a Systematic Literature Review  

PubMed Central

AIM: The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify the extent and implications of medication loss and the burden of prescription refill on medical relief teams following extreme weather events and other natural hazards. METHOD: The search strategy followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Key health journal databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Maternity and Infant Care, and Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC)) were searched via the OvidSP search engine. Search terms were identified by consulting MeSH terms. The inclusion criteria comprised articles published from January 2003 to August 2013, written in English and containing an abstract. The exclusion criteria included abstracts for conferences or dissertations, book chapters and articles written in a language other than English. A total of 70 articles which fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in this systematic review. RESULTS: All relevant information was collated regarding medication loss, prescription loss and refills, and medical aids loss which indicated a significant burden on the medical relief teams. Data also showed the difficulty in filling prescriptions due to lack of information from the evacuees. People with chronic conditions are most at risk when their medication is not available. This systematic review also showed that medical aids such as eye glasses, hearing aids as well as dental treatment are a high necessity among evacuees. DISCUSSION: This systematic review revealed that a considerable number of patients lose their medication during evacuation, many lose essential medical aids such as insulin pens and many do not bring prescriptions with them when evacuated.. Since medication loss is partly a responsibility of evacuees, understanding the impact of medication loss may lead to raising awareness and better preparations among the patients and health care professionals. People who are not prepared could have worse outcomes and many risk dying when their medication is not available. PMID:25642363

Ochi, Sae; Hodgson, Susan; Landeg, Owen; Mayner, Lidia; Murray, Virginia

2014-01-01

9

The value of medical history taking as risk indicator for tuboperitoneal pathology: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guidelines recommend diagnostic laparoscopy in subfertile women with known co-morbidities in their medical history. Aggregated evidence underpinning these recommendations is, however, currently lacking. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence on the association between items reported during medical history taking and tuboperitoneal pathology. MEDLINE (from 1966 to May 2007), EMBASE

FY Luttjeboer; HR Verhoeve; HJ van Dessel; Veen van der F; Mol de B; SFPJ Coppus

2009-01-01

10

A systematic review of interventions to enhance medication adherence in children and adolescents with chronic illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionPoor medication adherence is common in children and adolescents with chronic illness, but there is uncertainty about the best way to enhance medication adherence in this group. The authors conducted a systematic review of controlled trials examining interventions that aim to improve medication adherence.MethodA comprehensive literature search was undertaken to locate controlled trials that described specific interventions aiming to improve

Angela J Dean; Julie Walters; Anthony Hall

2010-01-01

11

Interventions to improve adherence and persistence with osteoporosis medications: a systematic literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Adherence and persistence with osteoporosis medications are poor. We conducted a systematic literature review of interventions\\u000a to improve adherence and persistence with osteoporosis medications. Seven studies met eligibility requirements and were included\\u000a in the review. Few interventions were efficacious, and no clear trends regarding successful intervention techniques were identified.\\u000a However, periodic follow-up interaction between patients and health professionals appeared to

T. Gleeson; M. D. Iversen; J. Avorn; A. M. Brookhart; J. N. Katz; E. Losina; F. May; A. R. Patrick; W. H. Shrank; D. H. Solomon

2009-01-01

12

A Systematic Review of Adherence With Medications for Diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE — The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which patients omit doses of medications prescribed for diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS — A literature search (1966 -2003) was per- formed to identify reports with quantitative data on adherence with oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) and insulin and correlations between adherence rates and glycemic control. Adequate documentation

JOYCE A. CRAMER

2004-01-01

13

Overriding parents' medical decisions for their children: a systematic review of normative literature.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the ethical literature on conflicts between health professionals and parents about medical decision-making for children. We present the results of a systematic review which addressed the question 'when health professionals and parents disagree about the appropriate course of medical treatment for a child,under what circumstances is the health professional ethically justified in overriding the parents' wishes?’ We identified nine different ethical frameworks that were put forward by their authors as applicable across various ages and clinical scenarios. Each of these frameworks centred on a different key moral concept including harm,constrained parental autonomy, best interests, medically reasonable alternatives, responsible thinking and rationality. PMID:23824967

McDougall, Rosalind J; Notini, Lauren

2014-07-01

14

Prevalence of self-medication for skin diseases: a systematic review*  

PubMed Central

Self-medication is the selection and use of drugs without medical prescription, to treat diseases or for symptomatic relief. This article is a systematic review on self-medication in skin diseases. A search was conducted on Virtual Health Library and PubMed databases using predetermined descriptors. Two researchers performed the article selection process independently, with the degree of inter-observer agreement measured by the kappa index. The prevalence of self-medication ranged from 6.0 to 45.0%. Topical corticosteroids were the most commonly used therapeutic strategies for self-medication, as found in the reviewed articles. This study revealed that published data on self-medication in dermatology are scarce, although the findings showed that it was a common practice.

Corrêa-Fissmer, Mariane; Mendonça, Mariana Gaspar; Martins, Anesio Henrique; Galato, Dayani

2014-01-01

15

Factors Associated With Non-Adherence to Oral Medication for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:Adherence is generally associated with improved treatment outcomes. Risk factors for non-adherence must be understood to improve adherence. A systematic review was undertaken to determine which variables were consistently associated with non-adherence to oral medication in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).METHODS:The databases EMBASE, Medline, and PsycINFO were searched for titles relating to adherence, medication, and IBD (1980–2008). Primary, quantitative studies were

C A Jackson; J Clatworthy; A Robinson; Rob Horne

2010-01-01

16

The Effect of Electronic Prescribing on Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Events: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this systematic review is to analyse the relative risk reduction on medication error and adverse drug events (ADE) by computerized physician order entry systems (CPOE). We included controlled field studies and pretest-posttest studies, evaluating all types of CPOE systems, drugs and clinical settings. We present the results in evidence tables, calculate the risk ratio with 95% confidence

ELSKE AMMENWERTH; PETRA SCHNELL-INDERST; CHRISTOF MACHAN; UWE SIEBERT

2008-01-01

17

Attitudes of Medical Students toward Psychiatry and Psychiatry as a Career: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The discipline of psychiatry, and psychiatry as a career option, have been negatively regarded by medical students for decades. There is a large amount of literature on attitudes of students and the factors that attract them to and detract from psychiatry. The aim of this article is to systematically review this literature from 1990 to…

Lyons, Zaza

2013-01-01

18

The Impact of Medical Interpreter Services on the Quality of Health Care: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-one million Americans are limited in English proficiency (LEP), but little is known about the effect of medical interpreter services on health care quality. A systematic literature review was conducted on the impact of interpreter services on quality of care. Five database searches yielded 2,640 citations and a final database of 36 articles, after applying exclusion criteria. Multiple studies document

Glenn Flores

2005-01-01

19

Inappropriateness of Medication Prescriptions to Elderly Patients in the Primary Care Setting: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Inappropriate medication prescription is a common cause of preventable adverse drug events among elderly persons in the primary care setting. Objective The aim of this systematic review is to quantify the extent of inappropriate prescription to elderly persons in the primary care setting. Methods We systematically searched Ovid-Medline and Ovid-EMBASE from 1950 and 1980 respectively to March 2012. Two independent reviewers screened and selected primary studies published in English that measured (in)appropriate medication prescription among elderly persons (>65 years) in the primary care setting. We extracted data sources, instruments for assessing medication prescription appropriateness, and the rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions. We grouped the reported individual medications according to the Anatomical Therapeutic and Chemical (ATC) classification and compared the median rate of inappropriate medication prescription and its range within each therapeutic class. Results We included 19 studies, 14 of which used the Beers criteria as the instrument for assessing appropriateness of prescriptions. The median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions (IMP) was 20.5% [IQR 18.1 to 25.6%.]. Medications with largest median rate of inappropriate medication prescriptions were propoxyphene 4.52(0.10–23.30)%, doxazosin 3.96 (0.32 15.70)%, diphenhydramine 3.30(0.02–4.40)% and amitriptiline 3.20 (0.05–20.5)% in a decreasing order of IMP rate. Available studies described unequal sets of medications and different measurement tools to estimate the overall prevalence of inappropriate prescription. Conclusions Approximately one in five prescriptions to elderly persons in primary care is inappropropriate despite the attention that has been directed to quality of prescription. Diphenhydramine and amitriptiline are the most common inappropriately prescribed medications with high risk adverse events while propoxyphene and doxazoxin are the most commonly prescribed medications with low risk adverse events. These medications are good candidates for being targeted for improvement e.g. by computerized clinical decision support. PMID:22928004

Opondo, Dedan; Eslami, Saied; Visscher, Stefan; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Verheij, Robert; Korevaar, Joke C.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

2012-01-01

20

Incidence of medication errors and adverse drug events in the ICU: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMedication errors (MEs) and adverse drug events (ADEs) are both common and under-reported in the intensive care setting. The definitions of these terms vary substantially in the literature. Many methods have been used to estimate their incidence.MethodsA systematic review was done to assess methods used for tracking unintended drug events in intensive care units (ICUs). Studies published up to 22

Amanda Wilmer; Kimberley Louie; Peter Dodek; Hubert Wong; Najib Ayas

2010-01-01

21

The Impact of Social Media on Medical Professionalism: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Challenges and Opportunities  

PubMed Central

Background The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full spectrum of (1) social media–related challenges imposed on medical professionalism and (2) social media–related opportunities to both undermine and improve medical professionalism. Objective The aim of this systematic qualitative review is to present this full spectrum of social media–related challenges and opportunities. Methods We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed (restricted to English and German literature published between 2002 and 2011) for papers that address social media–related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. To operationalize “medical professionalism”, we refer to the 10 commitments presented in the physicians’ charter “Medical professionalism in the new millennium” published by the ABIM Foundation. We applied qualitative text analysis to categorize the spectrum of social media–related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. Results The literature review retrieved 108 references, consisting of 46 original research studies and 62 commentaries, editorials, or opinion papers. All references together mentioned a spectrum of 23 broad and 12 further-specified, narrow categories for social media–related opportunities (n=10) and challenges (n=13) for medical professionalism, grouped under the 10 commitments of the physicians’ charter. Conclusions The accommodation of the traditional core values of medicine to the characteristics of social media presents opportunities as well as challenges for medical professionalism. As a profession that is entitled to self-regulation, health care professionals should proactively approach these challenges and seize the opportunities. There should be room to foster interprofessional and intergenerational dialogue (and eventually guidelines and policies) on both challenges and opportunities of social media in modern health care. This review builds a unique source of information that can inform further research and policy development in this regard. PMID:23985172

Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina

2013-01-01

22

Reflective writing and its impact on empathy in medical education: systematic review  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Medical schools are increasingly aware of the ways in which physician empathy can have a profound impact on patients’ lives and have developed humanities initiatives to address this concern. Reflective writing in particular is more commonly promoted in medical curricula, but there is limited research on the impact of reflective writing on medical student empathy levels. It aims to find the emotional effects of reflective writing interventions on medical and healthcare students by systemic review. Methods: Two investigators independently reviewed educational publications for critical analysis. This review focused systematically on quantitative papers that measure the impact of reflective writing on empathy. Results: Of the 1,032 studies found on Medline and CINAHL, only 8 used quantitative measures pre- and postwritten reflection to measure any impact on empathy outcomes. The outcomes measured included impact of reflective writing exercises on student wellness, aptitude, and/or clinical skills. Of these studies, a significant change in student empathy was observed in 100% of the studies, demonstrating a significant change in outcomes. Conclusion: Although the lack of homogeneity in outcome measurement in the literature limits possible conclusion from this review, the overwhelmingly positive reporting of outcomes suggests that reflective writing should be considered in any medical curriculum. PMID:25112448

2014-01-01

23

Confounding factors in using upward feedback to assess the quality of medical training: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Upward feedback is becoming more widely used in medical training as a means of quality control. Multiple biases exist, thus the accuracy of upward feedback is debatable. This study aims to identify factors that could influence upward feedback, especially in medical training. Methods: A systematic review using a structured search strategy was performed. Thirty-five databases were searched. Results were reviewed and relevant abstracts were shortlisted. All studies in English, both medical and non-medical literature, were included. A simple pro-forma was used initially to identify the pertinent areas of upward feedback, so that a focused pro-forma could be designed for data extraction. Results: A total of 204 articles were reviewed. Most studies on upward feedback bias were evaluative studies and only covered Kirkpatrick level 1-reaction. Most studies evaluated trainers or training, were used for formative purposes and presented quantitative data. Accountability and confidentiality were the most common overt biases, whereas method of feedback was the most commonly implied bias within articles. Conclusion: Although different types of bias do exist, upward feedback does have a role in evaluating medical training. Accountability and confidentiality were the most common biases. Further research is required to evaluate which types of bias are associated with specific survey characteristics and which are potentially modifiable. PMID:25112445

2014-01-01

24

The use of medications approved for Alzheimer's disease in autism spectrum disorder: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects 1 in 68 children in the United States. Even though it is a common disorder, only two medications (risperidone and aripiprazole) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat symptoms associated with ASD. However, these medications are approved to treat irritability, which is not a core symptom of ASD. A number of novel medications, which have not been approved by the FDA to treat ASD have been used off-label in some studies to treat ASD symptoms, including medications approved for Alzheimer's disease. Interestingly, some of these studies are high-quality, double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) studies. This article systematically reviews studies published through April, 2014, which examined the use of Alzheimer's medications in ASD, including donepezil (seven studies, two were DBPC, five out of seven reported improvements), galantamine (four studies, two were DBPC, all reported improvements), rivastigmine (one study reporting improvements), tacrine (one study reporting improvements), and memantine (nine studies, one was DBPC, eight reported improvements). An evidence-based scale was used to rank each medication. Collectively, these studies reported improvements in expressive language and communication, receptive language, social interaction, irritability, hyperactivity, attention, eye contact, emotional lability, repetitive or self-stimulatory behaviors, motor planning, disruptive behaviors, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, lethargy, overall ASD behaviors, and increased REM sleep. Reported side effects are reviewed and include irritability, gastrointestinal problems, verbal or behavioral regression, headaches, irritability, rash, tremor, sedation, vomiting, and speech problems. Both galantamine and memantine had sufficient evidence ranking for improving both core and associated symptoms of ASD. Given the lack of medications approved to treat ASD, further studies on novel medications, including Alzheimer's disease medications, are needed. PMID:25202686

Rossignol, Daniel A; Frye, Richard E

2014-01-01

25

Medical device procurement in low- and middle-income settings: protocol for a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Medical device procurement processes for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are a poorly understood and researched topic. To support LMIC policy formulation in this area, international public health organizations and research institutions issue a large body of predominantly grey literature including guidelines, manuals and recommendations. We propose to undertake a systematic review to identify and explore the medical device procurement methodologies suggested within this and further literature. Procurement facilitators and barriers will be identified, and methodologies for medical device prioritization under resource constraints will be discussed. Methods/design Searches of both bibliographic and grey literature will be conducted to identify documents relating to the procurement of medical devices in LMICs. Data will be extracted according to protocol on a number of pre-specified issues and variables. First, data relating to the specific settings described within the literature will be noted. Second, information relating to medical device procurement methodologies will be extracted, including prioritization of procurement under resource constraints, the use of evidence (e.g. cost-effectiveness evaluations, burden of disease data) as well as stakeholders participating in procurement processes. Information relating to prioritization methodologies will be extracted in the form of quotes or keywords, and analysis will include qualitative meta-summary. Narrative synthesis will be employed to analyse data otherwise extracted. The PRISMA guidelines for reporting will be followed. Discussion The current review will identify recommended medical device procurement methodologies for LMICs. Prioritization methods for medical device acquisition will be explored. Relevant stakeholders, facilitators and barriers will be discussed. The review is aimed at both LMIC decision makers and the international research community and hopes to offer a first holistic conceptualization of this topic. PMID:25336161

2014-01-01

26

Telephone-based motivational interviewing for medication adherence: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Adherence to prescribed medications continues to be a problem in the treatment of chronic disease. Motivational interviewing (MI) has been shown to be successful for eliciting patients' motivations to change their medication-taking behaviors. Due to the constraints of the US healthcare system, patients do not always have in-person access to providers. Because of this, there is increasing use of non-traditional healthcare delivery methods such as telephonic counseling. A systematic review was conducted among published studies of telephone-based MI interventions aimed at improving the health behavior change target of medication adherence. The goals of this review were to (1) examine and describe evidence and gaps in the literature for telephonically delivered MI interventions for medication adherence and (2) discuss the implications of the findings for research and practice. The MEDLINE, CINAHL, psycINFO, psycARTICLES, Academic Search Premier, Alt HealthWatch, Health Source: Consumer Edition, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition databases were searched for peer-reviewed research publications between 1991 and October 2012. A total of nine articles were retained for review. The quality of the studies and the interventions varied significantly, which precluded making definitive conclusions but findings among a majority of retained studies suggest that telephone-based MI may help improve medication adherence. The included studies provided promising results and justification for continued exploration in the provision of MI via telephone encounters. Future research is needed to address gaps in the current literature but the results suggest that MI may be an efficient option for healthcare professionals seeking an evidence-based method to reach remote or inaccessible patients to help them improve their medication adherence. PMID:25584086

Teeter, Benjamin S; Kavookjian, Jan

2014-12-01

27

Medication reviews for nursing home residents to reduce mortality and hospitalization: systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Aims Medication reviews by a third party have been introduced as a method to improve drug treatment in older people. We assessed whether this intervention reduces mortality and hospitalization for nursing home residents. Methods Systematic literature searches were performed (from January 1990 to June 2012) in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Sources and Health Technology Assessment databases. We included randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-RCTs) of medication reviews compared with standard care or other types of medication reviews in nursing home residents. The outcome variables were mortality and hospitalization. Study quality was assessed systematically. We performed meta-analyses using random-effects models. Results Seven RCTs and five non-RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The mean age of included patients varied between 78 and 86 years. They were treated with a mean of 4–12 drugs. The study quality was assessed as high (n = 1), moderate (n = 4) or low (n = 7). Eight studies compared medication reviews with standard care. In six of them, pharmacists were involved in the intervention. Meta-analyses of RCTs revealed a risk ratio (RR) for mortality of 1.03 [medication reviews vs. standard care; five trials; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–1.23]. The corresponding RR for hospitalization was 1.07 (two trials; 95% CI 0.61–1.87). Conclusions Our findings indicate that medication reviews for nursing home residents do not reduce mortality or hospitalization. More research in the setting of controlled trials remains to be done in order to clarify how drug treatment can be optimized for these patients. PMID:24548138

Wallerstedt, Susanna M; Kindblom, Jenny M; Nylén, Karin; Samuelsson, Ola; Strandell, Annika

2014-01-01

28

Maternal use of antidepressant or anxiolytic medication during pregnancy and childhood neurodevelopmental outcomes: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Antidepressant and anxiolytic medications are widely prescribed and used by pregnant women for acute and maintenance therapy. These drugs are able to pass the placental barrier, and may potentially influence fetal and brain development. It is possible that exposure to prenatal antidepressants or anxiolytic medication may disturb neurotransmitter systems in the brain and have long-lasting consequences on neurodevelopment in the offspring. As all medication during pregnancy may pose a certain risk to the developing fetus, the potential benefits of the medication must be weighed against the risks for both mother and her unborn child. Therefore, information to guide patients and physicians to make a well-balanced decision for the appropriate treatment during pregnancy is needed. In this systematic review, an overview of maternal use of antidepressant or anxiolytic medication during pregnancy and childhood neurodevelopmental outcomes is provided. Some studies indicate a relation between prenatal exposure to antidepressants and adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes such as delayed motor development/motor control, social difficulties, internalizing problems and autism, but cannot rule out confounding by indication. Overall, the results of the observational studies have been inconsistent, which makes translation of the findings into clinical recommendations difficult. More well-designed observational studies and also randomized controlled trials (e.g., maintenance treatment vs. cessation) are needed to move forward and provide a comprehensive evaluation of the risks and benefits of antidepressant and anxiolytic use during pregnancy. PMID:24863148

El Marroun, Hanan; White, Tonya; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

2014-10-01

29

The impact of computerized provider order entry systems on medical-imaging services: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems have been strongly promoted as a means to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare. Methods This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence of the impact of CPOE on medical-imaging services and patient outcomes. Results Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria, most of which (10/14) used a pre-/postintervention comparison design. Eight studies demonstrated benefits, such as decreased test utilization, associated with decision-support systems promoting adherence to test ordering guidelines. Three studies evaluating medical-imaging ordering and reporting times showed statistically significant decreases in turnaround times. Conclusions The findings reveal the potential for CPOE to contribute to significant efficiency and effectiveness gains in imaging services. The diversity and scope of the research evidence can be strengthened through increased attention to the circumstances and mechanisms that contribute to the success (or otherwise) of CPOE and its contribution to the enhancement of patient care delivery. PMID:21385821

Prgomet, Mirela; Markewycz, Andrew; Adams, Edwina; Westbrook, Johanna I

2011-01-01

30

A systematic review of cardiovascular effects following atypical antipsychotic medication overdose  

PubMed Central

As the use of atypical antipsychotic medications (AAPM) increases, the number of overdoses continues to grow. Cardiovascular toxicity was common with older psychiatric medications, but appears uncommon with AAPM. We conducted a systematic literature review to describe the cardiovascular effects reported following overdose of 5 common AAPM: Aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. We included case reports and case series describing overdose of these 5 medications identified in a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and abstracts from major toxicology meetings. We found 13 pediatric cases (<7 yr), 22 adolescent cases (7–16 years) and 185 adult cases. No pediatric case described a ventricular dysrhythmia or a cardiovascular death. In the adolescent and adult cases we found numerous reports of prolonged QTC interval and hypotension, but there were only three cases of ventricular dysrhythmia and three deaths that may have been due to direct cardiovascular toxicity. The results from case series reports were similar to the single case report data. Our review suggests that overdose of AAPM is unlikely to cause significant cardiovascular toxicity. PMID:19497468

Tan, Hock Heck; Hoppe, Jason; Heard, Kennon

2009-01-01

31

A systematic review of factors influencing adherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.  

PubMed

Adherence to antipsychotics improves outcome in schizophrenia. There is a lack of consensus on which factors most influence adherence behaviour and methodological issues hinder interpretation of existing evidence. A rigorous systematic search designed to identify robustly implicated factors emerging from methodologically rigorous studies narrowed our search to 13 observational studies (total N=6235) relating to adherence, antipsychotics and schizophrenia. Studies varied significantly, with reported adherence rates ranging from 47.2% to 95%. Positive attitude to medication and illness insight were the only factors consistently associated with better adherence, while contradictory results were found for socio-demographic characteristics, symptom severity and side effects. Only distinct aspects of the therapeutic relationship and social support in younger patients were related to good adherence. Antipsychotic type or formulation and neurocognitive functioning did not appear to impact medication adherence. Despite greater methodological rigour in determining studies to include in the present systematic review, it remains difficult to guide clinicians in this vital area and most of the work discussed contained small sample sizes. Future research in this field should therefore prioritise prospective study designs over longer periods and larger samples in naturalistic settings, providing a more appropriate and clinically meaningful framework than widely used cross-sectional designs. PMID:25466227

Sendt, Kyra-Verena; Tracy, Derek Kenneth; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik

2015-01-30

32

Methods uncovering usability issues in medication-related alerting functions: results from a systematic review.  

PubMed

This paper aims at listing the methods used to evaluate the usability of medication-related alerting functions and at knowing what type of usability issues those methods allow to detect. A sub-analysis of data from this systematic review has been performed. Methods applied in the included papers were collected. Then, included papers were sorted in four types of evaluation: "expert evaluation", "user- testing/simulation", "on site observation" and "impact studies". The types of usability issues (usability flaws, usage problems and negative outcomes) uncovered by those evaluations were analyzed. Results show that a large set of methods are used. The largest proportion of papers uses "on site observation" evaluation. This is the only evaluation type for which every kind of usability flaws, usage problems and outcomes are detected. It is somehow surprising that, in a usability systematic review, most of the papers included use a method that is not often presented as a usability method. Results are discussed about the opportunity to provide usability information collected after the implementation of the technology during their design process, i.e. before their implementation. PMID:25160315

Marcilly, Romaric; Vasseur, Francis; Ammenwerth, Elske; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine

2014-01-01

33

Systematic literature review of templates for reporting prehospital major incident medical management  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify and describe the content of templates for reporting prehospital major incident medical management. Design Systematic literature review according to PRISMA guidelines. Data sources PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Knowledge. Grey literature was also searched. Eligibility criteria for selected studies Templates published after 1 January 1990 and up to 19 March 2012. Non-English language literature, except Scandinavian; literature without an available abstract; and literature reporting only psychological aspects were excluded. Results The main database search identified 8497 articles, among which 8389 were excluded based on title and abstract. An additional 96 were excluded based on the full-text. The remaining 12 articles were included in the analysis. A total of 107 articles were identified in the grey literature and excluded. The reference lists for the included articles identified five additional articles. A relevant article published after completing the search was also included. In the 18 articles included in the study, 10 different templates or sets of data are described: 2 methodologies for assessing major incident responses, 3 templates intended for reporting from exercises, 2 guidelines for reporting in medical journals, 2 analyses of previous disasters and 1 Utstein-style template. Conclusions More than one template exists for generating reports. The limitations of the existing templates involve internal and external validity, and none of them have been tested for feasibility in real-life incidents. Trial registration The review is registered in PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42012002051). PMID:23906946

Fattah, Sabina; Rehn, Marius; Reierth, Eirik; Wisborg, Torben

2013-01-01

34

Systematic review and metasummary of attitudes toward research in emergency medical conditions.  

PubMed

Emergency departments are challenging research settings, where truly informed consent can be difficult to obtain. A deeper understanding of emergency medical patients' opinions about research is needed. We conducted a systematic review and meta-summary of quantitative and qualitative studies on which values, attitudes, or beliefs of emergent medical research participants influence research participation. We included studies of adults that investigated opinions toward emergency medicine research participation. We excluded studies focused on the association between demographics or consent document features and participation and those focused on non-emergency research. In August 2011, we searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Scirus, PsycINFO, AgeLine and Global Health. Titles, abstracts and then full manuscripts were independently evaluated by two reviewers. Disagreements were resolved by consensus and adjudicated by a third author. Studies were evaluated for bias using standardised scores. We report themes associated with participation or refusal. Our initial search produced over 1800 articles. A total of 44 articles were extracted for full-manuscript analysis, and 14 were retained based on our eligibility criteria. Among factors favouring participation, altruism and personal health benefit had the highest frequency. Mistrust of researchers, feeling like a 'guinea pig' and risk were leading factors favouring refusal. Many studies noted limitations of informed consent processes in emergent conditions. We conclude that highlighting the benefits to the participant and society, mitigating risk and increasing public trust may increase research participation in emergency medical research. New methods for conducting informed consent in such studies are needed. PMID:23665997

Limkakeng, Alexander T; de Oliveira, Lucas Lentini Herling; Moreira, Tais; Phadtare, Amruta; Garcia Rodrigues, Clarissa; Hocker, Michael B; McKinney, Ross; Voils, Corrine I; Pietrobon, Ricardo

2014-06-01

35

Efficacy and safety of medical cannabinoids in older subjects: a systematic review.  

PubMed

This systematic review aims to integrate the evidence on indications, efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of medical cannabinoids in older subjects. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane Library. We selected controlled trials including solely older subjects (?65 years) or reporting data on older subgroups. 105 (74%) papers, on controlled intervention trials, reported the inclusion of older subjects. Five studies reported data on older persons separately. These were randomized controlled trials, including in total 267 participants (mean age 47-78 years). Interventions were oral tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (n=3) and oral THC combined with cannabidiol (n=2). The studies showed no efficacy on dyskinesia, breathlessness and chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. Two studies showed that THC might be useful in treatment of anorexia and behavioral symptoms in dementia. Adverse events were more common during cannabinoid treatment compared to the control treatment, and were most frequently sedation like symptoms. Although trials studying medical cannabinoids included older subjects, there is a lack of evidence of its use specifically in older patients. Adequately powered trials are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids in older subjects, as the potential symptomatic benefit is especially attractive in this age group. PMID:24509411

van den Elsen, G A H; Ahmed, A I A; Lammers, M; Kramers, C; Verkes, R J; van der Marck, M A; Rikkert, M G M Olde

2014-03-01

36

Barriers to the acceptance of electronic medical records by physicians from systematic review to taxonomy and interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The main objective of this research is to identify, categorize, and analyze barriers perceived by physicians to the adoption of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) in order to provide implementers with beneficial intervention options. METHODS: A systematic literature review, based on research papers from 1998 to 2009, concerning barriers to the acceptance of EMRs by physicians was conducted. Four databases,

Albert Boonstra; Manda Broekhuis

2010-01-01

37

Guidelines for guideline developers: a systematic review of grading systems for medical tests  

PubMed Central

Background A variety of systems have been developed to grade evidence and develop recommendations based on the available evidence. However, development of guidelines for medical tests is especially challenging given the typical indirectness of the evidence; direct evidence of the effects of testing on patient important outcomes is usually absent. We compared grading systems for medical tests on how they use evidence in guideline development. Methods We used a systematic strategy to look for grading systems specific to medical tests in PubMed, professional guideline websites, via personal correspondence, and handsearching back references of key articles. Using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument as a starting point, we defined two sets of characteristics to describe these systems: methodological and process ones. Methodological characteristics are features relating to how evidence is gathered, appraised, and used in recommendations. Process characteristics are those relating to the guideline development process. Data were extracted in duplicate and differences resolved through discussion. Results Twelve grading systems could be included. All varied in the degree to which methodological and process characteristics were addressed. Having a clinical scenario, identifying the care pathway and/or developing an analytical framework, having explicit criteria for appraising and linking indirect evidence, and having explicit methodologies for translating evidence into recommendations were least frequently addressed. Five systems at most addressed these, to varying degrees of explicitness and completeness. Process wise, features most frequently addressed included involvement of relevant professional groups (8/12), external peer review of completed guidelines (9/12), and recommendations on methods for dissemination (8/12). Characteristics least often addressed were whether the system was piloted (3/12) and funder information (3/12). Conclusions Five systems for grading evidence about medical tests in guideline development addressed to differing degrees of explicitness the need for and appraisal of different bodies of evidence, the linking of such evidence, and its translation into recommendations. At present, no one system addressed the full complexity of gathering, assessing and linking different bodies of evidence. PMID:23842037

2013-01-01

38

Does primary medical practitioner involvement with a specialist team improve patient outcomes? A systematic review.  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic or complex medical or psychiatric conditions are treated by many practioners, including general practitioners (GPs). Formal liaison between primary and specialist is often assumed to offer benefits to patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of formal liaison of GPs with specialist service providers on patient health outcomes, by conducting a systematic review of the published literature in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Library databases using the following search terms: 'family physician': synonyms of 'patient care planning', 'patient discharge' and 'patient care team'; and synonyms of 'randomised controlled trials'. Seven studies were identified, involving 963 subjects and 899 controls. Most health outcomes were unchanged, although some physical and functional health outcomes were improved by formal liaison between GPs and specialist services, particularly among chronic mental illness patients. Some health outcomes worsened during the intervention. Patient retention rates within treatment programmes improved with GP involvement, as did patient satisfaction. Doctor (GP and specialist) behaviour changed with reports of more rational use of resources and diagnostic tests, improved clinical skills, more frequent use of appropriate treatment strategies, and more frequent clinical behaviours designed to detect disease complications. Cost effectiveness could not be determined. In conclusion, formal liaison between GPs and specialist services leaves most physical health outcomes unchanged, but improves functional outcomes in chronically mentally ill patients. It may confer modest long-term health benefits through improvements in patient concordance with treatment programmes and more effective clinical practice. PMID:12434964

Mitchell, Geoffrey; Del Mar, Chris; Francis, Daniel

2002-01-01

39

Oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast in hospitalised and medically compromised patients: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Yeast are major aetiological agents of localised oral mucosal lesions, and are also leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on the prevalence and incidence of these opportunistic oral pathogens in hospitalised and medically compromised patients. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast. Chlorhexidine delivered in a variety of oral hygiene products appeared to have some effect on oral yeast, although some studies found equivocal effects. Although a wide array of other compounds have also been investigated, their clinical effectiveness remains to be substantiated. Likewise, the utility of mechanical oral hygiene interventions and other oral health promotion measures such as topical application of salivary substitute, remains unsettled. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against oral yeast, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remains to be confirmed by further high-quality randomised controlled trials. This is pertinent, given the recent emergence of yeast resistance to conventional antifungal agents. PMID:21749481

Lam, Otto L T; Bandara, H M H N; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W

2012-03-01

40

Cardiovascular Outcomes in Trials of Oral Diabetes Medications: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Context A wide variety of oral diabetes medications are currently available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but it is unclear how these agents compare with respect to long-term cardiovascular risk. Objective To systematically review the peer-reviewed literature on cardiovascular risk associated with oral agents (second-generation sulfonylureas, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, and meglitinides) for treating adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Data Sources MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, from inception through January 2006. Study Selection 40 publications of controlled trials that reported information on cardiovascular events (primarily myocardial infarction and stroke). Data Extraction Using standardized protocols, 2 reviewers serially abstracted data for each article. Trials were first described qualitatively. For comparisons with four or more independent trials, results were quantitatively pooled using the Mantel- Haenszel method. Results were presented as odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Results Treatment with metformin was associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular mortality(pooled odds ratio(OR)=0.74, 95%CI 0.62-0.89) compared with any other oral diabetes agent or placebo; the results for cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality were similar but not statistically significant. No other significant associations of oral diabetes agents with fatal or non-fatal cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality were observed. When compared to any other agent or placebo, rosiglitazone was the only diabetes agent associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity or mortality, but this result was not statistically significant(OR 1.68 95%CI 0.92-3.06). Conclusions Meta-analysis suggested that compared to other oral diabetes agents and placebo, metformin was moderately protective and rosiglitazone possibly harmful, but lack of power prohibited firmer conclusions. Larger, long-term studies taken to hard endpoints and better reporting of cardiovascular events in short term studies will be required to draw firm conclusions about major clinical benefits and risks related to oral diabetes agents. PMID:18955635

Selvin, Elizabeth; Bolen, Shari; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Wiley, Crystal; Wilson, Lisa M.; Marinopoulos, Spyridon S.; Feldman, Leonard; Vassy, Jason; Wilson, Renee; Bass, Eric B.; Brancati, Frederick L.

2008-01-01

41

A Systematic Review of the Reporting of Adverse Events Associated With Medical Herb Use Among Children  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Information about the safety of herbal medicine often comes from case reports published in the medical literature, thus necessitating good quality reporting of these adverse events. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the comprehensiveness of reporting of published case reports of adverse events associated with herb use in the pediatric population. Methods: Electronic literature search included 7 databases and a manual search of retrieved articles from inception through 2010. We included published case reports and case series that reported an adverse event associated with exposure to an herbal product by children under the age of 18 years old. We used descriptive statistics. Based on the International Society of Epidemiology's “Guidelines for Submitting Adverse Events Reports for Publication,” we developed and assigned a guideline adherence score (0-17) to each case report. Results: Ninety-six unique journal papers were identified and represented 128 cases. Of the 128 cases, 37% occurred in children under 2 years old, 38% between the ages of 2 and 8 years old, and 23% between the ages of 9 and 18 years old. Twenty-nine percent of cases were the result of an intentional ingestion while 36% were from an unintentional ingestion. Fifty-two percent of cases documented the Latin binomial of the herb ingredients; 41% documented plant part. Thirty-two percent of the cases reported laboratory testing of the herb, 20% documented the manufacturer of the product, and 22% percent included an assessment of the potential concomitant therapies that could have been influential in the adverse events. Mean guideline adherence score was 12.5 (range 6-17). Conclusions: There is considerable need for improvement in reporting adverse events in children following herb use. Without better quality reporting, adverse event reports cannot be interpreted reliably and do not contribute in a meaningful way to guiding recommendations for medicinal herb use. PMID:24416663

Adams, Denise; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Nasser, Hafsa; Saper, Robert; White, Laura; Vohra, Sunita

2013-01-01

42

Quality of published Iranian medical education research studies: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background: Research in medical education has been paid more attention than before; however the quality of research reporting has not been comprehensively appraised. To evaluate the methodological and reporting quality of Iranian published medical education articles. Methods: Articles describing medical students, residents, fellows or program evaluation were included. Articles related to continuing medical education or faculty development, review articles and reports, and studies considering both medical and nonmedical students were excluded. We searched MEDLINE through PubMed in addition to major Iranian medical education search engines and databases including Scientific Information Database (SID) from March 2003 to March 2008. The Medical Education Research Quality Index (MERSQI) scale and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT 2001) were used for experimental studies and the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) was utilized for observational studies. Results: Ninety five articles were found to be related to the medical education research in Iran including 16 (16.8%) experimental studies. Total MERSQI scores ranged between 3.82 and 13.09 with the mean of 8.39 points. Mean domain scores were highest for data analysis (1.85) and lowest for validity (0.61). The most frequently reported item was background (96%) and the least reported was the study limitations (16%). Conclusion: The quality of published medical education research in Iran seems to be suboptimal. PMID:25405144

Golnari, Pedram; Sodagari, Faezeh; Baradaran, Hamid Reza

2014-01-01

43

A systematic review of the associations between dose regimens and medication compliance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Previous reviews of the literature on medication compliance have confirmed the inverse relationship between number of daily doses and rate of compliance. However, compliance in most of these studies was based on patient self-report, blood-level monitoring, prescription refills, or pill count data, none of which are as accurate as electronic monitoring (EM).Objective: In this paper, we review studies in

Ami J. Claxton; Joyce Cramer; Courtney Pierce

2001-01-01

44

The economic value of enteral medical nutrition in the management of disease-related malnutrition: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Economic evaluations for medical nutrition, such as oral nutritional supplements (ONS), are relatively uncommon compared with other health technologies, and represent an area that has not been reviewed so far. In this systematic review, economic evaluations of enteral medical nutrition in the management of disease-related malnutrition (DRM) were reviewed and qualified to estimate the economic value. Initially, 481 studies were found, of which 37 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and were rated on their quality using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument. The final review focused on the high QHES quality economic evaluation studies. As both the studied medical nutrition intervention and the form of the economic evaluation varied, a quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis) was not attempted but a critical analysis and comparison of the individual study results were performed. ONS was the most studied intervention, covering several patient populations and different health care settings. Outcomes included cost savings (n = 3), no significant extra costs per unit of clinical and/or functional improvement (n = 1), or significantly higher costs per unit of clinical and/or functional improvement but still cost-effective for the used threshold (n = 4). This review shows that the use of enteral medical nutrition in the management of DRM can be efficient from a health economic perspective. PMID:24239013

Freijer, Karen; Bours, Martijn J L; Nuijten, Mark J C; Poley, Marten J; Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Schols, Jos M G A

2014-01-01

45

The current provision of community-based teaching in UK medical schools: an online survey and systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the current provision and outcome of community-based education (CBE) in UK medical schools. Design and data sources An online survey of UK medical school websites and course prospectuses and a systematic review of articles from PubMed and Web of Science were conducted. Articles in the systematic review were assessed using Rossi, Lipsey and Freeman's approach to programme evaluation. Study selection Publications from November 1998 to 2013 containing information related to community teaching in undergraduate medical courses were included. Results Out of the 32 undergraduate UK medical schools, one was excluded due to the lack of course specifications available online. Analysis of the remaining 31 medical schools showed that a variety of CBE models are utilised in medical schools across the UK. Twenty-eight medical schools (90.3%) provide CBE in some form by the end of the first year of undergraduate training, and 29 medical schools (93.5%) by the end of the second year. From the 1378 references identified, 29 papers met the inclusion criteria for assessment. It was found that CBE mostly provided advantages to students as well as other participants, including GP tutors and patients. However, there were a few concerns regarding the lack of GP tutors’ knowledge in specialty areas, the negative impact that CBE may have on the delivery of health service in education settings and the cost of CBE. Conclusions Despite the wide variations in implementation, community teaching was found to be mostly beneficial. To ensure the relevance of CBE for ‘Tomorrow's Doctors’, a national framework should be established, and solutions sought to reduce the impact of the challenges within CBE. Strengths and limitations of this study This is the first study to review how community-based education is currently provided throughout Medical Schools in the UK. The use of Rossi, Lipsey and Freeman's method of programme evaluation means that the literature was analysed in a consistent and comprehensive way. However, a weakness is that data from the online survey was obtained from online medical school prospectuses. This means the data may be incomplete or out of date. Data in the literature review may also be skewed by publication bias. PMID:25448625

Lee, Sandra W W; Clement, Naomi; Tang, Natalie; Atiomo, William

2014-01-01

46

Effectiveness, Medication Patterns, and Adverse Events of Traditional Chinese Herbal Patches for Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the evidence whether traditional Chinese herbal patches (TCHPs) for osteoarthritis (OA) are effective and safe and analyze their medication patterns. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using all the possible Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and keywords from January 1979 to July 2013. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included. Estimated effects were analyzed using mean difference (MD) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and meta-analysis. Results. 86 kinds of TCHPs were identified. RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) which were mostly of low quality favored TCHPs for local pain and dysfunction relief. TCHPs, compared with diclofenac ointment, had significant effects on global effectiveness rate (RR = 0.50; 95% CI (0.29, 0.87)). Components of formulae were mainly based on the compounds “Xiao Huo Luo Dan” (Minor collateral-freeing pill) and “Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang” (Angelicae Pubescentis and Loranthi decoction). Ten kinds of adverse events (AEs), mainly consisting of itching and/or local skin rashes, were identified after 3-4 weeks of follow-up. Conclusions. TCHPs have certain evidence in improving global effectiveness rate for OA; however, more rigorous studies are warranted to support their use. PMID:24527043

Wang, Xuezong; Liu, Ting; Gao, Ningyang; Ding, Daofang; Duan, Tieli; Cao, Yuelong; Zheng, Yuxin

2014-01-01

47

Cytocompatibility of Medical Biomaterials Containing Nickel by Osteoblasts: a Systematic Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present review is based on a survey of 21 studies on the cytocompatibility of medical biomaterials containing nickel,\\u000a as assessed by cell culture of human and animal osteoblasts or osteoblast-like cells. Among the biomaterials evaluated were\\u000a stainless steel, NiTi alloys, pure Ni, Ti, and other pure metals. The materials were either commercially available, prepared\\u000a by the authors, or implanted

Marcin Mikulewicz; Katarzyna Chojnacka

48

Direct medical cost of overweight and obesity in the United States: a quantitative systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives To estimate per-person and aggregate direct medical costs of overweight and obesity and to examine the effect of study design factors. Methods PubMed (1968–2009), EconLit (1969–2009), and Business Source Premier (1995–2009) were searched for original studies. Results were standardized to compute the incremental cost per overweight person and per obese person, and to compute the national aggregate cost. Results A total of 33 U.S. studies met review criteria. Among the 4 highest quality studies, the 2008 per-person direct medical cost of overweight was $266 and of obesity was $1723. The aggregate national cost of overweight and obesity combined was $113.9 billion. Study design factors that affected cost estimate included: use of national samples versus more selected populations; age groups examined; inclusion of all medical costs versus obesity-related costs only; and BMI cutoffs for defining overweight and obesity. Conclusions Depending on the source of total national health care expenditures used, the direct medical cost of overweight and obesity combined is approximately 5.0% to 10% of U.S. health care spending. Future studies should include nationally representative samples, evaluate adults of all ages, report all medical costs, and use standard BMI cutoffs. PMID:20059703

Tsai, Adam Gilden; Williamson, David F.; Glick, Henry A.

2010-01-01

49

The Use of Medications Approved for Alzheimer’s Disease in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects 1 in 68 children in the United States. Even though it is a common disorder, only two medications (risperidone and aripiprazole) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat symptoms associated with ASD. However, these medications are approved to treat irritability, which is not a core symptom of ASD. A number of novel medications, which have not been approved by the FDA to treat ASD have been used off-label in some studies to treat ASD symptoms, including medications approved for Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, some of these studies are high-quality, double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) studies. This article systematically reviews studies published through April, 2014, which examined the use of Alzheimer’s medications in ASD, including donepezil (seven studies, two were DBPC, five out of seven reported improvements), galantamine (four studies, two were DBPC, all reported improvements), rivastigmine (one study reporting improvements), tacrine (one study reporting improvements), and memantine (nine studies, one was DBPC, eight reported improvements). An evidence-based scale was used to rank each medication. Collectively, these studies reported improvements in expressive language and communication, receptive language, social interaction, irritability, hyperactivity, attention, eye contact, emotional lability, repetitive or self-stimulatory behaviors, motor planning, disruptive behaviors, obsessive–compulsive symptoms, lethargy, overall ASD behaviors, and increased REM sleep. Reported side effects are reviewed and include irritability, gastrointestinal problems, verbal or behavioral regression, headaches, irritability, rash, tremor, sedation, vomiting, and speech problems. Both galantamine and memantine had sufficient evidence ranking for improving both core and associated symptoms of ASD. Given the lack of medications approved to treat ASD, further studies on novel medications, including Alzheimer’s disease medications, are needed. PMID:25202686

Rossignol, Daniel A.; Frye, Richard E.

2014-01-01

50

Adherence, persistence, and medication discontinuation in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder – a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

Untreated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can lead to substantial adverse social, economic, and emotional outcomes for patients. The effectiveness of current pharmacologic treatments is often reduced, due to low treatment adherence and medication discontinuation. This current systematic literature review analyzes the current state of knowledge surrounding ADHD medication discontinuation, focusing on: 1) the extent of patient persistence; 2) adherence; and 3) the underlying reasons for patients’ treatment discontinuation and how discontinuation rates and reasons vary across patient subgroups. We selected 91 original studies (67 with persistence/discontinuation results, 26 with adherence results, and 41 with reasons for discontinuation, switching, or nonadherence) and 36 expert opinion reviews on ADHD medication discontinuation, published from 1990 to 2013. Treatment persistence on stimulants, measured by treatment duration during the 12-month follow-up periods, averaged 136 days for children and adolescents and 230 days for adults. Owing to substantial study heterogeneity, comparisons across age or medication type subgroups were generally inconclusive; however, long-acting formulations and amphetamines were associated with longer treatment duration than short-acting formulations and methylphenidates. The medication possession ratio, used to measure adherence, was <0.7 for all age groups and medication classes during a 12-month period. Adverse effects were the most commonly cited reason for discontinuation in all studies. Original research studies reported the lack of symptom control as a common discontinuation reason, followed by dosing inconvenience, social stigma associated with ADHD medication, and the patient’s attitude. In summary, although there was a lack of consistency in the measurement of adherence and persistence, these findings indicate that drug adherence and persistence are generally poor among patients with ADHD. Clinicians may be able to help improve adherence and persistence to ADHD treatment by educating caregivers and patients on treatment goals, administering long-acting medications, and following-up with patients to verify if medication is still effective and well-tolerated. PMID:25187718

Gajria, Kavita; Lu, Mei; Sikirica, Vanja; Greven, Peter; Zhong, Yichen; Qin, Paige; Xie, Jipan

2014-01-01

51

Failure or success of search strategies to identify adverse effects of medical devices: a feasibility study using a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Research has indicated that adverse effects terms are increasingly prevalent in the title, abstract or indexing terms of articles that contain adverse drug effects data in MEDLINE and Embase. However, it is unknown whether adverse effects terms are present in the database records of articles that contain adverse effects data of medical devices, and thus, to what extent the development of an adverse effects search filter for medical devices may be feasible. Methods A case study systematic review of a medical device was selected. The included studies from a systematic review of the safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) for spinal fusion were used in the analysis. For each included study, the corresponding database record on MEDLINE and Embase was assessed to measure the presence or absence of adverse effects terms in the title, abstract or indexing. The performance of each potential adverse effects search term was also measured and compared. Results There were 82 publications (49 studies) included in the systematic review with 51 of these indexed on MEDLINE and 55 on Embase. Ninety-four percent (48/51) of the records on MEDLINE and 95% (52/55) of the records on Embase contained at least one adverse effects related search term. The wide variety of adverse effects terms included in the title, abstract or indexing of bibliographic records, and the lack of any individual high-performing search terms suggests that a combination of terms in different fields is required to identify adverse effects of medical devices. In addition, the most successful search terms differed from the most successful terms for identifying adverse drug effects. Conclusions The search filters currently available for adverse drug effects are not necessarily useful for searching adverse effects data of medical devices. The presence of adverse effects terms in the bibliographic records of articles on medical devices, however, indicates that combinations of adverse effects search terms may be useful in search strategies in MEDLINE and Embase. The results, therefore, suggest that not only a search filter for the adverse effects of medical devices is feasible, but also that it should be a research priority. PMID:25312884

2014-01-01

52

Strategies to improve adherence to medications for cardiovascular diseases in socioeconomically disadvantaged populations: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Medication non-adherence poses a major barrier to reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden globally, and is increasingly recognised as a socioeconomically determined problem. Strategies promoting CVD medication adherence appear of moderate effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Potentially, 'one-size-fits-all' measures are ill-equipped to address heterogeneous adherence behaviour between social groups. This review aims to determine the effects of strategies to improve adherence to CVD-related medications in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. Randomised/quasi-randomised controlled trials (1996-June 2012, English), testing strategies to increase adherence to CVD-related medications prescribed to adult patients who may experience health inequity (place of residence, occupation, education, or socioeconomic position) were reviewed. 772 abstracts were screened, 111 full-text articles retrieved, and 16 full-text articles reporting on 14 studies, involving 7739 patients (age range 41-66 years), were included. Methodological and clinical heterogeneity precluded quantitative data synthesis. Studies were thematically grouped by targeted outcomes; underlying interventions and policies were classified using Michie et al.'s Behaviour Change Wheel. Contrasting with patient or physician/practice strategies, those simultaneously directed at patients and physicians/practices resulted in statistically significant improvements in relative adherence (16-169%). Comparative cost and cost-effectiveness analyses from three studies did not find cost-saving or cost-effective strategies. Unlike much current evidence in general populations, promising evidence exists about what strategies improve adherence in disadvantaged groups. These strategies were generally complex: simultaneously targeting patients and physicians; addressing social, financial, and treatment-related adherence barriers; and supported by broader guidelines, regulatory and communication-based policies. Given their complexity and potential resource implications, comprehensive process evaluations and cost and cost-effectiveness evidence are urgently needed. PMID:23415168

Laba, Tracey-Lea; Bleasel, Jonathan; Brien, Jo-Anne; Cass, Alan; Howard, Kirsten; Peiris, David; Redfern, Julie; Salam, Abdul; Usherwood, Tim; Jan, Stephen

2013-09-10

53

Systematic review automation technologies  

PubMed Central

Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

2014-01-01

54

Systematic review automation technologies.  

PubMed

Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects.We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

Tsafnat, Guy; Glasziou, Paul; Choong, Miew Keen; Dunn, Adam; Galgani, Filippo; Coiera, Enrico

2014-01-01

55

Quality of randomised controlled trials in medical education reported between 2012 and 2013: a systematic review protocol  

PubMed Central

Introduction Research in medical education has increased in volume over the past decades but concerns have been raised regarding the quality of trials conducted within this field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving educational interventions that are reported in biomedical journals have been criticised for their insufficient conceptual, theoretical framework. RCTs published in journals dedicated to medical education, on the other hand, have been questioned regarding their methodological rigour. The aim of this study is therefore to assess the quality of RCTs of educational interventions reported in 2012 and 2013 in journals dedicated to medical education compared to biomedical journals with respect to objective quality criteria. Methods and analysis RCTs published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013 in English are included. The search strategy is developed with the help of experienced librarians to search online databases for key terms. All of the identified RCTs are screened based on their titles and abstracts individually by the authors and then compared in pairs to assess agreement. Data are extracted from the included RCTs by independently scoring each RCT using a data collection form. The data collection form consists of four steps. Step 1 includes confirmation of RCT eligibility; step 2 consists of the CONSORT checklist; step 3 consists of the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument framework; step 4 consists of a Medical Education Extension (MEdEx) to the CONSORT checklist. The MEdEx includes the following elements: Description of scientific background, explanation of rationale, quality of research questions and hypotheses, clarity in the description of the use of the intervention and control as well as interpretation of results. Ethics and dissemination This review is the first to systematically examine the quality of RCTs conducted in medical education. We plan to disseminate the results through publications and presentation at relevant conferences. Ethical approval is not sought for this review. PMID:25079932

Tolsgaard, Martin G; Ku, Cheryl; Woods, Nicole N; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan Mahan; Brydges, Ryan; Ringsted, Charlotte

2014-01-01

56

Systematic review on the primary and secondary reporting of the prevalence of ghostwriting in the medical literature  

PubMed Central

Background Ghostwriting of industry-sponsored articles is unethical and is perceived to be common practice. Objective To systematically review how evidence for the prevalence of ghostwriting is reported in the medical literature. Data sources MEDLINE via PubMed 1966+, EMBASE 1966+, The Cochrane Library 1988+, Medical Writing 1998+, The American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) Journal 1986+, Council of Science Editors Annual Meetings 2007+, and the Peer Review Congress 1994+ were searched electronically (23 May 2013) using the search terms ghostwrit*, ghostauthor*, ghost AND writ*, ghost AND author*. Eligibility criteria All publication types were considered; only publications reporting a numerical estimate of possible ghostwriting prevalence were included. Data extraction Two independent reviewers screened the publications; discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Data to be collected included a numerical estimate of the prevalence of possible ghostwriting (primary outcome measure), definitions of ghostwriting reported, source of the reported prevalence, publication type and year, study design and sample population. Results Of the 848 publications retrieved and screened for eligibility, 48 reported numerical estimates for the prevalence of possible ghostwriting. Sixteen primary publications reported findings from cross-sectional surveys or descriptive analyses of published articles; 32 secondary publications cited published or unpublished evidence. Estimates on the prevalence of possible ghostwriting in primary and secondary publications varied markedly. Primary estimates were not suitable for meta-analysis because of the various definitions of ghostwriting used, study designs and types of populations or samples. Secondary estimates were not always reported or cited correctly or appropriately. Conclusions Evidence for the prevalence of ghostwriting in the medical literature is limited and can be outdated, misleading or mistaken. Researchers should not inflate estimates using non-standard definitions of ghostwriting nor conflate ghostwriting with other unethical authorship practices. Editors and peer reviewers should not accept articles that incorrectly cite or interpret primary publications that report the prevalence of ghostwriting. PMID:25023129

Stretton, Serina

2014-01-01

57

Efficacy of Atypical Antipsychotic Medication in the Management of Behaviour Problems in Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Borderline Intelligence: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of medications to manage problem behaviours is widespread. However, robust evidence to support their use seems to be lacking. The aim was to review research evidence into the efficacy of atypical antipsychotic medication in managing problem behaviour in children with intellectual disabilities and borderline intelligence. A systematic

Unwin, Gemma L.; Deb, Shoumitro

2011-01-01

58

Post-marketing surveillance in the published medical and grey literature for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty catheters: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) may identify rare serious incidents or adverse events due to the long-term use of a medical device, which was not captured in the pre-market process. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a non-surgical procedure that uses a balloon-tipped catheter to enlarge a narrowed artery. In 2011, 1,942 adverse event reports related to the use of PTCA catheters were submitted to the FDA by the manufacturers, an increase from the 883 reported in 2008. The primary research objective is to conduct a systematic review of the published and grey literature published between 2007 and 2012 for the frequency of incidents, adverse events and malfunctions associated with the use of PTCA catheters in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Grey literature has not been commercially published. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PubMed for medical literature on PMS for PTCA catheters in patients with CAD published between January 2007 and July 2012. We also searched the grey literature. Results This review included 11 studies. The in-hospital adverse events reported were individual cases of myocardial infarction and hematoma. In studies of patients with coronary perforation, more patients with balloon angioplasty were identified compared with patients who required stenting. Conclusions Our systematic review illustrates that the volume and quality of PMS studies associated with the use of PTCA catheters in patients with CAD are low in the published and grey literature, and may not be useful sources of information for decisions on safety. In most studies, the objectives were not to monitor the long-term safety of the use of PTCA catheters in clinical practice. Future studies can explore the strengths and limitations of PMS databases administered by regulatory authorities. PMID:24112460

2013-01-01

59

Title and Abstract Screening and Evaluation in Systematic Reviews (TASER): a pilot randomised controlled trial of title and abstract screening by medical students  

PubMed Central

Background The production of high quality systematic reviews requires rigorous methods that are time-consuming and resource intensive. Citation screening is a key step in the systematic review process. An opportunity to improve the efficiency of systematic review production involves the use of non-expert groups and new technologies for citation screening. We performed a pilot study of citation screening by medical students using four screening methods and compared students’ performance to experienced review authors. Methods The aims of this pilot randomised controlled trial were to provide preliminary data on the accuracy of title and abstract screening by medical students, and on the effect of screening modality on screening accuracy and efficiency. Medical students were randomly allocated to title and abstract screening using one of the four modalities and required to screen 650 citations from a single systematic review update. The four screening modalities were a reference management software program (EndNote), Paper, a web-based systematic review workflow platform (ReGroup) and a mobile screening application (Screen2Go). Screening sensitivity and specificity were analysed in a complete case analysis using a chi-squared test and Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test according to screening modality and compared to a final set of included citations selected by expert review authors. Results Sensitivity of medical students’ screening decisions ranged from 46.7% to 66.7%, with students using the web-based platform performing significantly better than the paper-based group. Specificity ranged from 93.2% to 97.4% with the lowest specificity seen with the web-based platform. There was no significant difference in performance between the other three modalities. Conclusions Medical students are a feasible population to engage in citation screening. Future studies should investigate the effect of incentive systems, training and support and analytical methods on screening performance. Systematic review registration Cochrane Database CD001048 PMID:25335439

2014-01-01

60

A Systematic Review of Statistical Methods Used to Test for Reliability of Medical Instruments Measuring Continuous Variables  

PubMed Central

Objective(s): Reliability measures precision or the extent to which test results can be replicated. This is the first ever systematic review to identify statistical methods used to measure reliability of equipment measuring continuous variables. This studyalso aims to highlight the inappropriate statistical method used in the reliability analysis and its implication in the medical practice. Materials and Methods: In 2010, five electronic databases were searched between 2007 and 2009 to look for reliability studies. A total of 5,795 titles were initially identified. Only 282 titles were potentially related, and finally 42 fitted the inclusion criteria. Results: The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) is the most popular method with 25 (60%) studies having used this method followed by the comparing means (8 or 19%). Out of 25 studies using the ICC, only 7 (28%) reported the confidence intervals and types of ICC used. Most studies (71%) also tested the agreement of instruments. Conclusion: This study finds that the Intra-class Correlation Coefficient is the most popular method used to assess the reliability of medical instruments measuring continuous outcomes. There are also inappropriate applications and interpretations of statistical methods in some studies. It is important for medical researchers to be aware of this issue, and be able to correctly perform analysis in reliability studies. PMID:23997908

Zaki, Rafdzah; Bulgiba, Awang; Nordin, Noorhaire; Azina Ismail, Noor

2013-01-01

61

Assessment of depression in medical patients: A systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory-II  

PubMed Central

To perform a systematic review of the utility of the Beck Depression Inventory for detecting depression in medical settings, this article focuses on the revised version of the scale (Beck Depression Inventory-II), which was reformulated according to the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. We examined relevant investigations with the Beck Depression Inventory-II for measuring depression in medical settings to provide guidelines for practicing clinicians. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria seventy articles were retained. Validation studies of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, in both primary care and hospital settings, were found for clinics of cardiology, neurology, obstetrics, brain injury, nephrology, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, oncology, and infectious disease. The Beck Depression Inventory-II showed high reliability and good correlation with measures of depression and anxiety. Its threshold for detecting depression varied according to the type of patients, suggesting the need for adjusted cut-off points. The somatic and cognitive-affective dimension described the latent structure of the instrument. The Beck Depression Inventory-II can be easily adapted in most clinical conditions for detecting major depression and recommending an appropriate intervention. Although this scale represents a sound path for detecting depression in patients with medical conditions, the clinician should seek evidence for how to interpret the score before using the Beck Depression Inventory-II to make clinical decisions. PMID:24141845

Wang, Yuan-Pang; Gorenstein, Clarice

2013-01-01

62

Use and Acceptance of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among the General Population and Medical Personnel: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background The interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased during the past decade and the attitude of the general public is mainly positive, but the debate about the clinical effectiveness of these therapies remains controversial among many medical professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic search of the existing literature utilizing different databases, including PubMed/Medline, PSYNDEX, and PsycLit, to research the use and acceptance of CAM among the general population and medical personnel. A special focus on CAM-referring literature was set by limiting the PubMed search to “Complementary Medicine” and adding two other search engines: CAMbase (www.cambase.de) and CAMRESEARCH (www.camresearch.net). These engines were used to reveal publications that at the time of the review were not indexed in PubMed. Results A total of 16 papers met the scope criteria. Prevalence rates of CAM in each of the included studies were between 5% and 74.8%. We found a higher utilization of homeopathy and acupuncture in German-speaking countries. Excluding any form of spiritual prayer, the data demonstrate that chiropractic manipulation, herbal medicine, massage, and homeopathy were the therapies most commonly used by the general population. We identified sex, age, and education as predictors of CAM utilization: More users were women, middle aged, and more educated. The ailments most often associated with CAM utilization included back pain or pathology, depression, insomnia, severe headache or migraine, and stomach or intestinal illnesses. Medical students were the most critical toward CAM. Compared to students of other professions (ie, nursing students: 44.7%, pharmacy students: 18.2%), medical students reported the least consultation with a CAM practitioner (10%). Conclusions The present data demonstrate an increase of CAM usage from 1990 through 2006 in all countries investigated. We found geographical differences, as well as differences between the general population and medical personnel. PMID:22438782

Frass, Michael; Strassl, Robert Paul; Friehs, Helmut; Müllner, Michael; Kundi, Michael; Kaye, Alan D.

2012-01-01

63

Ethnicity and academic performance in UK trained doctors and medical students: systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether the ethnicity of UK trained doctors and medical students is related to their academic performance. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Online databases PubMed, Scopus, and ERIC; Google and Google Scholar; personal knowledge; backwards and forwards citations; specific searches of medical education journals and medical education conference abstracts. Study selection The included quantitative reports measured the performance of medical students or UK trained doctors from different ethnic groups in undergraduate or postgraduate assessments. Exclusions were non-UK assessments, only non-UK trained candidates, only self reported assessment data, only dropouts or another non-academic variable, obvious sampling bias, or insufficient details of ethnicity or outcomes. Results 23 reports comparing the academic performance of medical students and doctors from different ethnic groups were included. Meta-analyses of effects from 22 reports (n=23?742) indicated candidates of “non-white” ethnicity underperformed compared with white candidates (Cohen’s d=?0.42, 95% confidence interval ?0.50 to ?0.34; P<0.001). Effects in the same direction and of similar magnitude were found in meta-analyses of undergraduate assessments only, postgraduate assessments only, machine marked written assessments only, practical clinical assessments only, assessments with pass/fail outcomes only, assessments with continuous outcomes only, and in a meta-analysis of white v Asian candidates only. Heterogeneity was present in all meta-analyses. Conclusion Ethnic differences in academic performance are widespread across different medical schools, different types of exam, and in undergraduates and postgraduates. They have persisted for many years and cannot be dismissed as atypical or local problems. We need to recognise this as an issue that probably affects all of UK medical and higher education. More detailed information to track the problem as well as further research into its causes is required. Such actions are necessary to ensure a fair and just method of training and of assessing current and future doctors. PMID:21385802

2011-01-01

64

Systematic review of percutaneous closure versus medical therapy in patients with cryptogenic stroke and patent foramen ovale  

PubMed Central

Objectives To provide a comprehensive comparison of patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure versus medical therapy in patients with cryptogenic stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and demonstrated PFO. Design Systematic review with complete case meta-analysis and sensitivity analyses. Data sources included MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1980 up to May 2013. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing treatment with percutaneous catheter-based closure of PFO to anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy in patients with cryptogenic stroke or TIA and echocardiographically confirmed PFO or atrial septal defect (ASD) were eligible. Participants 1967 participants with prior stroke or TIA and echocardiographically confirmed PFO or ASD. Primary outcome measures The primary outcome of interest was recurrence of ischaemic stroke. We utilised data from complete cases only for the primary endpoint and combined data from trials to estimate the pooled risk ratio (RR) and associated 95% CIs calculated using random effects models. Results We identified 284 potentially eligible articles of which three RCTs including 2303 patients proved eligible and 1967 patients had complete data. Of the 1026 patients randomised to PFO closure and followed to study conclusion 22 experienced non-fatal ischaemic strokes, as did 34 of 941 patients randomised to medical therapy (risk ratio (RR) 0.61, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.07; heterogeneity: p=0.34, I2=8%, confidence in estimates low due to risk of bias and imprecision). Analyses for ischaemic stroke restricted to ‘per-protocol’ patients or patients with concomitant atrial septal aneurysm did not substantially change the observed RRs. Complication rates associated with either PFO closure or medical therapy were low. Conclusions Pooled data from three RCTs provides insufficient support that PFO closure is preferable to medical therapy for secondary prevention of cryptogenic stroke in patients with PFO. PMID:24607561

Spencer, Frederick A; Lopes, Luciane C; Kennedy, Sean A; Guyatt, Gordon

2014-01-01

65

Frankincense: systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess evidence from randomised clinical trials about the effectiveness of extracts of Boswellia serrata (frankincense). Design Systematic review. Data sources Electronic searches on Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Amed, and Cochrane Library. Hand searches of conference proceedings, bibliographies, and departmental files. Review methods All randomised clinical trials of B serrata extract as a treatment for any human medical condition were included and studies of B serrata preparations combined with other ingredients were excluded. Titles and abstracts of all retrieved articles were read and hard copies of all relevant articles were obtained. Selection of studies, data extraction and validation were done by the author. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality of all included trials. Results Of 47 potentially relevant studies, seven met all inclusion criteria (five placebo controlled, two with active controls). The included trials related to asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, osteoarthritis, and collagenous colitis. Results of all trials indicated that B serrata extracts were clinically effective. Three studies were of good methodological quality. No serious safety issues were noted. Conclusions The evidence for the effectiveness of B serrata extracts is encouraging but not compelling. PMID:19091760

2008-01-01

66

Cumulative radiation dose estimates from medical imaging in paediatric patients with non-oncologic chronic illnesses. A systematic review.  

PubMed

Paediatric patients with non-oncologic chronic illnesses often require ongoing care that may result in repeated imaging and exposure to ionizing radiation from both diagnostic and interventional procedures. In this study the scientific literature on cumulative effective dose (CED) of radiation accrued from medical imaging among specific cohorts of paediatric, non-oncologic chronic patients (inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, shunt-treated hydrocephalus, hemophilia, spinal dysraphism) was systematically reviewed. We conducted PubMed/Medline, Scopus and EMBASE searches of peer-reviewed papers on CED from diagnostic and therapeutic radiological examinations. No time restriction was introduced in the search. Only studies reporting CEDs accrued for a period >1 year were included. We found that the annual CED was relatively low (<3 mSv/year) in cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, patients with cerebrospinal fluid shunts and hemophilia, while being moderate (>3-20 mSv/year) in Crohn's patients. This extra yearly radiation exposure accrues over the lifetime and can reach high values (>100 mSv) in selected cohorts of paediatric chronic patients. PMID:24440537

Brambilla, Marco; De Mauri, Andreana; Lizio, Domenico; Leva, Lucia; Carriero, Alessandro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio

2014-06-01

67

Prescriber barriers and enablers to minimising potentially inappropriate medications in adults: a systematic review and thematic synthesis  

PubMed Central

Objective To synthesise qualitative studies that explore prescribers’ perceived barriers and enablers to minimising potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) chronically prescribed in adults. Design A qualitative systematic review was undertaken by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL and INFORMIT from inception to March 2014, combined with an extensive manual search of reference lists and related citations. A quality checklist was used to assess the transparency of the reporting of included studies and the potential for bias. Thematic synthesis identified common subthemes and descriptive themes across studies from which an analytical construct was developed. Study characteristics were examined to explain differences in findings. Setting All healthcare settings. Participants Medical and non-medical prescribers of medicines to adults. Outcomes Prescribers’ perspectives on factors which shape their behaviour towards continuing or discontinuing PIMs in adults. Results 21 studies were included; most explored primary care physicians’ perspectives on managing older, community-based adults. Barriers and enablers to minimising PIMs emerged within four analytical themes: problem awareness; inertia secondary to lower perceived value proposition for ceasing versus continuing PIMs; self-efficacy in regard to personal ability to alter prescribing; and feasibility of altering prescribing in routine care environments given external constraints. The first three themes are intrinsic to the prescriber (eg, beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviour) and the fourth is extrinsic (eg, patient, work setting, health system and cultural factors). The PIMs examined and practice setting influenced the themes reported. Conclusions A multitude of highly interdependent factors shape prescribers’ behaviour towards continuing or discontinuing PIMs. A full understanding of prescriber barriers and enablers to changing prescribing behaviour is critical to the development of targeted interventions aimed at deprescribing PIMs and reducing the risk of iatrogenic harm. PMID:25488097

Anderson, Kristen; Stowasser, Danielle; Freeman, Christopher; Scott, Ian

2014-01-01

68

Ethics in systematic reviews.  

PubMed

Since its introduction by the Nuremberg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki, the place held by ethics in biomedical research has been continuously increasing in importance. The past 30 years have also seen exponential growth in the number of biomedical articles published. A systematic review of the literature is the scientific way of synthesising a plethora of information, by exhaustively searching out and objectively analysing the studies dealing with a given issue. However, the question of ethics in systematic reviews is rarely touched upon. This could lead to some drawbacks, as systematic reviews may contain studies with ethical insufficiencies, may be a possible way to publish unethical research and may also be prone to conflict of interest. Finally, informed consent given for an original study is not necessarily still valid at the systematic review level. There is no doubt that routine ethical assessment in systematic reviews would help to improve the ethical and methodological quality of studies in general. However, ethical issues change so much with time and location, and are so broad in scope and in context that it appears illusory to search for a universal, internationally accepted standard for ethical assessment in systematic reviews. Some simple suggestions could nevertheless be drawn from the present reflection and are discussed in the paper. PMID:20952493

Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Marchal-Sixou, Christine; Nabet, Cathy; Maret, Delphine; Hamel, Olivier

2010-12-01

69

Why Are Medical and Health-Related Studies Not Being Published? A Systematic Review of Reasons Given by Investigators  

PubMed Central

Objective About half of medical and health-related studies are not published. We conducted a systematic review of reports on reasons given by investigators for not publishing their studies in peer-reviewed journals. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and SCOPUS (until 13/09/2013), and references of identified articles were searched to identify reports of surveys that provided data on reasons given by investigators for not publishing studies. The proportion of non-submission and reasons for non-publication was calculated using the number of unpublished studies as the denominator. Because of heterogeneity across studies, quantitative pooling was not conducted. Exploratory subgroup analyses were conducted. Results We included 54 survey reports. Data from 38 included reports were available to estimate proportions of at least one reason given for not publishing studies. The proportion of non-submission among unpublished studies ranged from 55% to 100%, with a median of 85%. The reasons given by investigators for not publishing their studies included: lack of time or low priority (median 33%), studies being incomplete (median 15%), study not for publication (median 14%), manuscript in preparation or under review (median 12%), unimportant or negative result (median 12%), poor study quality or design (median 11%), fear of rejection (median 12%), rejection by journals (median 6%), author or co-author problems (median 10%), and sponsor or funder problems (median 9%). In general, the frequency of reasons given for non-publication was not associated with the source of unpublished studies, study design, or time when a survey was conducted. Conclusions Non-submission of studies for publication remains the main cause of non-publication of studies. Measures to reduce non-publication of studies and alternative models of research dissemination need to be developed to address the main reasons given by investigators for not publishing their studies, such as lack of time or low priority and fear of being rejected by journals. PMID:25335091

Song, Fujian; Loke, Yoon; Hooper, Lee

2014-01-01

70

The Effect of New Cooperative Medical Scheme on Health Outcomes and Alleviating Catastrophic Health Expenditure in China: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background In 2002, the Chinese government launched a new rural health financing policy to provide health insurance (New Cooperative Medical Scheme, NCMS) for its rural population. NCMS, jointly financed by governments and individual households, aims to protect households from impoverishment due to catastrophic health expenditure. In 2011, NCMS covered more than 96% of the rural population. We have systematically searched and reviewed available evidence to estimate the effects of NCMS on health outcomes and on alleviating catastrophic health expenditure. Methods PubMed, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, ProQuest Digital Dissertations, CMCI, CNKI, and VIP were searched. We also obtained literature from colleague communications. Quasi-experimental studies regarding the effect of NCMS on health outcomes and catastrophic health expenditure were included. Two independent reviewers screened the literature, extracted the data, and assessed the study quality. Results Fifteen studies out of the 6123 studies in the literature fulfilled criteria and were included in this review. Twelve studies identified the relationship between NCMS and health outcomes, among which six studies measured sickness or injury in the past four weeks, four measured sickness or injury in the past two weeks, and five measured self-reported health status. Four studies focused on the relationship between NCMS and alleviating catastrophic health expenditure. However, the results from these studies were in conflict: individual studies indicated that NCMS had positive, negative, or no effect on health outcomes and/or the incidence of catastrophic health payments, respectively. Conclusions We still have no clear evidence that NCMS improves the health outcomes and decreases the alleviating catastrophic health expenditure of the China’s rural population. In addition, the heterogeneity among individual studies reminds us that provider payment method reforms, benefit package and information systems around NCMS should be improved in the future. PMID:22916098

Liang, Xiaoyun; Guo, Hong; Jin, Chenggang; Peng, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Xiulan

2012-01-01

71

The impact of health information technology on the quality of medical and health care: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to systematically review the published evidence of the impact of health information technology (HIT) or health information systems (HIS) on the quality of healthcare, focusing on clinicians' adherence to evidence-based guidelines and the corresponding impact this had on patient clinical outcomes. The review covered the use of health information technologies and systems in both

Aziz Jamal; Kirsten McKenzie; Michele Clark

2009-01-01

72

Diabetes and weight in comparative studies of bariatric surgery vs conventional medical therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

We performed a meta-analysis of weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) evaluated in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies of bariatric surgery vs conventional medical therapy. English articles published through June 10, 2013 that compared bariatric surgery with conventional therapy and included T2DM endpoints with ?12-month follow-up were systematically reviewed. Body mass index (BMI, in kilogram per square meter), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C, in degree), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG, in milligram per deciliter) were analyzed by calculating weighted mean differences (WMDs) and pooled standardized mean differences and associated 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). Aggregated T2DM remission event data were analyzed by calculating the pooled odds ratio (POR) and 95 % CI. Random effects assumptions were applied throughout; I(2)???75.0 % was considered indicative of significant heterogeneity. Systematic review identified 512 articles: 47 duplicates were removed, 446 failed inclusion criteria (i.e., n?reviews, case reports, abstracts, and kin studies). Of 19 eligible articles, two not focused on diagnosed T2DM and one with insufficient T2DM data were excluded. In the final 16 included papers, 3,076 patients (mean BMI, 40.9; age, 47.0; 72.0 % female) underwent bariatric surgery; 3,055 (39.4; 48.6, 69.0 %) received conventional or no weight-loss therapy. In bariatric surgery vs conventional therapy groups, the mean 17.3?±?5.7 month BMI WMD was 8.3 (7.0, 9.6; p?medical therapy in achieving weight loss, HbA(1C) and FPG reduction, and diabetes remission. The odds of bariatric surgery patients reaching T2DM remission ranged from 9.8 to 15.8 times the odds of patients treated with conventional therapy. PMID:24374842

Ribaric, G; Buchwald, J N; McGlennon, T W

2014-03-01

73

A systematic review of accidental injury from fire, wandering and medication self-administration errors for older adults with and without dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assessment of risk of injury in the home is important for older adults when considering whether they are able to live independently. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine the frequency of injury for persons with dementia and the general older adult population, from three sources: fires\\/burns, medication self-administration errors and wandering. Relevant articles (n=74) were screened

Alison Douglas; Lori Letts; Julie Richardson

2011-01-01

74

A Systematic Review of Cochrane Anticoagulation Reviews  

PubMed Central

Context I coauthored a published review of anticoagulation for venous thromboembolism in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and published a review on the same topic in MedGenMed (now the Medscape Journal of Medicine). In contrast to the article in Medscape, the discussion and conclusions in the Cochrane review were altered appreciably during the review process. Consequently, I decided to critique all anticoagulation drug-related reviews and protocols in the Cochrane database with feedback letters concerning any issues of potential controversy. Evidence Acquisition Using key words in the search engine of the Cochrane Reviews, I located reviews and protocols involving anticoagulant drugs. I critiqued each anticoagulation review and protocol and sent a total of 57 feedback letters to Cochrane concerning each publication to elicit a response/rebuttal from the authors. Evidence Synthesis Cochrane anticoagulation review editors acknowledged receipt of all letters. As of 12 months after receipt of my last letter, the Cochrane authors have replied to 13 of the 57 and agreed with many of my points. Two protocols were withdrawn after my feedback letters were acknowledged. The 58 Cochrane anticoagulation drug reviews, including mine, contained 9 categories of methodological errors (207 total instances) and 4 types of biases (18 total instances). This review of those Cochrane reviews suggests that the effectiveness of anticoagulants for 30 medical indications is questionable. Conclusions The efficacy of anticoagulants for treatment and prophylaxis for 30 current medical indications should be reconsidered by the scientific community and medical regulatory agencies. At least 50,000 people per year worldwide have fatal bleeding due to anticoagulant treatment or prophylaxis for these indications. PMID:19295926

Cundiff, David Keith

2009-01-01

75

Efficacy of single balloon enteroscopy: a 2 year Veterans Affairs medical center experience with a systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Backgrounds The inherent challenges associated with accessing the small bowel (SB) have limited evaluation of this portion of the GI tract. Recent advances in imaging have improved our ability to detect and treat SB pathology. However, little is known regarding the utilization and outcomes of single balloon enteroscopy (SBE). Objectives Here we report our single center experience with SBE to examine its efficacy on SB investigation in the Veteran's Affairs population. We also provide a systematic review of institutional experiences with SBE. Results Examination of our experience showed obscure GI bleeding as the most common indication (77%), with angioectasias being the most common finding (47%). Our diagnostic yield (DY) was 79%. Subgroup analysis showed a significantly higher DY when SBE was preceded by a positive video capsule endoscopy (VCE ) exam (89% vs 59%, p=0.03). Of the VCE findings, fresh blood and angioectasias were significantly more likely to be confirmed on subsequent SBE (p=0.02). We recorded no significant adverse events. Our systematic review showed a significant positive correlation only between depth of insertion and procedure time. Two (0.2%) perforations were reported. Conclusions SBE is a safe and effective method for SB evaluation, and has a significantly higher DY when preceded by a positive VCE exam showing fresh blood/angioectasias. Improvement of DY may not be dependent on procedure time, depth of insertion, or even procedure volume. Prior SB evaluation by VCE and diligent examination during SBE may be the primary means to enhance DY. PMID:24498527

Mittal, Mohit; Leung, Felix W; Mann, Surinder K

2013-01-01

76

Image-Based Medical Expert Teleconsultation in Acute Care of Injuries. A Systematic Review of Effects on Information Accuracy, Diagnostic Validity, Clinical Outcome, and User Satisfaction  

PubMed Central

Objective To systematically review the literature on image-based telemedicine for medical expert consultation in acute care of injuries, considering system, user, and clinical aspects. Design Systematic review of peer-reviewed journal articles. Data sources Searches of five databases and in eligible articles, relevant reviews, and specialized peer-reviewed journals. Eligibility criteria Studies were included that covered teleconsultation systems based on image capture and transfer with the objective of seeking medical expertise for the diagnostic and treatment of acute injury care and that presented the evaluation of one or several aspects of the system based on empirical data. Studies of systems not under routine practice or including real-time interactive video conferencing were excluded. Method The procedures used in this review followed the PRISMA Statement. Predefined criteria were used for the assessment of the risk of bias. The DeLone and McLean Information System Success Model was used as a framework to synthesise the results according to system quality, user satisfaction, information quality and net benefits. All data extractions were done by at least two reviewers independently. Results Out of 331 articles, 24 were found eligible. Diagnostic validity and management outcomes were often studied; fewer studies focused on system quality and user satisfaction. Most systems were evaluated at a feasibility stage or during small-scale pilot testing. Although the results of the evaluations were generally positive, biases in the methodology of evaluation were concerning selection, performance and exclusion. Gold standards and statistical tests were not always used when assessing diagnostic validity and patient management. Conclusions Image-based telemedicine systems for injury emergency care tend to support valid diagnosis and influence patient management. The evidence relates to a few clinical fields, and has substantial methodological shortcomings. As in the case of telemedicine in general, user and system quality aspects are poorly documented, both of which affect scale up of such programs. PMID:24887257

Hasselberg, Marie; Beer, Netta; Blom, Lisa; Wallis, Lee A.; Laflamme, Lucie

2014-01-01

77

Factors influencing the effectiveness of multisource feedback in improving the professional practice of medical doctors: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Multisource feedback (MSF) is currently being introduced in the UK as part of a cycle of performance review for doctors. However, although it is suggested that the provision of feedback can lead to a positive change in performance and learning for medical professionals, the evidence supporting these assumptions is unclear. The aim of this review, therefore, was to identify the key factors that influence the effectiveness of multisource feedback in improving the professional practice of medical doctors. Method Relevant electronic bibliographic databases were searched for studies that aimed to assess the impact of MSF on professional practice. Two reviewers independently selected and quality assessed the studies and abstracted data regarding study design, setting, MSF instrument, behaviour changes identified and influencing factors using a standard data extraction form. Results A total of 16 studies met the inclusion criteria and quality assessment criteria. While seven studies reported only a general change in professional practice, a further seven studies identified specific changes in behaviour. The main professional behaviours that were found to be influenced by the feedback were communication, both with colleagues and patients and an improvement in clinical competence/skills. The main factors found to influence the acceptance and use of MSF were the format of the feedback, specifically in terms of whether it was facilitated, or if narrative comments were included in the review, and if the feedback was from sources that the physician believed to be knowledgeable and credible. Conclusions While there is limited evidence suggesting that MSF can influence professional performance, the quality of this evidence is variable. Further research is necessary to establish how this type of feedback actually influences behaviours and what factors have greatest influence. PMID:24725268

2014-01-01

78

The systematic review: an overview.  

PubMed

This article is the first in a new series on systematic reviews from the Joanna Briggs Institute, an international collaborative supporting evidence-based practice in nursing, medicine, and allied health fields. The purpose of the series is to show nurses how to conduct a systematic review-one step at a time. This first installment provides a synopsis of the systematic review as a scientific exercise, one that influences health care decisions. PMID:24572533

Aromataris, Edoardo; Pearson, Alan

2014-03-01

79

A systematic view on medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical informatics is defined as the scientific discipline concerned with the systematic processing of data, information and knowledge in medicine and health care. The domain of medical informatics (including health informatics), its aim, methods and tools, and its relevance to other disciplines in medicine and health sciences are outlined. It is recognized that one of the major tasks of medical

A. Hasman; R. Haux; A. Albert

1996-01-01

80

Interventions to promote linkage to and utilization of HIV medical care among HIV-diagnosed persons: a qualitative systematic review, 1996-2011.  

PubMed

This qualitative systematic review examined interventions that promote linkage to or utilization of HIV care among HIV-diagnosed persons in the United States. We conducted automated searches of electronic databases (i.e., MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL) and manual searches of journals, reference lists, and listservs. Fourteen studies from 19 published reports between 1996 and 2011 met our inclusion criteria. We developed a three-tier approach, based on strength of study design, to evaluate 6 findings on linkage to care and 18 findings on HIV care utilization. Our review identified similar strategies for the two outcomes, including active coordinator's role in helping with linking to or utilizing HIV care; offering information and education about HIV care; providing motivational or strengths-based counseling; accompanying clients to medical appointments and helping with appointment coordination. The interventions focused almost exclusively on individual-level factors. More research is recommended to examine interventions that address system and structural barriers. PMID:23456593

Liau, Adrian; Crepaz, Nicole; Lyles, Cynthia M; Higa, Darrel H; Mullins, Mary M; DeLuca, Julia; Petters, Sarah; Marks, Gary

2013-07-01

81

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Self-Administration of Medication (SAM) Schemes in the Hospital Setting: A Systematic Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Background Self-administration of medicines is believed to increase patients' understanding about their medication and to promote their independence and autonomy in the hospital setting. The effect of inpatient self-administration of medication (SAM) schemes on patients, staff and institutions is currently unclear. Objective To systematically review the literature relating to the effect of SAM schemes on the following outcomes: patient knowledge, patient compliance/medication errors, success in self-administration, patient satisfaction, staff satisfaction, staff workload, and costs. Design Keyword and text word searches of online databases were performed between January and March 2013. Included articles described and evaluated inpatient SAM schemes. Case studies and anecdotal studies were excluded. Results 43 papers were included for final analysis. Due to the heterogeneity of results and unclear findings it was not possible to perform a quantitative synthesis of results. Participation in SAM schemes often led to increased knowledge about drugs and drug regimens, but not side effects. However, the effect of SAM schemes on patient compliance/medication errors was inconclusive. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with their involvement in SAM schemes. Conclusions SAM schemes appear to provide some benefits (e.g. increased patient knowledge), but their effect on other outcomes (e.g. compliance) is unclear. Few studies of high methodological quality using validated outcome measures exist. Inconsistencies in both measuring and reporting outcomes across studies make it challenging to compare results and draw substantive conclusions about the effectiveness of SAM schemes. PMID:25463269

Richardson, Suzanna J.; Brooks, Hannah L.; Bramley, George; Coleman, Jamie J.

2014-01-01

82

Impact of health information technology interventions to improve medication laboratory monitoring for ambulatory patients: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medication errors are a major source of morbidity and mortality. Inadequate laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications after initial prescription is a medical error that contributes to preventable adverse drug events. Health information technology (HIT)-based clinical decision support may improve patient safety by improving the laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications, but the effectiveness of such interventions is unclear. Therefore, the authors

Shira H. Fischer; Jennifer Tjia; Terry S. Field

2010-01-01

83

The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR)?=?0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR?=?0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P?medication errors are similar and robust to variations in important aspects of intervention design and context. This suggests that CPOE implementation, as subsidized under the HITECH Act, may benefit public health. More detailed reporting of the context and process of implementation could shed light on factors associated with greater effectiveness. PMID:24894078

2014-01-01

84

Methods used to conduct and report Bayesian mixed treatment comparisons published in the medical literature: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives To identify published closed-loop Bayesian mixed treatment comparisons (MTCs) and to summarise characteristics regarding their conduct and reporting. Design Systematic review. Methods We searched multiple bibliographic databases (January 2006–31 July 2011) for full-text, English language publications of Bayesian MTCs comparing the effectiveness or safety of ?3 interventions based on randomised controlled trials and having at least one closed loop. Methodological and reporting characteristics of MTCs were extracted in duplicate and summarised descriptively. Results We identified 34 Bayesian MTCs spanning 13 clinical areas. Publication of MTCs increased over the 5-year period; with 76.5% published during or after 2009. MTCs included a mean (±SD) of 35.9±30.1 trials (n=33?459±71?233 participants) and 8.5±4.3 interventions (85.7% pharmacological). Non-informative and informative prior distributions were reported to be used in 44.1% and 8.8% of MTCs, respectively, with the remainder failing to specify the prior used. A random-effects model was used to analyse the networks of trials in 58.5% of MTCs, all using WinBUGS; however, code was infrequently provided (20.6%). More than two-thirds of MTCs (76.5%) also conducted traditional meta-analysis. Methods used to evaluate convergence, heterogeneity and inconsistency were infrequently reported, but from those providing detail, methods appeared varied. MTCs most often used a binary effect measure (85.3%) and ranking of interventions based on probability was common (61.8%), although rarely displayed in a figure (8.8% of MTCs). MTCs were published in 24 different journals with a mean impact factor of 9.20±8.71. While 70.8% of journals imposed limits on word counts and 45.8% limits on the number of tables/figures, online supplements/appendices were allowed in 79.2% of journals. Publication of closed-loop Bayesian MTCs is increasing in frequency, but details regarding their methodology are often poorly described. Efforts in clarifying the appropriate methods and reporting of Bayesian MTCs should be of priority. PMID:23878173

Sobieraj, Diana M; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Baker, William L; Phung, Olivia J; White, C Michael; Coleman, Craig I

2013-01-01

85

Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System versus Medical Therapy for Menorrhagia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) with conventional medical treatment in reducing heavy menstrual bleeding. Material/Methods Relevant studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and clinical trials registries (from inception to April 2014). Randomized controlled trials comparing the LNG-IUS with conventional medical treatment (mefenamic acid, tranexamic acid, norethindrone, medroxyprogesterone acetate injection, or combined oral contraceptive pills) in patients with menorrhagia were included. Results Eight randomized controlled trials that included 1170 women (LNG-IUS, n=562; conventional medical treatment, n=608) met inclusion criteria. The LNG-IUS was superior to conventional medical treatment in reducing menstrual blood loss (as measured by the alkaline hematin method or estimated by pictorial bleeding assessment chart scores). More women were satisfied with the LNG-IUS than with the use of conventional medical treatment (odds ratio [OR] 5.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.73–9.86). Compared with conventional medical treatment, the LNG-IUS was associated with a lower rate of discontinuation (14.6% vs. 28.9%, OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.20–0.74) and fewer treatment failures (9.2% vs. 31.0%, OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.10–0.34). Furthermore, quality of life assessment favored LNG-IUS over conventional medical treatment, although use of various measurements limited our ability to pool the data for more powerful evidence. Serious adverse events were statistically comparable between treatments. Conclusions The LNG-IUS was the more effective first choice for management of menorrhagia compared with conventional medical treatment. Long-term, randomized trials are required to further investigate patient-based outcomes and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the LNG-IUS and other medical treatments. PMID:25245843

Qiu, Jin; Cheng, Jiajing; Wang, Qingying; Hua, Jie

2014-01-01

86

A systematic review of the efficacy of prophylactic control measures for naturally occurring canine leishmaniosis. Part II: Topically applied insecticide treatments and prophylactic medications.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to systematically review the efficacy of topically applied insecticide treatments of dogs (impregnated collars, spot-ons), and prophylactic medications to prevent natural Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) infection in dogs. Randomised controlled trials (RCT), non-randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies that investigated preventive efficacy for natural L. infantum infection in dogs were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed each study against the inclusion criteria, independently extracted relevant data from all included studies and assessed the risk of methodological shortcomings in each individual study. The odds ratio (OR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference for continuous outcomes were calculated. Meta-analysis was not performed due to heterogeneity of the studies identified. The search yielded 937 articles, from which 84 full text articles were selected for second stage screening. Eleven eligible studies were included; four on collars (two RCTs), three on spot-ons (two RCTs - one looking at two different dosing regimens), three on prophylactic medications (all RCTs) and one on both collars and spot-ons summarised in this paper. All of the studies were considered to be at a high risk of methodological shortcomings, with the exception of one spot-on study which was considered to be at an unclear risk of methodological shortcomings. Deltamethrin collars, 65% permethrin, 10% imidacloprid with 50% permethrin spot-ons and domperidone prophylactic medication tended to significantly reduce the proportion of dogs infected with L. infantum based on either parasitological or serological evidence. PMID:25062787

Wylie, C E; Carbonell-Antoñanzas, M; Aiassa, E; Dhollander, S; Zagmutt, F J; Brodbelt, D C; Solano-Gallego, L

2014-11-01

87

Tertiary teledermatology: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Telemedicine is becoming widely used in healthcare. Dermatology, because of its visual character, is especially suitable for telemedicine applications. Most common is teledermatology between general practitioners and dermatologists (secondary teledermatology). Another form of the teledermatology process is communication among dermatologists (tertiary teledermatology). The objective of this systematic review is to give an overview of studies on tertiary teledermatology with emphasis on the categories of use. A systematic literature search on tertiary teledermatology studies used all databases of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1966-November 2007) and EMBASE (1980-November 2007). Categories of use were identified for all included articles and the modalities of tertiary teledermatology were extracted, together with technology, the setting the outcome measures, and their results. The search resulted in 1,377 publications, of which 11 were included. Four categories of use were found: getting an expert opinion from a specialized, often academic dermatologist (6/11); resident training (2/11); continuing medical education (4/11); and second opinion from a nonspecialized dermatologist (2/11). Three modalities were found: a teledermatology consultation application (7/11), a Web site (2/11), and an e-mail list (1/11). The majority (7/11) used store-and-forward, and 3/11 used store-and-forward and real-time. Outcome measures mentioned were learning effect (6), costs (5), diagnostic accuracy (1), validity (2) and reliability (2), patient and physician satisfaction (1), and efficiency improvement (3). Tertiary teledermatology's main category of use is getting an expert opinion from a specialized, often academic dermatologist. Tertiary teledermatology research is still in early development. Future research should focus on identifying the scale of tertiary teledermatology and on what modality of teledermatology is most suited for what purpose in communication among dermatologists. PMID:20064068

van der Heijden, Job P; Spuls, Phyllis I; Voorbraak, Frans P; de Keizer, Nicolet F; Witkamp, Leonard; Bos, Jan D

2010-01-01

88

Reaching the hard-to-reach: a systematic review of strategies for improving health and medical research with socially disadvantaged groups  

PubMed Central

Background This study aims to review the literature regarding the barriers to sampling, recruitment, participation, and retention of members of socioeconomically disadvantaged groups in health research and strategies for increasing the amount of health research conducted with socially disadvantaged groups. Methods A systematic review with narrative synthesis was conducted. Searches of electronic databases Medline, PsychInfo, EMBASE, Social Science Index via Web of Knowledge and CINHAL were conducted for English language articles published up to May 2013. Qualitative and quantitative studies as well as literature reviews were included. Articles were included if they reported attempts to increase disadvantaged group participation in research, or the barriers to research with disadvantaged groups. Groups of interest were those described as socially, culturally or financially disadvantaged compared to the majority of society. Eligible articles were categorised according to five phases of research: 1) sampling, 2) recruitment and gaining consent, 3) data collection and measurement, 4) intervention delivery and uptake, and 5) retention and attrition. Results In total, 116 papers from 115 studies met inclusion criteria and 31 previous literature reviews were included. A comprehensive summation of the major barriers to working with various disadvantaged groups is provided, along with proposed strategies for addressing each of the identified types of barriers. Most studies of strategies to address the barriers were of a descriptive nature and only nine studies reported the results of randomised trials. Conclusions To tackle the challenges of research with socially disadvantaged groups, and increase their representation in health and medical research, researchers and research institutions need to acknowledge extended timeframes, plan for higher resourcing costs and operate via community partnerships. PMID:24669751

2014-01-01

89

Haematospermia – A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Haematospermia (or haemospermia) is a distressing symptom in sexually active men. In most cases, it is caused by non-specific inflammation of the prostate and seminal vesicles. In a small percentage of men, however, it may be a manifestation of genito-urinary or systemic malignancy, in particular prostate cancer. The purpose of this review is to explain the causes and management of patients with haematospermia. PMID:16834849

Kumar, Priya; Kapoor, Sona; Nargund, Vinod

2006-01-01

90

Acid-suppressive medications and risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background and aims Acid-suppressive medications, particularly proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), may decrease the risk of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) in patients with Barrett’s oesophagus (BO). We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis of studies evaluating the association between acid-suppressive medications (PPIs and histamine receptor antagonists (H2RAs)) and risk of OAC or high-grade dysplasia (BO-HGD) in patients with BO. Methods We performed a systematic search of multiple electronic databases and conference proceedings up to June 2013 to identify studies reporting the association between use of acid-suppressive medications and risk of OAC and/or BO-HGD in patients with BO. Summary ORs with 95% CIs were estimated. Results We identified seven observational studies (2813 patients with BO, 317 cases of OAC or BO-HGD, 84.4% PPI users). On meta-analysis, PPI use was associated with a 71% reduction in risk of OAC and/or BO-HGD in patients with BO (adjusted OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.79). There was a trend towards a dose–response relationship with PPI use for >2–3 years protective against OAC or BO-HGD (three studies; PPI use >2–3 years vs <2–3 years: OR 0.45 (95% CI 0.19 to 1.06) vs 1.09 (0.47 to 2.56)). Considerable heterogeneity was observed. Two studies reported the association between H2RA use and risk of OAC and/or BO-HGD (1352 patients with BO, 156 cases of OAC, 25.4% on H2RAs), and both studies did not show a significant effect. Conclusions Based on meta-analysis of observational studies, the use of PPIs is associated with a decreased risk of OAC and/or BO-HGD in patients with BO. None of the studies showed an increased risk of OAC. PPI use should be considered in BO, and chemopreventive trials of PPIs in patients with BO are warranted. PMID:24221456

Singh, Siddharth; Garg, Sushil Kumar; Singh, Preet Paul; Iyer, Prasad G; El-Serag, Hashem B

2014-01-01

91

Medical therapy of stricturing Crohn's disease: what the gut can learn from other organs - a systematic review.  

PubMed

Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic remitting and relapsing disease. Fibrostenosing complications such as intestinal strictures, stenosis and ultimately obstruction are some of its most common long-term complications. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding of CD and a significant improvement of anti-inflammatory therapeutics, medical therapy for stricturing CD is still inadequate. No specific anti-fibrotic therapy exists and the incidence rate of strictures has essentially remained unchanged. Therefore, the current therapy of established fibrotic strictures comprises mainly endoscopic dilation as well as surgical approaches. However, these treatment options are associated with major complications as well as high recurrence rates. Thus, a specific anti-fibrotic therapy for CD is urgently needed. Importantly, there is now a growing body of evidence for prevention as well as effective medical treatment of fibrotic diseases of other organs such as the skin, lung, kidney and liver. In face of the similarity of molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis across these organs, translation of therapeutic approaches from other fibrotic diseases to the intestine appears to be a promising treatment strategy. In particular transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) neutralization, selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors, blockade of components of the renin-angiotensin system, IL-13 inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have emerged as potential drug candidates for anti-fibrotic therapy and may retard progression or even reverse established intestinal fibrosis. However, major challenges have to be overcome in the translation of novel anti-fibrotics into intestinal fibrosis therapy, such as the development of appropriate biomarkers that predict the development and accurately monitor therapeutic responses. Future clinical studies are a prerequisite to evaluate the optimal timing for anti-fibrotic treatment approaches, to elucidate the best routes of application, and to evaluate the potential of drug candidates to reach the ultimate goal: the prevention or reversal of established fibrosis and strictures in CD patients. PMID:24678903

Bettenworth, Dominik; Rieder, Florian

2014-01-01

92

Medical therapy of stricturing Crohn’s disease: what the gut can learn from other organs - a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic remitting and relapsing disease. Fibrostenosing complications such as intestinal strictures, stenosis and ultimately obstruction are some of its most common long-term complications. Despite recent advances in the pathophysiological understanding of CD and a significant improvement of anti-inflammatory therapeutics, medical therapy for stricturing CD is still inadequate. No specific anti-fibrotic therapy exists and the incidence rate of strictures has essentially remained unchanged. Therefore, the current therapy of established fibrotic strictures comprises mainly endoscopic dilation as well as surgical approaches. However, these treatment options are associated with major complications as well as high recurrence rates. Thus, a specific anti-fibrotic therapy for CD is urgently needed. Importantly, there is now a growing body of evidence for prevention as well as effective medical treatment of fibrotic diseases of other organs such as the skin, lung, kidney and liver. In face of the similarity of molecular mechanisms of fibrogenesis across these organs, translation of therapeutic approaches from other fibrotic diseases to the intestine appears to be a promising treatment strategy. In particular transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) neutralization, selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors, blockade of components of the renin-angiotensin system, IL-13 inhibitors and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have emerged as potential drug candidates for anti-fibrotic therapy and may retard progression or even reverse established intestinal fibrosis. However, major challenges have to be overcome in the translation of novel anti-fibrotics into intestinal fibrosis therapy, such as the development of appropriate biomarkers that predict the development and accurately monitor therapeutic responses. Future clinical studies are a prerequisite to evaluate the optimal timing for anti-fibrotic treatment approaches, to elucidate the best routes of application, and to evaluate the potential of drug candidates to reach the ultimate goal: the prevention or reversal of established fibrosis and strictures in CD patients. PMID:24678903

2014-01-01

93

Medical Imaging: A Review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rapid progress of medical science and the invention of various medicines have benefited mankind and the whole civilization. Modern science also has been doing wonders in the surgical field. But, the proper and correct diagnosis of diseases is the primary necessity before the treatment. The more sophisticate the bio-instruments are, better diagnosis will be possible. The medical images plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy of doctor and teaching and researching etc. Medical imaging is often thought of as a way to represent anatomical structures of the body with the help of X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. But often it is more useful for physiologic function rather than anatomy. With the growth of computer and image technology medical imaging has greatly influenced medical field. As the quality of medical imaging affects diagnosis the medical image processing has become a hotspot and the clinical applications wanting to store and retrieve images for future purpose needs some convenient process to store those images in details. This paper is a tutorial review of the medical image processing and repository techniques appeared in the literature.

Ganguly, Debashis; Chakraborty, Srabonti; Balitanas, Maricel; Kim, Tai-Hoon

94

Improving the uptake of systematic reviews: a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and relevance  

PubMed Central

Objective Little is known about the barriers, facilitators and interventions that impact on systematic review uptake. The objective of this study was to identify how uptake of systematic reviews can be improved. Selection criteria Studies were included if they addressed interventions enhancing the uptake of systematic reviews. Reports in any language were included. All decisionmakers were eligible. Studies could be randomised trials, cluster-randomised trials, controlled-clinical trials and before-and-after studies. Data sources We searched 19 databases including PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library, covering the full range of publication years from inception to December 2010. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed quality according to the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care criteria. Results 10 studies from 11 countries, containing 12 interventions met our criteria. Settings included a hospital, a government department and a medical school. Doctors, nurses, mid-wives, patients and programme managers were targeted. Six of the studies were geared to improving knowledge and attitudes while four targeted clinical practice. Synthesis of results Three studies of low-to-moderate risk of bias, identified interventions that showed a statistically significant improvement: educational visits, short summaries of systematic reviews and targeted messaging. Promising interventions include e-learning, computer-based learning, inactive workshops, use of knowledge brokers and an e-registry of reviews. Juxtaposing barriers and facilitators alongside the identified interventions, it was clear that the three effective approaches addressed a wide range of barriers and facilitators. Discussion A limited number of studies were found for inclusion. However, the extensive literature search is one of the strengths of this review. Conclusions Targeted messaging, educational visits and summaries are recommended to enhance systematic review uptake. Identified promising approaches need to be developed further. New strategies are required to encompass neglected barriers and facilitators. This review addressed effectiveness and also appropriateness of knowledge uptake strategies. PMID:25324321

Wallace, John; Byrne, Charles; Clarke, Mike

2014-01-01

95

Local production of medical technologies and its effect on access in low and middle income countries: a systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the existing theoretical and empirical literature examining the link between "local production" of pharmaceuticals and medical devices and increased local access to these products. Our preliminary hypothesis is that studies showing a robust relationship between local production and access to medical products are sparse, at best. Methods: An extensive literature search was conducted using a wide variety of databases and search terms intending to capture as many different aspects of this issue as possible. The results of the search were reviewed and categorized according to their relevance to the research question. The literature was also reviewed to determine the rigor used to examine the effects of local production and what implications these experiences hold for other developing countries. Results: Literature addressing the benefits of local production and the link between it and access to medical products is sparse, mainly descriptive and lacking empirical evidence. Of the literature we reviewed that addressed comparative economics and strategic planning of multinational and domestic firms, there are few dealing with emerging markets and lower-middle income countries and even fewer that compare local biomedical producers with multinational corporations in terms of a reasonable metric. What comparisons exist mainly relate to prices of local versus foreign/multinational produced medicines. Conclusions: An assessment of the existing theoretical and empirical literature examining the link between "local production" of pharmaceuticals and medical devices and increased local access to these products reveals a paucity of literature explicitly dealing with this issue. Of the literature that does exist, methods used to date are insufficient to prove a robust relationship between local production of medical products and access to these products. There are mixed messages from various studies, and although the studies may correctly depict specific situations in specific countries with reference to specific products, such evidence cannot be generalized. Our review strongly supports the need for further research in understanding the dynamic link between local production and access to medical products PMID:23093883

Kaplan, Warren Allan; Ritz, Lindsay Sarah; Vitello, Marie

2011-01-01

96

Telemedicine Security: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Telemedicine is a technology-based alternative to traditional health care delivery. However, poor security measures in telemedicine services can have an adverse impact on the quality of care provided, regardless of the chronic condition being studied. We undertook a systematic review of 58 journal articles pertaining to telemedicine security. These articles were selected based on a keyword search on 14 relevant journals. The articles were coded to evaluate the methodology and to identify the key areas of research in security that are being reviewed. Seventy-six percent of the articles defined the security problem they were addressing, and only 47% formulated a research question pertaining to security. Sixty-one percent proposed a solution, and 20% of these tested the security solutions that they proposed. Prior research indicates inadequate reporting of methodology in telemedicine research. We found that to be true for security research as well. We also identified other issues such as using outdated security standards. PMID:21722592

Garg, Vaibhav; Brewer, Jeffrey

2011-01-01

97

Analysis of the systematic reviews process in reports of network meta-analyses: methodological systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine whether network meta-analyses, increasingly used to assess comparative effectiveness of healthcare interventions, follow the key methodological recommendations for reporting and conduct of systematic reviews. Design Methodological systematic review of reports of network meta-analyses. Data sources Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Medline, and Embase, searched from inception to 12 July 2012. Review methods All network meta-analyses comparing clinical efficacy of three or more interventions based on randomised controlled trials, excluding meta-analyses with an open loop network of three interventions. We assessed the reporting of general characteristics and key methodological components of the systematic review process using two composite outcomes. For some components, if reporting was adequate, we assessed their conduct quality. Results Of 121 network meta-analyses covering a wide range of medical areas, 100 (83%) assessed pharmacological interventions and 11 (9%) non-pharmacological interventions; 56 (46%) were published in journals with a high impact factor. The electronic search strategy for each database was not reported in 88 (73%) network meta-analyses; for 36 (30%), the primary outcome was not clearly identified. Overall, 61 (50%) network meta-analyses did not report any information regarding the assessment of risk of bias of individual studies, and 103 (85%) did not report any methods to assess the likelihood of publication bias. Overall, 87 (72%) network meta-analyses did not report the literature search, searched only one database, did not search other sources, or did not report an assessment of risk of bias of individual studies. These methodological components did not differ by publication in a general or specialty journal or by public or private funding. Conclusions Essential methodological components of the systematic review process—conducting a literature search and assessing risk of bias of individual studies—are frequently lacking in reports of network meta-analyses, even when published in journals with high impact factors. PMID:23818558

2013-01-01

98

Emergency cricothyrotomy – a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background An emergency cricothyrotomy is the last-resort in most airway management protocols and is performed when it is not possible to intubate or ventilate a patient. This situation can rapidly prove fatal, making it important to identify the best method to establish a secure airway. We conducted a systematic review to identify whether there exists superiority between available commercial kits versus traditional surgical and needle techniques. Methods Medline, EMBASE and other databases were searched for pertinent studies. The inclusion criteria included manikin, animal and human studies and there were no restrictions regarding the professional background of the person performing the procedure. Results In total, 1,405 unique references were identified; 108 full text articles were retrieved; and 24 studies were included in the review. Studies comparing kits with one another or with various surgical and needle techniques were identified. The outcome measures included in this systematic review were success rate and time consumption. The investigators performing the studies had chosen unique combinations of starting and stopping points for time measurements, making comparisons between studies difficult and leading to many conflicting results. No single method was shown to be better than the others, but the size of the studies makes it impossible to draw firm conclusions. Conclusions The large majority of the studies were too small to demonstrate statistically significant differences, and the limited available evidence was of low or very low quality. That none of the techniques in these studies demonstrated better results than the others does not necessarily indicate that each is equally good, and these conclusions will likely change as new evidence becomes available. PMID:23725520

2013-01-01

99

Systematic Review Methodology in Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Systematic review methodology can be distinguished from narrative reviews of the literature through its emphasis on transparent, structured and comprehensive approaches to searching the literature and its requirement for formal synthesis of research findings. There appears to be relatively little use of the systematic review methodology within the…

Bearman, Margaret; Smith, Calvin D.; Carbone, Angela; Slade, Susan; Baik, Chi; Hughes-Warrington, Marnie; Neumann, David L.

2012-01-01

100

Keratocystic odontogenic tumour: systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequencies between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of Medline and LILACS. Only those reports of KCOTs that occurred in a series of consecutive cases, in the reporting authors' caseload, were considered. Results 51 reports, of 49 series of cases, were included in the SR. 11 SR-included series were in languages other than English. KCOTs affected males more frequently and were three times more prevalent in the mandible. Although the mean age at first presentation was 37 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade. The main symptom was swelling. Over a third were found incidentally. Nearly two-thirds displayed buccolingual expansion. Over a quarter of cases recurred. Only a quarter of all SR-included reported series of cases included details of at least one radiological feature. The East Asian global group presented significantly as well-defined, even corticated, multilocular radiolucencies with buccolingual expansion. The KCOTs affecting the Western global group significantly displayed an association with unerupted teeth. Conclusions Long-term follow-up of large series that would have revealed detailed radiographic description and long-term outcomes of non-syndromic KCOT was lacking. PMID:21159911

MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

2011-01-01

101

Book reviews in medical journals.  

PubMed Central

In a study of book reviews published in four general medical journals over a six-month period, 480 reviews were analyzed. Twenty-five features that reviewers address when evaluating a text were identified, and the frequency of commentary for each feature was determined. The mean number of features addressed per review was 9.0. Reviews averaged 389 words, but review length did not correlate with the length or scope of the book, with the number of features addressed, nor with the reviewer's assessment of the text. Extraneous commentary by the reviewer occurred in 16% of the reviews. This editorializing appeared in lengthier reviews that addressed fewer features. Favorable reviews were far more common than unfavorable ones (88.5% vs. 11.5%). Consequently, for the fifty-five books reviewed in more than one journal, agreement regarding rating of the text was high (86%). Results of this study may provide useful guidelines for reviewers of medical texts. PMID:3947772

Kroenke, K

1986-01-01

102

Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic reviews provide clinical practice recommendations that are based on evaluation of primary evidence. When systematic reviews with the same aims have different conclusions, it is difficult to ascertain which review reported the most credible and robust findings. Methods This study examined five systematic reviews that have investigated the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain. A four-stage process was used to interpret findings of the reviews. This process included comparison of research questions, included primary studies, and the level and quality of evidence of systematic reviews. Two independent reviewers assessed the level of evidence and the methodological quality of systematic reviews, using the National Health and Medical Research Council hierarchy of evidence, and the Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews respectively. Any disagreements were resolved by a third researcher. Results A high level of consensus was achieved between the reviewers. Conflicting findings were reported by the five systematic reviews regarding the effectiveness of Pilates in reducing pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. Authors of the systematic reviews included primary studies that did not match their questions in relation to treatment or population characteristics. A total of ten primary studies were identified across five systematic reviews. Only two of the primary studies were included in all of the reviews due to different inclusion criteria relating to publication date and status, definition of Pilates, and methodological quality. The level of evidence of reviews was low due to the methodological design of the primary studies. The methodological quality of reviews varied. Those which conducted a meta-analysis obtained higher scores. Conclusion There is inconclusive evidence that Pilates is effective in reducing pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. This is due to the small number and poor methodological quality of primary studies. The Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews provides a useful method of appraising the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Individual item scores, however, should be examined in addition to total scores, so that significant methodological flaws of systematic reviews are not missed, and results are interpreted appropriately. (348 words) PMID:23331384

2013-01-01

103

Electroconvulsive treatment during pregnancy: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Pharmacological treatment of severe psychiatric disorders during pregnancy is complicated by the potential harmful effects of treatment for the fetus. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of several mental disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of ECT in the treatment of psychiatric disorders during pregnancy; to compare its efficacy with medication; and to identify the main indications for use in pregnancy. We performed a careful and systematic review of the literature on ECT and pregnancy was conducted. Almost all patients demonstrated total or at least partial remission of symptoms after ECT treatment. No deaths were reported in ECT-treated pregnant women. We conclude that ECT is probably currently under-used in many psychiatric settings because of its stigmatized perception by patients and by mental health professionals. ECT seems to be effective for treating major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy, and the risks of adverse events are low. PMID:25346216

Pompili, Maurizio; Dominici, Giovanni; Giordano, Gloria; Longo, Lucia; Serafini, Gianluca; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

2014-12-01

104

Dissemination Bias in Systematic Reviews of Animal Research: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic reviews of preclinical studies, in vivo animal experiments in particular, can influence clinical research and thus even clinical care. Dissemination bias, selective dissemination of positive or significant results, is one of the major threats to validity in systematic reviews also in the realm of animal studies. We conducted a systematic review to determine the number of published systematic reviews of animal studies until present, to investigate their methodological features especially with respect to assessment of dissemination bias, and to investigate the citation of preclinical systematic reviews on clinical research. Methods Eligible studies for this systematic review constitute systematic reviews that summarize in vivo animal experiments whose results could be interpreted as applicable to clinical care. We systematically searched Ovid Medline, Embase, ToxNet, and ScienceDirect from 1st January 2009 to 9th January 2013 for eligible systematic reviews without language restrictions. Furthermore we included articles from two previous systematic reviews by Peters et al. and Korevaar et al. Results The literature search and screening process resulted in 512 included full text articles. We found an increasing number of published preclinical systematic reviews over time. The methodological quality of preclinical systematic reviews was low. The majority of preclinical systematic reviews did not assess methodological quality of the included studies (71%), nor did they assess heterogeneity (81%) or dissemination bias (87%). Statistics quantifying the importance of clinical research citing systematic reviews of animal studies showed that clinical studies referred to the preclinical research mainly to justify their study or a future study (76%). Discussion Preclinical systematic reviews may have an influence on clinical research but their methodological quality frequently remains low. Therefore, systematic reviews of animal research should be critically appraised before translating them to a clinical context. PMID:25541734

Mueller, Katharina F.; Briel, Matthias; Strech, Daniel; Meerpohl, Joerg J.; Lang, Britta; Motschall, Edith; Gloy, Viktoria; Lamontagne, Francois; Bassler, Dirk

2014-01-01

105

Are Reports of Randomized Controlled Trials Improving over Time? A Systematic Review of 284 Articles Published in High-Impact General and Specialized Medical Journals  

PubMed Central

Background Inadequate reporting undermines findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study assessed and compared articles published in high-impact general medical and specialized journals. Methods Reports of RCTs published in high-impact general and specialized medical journals were identified through a search of MEDLINE from January to March of 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. Articles that provided original data on adult patients diagnosed with chronic conditions were included in the study. Data on trial characteristics, reporting of allocation concealment, quality score, and the presence of a trial flow diagram were extracted independently by two reviewers, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus or independent adjudication. Descriptive statistics were used for quantitative variables. Comparisons between general medical and specialized journals, and trends over time were performed using Chi-square tests. Results Reports of 284 trials were analyzed. There was a significantly higher proportion of RCTs published with adequate reporting of allocation concealment (p?=?0.003), presentation of a trial flow diagram (p<0.0001) and high quality scores (p?=?0.038) over time. Trials published in general medical journals had higher quality scores than those in specialized journals (p?=?0.001), reported adequate allocation concealment more often (p?=?0.013), and presented a trial flow diagram more often (p<0.001). Interpretation We found significant improvements in reporting quality of RCTs published in high-impact factor journals over the last fifteen years. These improvements are likely attributed to concerted international efforts to improve reporting quality such as CONSORT. There is still much room for improvement, especially among specialized journals. PMID:24391973

To, Matthew J.; Jones, Jennifer; Emara, Mohamed; Jadad, Alejandro R.

2013-01-01

106

Glandular odontogenic cyst: systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the principal features of “glandular odontogenic cyst” (GOC), by systematic review (SR), and to compare their frequencies among four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of MEDLINE and LILACS. Only those reports of GOCs that occurred in a series in the reporting authors' caseload were considered. All cases were confirmed histopathologically. Results 18 reports on 17 series of consecutive cases were included in the SR. GOC affected males twice as frequently and the mandible almost three times as frequently. The mean age at first presentation was 44 years, coincident with that of the Western global group, in which the largest proportion of reports and cases first presented in the second half of the fifth decade. However, age at presentation of GOCs in the East Asian and sub-Saharan African global groups was nearly a decade younger, this was significant. Six reports included details of at least one clinical presentation. Eight reports included at least one conventional radiological feature. There were some significant differences between global groups. The Western global group had a particular predilection for the anterior sextants of both jaws. The sub-Saharan African group displayed buccolingual expansion (as did the Latin American group) and tooth displacement in every case. 18% of GOCs recurred overall, except in the sub-Saharan African global group. Conclusions GOCs have a marked propensity to recur in most global groups. GOCs presented in older patients and with swellings, affected the anterior sextants of both jaws, and radiologically were more likely to present as a well-defined unilocular radiolucency with buccolingual expansion. Tooth displacement, root resorption and an association with unerupted teeth occurred in 50%, 30% and 11% of cases, respectively. PMID:20203274

MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

2010-01-01

107

Potential release of in vivo trace metals from metallic medical implants in the human body: from ions to nanoparticles--a systematic analytical review.  

PubMed

Metal ion release from metallic materials, e.g. metallic alloys and pure metals, implanted into the human body in dental and orthopedic surgery is becoming a major cause for concern. This review briefly provides an overview of both metallic alloys and pure metals used in implant materials in dental and orthopedic surgery. Additionally, a short section is dedicated to important biomaterials and their corrosive behavior in both real solutions and various types of media that model human biological fluids and tissues. The present review gives an overview of analytical methods, techniques and different approaches applied to the measurement of in vivo trace metals released into body fluids and tissues from patients carrying metal-on-metal prostheses and metal dental implants. Reference levels of ion concentrations in body fluids and tissues that have been determined by a host of studies are compiled, reviewed and presented in this paper. Finally, a collection of published clinical data on in vivo released trace metals from metallic medical implants is included. PMID:24565531

Matusiewicz, Henryk

2014-06-01

108

Career Choice in Academic Medicine: Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To review systematically the evidence about what factors influence the decision to choose or not choose a career in academic medicine. DESIGN A systematic review of relevant literature from 1990 to May 2005. DATA SOURCES Searches of The Cochrane Library, Medline (using Ovid and PubMed) from 1990 to May 2005, and EMBASE from 1990 to May 2005 were completed to identify relevant studies that explored the influential factors. Additional articles were identified from searching the bibliographies of retrieved articles. SELECTION OF STUDIES We attempted to identify studies that included residents, fellows, or staff physicians. No restrictions were placed on the study methodologies identified and all articles presenting empirical evidence were retrieved. For cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies, minimum inclusion criteria were the presence of defined groups, and the ability to extract relevant data. For surveys that involved case series, minimum inclusion criteria were a description of the population, and the availability of extractable data. Minimum inclusion criteria for qualitative studies were descriptions of the sampling strategy and methods. RESULTS The search identified 251 abstracts; 25 articles were included in this review. Completion of an MD with a graduate degree or fellowship program is associated with a career in academic medicine. Of the articles identified in this review, this finding is supported by the highest quality of evidence. Similarly, the completion of research and publication of this research in medical school and residency are associated with a career in academic medicine. The desire to teach, conduct research, and the intellectual stimulation and challenge provided in academia may also persuade people to choose this career path. The influence of a role model or a mentor was reported by physicians to impact their decision making. Trainees' interest in academic medicine wanes as they progress through their residency. CONCLUSIONS In order to revitalize academic medicine, we must engage trainees and retain their interest throughout their training. Research opportunities for medical students, and fellowships or graduate training can meet this challenge and influence career choice. Initiatives to stimulate and maintain interest in academic medicine should be evaluated in prospective studies across multiple sites. PMID:17105520

Straus, Sharon E; Straus, Christine; Tzanetos, Katina

2006-01-01

109

Bee venom acupuncture for rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review protocol  

PubMed Central

Introduction This systematic review aims to analyse the trial data on the effects of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and analysis The following 14 databases will be searched from their inception to March 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), AMED, CINAHL, six Korean medical databases (OASIS, Korean Traditional Knowledge Portal, Korean Studies Information Service System, KoreaMed, Korean Medical Database and DBPIA) and three Chinese databases including CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), Wanfang and VIP. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Dissemination The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. The review will also be disseminated electronically and in print. Trial registration number PROSPERO 2013: CRD42013005853 PMID:24760349

Lee, Ju Ah; Son, Mi Ju; Choi, Jiae; Yun, Kyung-Jin; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo

2014-01-01

110

Quality assessment of systematic reviews or meta-analyses of nursing interventions conducted by Korean reviewers  

PubMed Central

Background A systematic review is used to investigate the best available evidence of clinical safety and effectiveness of healthcare intervention. This requires methodological rigor in order to minimize bias and random error. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of systematic reviews or meta-analyses for nursing interventions conducted by Korean researchers. Methods We searched electronic databases from 1950 to July 2010, including ovidMEDLINE, ovidEMBASE, and Korean databases, including KoreaMed, Korean Medical Database, and Korean studies Information Service System etc. Two reviewers independently screened and selected all references, and assessed the quality of systematic reviews or meta-analyses using the “Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews" (AMSTAR) tool. Results Twenty two systematic reviews or meta-analyses were included in this study. The median overall score (out of 11) for included reviews was 5 (range 2–11) and the mean overall score for AMSTAR was 4.7 (95% confidence interval 3.8-5.7). Nine out of 22 reviews were rated as low quality (AMSTAR score 0–4), 11 were rated as moderate quality (AMSTAR score 5–8), and two reviews were categorized as high quality (AMSTAR score 9–11). Conclusions The methodological quality of published reviews on nursing interventions conducted by Korean reviewers was assessed as low to moderate. In order to use the best available evidence in clinical decision making, reviewers should conduct systematic reviews or meta- analyses using rigorous research methods. PMID:22928687

2012-01-01

111

September 2014 1 Systematic Reviews in Education  

E-print Network

: A guide to information retrieval for Campbell Systematic Reviews: www.campbellcollaboration.org/lib/download/969 Hannes, K. (2012). Synthesizing qualitative research: Choosing the right approach. e-book). Systematic synthesis of qualitative research. e-book. Consider scope of the search Overall approach: range

Graham, Nick

112

Systematic reviews in the field of nutrition  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Systematic reviews are valuable tools for staying abreast of evolving nutrition and aging -related topics, formulating dietary guidelines, establishing nutrient reference intakes, formulating clinical practice guidance, evaluating health claims, and setting research agendas. Basic steps of conductin...

113

Systematic reviews of animal models: methodology versus epistemology.  

PubMed

Systematic reviews are currently favored methods of evaluating research in order to reach conclusions regarding medical practice. The need for such reviews is necessitated by the fact that no research is perfect and experts are prone to bias. By combining many studies that fulfill specific criteria, one hopes that the strengths can be multiplied and thus reliable conclusions attained. Potential flaws in this process include the assumptions that underlie the research under examination. If the assumptions, or axioms, upon which the research studies are based, are untenable either scientifically or logically, then the results must be highly suspect regardless of the otherwise high quality of the studies or the systematic reviews. We outline recent criticisms of animal-based research, namely that animal models are failing to predict human responses. It is this failure that is purportedly being corrected via systematic reviews. We then examine the assumption that animal models can predict human outcomes to perturbations such as disease or drugs, even under the best of circumstances. We examine the use of animal models in light of empirical evidence comparing human outcomes to those from animal models, complexity theory, and evolutionary biology. We conclude that even if legitimate criticisms of animal models were addressed, through standardization of protocols and systematic reviews, the animal model would still fail as a predictive modality for human response to drugs and disease. Therefore, systematic reviews and meta-analyses of animal-based research are poor tools for attempting to reach conclusions regarding human interventions. PMID:23372426

Greek, Ray; Menache, Andre

2013-01-01

114

Literature Searching for Systematic Reviews Tuesday, March 4 -Learn how systematic reviews differs from  

E-print Network

Research Tips Tuesday, March 11 - Find out about new search engines, e- archives, mining the dark webLiterature Searching for Systematic Reviews Tuesday, March 4 - Learn how systematic reviews differs from other types of reviews, essential search skills and how to document the search. Government

Peak, Derek

115

A review on systematic reviews of health information system studies  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this review is to consolidate existing evidence from published systematic reviews on health information system (HIS) evaluation studies to inform HIS practice and research. Fifty reviews published during 1994–2008 were selected for meta-level synthesis. These reviews covered five areas: medication management, preventive care, health conditions, data quality, and care process/outcome. After reconciliation for duplicates, 1276 HIS studies were arrived at as the non-overlapping corpus. On the basis of a subset of 287 controlled HIS studies, there is some evidence for improved quality of care, but in varying degrees across topic areas. For instance, 31/43 (72%) controlled HIS studies had positive results using preventive care reminders, mostly through guideline adherence such as immunization and health screening. Key factors that influence HIS success included having in-house systems, developers as users, integrated decision support and benchmark practices, and addressing such contextual issues as provider knowledge and perception, incentives, and legislation/policy. PMID:20962125

Kuziemsky, Craig; Price, Morgan; Gardner, Jesse

2010-01-01

116

Interventions Encouraging the Use of Systematic Reviews in Clinical Decision-Making: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Systematic reviews have the potential to inform clinical decisions, yet little is known about the impact of interventions\\u000a on increasing the use of systematic reviews in clinical decision-making.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Purpose  To systematically review the evidence on the impact of interventions for seeking, appraising, and applying evidence from systematic\\u000a reviews in decision-making by clinicians.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Data Sources  Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled

Laure Perrier; Kelly Mrklas; Sasha Shepperd; Maureen Dobbins; K. Ann McKibbon; Sharon E. Straus

2011-01-01

117

A systematic review of the safety information contained within the Summaries of Product Characteristics of medications licensed in the United Kingdom for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. how does the safety prescribing advice compare with national guidance?  

PubMed Central

Background The safety of paediatric medications is paramount and contraindications provide clear pragmatic advice. Further advice may be accessed through Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPCs) and relevant national guidelines. The SPC can be considered the ultimate independent guideline and is regularly updated. In 2008, the authors undertook a systematic review of the SPC contraindications of medications licensed in the United Kingdom (UK) for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). At that time, there were fewer contraindications reported in the SPC for atomoxetine than methylphenidate and the specific contraindications varied considerably amongst methylphenidate formulations. In 2009, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) mandated harmonisation of methylphenidate SPCs. Between September and November 2011, there were three changes to the atomoxetine SPC that resulted in revised prescribing information. In addition, Clinical Guidance has also been produced by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) (2008), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) (2009) and the British National Formulary for Children (BNFC). Methods An updated systematic review of the Contraindications sections of the SPCs of all medications currently licensed for treatment of ADHD in the UK was undertaken and independent statements regarding contraindications and relevant warnings and precautions were then compared with UK national guidance with the aim of assessing any disparity and potential areas of confusion for prescribers. Results As of November 2011, there were seven medications available in the UK for the treatment of ADHD. There are 15 contraindications for most formulations of methylphenidate, 14 for dexamfetamine and 5 for atomoxetine. Significant differences exist between the SPCs and national guidance part due to the ongoing reactive process of amending the former as new information becomes known. In addition, recommendations are made outside UK SPC licensed indications and a significant contraindication for methylphenidate (suicidal behaviours) is missing from both the NICE and SIGN guidelines. Particular disparity exists relating to monitoring for suicidal and psychiatric side effects. The BNFC has not yet been updated in line with the European Union (EU) Directive on methylphenidate; it does not include any contraindications for atomoxetine but describes contraindications for methylphenidate that are no longer in the SPC. Conclusion Clinicians seeking prescribing advice from critical independent sources of data, such as SPCs and national guidelines, may be confused by the disparity that exists. There are major differences between guidelines and SPCs and neither should be referred to in isolation. The SPC represents the most relevant source of safety data to aid prescribing of medications for ADHD as they present the most current safety data in line with increased exposure. National guidelines may need more regular updates. PMID:22234242

2012-01-01

118

Help Options in CALL: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a systematic review of research investigating help options in the different language skills in computer-assisted language learning (CALL). In this review, emerging themes along with is-sues affecting help option research are identified and discussed. We argue that help options in CALL are application resources that do not only seem…

Cardenas-Claros, Monica S.; Gruba, Paul A.

2009-01-01

119

Medication Reconciliation and Therapy Management in Dialysis-Dependent Patients: Need for a Systematic Approach  

PubMed Central

Summary Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model. PMID:23990162

Cardone, Katie E.; Manley, Harold J.; St. Peter, Wendy L.; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

2013-01-01

120

Clinical outcomes resulting from telemedicine interventions: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The use of telemedicine is growing, but its efficacy for achieving comparable or improved clinical outcomes has not been established in many medical specialties. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of telemedicine interventions for health outcomes in two classes of application: home-based and office\\/hospital-based. METHODS: Data sources for the study included deports of studies

William R Hersh; Mark Helfand; James Wallace; Dale Kraemer; Patricia Patterson; Susan Shapiro; Merwyn Greenlick

2001-01-01

121

Interventions aimed at increasing research use in nursing: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There has been considerable interest recently in developing and evaluating interventions to increase research use by clinicians. However, most work has focused on medical practices; and nursing is not well represented in existing systematic reviews. The purpose of this article is to report findings from a systematic review of interventions aimed at increasing research use in nursing. OBJECTIVE: To

David S Thompson; Carole A Estabrooks; Shannon Scott-Findlay; Katherine Moore; Lars Wallin

2007-01-01

122

Dental insurance: A systematic review.  

PubMed

To review uses of finance in dentistry. A search of 25 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Insurance has come of ages and has become the mainstay of payment in many developed countries. So much so that all the alternative forms of payment which originated as an alternative to fee for service now depend on insurance at one point or the other. Fee for service is still the major form of payment in many developing countries including India. It is preferred in many instances since the payment is made immediately. PMID:25558454

Garla, Bharath Kumar; Satish, G; Divya, K T

2014-12-01

123

Dental insurance: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

To review uses of finance in dentistry. A search of 25 electronic databases and World Wide Web was conducted. Relevant journals were hand searched and further information was requested from authors. Inclusion criteria were a predefined hierarchy of evidence and objectives. Study validity was assessed with checklists. Two reviewers independently screened sources, extracted data, and assessed validity. Insurance has come of ages and has become the mainstay of payment in many developed countries. So much so that all the alternative forms of payment which originated as an alternative to fee for service now depend on insurance at one point or the other. Fee for service is still the major form of payment in many developing countries including India. It is preferred in many instances since the payment is made immediately.

Garla, Bharath Kumar; Satish, G.; Divya, K. T.

2014-01-01

124

Systematic reviews and knowledge translation.  

PubMed Central

Proven effective interventions exist that would enable all countries to meet the Millennium Development Goals. However, uptake and use of these interventions in the poorest populations is at least 50% less than in the richest populations within each country. Also, we have recently shown that community effectiveness of interventions is lower for the poorest populations due to a "staircase" effect of lower coverage/access, worse diagnostic accuracy, less provider compliance and less consumer adherence. We propose an evidence-based framework for equity-oriented knowledge translation to enhance community effectiveness and health equity. This framework is represented as a cascade of steps to assess and prioritize barriers and thus choose effective knowledge translation interventions that are tailored for relevant audiences (public, patient, practitioner, policy-maker, press and private sector), as well as the evaluation, monitoring and sharing of these strategies. We have used two examples of effective interventions (insecticide-treated bednets to prevent malaria and childhood immunization) to illustrate how this framework can provide a systematic method for decision-makers to ensure the application of evidence-based knowledge in disadvantaged populations. Future work to empirically validate and evaluate the usefulness of this framework is needed. We invite researchers and implementers to use the cascade for equity-oriented knowledge translation as a guide when planning implementation strategies for proven effective interventions. We also encourage policy-makers and health-care managers to use this framework when deciding how effective interventions can be implemented in their own settings. PMID:16917652

Tugwell, Peter; Robinson, Vivian; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Santesso, Nancy

2006-01-01

125

[Medical image compression: a review].  

PubMed

Modern medicine is an increasingly complex activity , based on the evidence ; it consists of information from multiple sources : medical record text , sound recordings , images and videos generated by a large number of devices . Medical imaging is one of the most important sources of information since they offer comprehensive support of medical procedures for diagnosis and follow-up . However , the amount of information generated by image capturing gadgets quickly exceeds storage availability in radiology services , generating additional costs in devices with greater storage capacity . Besides , the current trend of developing applications in cloud computing has limitations, even though virtual storage is available from anywhere, connections are made through internet . In these scenarios the optimal use of information necessarily requires powerful compression algorithms adapted to medical activity needs . In this paper we present a review of compression techniques used for image storage , and a critical analysis of them from the point of view of their use in clinical settings. PMID:23715317

Noreña, Tatiana; Romero, Eduardo

2013-01-01

126

Clinician-patient communication: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal of Work  The goal of this work was to identify methods of clinician–patient cancer-related communication that may impact patient outcomes\\u000a associated with distress at critical points in the course of cancer care.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A systematic review of practice guidelines, systematic reviews, or randomized trials on this topic was conducted. Guidelines\\u000a for quality was evaluated using the Appraisal of Guidelines

Gary Rodin; Jean A. Mackay; Camilla Zimmermann; Carole Mayer; Doris Howell; Mark Katz; Jonathan Sussman; Melissa Brouwers

2009-01-01

127

Intrasellar cysticercosis: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to review patients with intrasellar cysticercosis to outline the features of this form of neurocysticercosis. A MEDLINE and manual search of patients with intrasellar cysticercosis were done. Abstracted data included clinical manifestations, neuroimaging findings, therapy, and outcome. Twenty-three patients were reviewed. Ophthalmological disturbances, including diminution of visual acuity and visual field defects following a chiasmatic pattern, were recorded in 67 % of cases. Endocrine abnormalities were found in 56 % of patients (panhypopituitarism, hyperprolactinemia, diabetes insipidus, and isolated hypothyroidism). In addition, some patients complained of seizures or chronic headaches. Neuroimaging studies showed lesions confined to the sellar region in 47 % of cases. The remaining patients also had subarachnoid cysts associated or not with hydrocephalus, parenchymal brain cysts, or parenchymal brain calcifications. Thirteen patients underwent surgical resection of the sellar cyst through a craniotomy in nine cases and by the transsphenoidal approach in four. Visual acuity or visual field defects improved in only two of these patients. Five patients were treated with cysticidal drugs without improvement. Intrasellar cysticercosis is rare and probably under-recognized. Clinical manifestations resemble those caused by pituitary tumors, cysts, or other granulomatous lesions. Neuroimaging findings are of more value when intrasellar cysts are associated with other forms of neurocysticercosis, such as basal subarachnoid cysts or hydrocephalus. Prompt surgical resection is mandatory to reduce the risk of permanent loss of visual function. There seems to be no role for cysticidal drug therapy in these cases. PMID:23605125

Del Brutto, Oscar H; Del Brutto, Victor J

2013-09-01

128

Methodology in conducting a systematic review of systematic reviews of healthcare interventions  

PubMed Central

Background Hundreds of studies of maternity care interventions have been published, too many for most people involved in providing maternity care to identify and consider when making decisions. It became apparent that systematic reviews of individual studies were required to appraise, summarise and bring together existing studies in a single place. However, decision makers are increasingly faced by a plethora of such reviews and these are likely to be of variable quality and scope, with more than one review of important topics. Systematic reviews (or overviews) of reviews are a logical and appropriate next step, allowing the findings of separate reviews to be compared and contrasted, providing clinical decision makers with the evidence they need. Methods The methods used to identify and appraise published and unpublished reviews systematically, drawing on our experiences and good practice in the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews are described. The process of identifying and appraising all published reviews allows researchers to describe the quality of this evidence base, summarise and compare the review's conclusions and discuss the strength of these conclusions. Results Methodological challenges and possible solutions are described within the context of (i) sources, (ii) study selection, (iii) quality assessment (i.e. the extent of searching undertaken for the reviews, description of study selection and inclusion criteria, comparability of included studies, assessment of publication bias and assessment of heterogeneity), (iv) presentation of results, and (v) implications for practice and research. Conclusion Conducting a systematic review of reviews highlights the usefulness of bringing together a summary of reviews in one place, where there is more than one review on an important topic. The methods described here should help clinicians to review and appraise published reviews systematically, and aid evidence-based clinical decision-making. PMID:21291558

2011-01-01

129

Medical health physics: a review.  

PubMed

Medical health physics is the profession dedicated to the protection of healthcare providers, members of the public, and patients from unwarranted radiation exposure. Medical health physicists must be knowledgeable in the principles of health physics and in the applications of radiation in medicine. Advances in medical health physics require the definition of problems, testing of hypotheses, and gathering of evidence to defend changes in health physics practice and to assist medical practitioners in making changes in their practices as appropriate. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples included in this review include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This review summarizes evidence that supports changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. Medical health physicists must continue to gather evidence to support intelligent but practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients as modalities and applications evolve in the practice of medicine. PMID:15083140

Vetter, Richard J

2004-05-01

130

Medical health physics: a review.  

PubMed

Medical health physics is the profession dedicated to the protection of healthcare providers, members of the public, and patients from unwarranted radiation exposure. Medical health physicists must be knowledgeable in the principles of health physics and in the applications of radiation in medicine. Advances in medical health physics require the definition of problems, testing of hypotheses, and gathering of evidence to defend changes in health physics practice and to assist medical practitioners in making changes in their practices as appropriate. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples included in this review include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This review summarizes evidence that supports changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. Medical health physicists must continue to gather evidence to support intelligent but practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients as modalities and applications evolve in the practice of medicine. PMID:15891459

Vetter, Richard J

2005-06-01

131

Challenges of Systematic Reviewing Integrative Health Care  

PubMed Central

This article is based on an extensive review of integrative medicine (IM) and integrative health care (IHC). Since there is no general agreement of what constitutes IM/IHC, several major problems were identified that make the review of work in this field problematic. In applying the systematic review methodology, we found that many of those captured articles that used the term integrative medicine were in actuality referring to adjunctive, complementary, or supplemental medicine. The objective of this study was to apply a sensitivity analysis to demonstrate how the results of a systematic review of IM and IHC will differ according to what inclusion criteria is used based on the definition of IM/IHC. By analyzing 4 different scenarios, the authors show that, due to unclear usage of these terms, results vary dramatically, exposing an inconsistent literature base for this field. PMID:23843689

Coulter, Ian D.; Khorsan, Raheleh; Crawford, Cindy; Hsiao, An-Fu

2013-01-01

132

Medical hyperspectral imaging: a review  

PubMed Central

Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications, especially in disease diagnosis and image-guided surgery. HSI acquires a three-dimensional dataset called hypercube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Spatially resolved spectral imaging obtained by HSI provides diagnostic information about the tissue physiology, morphology, and composition. This review paper presents an overview of the literature on medical hyperspectral imaging technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application. PMID:24441941

Lu, Guolan; Fei, Baowei

2014-01-01

133

Health sector accreditation research: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze research into accreditation and accreditation processes. Data sources. A multi-method, systematic review of the accreditation literature was conducted from March to May 2007. The search identified articles researching accreditation. Discussion or commentary pieces were excluded. Study selection. From the initial identification of over 3000 abstracts, 66 studies that met

DAVID GREENFIELD; JEFFREY BRAITHWAITE

2008-01-01

134

Patients' perspectives on electroconvulsive therapy: systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To ascertain patients' views on the benefits of and possible memory loss from electroconvulsive therapy. Design Descriptive systematic review. Data sources Psychinfo, Medline, Web of Science, and Social Science Citation Index databases, and bibliographies. Study selection Articles with patients' views after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy. Data extraction 26 studies carried out by clinicians and nine reports of work undertaken

Diana Rose; Til Wykes; Morven Leese; Jonathan Bindman; Pete Fleischmann

2003-01-01

135

An Evidence-Based Systematic Review of  

E-print Network

(Kang et al., 2012). The main objective of this Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) project was to compare and the highest quality of care. Methods Utilizing the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) modelAn Evidence-Based Systematic Review of Efficacious Interventions for the Management of Delirium

Connor, Ed

136

Vasectomy surgical techniques: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A wide variety of surgical techniques are used to perform vasectomy. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess if any surgical techniques to isolate or occlude the vas are associated with better outcomes in terms of occlusive and contraceptive effectiveness, and complications. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE (1966-June 2003), EMBASE (1980-June 2003), reference lists of retrieved articles, urology

Michel Labrecque; Caroline Dufresne; Mark A Barone; Karine St-Hilaire

2004-01-01

137

JSTOR: Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The full text of Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics is available on line at the JSTOR site. Coverage includes volumes 1-28, 1970-1997. Visitors can search or browse the journal. Note: access to JSTOR contents is currently available only on a site licence basis to academic institutions. A list of institutions with site licenses is available.

1998-01-01

138

Understanding systematic conceptual structures in polysemous medical terms.  

PubMed Central

Polysemy is a bottleneck for the demanding needs of semantic data management. We suggest the importance of a well-founded conceptual analysis for understanding some systematic structures underlying polysemy in the medical lexicon. We present some cases studies, which exploit the methods (ontological integration and general theories) and tools (description logics and ontology libraries) of the ONIONS methodology defined elsewhere by the authors. This paper addresses an aspect (systematic metomymies) of the project we are involved in, which investigates the feasibility of building a large-scale ontology library of medicine that integrates the most important medical terminology banks. PMID:11079890

Gangemi, A.; Pisanelli, D. M.; Steve, G.

2000-01-01

139

Family-based interventions for substance misuse: a systematic review of systematic reviews—protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Worldwide, there are an estimated 15 million individuals with drug use disorders and over five times as many with alcohol use disorders (WHO 1:2, 2005). Most individuals with substance misuse have families who are affected. Initial scoping searches identified an expanse of broad and disparate studies and reviews on the family interventions for substance misuse. This systematic review of systematic reviews aims to bring together the expanse of research on the effectiveness of family-based interventions in substance misuse. Initial scoping searches identified an expanse of broad and disparate studies and reviews on the family interventions for substance misuse. This systematic review of systematic reviews aims to bring together the expanse of research on the effectiveness of family-based interventions in substance misuse. Methods Extensive electronic and manual searches will be undertaken. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment will be undertaken by two reviewers with disagreements resolved through discussion. The inclusion criteria will be that the study is a systematically undertaken review, the population is individuals with substance misuse problems and the interventions include a family-focused component. Reviews that focus on prevention rather than treatment will be excluded. The reviews will be assessed for quality and relevance. The evidence from included systematic reviews will be mapped by focus of intervention (promoting engagement of user into treatment/joint involvement in treatment of user/treating family member in own right) for both adults and adolescents for drug and/or alcohol misusers to allow assessment of the density of available evidence. The higher-quality, up-to-date evidence for each domain will be identified and described, and conclusions will be drawn with limitations of the evidence highlighted. Discussion This systematic review of systematic reviews will be an efficient and robust way of looking at the current state of the evidence in the field of family-based interventions for substance misuse. It will evaluate all the available systematic-review-level literature to report on the effectiveness of family-based psychological interventions in improving substance-related outcomes and improving health and wellbeing of substance misusers and/or their families. This will inform future treatment policies and commissioning decisions. In addition, it will identify areas of poor quality, inconsistency and gaps in the evidence base for family-based psychological interventions in substance misuse with respect to secondary evidence in order to inform future research. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014006834 PMID:25128186

2014-01-01

140

Effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances: a systematic review protocol  

PubMed Central

Background There is a significant public health burden associated with substance use in Canada. The early detection and/or treatment of risky substance use has the potential to dramatically improve outcomes for those who experience harms from the non-medical use of psychoactive substances, particularly adolescents whose brains are still undergoing development. The Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment model is a comprehensive, integrated approach for the delivery of early intervention and treatment services for individuals experiencing substance use-related harms, as well as those who are at risk of experiencing such harm. Methods This article describes the protocol for a systematic review of the effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment model for reducing the non-medical use of psychoactive substances. Studies will be selected in which brief interventions target non-medical psychoactive substance use (excluding alcohol, nicotine, or caffeine) among those 12?years and older who are opportunistically screened and deemed at risk of harms related to psychoactive substance use. We will include one-on-one verbal interventions and exclude non-verbal brief interventions (for example, the provision of information such as a pamphlet or online interventions) and group interventions. Primary, secondary and adverse outcomes of interest are prespecified. Randomized controlled trials will be included; non-randomized controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series designs will be considered in the absence of randomized controlled trials. We will search several bibliographic databases (for example, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, CORK) and search sources for grey literature. We will meta-analyze studies where possible. We will conduct subgroup analyses, if possible, according to drug class and intervention setting. Discussion This review will provide evidence on the effectiveness of brief interventions as part of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment protocol aimed at the non-medical use of psychoactive substances and may provide guidance as to where future research might be most beneficial. PMID:22587894

2012-01-01

141

Systematic Reviews of Diagnostic Test Accuracy  

PubMed Central

Systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy studies are increasingly being published, but they can be methodologically challenging. In this paper we present some of the recent developments in the methodology for conducting systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy studies. Restrictive electronic search filters are discouraged, as is the use of summary quality scores. Methods for meta-analysis should take the paired nature of the estimates and their dependence on threshold into account, we therefore advice authors of these reviews to use the hierarchical summary ROC or the bivariate model for the analysis of the data for the analysis. Challenges that remain are the poor reporting of original diagnostic test accuracy research, and difficulties with the interpretation of the results of diagnostic test accuracy research. PMID:19075208

Leeflang, Mariska.M.G.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Gatsonis, Constantine; Bossuyt, Patrick M.M.

2009-01-01

142

Psychological profile of sasang typology: a systematic review.  

PubMed

A systematic review of studies related to the psychological characteristics of Sasang types was conducted with the goal of delineating generalizable psychological profiles based on Sasang typology, a traditional Korean medical typology with medical herbs and acupuncture that is characterized as personalized medicine. Journal articles pertaining to Sasang typology were collected using five electronic database systems in Korea and in the USA. As a result, 64 potentially relevant studies were identified and 21 peer-reviewed research articles that employed psychometric inventories were included. Beginning with the use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in 1992, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, NEO-Personality Inventory, Temperament and Character Inventory and other personality assessment tools were employed in the identified studies. Because data synthesis could not be carried out due to the heterogeneity of the studies, the present review article sought to delineate the mutual relevance of the studies based on research results pertaining to the correlation between the aforementioned psychological assessment instruments. Results of the review indicate that two super-factors, Extraversion and Neuroticism, serve as the foundation in regards to delineating personality constructs, such that the So-Yang type scored high on the Extraversion dimension and low on the Neuroticism dimension, while the So-Eum type scored low on the Extraversion dimension and high on the Neuroticism dimension. The present systematic review indicates that Sasang typology shares similarities with the Western psychological tradition. PMID:19745008

Chae, Han; Park, Soo Hyun; Lee, Soo Jin; Kim, Myoung-Geun; Wedding, Danny; Kwon, Young-Kyu

2009-09-01

143

Psychological Profile of Sasang Typology: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

A systematic review of studies related to the psychological characteristics of Sasang types was conducted with the goal of delineating generalizable psychological profiles based on Sasang typology, a traditional Korean medical typology with medical herbs and acupuncture that is characterized as personalized medicine. Journal articles pertaining to Sasang typology were collected using five electronic database systems in Korea and in the USA. As a result, 64 potentially relevant studies were identified and 21 peer-reviewed research articles that employed psychometric inventories were included. Beginning with the use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in 1992, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, NEO-Personality Inventory, Temperament and Character Inventory and other personality assessment tools were employed in the identified studies. Because data synthesis could not be carried out due to the heterogeneity of the studies, the present review article sought to delineate the mutual relevance of the studies based on research results pertaining to the correlation between the aforementioned psychological assessment instruments. Results of the review indicate that two super-factors, Extraversion and Neuroticism, serve as the foundation in regards to delineating personality constructs, such that the So-Yang type scored high on the Extraversion dimension and low on the Neuroticism dimension, while the So-Eum type scored low on the Extraversion dimension and high on the Neuroticism dimension. The present systematic review indicates that Sasang typology shares similarities with the Western psychological tradition. PMID:19745008

Park, Soo Hyun; Lee, Soo Jin; Kim, Myoung-geun; Wedding, Danny; Kwon, Young-Kyu

2009-01-01

144

Effectiveness of medications used to attenuate antipsychotic-related weight gain and metabolic abnormalities: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Antipsychotic-related weight gain and metabolic effects are a critical outcome for patients requiring these medications. A literature search using MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsycNET, and EMBASE for randomized, open and double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of medications targeting antipsychotic-induced weight gain was performed. Primary outcome measures were change and endpoint values in body weight and body mass index (BMI). Secondary outcomes included >or=7% weight gain, all-cause discontinuation, change in waist circumference, glucose and lipid metabolism parameters, and psychiatric symptoms. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to explain heterogeneity of the results. Across 32 studies including 1482 subjects, 15 different medications were tested: amantadine, dextroamphetamine, d-fenfluramine, famotidine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, metformin, nizatidine, orlistat, phenylpropanolamine, reboxetine, rosiglitazone, sibutramine, topiramate, and metformin+sibutramine. Compared with placebo, metformin had the greatest weight loss (N=7, n=334, -2.94 kg (confidence interval (CI:-4.89,-0.99)), followed by d-fenfluramine (N=1, n=16, -2.60 kg (CI:-5.14,-0.06)), sibutramine (N=2, n=55, -2.56 kg (CI:-3.91,-1.22)), topiramate (N=2, n=133, -2.52 kg (CI:-4.87,-0.16)), and reboxetine (N=2, n=79, -1.90 kg (CI:-3.07,-0.72)). Weight loss remained significant with metformin initiation after weight gain had occurred, but not when started concomitantly with antipsychotics. Nausea rates were not higher with any treatment compared with placebo. In all, 5 of 15 psychopharmacologic interventions aimed at ameliorating antipsychotic-induced weight gain outperformed placebo. Results were most robust for metformin, although these were modest and heterogeneous. Only one (negative) combination treatment study was available and head-to-head studies are absent. None of the agents were able to entirely reverse weight gain because of antipsychotics. At present, no treatment has sufficient evidence to recommend broad clinical usage. Antipsychotics with no or minimal cardiometabolic liability, as well as interventions that prevent or normalize adverse antipsychotic cardiometabolic effects are needed. PMID:20336059

Maayan, Lawrence; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Correll, Christoph U

2010-06-01

145

Acupuncture for postherpetic neuralgia: a systematic review protocol  

PubMed Central

Introduction Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is one of the most common complications following herpes zoster. Clinical trials indicate that acupuncture could reduce pain and discomfort among patients with PHN. This protocol aims to describe how to accumulate the current evidence on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for treating PHN. Methods and analysis This systematic review will electronically search multiple databases including the Cochrane Skin Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), the Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC) and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and will hand search a list of medical journals as a supplement. Any clinical randomised controlled trials related to acupuncture for treating PHN will be included. Outcomes will include pain intensity, global impression, quality of life, safety and costs. By screening the titles, abstracts and full texts, two reviewers will independently select studies, extract data, and assess study quality. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials will be conducted using Revman 5.1 software. The results will be presented as risk ratio for dichotomous data, and standardised or weighted mean difference for continuous data. Ethics and dissemination This systematic review does not need ethical approval because there are no data used in our study that are linked to individual patient data. Also, the findings will be disseminated through a peer-review publication or conference presentation. Trial registration number PROSPERO registration number: CRD42014009555. PMID:25392023

Li, Wang; Peng, Weina; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Zhishun

2014-01-01

146

Psychotherapy in dizziness: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundAbout 30–50% of complex dizziness disorders are organically not sufficiently explained or related to a psychiatric disorder. Of patients with such dizziness disorders, 80% are severely impaired by dizziness in their daily and working lives; nevertheless, they are often not diagnosed or treated adequately.ObjectivesThis review aims to give a systematic overview of psychotherapeutic approaches and their efficacy regarding the treatment

G Schmid; P Henningsen; M Dieterich; H Sattel; C Lahmann

2011-01-01

147

Using Multiple Types of Studies in Systematic Reviews of Health Care Interventions – A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background A systematic review may evaluate different aspects of a health care intervention. To accommodate the evaluation of various research questions, the inclusion of more than one study design may be necessary. One aim of this study is to find and describe articles on methodological issues concerning the incorporation of multiple types of study designs in systematic reviews on health care interventions. Another aim is to evaluate methods studies that have assessed whether reported effects differ by study types. Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Methodology Register on 31 March 2012 and identified 42 articles that reported on the integration of single or multiple study designs in systematic reviews. We summarized the contents of the articles qualitatively and assessed theoretical and empirical evidence. We found that many examples of reviews incorporating multiple types of studies exist and that every study design can serve a specific purpose. The clinical questions of a systematic review determine the types of design that are necessary or sufficient to provide the best possible answers. In a second independent search, we identified 49 studies, 31 systematic reviews and 18 trials that compared the effect sizes between randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials, which were statistically different in 35%, and not different in 53%. Twelve percent of studies reported both, different and non-different effect sizes. Conclusions Different study designs addressing the same question yielded varying results, with differences in about half of all examples. The risk of presenting uncertain results without knowing for sure the direction and magnitude of the effect holds true for both nonrandomized and randomized controlled trials. The integration of multiple study designs in systematic reviews is required if patients should be informed on the many facets of patient relevant issues of health care interventions. PMID:24416098

Peinemann, Frank; Tushabe, Doreen Allen; Kleijnen, Jos

2013-01-01

148

Radical radiotherapy for stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in patients not sufficiently fit for or declining surgery (medically inoperable): a systematic review  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES—To determine the effectiveness of radical radiotherapy in medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the extent of treatment related morbidity.?METHODS—Randomised trials were sought by electronically searching the Cochrane Clinical Trials Register, and both randomised and non-randomised trials were sought by searching Medline and Excerpta Medica (Embase). Further studies were identified from references cited in those papers already identified by electronic searching. The studies included were those of patients of any age with stage I/II NSCLC receiving radiotherapy at a dose of >40 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks or its radiobiological equivalent.?RESULTS—Two randomised and 35 non-randomised studies were identified. One randomised and nine non-randomised studies did not meet the selection criteria, leaving one randomised and 26 non-randomised studies for analysis. In the randomised trial 2 year survival was higher following continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART; 37%) than following 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks (24%). An estimated 2003 patients were included in the 26 non-randomised studies; overall survival was 22-72% at 2 years, 17-55% at 3 years, and 0-42% at 5 years. Following treatment, 11-43% of patients died from causes other than cancer. Cancer specific survival was 54-93% at 2 years, 22-56% at 3 years, and 13-39% at 5 years. Complete response rates were 33-61% and local failure rates were 6-70%. Distant metastases developed in approximately 25% of patients. Better response rates and survival were seen in those with smaller tumours and in those receiving higher doses although the reasons for prescribing higher doses were not clearly stated. The outcome was worse in those with prior weight loss or poor performance status. Assessment of treatment related morbidity and effects on quality of life and symptom control were inconclusive because of the lack of prospective evaluation and paucity of data.?CONCLUSIONS—No randomised trials compared a policy of immediate radical radiotherapy with palliative radiotherapy given when patients develop symptoms. In the absence of such trials, radical radiotherapy appears to result in a better survival than might be expected had treatment not been given. A substantial, though variable, proportion of patients died during follow up from causes other than cancer. The optimal radiation dose and treatment technique (particularly with respect to mediastinal irradiation) remain uncertain.?? PMID:11462066

Rowell, N; Williams, C

2001-01-01

149

Contribution of Systematic Reviews to Management Decisions  

PubMed Central

Systematic reviews comprehensively summarize evidence about the effectiveness of conservation interventions. We investigated the contribution to management decisions made by this growing body of literature. We identified 43 systematic reviews of conservation evidence, 23 of which drew some concrete conclusions relevant to management. Most reviews addressed conservation interventions relevant to policy decisions; only 35% considered practical on-the-ground management interventions. The majority of reviews covered only a small fraction of the geographic and taxonomic breadth they aimed to address (median = 13% of relevant countries and 16% of relevant taxa). The likelihood that reviews contained at least some implications for management tended to increase as geographic coverage increased and to decline as taxonomic breadth increased. These results suggest the breadth of a systematic review requires careful consideration. Reviews identified a mean of 312 relevant primary studies but excluded 88% of these because of deficiencies in design or a failure to meet other inclusion criteria. Reviews summarized on average 284 data sets and 112 years of research activity, yet the likelihood that their results had at least some implications for management did not increase as the amount of primary research summarized increased. In some cases, conclusions were elusive despite the inclusion of hundreds of data sets and years of cumulative research activity. Systematic reviews are an important part of the conservation decision making tool kit, although we believe the benefits of systematic reviews could be significantly enhanced by increasing the number of reviews focused on questions of direct relevance to on-the-ground managers; defining a more focused geographic and taxonomic breadth that better reflects available data; including a broader range of evidence types; and appraising the cost-effectiveness of interventions. Contribuciones de las Revisiones Sistemáticas a las Decisiones de Manejo Resumen Las revisiones sistemáticas resumen integralmente la evidencia sobre la efectividad de las intervenciones de conservación. Investigamos la contribución de las decisiones de manejo hechas por este creciente cuerpo de literatura. Identificamos 43 revisiones sistemáticas de evidencia de conservación, 23 de las cuales hicieron algunas conclusiones concretas relevantes al manejo. La mayoría de las revisiones se dirigían a intervenciones de conservación relevantes a las decisiones políticas; sólo el 35% consideraba intervenciones de manejo sobre-la-causa prácticas. La mayoría de las revisiones cubrieron solo una pequeña fracción de la amplitud geográfica y taxonómica a la que buscaban dirigirse (mediana = 13% de los países relevantes y 16% de los taxones relevantes). La probabilidad de que las revisiones tuvieran por lo menos algunas implicaciones para el manejo tendió a incrementar conforme la cobertura geográfica incrementaba y a declinar conforme aumentaba la amplitud taxonómica. Estos resultados sugieren que la amplitud de una revisión taxonómica requiere de una consideración cuidadosa. Las revisiones identificaron una media de 312 estudios primarios relevantes pero excluyeron 88% de estos por deficiencias en el diseño o fallas para coincidir con otros criterios de inclusión. Las revisiones resumieron en promedio 248 juegos de datos y 112 años de actividad de investigación, pero la probabilidad de que sus resultados tuvieran por lo menos algunas implicaciones para el manejo no incrementaron mientras la cantidad de investigación primaria resumida aumentaba. En algunos casos, las conclusiones fueron elusivas a pesar de la inclusión de cientos de conjuntos de datos y años de actividad de investigación acumulada. Las revisiones sistemáticas son una parte importante del juego de herramientas en la toma de decisiones de conservación, aunque consideramos que los beneficios de las rev

COOK, CARLY N; POSSINGHAM, HUGH P; FULLER, RICHARD A

2014-01-01

150

Latino Veterans with PTSD: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Latinos have a long history of military service with recent service including combat conditions and multiple deployments, which are highly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Clinical acumen underscores the importance of culture in assessment and treatment, but there has been little scientific literature that investigates the unique needs of veteran Latinos with PTSD. The primary goal of this systematic review was to analyze the existing literature on Latino veterans with PTSD and to critically evaluate attention to cultural issues. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses were used to guide this review. Peer-reviewed, research reports written in English on Latino Veterans with PTSD since 1980 were included; 20 were assessment related, and nine were treatment related. All studies were quantitative. Only 13 studies mentioned culture as part of the context for Latino veterans, and only seven included cultural factors as part of the study design. Present findings highlight a lack of research focused on understanding cultural factors related to the assessment and treatment of Latino veterans with PTSD. Culturally-informed research on Latino veterans from current wars, Latina veterans and Latino veteran treatment outcomes are necessary to provide culturally-appropriate care to this growing veteran subgroup. PMID:25379284

Pittman, James O. E.

2014-01-01

151

Health effects of indebtedness: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background In the aftermath of the global financial crisis, millions of households have been left with debts that they are unable to manage. Indebtedness may impair the wellbeing of those affected by it for years to come. This systematic review focuses on the long-term consequences of indebtedness on health. Methods The method used in the paper is a systematic review. First, bibliographic databases were searched for peer-reviewed articles. Second, the references and citations of the included articles were searched for additional articles. Results The results from our sample of 33 peer-reviewed studies demonstrate serious health effects related to indebtedness. Individuals with unmet loan payments had suicidal ideation and suffered from depression more often than those without such financial problems. Unpaid financial obligations were also related to poorer subjective health and health-related behaviour. Debt counselling and other programmes to mitigate debt-related stress are needed to alleviate the adverse effects of indebtedness on health. Conclusions The results demonstrate that indebtedness has serious effects on health. PMID:24885280

2014-01-01

152

Disasters and Perinatal Health: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background The empirical literature on the effects of disaster on pregnancy and the postpartum period is limited. The objective of this review was to examine the existing evidence on the effect of disasters on perinatal health. Methods A systematic review was conducted by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycInfo), including literature on disasters and pregnancy outcomes (e.g., preterm birth, low birthweight, congenital anomalies), mental health, and child development. 110 articles were identified, but many published reports were anecdotes or recommendations rather than systematic studies. The final review included 49 peer-reviewed studies that met inclusion criteria. Results Studies addressing the World Trade Center disaster of September 11th and other terrorist attacks, environmental/chemical disasters, and natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes were identified. Disasters of various types may reduce fetal growth in some women, though there does not appear to be an effect on gestational age at birth. Severity of exposure is the major predictor of mental health issues among pregnant and postpartum women. The mother's mental health after a disaster may more strongly influence on child development than any direct effect of disaster-related prenatal stress. Conclusions There is evidence that disaster impacts maternal mental health and some perinatal health outcomes, particular among highly-exposed women. Future research should focus on under-studied outcomes such as spontaneous abortion. Relief workers and clinicians should concentrate on the most exposed women, particularly with respect to mental health. PMID:21375788

Harville, EW; Xiong, X; Buekens, P

2012-01-01

153

The prevalence of stillbirths: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Stillbirth rate is an important indicator of access to and quality of antenatal and delivery care. Obtaining overall estimates across various regions of the world is not straightforward due to variation in definitions, data collection methods and reporting. Methods We conducted a systematic review of a range of pregnancy-related conditions including stillbirths and performed meta-analysis of the subset of studies reporting stillbirth rates. We examined variation across rates and used meta-regression techniques to explain observed variation. Results We identified 389 articles on stillbirth prevalence among the 2580 included in the systematic review. We included 70 providing 80 data sets from 50 countries in the meta-analysis. Pooled prevalence rates show variation across various subgroup categories. Rates per 100 births are higher in studies conducted in less developed country settings as compared to more developed (1.17 versus 0.50), of inadequate quality as compared to adequate (1.12 versus 0.66), using sub-national sample as compared to national (1.38 versus 0.68), reporting all stillbirths as compared to late stillbirths (0.95 versus 0.63), published in non-English as compared to English (0.91 versus 0.59) and as journal articles as compared to non-journal (1.37 versus 0.67). The results of the meta-regression show the significance of two predictor variables – development status of the setting and study quality – on stillbirth prevalence. Conclusion Stillbirth prevalence at the community level is typically less than 1% in more developed parts of the world and could exceed 3% in less developed regions. Regular reviews of stillbirth rates in appropriately designed and reported studies are useful in monitoring the adequacy of care. Systematic reviews of prevalence studies are helpful in explaining sources of variation across rates. Exploring these methodological issues will lead to improved standards for assessing the burden of reproductive ill-health. PMID:16401351

Say, Lale; Donner, Allan; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Taljaard, Monica; Piaggio, Gilda

2006-01-01

154

Reversed halo sign: a systematic review.  

PubMed

A reversed halo sign (RHS) is defined as the presence of a focal ring-shaped area of ground-glass opacity within a peripheral rim of consolidation. Although originally described in patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, it has been described with several other noninfectious and infectious diseases, including fungal infections. Thus, it is imperative that a proper diagnosis be established before initiating treatment. In this article, we systematically review the literature (PubMed and Embase) for the associations of the RHS. We have also proposed a diagnostic algorithm for an approach to a patient with an RHS. PMID:24782557

Maturu, Venkata N; Agarwal, Ritesh

2014-09-01

155

Systematic sports medical prophylactic evaluations in the countries of the former USSR  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPeriodic health evaluations for athletes are widely discussed in the sports medical literature, and are intended to screen for underlying cardiovascular disease, identify sports injury risk factors and posture disturbances, as well as exercise induced physiological conditions.ObjectiveTo review the systematic the athletes' periodic health evaluations in the territories of the former USSR.ParticipantsSelected sports medicine outpatient centres (SMC) and sports medicine

P Mustafins; A Landyr; I Schybria; J Istomina; T Gurevich

2011-01-01

156

Automatic Evidence Retrieval for Systematic Reviews  

PubMed Central

Background Snowballing involves recursively pursuing relevant references cited in the retrieved literature and adding them to the search results. Snowballing is an alternative approach to discover additional evidence that was not retrieved through conventional search. Snowballing’s effectiveness makes it best practice in systematic reviews despite being time-consuming and tedious. Objective Our goal was to evaluate an automatic method for citation snowballing’s capacity to identify and retrieve the full text and/or abstracts of cited articles. Methods Using 20 review articles that contained 949 citations to journal or conference articles, we manually searched Microsoft Academic Search (MAS) and identified 78.0% (740/949) of the cited articles that were present in the database. We compared the performance of the automatic citation snowballing method against the results of this manual search, measuring precision, recall, and F1 score. Results The automatic method was able to correctly identify 633 (as proportion of included citations: recall=66.7%, F1 score=79.3%; as proportion of citations in MAS: recall=85.5%, F1 score=91.2%) of citations with high precision (97.7%), and retrieved the full text or abstract for 490 (recall=82.9%, precision=92.1%, F1 score=87.3%) of the 633 correctly retrieved citations. Conclusions The proposed method for automatic citation snowballing is accurate and is capable of obtaining the full texts or abstracts for a substantial proportion of the scholarly citations in review articles. By automating the process of citation snowballing, it may be possible to reduce the time and effort of common evidence surveillance tasks such as keeping trial registries up to date and conducting systematic reviews. PMID:25274020

Choong, Miew Keen; Galgani, Filippo; Dunn, Adam G

2014-01-01

157

Acupuncture for adults with overactive bladder: a systematic review protocol  

PubMed Central

Introduction Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom syndrome defined by the International Continence Society (ICS) as ‘the presence of urinary urgency (both daytime and nighttime), usually accompanied by increased frequency and nocturia with or without urge urinary incontinence in the absence of a urinary tract infection or other obvious pathology’. Clinical studies indicate that acupuncture could reduce micturition over 24?h, urgency episodes over 24?h, and improve quality of life among people with OAB. This systematic review protocol details the proposed methods for evaluating the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for OAB. Methods and analysis The following databases will be searched for relevant studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Incontinence Group Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC), Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP database), Wan-Fang Data, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and will hand search a list of medical journals as a supplement. Any randomised controlled trials in English or Chinese without restriction of publication status will be included with treatment of OAB. Outcomes will mainly include number of micturition episodes over 24?h, number of urgency episodes over 24?h and number of incontinence episodes over 24?h. Two reviewers will independently screen the titles, abstracts or even full texts, and extract data. Two other reviewers will assess study quality. Revman 5.1 software will be used to conduct meta-analysis and calculate the risk ratio for dichotomous data. Weighted mean difference or standard mean difference will be calculated for continuous data. The Cochrane collaboration's tool will be used to assess the risk of bias. Dissemination This systematic review protocol will provide information on acupuncture therapy for OAB. The results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publication or conference presentations. Protocol registration PROSPERO CRD42014010181. PMID:25573525

Mo, Qian; Wang, Yang; Ye, Yongming; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun

2015-01-01

158

Systematic Review of Breastfeeding and Herbs  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objectives Despite popular and historical use, there has been little modern research conducted to determine the safety and efficacy of herb use during breastfeeding. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the clinical literature on herbal medicine and lactation. Methods The databases PubMed, CAB Abstracts, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HealthSTAR, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Reprotox were systematically searched for human trials from 1970 until 2010. Reference lists from relevant articles were hand-searched. Results Thirty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Clinical studies were divided into three categories: survey studies (n=11), safety studies (n=8), and efficacy studies (n=13). Six studies were randomized controlled trials. The most common herbs studied were St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum L.) (n=3), garlic (Allium sativum L.) extract (n=2), and senna (Cassia senna L.) (n=2). Studies were very heterogeneous with regard to study design, herbal intervention, and outcome measures. Overall, poor methodological quality predominated among the studies. Conclusions Our review concludes that further research is needed to assess the prevalence, efficacy, and safety of commonly used herbs during breastfeeding. PMID:22686865

Budzynska, Katarzyna; Gardner, Zoë E.; Dugoua, Jean-Jacques; Low Dog, Tieraona

2012-01-01

159

Pharmaceutical supply chain risks: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Introduction Supply of medicine as a strategic product in any health system is a top priority. Pharmaceutical companies, a major player of the drug supply chain, are subject to many risks. These risks disrupt the supply of medicine in many ways such as their quantity and quality and their delivery to the right place and customers and at the right time. Therefore risk identification in the supply process of pharmaceutical companies and mitigate them is highly recommended. Objective In this study it is attempted to investigate pharmaceutical supply chain risks with perspective of manufacturing companies. Methods Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science bibliographic databases and Google scholar scientific search engines were searched for pharmaceutical supply chain risk management studies with 6 different groups of keywords. All results found by keywords were reviewed and none-relevant articles were excluded by outcome of interests and researcher boundaries of study within 4 steps and through a systematic method. Results Nine articles were included in the systematic review and totally 50 main risks based on study outcome of interest extracted which classified in 7 categories. Most of reported risks were related to supply and supplier issues. Organization and strategy issues, financial, logistic, political, market and regulatory issues were in next level of importance. Conclusion It was shown that the majority of risks in pharmaceutical supply chain were internal risks due to processes, people and functions mismanagement which could be managed by suitable mitigation strategies. PMID:24355166

2013-01-01

160

A Systematic Review of Interventions Used to Treat Catatonic Symptoms in People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A systematic review was conducted to examine the efficacy of a range of treatments for autistic catatonia. The review identified 22 relevant papers, reporting a total of 28 cases including both adult and paediatric patients. Treatment methods included electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), medication, behavioural and sensory interventions. Quality…

DeJong, Hannah; Bunton, Penny; Hare, Dougal J.

2014-01-01

161

Occupational Psychological Factors Increase the Risk for Back Pain: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge concerning the role of psychological workplace variables in back pain. To this end the literature on psycholog- ical factors and back pain was systematically searched and analyzed. Psychological and medical databases and cross-referencing were used to locate 975 studies. To be included in this review, studies had to have a

Steven James Linton

2001-01-01

162

Occupational Psychological Factors Increase the Risk for Back Pain: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this review was to summarize current knowledge concerning the role of psychological workplace variables in back pain. To this end the literature on psychological factors and back pain was systematically searched and analyzed. Psychological and medical databases and cross-referencing were used to locate 975 studies. To be included in this review, studies had to have a prospective

Steven James Linton

2001-01-01

163

Disease-specific health education for COPD: a systematic review of changes in health outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic review was conducted to deter- mine the benefits of disease-specific health edu- cation for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A search was con- ducted through Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Library, Physiotherapy Evi- dence Database and reference lists to obtain publications reporting on educational interven- tions compared with usual medical care. Two reviewers independently assessed each

Felicity Blackstock; K. E. Webster

2006-01-01

164

Telemonitoring can assist in managing cardiovascular disease in primary care: a systematic review of systematic reviews  

PubMed Central

Background There has been growing interest regarding the impact of telemonitoring and its ability to reduce the increasing burden of chronic diseases, including chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD), on healthcare systems. A number of randomised trials have been undertaken internationally and synthesised into various systematic reviews to establish an evidence base for this model of care. This study sought to synthesise and critically evaluate this large body of evidence to inform clinicians, researchers and policy makers. Methods A systematic review of systematic reviews investigating the impact of telemonitoring interventions in the primary care management of CVD was conducted. Reviews were included if they explored primary care based telemonitoring in either CVD, heart failure or hypertension, were reported in the English language and were published between 2000 and 2013. Data was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer using a standardised form. Two assessors then rated the quality of each review using the Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ). Results Of the 13 included reviews, four focused on telemonitoring interventions in hypertension or CVD management and the remaining 9 reviews investigated telemonitoring in HF management. Seven reviews scored a five or above on the OQAQ evidencing good quality reviews. Findings suggest that telemonitoring can contribute to significant reductions in blood pressure, decreased all-cause and HF related hospitalisations, reduced all-cause mortality and improved quality of life. Telemonitoring was also demonstrated to reduce health care costs and appears acceptable to patients. Conclusion Telemonitoring has the potential to enhance primary care management of CVD by improving patient outcomes and reducing health costs. However, further research needs to explore the specific elements of telemonitoring interventions to determine the relative value of the various elements. Additionally, the ways in which telemonitoring care improves health outcomes needs to be further explored to understand the nature of these interventions. PMID:24606887

2014-01-01

165

Work-related leukemia: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Leukemia is a complex disease, which only became better understood during the last decades following the development of new laboratory techniques and diagnostic methods. Despite our improved understanding of the physiology of the disease, little is yet known about the causes of leukemia. A variety of potential risk factors have been suggested so far, including personal habits and lifestyle, and a wide range of occupational or environmental exposures. A causal association with leukemia has only been documented to date for ionizing radiation, benzene and treatment with cytostatic drugs, but there is an ongoing scientific debate on the possible association of leukemia with a number of other work-related hazards. In this article, we have reviewed scientific studies, published over the past 5 years, which investigated potential associations between leukemia and exposure to occupational risk factors. The systematic literature review took place via electronic databases, using specific search criteria, and independent reviewers have further filtered the search results to identify the number of articles, presented in our paper. A large number of studies included in the review referred to the effects of ionizing radiation, where new data suggest that the effects of exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation should probably be reevaluated. Some other works appear to substantiate a potential association of the disease with certain pesticides. Further research is also suggested regarding the role of infectious agents or exposure to certain chemicals like formaldehyde or butadiene in the pathogenesis of leukemia. PMID:23697536

2013-01-01

166

Refeeding hypophosphatemia in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The rate of adolescents presenting with anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasing. Medically unstable adolescents are admitted to the hospital for nutrition restoration. A lack of global consensus on appropriate refeeding practices of malnourished patients has resulted in inconsistent refeeding practices. Refeeding hypophosphatemia (RH) is the most common complication associated with refeeding the malnourished patient. This review sought to identify the range of refeeding rates adopted globally and the implication that total energy intake and malnutrition may have on RH while refeeding adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Studies were identified by a systematic electronic search of medical databases from 1980 to September 2012. Seventeen publications were identified, including 6 chart reviews, 1 observational study, and 10 case reports, with a total of 1039 subjects. The average refeeding energy intake was 1186 kcal/d, ranging from 125-1900 kcal/d, with a mean percentage median body mass index (% mBMI) of 78%. The average incidence rate of RH was 14%. A significant correlation between malnutrition (% mBMI) and post-refeeding phosphate was identified (R (2) = 0.6, P = .01). This review highlights the disparity in refeeding rates adopted internationally in treating malnourished adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Based on this review, the severity of malnutrition seems to be a marker for the development of RH more so than total energy intake. PMID:23459608

O'Connor, Graeme; Nicholls, Dasha

2013-06-01

167

Effectiveness of Nursing Management Information Systems: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to review evaluation studies of nursing management information systems (NMISs) and their outcome measures to examine system effectiveness. Methods For the systematic review, a literature search of the PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was conducted to retrieve original articles published between 1970 and 2014. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms included informatics, medical informatics, nursing informatics, medical informatics application, and management information systems for information systems and evaluation studies and nursing evaluation research for evaluation research. Additionally, manag* and admin*, and nurs* were combined. Title, abstract, and full-text reviews were completed by two reviewers. And then, year, author, type of management system, study purpose, study design, data source, system users, study subjects, and outcomes were extracted from the selected articles. The quality and risk of bias of the studies that were finally selected were assessed with the Risk of Bias Assessment Tool for Non-randomized Studies (RoBANS) criteria. Results Out of the 2,257 retrieved articles, a total of six articles were selected. These included two scheduling programs, two nursing cost-related programs, and two patient care management programs. For the outcome measurements, usefulness, time saving, satisfaction, cost, attitude, usability, data quality/completeness/accuracy, and personnel work patterns were included. User satisfaction, time saving, and usefulness mostly showed positive findings. Conclusions The study results suggest that NMISs were effective in time saving and useful in nursing care. Because there was a lack of quality in the reviewed studies, well-designed research, such as randomized controlled trials, should be conducted to more objectively evaluate the effectiveness of NMISs. PMID:25405060

Choi, Mona; Yang, You Lee

2014-01-01

168

Systematic review on cashew nut allergy.  

PubMed

Recent studies on cashew nut allergy suggest that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing. Cashew nut consumption by allergic patients can cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. This review summarizes current knowledge on cashew nut allergy to facilitate timely clinical recognition and to promote awareness of this emerging food allergy amongst clinicians. The goal of this study is to present a systematic review focused on the clinical aspects of allergy to cashew nut including the characteristics of cashew nut, the prevalence, allergenic components, cross-reactivity, diagnosis and management of cashew nut allergy. The literature search yielded 255 articles of which 40 met our selection criteria and were considered to be relevant for this review. The 40 articles included one prospective study, six retrospective studies and seven case reports. The remaining 26 papers were not directly related to cashew nut allergy. The literature suggests that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing, although the level of evidence for this is low. A minimal amount of cashew nut allergen may cause a severe allergic reaction, suggesting high potency comparable with other tree nuts and peanuts. Cashew allergy is clearly an underestimated important healthcare problem, especially in children. PMID:24734868

van der Valk, J P M; Dubois, A E J; Gerth van Wijk, R; Wichers, H J; de Jong, N W

2014-06-01

169

Yoga and hypertension: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Lifestyle modification is a cornerstone of hypertension (HPT) treatment, yet most recommendations currently focus on diet and exercise and do not consider stress reduction strategies. Yoga is a spiritual path that may reduce blood pressure (BP) through reducing stress, increasing parasympathetic activation, and altering baroreceptor sensitivity; however, despite reviews on yoga and cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and anxiety that suggest yoga may reduce BP, no comprehensive review has yet focused on yoga and HPT. A systematic review of all published studies on yoga and HPT was performed revealing 39 cohort studies, 30 nonrandomized, controlled trials (NRCTs), 48 randomized, controlled trials (RCTs), and 3 case reports with durations ranging from 1 wk to 4 y and involving a total of 6693 subjects. Most studies reported that yoga effectively reduced BP in both normotensive and hypertensive populations. These studies suggest that yoga is an effective adjunct therapy for HPT and worthy of inclusion in clinical guidelines, yet the great heterogeneity of yoga practices and the variable quality of the research makes it difficult to recommend any specific yoga practice for HPT. Future research needs to focus on high quality clinical trials along with studies on the mechanisms of action of different yoga practices. PMID:24657958

Tyagi, Anupama; Cohen, Marc

2014-01-01

170

Sunscreen use and melanocytic nevi in children: a systematic review.  

PubMed

We conducted a systematic review of the association between melanocytic nevi (MN) in childhood and sunscreen use. A bibliographic search was conducted between November 2008 and January 2009 using the following key words on MEDLINE and EMBASE: child*, in combination with naevi, nevi, naevus, nevus and sunscreen, sun protection. We also used Medical Subject Headings [sunscreening agents], or [radiation protection] with [nevus, pigmented]. A first screening was done on title and abstract reading. Randomized trials and cohort and cross-sectional studies analyzing the relationship between the use of sunscreen and MN in children were selected. Three reviewers abstracted data from each article. The three sets of results were compared for concordance and rereviewed if necessary. Fifteen articles were included (20,743 children). The studies were not consistent in terms of the ages of the children, MN count methods, or sunscreen use assessment. Owing to this heterogeneity, we were unable to pool the studies and conduct a meta-analysis. Twelve studies did not report that the use of sunscreen had a protective effect against MN development. Three studies reported a lower MN count when sunscreen was applied. This systematic review underlines the methodologic differences between studies. Eight of 15 studies reported a positive association between sunscreen application and MN count. Differences in MN counts, overexposure to sun, and inadequate sunscreen application on fair-skinned children could explain the disparity in the results. There is still no evidence of a protective effect of sunscreen against MN development in children. PMID:22994908

de Maleissye, Marie-Florence; Beauchet, Alain; Saiag, Phillippe; Corrêa, Marcelo; Godin-Beeckmann, Sophie; Haeffelin, Martial; Mahé, Emmanuel

2013-01-01

171

Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of the Effectiveness of Contraceptive Service Interventions for Young People, Delivered in Health Care Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A systematic review and narrative synthesis to determine the effectiveness of contraception service interventions for young people delivered in health care premises was undertaken. We searched 12 key health and medical databases, reference lists of included papers and systematic reviews and cited reference searches on included articles. All…

Blank, Lindsay; Baxter, Susan K.; Payne, Nick; Guillaume, Louise R.; Squires, Hazel

2012-01-01

172

Diet and breast cancer: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Abstract Breast cancer occurs as a result between genes-diet interactions. Concerning diet, only alcohol is widely recognized for being most consistently associated with breast cancer risk. The purpose of this review is to report through a systematic way the current scientific evidence relating breast cancer and diet, through original-research studies published in English language during the last decade, assessing the consumption of specific foodstuffs/food-nutrients in relation to the disease. The available literature suggests that soy food intake seems to be inversely associated with the disease, while no association seems to be reported for dietary carbohydrates and dietary fiber intake. The consumption of dietary fat, is probably suggestive of an increase in breast cancer risk, while studies evaluating the role of fruit/vegetable, meat as well as dietary patterns and breast cancer risk, provide inconsistent results. Diet seems to be modestly associated with the disease, highlighting the need for more studies to be conducted. PMID:25198160

Mourouti, Niki; Kontogianni, Meropi D; Papavagelis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

2015-02-01

173

Orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aims of the review were to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst (OOC) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequency of OOC between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of MEDLINE and LILACS. Only those reports of OOCs that occurred in a consecutive series of OOCs in the reporting authors' caseload were considered. Results 37 reports on 36 case series were included in the SR. OOC affected males twice as frequently and the mandible almost 2.5 times as frequently. Although the mean age at first presentation was 35 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade for the Western, East Asian and Latin American global groups. Seven reports included details of at least one clinical finding. 11 reported case series included at least 1 radiological feature. All OOCs were radiolucent, 93% were unilocular and 68% were associated with unerupted teeth. 28% of the reported case series included follow up. 4% of OCC recurred and all of these were in the Western global group. Conclusions Although one feature of OOCs is that they are unlikely to recur, some do. Not only is there a lack of long-term follow up of large series with long-term outcomes of OOC, but there is a paucity of clinical and radiological details of OOC at initial presentation. PMID:21062939

MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

2010-01-01

174

A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

2013-01-01

175

A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

2014-01-01

176

Toxocariasis in North America: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Toxocariasis is an important neglected tropical disease that can manifest as visceral or ocular larva migrans, or covert toxocariasis. All three forms pose a public health problem and cause significant morbidity in areas of high prevalence. To determine the burden of toxocariasis in North America, we conducted a systematic review of the literature following PRISMA guidelines. We found 18 articles with original prevalence, incidence, or case data for toxocariasis. Prevalence estimates ranged from 0.6% in a Canadian Inuit community to 30.8% in Mexican children with asthma. Commonly cited risk factors included: African-American race, poverty, male sex, and pet ownership or environmental contamination by animal feces. Increased prevalence of Toxocara spp. infection was linked in a group of case control studies conducted in Mexico to several high risk groups including waste pickers, asthmatic children, and inpatient psychiatry patients. Further research is needed to determine the true current burden of toxocariasis in North America; however the prevalence estimates gathered in this review suggest that the burden of disease is significant. PMID:25166906

Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.

2014-01-01

177

Transplantation of Cryopreserved Teeth: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

The aim of this article was to examine the research articles regarding biological and mechanical properties of cryopreserved teeth for potential use in tooth transplantation. A systematic review of literatures was performed by Pubmed searching with assigned key words from January 1, 1990 to June 8, 2009. All articles were examined for inclusion criteria. Secondary search was conducted by hand-search through references of included articles from primary search. A total of 24 articles were obtained from both primary and secondary search and used as fundamental articles in this review. Periodontal ligament tissues of cryopreserved teeth were able to maintain their biological properties resulted in a satisfactory healing of periodontium. Dental pulp tissues, however, may be compromised by limitation of permeability of cryopreservative agent into pulp cavity. Therefore, an endodontic treatment of transplanted cryopreserved teeth was recommended. Cryopreserved teeth had comparable mechanical properties to those of normal teeth. Importantly, the success of cryopreserved tooth transplantation treatment in orthodontic patients was reported. The cryopreserved teeth for tooth banking have a potential clinical application for treatment of missing teeth. Case selection, however, is critical for treatment success. More studies and data regarding masticatory function and periodontal healing of transplanted cryopreserved teeth are needed. PMID:20737931

Osathanon, Thanaphum

2010-01-01

178

Toxocariasis in North America: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Toxocariasis is an important neglected tropical disease that can manifest as visceral or ocular larva migrans, or covert toxocariasis. All three forms pose a public health problem and cause significant morbidity in areas of high prevalence. To determine the burden of toxocariasis in North America, we conducted a systematic review of the literature following PRISMA guidelines. We found 18 articles with original prevalence, incidence, or case data for toxocariasis. Prevalence estimates ranged from 0.6% in a Canadian Inuit community to 30.8% in Mexican children with asthma. Commonly cited risk factors included: African-American race, poverty, male sex, and pet ownership or environmental contamination by animal feces. Increased prevalence of Toxocara spp. infection was linked in a group of case control studies conducted in Mexico to several high risk groups including waste pickers, asthmatic children, and inpatient psychiatry patients. Further research is needed to determine the true current burden of toxocariasis in North America; however the prevalence estimates gathered in this review suggest that the burden of disease is significant. PMID:25166906

Lee, Rachel M; Moore, Laura B; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

2014-08-01

179

Interventions to promote cycling: systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives To determine what interventions are effective in promoting cycling, the size of the effects of interventions, and evidence of any associated benefits on overall physical activity or anthropometric measures. Design Systematic review. Data sources Published and unpublished reports in any language identified by searching 13 electronic databases, websites, reference lists, and existing systematic reviews, and papers identified by experts in the field. Review methods Controlled “before and after” experimental or observational studies of the effect of any type of intervention on cycling behaviour measured at either individual or population level. Results Twenty five studies (of which two were randomised controlled trials) from seven countries were included. Six studies examined interventions aimed specifically at promoting cycling, of which four (an intensive individual intervention in obese women, high quality improvements to a cycle route network, and two multifaceted cycle promotion initiatives at town or city level) were found to be associated with increases in cycling. Those studies that evaluated interventions at population level reported net increases of up to 3.4 percentage points in the population prevalence of cycling or the proportion of trips made by bicycle. Sixteen studies assessing individualised marketing of “environmentally friendly” modes of transport to interested households reported modest but consistent net effects equating to an average of eight additional cycling trips per person per year in the local population. Other interventions that targeted travel behaviour in general were not associated with a clear increase in cycling. Only two studies assessed effects of interventions on physical activity; one reported a positive shift in the population distribution of overall physical activity during the intervention. Conclusions Community-wide promotional activities and improving infrastructure for cycling have the potential to increase cycling by modest amounts, but further controlled evaluative studies incorporating more precise measures are required, particularly in areas without an established cycling culture. Studies of individualised marketing report consistent positive effects of interventions on cycling behaviour, but these findings should be confirmed using more robust study designs. Future research should also examine how best to promote cycling in children and adolescents and through workplaces. Whether interventions to promote cycling result in an increase in overall physical activity or changes in anthropometric measures is unclear. PMID:20959282

2010-01-01

180

Vasectomy surgical techniques: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background A wide variety of surgical techniques are used to perform vasectomy. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess if any surgical techniques to isolate or occlude the vas are associated with better outcomes in terms of occlusive and contraceptive effectiveness, and complications. Methods We searched MEDLINE (1966-June 2003), EMBASE (1980-June 2003), reference lists of retrieved articles, urology textbooks, and our own files looking for studies comparing two or more vasectomy surgical techniques and reporting on effectiveness and complications. From 2,058 titles or abstracts, two independent reviewers identified 224 as potentially relevant. Full reports of 219 articles were retrieved and final selection was made by the same two independent reviewers using the same criteria as for the initial selection. Discrepancies were resolved by involving a third reviewer. Data were extracted and methodological quality of selected studies was assessed by two independent reviewers. Studies were divided in broad categories (isolation, occlusion, and combined isolation and occlusion techniques) and sub-categories of specific surgical techniques performed. Qualitative analyses and syntheses were done. Results Of 31 comparative studies (37 articles), only four were randomized clinical trials, most studies were observational and retrospective. Overall methodological quality was low. From nine studies on vas isolation, there is good evidence that the no-scalpel vasectomy approach decreases the risk of surgical complications, namely hematoma/bleeding and infection, compared with incisional techniques. Five comparative studies including one high quality randomized clinical trial provided good evidence that fascial interposition (FI) increases the occlusive effectiveness of ligation and excision. Results of 11 comparative studies suggest that FI with cautery of the vas lumen provides the highest level of occlusive effectiveness, even when leaving the testicular end open. Otherwise, firm evidence to support any occlusion technique in terms of increased effectiveness or decreased risk of complications is lacking. Conclusions Current evidence supports no-scalpel vasectomy as the safest surgical approach to isolate the vas when performing vasectomy. Adding FI increases effectiveness beyond ligation and excision alone. Occlusive effectiveness appears to be further improved by combining FI with cautery. Methodologically sound prospective controlled studies should be conducted to evaluate specific occlusion techniques further. PMID:15157272

Labrecque, Michel; Dufresne, Caroline; Barone, Mark A; St-Hilaire, Karine

2004-01-01

181

Digital Asthma Self-Management Interventions: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Many people with asthma tolerate symptoms and lifestyle limitations unnecessarily by not utilizing proven therapies. Better support for self-management is known to improve asthma control, and increasingly the Internet and other digital media are being used to deliver that support. Objective Our goal was to summarize current knowledge, evidenced through existing systematic reviews, of the effectiveness and implementation of digital self-management support for adults and children with asthma and to examine what features help or hinder the use of these programs. Methods A comprehensive search strategy combined 3 facets of search terms: (1) online technology, (2) asthma, and (3) self-management/behavior change/patient experience. We undertook searches of 14 databases, and reference and citation searching. We included qualitative and quantitative systematic reviews about online or computerized interventions facilitating self-management. Title, abstract, full paper screening, and quality appraisal were performed by two researchers independently. Data extraction was undertaken using standardized forms. Results A total of 3810 unique papers were identified. Twenty-nine systematic reviews met inclusion criteria: the majority were from the United States (n=12), the rest from United Kingdom (n=6), Canada (n=3), Portugal (n=2), and Australia, France, Spain, Norway, Taiwan, and Greece (1 each). Only 10 systematic reviews fulfilled pre-determined quality standards, describing 19 clinical trials. Interventions were heterogeneous: duration of interventions ranging from single use, to 24-hour access for 12 months, and incorporating varying degrees of health professional involvement. Dropout rates ranged from 5-23%. Four RCTs were aimed at adults (overall range 3-65 years). Participants were inadequately described: socioeconomic status 0/19, ethnicity 6/19, and gender 15/19. No qualitative systematic reviews were included. Meta-analysis was not attempted due to heterogeneity and inadequate information provision within reviews. There was no evidence of harm from digital interventions. All RCTs that examined knowledge (n=2) and activity limitation (n=2) showed improvement in the intervention group. Digital interventions improved markers of self care (5/6), quality of life (4/7), and medication use (2/3). Effects on symptoms (6/12) and school absences (2/4) were equivocal, with no evidence of overall benefits on lung function (2/6), or health service use (2/15). No specific data on economic analyses were provided. Intervention descriptions were generally brief making it impossible to identify which specific “ingredients” of interventions contribute most to improving outcomes. Conclusions Digital self-management interventions show promise, with evidence of beneficial effects on some outcomes. There is no evidence about utility in those over 65 years and no information about socioeconomic status of participants, making understanding the “reach” of such interventions difficult. Digital interventions are poorly described within reviews, with insufficient information about barriers and facilitators to their uptake and utilization. To address these gaps, a detailed quantitative systematic review of digital asthma interventions and an examination of the primary qualitative literature are warranted, as well as greater emphasis on economic analysis within trials. PMID:24550161

Morrison, Deborah; Wyke, Sally; Agur, Karolina; Cameron, Euan J; Docking, Robert I; MacKenzie, Alison M; McConnachie, Alex; Raghuvir, Vandana; Thomson, Neil C

2014-01-01

182

Site Selection Criteria for Sheltering after Earthquakes: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective: Proper shelter site selection is necessary for long-term welfare of earthquake affected people. This study aims to explore the criteria that need to be considered after earthquakes. Methods: Through a systematic review, 273 articles found that were published till April 2014. Among these, seven articles have been selected and analyzed for the criteria that they introduced for sheltering site selection after earthquakes. Results: Out of 27 proposed criteria, accessibility and proximity to homes of affected people were stressed in all the papers. Moreover, seven other criteria were the same in most of the papers including suitable size, suitable distance from hazardous areas, geological hazards and land slope, suitable distance from medical centers, water supply and Security. We categorized all the mentioned criteria in six main categories. Size and location, disaster risk reduction, relief and rescue facilities, feasibility of the site, environmental and social aspects are the main categories. Conclusion: Selection and applying proper criteria for shelter site selection after earthquakes is a multi-disciplinary task. The decision needs relevant models and/or tools. Geographic Information System (GIS) is a useful tool for this purpose. Key words: Disaster, earthquake, shelter, site selection, systematic review PMID:25642367

Soltani, Ahmad; Ardalan, Ali; Darvishi Boloorani, Ali; Haghdoost, AliAkbar; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad

2014-01-01

183

[Improving practice and organisation of care: methodology for systematic reviews].  

PubMed

The number of intervention studies designed to improve quality of care is increasing exponentially, making it difficult to access all available information on a given subject. Systematic reviews are tools that provide health professionals with comprehensive and objective information. This article describes the main phases of a systematic review: formulating the research question, search and selection of studies, data extraction and analysis, assessment of the methodological quality of studies, and synthesis of the results. Interventions designed to improve professional practices and organisation of care have specific characteristics that determine the methodology of systematic reviews. For example, the often substantial heterogeneity between populations, organisations, and intervention settings among studies must be taken into account, which makes meta-analysis more difficult. Knowledge on specific features of systematic reviews designed to improve quality of care is essential to ensure a good review of the literature, or to evaluate the level of evidence of published systematic reviews. PMID:25490225

Zaugg, Vincent; Savoldelli, Virginie; Sabatier, Brigitte; Durieux, Pierre

2014-01-01

184

Qigong for hypertension: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The purpose of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of qigong for hypertension.A systematic literature search was performed in 7 databases from their respective inceptions until April 2014, including the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Chinese Scientific Journal Database, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Wanfang database, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure. Randomized controlled trials of qigong as either monotherapy or adjunctive therapy with antihypertensive drugs versus no intervention, exercise, or antihypertensive drugs for hypertension were identified. The risk of bias was assessed using the tool described in Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Review of Interventions, version 5.1.0.Twenty trials containing 2349 hypertensive patients were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bias was generally high. Compared with no intervention, qigong significantly reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP) (weighted mean difference [WMD]?=?-17.40?mm Hg, 95% confidence interval [CI] -21.06 to -13.74, P?

Xiong, Xingjiang; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yuqing

2015-01-01

185

The Safety of Cruciferous Plants in Humans: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Some cruciferous plants may serve as preventive treatments for several medical conditions; our objective was to systematically investigate their safety in humans. Four electronic databases were searched, and, of 10,831 references identified, 50 were included. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers, whereafter the association between interventions and adverse events was assessed. Adverse events in 53 subjects were identified through clinical trials; of these, altered drug metabolism was rated as certainly/likely caused by cruciferous plants. Adverse events in 1247 subjects were identified through observational studies, of which none received high causality ratings. Adverse events in 35 subjects were identified through case reports, of which allergies and warfarin resistance were rated as certainly/likely caused by cruciferous plants. We conclude that cruciferous plants are safe in humans, with the exception of allergies. Individuals treated with warfarin should consult their physician. Further investigation of uses of cruciferous plants in preventative medicine is warranted. PMID:22500092

Scott, Ori; Galicia-Connolly, Elaine; Adams, Denise; Surette, Soleil; Vohra, Sunita; Yager, Jerome Y.

2012-01-01

186

Systematic review of the surgical treatment for symptomatic os acromiale  

PubMed Central

The optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic os acromiale that has failed nonoperative management is unclear in the literature. We conducted a systematic review of multiple medical databases for level I–IV evidence. Both radiographic and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria (118 subjects, 125 shoulders). One hundred and fifteen subjects were treated surgically (122 shoulders). The mean age of the subjects was 49±11 years. The mean preoperative duration of symptoms was 12±8.6 months. Mesoacromiale was the most common type treated (94%). Internal fixation was the most common surgical technique used (60%), followed by excision (27%) and acromioplasty (13%). Rotator cuff repair was the most common concurrent surgical technique (performed in 59% of the surgically treated shoulders), followed by distal clavicle excision (25%). All surgical techniques resulted in improvement in clinical outcomes. Surgical management of symptomatic os acromiale that has failed nonoperative measures may predictably lead to improved outcomes. PMID:21660192

Harris, Joshua D.; Griesser, Michael J.; Jones, Grant L.

2011-01-01

187

Chronic Pain and Mortality: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic pain is common, often widespread and has a substantial impact on health and quality of life. The relationship between chronic pain and mortality is unclear. This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate evidence for a relationship between chronic pain and mortality. Methods A search of ten electronic databases including EMBASE and MEDLINE was conducted in March 2012, and updated until March 2014. Observational studies investigating the association between chronic or widespread pain (including fibromyalgia) and mortality were included. Risk of bias was assessed and a meta-analysis was undertaken to quantify heterogeneity and pool results. A narrative review was undertaken to explore similarities and differences between the included studies. Results Ten studies were included in the review. Three reported significant associations between chronic or widespread pain and mortality in unadjusted results. In adjusted analyses, four studies reported a significant association. The remaining studies reported no statistically significant association. A meta-analysis showed statistically significant heterogeneity of results from studies using comparable outcome measures (n?=?7)(I2?=?78.8%) and a modest but non-significant pooled estimate (MRR1.14,95%CI 0.95–1.37) for the relationship between chronic pain and all-cause mortality. This association was stronger when analysis was restricted to studies of widespread pain (n?=?5,I2?=?82.3%) MRR1.22(95%CI 0.93–1.60). The same pattern was observed with deaths from cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity is likely to be due to differences in study populations, follow-up time, pain phenotype, methods of analysis and use of confounding factors. Conclusion This review showed a mildly increased risk of death in people with chronic pain, particularly from cancer. However, the small number of studies and methodological differences prevented clear conclusions from being drawn. Consistently applied definitions of chronic pain and further investigation of the role of health, lifestyle, social and psychological factors in future studies will improve understanding of the relationship between chronic pain and mortality. PMID:24901358

Smith, Diane; Wilkie, Ross; Uthman, Olalekan; Jordan, Joanne L.; McBeth, John

2014-01-01

188

Volatile Metabolites of Pathogens: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Ideally, invading bacteria are detected as early as possible in critically ill patients: the strain of morbific pathogens is identified rapidly, and antimicrobial sensitivity is known well before the start of new antimicrobial therapy. Bacteria have a distinct metabolism, part of which results in the production of bacteria-specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which might be used for diagnostic purposes. Volatile metabolites can be investigated directly in exhaled air, allowing for noninvasive monitoring. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of VOCs produced by the six most abundant and pathogenic bacteria in sepsis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Such VOCs could be used as biological markers in the diagnostic approach of critically ill patients. A systematic review of existing literature revealed 31 articles. All six bacteria of interest produce isopentanol, formaldehyde, methyl mercaptan, and trimethylamine. Since humans do not produce these VOCs, they could serve as biological markers for presence of these pathogens. The following volatile biomarkers were found for identification of specific strains: isovaleric acid and 2-methyl-butanal for Staphylococcus aureus; 1-undecene, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-quinazoline, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl thiocyanide for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and methanol, pentanol, ethyl acetate, and indole for Escherichia coli. Notably, several factors that may effect VOC production were not controlled for, including used culture media, bacterial growth phase, and genomic variation within bacterial strains. In conclusion, VOCs produced by bacteria may serve as biological markers for their presence. Goal-targeted studies should be performed to identify potential sets of volatile biological markers and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers in critically ill patients. PMID:23675295

Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

2013-01-01

189

Clinical trials registries are under-utilized in the conduct of systematic reviews: a cross-sectional analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Publication bias is a major threat to the validity of systematic reviews. Searches of clinical trials registries can help to identify unpublished trials, though little is known about how often these resources are utilized. We assessed the usage and results of registry searches reported in systematic reviews published in major general medical journals. Methods This cross-sectional analysis includes data from systematic reviews assessing medical interventions which were published in one of six major general medical journals between July 2012 and June 2013. Two authors independently examined each published systematic review and all available supplementary materials to determine whether at least one clinical trials registry was searched. Results Of the 117 included systematic reviews, 41 (35%) reported searching a trials registry. Of the 29 reviews which also provided detailed registry search results, 15 (52%) identified at least one completed trial and 18 (62%) identified at least one ongoing trial. Conclusions Clinical trials registry searches are not routinely included in systematic reviews published in major medical journals. Routine examination of registry databases may allow a more accurate characterization of publication and outcome reporting biases and improve the validity of estimated effects of medical treatments. PMID:25348628

2014-01-01

190

Primary adrenal lymphoma: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Fewer than 200 cases of primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) have been reported. We have systematically reviewed all 187 cases of PAL reported in the English literature until June 2013, from which we drew the following conclusions: PAL is typically a highly symptomatic and aggressive, metabolically hyperactive, hypovascular, hypoechoic (and heterogeneous on ultrasound), hypodense (with slight to moderate enhancement on computed tomography), high-grade lymphoma, primarily affecting elderly males and presenting with large bilateral adrenal masses. Most cases have adrenal insufficiency, B-symptoms, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, concurrent or prior immune dysregulation, and bone marrow involvement are uncommon. Epstein-Barr virus positivity is observed in more than half of cases and the disease is disseminated at presentation in 18 % of cases. The two most common WHO 2008-defined PAL subtypes are diffuse large B cell lymphoma (78 %) and peripheral T cell lymphoma (7 %). The prognosis of PAL has improved with the advent of rituximab-containing chemotherapeutic regimens. According to our results, administration of chemotherapy and adrenal insufficiency are significant independent predictors of prognosis. PMID:23771429

Rashidi, Armin; Fisher, Stephen I

2013-12-01

191

Maternal healthcare in migrants: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Pregnancy is a period of increased vulnerability for migrant women, and access to healthcare, use and quality of care provided during this period are important aspects to characterize the support provided to this population. A systematic review of the scientific literature contained in the MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases was carried out, searching for population based studies published between 1990 and 2012 and reporting on maternal healthcare in immigrant populations. A total of 854 articles were retrieved and 30 publications met the inclusion criteria, being included in the final evaluation. The majority of studies point to a higher health risk profile in immigrants, with an increased incidence of co-morbidity in some populations, reduced access to health facilities particularly in illegal immigrants, poor communication between women and caregivers, a lower rate of obstetrical interventions, a higher incidence of stillbirth and early neonatal death, an increased risk of maternal death, and a higher incidence of postpartum depression. Incidences vary widely among different population groups. Some migrant populations are at a higher risk of serious complications during pregnancy, for reasons that include reduced access and use of healthcare facilities, as well as less optimal care, resulting in a higher incidence of adverse outcomes. Tackling these problems and achieving equality of care for all is a challenging aim for public healthcare services. PMID:23334357

Almeida, Lígia Moreira; Caldas, José; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Salcedo-Barrientos, Dora; Dias, Sónia

2013-10-01

192

Remission in schizophrenia: critical and systematic review.  

PubMed

In 2005, the Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group published consensus criteria to define remission. These criteria have been widely accepted and utilized and have provided further insights about schizophrenia management and prognosis. We systematically reviewed studies that utilized these criteria, with the aim of assessing the remission rate in follow-up studies and the variables predicting or associated with remission. Remission has a reported rate of 17% to 78% (weighted mean = 35.6%) in first-episode schizophrenia and 16% to 62% (weighted mean = 37%) in multiple-episode patients, with no statistical difference between the two weighted means (p = .79). Patients who were treated with long-acting injectable risperidone showed high maintenance of remission status. Studies comparing second-generation antipsychotics versus haloperidol showed higher remission rates for the former. The variables most frequently associated with remission were better premorbid function, milder symptoms at baseline (especially negative symptoms), early response to treatment, and shorter duration of untreated psychosis. Variability in the length and frequency of follow-ups, as well as differences in dropout rates, could partially explain the differences in reported rates. Rates of symptomatic remission exceeded reported rates for functional recovery. Moreover, the majority of studies used Remission in Schizophrenia Working Group severity criteria only, neglecting duration. To enhance comparison between future research findings, we suggest further specifiers of the working group's criteria, to better define frequency and duration of follow-up, and proxy measures of remission. PMID:23216066

AlAqeel, Bandar; Margolese, Howard C

2012-01-01

193

Systematic reviews of epidemiology in diabetes: finding the evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Methodological research to support searching for those doing systematic reviews of epidemiological studies is a relatively neglected area. Our aim was to determine how many databases it is necessary to search to ensure a comprehensive coverage of the literature in diabetes epidemiology, with the aim of examining the efficiency of searching in support of systematic reviews of the epidemiology

Pamela Royle; Lynda Bain; Norman Waugh

2005-01-01

194

Complementary therapies for reducing body weight: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and a plethora of complementary therapies are on offer claiming effectiveness for reducing body weight. The aim of this systematic review is to critically assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of complementary therapies for reducing body weight. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed,

M H Pittler; E Ernst

2005-01-01

195

Assessing the Strengths of Mental Health Consumers: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Strengths assessments focus on the individual's talents, abilities, resources, and strengths. No systematic review of strengths assessments for use within mental health populations has been published. The aims of this study were to describe and evaluate strengths assessments for use within mental health services. A systematic review identified 12…

Bird, Victoria J.; Le Boutillier, Clair; Leamy, Mary; Larsen, John; Oades, Lindsay G.; Williams, Julie; Slade, Mike

2012-01-01

196

A Systematic Review of Theory Use in Software Engineering Experiments  

E-print Network

of 103 articles reporting experiments, from of a total of 5,453 articles published in major softwareA Systematic Review of Theory Use in Software Engineering Experiments Jo E. Hannay, Dag I engineering. This article reports a systematic review of the explicit use of theory in a comprehensive set

197

Antimalarial medications in dermatology. A review.  

PubMed

Antimalarial medications are effective for the treatment of a variety of dermatologic conditions. Their use is often curtailed by concern for adverse reactions, including ophthalmologic side effects; however, recent evidence points to a greater margin of safety with these medications than was previously appreciated. This article reviews the pharmacology of antimalarial medications as well as indications and safe guidelines for their use in the treatment of dermatologic conditions. PMID:2060155

Weiss, J S

1991-04-01

198

Innovations in data collection, management, and archiving for systematic reviews.  

PubMed

Data abstraction is a key step in conducting systematic reviews because data collected from study reports form the basis of appropriate conclusions. Recent methodological standards and expectations highlight several principles for data collection. To support implementation of these standards, this article provides a step-by-step tutorial for selecting data collection tools; constructing data collection forms; and abstracting, managing, and archiving data for systematic reviews. Examples are drawn from recent experience using the Systematic Review Data Repository for data collection and management. If it is done well, data collection for systematic reviews only needs to be done by 1 team and placed into a publicly accessible database for future use. Technological innovations, such as the Systematic Review Data Repository, will contribute to finding trustworthy answers for many health and health care questions. PMID:25686168

Li, Tianjing; Vedula, S Swaroop; Hadar, Nira; Parkin, Christopher; Lau, Joseph; Dickersin, Kay

2015-02-17

199

Steps in the undertaking of a systematic review in orthopaedic surgery.  

PubMed

In the last decades of the twentieth century it became obvious that modern medical care is replete with data and information, but in need of reliable evidence. This has led to an increased effort to systematically synthesise medical research and make it more useful for practitioners. Systematic reviews use an approach to research synthesis that minimises the risk of misinterpreting a body of evidence due to incomprehensive search or subjective opinion. Carrying out a systematic review is a rigorous procedure which corresponds to standard methodological steps in primary research studies. It involves posing a well-defined question, developing a robust search strategy, screening for relevant primary studies, critical appraisal of included studies, data extraction and processing, analysis and interpretation of results. In some, but not all systematic reviews it is appropriate to conduct a meta-analysis, which is a statistical procedure that integrates the results of several independent studies. Results of meta-analysis are graphically presented in forest plots, with pooled point estimate and its confidence interval represented as a rhombus, usually called a "diamond". Methodological quality of systematic reviews should not be judged by the quality of primary studies included, but by a distinct set of criteria specified in assessment tools such as AMSTAR. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses should be reported according to the PRISMA checklist. A major contribution to the development of methodological standards has been given by The Cochrane Collaboration, whose Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions is the primary reference for all authors and referees of systematic reviews in health care. PMID:22198362

Sambunjak, Dario; Frani?, Miljenko

2012-03-01

200

Cost-Effectiveness of Complementary Therapies in the United Kingdom—A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The aim of this review is to systematically summarize and assess all prospective, controlled, cost-effectiveness studies of complementary therapies carried out in the UK. Data sources: Medline (via PubMed), Embase, CINAHL, Amed (Alternative and Allied Medicine Database, British Library Medical Information Centre), The Cochrane Library, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (via Cochrane) and Health Technology Assessments up to

Peter H. Canter; Joanna Thompson Coon; Edzard Ernst; Exeter Devon

2006-01-01

201

Osteoarthritis and nutrition. From nutraceuticals to functional foods: a systematic review of the scientific evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The scientific and medical community remains skeptical regarding the efficacy of nutrition for osteoarthritis despite their broad acceptation by patients. In this context, this paper systematically reviews human clinical trials evaluating the effects of nutritional compounds on osteoarthritis. We searched the Medline, Embase, and Biosis databases from their inception to September 2005 using the terms random, double-blind method, trial, study,

Laurent G Ameye; Winnie SS Chee

2006-01-01

202

Systematic review of interventions to reduce delay in patients with suspected heart attack  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions aiming to reduce time from onset of signs and symptoms of an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to seeking medical help\\/arrival at hospital.Methods: A systematic review was conducted. Fifteen electronic databases, the internet, and bibliographies of included studies were searched, and experts in the field of cardiac care were contacted. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs),

A Kainth; A Hewitt; J Pattenden; A Sowden; R Lewin; D Thompson

2004-01-01

203

Adoption of Clinical Decision Support in Multimorbidity: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with multiple conditions have complex needs and are increasing in number as populations age. This multimorbidity is one of the greatest challenges facing health care. Having more than 1 condition generates (1) interactions between pathologies, (2) duplication of tests, (3) difficulties in adhering to often conflicting clinical practice guidelines, (4) obstacles in the continuity of care, (5) confusing self-management information, and (6) medication errors. In this context, clinical decision support (CDS) systems need to be able to handle realistic complexity and minimize iatrogenic risks. Objective The aim of this review was to identify to what extent CDS is adopted in multimorbidity. Methods This review followed PRISMA guidance and adopted a multidisciplinary approach. Scopus and PubMed searches were performed by combining terms from 3 different thesauri containing synonyms for (1) multimorbidity and comorbidity, (2) polypharmacy, and (3) CDS. The relevant articles were identified by examining the titles and abstracts. The full text of selected/relevant articles was analyzed in-depth. For articles appropriate for this review, data were collected on clinical tasks, diseases, decision maker, methods, data input context, user interface considerations, and evaluation of effectiveness. Results A total of 50 articles were selected for the full in-depth analysis and 20 studies were included in the final review. Medication (n=10) and clinical guidance (n=8) were the predominant clinical tasks. Four studies focused on merging concurrent clinical practice guidelines. A total of 17 articles reported their CDS systems were knowledge-based. Most articles reviewed considered patients’ clinical records (n=19), clinical practice guidelines (n=12), and clinicians’ knowledge (n=10) as contextual input data. The most frequent diseases mentioned were cardiovascular (n=9) and diabetes mellitus (n=5). In all, 12 articles mentioned generalist doctor(s) as the decision maker(s). For articles reviewed, there were no studies referring to the active involvement of the patient in the decision-making process or to patient self-management. None of the articles reviewed adopted mobile technologies. There were no rigorous evaluations of usability or effectiveness of the CDS systems reported. Conclusions This review shows that multimorbidity is underinvestigated in the informatics of supporting clinical decisions. CDS interventions that systematize clinical practice guidelines without considering the interactions of different conditions and care processes may lead to unhelpful or harmful clinical actions. To improve patient safety in multimorbidity, there is a need for more evidence about how both conditions and care processes interact. The data needed to build this evidence base exist in many electronic health record systems and are underused.

Arguello Casteleiro, Mercedes; Ainsworth, John; Buchan, Iain

2015-01-01

204

Medical audible alarms: a review  

PubMed Central

Objectives This paper summarizes much of the research that is applicable to the design of auditory alarms in a medical context. It also summarizes research that demonstrates that false alarm rates are unacceptably high, meaning that the proper application of auditory alarm design principles are compromised. Target audience Designers, users, and manufacturers of medical information and monitoring systems that indicate when medical or other parameters are exceeded and that are indicated by an auditory signal or signals. Scope The emergence of alarms as a ‘hot topic’; an outline of the issues and design principles, including IEC 60601-1-8; the high incidence of false alarms and its impact on alarm design and alarm fatigue; approaches to reducing alarm fatigue; alarm philosophy explained; urgency in audible alarms; different classes of sound as alarms; heterogeneity in alarm set design; problems with IEC 60601-1-8 and ways of approaching this design problem. PMID:23100127

Edworthy, Judy

2013-01-01

205

The use of Facebook in medical education – A literature review  

PubMed Central

Background: The vogue of social media has changed interpersonal communication as well as learning and teaching opportunities in medical education. The most popular social media tool is Facebook. Its features provide potentially useful support for the education of medical students but it also means that some new challenges will have to be faced. Aims: This review aimed to find out how Facebook has been integrated into medical education. A systematical review of the current literature and grade of evidence is provided, research gaps are identified, links to prior reviews are drawn and implications for the future are discussed. Method: The authors searched six databases. Inclusion criteria were defined and the authors independently reviewed the search results. The key information of the articles included was methodically abstracted and coded, synthesized and discussed in the categories study design, study participants’phase of medical education and study content. Results: 16 articles met all inclusion criteria. 45-96% of health care professionals in all phases of their medical education have a Facebook profile. Most studies focused on Facebook and digital professionalism. Unprofessional behavior and privacy violations occurred in 0.02% to 16%. In terms of learning and teaching environment, Facebook is well accepted by medical students. It is used to prepare for exams, share online material, discuss clinical cases, organize face-to-face sessions and exchange information on clerkships. A few educational materials to teach Facebook professionalism were positively evaluated. There seems to be no conclusive evidence as to whether medical students benefit from Facebook as a learning environment on higher competence levels. Discussion: Facebook influences a myriad of aspects of health care professionals, particularly at undergraduate and graduate level in medical education. Despite an increasing number of interventions, there is a lack of conclusive evidence in terms of its educational effectiveness. Furthermore, we suggest that digital professionalism be integrated in established and emerging competency-based catalogues. PMID:25228935

Pander, Tanja; Pinilla, Severin; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Fischer, Martin R.

2014-01-01

206

Flax and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review.  

PubMed

Background. Flax is a food and dietary supplement commonly used for menopausal symptoms. Flax is known for its lignan, ?-linolenic acid, and fiber content, components that may possess phytogestrogenic, anti-inflammatory, and hormone modulating effects, respectively. We conducted a systematic review of flax for efficacy in improving menopausal symptoms in women living with breast cancer and for potential impact on risk of breast cancer incidence or recurrence. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and AMED from inception to January 2013 for human interventional or observational data pertaining to flax and breast cancer. Results. Of 1892 records, we included a total of 10 studies: 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 uncontrolled trials, 1 biomarker study, and 5 observational studies. Nonsignificant (NS) decreases in hot flash symptomatology were seen with flax ingestion (7.5 g/d). Flax (25 g/d) increased tumor apoptotic index (P < .05) and decreased HER2 expression (P < .05) and cell proliferation (Ki-67 index; NS) among newly diagnosed breast cancer patients when compared with placebo. Uncontrolled and biomarker studies suggest beneficial effects on hot flashes, cell proliferation, atypical cytomorphology, and mammographic density, as well as possible anti-angiogenic activity at doses of 25 g ground flax or 50 mg secoisolariciresinol diglycoside daily. Observational data suggests associations between flax and decreased risk of primary breast cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.69-0.97), better mental health (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.05-2.94), and lower mortality (multivariate hazard ratio = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95) among breast cancer patients. Conclusions. Current evidence suggests that flax may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Flax demonstrates antiproliferative effects in breast tissue of women at risk of breast cancer and may protect against primary breast cancer. Mortality risk may also be reduced among those living with breast cancer. PMID:24013641

Flower, Gillian; Fritz, Heidi; Balneaves, Lynda G; Verma, Shailendra; Skidmore, Becky; Fernandes, Rochelle; Kennedy, Deborah; Cooley, Kieran; Wong, Raimond; Sagar, Stephen; Fergusson, Dean; Seely, Dugald

2013-09-01

207

Sarcopenia in lung transplantation: A systematic review.  

PubMed

Lung transplant candidates and recipients have significant impairments in skeletal muscle mass, strength and function-individual measures of sarcopenia. Skeletal muscle dysfunction has been observed in the pre-transplant and post-transplant period and could have an important effect on transplant outcomes. A systematic review was performed to characterize the techniques used to study sarcopenia and assess the level of impairment throughout the transplant process. Electronic databases were searched (inception to July 2013) for prospective studies measuring at least 1 element of sarcopenia (muscle mass, strength, or function) in lung transplant patients. Eighteen studies were included, and study quality was assessed using the Downs and Black scale. A variety of measurements were used to evaluate sarcopenia in 694 lung transplant patients. Muscle mass in 7 studies was assessed using bioelectrical impedance (n = 4), computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 2), or skin folds (n = 1), and was significantly reduced. Quadriceps strength was examined in 14 studies with computerized dynamometer (n = 10) and hand-held dynamometer (n = 4). Quadriceps strength was reduced in the pre-transplant period (mean range, 49%-86% predicted; n = 455 patients), further reduced immediately after transplant (51%-72%, n = 126), and improved beyond 3 months after transplant (58%-101%, n = 164). Only 2 studies measured lower extremity function (sit-to-stand test). A multitude of measurement techniques have been used to assess individual measures of sarcopenia, with reduced muscle mass and quadriceps strength observed in the pre-transplant and post-transplant period. Further standardization of measurement techniques is needed to assess the clinical effect of sarcopenia in lung transplantation. PMID:25044057

Rozenberg, Dmitry; Wickerson, Lisa; Singer, Lianne G; Mathur, Sunita

2014-12-01

208

Probiotics for infantile colic: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Infantile colic is a common paediatric condition which causes significant parental distress. Increased intestinal coliform colonization in addition to alteration in Lactobacillus abundance and distribution may play an important role in its pathogenesis. The objectives of this systematic review are to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic supplementation in the reduction of crying time and successful treatment of infantile colic. Methods Literature searches were conducted of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Only randomized controlled trials enrolling term, healthy infants with colic were included. A meta-analysis of included trials was performed utilizing the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. Results Three trials that enrolled 220 breastfed infants met inclusion criteria, of which 209 infants were available for analysis. Two of the studies were assessed as good quality. Lactobacillus reuteri (strains-American Type Culture Collection Strain 55730 and DSM 17 938) was the only species utilized in the therapeutic intervention. Two of the trials were industry funded. Probiotic supplementation compared to simethicone or placebo significantly and progressively shortened crying times to 7 days reaching a plateau at three weeks post initiation of therapy [mean difference ?56.03 minutes; 95% CI (?59.92, -52.15)]. Similarly, probiotics compared to placebo significantly increased the treatment success of infantile colic with a relative risk (RR) of 0.06; 95% CI (0.01, 0.25) and a number needed to treat of 2. Conclusions Although L. reuteri may be effective as a treatment strategy for crying in exclusively breastfed infants with colic, the evidence supporting probiotic use for the treatment of infant colic or crying in formula-fed infants remains unresolved. Results from larger rigorously designed studies will help draw more definitive conclusions. PMID:24238101

2013-01-01

209

Patient engagement in research: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background A compelling ethical rationale supports patient engagement in healthcare research. It is also assumed that patient engagement will lead to research findings that are more pertinent to patients’ concerns and dilemmas. However; it is unclear how to best conduct this process. In this systematic review we aimed to answer 4 key questions: what are the best ways to identify patient representatives? How to engage them in designing and conducting research? What are the observed benefits of patient engagement? What are the harms and barriers of patient engagement? Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane, EBSCO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Business Search Premier, Academic Search Premier and Google Scholar. Included studies were published in English, of any size or design that described engaging patients or their surrogates in research design. We conducted an environmental scan of the grey literature and consulted with experts and patients. Data were analyzed using a non-quantitative, meta-narrative approach. Results We included 142 studies that described a spectrum of engagement. In general, engagement was feasible in most settings and most commonly done in the beginning of research (agenda setting and protocol development) and less commonly during the execution and translation of research. We found no comparative analytic studies to recommend a particular method. Patient engagement increased study enrollment rates and aided researchers in securing funding, designing study protocols and choosing relevant outcomes. The most commonly cited challenges were related to logistics (extra time and funding needed for engagement) and to an overarching worry of a tokenistic engagement. Conclusions Patient engagement in healthcare research is likely feasible in many settings. However, this engagement comes at a cost and can become tokenistic. Research dedicated to identifying the best methods to achieve engagement is lacking and clearly needed. PMID:24568690

2014-01-01

210

Burden of paediatric influenza in Western Europe: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Influenza illness in children causes significant clinical and economic burden. Although some European countries have adopted influenza immunisation policies for healthy children, the debate about paediatric influenza vaccination in most countries of the European Union is ongoing. Our aim was to summarise influenza burden (in terms of health outcomes and economic burden) in children in Western Europe via a systematic literature review. Methods We conducted a systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (1970-April 2011) and extracted data on influenza burden in children (defined as aged ? 18 years) from 50 publications (13 reporting laboratory-confirmed influenza; 37 reporting influenza-like illness). Results Children with laboratory-confirmed influenza experienced hospitalisations (0.3%-20%), medical visits (1.7-2.8 visits per case), antibiotic prescriptions (7%-55%), and antipyretic or other medications for symptomatic relief (76%-99%); young children and those with severe illness had the highest rates of health care use. Influenza in children also led to absenteeism from day care, school, or work for the children, their siblings, and their parents. Average (mean or median) length of absence from school or day care associated with confirmed influenza ranged from 2.8 to 12.0 days for the children, from 1.3 to 6.0 days for their siblings, and from 1.3 to 6.3 days for their parents. Influenza negatively affected health-related quality of life in children with asthma, including symptoms and activities; this negative effect was smaller in vaccinated children than in non-vaccinated children. Conclusions Influenza burden in children is substantial and has a significant direct impact on the ill children and an indirect impact on their siblings and parents. The identified evidence regarding the burden of influenza may help inform both influenza antiviral use in children and paediatric immunisation policies in European countries. PMID:23146107

2012-01-01

211

Worksite primary care clinics: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Despite levels of health spending that are higher per capita and as share of gross domestic product than any country worldwide, the US health care system is fragmented, technology and administration heavy, and primary care deficient. Studies of regional variations in US health care show similar "disconnects" between higher spending and better health outcomes. Faced with rising health benefit costs and suboptimal workforce health amid economic downturn, concerned US employers have implemented innovative payment and health care delivery strategies such as consumer-driven health plans and targeted prevention programs. The former may impose undue cost shifting, prohibitive out-of-pocket expenses, and health literacy challenges, while the latter have shown inconsistent near-term economic returns and long-term clinical efficacy. Employers have begun exploring more comprehensive health delivery platforms such as integrated worksite primary care clinics that have potential to cost-effectively address several pressing problems with current US health care: the growing primary care physician shortage, poor access to routine care, lack of coordinated and patient-centered treatment models, low rates of childhood immunizations, and "quality-blind" fee-for-service payment mechanisms. Such on-site medical clinics exploit one of the rare comparative strengths of the US health care system-its plentiful supply of highly skilled registered nurses-to offer workers and their dependents convenient, high-quality, affordable care. A relatively recent health care paradigm, worksite clinics must yet develop consistent reporting strategies and credible demonstration of outcomes. This review explores available evidence regarding worksite primary care clinics, including current rationale, historical trends, prevalence and projected growth, expected health and financial benefits, challenges, and future research directions. PMID:24835541

Shahly, Victoria; Kessler, Ronald C; Duncan, Ian

2014-10-01

212

Home Visiting and Outcomes of Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Home visiting is 1 strategy to improve child health and parenting. Since implementation of home visiting trials 2 decades ago, US preterm births (<37 weeks) have risen by 20%. The objective of this study was to review evidence regarding home visiting and outcomes of preterm infants METHODS: Searches of Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register, PsycINFO, and Embase were conducted. Criteria for inclusion were (1) cohort or controlled trial designs; (2) home-based, preventive services for infants at medical or social risk; and (3) outcomes reported for infants born preterm or low birth weight (<2500 g). Data from eligible reports were abstracted by 2 reviewers. Random effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize data for developmental and parent interaction measures. RESULTS: Seventeen studies (15 controlled trials, 2 cohort studies) were reviewed. Five outcome domains were identified: infant development, parent-infant interaction, morbidity, abuse/neglect, and growth/nutrition. Six studies (n = 336) demonstrated a pooled standardized mean difference of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.57 to 1.02) in Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment Inventory scores at 1 year in the home-visited groups versus control. Evidence for other outcomes was limited. Methodological limitations were common. CONCLUSIONS: Reviewed studies suggest that home visiting for preterm infants promotes improved parent-infant interaction. Further study of interventions targeting preterm infants within existing programs may strengthen the impact and cost benefits of home visiting in at-risk populations. PMID:23940238

Teeters, Angelique; Ammerman, Robert T.

2013-01-01

213

Polypharmacy Patterns: Unravelling Systematic Associations between Prescribed Medications  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to demonstrate the existence of systematic associations in drug prescription that lead to the establishment of patterns of polypharmacy, and the clinical interpretation of the associations found in each pattern. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted based on information obtained from electronic medical records and the primary care pharmacy database in 2008. An exploratory factor analysis of drug dispensing information regarding 79,089 adult patients was performed to identify the patterns of polypharmacy. The analysis was stratified by age and sex. Results Seven patterns of polypharmacy were identified, which may be classified depending on the type of disease they are intended to treat: cardiovascular, depression-anxiety, acute respiratory infection (ARI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), rhinitis-asthma, pain, and menopause. Some of these patterns revealed a clear clinical consistency and included drugs that are prescribed together for the same clinical indication (i.e., ARI and COPD patterns). Other patterns were more complex but also clinically consistent: in the cardiovascular pattern, drugs for the treatment of known risk factors—such as hypertension or dyslipidemia—were combined with other medications for the treatment of diabetes or established cardiovascular pathology (e.g., antiplatelet agents). Almost all of the patterns included drugs for preventing or treating potential side effects of other drugs in the same pattern. Conclusions The present study demonstrated the existence of non-random associations in drug prescription, resulting in patterns of polypharmacy that are sound from the pharmacological and clinical viewpoints and that exist in a significant proportion of the population. This finding necessitates future longitudinal studies to confirm some of the proposed causal associations. The information discovered would further the development and/or adaptation of clinical patient guidelines to patients with multimorbidity who are taking multiple drugs. PMID:24376858

Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Gimeno-Feliu, Luis A.; González-Rubio, Francisca; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Lairla-San José, María; Abad-Díez, José M.; Poncel-Falcó, Antonio; Prados-Torres, Alexandra

2013-01-01

214

Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis: Understanding the Best Evidence in Primary Healthcare  

PubMed Central

Healthcare decisions for individual patients and for public health policies should be informed by the best available research evidence. The practice of evidence-based medicine is the integration of individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research and patient's values and expectations. Primary care physicians need evidence for both clinical practice and for public health decision making. The evidence comes from good reviews which is a state-of-the-art synthesis of current evidence on a given research question. Given the explosion of medical literature, and the fact that time is always scarce, review articles play a vital role in decision making in evidence-based medical practice. Given that most clinicians and public health professionals do not have the time to track down all the original articles, critically read them, and obtain the evidence they need for their questions, systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines may be their best source of evidence. Systematic reviews aim to identify, evaluate, and summarize the findings of all relevant individual studies over a health-related issue, thereby making the available evidence more accessible to decision makers. The objective of this article is to introduce the primary care physicians about the concept of systematic reviews and meta-analysis, outlining why they are important, describing their methods and terminologies used, and thereby helping them with the skills to recognize and understand a reliable review which will be helpful for their day-to-day clinical practice and research activities. PMID:24479036

Gopalakrishnan, S.; Ganeshkumar, P.

2013-01-01

215

A Systematic Review of Software Development Cost Estimation Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to provide a basis for the improvement of software estimation research through a systematic review of previous work. The review identifies 304 software cost estimation papers in 76 journals and classifies the papers according to research topic, estimation approach, research approach, study context and data set. Based on the review, we provide recommendations for future software cost

Magne Jørgensen; Martin J. Shepperd

2007-01-01

216

Increasing response rates to postal questionnaires: systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To identify methods to increase response to postal questionnaires. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of any method to influence response to postal questionnaires. Studies reviewed 292 randomised controlled trials including 258 315 participants Intervention reviewed 75 strategies for influencing response to postal questionnaires.

Phil Edwards; Ian Roberts; Mike Clarke; Carolyn DiGuiseppi; Sarah Pratap; Reinhard Wentz; Irene Kwan

2002-01-01

217

A systematic review of interventions by healthcare professionals on community-dwelling postmenopausal women with osteoporosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  A systematic review was conducted to evaluate evidence concerning the effect of non-drug interventions by healthcare professionals\\u000a on community-dwelling postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Evidence available indicates that such interventions are effective\\u000a in improving the quality of life, medication compliance, and calcium intake, but effect on other outcomes is less conclusive.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  The purpose of this study is to conduct a systematic review

P. Lai; S. S. Chua; S. P. Chan

2010-01-01

218

Systematic review of the efficacy of herbal galactogogues.  

PubMed

Exclusive breastfeeding has been linked to many positive health outcomes, yet its widespread adoption as the primary mode of providing nutrition to infants remains challenging. The most common reported reason for early breastfeeding cessation is perception of inadequate milk production. To augment breast milk production, a substantial number of women turn to herbal galactogogues despite the limited scientific evidence of their efficacy and safety. We conducted a systematic review of published literature to evaluate the efficacy of herbal galactogogues. PubMed was searched from inception to October 2012 using an iterative search process that proceeded from broad categories to specific herbs. Manuscript references were also reviewed. Only experimental studies with objective outcome measures were included. Six trials met our search criteria. Using an adapted version of the CONSORT checklist, each trial was evaluated for potential sources of bias in design and reporting. Shatavari, torbangun, fenugreek, milk thistle, and a Japanese herbal medication were the 5 herbal preparations studied. Five trials found an increase in breast milk production. Several limitations exist that affect the validity of the trial results, including small sample size, insufficient randomization methods, poorly defined eligibility criteria, use of poly-herbal interventions, and variable breastfeeding practices among enrolled subjects. Given the insufficiency of evidence from these trials, no recommendation is made for the use of herbs as galactogogues. Well-designed and well-conducted clinical trials that address the above limitations are necessary to generate a body of evidence as a basis for recommendations regarding herbal galactogogues. PMID:23468043

Mortel, Mylove; Mehta, Supriya D

2013-05-01

219

[Soil transmitted helminthiasis in Argentina. A systematic review].  

PubMed

A systematic review of surveys performed between 1980 and 2011 (published in MEDLINE/Pubmed and/or LILACS indexed journals, available in the baseline data from a Mass Deworming National Program (MDNP, 2005) was used to identify the prevalence, distribution and detection of risk areas for soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) in Argentina. We found 310 publications in the database using the pre-defined key-words (medical subject headings) for research purposes. Only 24 articles with 26 surveillance sites in 8 provinces and a total of 5495 surveyed individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Frequency rates for STH had a wide range: Ascaris lumbricoides: 0-67%, hookworms: 0-90%, Trichuris trichiura: 0-24.6 and Strongyloides stercoralis: 0-83%. The estimated combined incidence varied from 0.8% to 88.6%. Baseline surveys from the MDNP reporting on 1943 children from 12 provinces confirmed the heterogeneity, with combined STH frequency rates ranging from 0 to 42.7%. Surveys included in this review showed that the distribution of STH in Argentina is not homogeneous, with areas of high incidence (> 20%) in the northeastern and northwestern provinces where mass deworming activities would be highly beneficial. In several surveys, the high overall incidence was mostly due to hookworms and S. stercoralis, a situation to be considered when selecting diagnostic and therapeutic control strategies. The scarcity or absence of data from various provinces and the availability of less than 8000 surveyed individuals should be considered. PMID:24561837

Socías, M Eugenia; Fernández, Anabel; Gil, José F; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J

2014-01-01

220

Assessing telemedicine: a systematic review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: To clarify the current status of telemedicine, we carried out a systematic review of the literature. We identified controlled assessment studies of telemedicine that reported patient outcomes, administrative changes or economic assessments and assessed the quality of that literature. Methods: We carried out a systematic electronic search for articles published from 1966 to early 2000 using the MEDLINE (1966-April

Risto Roine; Arto Ohinmaa; David Hailey

2001-01-01

221

Treatment of hyperprolactinemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Hyperprolactinemia is a common endocrine disorder that can be associated with significant morbidity. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses of outcomes of hyperprolactinemic patients, including microadenomas and macroadenomas, to provide evidence-based recommendations for practitioners. Through this review, we aimed to compare efficacy and adverse effects of medications, surgery and radiotherapy in the treatment of hyperprolactinemia. Methods We searched electronic databases, reviewed bibliographies of included articles, and contacted experts in the field. Eligible studies provided longitudinal follow-up of patients with hyperprolactinemia and evaluated outcomes of interest. We collected descriptive, quality and outcome data (tumor growth, visual field defects, infertility, sexual dysfunction, amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea and prolactin levels). Results After review, 8 randomized and 178 nonrandomized studies (over 3,000 patients) met inclusion criteria. Compared to no treatment, dopamine agonists significantly reduced prolactin level (weighted mean difference, -45; 95% confidence interval, -77 to ?11) and the likelihood of persistent hyperprolactinemia (relative risk, 0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.81 to 0.99). Cabergoline was more effective than bromocriptine in reducing persistent hyperprolactinemia, amenorrhea/oligomenorrhea, and galactorrhea. A large body of noncomparative literature showed dopamine agonists improved other patient-important outcomes. Low-to-moderate quality evidence supports improved outcomes with surgery and radiotherapy compared to no treatment in patients who were resistant to or intolerant of dopamine agonists. Conclusion Our results provide evidence to support the use of dopamine agonists in reducing prolactin levels and persistent hyperprolactinemia, with cabergoline proving more efficacious than bromocriptine. Radiotherapy and surgery are useful in patients with resistance or intolerance to dopamine agonists. PMID:22828169

2012-01-01

222

Safety of Vaccines Used for Routine Immunization of US Children: A Systematic Review  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Concerns about child vaccines continue to rise and it's great to have objective and thoughtful analysis of this matter from medical professionals. This systematic review was originally published in the August 2014 edition of the Pediatrics journal and now has found its way to the RAND CorporationâÂÂs website. Authored by a team of medical professionals, the report looks at a range of existing medical works, including the 2011 Institute of Medicine consensus report on vaccine safety. Key findings include observations that the MMR vaccine is not associated with autism in children and that serious side effects associated with vaccines are extremely rare.

2014-07-02

223

Incorporating Qualitative Evidence in Systematic Reviews: Strategies and Challenges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The quality of mixed methods systematic reviews relies on the quality of primary-level studies. The synthesis of qualitative evidence and the recent development of synthesizing mixed methods studies hold promise, but also pose challenges to evidence synthesis.

Caracelli, Valerie J.; Cooksy, Leslie J.

2013-01-01

224

Evidence-based podiatric medicine: importance of systematic reviews in clinical practice.  

PubMed

Due to the exponential increase in the quantity and quality of podiatric medicine-related research during the past decade, podiatric physicians are inundated with an insurmountable volume of research relevant to clinical practice. Systematic reviews can refine this literature by using explicit, rigorous, and reproducible methods to identify, critically appraise, and synthesize the best evidence from all clinical trials to answer clearly defined clinical questions. The Cochrane Collaboration is an international not-for-profit organization created to improve the user-friendliness and accessibility of medical literature mainly through preparing and maintaining systematic reviews of health-care interventions. The Cochrane Library currently contains more than 50 podiatric medicine-relevant systematic reviews summarizing and synthesizing evidence from many hundreds of randomized controlled trials evaluating interventions for foot problems. Although more than 60 countries worldwide have open online access to The Cochrane Library, in the United States, only the state of Wyoming has free access to full-text reviews. In an era demanding an evidence-based approach for every clinical intervention, high-quality systematic reviews streamline podiatric medical literature by reducing the time, cost, and training necessary to establish a solid evidence base for practice. PMID:19448181

Hawke, Fiona; Burns, Joshua; Landorf, Karl B

2009-01-01

225

Routine piloting in systematic reviews—a modified approach?  

PubMed Central

Background A continuous growth in the publication of research papers means that there is an expanding volume of data available to the systematic reviewer. Sometimes, researchers can become overwhelmed by the sheer volume of data being processed, leading to inefficient data extraction. This paper seeks to address this problem by proposing a modification to the current systematic review methodology. Proposed method This paper details the routine piloting of a systematic review all the way through to evidence-synthesis stage using data from a sample of included papers. Results and discussion The result of piloting a sample of papers through to evidence-synthesis stage is to produce a ‘mini systematic review’. Insights from such a pilot review may be used to modify the criteria in the data extraction form. It is proposed that this approach will ensure that in the full review the most useful and relevant information is extracted from all the papers in one phase without needing to re-visit the individual papers at a later stage. Conclusions Routine piloting in systematic reviews has been developed in response to advances in information technology and the subsequent increase in rapid access to clinical papers and data. It is proposed that the routine piloting of large systematic reviews will enable themes and meaning in the data to become apparent early in the review process. This, in turn, will facilitate the efficient extraction of data from all the papers in the full review. It is proposed that this approach will result in increased validity of the review, with potential benefits for increasing efficiency. PMID:25035096

2014-01-01

226

Integration of existing systematic reviews into new reviews: identification of guidance needs  

PubMed Central

Background An exponential increase in the number of systematic reviews published, and constrained resources for new reviews, means that there is an urgent need for guidance on explicitly and transparently integrating existing reviews into new systematic reviews. The objectives of this paper are: 1) to identify areas where existing guidance may be adopted or adapted, and 2) to suggest areas for future guidance development. Methods We searched documents and websites from healthcare focused systematic review organizations to identify and, where available, to summarize relevant guidance on the use of existing systematic reviews. We conducted informational interviews with members of Evidence-based Practice Centers (EPCs) to gather experiences in integrating existing systematic reviews, including common issues and challenges, as well as potential solutions. Results There was consensus among systematic review organizations and the EPCs about some aspects of incorporating existing systematic reviews into new reviews. Current guidance may be used in assessing the relevance of prior reviews and in scanning references of prior reviews to identify studies for a new review. However, areas of challenge remain. Areas in need of guidance include how to synthesize, grade the strength of, and present bodies of evidence composed of primary studies and existing systematic reviews. For instance, empiric evidence is needed regarding how to quality check data abstraction and when and how to use study-level risk of bias assessments from prior reviews. Conclusions There remain areas of uncertainty for how to integrate existing systematic reviews into new reviews. Methods research and consensus processes among systematic review organizations are needed to develop guidance to address these challenges. PMID:24956937

2014-01-01

227

Adverse-event profile of Crataegus spp.: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Crataegus spp. (hawthorn) monopreparations are predominantly used for treating congestive heart failure. The effectiveness of hawthorn preparations (flowers with leaves; berries) is documented in a number of clinical studies, reviews and meta-analyses. The aim of this article is to assess the safety data of all available human studies on hawthorn monopreparations. Systematic searches were conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, The Cochrane Library, the UK National Research Register and the US ClinicalTrials.gov (up to January 2005). Data were requested from the spontaneous reporting scheme of the WHO. Hand searches were also conducted in a sample of relevant medical journals, conference proceedings, reference lists of identified articles and our own files. Eight manufacturers of hawthorn-containing preparations were contacted and asked to supply any information on adverse events or drug interactions. Data from all clinical studies and reports were assessed. Only human studies on monopreparations were included. Data from hawthorn-containing combination preparations and homeopathic preparations were excluded. All studies were read and evaluated by one reviewer and independently verified by at least one additional reviewer.Twenty-nine clinical studies were identified, of which 24 met our inclusion criteria. A total of 7311 patients were enrolled, and data from 5,577 patients were available for analysis. The daily dose and duration of treatment with hawthorn monopreparations ranged from 160 to 1,800 mg and from 3 to 24 weeks, respectively. The extracts most used in the clinical trials were WS 1,442 (extract of hawthorn standardised to 18.75% oligomeric procyanidins) and LI 132 (extract of hawthorn standardised to 2.25% flavonoids). Overall, 166 adverse events were reported. Most of these adverse events were, in general, mild to moderate; eight severe adverse events have been reported with the LI 132 extract. The most frequent adverse events were dizziness/vertigo (n = 15), gastrointestinal complaints (n = 24), headache (n = 9), migraine (n = 8) and palpitation (n = 11). The WHO spontaneous reporting scheme received 18 case reports. In the identified trials, the most frequent adverse events were dizziness (n = 6), nausea (n = 5), fall (n = 2), gastrointestinal haemorrhage (n = 2), circulation failure (n = 2) and erythematous rash (n = 2). There were no reports of drug interactions. In conclusion, all data reviewed in this article seem to indicate that hawthorn is well tolerated even if some severe adverse events were reported; this suggests that further studies are needed to better assess the safety of hawthorn-containing preparations. Moreover, the unsupervised use of this drug can be associated with problems, especially if given with concomitant medications. PMID:16752934

Daniele, Claudia; Mazzanti, Gabriela; Pittler, Max H; Ernst, Edzard

2006-01-01

228

Barriers to the uptake of evidence from systematic reviews and meta-analyses: a systematic review of decision makers’ perceptions  

PubMed Central

Objective To review the barriers to the uptake of research evidence from systematic reviews by decision makers. Search strategy We searched 19 databases covering the full range of publication years, utilised three search engines and also personally contacted investigators. Reference lists of primary studies and related reviews were also consulted. Selection criteria Studies were included if they reported on the views and perceptions of decision makers on the uptake of evidence from systematic reviews, meta-analyses and the databases associated with them. All study designs, settings and decision makers were included. One investigator screened titles to identify candidate articles then two reviewers independently assessed the quality and the relevance of retrieved reports. Data extraction Two reviewers described the methods of included studies and extracted data that were summarised in tables and then analysed. Using a pre-established taxonomy, the barriers were organised into a framework according to their effect on knowledge, attitudes or behaviour. Results Of 1726 articles initially identified, we selected 27 unique published studies describing at least one barrier to the uptake of evidence from systematic reviews. These studies included a total of 25 surveys and 2 qualitative studies. Overall, the majority of participants (n=10?218) were physicians (64%). The most commonly investigated barriers were lack of use (14/25), lack of awareness (12/25), lack of access (11/25), lack of familiarity (7/25), lack of usefulness (7/25), lack of motivation (4/25) and external barriers (5/25). Conclusions This systematic review reveals that strategies to improve the uptake of evidence from reviews and meta-analyses will need to overcome a wide variety of obstacles. Our review describes the reasons why knowledge users, especially physicians, do not call on systematic reviews. This study can inform future approaches to enhancing systematic review uptake and also suggests potential avenues for future investigation. PMID:22942232

Wallace, John; Nwosu, Bosah; Clarke, Mike

2012-01-01

229

Postoperative pain treatment after total hip arthroplasty: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Treatment of postoperative pain should rely on results from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses of high scientific quality. The efficacy of a particular intervention may depend on the type of surgical procedure, which supports the reporting of "procedure-specific" interventions. The aim of this systematic review was to document the procedure-specific evidence for analgesic interventions after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This PRISMA-compliant and PROSPERO-registered review includes randomized placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) of medication-based analgesic interventions after THA. Endpoints were postoperative opioid consumption, pain scores (rest and during mobilization), adverse events, and length of hospital stay. Fifty-eight trials with 19 different interventions were retrieved. High risk of bias, substantial differences in assessment-tools and criteria for pain, irregular reporting of adverse events, considerable differences in supplemental analgesic consumption, and basic analgesic regimens generally characterized trials. Meta-analyses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local infiltration analgesia, intrathecal opioids, and lumbar plexus block provided a 24-hour intravenous morphine-sparing effect of 14.1 (95 % confidence interval: 8.0-20.2) mg, 7.5 (3.7-11.3) mg, 19.8 (14.9-24.7) mg, and 11.9 (6.4-17.3) mg, respectively. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and lumbar plexus block were demonstrated to provide reductions in postoperative pain scores. Intrathecal opioids increased pruritus, and lumbar plexus block reduced nausea and pruritus. The GRADE-rated quality of evidence ranged from low to very low throughout the analyses. This review demonstrated, that some analgesic interventions may have the capacity to reduce mean opioid requirements and/or mean pain intensity compared with controls, but the available randomized placebo-controlled trials does not allow a designation of a "best proven intervention" for THA. PMID:25599296

Højer Karlsen, Anders Peder; Geisler, Anja; Petersen, Pernille Lykke; Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Jørgen B

2015-01-01

230

Correlates of physical activity in youth: a review of quantitative systematic reviews  

Microsoft Academic Search

To increase young people's physical activity (PA) levels it is important to understand the correlates of PA in children and adolescents. We sought to identify factors associated with children's and adolescents’ PA by reviewing systematic quantitative reviews of non-intervention research. Systematic reviews examining associations between quantitatively measured variables and PA in young people (< 19 years) from 2000–2010 were identified

Stuart J. H. Biddle; Andrew J. Atkin; Nick Cavill; Charlie Foster

2011-01-01

231

A Systematic Review of Software Development Cost Estimation Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to provide a basis for the improvement of software-estimation research through a systematic review of previous work. The review identifies 304 software cost estimation papers in 76 journals and classifies the papers according to research topic, estimation approach, research approach, study context and data set. A Web-based library of these cost estimation papers is provided to ease

M. Jorgensen; Martin Shepperd

2007-01-01

232

Parenteral opioids for labor pain relief: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parenteral opioids are commonly used for labor pain relief and have been the subject of research for many years. The objectives of this review were to determine the safety and effectiveness of parenteral opioids in this context. Of 85 trials systematically reviewed, 48 comprising more than 9800 were included, but the number of trials contributing data to individual outcome measures

Leanne Bricker; Tina Lavender

2002-01-01

233

A systematic review of antidepressants in neuropathic pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to review the effectiveness and safety of antidepressants in neuropathic pain. In a systematic review of randomised controlled trials, the main outcomes were global judgements, pain relief or fall in pain intensity which approximated to more than 50% pain relief, and information about minor and major adverse effects. Dichotomous data for effectiveness and adverse

H. J. McQuay; M. Tramér; B. A. Nye; D. Carroll; P. J. Wiffen; R. A. Moore

1996-01-01

234

Family Adjustment to Childhood Cancer: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This systematic review integrates qualitative and quantitative research findings regarding family changes in the context of childhood cancer. Twenty-eight quantitative, 42 qualitative, and one mixed-method studies were reviewed. Included studies focused on family functioning, marital quality, and/or parenting in the context of pediatric cancer,…

Long, Kristin A.; Marsland, Anna L.

2011-01-01

235

Creative Learning Environments in Education--A Systematic Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a systematic review of 210 pieces of educational research, policy and professional literature relating to creative environments for learning in schools, commissioned by Learning and Teaching Scotland (LTS). Despite the volume of academic literature in this field, the team of six reviewers found comparatively few empirical…

Davies, Dan; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Collier, Chris; Digby, Rebecca; Hay, Penny; Howe, Alan

2013-01-01

236

Electronic whiteboards in emergency medicine: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

As more and more Emergency Departments replace the manual dry-erase whiteboards used for coordination of patient care and communication among clinicians with IT-based electronic whiteboards a need to clarify the effects of implementing these systems arises. This paper seeks to answer this question by systematically reviewing studies on electronic whiteboards. The results of the review indicate that electronic whiteboards influence

Rasmus Rasmussen

2012-01-01

237

Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted…

Morgan, Gareth

2010-01-01

238

A systematic review of effect size in software engineering experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

An effect size quantifies the effects of an experimental treatment. Conclusions drawn from hypothesis testing results might be errone- ous if effect sizes are not judged in addition to statistical significance. This paper reports a systematic review of 92 controlled experiments published in 12 major software engineering journals and conference proceedings in the decade 1993-2002. The review investigates the practice

Vigdis By Kampenes; Tore Dybå; Jo Erskine Hannay; Dag I. K. Sjøberg

2007-01-01

239

Systematic Reviews knowledge to support evidence-informed  

E-print Network

and supporting the development of methods. With an annual budget of around £13 million, the NIHR Systematic Excellence (NICE), the National Screening Committee, the Chief Medical Officer and the National Clinical Directors for Cancer, Diabetes, Mental Health, Heart Disease and Stroke. Each part of the NSRI works

Diggle, Peter J.

240

Cognitive Change in Heart Failure: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Cognitive impairment (CI), highly prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF), increases risk for hospitalization, and mortality. However, the course of cognitive change in HF is not well characterized. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the available evidence regarding longitudinal changes in cognitive function in patients with HF. Methods and Results A literature search of several electronic databases was performed. Studies published from January 1st, 1980 to September 30th, 2012 that used validated measures to diagnose HF and assess cognitive function two or more times in adults with HF were eligible for inclusion. Change in cognitive function was examined in the context of HF treatments applied (e.g., medication initiation, left ventricular assist device implantation), length of follow-up, and by comparison group. 15 studies met eligibility criteria. Significant decline in cognitive function was noted among patients with HF followed up for >1 year. Improvements in cognition were observed among patients with HF undergoing interventions to improve cardiac function (e.g., heart transplant) and among patients examined over short time periods (< 1 year). Studies comparing HF patient to their own baseline tended to report improvements while studies using a comparison group without HF tended to report declines or stability in cognition over time among patients with HF. Conclusions Patients with HF are at increased risk for cognitive decline but this risk appears to be modifiable with cardiac treatment. Further research is needed to identify the mechanisms that cause cognitive change in HF. PMID:23838109

Hajduk, Alexandra M.; Kiefe, Catarina I; Person, Sharina D.; Gore, Joel G.; Saczynski, Jane S.

2013-01-01

241

Nongenetic Determinants of Age at Menarche: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background. The acceleration of pubertal development is an important medical and social problem, as it may result in increased morbidity and mortality in later life. This systematic review summarizes relevant data about nongenetic factors, which contribute to age at menarche (AAM), and suggests those which may be the most important. Methods. The available literature from 1980 till July 2013 was searched using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Finally, 154 papers were selected for the analysis. Results. Environmental factors, which may affect AAM, vary in populations of different ethnicity. The prenatal, infancy, and early childhood periods are the most susceptible to these factors. Body weight, high animal protein intake, family stressors (e.g., single parenting), and physical activity seem to influence AAM in most populations. Conclusions. The data about influence of nongenetic factors on AAM are still inconsistent. The factors affecting prenatal and early childhood growth seem to have a larger effect on further sexual maturation. Further studies are needed in order to validate the association between other environmental determinants and AAM in different ethnical groups. PMID:25050345

2014-01-01

242

Diffusion of Innovations in Service Organizations: Systematic Review and Recommendations  

PubMed Central

This article summarizes an extensive literature review addressing the question, How can we spread and sustain innovations in health service delivery and organization? It considers both content (defining and measuring the diffusion of innovation in organizations) and process (reviewing the literature in a systematic and reproducible way). This article discusses (1) a parsimonious and evidence-based model for considering the diffusion of innovations in health service organizations, (2) clear knowledge gaps where further research should be focused, and (3) a robust and transferable methodology for systematically reviewing health service policy and management. Both the model and the method should be tested more widely in a range of contexts. PMID:15595944

Greenhalgh, Trisha; Robert, Glenn; Macfarlane, Fraser; Bate, Paul; Kyriakidou, Olivia

2004-01-01

243

Development of two shortened systematic review formats for clinicians  

PubMed Central

Background Systematic reviews provide evidence for clinical questions, however the literature suggests they are not used regularly by physicians for decision-making. A shortened systematic review format is proposed as one possible solution to address barriers, such as lack of time, experienced by busy clinicians. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process of two shortened formats for a systematic review intended for use by primary care physicians as an information tool for clinical decision-making. Methods We developed prototypes for two formats (case-based and evidence-expertise) that represent a summary of a full-length systematic review before seeking input from end-users. The process was composed of the following four phases: 1) selection of a systematic review and creation of initial prototypes that represent a shortened version of the systematic review; 2) a mapping exercise to identify obstacles described by clinicians in using clinical evidence in decision-making; 3) a heuristic evaluation (a usability inspection method); and 4) a review of the clinical content in the prototypes. Results After the initial prototypes were created (Phase 1), the mapping exercise (Phase 2) identified components that prompted modifications. Similarly, the heuristic evaluation and the clinical content review (Phase 3 and Phase 4) uncovered necessary changes. Revisions were made to the prototypes based on the results. Conclusions Documentation of the processes for developing products or tools provides essential information about how they are tailored for the intended user. One step has been described that we hope will increase usability and uptake of these documents to end-users. PMID:23767771

2013-01-01

244

Clinical outcomes resulting from telemedicine interventions: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background The use of telemedicine is growing, but its efficacy for achieving comparable or improved clinical outcomes has not been established in many medical specialties. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of telemedicine interventions for health outcomes in two classes of application: home-based and office/hospital-based. Methods Data sources for the study included deports of studies from the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and HealthSTAR databases; searching of bibliographies of review and other articles; and consultation of printed resources as well as investigators in the field. We included studies that were relevant to at least one of the two classes of telemedicine and addressed the assessment of efficacy for clinical outcomes with data of reported results. We excluded studies where the service did not historically require face-to-face encounters (e.g., radiology or pathology diagnosis). All included articles were abstracted and graded for quality and direction of the evidence. Results A total of 25 articles met inclusion criteria and were assessed. The strongest evidence for the efficacy of telemedicine in clinical outcomes comes from home-based telemedicine in the areas of chronic disease management, hypertension, and AIDS. The value of home glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus is conflicting. There is also reasonable evidence that telemedicine is comparable to face-to-face care in emergency medicine and is beneficial in surgical and neonatal intensive care units as well as patient transfer in neurosurgery. Conclusions Despite the widespread use of telemedicine in virtually all major areas of health care, evidence concerning the benefits of its use exists in only a small number of them. Further randomized controlled trials must be done to determine where its use is most effective. PMID:11737882

2001-01-01

245

Alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The traditional hospital-based model of cardiac rehabilitation faces substantial challenges, such as cost and accessibility. These challenges have led to the development of alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation in recent years. The aim of this study was to identify and critique evidence for the effectiveness of these alternative models. A total of 22 databases were searched to identify quantitative studies or systematic reviews of quantitative studies regarding the effectiveness of alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation. Included studies were appraised using a Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool and the National Health and Medical Research Council's designations for Level of Evidence. The 83 included articles described interventions in the following broad categories of alternative models of care: multifactorial individualized telehealth, internet based, telehealth focused on exercise, telehealth focused on recovery, community- or home-based, and complementary therapies. Multifactorial individualized telehealth and community- or home-based cardiac rehabilitation are effective alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation, as they have produced similar reductions in cardiovascular disease risk factors compared with hospital-based programmes. While further research is required to address the paucity of data available regarding the effectiveness of alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation in rural, remote, and culturally and linguistically diverse populations, our review indicates there is no need to rely on hospital-based strategies alone to deliver effective cardiac rehabilitation. Local healthcare systems should strive to integrate alternative models of cardiac rehabilitation, such as brief telehealth interventions tailored to individual's risk factor profiles as well as community- or home-based programmes, in order to ensure there are choices available for patients that best fit their needs, risk factor profile, and preferences. PMID:23943649

Clark, Robyn A; Conway, Aaron; Poulsen, Vanessa; Keech, Wendy; Tirimacco, Rosy; Tideman, Phillip

2015-01-01

246

Substandard and counterfeit medicines: a systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore the evidence available of poor-quality (counterfeit and substandard) medicines in the literature. Design Systematic review. Data sources Databases used were EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed and the International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, including articles published till January 2013. Eligibility criteria Prevalence studies containing original data. WHO definitions (1992) used for counterfeit and substandard medicines. Study appraisal and synthesis Two reviewers independently scored study methodology against recommendations from the MEDQUARG Checklist. Studies were classified according to the World Bank classification of countries by income. Data extraction Data extracted: place of study; type of drugs sampled; sample size; percentage of substandard/counterfeit medicines; formulations included; origin of the drugs; chemical analysis and stated issues of counterfeit/substandard medicines. Results 44 prevalence studies were identified, 15 had good methodological quality. They were conducted in 25 different countries; the majority were in low-income countries (11) and/or lower middle-income countries (10). The median prevalence of substandard/counterfeit medicines was 28.5% (range 11–48%). Only two studies differentiated between substandard and counterfeit medicines. Prevalence data were limited to antimicrobial drugs (all 15 studies). 13 studies involved antimalarials, 6 antibiotics and 2 other medications. The majority of studies (93%) contained samples with inadequate amounts of active ingredients. The prevalence of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials was significantly higher when purchased from unlicensed outlets (p<0.000; 95% CI 0.21 to 0.32). No individual data about the prevalence in upper middle-income countries and high-income countries were available. Limitations Studies with strong methodology were few. The majority did not differentiate between substandard and counterfeit medicines. Most studies assessed only a single therapeutic class of antimicrobials. Conclusions The prevalence of poor-quality antimicrobial medicines is widespread throughout Africa and Asia in lower income countries and lower middle-income countries . The main problem identified was inadequate amounts of the active ingredients. PMID:23955188

Almuzaini, Tariq; Choonara, Imti; Sammons, Helen

2013-01-01

247

Society of Systematic Biologists Review: [untitled  

E-print Network

the Arthropoda. The single contri bution by Ronald Jenner and Gerhard Scholtz reviews available morphological conclusive information is still needed to accurately place the Arthropoda within the phylogeny of the Metazoa, and also to understand early divisions in the evolution of the Arthropoda that would allow an unequivocal

Renner, Susanne

248

Valerian for insomnia: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To systematically review the evidence for the effects of the herb valerian (Valeriana officinalis) on insomnia, based on randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials.Background: Valerian has long been advocated and used for promoting sleep but until quite recently evidence was solely anecdotal. However, during the last two decades a number of clinical trials have been conducted.Materials and methods: Systematic literature searches

Clare Stevinson; Edzard Ernst

2000-01-01

249

Spinal Cystic Echinococcosis – A Systematic Analysis and Review of the Literature: Part 1. Epidemiology and Anatomy  

PubMed Central

Bone involvement in human cystic echinococcosis (CE) is rare, but affects the spine in approximately 50% of cases. Despite significant advances in diagnostic imaging techniques as well as surgical and medical treatment of spinal CE, our basic understanding of the parasite's predilection for the spine remains incomplete. To fill this gap, we systematically reviewed the published literature of the last five decades to summarize and analyze the currently existing data on epidemiological and anatomical aspects of spinal CE. PMID:24086783

Neumayr, Andreas; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Goblirsch, Sam; Blum, Johannes; Brunetti, Enrico

2013-01-01

250

Use and misuse of cost-effectiveness terminology in the gastroenterology literature: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE:The increased popularity of economic analyses for evaluating medical interventions has given rise to concern about the rigor with which economic constructs and terminology are used. True cost-effectiveness analysis considers both the costs and outcomes of alternative interventions. A systematic review of the gastroenterology literature was undertaken to evaluate how appropriately cost-effectiveness is assessed.METHODS:A structured MEDLINE search identified all studies

John K. Marshall; Ruth Cawdron; Deborah L. R. Yamamura; Subhas Ganguli; Rameeta Lad; Bernie J. O'Brien

2002-01-01

251

A systematic review of web-based educational interventions.  

PubMed

A complement to in-hospital educational interventions is web-based patient education accessed during the home recovery period. While findings demonstrate the effectiveness of web-based patient education interventions on patient outcomes, they fall short of identifying the characteristics that are associated with desired outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the characteristics of web-based patient education interventions that are associated with producing changes in self-care behaviors. A systematic review involving 19 studies was conducted to determine the most effective components of a web-based intervention. Findings suggest that the most effective form of web-based patient education is one that is interactive and allows patients to navigate the online system on their own. The findings from this systematic review allow for the design of a web-based educational intervention that will promote increased performance of self-care behaviors during the home recovery period. PMID:24571963

Fredericks, Suzanne; Martorella, Géraldine; Catallo, Cristina

2015-02-01

252

Meta-Review: Systematic Assessment of Program Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over 20 years ago, Robert J. Barak and Barbara E. Breier suggested incorporating a regular assessment of the entire program review system into the review schedule in order to ensure that the system itself is as efficient and effective as the programs under review. Barak and Breier's seminal book on the goals and processes of program review has…

Harlan, Brian

2012-01-01

253

Increased Workload for Systematic Review Literature Searches of Diagnostic Tests Compared With Treatments: Challenges and Opportunities  

PubMed Central

Background Comprehensive literature searches are conducted over multiple medical databases in order to meet stringent quality standards for systematic reviews. These searches are often very laborious, with authors often manually screening thousands of articles. Information retrieval (IR) techniques have proven increasingly effective in improving the efficiency of this process. IR challenges for systematic reviews involve building classifiers using training data with very high class-imbalance, and meeting the requirement for near perfect recall on relevant studies. Traditionally, most systematic reviews have focused on questions relating to treatment. The last decade has seen a large increase in the number of systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA). Objective We aim to demonstrate that DTA reviews comprise an especially challenging subclass of systematic reviews with respect to the workload required for literature screening. We identify specific challenges for the application of IR to literature screening for DTA reviews, and identify potential directions for future research. Methods We hypothesize that IR for DTA reviews face three additional challenges, compared to systematic reviews of treatments. These include an increased class-imbalance, a broader definition of the target class, and relative inadequacy of available metadata (ie, medical subject headings (MeSH) terms for medical literature analysis and retrieval system online). Assuming these hypotheses to be true, we identify five manifestations when we compare literature searches of DTA versus treatment. These manifestations include: an increase in the average number of articles screened, and increase in the average number of full-text articles obtained, a decrease in the number of included studies as a percentage of full-text articles screened, a decrease in the number of included studies as a percentage of all articles screened, and a decrease in the number of full-text articles obtained as a percentage of all articles screened. As of July 12 2013, 13 published Cochrane DTA reviews were available and all were included. For each DTA review, we randomly selected 15 treatment reviews published by the corresponding Cochrane Review Group (N=195). We then statistically tested differences in these five hypotheses, for the DTA versus treatment reviews. Results Despite low statistical power caused by the small sample size for DTA reviews, strong (P<.01) or very strong (P<.001) evidence was obtained to support three of the five expected manifestations, with evidence for at least one manifestation of each hypothesis. The observed difference in effect sizes are substantial, demonstrating the practical difference in reviewer workload. Conclusions Reviewer workload (volume of citations screened) when screening literature for systematic reviews of DTA is especially high. This corresponds to greater rates of class-imbalance when training classifiers for automating literature screening for DTA reviews. Addressing concerns such as lower quality metadata and effectively modelling the broader target class could help to alleviate such challenges, providing possible directions for future research.

2014-01-01

254

Effect of Different Insoles on Postural Balance: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the effect of different insoles on postural balance. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic review was conducted of four databases. The papers retrieved were evaluated based on the following inclusion criteria: 1) design: controlled clinical trial; 2) intervention: insole; 3) outcome: change in static postural balance; and 4) year of publication: 2005 to 2012. [Results] Twelve controlled trials were found comparing the effects of different insoles on postural balance. The papers had methodological quality scores of 3 or 4 on the PEDro scale. [Conclusion] Insoles have benefits that favor better postural balance and control. PMID:24259792

Christovão, Thaluanna Calil Lourenço; Neto, Hugo Pasini; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Ferreira, Luiz Alfredo Braun; Franco de Moura, Renata Calhes; Eliege de Souza, Maria; Franco de Oliveira, Luis Vicente; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

2013-01-01

255

Effect of different insoles on postural balance: a systematic review.  

PubMed

[Purpose] The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the effect of different insoles on postural balance. [Subjects and Methods] A systematic review was conducted of four databases. The papers retrieved were evaluated based on the following inclusion criteria: 1) design: controlled clinical trial; 2) intervention: insole; 3) outcome: change in static postural balance; and 4) year of publication: 2005 to 2012. [Results] Twelve controlled trials were found comparing the effects of different insoles on postural balance. The papers had methodological quality scores of 3 or 4 on the PEDro scale. [Conclusion] Insoles have benefits that favor better postural balance and control. PMID:24259792

Christovão, Thaluanna Calil Lourenço; Neto, Hugo Pasini; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Ferreira, Luiz Alfredo Braun; Franco de Moura, Renata Calhes; Eliege de Souza, Maria; Franco de Oliveira, Luis Vicente; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

2013-10-01

256

Amnioreduction in a singleton pregnancy: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of adverse events following amnioreduction in a singleton pregnancy. A systematic review was conducted. Literature was identified by searching two bibliographical databases between 1991 and 2011, without language restrictions. The data extracted and overall rates and confidence intervals for each adverse event were calculated. Four studies met the selection criteria for systematic review. The rate of symptom relief in one study was 100%. Because of the small numbers and wide confidence intervals, an exact quantification of risk of adverse events cannot be determined. PMID:24219710

Thompson, A; Mone, F; McComiskey, M; Ong, S

2013-11-01

257

Correlates of Physical Activity of Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review of Reviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The aim of this study was to identify promoting and inhibiting correlates associated with the physical activity (PA) of children and adolescents (aged 3-18). The intention was to demonstrate the complexity of correlates of PA and to determine possible influencing factors. Design: A systematic review of reviews. Methods: Systematic

Sterdt, Elena; Liersch, Sebastian; Walter, Ulla

2014-01-01

258

Outcome measures in haemophilia: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Haemophilia A and B are hereditary X-linked disorders due to deficiency (or absence) of coagulation factor VIII or IX, respectively. Bleeding risk is related to the severity of factor deficiency. Repeated joint bleeding can lead to a severe haemophilic arthropathy resulting in disabilities. Outcome measurements in persons with haemophilia (PWH) have been limited to laboratory evaluation (factor VIII or IX levels) and clinical outcomes (such as bleeding frequency), morbidity (for example linked with arthropathy) and mortality. Due to the new standard of care of PWH, there is a need to consider other outcome measures, such as the early detection and quantification of joint disease, health-related quality of life (QoL) and economic or cost-utility analyses. To investigate this, we performed a 10-yr systematic overview of outcome measures in haemophilia. Only clinical trials including at least 20 patients with haemophilia A or B were included. To facilitate the search strategy, eight issues of outcome measures were selected: physical scores, imaging technique scores, functional scores, QoL measurement, mortality, bleeding frequency, cost and outcome and bone mineral density. The results of these will be discussed. Clearly defined outcomes in haemophilia care are important for many reasons, to evaluate new treatments, to justify treatment strategies, to allow a good follow-up, to perform studies and to allocate resources. The use of such scoring systems is clearly recommended by experts in haemophilia care. However, most centres do not perform such scores outside clinical trials due to reasons such as lack of time and resources. PMID:24957102

Boehlen, Françoise; Graf, Lukas; Berntorp, Erik

2014-08-01

259

Screening Questionnaires for Parkinsonism: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common, treatable movement disorder that often remains undiagnosed despite clinically manifest symptoms. Screening for parkinsonism could lead to improved detection and earlier treatment, and facilitate research studies of PD prevalence. In order to determine the feasibility of screening, this study evaluated the validity of previously developed screening questionnaires. We systematically searched online databases PubMed and EMBASE for English-language studies published between 1980 and 2009. In each database a “Parkinson(s) disease” or “parkinsonism” term was combined with a screening term (“screening instrument,” screening questionnaire,” “screen” or “prevalence survey”) and a validity term (“validation,” “sensitivity” and “specificity”). Included studies reported the psychometric properties of at least one self-report questionnaire for parkinsonism. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. From these studies, 9 screening questionnaires were identified. Sensitivity and specificity estimates varied widely. Sensitivity estimates were as high as 100% when questionnaires were tested among previously diagnosed PD patients and included a high number of parkinsonism-specific items, but were as low as 48% when tested among early cases in a community-based sample. Specificity estimates were lower, ranging from 22–100%. An older sample, presence of multiple co-morbid conditions and lower literacy led to lower specificity estimates. Higher specificity estimates were seen when the screening questionnaires were administered by a physician. Screening questionnaires can detect symptomatic parkinsonism. However, the performance of these questionnaires varied based on the individual items, study sample, and method of administration. The performance of screening questionnaires in the detection of early or mild parkinsonism was modest. PMID:21930414

Dahodwala, Nabila; Siderowf, Andrew; Baumgarten, Mona; Abrams, Aaron; Karlawish, Jason

2011-01-01

260

Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

2010-01-01

261

Pharmacopuncture for cancer care: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12-2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

2014-01-01

262

Ultraweak photon emission as a non-invasive health assessment: a systematic review.  

PubMed

We conducted a systematic review (SR) of the peer reviewed scientific literature on ultraweak photon emissions (UPE) from humans. The question was: Can ultraweak photon emissions from humans be used as a non-invasive health assessment? A systematic search was conducted across eight relevant databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, BIOSIS, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, All of Cochrane EBM databases, GIDEON, DoD Biomedical Research, and clinicaltrials.gov from database inception to October 2011. Of the 1315 studies captured by the search strategy, 56 met the inclusion criteria, out of which 1 was a RCT, 27 were CCT, and 28 were observational and descriptive studies. There were no systematic reviews/meta-analyses that fit the inclusion criteria. In this report, the authors provide an assessment of the quality of the RCT included; describe the characteristics of all the included studies, the outcomes assessed, and the effectiveness of photon emission as a potential health assessment tool. This report demonstrates that the peer reviewed literature on UPE and human UPE measurement in particular is surprisingly large. Most of the human UPE literature is of good to high quality based on our systematic evaluation. However, an evaluation tool for systematically evaluating this type of "bio-evaluation" methodology is not currently available and would be worth developing. Publications in the peer reviewed literature over the last 50 years demonstrate that the use of "off-the-shelf" technologies and well described methodologies for the detection of human photon emissions are being used on a regular basis in medical and research settings. The overall quality of this literature is good and the use of this approach for determining inflammatory and oxidative states of patients indicate the growing use and value of this approach as both a medical and research tool. PMID:24586274

Ives, John A; van Wijk, Eduard P A; Bat, Namuun; Crawford, Cindy; Walter, Avi; Jonas, Wayne B; van Wijk, Roeland; van der Greef, Jan

2014-01-01

263

A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews and Panoramic Meta-Analysis: Staples versus Sutures for Surgical Procedures  

PubMed Central

Objective To systematically evaluate the evidence across surgical specialties as to whether staples or sutures better improve patient and provider level outcomes. Design A systematic review of systematic reviews and panoramic meta-analysis of pooled estimates. Results Eleven systematic reviews, including 13,661 observations, met the inclusion criteria. In orthopaedic surgery sutures were found to be preferable, and for appendicial stump sutures were protective against both surgical site infection and post surgical complications. However, staples were protective against leak in ilecolic anastomosis. For all other surgery types the evidence was inconclusive with wider confidence intervals including the possibly of preferential outcomes for surgical site infection or post surgical complication for either staples or sutures. Whilst reviews showed substantial variation in mean differences in operating time (I2 94%) there was clear evidence of a reduction in average operating time across all surgery types. Few reviews reported on length of stay, but the three reviews that did (I2 0%, including 950 observations) showed a non significant reduction in length of stay, but showed evidence of publication bias (P-value for Egger test 0.05). Conclusions Evidence across surgical specialties indicates that wound closure with staples reduces the mean operating time. Despite including several thousand observations, no clear evidence of superiority emerged for either staples or sutures with respect to surgical site infection, post surgical complications, or length of stay. PMID:24116028

Hemming, Karla; Pinkney, Thomas; Futaba, Kay; Pennant, Mary; Morton, Dion G.; Lilford, Richard J.

2013-01-01

264

Interventions in exclusive breastfeeding: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Now recognised as a worldwide public health issue, the significance of promoting and encouraging exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been acknowledged by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Documented policies about the importance of facilitating the support of breastfeeding women is currently receiving worldwide recognition (WHO, 2011; WHO and UNICEF, 2003). This literature review will examine provision of support mechanisms for breastfeeding mothers, focusing on peer support in encouraging the starting and maintaining of EBF. Consideration will also be given to any barriers that may prevent higher success rates, as cultural and educational factors may have a significant impact on the starting and maintaining of EBF. These factors must be considered when starting support groups, networks or activities that aim to address this significant public health issue. PMID:24464112

Bevan, Gillian; Brown, Michelle

265

Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, has been used for the treatment of diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The applications of additional curcuminoid compounds for diabetes prevention and treatment are also included in this paper. Finally, we mention the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a “super curcumin” through improvement of the bioavailability to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of diabetes therapeutics. PMID:24348712

Zhang, Dong-wei; Fu, Min; Gao, Si-Hua; Liu, Jun-Li

2013-01-01

266

Epidemiology of Adolescent Rugby Injuries: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective: Despite recent increases in the volume of research in professional rugby union, there is little consensus on the epidemiology of injury in adolescent players. We undertook a systematic review to determine the incidence, severity, and nature of injury in adolescent rugby union players. Data Sources: In April 2009, we performed a computerized literature search on PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (via Ovid). Population-specific and patient-specific search terms were combined in the form of MEDLINE subject headings and key words (wound$ and injur$, rugby, adolescent$). These were supplemented with related-citation searches on PubMed and bibliographic tracking of primary and review articles. Study Selection: Prospective epidemiologic studies in adolescent rugby union players. Data Synthesis: A total of 15 studies were included, and the data were analyzed descriptively. Two independent reviewers extracted key study characteristics regarding the incidence, severity, and nature of injuries and the methodologic design. Conclusions: Wide variations existed in the injury definitions and data collection procedures. The incidence of injury necessitating medical attention varied with the definition, from 27.5 to 129.8 injuries per 1000 match hours. The incidence of time-loss injury (>7 days) ranged from 0.96 to 1.6 per 1000 playing hours and from 11.4/1000 match hours (>1 day) to 12–22/1000 match hours (missed games). The highest incidence of concussion was 3.3/1000 playing hours. No catastrophic injuries were reported. The head and neck, upper limb, and lower limb were all common sites of injury, and trends were noted toward greater time loss due to upper limb fractures or dislocations and knee ligament injuries. Increasing age, the early part of the playing season, and the tackle situation were most closely associated with injury. Future injury-surveillance studies in rugby union must follow consensus guidelines to facilitate interstudy comparisons and provide further clarification as to where injury- prevention strategies should be focused. PMID:22488143

Bleakley, Christopher; Tully, Mark; O'Connor, Sean

2011-01-01

267

Cigarette Smoking and Incident Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Several studies have examined the role of cigarette smoking in the development of renal disease in human populations. However, there have been no systematic reviews on the evidence linking smoking with incident renal disease. Methods: We performed an evidence-based evaluation of peer-reviewed research published during 1966–2005, from a search of five databases, including Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE. Results: Of

Charlotte Jones-Burton; Stephen L. Seliger; Roberta W. Scherer; Shiraz I. Mishra; Ghazal Vessal; Jeanine Brown; Matthew R. Weir; Jeffrey C. Fink

2007-01-01

268

A systematic review of aluminium phosphide poisoning.  

PubMed

Every year, about 300,000 people die because of pesticide poisoning worldwide. The most common pesticide agents are organophosphates and phosphides, aluminium phosphide (AlP) in particular. AlP is known as a suicide poison that can easily be bought and has no effective antidote. Its toxicity results from the release of phosphine gas as the tablet gets into contact with moisture. Phosphine gas primarily affects the heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. Poisoning signs and symptoms include nausea, vomiting, restlessness, abdominal pain, palpitation, refractory shock, cardiac arrhythmias, pulmonary oedema, dyspnoea, cyanosis, and sensory alterations. Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion, positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination with coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal, and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Moreover, acidosis can be treated with early intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate, cardiogenic shock with fluid, vasopresor, and refractory cardiogenic shock with intra-aortic baloon pump or digoxin. Trimetazidine may also have a useful role in the treatment, because it can stop ventricular ectopic beats and bigeminy and preserve oxidative metabolism. This article reviews the epidemiological, toxicological, and clinical/pathological aspects of AlP poisoning and its management. PMID:22450207

Mehrpour, Omid; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Abdollahi, Mohammad

2012-03-01

269

Endometriosis and physical exercises: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Regular physical exercise seems to have protective effects against diseases that involve inflammatory processes since it induces an increase in the systemic levels of cytokines with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and also acts by reducing estrogen levels. Evidence has suggested that the symptoms associated with endometriosis result from a local inflammatory peritoneal reaction caused by ectopic endometrial implants. Thus, the objective of the present review was to assess the relationship between physical exercise and the prevalence and/or improvement of the symptoms associated with endometriosis. To this end, data available in PubMed (1985-2012) were surveyed using the terms "endometriosis and physical exercises", "endometriosis and life style and physical exercises" in the English language literature. Only 6 of the 935 articles detected were included in the study. These studies tried establish a possible relationship between the practice of physical exercise and the prevalence of endometriosis. The data available are inconclusive regarding the benefits of physical exercise as a risk factor for the disease and no data exist about the potential impact of exercise on the course of the endometriosis. In addition, randomized studies are necessary. PMID:24393293

Bonocher, Camila M; Montenegro, Mary L; Rosa E Silva, Julio C; Ferriani, Rui A; Meola, Juliana

2014-01-01

270

Endometriosis and physical exercises: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Regular physical exercise seems to have protective effects against diseases that involve inflammatory processes since it induces an increase in the systemic levels of cytokines with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and also acts by reducing estrogen levels. Evidence has suggested that the symptoms associated with endometriosis result from a local inflammatory peritoneal reaction caused by ectopic endometrial implants. Thus, the objective of the present review was to assess the relationship between physical exercise and the prevalence and/or improvement of the symptoms associated with endometriosis. To this end, data available in PubMed (1985–2012) were surveyed using the terms “endometriosis and physical exercises”, “endometriosis and life style and physical exercises” in the English language literature. Only 6 of the 935 articles detected were included in the study. These studies tried establish a possible relationship between the practice of physical exercise and the prevalence of endometriosis. The data available are inconclusive regarding the benefits of physical exercise as a risk factor for the disease and no data exist about the potential impact of exercise on the course of the endometriosis. In addition, randomized studies are necessary. PMID:24393293

2014-01-01

271

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.): A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium L.) (Asteraceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used for the treatment of fevers, migraine headaches, rheumatoid arthritis, stomach aches, toothaches, insect bites, infertility, and problems with menstruation and labor during childbirth. The feverfew herb has a long history of use in traditional and folk medicine, especially among Greek and early European herbalists. Feverfew has also been used for psoriasis, allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. The plant contains a large number of natural products, but the active principles probably include one or more of the sesquiterpene lactones known to be present, including parthenolide. Other potentially active constituents include flavonoid glycosides and pinenes. It has multiple pharmacologic properties, such as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, antispasmodic, an emmenagogue, and as an enema for worms. In this review, we have explored the various dimensions of the feverfew plant and compiled its vast pharmacologic applications to comprehend and synthesize the subject of its potential image of multipurpose medicinal agent. The plant is widely cultivated to large regions of the world and its importance as a medicinal plant is growing substantially with increasing and stronger reports in support of its multifarious therapeutic uses. PMID:22096324

Pareek, Anil; Suthar, Manish; Rathore, Garvendra S.; Bansal, Vijay

2011-01-01

272

Guidelines for overcoming hospital managerial challenges: a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

Purpose The need to respond to accreditation institutes’ and patients’ requirements and to align health care results with increased medical knowledge is focusing greater attention on quality in health care. Different tools and techniques have been adopted to measure and manage quality, but clinical errors are still too numerous, suggesting that traditional quality improvement systems are unable to deal appropriately with hospital challenges. The purpose of this paper is to grasp the current tools, practices, and guidelines adopted in health care to improve quality and patient safety and create a base for future research on this young subject. Methods A systematic literature review was carried out. A search of academic databases, including papers that focus not only on lean management, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, yielded 47 papers. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analyzed, and a content analysis was conducted. Results A variety of managerial techniques, tools, and practices are being adopted in health care, and traditional methodologies have to be integrated with the latest ones in order to reduce errors and ensure high quality and patient safety. As it has been demonstrated, these tools are useful not only for achieving efficiency objectives, but also for providing higher quality and patient safety. Critical indications and guidelines for successful implementation of new health managerial methodologies are provided and synthesized in an operative scheme useful for extending and deepening knowledge of these issues with further studies. Conclusion This research contributes to introducing a new theme in health care literature regarding the development of successful projects with both clinical risk management and health lean management objectives, and should address solutions for improving health care even in the current context of decreasing resources. PMID:24307833

Crema, Maria; Verbano, Chiara

2013-01-01

273

Infective Endocarditis Epidemiology Over Five Decades: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Aims To Assess changes in infective endocarditis (IE) epidemiology over the last 5 decades. Methods and Results We searched the published literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception until December 2011. Data From Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA were also included. Criteria for inclusion in this systematic review included studies with reported IE microbiology, IE definition, description of population studied, and time frame. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed manuscript quality. One hundred sixty studies (27,083 patients) met inclusion criteria. Among hospital-based studies (n=142; 23,606 patients) staphylococcal IE percentage increased over time, with coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS) increasing over each of the last 5 decades (p<0.001) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) in the last decade (21% to 30%; p<0.05). Streptococcus viridans (SV) and culture negative (CN) IE frequency decreased over time (p<0.001), while enterococcal IE increased in the last decade (p<0.01). Patient age and male predominance increased over time as well. In subgroup analysis, SA frequency increased in North America, but not the rest of the world. This was due, in part, to an increase in intravenous drug abuse IE in North America (p<0.001). Among population-based studies (n=18; 3,477 patients) no significant changes were found. Conclusion Important changes occurred in IE epidemiology over the last half-century, especially in the last decade. Staphylococcal and enterococcal IE percentage increased while SV and CN IE decreased. Moreover, mean age at diagnosis increased together with male:female ratio. These changes should be considered at the time of decision-making in treatment of and prophylaxis for IE. PMID:24349331

Slipczuk, Leandro; Codolosa, J. Nicolas; Davila, Carlos D.; Romero-Corral, Abel; Yun, Jeong; Pressman, Gregg S.; Figueredo, Vincent M.

2013-01-01

274

Disagreement in primary study selection between systematic reviews on negative pressure wound therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Primary study selection between systematic reviews is inconsistent, and reviews on the same topic may reach different conclusions. Our main objective was to compare systematic reviews on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) regarding their agreement in primary study selection. METHODS: This retrospective analysis was conducted within the framework of a systematic review (a full review and a subsequent rapid

Frank Peinemann; Natalie McGauran; Stefan Sauerland; Stefan Lange

2008-01-01

275

Autogenic training for stress and anxiety: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate all controlled trials of autogenic training (AT) as a means of reducing stress and anxiety levels in human subjects. Method: A search for all published and unpublished controlled trials was carried out in the four major databases, specifically CISCOM, Medline, PsychLit and CINAHL. Results: Eight such trials were located, all

E. Ernst; N. Kanji

2000-01-01

276

Anorexia nervosa treatment: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The RTI International-Univer- sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Evi- dence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on efficacy of treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN), harms associat- ed with treatments, factors associated with treatment efficacy, and differential outcome by sociodemographic characteristics. Method: We searched six major data- bases published from 1980 to September 2005 in all languages against a

Jennifer R. Shapiro; Nancy D. Berkman; Kimberly A. Brownley; Jan A. Sedway; Kathleen N. Lohr; Cynthia M. Bulik

2007-01-01

277

Systematic review of interventions delivered by UK mental health nurses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of mental health nurse interventions has not been generally established in the literature. In this systematic review, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified, undertaken in the United Kingdom, where mental health interventions delivered by mental health nurses had been evaluated. The main online literature databases were searched, key journals were hand searched and contact was made with key

Joseph Curran; Charles Brooker

2007-01-01

278

Evidence-Based Medicine, the Essential Role of Systematic Reviews,  

E-print Network

Evidence-Based Medicine, the Essential Role of Systematic Reviews, and the Need for Automated Text Storage and Retrieval, Text-Mining, Evidence-Based Medicine. 1. Introduction The practice of Evidence-Based available, most appropriate evidence in the care of each patient, a practice known as Evidence-based

Meng, Weiyi

279

A Systematic Review of Software Development Cost Estimation Studies  

E-print Network

1 A Systematic Review of Software Development Cost Estimation Studies Magne Jørgensen, Simula identifies 304 software cost estimation papers in 76 journals and classifies the papers according to research provide recommendations for future software cost estimation research: 1) Increase the breadth

280

EGD IN CHILDREN WITH ABDOMINAL PAIN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review to examine the diagnostic yield (endoscopic and histologic) of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for the evaluation of abdominal pain of unclear etiology in children. We also examined the effect of EGD on change in treatment, quality of life, change in abd...

281

Clone evolution: a systematic review Jeremy R. Pate  

E-print Network

Revised August 29, 2011 #12;Journal of Software Maintenance and Evolution: Research and Practice Copyright clones are changed during software evolution. We identify human-based empirical studiesClone evolution: a systematic review Jeremy R. Pate Robert Tairas Nicholas A. Kraft Department

Carver, Jeffrey C.

282

Health Hazards from Volcanic Gases: A Systematic Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of people are potentially exposed to volcanic gases worldwide, and exposures may differ from those in anthropogenic air pollution. A systematic literature review found few primary studies relating to health hazards of volcanic gases. SO2 and acid aerosols from eruptions and degassing events were associated with respiratory morbidity and mortality but not childhood asthma prevalence or lung function decrements.

Anna Hansell; Clive Oppenheimer

2004-01-01

283

Communication Intervention in Rett Syndrome: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We reviewed communication intervention studies involving people with Rett syndrome. Systematic searches of five electronic databases, selected journals, and reference lists identified nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) target skills, (c) procedures, (d) main…

Sigafoos, Jeff; Green, Vanessa A.; Schlosser, Ralf; O'eilly, Mark F.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

2009-01-01

284

Fallopian Tube Prolapse after Hysterectomy: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Prolapse of the fallopian tube into the vaginal vault is a rarely reported complication that may occur after hysterectomy. Clinicians can miss the diagnosis of this disregarded complication when dealing with post-hysterectomy vaginal bleeding. Objectives We performed a systematic review in order to describe the clinical presentation, therapeutic management and outcome of fallopian tube prolapse occurring after hysterectomy. Search Strategy A systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE references from January 1980 to December 2010 was performed. We included articles that reported cases of fallopian tube prolapse after hysterectomy. Data from eligible studies were independently extracted onto standardized forms by two reviewers. Results Twenty-eight articles including 51 cases of fallopian tube prolapse after hysterectomy were included in this systematic review. Clinical presentations included abdominal pain, dyspareunia, post- coital bleeding, and/or vaginal discharge. Two cases were asymptomatic and diagnosed at routine checkup. The surgical management reported comprised partial or total salpingectomy, with vaginal repair in some cases combined with oophorectomy using different approaches (vaginal approach, combined vaginal-laparoscopic approach, laparoscopic approach, or laparotomy). Six patients were initially treated by silver nitrate application without success. Conclusions This systematic review provided a precise summary of the clinical characteristics and treatment of patients presenting with fallopian tube prolapse following hysterectomy published in the past 30 years. We anticipate that these results will help inform current investigations and treatment. PMID:24116117

Ouldamer, Lobna; Caille, Agnès; Body, Gilles

2013-01-01

285

Systematic review of adherence to infection control guidelines in dentistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and attitudes of dental health care workers (DHCWs) towards infection control procedures, to examine DHCWs’ practising behaviour in respect of infection control, and to determine whether a relationship exists between knowledge, attitudes and behaviour.Methods:Within this systematic review, study quality was assessed in line with selection criteria relating to study

B. L Gordon; F. J. T Burke; J Bagg; H. S Marlborough; E. S McHugh

2001-01-01

286

Systematic review of antidepressant therapies in Parkinson's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression is the most common psychiatric disturbance in Parkinson's disease. We conducted a Cochrane systematic review to assess the efficacy and safety of antidepressant therapies in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Relevant trials were identified from electronic databases, reference lists and queries to antidepressant manufacturers.Three randomised controlled trials examined oral antidepressants in 106 patients with Parkinson's disease. No eligible trials of electroconvulsive

T. H. Chung; K. H. O. Deane; S. Ghazi-Noori; H. Rickards; C. E. Clarke

2003-01-01

287

A Systematic Review of Action Imitation in Autistic Spectrum Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Imitative deficits have been associated with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) for many years, most recently through more robust methodologies. A fresh, systematic review of the significance, characteristics, and underlying mechanism of the association is therefore warranted. From 121 candidates, we focused on 21 well-controlled studies involving…

Williams, Justin H. G.; Whiten, Andrew; Singh, Tulika

2004-01-01

288

Facial Emotion Recognition in Child Psychiatry: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review focuses on facial affect (emotion) recognition in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders other than autism. A systematic search, using PRISMA guidelines, was conducted to identify original articles published prior to October 2011 pertaining to face recognition tasks in case-control studies. Used in the qualitative…

Collin, Lisa; Bindra, Jasmeet; Raju, Monika; Gillberg, Christopher; Minnis, Helen

2013-01-01

289

Cannabis as a risk factor for psychosis: systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various lines of evidence suggest an association between cannabis and psychosis. Five years ago, the only significant case-control study addressing this question was the Swedish Conscript Cohort. Within the last few years, other studies have emerged, allowing the evidence for cannabis as a risk factor to be more systematically reviewed and assessed. Using specific search criteria on Embase, PsychINFO and

David M. Semple; Andrew M. McIntosh; Stephen M. Lawrie

2005-01-01

290

Randomized Clinical Trials of Constitutional Acupuncture: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional med- icine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of

Myeong Soo Lee; Byung-Cheul Shin; Sun-Mi Choi; Jong Yeol Kim

2009-01-01

291

cVEMPs: A systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

Objective: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was performed to determine the effect of stimulus type, SCM muscle activation method, transducer type, and method to control SCM muscle EMG level on response parameter values for 0.1-ms click-evoked and 500-Hz tone burst cVEMPs. A description of normative response values was attempted. Design: An electronic systematic literature review was performed to obtain normative cVEMP response data. Subsequently a meta-analysis was conducted to determine significant effects on cVEMP response parameters and to obtain norms. Study sample: Scopus was used to identify reports containing normative data. Reports were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria determined beforehand. Weighted means were calculated and compared to identify significant effects and normative data. Results: Sixty-six reports were included in the systematic review. Stimulus type, SCM muscle activation method, transducer type, and method to control SCM muscle EMG level had significant effects on all response parameters. Conclusions: Optimal stimulus and recording parameters suggested by previous research are confirmed by the current systematic review and meta-analysis and are suggested for clinical use. Response parameter values are influenced by variations in stimulus and recording parameters and normative response values are suggested as guideline for cVEMP interpretation. PMID:25490156

Meyer, Nathalie; Vinck, Bart; Heinze, Barbara

2014-12-01

292

Strength of Evidence in Systematic Reviews in Software Engineering  

E-print Network

for enabling evidence-based practice as they bring together, and combine, the findings from multiple studies as the evidence they are based on. It is important, therefore, that users of systematic reviews know how much], [32]. This is useful, in evidence-based software engineering (EBSE), which aims to improve decision

293

Student Online Readiness Assessment Tools: A Systematic Review Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there are tools to assess student's readiness in an "online learning context," little is known about the "psychometric" properties of the tools used or not. A systematic review of 5107 published and unpublished papers identified in a literature search on student online readiness assessment tools between 1990 and…

Farid, Alem

2014-01-01

294

Systematic review of dexketoprofen in acute and chronic pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Dexketoprofen, an NSAID used in the management of acute and chronic pains, is licensed in several countries but has not previously been the subjected of a systematic review. We used published and unpublished information from randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of dexketoprofen in painful conditions to assess evidence on efficacy and harm. METHODS: PubMed and Cochrane Central were searched for

R Andrew Moore; Jodie Barden

2008-01-01

295

Estrogens and experimental ischemic stroke: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estrogens are believed to provide females with endogenous protection against cerebrovascular events although clinical trials studying long-term hormone replacement have yielded disappointing results. In contrast, estrogens might be neuroprotective after experimental ischemia. We performed a systematic review of controlled experimental studies that administered estrogens before, or after, cerebral ischemia and measured lesion volume. Relevant studies were found from searching PubMed,

Claire L Gibson; Laura J Gray; Sean P Murphy; Philip M W Bath

2006-01-01

296

Immunotherapy for Guillain-Barré syndrome: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system thought to be due to autoimmunity for which immunotherapy is usually prescribed. To provide the best evidence on which to base clinical practice, we systematically reviewed the results of randomized trials of immunotherapy for GBS. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE in July 2006 and

R. A. C. Hughes; A. V. Swan; J.-C. Raphaël; D. Annane; R. van Koningsveld; Doorn van P. A

2007-01-01

297

Conducting Systematic Reviews of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Common Pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systematic reviews (SRs) are considered the best tools for summarizing the evidence for or against the effectiveness of health care interventions. The principles and methods of SRs apply equally to both, mainstream and complementary\\/alternative medicine (CAM). Certain challenges are, however, more commonly encountered in CAM or even specific to it; this article is aimed at raising awareness of these among

Barbara Wider; Kate Boddy

2009-01-01

298

Using Agile Practices in Global Software Development: A Systematic Review  

E-print Network

Using Agile Practices in Global Software Development: A Systematic Review Emam Hossain1 Muhammad There is a growing interest in applying agile approaches in Global Software Development (GSD) projects. Recently its popular- ity, the question of "which agile practices are effective for GSD under which

New South Wales, University of

299

Dynamic exercise therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of dynamic exercixe therapy in improving joint mobility, muscle strength, aerobic capacity and daily functioning in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, possible unwanted effects such as an increase in pain, disease activity and radiological progression were studied. A computer-aided search of the MEDLINE , Embase and SCISEARCH

C. H. M. van den Ende; T. P. M. Vliet Vlieland; M. Munneke; J. M. W. Hazes

1998-01-01

300

Do Young People's Illness Beliefs Affect Healthcare? A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

A successful patient-centered approach in clinical practice implies an understanding of patients' experiences of illness, and therefore of their illness beliefs. This paper presents a systematic review of the literature on young people's common illness beliefs in contemporary Western societies and the extent to which these beliefs have been shown to affect healthcare.

Dagmar M. Haller; Lena A. Sanci; Susan M. Sawyer; George Patton

2008-01-01

301

Predictors of Complicated Grief: A Systematic Review of Empirical Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic review of the literature on predictors of complicated grief (CG) was undertaken with the aim of clarifying the current knowledge and to inform future planning and work in CG following bereavement. Predictors of CG prior to the death include previous loss, exposure to trauma, a previous psychiatric history, attachment style, and the relationship to the deceased. Factors associated

Elizabeth A. Lobb; Linda J. Kristjanson; Samar M. Aoun; Leanne Monterosso; Georgia K. B. Halkett; Anna Davies

2010-01-01

302

Systematic Review of Prognostic Models in Patients with Acute Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prognostic models in stroke may be useful in clinical practice and research. We systematically reviewed the methodology and results of studies that have identified independent predictors of survival, independence in activities of daily living, and getting home in patients with acute stroke. Eligible studies (published in full in English) included at least 100 patients in whom at least 3 predictor

Carl Counsell; Martin Dennis

2001-01-01

303

Does Being Overweight Impede Academic Attainment? A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To examine evidence from studies exploring the relationship between childhood obesity and educational attainment. Design: A systematic review of secondary analyses and observational studies published in English after 1997 examining attainment as measured by grade point average or other validated measure, in children aged 6 to 16 years,…

Caird, Jennifer; Kavanagh, Josephine; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Oliver, Kathryn; Oliver, Sandy; Stansfield, Claire; Thomas, James

2014-01-01

304

A systematic review of natural health product treatment for vitiligo  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Vitiligo is a hypopigmentation disorder affecting 1 to 4% of the world population. Fifty percent of cases appear before the age of 20 years old, and the disfigurement results in psychiatric morbidity in 16 to 35% of those affected. METHODS: Our objective was to complete a comprehensive, systematic review of the published scientific literature to identify natural health products

Orest Szczurko; Heather S Boon

2008-01-01

305

Psychological Distress in Refugee Children: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nearly one-quarter of the refugees worldwide are children. There have been numerous studies reporting their levels of psychological distress. The aim of this paper is to review systematically and synthesize the epidemiological research concerning the mental health of refugee children residing in Western countries. A Cochrane Collaboration style…

Bronstein, Israel; Montgomery, Paul

2011-01-01

306

Predictors of Complicated Grief: A Systematic Review of Empirical Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A systematic review of the literature on predictors of complicated grief (CG) was undertaken with the aim of clarifying the current knowledge and to inform future planning and work in CG following bereavement. Predictors of CG prior to the death include previous loss, exposure to trauma, a previous psychiatric history, attachment style, and the…

Lobb, Elizabeth A.; Kristjanson, Linda J.; Aoun, Samar M.; Monterosso, Leanne; Halkett, Georgia K. B.; Davies, Anna

2010-01-01

307

Post-traumatic glenohumeral cartilage lesions: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Any cartilage damage to the glenohumeral joint should be avoided, as these damages may result in osteoarthritis of the shoulder. To understand the pathomechanism leading to shoulder cartilage damage, we conducted a systematic review on the subject of articular cartilage lesions caused by traumas where non impression fracture of the subchondral bone is present. METHODS: PubMed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect (EMBASE,

Heidi Ruckstuhl; Eling D de Bruin; Edgar Stussi; Benedicte Vanwanseele

2008-01-01

308

Analgesic Therapy in Postherpetic Neuralgia: A Quantitative Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPostherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a complication of acute herpes zoster, which is emerging as a preferred clinical trial model for chronic neuropathic pain. Although there are published meta-analyses of analgesic therapy in PHN, and neuropathic pain in general, the evidence base has been substantially enhanced by the recent publication of several major trials. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review

Kathleen Hempenstall; Turo J. Nurmikko; Robert W. Johnson; Roger P AHern; Andrew S. C. Rice

2005-01-01

309

Systematic review: conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema  

PubMed Central

Background Several conservative (i.e., nonpharmacologic, nonsurgical) treatments exist for secondary lymphedema. The optimal treatment is unknown. We examined the effectiveness of conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema, as well as harms related to these treatments. Methods We searched MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials®, AMED, and CINAHL from 1990 to January 19, 2010. We obtained English- and non-English-language randomized controlled trials or observational studies (with comparison groups) that reported primary effectiveness data on conservative treatments for secondary lymphedema. For English-language studies, we extracted data in tabular form and summarized the tables descriptively. For non-English-language studies, we summarized the results descriptively and discussed similarities with the English-language studies. Results Thirty-six English-language and eight non-English-language studies were included in the review. Most of these studies involved upper-limb lymphedema secondary to breast cancer. Despite lymphedema's chronicity, lengths of follow-up in most studies were under 6 months. Many trial reports contained inadequate descriptions of randomization, blinding, and methods to assess harms. Most observational studies did not control for confounding. Many studies showed that active treatments reduced the size of lymphatic limbs, although extensive between-study heterogeneity in areas such as treatment comparisons and protocols, and outcome measures, prevented us from assessing whether any one treatment was superior. This heterogeneity also precluded us from statistically pooling results. Harms were rare (< 1% incidence) and mostly minor (e.g., headache, arm pain). Conclusions The literature contains no evidence to suggest the most effective treatment for secondary lymphedema. Harms are few and unlikely to cause major clinical problems. PMID:22216837

2012-01-01

310

Medication-overuse headache: a review  

PubMed Central

Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a worldwide health problem with a prevalence of 1%–2%. It is a severe form of headache where the patients often have a long history of headache and of unsuccessful treatments. MOH is characterized by chronic headache and overuse of different headache medications. Through the years, withdrawal of the overused medication has been recognized as the treatment of choice. However, currently, there is no clear consensus regarding the optimal strategy for management of MOH. Treatment approaches are based on expert opinion rather than scientific evidence. This review focuses on aspects of epidemiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of MOH. We suggest that information and education about the risk of MOH is important since the condition is preventable. Most patients experience reduction of headache days and intensity after successful treatment. The first step in the treatment of MOH should be carried out in primary care and focus primarily on withdrawal, leaving prophylactic medication to those who do not manage primary detoxification. For most patients, a general practitioner can perform the follow-up after detoxification. More complicated cases should be referred to neurologists and headache clinics. Patients suffering with MOH have much to gain by an earlier treatment-focused approach, since the condition is both preventable and treatable. PMID:25061336

Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Lundqvist, Christofer

2014-01-01

311

Medication-overuse headache: a review.  

PubMed

Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a worldwide health problem with a prevalence of 1%-2%. It is a severe form of headache where the patients often have a long history of headache and of unsuccessful treatments. MOH is characterized by chronic headache and overuse of different headache medications. Through the years, withdrawal of the overused medication has been recognized as the treatment of choice. However, currently, there is no clear consensus regarding the optimal strategy for management of MOH. Treatment approaches are based on expert opinion rather than scientific evidence. This review focuses on aspects of epidemiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of MOH. We suggest that information and education about the risk of MOH is important since the condition is preventable. Most patients experience reduction of headache days and intensity after successful treatment. The first step in the treatment of MOH should be carried out in primary care and focus primarily on withdrawal, leaving prophylactic medication to those who do not manage primary detoxification. For most patients, a general practitioner can perform the follow-up after detoxification. More complicated cases should be referred to neurologists and headache clinics. Patients suffering with MOH have much to gain by an earlier treatment-focused approach, since the condition is both preventable and treatable. PMID:25061336

Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Lundqvist, Christofer

2014-01-01

312

Chiropractic manipulation in pediatric health conditions – an updated systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objective Our purpose was to review the biomedical literature from January 2004 to June 2007 inclusive to determine the extent of new evidence related to the therapeutic application of manipulation for pediatric health conditions. This updates a previous systematic review published in 2005. No critical appraisal of the evidence is undertaken. Data Sources We searched both the indexed and non-indexed biomedical manual therapy literature. This included PubMed, MANTIS, CINAHL, ICL, as well as reference tracking. Other resources included the Cochrane Library, CCOHTA, PEDro, WHO ICTRP, AMED, EMBASE and AHRQ databases, as well as research conferences and symposium proceedings. Results The search identified 1275 citations of which 57 discrete citations met the eligibility criteria determined by three reviewers who then determined by consensus, each citation's appropriate level on the strength of evidence scale. The new evidence from the relevant time period was 1 systematic review, 1 RCT, 2 observational studies, 36 descriptive case studies and 17 conference abstracts. When this additional evidence is combined with the previous systematic review undertaken up to 2003, there are now in total, 2 systematic reviews, 10 RCT's, 3 observational studies, 177 descriptive studies, and 31 conference abstracts defining this body of knowledge. Summary There has been no substantive shift in this body of knowledge during the past 3 1/2 years. The health claims made by chiropractors with respect to the application of manipulation as a health care intervention for pediatric health conditions continue to be supported by only low levels of scientific evidence. Chiropractors continue to treat a wide variety of pediatric health conditions. The evidence rests primarily with clinical experience, descriptive case studies and very few observational and experimental studies. The health interests of pediatric patients would be advanced if more rigorous scientific inquiry was undertaken to examine the value of manipulative therapy in the treatment of pediatric conditions. PMID:18789139

Gotlib, Allan; Rupert, Ron

2008-01-01

313

Mission Drift in Qualitative Research, or Moving Toward a Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies, Moving Back to a More Systematic Narrative Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper argues that the systematic review of qualitative research is best served by reliance upon qualitative methods themselves. A case is made for strengthening the narrative literature review and using narrative itself as a method of review. A technique is proposed that builds upon recent developments in qualitative systematic review by the use of a narrative inductive method of

Kip Jones

2004-01-01

314

Birth weight and adult bone mass: a systematic literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  This systematic literature review comprised 16 studies. The association of birth weight with bone parameters was much more\\u000a evident for bone mineral content (BMC) rather than bone mineral density (BMD). This is an important finding since a reduction\\u000a in BMC is strongly associated with an increased risk of fractures.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic literature

M. M. Schlüssel; J. dos Santos Vaz; G. Kac

2010-01-01

315

SUBMITTED TO CURRENT MEDICAL IMAGING REVIEWS 1 A review of wavelet denoising in MRI and  

E-print Network

SUBMITTED TO CURRENT MEDICAL IMAGING REVIEWS 1 A review of wavelet denoising in MRI and ultrasound of medical imaging appli- cations. We review recent wavelet denoising techniques for medical ultrasound methods for medical ultrasound and MRI imaging and their applications in some clinical investigations

Pizurica, Aleksandra

316

Calcitonin for treating acute pain of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures: a systematic review of randomized, controlled trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vertebral collapse is one of the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. The subsequent back pain is severe and often requires medications, bed rest and hospitalization to control pain and improve mobilization. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effects of calcitonin versus placebo for the treatment of acute pain in patients sustaining stable, recent, osteoporotic vertebral

Jennifer A. Knopp; Barry M. Diner; Maurice Blitz; George P. Lyritis; Brian H. Rowe

2005-01-01

317

78 FR 5558 - Medical Review Board Public Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DOT. ACTION: Notice of Medical Review Board (MRB) public...FMCSA announces that the Medical Review Board (MRB) will meet...report about fatigue-related research concerning bus and motorcoach...identify relevant scientific and medical studies the Agency could...

2013-01-25

318

Systematic reviews of the effectiveness of quality improvement strategies and programmes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Systematic reviews provide the best evidence on the effectiveness of healthcare interventions including quality improvement strategies. The methods of systematic review of individual patient randomised trials of healthcare interventions are well developed. We discuss methodological and practice issues that need to be considered when undertaking systematic reviews of quality improvement strategies including developing a review protocol, identifying and screening evidence

J Grimshaw; L M McAuley; L A Bero; R Grilli; A D Oxman; C Ramsay; L Vale; M Zwarenstein

2003-01-01

319

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Africa: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Background Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is any degree of impaired glucose tolerance first recognised during pregnancy. Most women with GDM revert to normal glucose metabolism after delivery of their babies; however, they are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life as are their offspring. Determining a country’s GDM prevalence can assist with policy guidelines regarding GDM screening and management, and can highlight areas requiring research. This systematic review assesses GDM prevalence in Africa. Methods and Findings Three electronic databases were searched without language restrictions; PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library. Thirty-one search terms were searched. Eligible articles defined GDM, stated what GDM screening approaches were employed and reported GDM prevalence. The reporting quality and risk of bias within each study was assessed. The PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. The literature search identified 466 unique records. Sixty full text articles were reviewed of which 14 were included in the systematic review. One abstract, for which the full text article could not be obtained, was also included. Information regarding GDM classification, screening methods and prevalence was obtained for six African countries; Ethiopia (n?=?1), Morocco (n?=?1), Mozambique (n?=?1), Nigeria (n?=?6), South Africa (n?=?4) and Tanzania (n?=?1). Prevalence figures ranged from 0% (Tanzania) to 13.9% (Nigeria) with some studies focussing on women with GDM risk factors. Most studies utilised the two hour 75 g oral glucose tolerance test and applied the World Health Organization’s diagnostic criteria. Conclusions Six countries, equating to 11% of the African continent, were represented in this systematic review. This indicates how little is known about GDM in Africa and highlights the need for further research. Considering the increasing public health burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes, it is essential that the extent of GDM is understood in Africa to allow for effective intervention programmes. PMID:24892280

Macaulay, Shelley; Dunger, David B.; Norris, Shane A.

2014-01-01

320

Medical applications of infrared thermography: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abnormal body temperature is a natural indicator of illness. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a fast, passive, non-contact and non-invasive alternative to conventional clinical thermometers for monitoring body temperature. Besides, IRT can also map body surface temperature remotely. Last five decades witnessed a steady increase in the utility of thermal imaging cameras to obtain correlations between the thermal physiology and skin temperature. IRT has been successfully used in diagnosis of breast cancer, diabetes neuropathy and peripheral vascular disorders. It has also been used to detect problems associated with gynecology, kidney transplantation, dermatology, heart, neonatal physiology, fever screening and brain imaging. With the advent of modern infrared cameras, data acquisition and processing techniques, it is now possible to have real time high resolution thermographic images, which is likely to surge further research in this field. The present efforts are focused on automatic analysis of temperature distribution of regions of interest and their statistical analysis for detection of abnormalities. This critical review focuses on advances in the area of medical IRT. The basics of IRT, essential theoretical background, the procedures adopted for various measurements and applications of IRT in various medical fields are discussed in this review. Besides background information is provided for beginners for better understanding of the subject.

Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

2012-07-01

321

Literature Review of Testing Techniques for Medical Device Software  

E-print Network

Literature Review of Testing Techniques for Medical Device Software John J. Majikes Department As software-controlled medical devices evolve from monolithic de- vices to modular Medical Cyber existing software-testing techniques that expose failures in software-controlled medical devices. In par

Xie, Tao

322

REVIEW Open Access Overview of medical errors and adverse events  

E-print Network

REVIEW Open Access Overview of medical errors and adverse events Maité Garrouste-Orgeas1 hospitalized patients to experience medical errors, due to the complexity of their conditions, need for urgent interventions, and considerable workload fluctuation. Medication errors are the most common medical errors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

The impact of cosmetic breast implants on breastfeeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Cosmetic breast augmentation (breast implants) is one of the most common plastic surgery procedures worldwide and uptake in high income countries has increased in the last two decades. Women need information about all associated outcomes in order to make an informed decision regarding whether to undergo cosmetic breast surgery. We conducted a systematic review to assess breastfeeding outcomes among women with breast implants compared to women without. Methods A systematic literature search of Medline, Pubmed, CINAHL and Embase databases was conducted using the earliest inclusive dates through December 2013. Eligible studies included comparative studies that reported breastfeeding outcomes (any breastfeeding, and among women who breastfed, exclusive breastfeeding) for women with and without breast implants. Pairs of reviewers extracted descriptive data, study quality, and outcomes. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled across studies using the random-effects model. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used to critically appraise study quality, and the National Health and Medical Research Council Level of Evidence Scale to rank the level of the evidence. This systematic review has been registered with the international prospective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO): CRD42014009074. Results Three small, observational studies met the inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was fair (NOS 4-6) and the level of evidence was low (III-2 - III-3). There was no significant difference in attempted breastfeeding (one study, RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.76, 1.17). However, among women who breastfed, all three studies reported a reduced likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding amongst women with breast implants with a pooled rate ratio of 0.60 (95% CI 0.40, 0.90). Conclusions This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that women with breast implants who breastfeed were less likely to exclusively feed their infants with breast milk compared to women without breast implants. PMID:25332722

2014-01-01

324

Long-term Drug Treatment for Obesity: A Systematic and Clinical Review  

PubMed Central

Importance Thirty-six percent of US adults are obese and many cannot lose sufficient weight to improve health with lifestyle interventions alone. Objective Conduct a systematic review of medications currently approved in the US for obesity treatment in adults. We also discuss off-label use of medications studied for obesity and provide considerations for obesity medication use in clinical practice. Evidence Acquisition A PubMed search from inception through September, 2013 was performed to find meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and randomized, placebo-controlled trials for currently-approved obesity medications lasting ?1y, that had a primary or secondary outcome of body weight, included ?50 participants per group, reported ?50% retention, and reported results on an intention-to-treat basis. Studies of medications approved for other purposes but tested for obesity treatment were also reviewed. Results Obesity medications approved for long-term use, when prescribed with lifestyle interventions, produce additional weight loss relative to placebo ranging from approximately 3% of initial weight for orlistat and lorcaserin to 9% for top-dose (15/92mg) phentermine/topiramate-ER at 1y. The proportion of patients achieving clinically-meaningful (?5%) weight loss ranges from 37–47% for lorcaserin, 35–73% for orlistat, and 67–70% for top-dose phentermine/topiramate-ER. All three produce greater improvements in many cardiometabolic risk factors than placebo, but no obesity medication has been shown to reduce cardiovascular morbidity or mortality. Most prescriptions are for noradrenergic medications, despite their approval only for short-term use and limited data for their long-term safety and efficacy. Conclusions/Relevance Medications approved for long-term obesity treatment, when used as an adjunct to lifestyle intervention, lead to greater mean weight loss and an increased likelihood of achieving clinically-meaningful 1-year weight loss relative to placebo. By discontinuing medication in patients who do not respond with weight loss ?5%, clinicians can decrease their patients' exposure to the risks and costs of drug treatment when there is little prospect of long-term benefit. PMID:24231879

Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

2014-01-01

325

Global burden of COPD: systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to quantify the global prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by means of a systematic review and random effects meta-analysis. PubMed was searched for population-based prevalence estimates published during the period 1990-2004. Articles were included if they: 1) provided total population or sex-specific estimates for COPD, chronic bronchitis and\\/or emphysema; and 2) gave

R. J. Halbert; J. L. Natoli; A. Gano; E. Badamgarav; A. S. Buist; D. M. Mannino

2006-01-01

326

Gastrostomy feeding in cerebral palsy: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Aims: To determine benefits and risks for gastrostomy or jejunostomy feeding compared with oral feeding for children with cerebral palsy. Methods: Systematic review. Search strategy: electronic databases—Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Lilacs, databases of theses, grey literature. Included: relevant systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, observational studies, case reports. Excluded: non-systematic reviews and qualitative research. Participants: children with cerebral palsy. Intervention: use of gastrostomy or jejunostomy tube to provide nutrition. Outcome: evaluated outcome measures included death, growth, gastro-oesophageal reflux, other complications, psychosocial aspects, and caregiver wellbeing. Results: No relevant systematic reviews or randomised controlled trials were found. Two cohort studies, 15 case series, and eight case reports met the inclusion criteria. Eight studies specifically described percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy as the intervention. Weight gain resulted from gastrostomy feeding in most cases. There was an approximately fourfold increased risk of death reported in one cohort study for the gastrostomy fed children. Many complications were reported, including potential for increased gastro-oesophageal reflux and fluid aspiration into the lungs. Conclusions: Benefits associated with gastrostomy or jejunostomy feeding are difficult to assess from the available evidence. Risks of gastrostomy, particularly in relation to surgical complications, have been described but the size of the risk could not be quantified. The finding of a higher death rate for children fed by gastrostomy may merely reflect the greater disability of these compared with orally fed children. Lack of available evidence and the substantial risk of bias in observational studies suggests that a well conducted randomised controlled trial of sufficient size will be needed to answer these problems. PMID:15155398

Sleigh, G; Brocklehurst, P

2004-01-01

327

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Africa: A systematic Review  

E-print Network

on public health. Understanding and subsequently attempting to curb the prevalence of GDM in developing countries is imperative for maternal and child health. As GDM often results in macrosomic infants, birth trauma and the need for Caesarean sections... JA, Njoroge T (2011) Gestational DiabetesMelli- tus and Risk of Childhood Overweight and Obesity in Offspring: A Systematic Review. Exp Diabetes Res 2011: 1–9. 12. Hillier TA, Pedula KL, Schmidt MM, Mullen JA, Charles MA, et al. (2007) Childhood...

Macaulay, Shelley; Dunger, David B.; Norris, Shane A.

2014-06-03

328

Dietary Management of Infantile Colic: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Infantile colic, the cause of 10–20% of all early paediatrician visits, can lead to parental exhaustion and stress. A systematic\\u000a review was conducted to examine whether dietary change provides an effective therapy for infantile colic. Six databases were\\u000a searched from 1960, and 24 studies selected for inclusion. In breastfed infants, evidence suggests that a hypoallergenic maternal\\u000a diet may be beneficial

Marina Iacovou; Robin A. Ralston; Jane Muir; Karen Z. Walker; Helen Truby

329

Care Transitions: A Systematic Review of Best Practices.  

PubMed

This article reports results from a systematic review used to inform the development of a best practice guideline to assist nurses in understanding their roles and responsibilities in promoting safe and effective client care transitions. A care transition is a set of actions designed to ensure safe and effective coordination and continuity of care as clients experience a change in health status, care needs, health care providers, or location. PMID:25470233

Dusek, Brenda; Pearce, Nancy; Harripaul, Anastasia; Lloyd, Monique

2014-12-01

330

Cigarette smoking and thyroid eye disease: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeTo evaluate the epidemiological evidence for a causal association between tobacco smoking and thyroid eye disease (TED).MethodsSystematic review, including quality assessment, of published epidemiological studies and evaluation of the evidence using established causality criteria.ResultsFourteen papers describing 15 studies were included. There was a positive association between smoking and TED in four case–control studies when compared with control patients with Graves’

J Thornton; S P Kelly; R A Harrison; R Edwards

2007-01-01

331

Effect of fish oil on arrhythmias and mortality: systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To synthesise the literature on the effects of fish oil—docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)—on mortality and arrhythmias and to explore dose response and formulation effects.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis.Data sources Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, IPA, Web of Science, Scopus, Pascal, Allied and Complementary Medicine, Academic OneFile, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Evidence-Based Complementary Medicine, and

Hernando León; Marcelo C Shibata; Soori Sivakumaran; Marlene Dorgan; Trish Chatterley; Ross T Tsuyuki

2008-01-01

332

Chronic Kidney Disease and Mortality Risk: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current guidelines identify people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) as being at high risk for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Because as many as 19 million Americans may have CKD, a comprehensive summary of this risk would be potentially useful for planning public health policy. A systematic review of the association between non-dialysis-dependent CKD and the risk for all-cause and cardiovascular

Marcello Tonelli; Natasha Wiebe; Bruce Culleton; Chris Rabbat; Mei Fok; Finlay McAlister

2006-01-01

333

Systematic Omics Analysis Review (SOAR) Tool to Support Risk Assessment  

PubMed Central

Environmental health risk assessors are challenged to understand and incorporate new data streams as the field of toxicology continues to adopt new molecular and systems biology technologies. Systematic screening reviews can help risk assessors and assessment teams determine which studies to consider for inclusion in a human health assessment. A tool for systematic reviews should be standardized and transparent in order to consistently determine which studies meet minimum quality criteria prior to performing in-depth analyses of the data. The Systematic Omics Analysis Review (SOAR) tool is focused on assisting risk assessment support teams in performing systematic reviews of transcriptomic studies. SOAR is a spreadsheet tool of 35 objective questions developed by domain experts, focused on transcriptomic microarray studies, and including four main topics: test system, test substance, experimental design, and microarray data. The tool will be used as a guide to identify studies that meet basic published quality criteria, such as those defined by the Minimum Information About a Microarray Experiment standard and the Toxicological Data Reliability Assessment Tool. Seven scientists were recruited to test the tool by using it to independently rate 15 published manuscripts that study chemical exposures with microarrays. Using their feedback, questions were weighted based on importance of the information and a suitability cutoff was set for each of the four topic sections. The final validation resulted in 100% agreement between the users on four separate manuscripts, showing that the SOAR tool may be used to facilitate the standardized and transparent screening of microarray literature for environmental human health risk assessment. PMID:25531884

McConnell, Emma R.; Bell, Shannon M.; Cote, Ila; Wang, Rong-Lin; Perkins, Edward J.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Gong, Ping; Burgoon, Lyle D.

2014-01-01

334

Using and understanding sedation scoring systems: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To systematically review instruments for measuring the level and effectiveness of sedation in adult and pediatric ICU patients.¶Study identification: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and reference lists of the relevant articles. We selected studies if the\\u000a sedation instrument reported items related to consciousness and one or more additional items related to the effectiveness\\u000a or side effects of

B. De Jonghe; D. Cook; C. Appere-De-Vecchi; G. Guyatt; Maureen Meade; H. Outin

2000-01-01

335

Axial pain after posterior cervical spine surgery: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Posterior operative approach has been the standard treatment for cervical compressive myelopathy, and axial pain after laminoplasty\\u000a or laminectomy as a postoperative complication is now gradually receiving more and more attention. The objective of this study\\u000a was to provide a systematic review of the current understanding of axial pain after cervical laminoplasty and laminectomy,\\u000a and summarize clinical features, influence factors

Shan-Jin Wang; Sheng-Dan Jiang; Lei-Sheng Jiang; Li-Yang Dai

2011-01-01

336

The epidemiology of malpractice claims in primary care: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this systematic review was to examine the epidemiology of malpractice claims in primary care. Design A computerised systematic literature search was conducted. Studies were included if they reported original data (?10 cases) pertinent to malpractice claims, were based in primary care and were published in the English language. Data were synthesised using a narrative approach. Setting Primary care. Participants Malpractice claimants. Primary outcome Malpractice claim (defined as a written demand for compensation for medical injury). We recorded: medical misadventure cited in claims, missed/delayed diagnoses cited in claims, outcome of claims, prevalence of claims and compensation awarded to claimants. Results Of the 7152 articles retrieved by electronic search, a total of 34 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the narrative analysis. Twenty-eight studies presented data from medical indemnity malpractice claims databases and six studies presented survey data. Fifteen studies were based in the USA, nine in the UK, seven in Australia, one in Canada and two in France. The commonest medical misadventure resulting in claims was failure to or delay in diagnosis, which represented 26–63% of all claims across included studies. Common missed or delayed diagnoses included cancer and myocardial infarction in adults and meningitis in children. Medication error represented the second commonest domain representing 5.6–20% of all claims across included studies. The prevalence of malpractice claims in primary care varied across countries. In the USA and Australia when compared with other clinical disciplines, general practice ranked in the top five specialties accounting for the most claims, representing 7.6–20% of all claims. However, the majority of claims were successfully defended. Conclusions This review of malpractice claims in primary care highlights diagnosis and medication error as areas to be prioritised in developing educational strategies and risk management systems. PMID:23869100

Wallace, E; Lowry, J; Smith, S M; Fahey, T

2013-01-01

337

The Effectiveness of Public Health Interventions to Reduce the Health Impact of Climate Change: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews  

PubMed Central

Background Climate change is likely to be one of the most important threats to public health in the coming years. Yet despite the large number of papers considering the health impact of climate change, few have considered what public health interventions may be of most value in reducing the disease burden. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions to reduce the disease burden of high priority climate sensitive diseases. Methods and Findings For each disease, we performed a systematic search with no restriction on date or language of publication on Medline, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane CENTRAL and SCOPUS up to December 2010 to identify systematic reviews of public health interventions. We retrieved some 3176 records of which 85 full papers were assessed and 33 included in the review. The included papers investigated the effect of public health interventions on various outcome measures. All interventions were GRADE assessed to determine the strength of evidence. In addition we developed a systematic review quality score. The interventions included environmental interventions to control vectors, chemoprophylaxis, immunization, household and community water treatment, greening cities and community advice. For most reviews, GRADE showed low quality of evidence because of poor study design and high heterogeneity. Also for some key areas such as floods, droughts and other weather extremes, there are no adequate systematic reviews of potential public health interventions. Conclusion In conclusion, we found the evidence base to be mostly weak for environmental interventions that could have the most value in a warmer world. Nevertheless, such interventions should not be dismissed. Future research on public health interventions for climate change adaptation needs to be concerned about quality in study design and should address the gap for floods, droughts and other extreme weather events that pose a risk to health. PMID:23634220

Bouzid, Maha; Hooper, Lee; Hunter, Paul R.

2013-01-01

338

Interventions for the treatment of stretch marks: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Stretch marks are a common disfiguring skin condition that can have a deep psychological impact on affected patients. Although there are a variety of treatments available, no consistently effective therapies have been established. In this systematic review, we evaluate 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy and safety of currently available therapies for the treatment of stretch marks. Due to the limited number of patients and high or unclear risk of bias in the studies included in this assessment, the evidence from this review is insufficient to provide clear guidelines for practice. Therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:25184641

Liu, Liping; Ma, Hong; Li, Yumei

2014-08-01

339

School scoliosis screening programme-a systematic review.  

PubMed

A systematic review on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of school scoliosis screening programme was carried out. A total of 248 relevant titles were identified, 117 abstracts were screened and 28 articles were included in the results. There was fair level of evidence to suggest that school scoliosis screening programme is safe, contributed to early detection and reduction of surgery. There was also evidence to suggest that school-based scoliosis screening programme is cost-effective. Based on the above review, screening for scoliosis among school children is recommended only for high risk group such as girls at twelve years of age. PMID:21901941

Sabirin, J; Bakri, R; Buang, S N; Abdullah, A T; Shapie, A

2010-12-01

340

The treatment of depression in cancer patients: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goals of the work:  To evaluate the efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments for depression in cancer populations.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods:  The Supportive Care Guidelines Group conducted a systematic review of the published literature through June 2005. Search sources\\u000a includes MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library. Comparative studies of treatments for depression in\\u000a cancer patients were selected for review by

Gary Rodin; Nancy Lloyd; Mark Katz; Esther Green; Jean A. Mackay; Rebecca K. S. Wong

2007-01-01

341

Conceptualizing prognostic awareness in advanced cancer: a systematic review.  

PubMed

This systematic review synthesizes the complex literature on prognostic awareness in cancer. A total of 37 studies examining cancer patients' understanding of their prognosis were included. Prognostic awareness definitions and assessment methods were inconsistent across studies. A surprisingly high percentage of patients (up to 75%) were unaware of their poor prognosis, and in several studies, even their cancer diagnosis (up to 96%), particularly in studies conducted outside of North America. This review highlights surprisingly low rates of prognostic awareness in patients with advanced cancer as well as discrepancies in prognostic awareness assessment, suggesting the need for empirically validated measures of prognostic awareness. PMID:24157936

Applebaum, Allison J; Kolva, Elissa A; Kulikowski, Julia R; Jacobs, Jordana D; DeRosa, Antonio; Lichtenthal, Wendy G; Olden, Megan E; Rosenfeld, Barry; Breitbart, William

2014-09-01

342

Computer-aided planning in orthognathic surgery-systematic review.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the accuracy and benefits of computer-aided planning in orthognathic surgery. The search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS, and SciELO. The articles identified were assessed independently and in a blinded manner by two authors using selection criteria and eligibility criteria. The database search yielded 375 studies. Following the application of search and eligibility criteria, a final nine studies were included in the systematic review. The level of agreement between the authors in the study selection process was substantial (?=0.767) and study eligibility was considered excellent (?=0.863). The accuracy of translation was <1.2mm in the maxilla (vertical) and <1.1mm in the mandible (sagittal), and for rotation was <1.5° in the maxilla (pitch) and <1.8° in the mandible (pitch). Two studies showed a medium potential risk of bias and six studies showed a high potential risk of bias. Computer-aided planning in orthognathic surgery was considered accurate for the studies included in this systematic review. However, the low quality of these studies means that randomized clinical trials are needed to compare computer-aided planning to conventional planning in orthognathic surgery. PMID:25432508

Haas Jr, O L; Becker, O E; de Oliveira, R B

2014-11-25

343

Effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine: systematic review.  

PubMed

Acupuncture is a popular complementary treatment option in human medicine. Increasingly, owners also seek acupuncture for their animals. The aim of the systematic review reported here was to summarize and assess the clinical evidence for or against the effectiveness of acupuncture in veterinary medicine. Systematic searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, Cinahl, Japana Centra Revuo Medicina and Chikusan Bunken Kensaku. Hand-searches included conference proceedings, bibliographies, and contact with experts and veterinary acupuncture associations. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. All controlled clinical trials testing acupuncture in any condition of domestic animals were included. Studies using laboratory animals were excluded. Titles and abstracts of identified articles were read, and hard copies were obtained. Inclusion and exclusion of studies, data extraction, and validation were performed independently by two reviewers. Methodologic quality was evaluated by means of the Jadad score. Fourteen randomized controlled trials and 17 nonrandomized controlled trials met our criteria and were, therefore, included. The methodologic quality of these trials was variable but, on average, was low. For cutaneous pain and diarrhea, encouraging evidence exists that warrants further investigation in rigorous trials. Single studies reported some positive intergroup differences for spinal cord injury, Cushing's syndrome, lung function, hepatitis, and rumen acidosis. These trials require independent replication. On the basis of the findings of this systematic review, there is no compelling evidence to recommend or reject acupuncture for any condition in domestic animals. Some encouraging data do exist that warrant further investigation in independent rigorous trials. PMID:16734078

Habacher, Gabriele; Pittler, Max H; Ernst, Edzard

2006-01-01

344

From Systematic Reviews to Clinical Recommendations for Evidence-Based Health Care: Validation of Revised Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (R-AMSTAR) for Grading of Clinical Relevance  

PubMed Central

Research synthesis seeks to gather, examine and evaluate systematically research reports that converge toward answering a carefully crafted research question, which states the problem patient population, the intervention under consideration, and the clinical outcome of interest. The product of the process of systematically reviewing the research literature pertinent to the research question thusly stated is the “systematic review”. The objective and transparent approach of the systematic review aims to minimize bias. Most systematic reviews yield quantitative analyses of measurable data (e.g., acceptable sampling analysis, meta-analysis). Systematic reviews may also be qualitative, while adhering to accepted standards for gathering, evaluating, and reporting evidence. Systematic reviews provide highly rated recommendations for evidence-based health care; but, systematic reviews are not equally reliable and successful in minimizing bias. Several instruments are available to evaluate the quality of systematic reviews. The 'assessment of multiple systematic reviews' (AMSTAR) was derived from factor analysis of the most relevant items among them. AMSTAR consists of eleven items with good face and content validity for measuring the methodological quality of systematic reviews, has been widely accepted and utilized, and has gained in reliability, reproducibility. AMSTAR does not produce quantifiable assessments of systematic review quality and clinical relevance. In this study, we have revised the AMSTAR instrument, detracting nothing from its content and construct validity, and utilizing the very criteria employed in the development of the original tool, with the aim of yielding an instrument that can quantify the quality of systematic reviews. We present validation data of the revised AMSTAR (R-AMSTAR), and discuss its implications and application in evidence-based health care. PMID:21088686

Kung, Jason; Chiappelli, Francesco; Cajulis, Olivia O; Avezova, Raisa; Kossan, George; Chew, Laura; Maida, Carl A

2010-01-01

345

Selected References for Medical Writing & Reviewing American Medical Association. (2007). Manual of Style (10th  

E-print Network

Selected References for Medical Writing & Reviewing American Medical Association. (2007). Manual of Style (10th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press. American Psychological Association. (2010). Concise Rules of APA Style (6th Edition).Washington DC: Author. American Psychological Association. (2010

Ward, Karen

346

78 FR 12764 - Draft Office of Health Assessment and Translation Approach for Systematic Review and Evidence...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Institutes of Health Draft Office of Health Assessment and Translation Approach for Systematic Review and Evidence Integration for...public comments on the Draft Office of Health Assessment and Translation (OHAT) Approach for Systematic Review and Evidence...

2013-02-25

347

Introduction to the medication regimen review--Part 1.  

PubMed

The medication regimen review is considered the core activity of the consultant pharmacist. This article, the first in a series of three, will provide an introduction and overview of the medication regimen review. Goals of the MRR will be presented, along with a discussion of the different types of MRR. The importance of focusing on the values, priorities, and goals of each individual patient is emphasized. Other articles in this series will provide more specifics about the medication regimen review process. PMID:21138820

Clark, Thomas R; Gruber, Joseph; Martin, Harlan

2010-11-01

348

What implementation interventions increase cancer screening rates? a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Appropriate screening may reduce the mortality and morbidity of colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers. However, effective implementation strategies are warranted if the full benefits of screening are to be realized. As part of a larger agenda to create an implementation guideline, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate interventions designed to increase the rate of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. The interventions considered were: client reminders, client incentives, mass media, small media, group education, one-on-one education, reduction in structural barriers, reduction in out-of-pocket costs, provider assessment and feedback interventions, and provider incentives. Our primary outcome, screening completion, was calculated as the overall median post-intervention absolute percentage point (PP) change in completed screening tests. Methods Our first step was to conduct an iterative scoping review in the research area. This yielded three relevant high-quality systematic reviews. Serving as our evidentiary foundation, we conducted a formal update. Randomized controlled trials and cluster randomized controlled trials, published between 2004 and 2010, were searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHinfo. Results The update yielded 66 studies new eligible studies with 74 comparisons. The new studies ranged considerably in quality. Client reminders, small media, and provider audit and feedback appear to be effective interventions to increase the uptake of screening for three cancers. One-on-one education and reduction of structural barriers also appears effective, but their roles with CRC and cervical screening, respectively, are less established. More study is required to assess client incentives, mass media, group education, reduction of out-of-pocket costs, and provider incentive interventions. Conclusion The new evidence generally aligns with the evidence and conclusions from the original systematic reviews. This review served as the evidentiary foundation for an implementation guideline. Poor reporting, lack of precision and consistency in defining operational elements, and insufficient consideration of context and differences among populations are areas for additional research. PMID:21958556

2011-01-01

349

Methodological developments in searching for studies for systematic reviews: past, present and future?  

PubMed

The Cochrane Collaboration was established in 1993, following the opening of the UK Cochrane Centre in 1992, at a time when searching for studies for inclusion in systematic reviews was not well-developed. Review authors largely conducted their own searches or depended on medical librarians, who often possessed limited awareness and experience of systematic reviews. Guidance on the conduct and reporting of searches was limited. When work began to identify reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for inclusion in Cochrane Reviews in 1992, there were only approximately 20,000 reports indexed as RCTs in MEDLINE and none indexed as RCTs in Embase. No search filters had been developed with the aim of identifying all RCTs in MEDLINE or other major databases. This presented The Cochrane Collaboration with a considerable challenge in identifying relevant studies.Over time, the number of studies indexed as RCTs in the major databases has grown considerably and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) has become the best single source of published controlled trials, with approximately 700,000 records, including records identified by the Collaboration from Embase and MEDLINE. Search filters for various study types, including systematic reviews and the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategies for RCTs, have been developed. There have been considerable advances in the evidence base for methodological aspects of information retrieval. The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions now provides detailed guidance on the conduct and reporting of searches. Initiatives across The Cochrane Collaboration to improve the quality inter alia of information retrieval include: the recently introduced Methodological Expectations for Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) programme, which stipulates 'mandatory' and 'highly desirable' standards for various aspects of review conduct and reporting including searching, the development of Standard Training Materials for Cochrane Reviews and work on peer review of electronic search strategies. Almost all Cochrane Review Groups and some Cochrane Centres and Fields now have a Trials Search Co-ordinator responsible for study identification and medical librarians and other information specialists are increasingly experienced in searching for studies for systematic reviews.Prospective registration of clinical trials is increasing and searching trials registers is now mandatory for Cochrane Reviews, where relevant. Portals such as the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) are likely to become increasingly attractive, given concerns about the number of trials which may not be registered and/or published. The importance of access to information from regulatory and reimbursement agencies is likely to increase. Cross-database searching, gateways or portals and improved access to full-text databases will impact on how searches are conducted and reported, as will services such as Google Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science. Technologies such as textual analysis, semantic analysis, text mining and data linkage will have a major impact on the search process but efficient and effective updating of reviews may remain a challenge.In twenty years' time, we envisage that the impact of universal social networking, as well as national and international legislation, will mean that all trials involving humans will be registered at inception and detailed trial results will be routinely available to all. Challenges will remain, however, to ensure the discoverability of relevant information in diverse and often complex sources and the availability of metadata to provide the most efficient access to information. We envisage an ongoing role for information professionals as experts in identifying new resources, researching efficient ways to link or mine them for relevant data and managing their content for the efficient production of systematic reviews. PMID:24066664

Lefebvre, Carol; Glanville, Julie; Wieland, L Susan; Coles, Bernadette; Weightman, Alison L

2013-01-01

350

Overview of Evidence in Prevention and Aetiology of Food Allergy: A Review of Systematic Reviews  

PubMed Central

The worldwide prevalence of food allergy appears to be increasing. Early life environmental factors are implicated in the aetiology of this global epidemic. The largest burden of disease is in early childhood, where research efforts aimed at prevention have been focused. Evidence synthesis from good quality systematic reviews is needed. We performed an overview of systematic reviews concerning the prevention and aetiology of food allergy, retrieving 14 systematic reviews, which covered three broad topics: formula (hydrolysed or soy) for the prevention of food allergy or food sensitization; maternal and infant diet and dietary supplements for the prevention of food allergy or food sensitization and hygiene hypothesis-related interventions. Using the AMSTAR criteria for assessment of methodological quality, we found five reviews to be of high quality, seven of medium quality and two of low quality. Overall we found no compelling evidence that any of the interventions that had been systematically reviewed were related to the risk of food allergy. Updating of existing reviews, and production of new systematic reviews, are needed in areas where evidence is emerging for interventions and environmental associations. Furthermore, additional primary studies, with greater numbers of participants and objective food allergy definitions are urgently required. PMID:24192789

Lodge, Caroline J.; Allen, Katrina J.; Lowe, Adrian J.; Dharmage, Shyamali C.

2013-01-01

351

Systematic review of reviews of behavioural HIV prevention interventions among men who have sex with men.  

PubMed

Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain one of the groups most at risk of HIV. The growing evidence-base on behavioural HIV prevention interventions includes systematic review-level evidence, including reviews specific to MSM populations. Here, we provide an up-to-date review of these systematic reviews in which we examined the effectiveness of behavioural HIV prevention interventions among MSM. A systematic search of electronic databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PsycInfo, from January 2000 to October 2010, along with hand searches of the reference lists of retrieved documents were conducted. Inclusion criteria included: study design limited to systematic reviews and meta-analyses; methodological quality; and review to focus on MSM and behavioural interventions. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Across the four included meta-analyses (102 studies; 52 independent studies), there was strong and consistent evidence for group- and community-level interventions being associated with reductions in UAI (27-30% and 30%, respectively) and increases in condom use amongst MSM, but inconsistent evidence for the effectiveness of individual-level interventions. Skills-building, trained professionals delivering the training and theory-based interventions were also consistently effective. The inherent limitations of the review of review method within a changing health domain meant it was difficult to develop contemporary and directly transferable guidance to HIV prevention policy development. However, the analysis does demonstrate a need for a step change in the kinds of data that are collated in the development of future systematic reviews of HIV prevention interventions among MSM. PMID:22774763

Lorimer, Karen; Kidd, Lisa; Lawrence, Maggie; McPherson, Kerri; Cayless, Sandi; Cornish, Flora

2013-01-01

352

Ischemic cardiovascular involvement in psoriasis: a systematic review.  

PubMed

Epidemiologic studies demonstrate that psoriasis is associated with shorter life expectancy, most frequently attributable to cardiovascular (CV) events. Although increased prevalence and incidence of CV risk factors for atherosclerosis have been reported in psoriatic patients, psoriasis likely plays an independent role in the increased cardiovascular risk, presumably linked to the chronic systemic inflammatory state. Consistently, preliminary investigations suggest that anti-inflammatory therapies may improve early subclinical vascular alterations and reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on ischemic CV involvement in psoriatic patients, summarizing the prevalence and incidence of CV risk factors and CV events, as well as evidence on mechanisms of premature atherosclerosis and on effects of systemic anti-inflammatory therapies on CV risk profile. We performed a systematic review using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) and evaluated the quality of studies comparing drug treatments using Detsky score. Our review documented that psoriatic patients are at increased CV risk, related to raised prevalence and incidence of CV risk factor and to inflammatory status. However, available literature lacks of studies that establish appropriate targets for CV risk factors and assess the clinical value of screening for subclinical organ damage and the impact of disease-modifying therapies on CV risk profile in psoriatic patients. Awareness of raised CV risk in psoriatic patients should foster further research aimed at elucidating these aspects. PMID:25464252

Mosca, Susanna; Gargiulo, Paola; Balato, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Luisa; Parente, Antonio; Paolillo, Stefania; Ayala, Fabio; Trimarco, Bruno; Crea, Filippo; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

2015-01-15

353

Reducing systematic review workload through certainty-based screening.  

PubMed

In systematic reviews, the growing number of published studies imposes a significant screening workload on reviewers. Active learning is a promising approach to reduce the workload by automating some of the screening decisions, but it has been evaluated for a limited number of disciplines. The suitability of applying active learning to complex topics in disciplines such as social science has not been studied, and the selection of useful criteria and enhancements to address the data imbalance problem in systematic reviews remains an open problem. We applied active learning with two criteria (certainty and uncertainty) and several enhancements in both clinical medicine and social science (specifically, public health) areas, and compared the results in both. The results show that the certainty criterion is useful for finding relevant documents, and weighting positive instances is promising to overcome the data imbalance problem in both data sets. Latent dirichlet allocation (LDA) is also shown to be promising when little manually-assigned information is available. Active learning is effective in complex topics, although its efficiency is limited due to the difficulties in text classification. The most promising criterion and weighting method are the same regardless of the review topic, and unsupervised techniques like LDA have a possibility to boost the performance of active learning without manual annotation. PMID:24954015

Miwa, Makoto; Thomas, James; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Ananiadou, Sophia

2014-10-01

354

Lifestyle risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Objective To systematically review the literature for evidence of smoking and alcohol intake as independent risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Design Systematic review. Methods MEDLINE (1946—May 2012) and EMBASE (1947—May 2012) were searched for studies investigating alcohol or smoking as risk factors for acquiring IPD and which reported results as relative risk. Studies conducted exclusively in clinical risk groups, those assessing risk factors for outcomes other than acquisition of IPD and studies describing risk factors without quantifying a relative risk were excluded. Results Seven observational studies were identified and reviewed; owing to the heterogeneity of study design, meta-analysis was not attempted. Five of six studies investigating smoking reported an increased risk of IPD in the range 2.2–4.1. Four of the six studies investigating alcohol intake reported a significant increased risk for IPD ranging from 2.9 to 11.4, while one reported a significant protective effect. Conclusions Overall, these observational data suggest that smoking and alcohol misuse may increase the risk of IPD in adults, but the magnitude of this risk remains unclear and should be explored with further research. The findings of this review will contribute to the debate on whether pneumococcal vaccine should be offered to smokers and people who misuse alcohol in addition to other clinically defined risk groups. PMID:24951110

Cruickshank, Helen C; Jefferies, Johanna M; Clarke, Stuart C

2014-01-01

355

Occupational therapy and return to work: a systematic literature review  

PubMed Central

Background The primary aim of this review study was to gather evidence on the effectiveness in terms of return to work (RTW) of occupational therapy interventions (OTIs) in rehabilitation patients with non-congenital disorders. A secondary aim was to be able to select the most efficient OTI. Methods A systematic literature review of peer-reviewed papers was conducted using electronic databases (Cinahl, Cochrane Library, Ebsco, Medline (Pubmed), and PsycInfo). The search focussed on randomised controlled trials and cohort studies published in English from 1980 until September 2010. Scientific validity of the studies was assessed. Results Starting from 1532 papers with pertinent titles, six studies met the quality criteria. Results show systematic reviewing of OTIs on RTW was challenging due to varying populations, different outcome measures, and poor descriptions of methodology. There is evidence that OTIs as part of rehabilitation programs, increase RTW rates, although the methodological evidence of most studies is weak. Conclusions Analysis of the selected papers indicated that OTIs positively influence RTW; two studies described precisely what the content of their OTI was. In order to identify the added value of OTIs on RTW, studies with well-defined OT intervention protocols are necessary. PMID:21810228

2011-01-01

356

A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

1989-01-01

357

Steroids as Adjuvant Therapy for Acute Pharyngitis in Ambulatory Patients: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE This review summarizes the evidence regarding the efficacy of adjuvant steroids for pain reduction in acute pharyngitis. METHODS We searched for randomized controlled trials, using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, published between 1966 and December 2008. Two reviewers assessed the quality of each retrieved article and summarized the data. RESULTS Our review found 8 relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a total of 806 patients. There were 5 RCTs with adult patients and 3 with children. All RCTs found a statistically significant faster reduction of pain or complete pain relief from steroid use compared with placebo. The trials used different steroids (dexamethasone, betamethasone, prednisone), and most participants had received antibiotics at least initially. Analgesic medication, such as acetaminophen, was allowed in all studies, but this factor was not always controlled. No serious adverse side effects were reported. CONCLUSIONS Steroids are effective in relieving pain in acute pharyngitis. Although no serious adverse effects were observed, the benefits have to be balanced with possible adverse drug effects. There are safe and effective over-the-counter medications to relieve throat pain. Most patients received concomitant antibiotics; however, reducing the prescription of antibiotics for generally benign upper respiratory tract infection is a public health goal. We therefore recommend further studies to establish both the safety of steroids without antibiotic coverage and the additional benefits of steroids when used with regular administration of over-the-counter analgesic medications. PMID:20065280

Korb, Katrin; Scherer, Martin; Chenot, Jean-François

2010-01-01

358

Vitamin D-related changes in physical performance: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The objective of this study was to systematically review all the published articles examining the effects of low serum vitamin\\u000a D concentration and vitamin D supplementation on muscle, balance and gait performance among people aged 65 and older.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  An English and French Medline search ranging from January 2004 to November 2008 indexed under the Medical Subject Heading\\u000a (MeSH) terms “aged

C. Annweiler; A.-M. Schott; G. Berrut; B. Fantino; Olivier Beauche

359

Vitamin D-related changes in physical performance: A systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The objective of this study was to systematically review all the published articles examining the effects of low serum vitamin\\u000a D concentration and vitamin D supplementation on muscle, balance and gait performance among people aged 65 and older.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  An English and French Medline search ranging from January 2004 to November 2008 indexed under the Medical Subject Heading\\u000a (MeSH) terms “aged

C. Annweiler; A.-M. Schott; G. Berrut; B. Fantino; Olivier Beauchet

2009-01-01

360

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation to treat respiratory failure resulting from exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To determine the effectiveness of non›invasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in the management of respiratory failure secondary to acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Design Systematic review of randomised controlled trials that compared NPPV and usual medical care with usual medical care alone in patients admitted to hospital with respiratory failure resulting from an exacerbation of chronic obstructive

Josephine V Lightowler; Mark W Elliott

2003-01-01

361

Drug treatment of inborn errors of metabolism: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background The treatment of inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) has seen significant advances over the last decade. Many medicines have been developed and the survival rates of some patients with IEM have improved. Dosages of drugs used for the treatment of various IEM can be obtained from a range of sources but tend to vary among these sources. Moreover, the published dosages are not usually supported by the level of existing evidence, and they are commonly based on personal experience. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify key material published in English in relation to the dosages of medicines used for specific IEM. Textbooks, peer reviewed articles, papers and other journal items were identified. The PubMed and Embase databases were searched for material published since 1947 and 1974, respectively. The medications found and their respective dosages were graded according to their level of evidence, using the grading system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Results 83 medicines used in various IEM were identified. The dosages of 17 medications (21%) had grade 1 level of evidence, 61 (74%) had grade 4, two medications were in level 2 and 3 respectively, and three had grade 5. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this matter and the authors hope that it will serve as a quickly accessible reference for medications used in this important clinical field. PMID:23532493

Alfadhel, Majid; Al-Thihli, Khalid; Moubayed, Hiba; Eyaid, Wafaa; Al-Jeraisy, Majed

2013-01-01

362

The effectiveness of interventions for reducing stigma related to substance use disorders: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Aims This study provides a systematic review of existing research that has empirically evaluated interventions designed to reduce stigma related to substance use disorders. Methods A comprehensive review of electronic databases was conducted to identify evaluations of substance use disorder related stigma interventions. Studies that met inclusion criteria were synthesized and assessed using systematic review methods. Results Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the studies was moderately strong. Interventions of three studies (23%) focused on people with substance use disorders (self-stigma), three studies (23%) targeted the general public (social stigma) and seven studies (54%) focused on medical students and other professional groups (structural stigma). Nine interventions (69%) used approaches that included education and/or direct contact with people who have substance use disorders. All but one study indicated their interventions produced positive effects on at least one stigma outcome measure. None of the interventions have been evaluated across different settings or populations. Conclusions A range of interventions demonstrate promise for achieving meaningful improvements in stigma related to substance use disorders. The limited evidence indicates that self-stigma can be reduced through therapeutic interventions such as group-based acceptance and commitment therapy. Effective strategies for addressing social stigma include motivational interviewing and communicating positive stories of people with substance use disorders. For changing stigma at a structural level, contact-based training and education programs targeting medical students and professionals (e.g. police, counsellors) are effective. PMID:21815959

Livingston, James D; Milne, Teresa; Fang, Mei Lan; Amari, Erica

2012-01-01

363

Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks - a systematic review.  

PubMed

Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks has been examined in several studies and reviews, but so far, no studies have successfully applied a systematic approach. In the present systematic review, we examined the need of follow-up after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) - diagnosed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy or Goldmann 3-mirror examination - with regard to retinal breaks as well as the indication of prophylactic treatment in asymptomatic and symptomatic breaks. A total of 2941 publications were identified with PubMed and Medline searches. Two manual search strategies were used for papers in English published before 2012. Four levels of screening identified 13 studies suitable for inclusion in this systematic review. No meta-analysis was conducted as no data suitable for statistical analysis were identified. In total, the initial examination after symptomatic PVD identified 85-95% of subsequent retinal breaks. Additional retinal breaks were only revealed at follow-up in patients where a full retinal examination was compromised at presentation by, for example, vitreous haemorrhage. Asymptomatic and symptomatic retinal breaks progressed to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in 0-13.8% and 35-47% of cases, respectively. The cumulated incidence of RRD despite prophylactic treatment was 2.1-8.8%. The findings in this review suggest that follow-up after symptomatic PVD is only necessary in cases of incomplete retinal examination at presentation. Prophylactic treatment of symptomatic retinal breaks must be considered, whereas no unequivocal conclusion could be reached with regard to prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic retinal breaks. PMID:24853827

Blindbaek, Søren; Grauslund, Jakob

2015-02-01

364

Palinopsia revamped: A systematic review of the literature.  

PubMed

Palinopsia, the persistence or recurrence of visual images after the stimulus has been removed, is a nonspecific term that describes multiple types of visual symptoms with a wide variety of etiologies. For example, palinopsia may be the presenting symptom of a potentially life-threatening posterior cortical lesion, yet it may also be a benign medication side effect. We comprehensively review all published cases and subdivide palinopsia into two clinically relevant categories: illusory palinopsia and hallucinatory palinopsia. PMID:25113609

Gersztenkorn, David; Lee, Andrew G

365

Patient Web Portals to Improve Diabetes Outcomes: A Systematic Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patient web portals (PWPs), defined as the integration of electronic medical records and patient health records, have been\\u000a related to enhanced patient outcomes. A literature review was conducted to characterize the design and evaluation of PWPs\\u000a to improve health care processes and outcomes in diabetes. A summary of 26 articles revealed the positive impact PWPs have\\u000a on patient outcomes, patient-provider

Chandra Y. Osborn; Lindsay Satterwhite Mayberry; Shelagh A. Mulvaney; Rachel Hess

2010-01-01

366

Metadherin in prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Metadherin (MTDH) has been identified as an important oncogene in carcinogenesis, tumor progression and metastasis in numerous malignancies, through signal transduction pathways. MTDH is a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in cancers. The present systematic review was performed to search for studies regarding MTDH and prostate, bladder and kidney cancer using several databases and the eligible studies were reviewed. MTDH expression was found to significantly increase in prostate, bladder and kidney cancers, not only in clinical tissue samples, but also in cancer cell lines. Reviewing the clinical and statistical analysis revealed that MTDH may be involved in urologic cancer progression, metastasis and prognosis. MTDH may be an independent or one of the cofactors in urologic cancers for prediction of patient survival, and may be involved in potential anticancer strategies. MTDH may be associated with several signal transduction pathways in urologic cancers, indicating latent targets to develop anticancer therapeutic strategy. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25279212

WANG, ZHAO; WEI, YONG-BAO; GAO, YUN-LIANG; YAN, BIN; YANG, JIN-RUI; GUO, QIONG

2014-01-01

367

A Systematic Review of Risk Factors for Intimate Partner Violence  

PubMed Central

A systematic review of risk factors for intimate partner violence was conducted. Inclusion criteria included publication in a peer-reviewed journal, a representative community sample or a clinical sample with a control-group comparison, a response rate of at least 50%, use of a physical or sexual violence outcome measure, and control of confounding factors in the analyses. A total of 228 articles were included (170 articles with adult and 58 with adolescent samples). Organized by levels of a dynamic developmental systems perspective, risk factors included: (a) contextual characteristics of partners (demographic, neighborhood, community and school factors), (b) developmental characteristics and behaviors of the partners (e.g., family, peer, psychological/behavioral, and cognitive factors), and (c) relationship influences and interactional patterns. Comparisons to a prior review highlight developments in the field in the past 10 years. Recommendations for intervention and policy along with future directions for intimate partner violence (IPV) risk factor research are presented. PMID:22754606

Capaldi, Deborah M.; Knoble, Naomi B.; Shortt, Joann Wu; Kim, Hyoun K.

2012-01-01

368

Translating Medical Effectiveness Research into Policy: Lessons from the California Health Benefits Review Program  

PubMed Central

Context: Legislatures and executive branch agencies in the United States and other nations are increasingly using reviews of the medical literature to inform health policy decisions. To clarify these efforts to give policymakers evidence of medical effectiveness, this article discusses the California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP). This program, based at the University of California, analyzes the medical effectiveness of health insurance benefit mandate bills for the California legislature, as well as their impact on cost and public health. Methods: This article is based on the authors’ experience reviewing benefit mandate bills for CHBRP and findings from evaluations of the program. General observations are illustrated with examples from CHBRP's reports. Information about efforts to incorporate evidence into health policymaking in other states and nations was obtained through a review of published literature. Findings: CHBRP produces reports that California legislators, legislative staff, and other major stakeholders value and use routinely in deliberations about benefit mandate bills. Where available, the program relies on previously published meta-analyses and systematic reviews to streamline the review of the medical literature. Faculty and staff responsible for the medical effectiveness sections of CHBRP's reports have learned four major lessons over the course of the program's six-year history: the need to (1) recognize the limitations of the medical literature, (2) anticipate the need to inform legislators about the complexity of evidence, (3) have realistic expectations regarding the impact of medical effectiveness reviews, and (4) understand the consequences of the reactive nature of mandated benefit reviews. Conclusions: CHBRP has demonstrated that it is possible to produce useful reviews of the medical literature within the tight time constraints of the legislative process. The program's reports have provided state legislators with independent analyses that allow them to move beyond sifting through conflicting information from proponents and opponents to consider difficult policy choices and their implications. PMID:20021589

Coffman, Janet M; Hong, Mi-Kyung; Aubry, Wade M; Luft, Harold S; Yelin, Edward

2009-01-01

369

New activities and changing roles of health sciences librarians: a systematic review, 1990–2012  

PubMed Central

Objective: The paper identifies and documents new health sciences librarian activities and roles during the period from 1990–2012. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, Library and Information Abstracts, Library Literature, Scopus, and Web of Science. To find new roles that might not yet have been described in the literature, job announcements published in the Medical Library Association email discussion list archives from 2008–2012 were searched. For inclusion, an article needed to contain a substantive description of a new role and/or activity performed by librarians and be in the field of medical or health sciences librarianship. Papers that did not describe an actual (rather than proposed) librarian role were excluded. Results: New roles identified through the literature search were: embedded librarians (such as clinical informationist, bioinformationist, public health informationist, disaster information specialist); systematic review librarian; emerging technologies librarian; continuing medical education librarian; grants development librarian; and data management librarian. New roles identified through job announcements were digital librarian, metadata librarian, scholarly communication librarian, and translational research librarian. New twists to old roles were also identified: clinical medical librarian, instruction librarian, outreach librarian, and consumer health librarian. Conclusions: While the main purposes of health sciences librarianship remain the same, the new roles represent major new activities so that, for many librarians, daily on-the-job work is completely different. Implications: This list of new activities should inform students contemplating medical librarianship careers, guide formal and continuing education programs, and encourage other librarians to consider these new services. PMID:24163598

Cooper, I. Diane; Crum, Janet A

2013-01-01

370

Investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews: a methodologic review of guidance in the literature  

PubMed Central

Background While there is some consensus on methods for investigating statistical and methodological heterogeneity, little attention has been paid to clinical aspects of heterogeneity. The objective of this study is to summarize and collate suggested methods for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Methods We searched databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CONSORT, to December 2010) and reference lists and contacted experts to identify resources providing suggestions for investigating clinical heterogeneity between controlled clinical trials included in systematic reviews. We extracted recommendations, assessed resources for risk of bias, and collated the recommendations. Results One hundred and one resources were collected, including narrative reviews, methodological reviews, statistical methods papers, and textbooks. These resources generally had a low risk of bias, but there was minimal consensus among them. Resources suggested that planned investigations of clinical heterogeneity should be made explicit in the protocol of the review; clinical experts should be included on the review team; a set of clinical covariates should be chosen considering variables from the participant level, intervention level, outcome level, research setting, or others unique to the research question; covariates should have a clear scientific rationale; there should be a sufficient number of trials per covariate; and results of any such investigations should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions Though the consensus was minimal, there were many recommendations in the literature for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Formal recommendations for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews of controlled trials are required. PMID:22846171

2012-01-01

371

Depression Treatment in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective: Depression has been linked to adverse coronary artery disease outcomes. Whether depression treatment improves or worsens coronary artery disease prognosis is unclear. This 25-year systematic review examines medical outcomes, and, secondarily, mood outcomes of depression treatment among patients with coronary artery disease. Data Sources: We systematically reviewed the past 25 years (January 1, 1986–December 31, 2011) of prospective trials reporting on the medical outcomes of depression treatment among patients with established coronary artery disease using keywords and MESH terms from OVID MEDLINE. Search 1 combined depression AND coronary artery disease AND antidepressants. Search 2 combined depression AND coronary artery disease AND psychotherapy. Search 3 combined depression AND revascularization AND antidepressants OR psychotherapy. Study Selection: English-language longitudinal randomized controlled trials, with at least 50 depressed coronary artery disease patients, reporting the impact of psychotherapy and/or antidepressants on cardiac and mood outcomes were included. Data Extraction: Data extracted included author name, year published, number of participants, enrollment criteria, depression definition/measures (standardized interviews, rating scales), power analyses, description of control arms and interventions (psychotherapy and/or medications), randomization, blinding, follow-up duration, follow-up loss, depression scores, and medical outcomes Results: The review yielded 10 trials. Antidepressant and/or psychotherapy did not significantly influence coronary artery disease outcomes in the overall population, but most studies were underpowered. There was a trend toward worse coronary artery disease outcomes after treatment with bupropion. Conclusions: After an acute coronary syndrome, depression often spontaneously remitted without treatment. Post–acute coronary syndrome persistence of depression predicted adverse coronary artery disease outcomes. Antidepressant and/or psychotherapy, particularly as part of the Coronary Psychosocial Evaluation Studies intervention, may improve prognosis in persistent depression among post–acute coronary syndrome patients. Noradrenergic antidepressants should be prescribed cautiously in patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:24511449

Trejo, Edgardo; Faraone, Stephen V.

2013-01-01

372

Landslide Susceptibility Statistical Methods: A Critical and Systematic Literature Review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Landslide susceptibility assessment, the subject of this systematic review, is aimed at understanding the spatial probability of slope failures under a set of geomorphological and environmental conditions. It is estimated that about 375 landslides that occur globally each year are fatal, with around 4600 people killed per year. Past studies have brought out the increasing cost of landslide damages which primarily can be attributed to human occupation and increased human activities in the vulnerable environments. Many scientists, to evaluate and reduce landslide risk, have made an effort to efficiently map landslide susceptibility using different statistical methods. In this paper, we do a critical and systematic landslide susceptibility literature review, in terms of the different statistical methods used. For each of a broad set of studies reviewed we note: (i) study geography region and areal extent, (ii) landslide types, (iii) inventory type and temporal period covered, (iv) mapping technique (v) thematic variables used (vi) statistical models, (vii) assessment of model skill, (viii) uncertainty assessment methods, (ix) validation methods. We then pulled out broad trends within our review of landslide susceptibility, particularly regarding the statistical methods. We found that the most common statistical methods used in the study of landslide susceptibility include logistic regression, artificial neural network, discriminant analysis and weight of evidence. Although most of the studies we reviewed assessed the model skill, very few assessed model uncertainty. In terms of geographic extent, the largest number of landslide susceptibility zonations were in Turkey, Korea, Spain, Italy and Malaysia. However, there are also many landslides and fatalities in other localities, particularly India, China, Philippines, Nepal and Indonesia, Guatemala, and Pakistan, where there are much fewer landslide susceptibility studies available in the peer-review literature. This raises some concern that existing studies do not always cover all the regions globally that currently experience landslides and landslide fatalities.

Mihir, Monika; Malamud, Bruce; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca

2014-05-01

373

Anorexia nervosa and body fat distribution: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry-Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738). PMID:25251296

El Ghoch, Marwan; Calugi, Simona; Lamburghini, Silvia; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

2014-09-01

374

Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry—Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738). PMID:25251296

El Ghoch, Marwan; Calugi, Simona; Lamburghini, Silvia; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

2014-01-01

375

Complications after percutaneous ablation of liver tumors: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background Although ablation therapy has been accepted as a promising and safe technique for treatment of unrespectable hepatic tumors, investigation of its complications has been limited. A physician who performs ablation treatment of hepatic malignancies should be aware of the broad spectrum of complications. Proper management is possible only if the physician Performing ablation understands the broad spectrum of complications encountered after ablation. Objectives To systematically review the complications after different ablation modalities: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA) and Nano knife for the treatment of liver tumors and analyze possible risk factors that precipitate these complications. Search methods We performed electronic searches in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHARNE. Current trials were identified through the Internet (from January 1, 2000 to January 1, 2014). We included only studies who specific mentioned complications after liver ablation therapy (RFA/MWA/Nano knife). Main results A total of 2,588 publications were identified, after detailed examination only 32 publications were included in the review. The included studies involved 15,744 participants. According to the type of technique, 13,044 and 2,700 patients were included for RFA and MWA. Analysis showed a pooled mortality of 0.15% for RFA, and 0.23% for MWA. Conclusions This systematic review gathers information from controlled clinical trials and observational studies which are vulnerable to different types of bias, never the less RFA and MWA can be considered safe techniques for the treatment of liver tumors. PMID:25392844

Lahat, Eylon; Eshkenazy, Rony; Zendel, Alex; Zakai, Barak Bar; Maor, Mayan; Dreznik, Yael

2014-01-01

376

Dedicated Spine Trauma Clinical Quality Registries: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Study Design?Systematic review. Objective?We assessed the current state of spine registries by collecting spine trauma data and assessing their compliance to defined registry standards of being clinical quality. We ascertained if these registries collected spinal cord injury data alone or with spine column trauma data. Methods?A systematic review was performed using MEDLINE and Embase databases for articles describing dedicated spinal cord and spine column databases published between January 1990 and April 2011. Correspondence with these registries was performed via e-mail or post. When no correspondence was possible, the registries were analyzed with best information available. Results?Three hundred eight full-text articles were reviewed. Of 41 registries identified, 20 registries fulfilled the criteria of being clinical quality. The main reason for failure to attain clinical quality designation was due to the unavailability of patient outcomes. Eight registries collected both spine column and spinal cord injury data with 33 collecting only traumatic spinal cord injury data. Conclusion?There is currently a paucity of clinical quality spine trauma registries. Clinical quality registries are important tools for demonstrating trends and outcomes, monitoring care quality, and resolving controversies in the management of spine trauma. An international spine trauma data set (containing both spinal cord and spine column injury data) and standardized approach to recording and analysis are needed to allow international multicenter collaboration and benchmarking. PMID:24436881

Tee, Jin W.; Chan, Patrick C. H.; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Gruen, Russell L.

2013-01-01

377

Genetic Association Studies in Lumbar Disc Degeneration: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

Objective Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990–2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. Results Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat), COL11A1 (rs1676486), GDF5 (rs143383), SKT (rs16924573), THBS2 (rs9406328) and MMP9 (rs17576). Conclusions Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration. PMID:23185509

Eskola, Pasi J.; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per; Solovieva, Svetlana; Männikkö, Minna; Tommerup, Niels; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Cheung, Kenneth M. C.; Chan, Danny

2012-01-01

378

A systematic review protocol: social network analysis of tobacco use  

PubMed Central

Background Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death in the world. Evidence indicates that behaviours such as tobacco use can influence social networks, and that social network structures can influence behaviours. Social network analysis provides a set of analytic tools to undertake methodical analysis of social networks. We will undertake a systematic review to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the literature regarding social network analysis and tobacco use. The review will answer the following research questions: among participants who use tobacco, does social network structure/position influence tobacco use? Does tobacco use influence peer selection? Does peer selection influence tobacco use? Methods We will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and search the following databases for relevant articles: CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Informit Health Collection; PsycINFO; PubMed/MEDLINE; Scopus/Embase; Web of Science; and the Wiley Online Library. Keywords include tobacco; smoking; smokeless; cigarettes; cigar and ‘social network’ and reference lists of included articles will be hand searched. Studies will be included that provide descriptions of social network analysis of tobacco use. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed method data that meets the inclusion criteria for the review, including methodological rigour, credibility and quality standards, will be synthesized using narrative synthesis. Results will be presented using outcome statistics that address each of the research questions. Discussion This systematic review will provide a timely evidence base on the role of social network analysis of tobacco use, forming a basis for future research, policy and practice in this area. This systematic review will synthesise the evidence, supporting the hypothesis that social network structures can influence tobacco use. This will also include exploring the relationship between social network structure, social network position, peer selection, peer influence and tobacco use across all age groups, and across different demographics. The research will increase our understanding of social networks and their impact on tobacco use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. PMID:25108616

2014-01-01

379

Isolated hypoganglionosis: systematic review of a rare intestinal innervation defect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Isolated hypoganglionosis (IH) is rare and resembles Hirschsprung’s disease. The diagnosis by suction biopsy is difficult.\\u000a A full-thickness biopsy is essential. Histological features of IH include sparse, small myenteric ganglia, low acetylcholinesterase\\u000a activity in the lamina propria, and hypertrophy of muscularis mucosae and circular muscle. This review investigates the epidemiology,\\u000a symptoms, diagnosis, and outcome of patients with IH.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A systematic

Jens Dingemann; Prem Puri

2010-01-01

380

Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome: systematic review of outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare and the most severe form of functional intestinal\\u000a obstruction in the newborn. This congenital condition is associated with non-obstructed urinary bladder, microcolon and decreased\\u000a or absent intestinal peristalsis. This study was designed to determine the incidence and outcome of MMIHS.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A systematic review of the literature (1976–2011) was performed for key

Jan-Hendrik Gosemann; Prem Puri

381

Estrogens in the breast tissue: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

The role of estrogens in breast carcinogenesis has been investigated at the level of whole body (plasma) and cell (molecular, receptors, etc.). Growing attention focused on the breast tissue being an intracrine organ, with potentially important local estrogen production in the breast. However, very little is known about the local breast tissue estrogen levels. Understanding the role of the tissue estrogens in breast carcinogenesis might open new avenues in breast cancer prevention. This systematic review summarizes published studies that measured local estrogen levels in the breast and offers suggestions for strategies to fill gaps in our existing scientific knowledge. PMID:21286801

Colditz, Graham A.

2013-01-01

382

Illness perceptions and work participation: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Self-regulatory processes play an important role in mediating between the disease and the health outcomes, and potentially\\u000a also work outcomes. This systematic review aims to explore the relationship between illness perceptions and work participation\\u000a in patients with somatic diseases and complaints.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The bibliographic databases Medline, PsycINFO and Embase were searched from inception to March 2008. Included were cross-sectional\\u000a or longitudinal

J. L. HovingM; M. van der Meer; A. Y. Volkova; M. H. W. Frings-Dresen

2010-01-01

383

The Value of Neuraminidase Inhibitors for the Prevention and Treatment of Seasonal Influenza: A Systematic Review of Systematic Reviews  

PubMed Central

Controversy has arisen regarding the effectiveness of neuraminidase inhibitors (NIs), especially against influenza-related complications. A literature search was performed to critically assess the evidence collected by the available systematic reviews (SRs) regarding the benefits and disadvantages of NIs (oseltamivir, zanamivir) compared to placebos in healthy and at-risk individuals of all ages for prophylaxis and treatment of seasonal influenza. A SR was done using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Health Technology Assessment Database, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Medline (January 2006–July 2012). Two reviewers selected SRs based on randomized clinical trials, which were restricted to intention-to-treat results, and they assessed review (AMSTAR) and study quality indicators (GRADE). The SRs included (N?=?9) were of high quality. The efficacy of NIs in prophylaxis ranged from 64% (16–85) to 92% (37–99); the absolute risk reduction ranged from 1.2% to 12.1% (GRADE moderate to low). Clinically relevant treatment benefits of NIs were small in healthy adults and children suffering from influenza-like illness (GRADE high to moderate). Oseltamivir reduced antibiotic usage in healthy adults according to one SR, but this was not confirmed by other reviews (GRADE low). Zanamivir showed a preventive effect on antibiotic usage in children (95% (77–99);GRADE moderate) and on the occurrence of bronchitis in at-risk individuals (59% (30–76);GRADE moderate). No evidence was available on the treatment benefits of NIs in elderly and at-risk groups and their effects on hospitalization and mortality. In oseltamivir trials, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea were significant side-effects. For zanamivir trials, no adverse effects have been reported. The combination of diagnostic uncertainty, the risk for virus strain resistance, possible side effects and financial cost outweigh the small benefits of oseltamivir or zanamivir for the prophylaxis and treatment of healthy individuals. No relevant benefits of these NIs on complications in at-risk individuals have been established. PMID:23565231

Michiels, Barbara; Van Puyenbroeck, Karolien; Verhoeven, Veronique; Vermeire, Etienne; Coenen, Samuel