Science.gov

Sample records for systems engineering overview

  1. Security systems engineering overview

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    Crime prevention is on the minds of most people today. The concern for public safety and the theft of valuable assets are being discussed at all levels of government and throughout the public sector. There is a growing demand for security systems that can adequately safeguard people and valuable assets against the sophistication of those criminals or adversaries who pose a threat. The crime in this country has been estimated at $70 billion in direct costs and up to $300 billion in indirect costs. Health insurance fraud alone is estimated to cost American businesses $100 billion. Theft, warranty fraud, and counterfeiting of computer hardware totaled $3 billion in 1994. A threat analysis is a prerequisite to any security system design to assess the vulnerabilities with respect to the anticipated threat. Having established a comprehensive definition of the threat, crime prevention, detection, and threat assessment technologies can be used to address these criminal activities. This talk will outline the process used to design a security system regardless of the level of security. This methodology has been applied to many applications including: government high security facilities; residential and commercial intrusion detection and assessment; anti-counterfeiting/fraud detection technologies (counterfeit currency, cellular phone billing, credit card fraud, health care fraud, passport, green cards, and questionable documents); industrial espionage detection and prevention (intellectual property, computer chips, etc.); and security barrier technology (creation of delay such as gates, vaults, etc.).

  2. Security systems engineering overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Basil J.

    1997-01-01

    Crime prevention is on the minds of most people today. The concern for public safety and the theft of valuable assets are being discussed at all levels of government and throughout the public sector. There is a growing demand for security systems that can adequately safeguard people and valuable assets against the sophistication of those criminals or adversaries who pose a threat. The crime in this country has been estimated at 70 billion dollars in direct costs and up to 300 billion dollars in indirect costs. Health insurance fraud alone is estimated to cost American businesses 100 billion dollars. Theft, warranty fraud, and counterfeiting of computer hardware totaled 3 billion dollars in 1994. A threat analysis is a prerequisite to any security system design to assess the vulnerabilities with respect to the anticipated threat. Having established a comprehensive definition of the threat, crime prevention, detection, and threat assessment technologies can be used to address these criminal activities. This talk will outline the process used to design a security system regardless of the level of security. This methodology has been applied to many applications including: government high security facilities; residential and commercial intrusion detection and assessment; anti-counterfeiting/fraud detection technologies; industrial espionage detection and prevention; security barrier technology.

  3. The MSFC Systems Engineering Guide: An Overview and Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelby, Jerry; Thomas, L. Dale

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the guiding vision, progress to date and the plan forward for development of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Systems Engineering Guide (SEG), a virtual systems engineering handbook and archive that describes the system engineering processes used by MSFC in the development of ongoing complex space systems such as the Ares launch vehicle and forthcoming ones as well. It is the intent of this website to be a "One Stop Shop' for MSFC systems engineers that will provide tutorial information, an overview of processes and procedures and links to assist system engineering with guidance and references, and provide an archive of relevant systems engineering artifacts produced by the many NASA projects developed and managed by MSFC over the years.

  4. The MSFC Systems Engineering Guide: An Overview and Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelby, Jerry A.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2007-01-01

    As systems and subsystems requirements become more complex in the pursuit of the exploration of space, advanced technology will demand and require an integrated approach to the design and development of safe and successful space vehicles and there products. System engineers play a vital and key role in transforming mission needs into vehicle requirements that can be verified and validated. This will result in a safe and cost effective design that will satisfy the mission schedule. A key to successful vehicle design within systems engineering is communication. Communication, through a systems engineering infrastructure, will not only ensure that customers and stakeholders are satisfied but will also assist in identifying vehicle requirements; i.e. identification, integration and management. This vehicle design will produce a system that is verifiable, traceable, and effectively satisfies cost, schedule, performance, and risk throughout the life-cycle of the product. A communication infrastructure will bring about the integration of different engineering disciplines within vehicle design. A system utilizing these aspects will enhance system engineering performance and improve upon required activities such as Development of Requirements, Requirements Management, Functional Analysis, Test, Synthesis, Trade Studies, Documentation, and Lessons Learned to produce a successful final product. This paper will describe the guiding vision, progress to date and the plan forward for development of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Systems Engineering Guide (SEG), a virtual systems engineering handbook and archive that will describe the system engineering processes that are used by MSFC in the development of complex systems such as the Ares launch vehicle. It is the intent of this website to be a "One Stop Shop" for our systems engineers that will provide tutorial information, an overview of processes and procedures and links to assist system engineering with guidance and

  5. Intelligent Systems for Aerospace Engineering: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Clancey, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Intelligent systems are nature-inspired, mathematically sound, computationally intensive problem solving tools and methodologies that have become extremely important for advancing the current trends in information technology. Artificially intelligent systems currently utilize computers to emulate various faculties of human intelligence and biological metaphors. They use a combination of symbolic and sub-symbolic systems capable of evolving human cognitive skills and intelligence, not just systems capable of doing things humans do not do well. Intelligent systems are ideally suited for tasks such as search and optimization, pattern recognition and matching, planning, uncertainty management, control, and adaptation. In this paper, the intelligent system technologies and their application potential are highlighted via several examples.

  6. Intelligent Systems For Aerospace Engineering: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    KrishnaKumar, K.

    2003-01-01

    Intelligent systems are nature-inspired, mathematically sound, computationally intensive problem solving tools and methodologies that have become extremely important for advancing the current trends in information technology. Artificially intelligent systems currently utilize computers to emulate various faculties of human intelligence and biological metaphors. They use a combination of symbolic and sub-symbolic systems capable of evolving human cognitive skills and intelligence, not just systems capable of doing things humans do not do well. Intelligent systems are ideally suited for tasks such as search and optimization, pattern recognition and matching, planning, uncertainty management, control, and adaptation. In this paper, the intelligent system technologies and their application potential are highlighted via several examples.

  7. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Systems Operation Overview and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benefield, Philip A.; Kan, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a large thrust class, reusable, staged combustion cycle rocket engine employing liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants. A cluster of three SSMEs is used on every space shuttle mission to propel the space shuttle orbiter vehicle into low earth orbit. Development of the SSME began in the early 70's and the first flight of the space shuttle occurred in 1981. Today, the SSME has accrued over one million seconds of ground test and flight operational time, launching 129 space shuttle missions. The systems operation of the SSME was developed and evolved to support the specific requirements of the Space Shuttle Program (SSP). This paper provides a systems operation overview of the SSME, including: engine cycle, propellant flowpaths, and major components; control system; operations during pre-start, start, mainstage, and shutdown phases; launch commit criteria (LCCs) and operational redlines. Furthermore, this paper will discuss how changes to the SSME over its history have impacted systems operations.

  8. The systems engineering overview and process (from the Systems Engineering Management Guide, 1990)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The past several decades have seen the rise of large, highly interactive systems that are on the forward edge of technology. As a result of this growth and the increased usage of digital systems (computers and software), the concept of systems engineering has gained increasing attention. Some of this attention is no doubt due to large program failures which possibly could have been avoided, or at least mitigated, through the use of systems engineering principles. The complexity of modern day weapon systems requires conscious application of systems engineering concepts to ensure producible, operable and supportable systems that satisfy mission requirements. Although many authors have traced the roots of systems engineering to earlier dates, the initial formalization of the systems engineering process for military development began to surface in the mid-1950s on the ballistic missile programs. These early ballistic missile development programs marked the emergence of engineering discipline 'specialists' which has since continued to grow. Each of these specialties not only has a need to take data from the overall development process, but also to supply data, in the form of requirements and analysis results, to the process. A number of technical instructions, military standards and specifications, and manuals were developed as a result of these development programs. In particular, MILSTD-499 was issued in 1969 to assist both government and contractor personnel in defining the systems engineering effort in support of defense acquisition programs. This standard was updated to MIL-STD499A in 1974, and formed the foundation for current application of systems engineering principles to military development programs.

  9. Space Shuttle Main Engine. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Eugene D.

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is presented. The Space Shuttle propulsion system consists of two large solid booster motors, three SSME's, two orbital maneuvering system engines, and 44 reaction control system thrusters. The three SSME's burn liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen from the external tank and are sequentially started at launch. Engine thrust is throttleable. The major components and some of their key features and operational parameters are outlined. The life and reliability being achieved by the SSME are presented.

  10. Structural Engineering: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation presents the work of the Structural Engineering Division of the Engineering Directorate. The work includes: providing technical expertise and leadership for the development, evaluation, and operation of structural, mechanical, and thermal spaceflight systems.

  11. Computer aided system engineering and analysis (CASE/A) modeling package for ECLS systems - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalee, Robert C.; Bacskay, Allen S.; Knox, James C.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the CASE/A-ECLSS series modeling package is presented. CASE/A is an analytical tool that has supplied engineering productivity accomplishments during ECLSS design activities. A components verification program was performed to assure component modeling validity based on test data from the Phase II comparative test program completed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. An integrated plotting feature has been added to the program which allows the operator to analyze on-screen data trends or get hard copy plots from within the CASE/A operating environment. New command features in the areas of schematic, output, and model management, and component data editing have been incorporated to enhance the engineer's productivity during a modeling program.

  12. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  13. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the development and technological activities of the free-piston Stirling engine. The engine started as a small scale fractional horsepower engine which demonstrated basic engine operating principles and the advantages of being hermetically sealed, highly efficient, and simple. It eventually developed into the free piston Stirling engine driven heat pump, and then into the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Program from which came the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). The SPDE successfully operated for over 300 hr and delivered 20 kW of PV power to an alternator plunger. The SPDE demonstrated that a dynamic power conversion system can, with proper design, be balanced; and the engine performed well with externally pumped hydrostatic gas bearings.

  14. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    A brief overview is presented of the development and technological activities of the free-piston Stirling engine. The engine started as a small scale fractional horsepower engine which demonstrated basic engine operating principles and the advantages of being hermetically sealed, highly efficient, and simple. It eventually developed into the free piston Stirling engine driven heat pump, and then into the SP-100 Space Reactor Power Program from which came the Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE). The SPDE successfully operated for over 300 hr and delivered 20 kW of PV power to an alternator plunger. The SPDE demonstrated that a dynamic power conversion system can, with proper design, be balanced; and the engine performed well with externally pumped hydrostatic gas bearings.

  15. Weapons engineering tritium facility overview

    SciTech Connect

    Najera, Larry

    2011-01-20

    Materials provide an overview of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) as introductory material for January 2011 visit to SRS. Purpose of the visit is to discuss Safety Basis, Conduct of Engineering, and Conduct of Operations. WETF general description and general GTS program capabilities are presented in an unclassified format.

  16. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the research findings of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) are presented. Included in the SPDE discussion are initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators. Projections are made for future space-power requirements over the next few decades. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits that a Stirling system has over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power.

  17. An overview of SAE ARP 1587: Aircraft gas turbine engine monitoring system guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A systematic approach to developing an engine monitoring system (EMS) is outlined. An extensive shopping list of EMS capabilities and benefits are included. A team approach to developing an EMS is emphasized with a description of the responsibilities of each team member.

  18. Generic Health Management: A System Engineering Process Handbook Overview and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Moses Lee; Spruill, Jim; Hong, Yin Paw

    1995-01-01

    Health Management, a System Engineering Process, is one of those processes-techniques-and-technologies used to define, design, analyze, build, verify, and operate a system from the viewpoint of preventing, or minimizing, the effects of failure or degradation. It supports all ground and flight elements during manufacturing, refurbishment, integration, and operation through combined use of hardware, software, and personnel. This document will integrate Health Management Processes (six phases) into five phases in such a manner that it is never a stand alone task/effort which separately defines independent work functions.

  19. The interconnection of photovoltaic power systems with the utility grid: An overview for utility engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, R.H.

    1994-06-01

    Utility-interactive (UI) photovoltaic power systems mounted on residences and commercial buildings are likely to become a small, but important source of electric generation in the next century. This is a new concept in utility power production--a change from large-scale central generation to small-scale dispersed generation. As such, it requires a re-examination of many existing standards and practices to enable the technology to develop and emerge into the marketplace. Much work has been done over the last 20 years to identify and solve the potential problems associated with dispersed power generation systems. This report gives an overview of these issues and also provides a guide to applicable codes, standards and other related documents. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that there are no major technical barriers to the implementation of dispersed PV generating systems. While more technical research is needed in some specific areas, the remaining barriers are fundamentally price and policy.

  20. International Collaborations on Engineered Barrier Systems: Brief Overview of SKB-EBS Activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.

    2015-10-01

    Research collaborations with international partners on the behavior and performance of engineered barrier systems (EBS) are an important aspect of the DOE-NE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign strategy in the evaluation of disposal design concepts. These international partnerships are a cost-effective way of engaging in key R&D activities with common goals resulting in effective scientific knowledge exchanges thus enhancing existing and future research programs in the USA. This report provides a brief description of the activities covered by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) EBS Task Force (TF) (referred hereafter as SKB EBS TF) and potential future directions for engagement of the DOE-NE UFDC program in relevant R&D activities. Emphasis is given to SKB EBS TF activities that are still ongoing and aligned to the UFDC R&D program. This include utilization of data collected in the bentonite rock interaction experiment (BRIE) and data sets from benchmark experiments produced by the chemistry or “C” part of the SKB EBS TF. Potential applications of information generated by this program include comparisons/tests between model and data (e.g., reactive diffusion), development and implementation of coupled-process models (e.g., HM), and code/model benchmarking.

  1. Science and Engineering Personnel: A National Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Michael F.; And Others

    This document provides statistical data concerning the national human resources of scientists and engineers. It presents an integrated overview of current utilization and supply patterns for U.S. scientists and engineers in 1978, continues with a detailed examination of the status of doctoral scientists and engineers, and concludes with an…

  2. NASA Systems Engineering Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Aster, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Mcduffee, Patrick; Pieniazek, Les; Rowell, Tom; Bain, Beth; Cox, Renee I.; Mooz, Harold; Polaski, Lou

    1995-01-01

    This handbook brings the fundamental concepts and techniques of systems engineering to NASA personnel in a way that recognizes the nature of NASA systems and environment. It is intended to accompany formal NASA training courses on systems engineering and project management when appropriate, and is designed to be a top-level overview. The concepts were drawn from NASA field center handbooks, NMI's/NHB's, the work of the NASA-wide Systems Engineering Working Group and the Systems Engineering Process Improvement Task team, several non-NASA textbooks and guides, and material from independent systems engineering courses taught to NASA personnel. Five core chapters cover systems engineering fundamentals, the NASA Project Cycle, management issues in systems engineering, systems analysis and modeling, and specialty engineering integration. It is not intended as a directive. Superseded by: NASA/SP-2007-6105 Rev 1 (20080008301).

  3. EPICS system: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, J.F.; Bobbitt, J.S.; Kramper, B.J.; Lahey, T.E.; MacKinnon, B.A.; West, R.E.

    1984-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of the EPICS control system at FERMILAB. EPICS is a distributed, multi-user, interactive system for the control and monitoring of particle beamlines at a high-energy experimental physics laboratory. The overview discusses the operating environment of the control system, the requirements which determined the design decisions, the hardware and software configurations, and plans for the future growth and enhancement of the present system. This paper is the first of three related papers on the EPICS system. The other two cover (1) the system structure and user interface and (2) RSX implementation issues.

  4. Mod II Stirling engine overviews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, Roger A.

    1988-01-01

    The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given.

  5. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  6. Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This short course provides information on what systems engineering is and how the systems engineer guides requirements, interfaces with the discipline leads, and resolves technical issues. There are many system-wide issues that either impact or are impacted by the thermal subsystem. This course will introduce these issues and illustrate them with real life examples.

  7. Overview of Lightweight Structures for Rotorcraft Engines and Drivetrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    This is an overview presentation of research being performed in the Advanced Materials Task within the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. This research is focused on technology areas that address both national goals and project goals for advanced rotorcraft. Specific technology areas discussed are: (1) high temperature materials for advanced turbines in turboshaft engines; (2) polymer matrix composites for lightweight drive system components; (3) lightweight structure approaches for noise and vibration control; and (4) an advanced metal alloy for lighter weight bearings and more reliable mechanical components. An overview of the technology in each area is discussed, and recent accomplishments are presented.

  8. Integrated computer control system architectural overview

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.

    1997-06-18

    This overview introduces the NIF Integrated Control System (ICCS) architecture. The design is abstract to allow the construction of many similar applications from a common framework. This summary lays the essential foundation for understanding the model-based engineering approach used to execute the design.

  9. Wind Turbine Modeling Overview for Control Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Butterfield, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of wind turbine systems is of paramount importance for controls engineers seeking to reduce loads and optimize energy capture of operating turbines in the field. When designing control systems, engineers often employ a series of models developed in the different disciplines of wind energy. The limitations and coupling of each of these models is explained to highlight how these models might influence control system design.

  10. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  11. 1. OVERVIEW OF POST ENGINEER'S SHOPS AND YARD BUILDINGS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW OF POST ENGINEER'S SHOPS AND YARD BUILDINGS, LOOKING 40 DEGREES NORTH EAST - Presidio of San Francisco, Post Engineer's Headquarters Office, Crissy Field North cantonment, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine technology activities applicable to space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Free piston Stirling technology is applicable for both solar and nuclear powered systems. As such, the Lewis Research Center serves as the project office to manage the newly initiated SP-100 Advanced Technology Program. This five year program provides the technology push for providing significant component and subsystem options for increased efficiency, reliability and survivability, and power output growth at reduced specific mass. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion concepts of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the research findings of the 25 kWe opposed piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) are presented. Included in the SPDE discussions are initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators. Projections are made for future space power requirements over the next few decades. And a cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits that a Stirling system has over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power.

  13. Overview of Engineering Design and Analysis at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congiardo, Jared; Junell, Justin; Kirkpatrick, Richard; Ryan, Harry

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives a general overview of the design and analysis division of NASA John C. Stennis Space Center. This division develops and maintains propulsion test systems and facilities for engineering competencies.

  14. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing....104 Locomotive and engine testing; overview. (a) The test procedures described here...

  15. 40 CFR 92.104 - Locomotive and engine testing; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... restriction within 1 inch of water of the upper limit of a typical engine as installed with clean air filters... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Locomotive and engine testing....104 Locomotive and engine testing; overview. (a) The test procedures described here...

  16. Thin-film reliability and engineering overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability and engineering technology base required for thin film solar energy conversions modules is discussed. The emphasis is on the integration of amorphous silicon cells into power modules. The effort is being coordinated with SERI's thin film cell research activities as part of DOE's Amorphous Silicon Program. Program concentration is on temperature humidity reliability research, glass breaking strength research, point defect system analysis, hot spot heating assessment, and electrical measurements technology.

  17. Mobile Multi-System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witoff, Robert J.; Doody, David F.

    2012-01-01

    At the time of this reporting, there are 2,589 rich mobile devices used at JPL, including 1,550 iPhones and 968 Blackberrys. Considering a total JPL population of 5,961 employees, mobile applications have a total addressable market of 43 percent of the employees at JPL, and that number is rising. While it was found that no existing desktop tools can realistically be replaced by a mobile application, there is certainly a need to improve access to these desktop tools. When an alarm occurs and an engineer is away from his desk, a convenient means of accessing relevant data can save an engineer a great deal of time and improve his job efficiency. To identify which data is relevant, an engineer benefits from a succinct overview of the data housed in 13+ tools. This need can be well met by a single, rich, mobile application that provides access to desired data across tools in the ops infrastructure.

  18. Satellite services system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of a satellite services system and the basic needs of the Space Transportation System to have improved satellite service capability are identified. Specific required servicing equipment are discussed in terms of their technology development status and their operative functions. Concepts include maneuverable television systems, extravehicular maneuvering unit, orbiter exterior lighting, satellite holding and positioning aid, fluid transfer equipment, end effectors for the remote manipulator system, teleoperator maneuvering system, and hand and power tools.

  19. Tug avionics system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raaberg, M. T.; Newcomb, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    The recently defined Tug avionics system takes maximum advantage of projected technology advances to attain: low system weight; power system capacity essentially independent of mission duration; sensors for rendezvous, docking, and navigation update; all attitude communications; onboard checkout and redundancy management; and modular fault tolerant computer control. The requirements, selection trades, and configurations are discussed for the major subsystems: data management, guidance navigation and control, communications, rendezvous and docking, and electrical power. The integrated avionics system and the interfaces with the payload, Shuttle and ground are described.

  20. Overview of locking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, K.T.; Scott, S.H.; Wilde, M.G.; Highland, S.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to present technical information that should be useful for understanding and applying locking systems for physical protection and control. There are major sections on hardware for locks, vaults, safes, and security containers. Other topics include management of lock systems and safety considerations. This document also contains notes on standards and specifications and a glossary.

  1. Information System Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, J. H.

    This paper was prepared for distribution to the California Educational Administrators participating in the "Executive Information Systems" Unit of Instruction as part of the instructional program of Operation PEP (Prepare Educational Planners). The purpose of the course was to introduce some basic concepts of information systems technology to…

  2. Space Transportation systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.

    1979-01-01

    Planning for the operations phase of the Space Transportation system is reviewed. Attention is given to mission profile (typical), applications, manifesting rationale, the Operational Flight Test manifest, the operations manifest, pricing policy, and potential applications of the STS.

  3. Engineering Review Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grems, III, Edward G. (Inventor); Henze, James E. (Inventor); Bixby, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Roberts, Mark (Inventor); Mann, Thomas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A disciplinal engineering review computer information system and method by defining a database of disciplinal engineering review process entities for an enterprise engineering program, opening a computer supported engineering item based upon the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, managing a review of the opened engineering item according to the defined disciplinal engineering review process entities, and closing the opened engineering item according to the opened engineering item review.

  4. An overview of the NASA rotary engine research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    A brief overview and technical highlights of the research efforts and studies on rotary engines over the last several years at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The test results obtained from turbocharged rotary engines and preliminary results from a high performance single rotor engine were discussed. Combustion modeling studies of the rotary engine and the use of a Laser Doppler Velocimeter to confirm the studies were examined. An in-house program in which a turbocharged rotary engine was installed in a Cessna Skymaster for ground test studies was reviewed. Details are presented on single rotor stratified charge rotary engine research efforts, both in-house and on contract.

  5. Overview of a stirling engine test project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted on three Stirling engines ranging in size from 1.33 to 53 horsepower (1 to 40 kW). The tests were directed toward developing alternative, backup component concepts to improve engine efficiency and performance or to reduce costs. Some of the activities included investigating attractive concepts and materials for cooler-regenerator units, installing a jet impingement device on a Stirling engine to determine its potential for improved engine performance, and presenting performance maps for initial characterization of Stirling engines. The experiment results of the tests are presented along with predictions of results of future tests to be conducted on the Stirling engines.

  6. Materials for engine applications above 3000 deg F: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Nancy J.; Dicarlo, James A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Levine, Stanley R.; Nesbitt, James A.; Probst, Hubert B.; Sanders, William A.; Stearns, Carl A.

    1987-01-01

    Materials for future generations of aeropropulsion systems will be required to perform at ever-increasing temperatures and have properties superior to the current state of the art. Improved engine efficiency can reduce specific fuel consumption and thus increase range and reduce operating costs. The ultimate payoff gain is expected to come when materials are developed which can perform without cooling at gas temperatures to 2200 C (4000 F). An overview is presented of materials for applications above 1650 C (3000 F), some pertinent physical property data, and the rationale used: (1) to arrive at recommendations of material systems that qualify for further investigation, and (2) to develop a proposed plan of research. From an analysis of available thermochemical data it was included that such materials systems must be composed of oxide ceramics. The required structural integrity will be achieved by developing these materials into fiber-reinforced ceramic composites.

  7. UAVSAR System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) project began as an Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) out of the NASA ESTO Program Office. After a year of study JPL presented to NASA an instrument concept that could be accommodated on the desired class of platforms, that would meet the original IIP science and instrument objectives and could be expanded to meet future airborne radar science needs. The UAVSAR project is a four year program consisting of a 3 year phase in which the radar system is designed and fabricated, the platform is modified, radar is installed on the aircraft and an initial flight testing program is begun. The last year of the program is designed to collect repeat pass data, to improve system robustness and to validate that the scientific objectives of the sensor are being met.

  8. Healthwatch-2 System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barszcz, Eric; Mosher, Marianne; Huff, Edward M.

    2004-01-01

    Healthwatch-2 (HW-2) is a research tool designed to facilitate the development and testing of in-flight health monitoring algorithms. HW-2 software is written in C/C++ and executes on an x86-based computer running the Linux operating system. The executive module has interfaces for collecting various signal data, such as vibration, torque, tachometer, and GPS. It is designed to perform in-flight time or frequency averaging based on specifications defined in a user-supplied configuration file. Averaged data are then passed to a user-supplied algorithm written as a Matlab function. This allows researchers a convenient method for testing in-flight algorithms. In addition to its in-flight capabilities, HW-2 software is also capable of reading archived flight data and processing it as if collected in-flight. This allows algorithms to be developed and tested in the laboratory before being flown. Currently HW-2 has passed its checkout phase and is collecting data on a Bell OH-58C helicopter operated by the U.S. Army at NASA Ames Research Center.

  9. OVERVIEW OF EMERGING CLEAN DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbanks, John

    2001-08-05

    Diesel engines are the most realistic technology to achieve a major improvement in fuel economy in the next decade. In the US light truck market, i.e. Sport Utility Vehicles , pick-up trucks and mini-vans, diesel engines can more than double the fuel economy of similarly rated spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines currently in these vehicles. These new diesel engines are comparable to the SI engines in noise levels and 0 to 60 mph acceleration. They no longer have the traditional ''diesel smell.'' And the new diesel engines will provide roughly twice the service life. This is very significant for resale value which could more than offset the initial premium cost of the diesel engine over that of the SI gasoline engine. So why are we not seeing more diesel engine powered personal vehicles in the U.S.? The European auto fleet is comprised of a little over 30 percent diesel engine powered vehicles while current sales are about 50 percent diesel. In France, over 70 percent of the luxury class cars i.e. Mercedes ''S'' Class, BMW 700 series etc., are sold with the diesel engine option selected. Diesel powered BMW's are winning auto races in Germany. These are a typical of the general North American perspective of diesel powered autos. The big challenge to commercial introduction of diesel engine powered light trucks and autos is compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2, 2007 emissions standards. Specifically, 0.07gm/mile Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and 0.01 gm/mile particulates (PM). Although the EPA has set a series of bins of increasing stringency until the 2007 levels are met, vehicle manufacturers appear to want some assurance that Tier 2, 2007 can be met before they commit an engine to a vehicle.

  10. Overview of Risk Management for Engineered Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, P. A.; Geraci, C. L.; Hodson, L. L.; Zumwalde, R. D.; Kuempel, E. D.; Murashov, V.; Martinez, K. F.; Heidel, D. S.

    2013-04-01

    Occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is considered a new and challenging occurrence. Preliminary information from laboratory studies indicates that workers exposed to some kinds of ENMs could be at risk of adverse health effects. To protect the nanomaterial workforce, a precautionary risk management approach is warranted and given the newness of ENMs and emergence of nanotechnology, a naturalistic view of risk management is useful. Employers have the primary responsibility for providing a safe and healthy workplace. This is achieved by identifying and managing risks which include recognition of hazards, assessing exposures, characterizing actual risk, and implementing measures to control those risks. Following traditional risk management models for nanomaterials is challenging because of uncertainties about the nature of hazards, issues in exposure assessment, questions about appropriate control methods, and lack of occupational exposure limits (OELs) or nano-specific regulations. In the absence of OELs specific for nanomaterials, a precautionary approach has been recommended in many countries. The precautionary approach entails minimizing exposures by using engineering controls and personal protective equipment (PPE). Generally, risk management utilizes the hierarchy of controls. Ideally, risk management for nanomaterials should be part of an enterprise-wide risk management program or system and this should include both risk control and a medical surveillance program that assesses the frequency of adverse effects among groups of workers exposed to nanomaterials. In some cases, the medical surveillance could include medical screening of individual workers to detect early signs of work-related illnesses. All medical surveillance should be used to assess the effectiveness of risk management; however, medical surveillance should be considered as a second line of defense to ensure that implemented risk management practices are effective.

  11. Overview of surface engineering and wear

    SciTech Connect

    Budinski, K.G.

    1996-12-31

    Surface engineering is a multidiscipline activity aimed at tailoring the properties or surfaces of engineering materials to improve their function or service life. As applied to metals, surface engineering includes processes such as plating, diffusion treatment, physical and chemical vapor deposition, ion implantation, thermal spray coatings, selective hardening, hardfacing, and a variety of less-used and proprietary processes. These processes will be described briefly and it is shown that each process has a niche where it works better or is more cost effective than competing surface engineering treatments or bulk materials. This paper reviews the various forms of wear that occur in industrial environments. Techniques are described to match available surface engineering processes with wear situations. The goal is to present selection guidelines for machine designers and industrial operating personnel on the use of surface engineering to solve wear problems.

  12. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system is designed to initiate control procedures which will minimize damage to the engine and vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. This report describes the features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems. Specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions are discussed. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given from recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, a general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  13. Space engine safety system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1991-01-01

    A rocket engine safety system was designed to initiate control procedures to minimize damage to the engine or vehicle or test stand in the event of an engine failure. The features and the implementation issues associated with rocket engine safety systems are discussed, as well as the specific concerns of safety systems applied to a space-based engine and long duration space missions. Examples of safety system features and architectures are given, based on recent safety monitoring investigations conducted for the Space Shuttle Main Engine and for future liquid rocket engines. Also, the general design and implementation process for rocket engine safety systems is presented.

  14. Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has been instrumental in establishing the Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics initiative -- i-STEM, which brings together industry, educators, government and other partners to provide K-12 teachers with support, materials and opportunities to improve STEM instruction and increase student interest in technical careers. You can learn more about INL's education programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Overview

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    Idaho National Laboratory has been instrumental in establishing the Idaho Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics initiative -- i-STEM, which brings together industry, educators, government and other partners to provide K-12 teachers with support, materials and opportunities to improve STEM instruction and increase student interest in technical careers. You can learn more about INL's education programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Program (systems) engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroff, Lynn E.; Easter, Robert W.; Pomphrey, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    Program Systems Engineering applies the principles of Systems Engineering at the program level. Space programs are composed of interrelated elements which can include collections of projects, advanced technologies, information systems, etc. Some program elements are outside traditional engineering's physical systems, such as education and public outreach, public relations, resource flow, and interactions within the political environments.

  17. Overview: Engineering transgenic constructs and mice

    PubMed Central

    Haruyama, Naoto; Cho, Andrew; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    Cell biology research encompasses everything from single cells to whole animals. Recent discoveries concerning particular gene functions can be applied to the whole animal for understanding genotype-phenotype relationships underlying disease mechanisms. For this reason, genetically manipulated mouse models are now considered essential to correctly understand disease processes in whole animals. This unit provides the basic mouse technologies used to generate conventional transgenic mice, which represents gain-of-function approach. First, an overview of the transgenic construct design is presented. This unit then explains basic strategies for the identification and establishment of independent transgenic mouse lines, followed by comments on historical and emerging techniques, and then on typical problems that are encountered when researchers start to generate transgenic mice. PMID:19283728

  18. An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center is presented. The following subject areas are covered: research objectives and long term perspective of the Center; current status and operational philosophy; and brief description of Center projects (combustion, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, materials compatibility, turbomachinery, and advanced propulsion concepts).

  19. An overview of in-flight plume diagnostics for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madzsar, G. C.; Bickford, R. L.; Duncan, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    An overview and progress report of the work performed or sponsored by LeRC toward the development of in-flight plume spectroscopy technology for health and performance monitoring of liquid propellant rocket engines are presented. The primary objective of this effort is to develop technology that can be utilized on any flight engine. This technology will be validated by a hardware demonstration of a system capable of being retrofitted onto the Space Shuttle Main Engines for spectroscopic measurements during flight. The philosophy on system definition and status on the development of instrumentation, optics, and signal processing with respect to implementation on a flight engine are discussed.

  20. General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    When all the technology studies were done and the accompanying market analyses were complete, the conclusion was that it is indeed possible to reduce the cost of turbine engines by a factor of 3 using low-cost manufacturing techniques and increased production rates. In the interest of reducing engine cost, some performance was sacrificed. Yet we ended up with about a 20 percent predicted improvement in SFC over current technology turboprops. However, even this level of improvement does not match the low SFC of reciprocating powerplants--particularly those advanced concepts described earlier. The 20 percent better SFC and much lower weight of a turboprop does mean that if such a powerplant were installed in a resized small airplane, one could save between 10 and 30 percent fuel relative to existing recip engines, depending on different mission and airplane combinations. The price of the aircraft would go down about 15 percent in the case of a high powered single, or 25 percent in the case of a normal size twin. The operating costs would decrease about 10 percent in the case of the single, and as much as 35 percent in the case of the twin.

  1. Natural Lignocellulosic Fibers as Engineering Materials—An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Lopes, Felipe Perissé Duarte; Barbosa, Anderson Paula; Bevitori, Alice Barreto; Silva, Isabela Leão Amaral Da; Costa, Lucas Lopes Da

    2011-10-01

    Recent investigations on the tensile properties of natural cellulose-based fibers revealed an increasing potential as engineering materials. This is particularly the case of very thin fibers of some species such as sisal, ramie, and curaua. However, several other commonly used fibers such as flax, jute, hemp, coir, cotton, and bamboo as well as less known bagasse, piassava, sponge gourde, and buriti display tensile properties that could qualify them as engineering materials. An overview of the strength limits attained by these fibers is presented. Based on a tensile strength vs density chart, it is shown that natural fibers stand out as a relevant class of engineering materials.

  2. Engine systems analysis results of the Space Shuttle Main Engine redesigned powerhead initial engine level testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Erik J.; Gosdin, Dennis R.

    1992-07-01

    Engineers regularly analyze SSME ground test and flight data with respect to engine systems performance. Recently, a redesigned SSME powerhead was introduced to engine-level testing in part to increase engine operational margins through optimization of the engine internal environment. This paper presents an overview of the MSFC personnel engine systems analysis results and conclusions reached from initial engine level testing of the redesigned powerhead, and further redesigns incorporated to eliminate accelerated main injector baffle and main combustion chamber hot gas wall degradation. The conclusions are drawn from instrumented engine ground test data and hardware integrity analysis reports and address initial engine test results with respect to the apparent design change effects on engine system and component operation.

  3. ATK Launch Systems Engineering NASA Programs Engineering Examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, David

    2007-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work done at ATK Launch Systems with and indication of how engineering knowledge can be applied to several real world problems. All material in the presentation has been screened to meet ITAR restrictions. The information provided is a compilation of general engineering knowledge and material available in the public domain. The presentation provides an overview of ATK Launch Systems and NASA programs. Some discussion is provided about the types of engineering conducted at the Promontory plant with added detail about RSRM nozzle engineering. Some brief examples of examples of nozzle technical issues with regard to adhesives and phenolics are shared. These technical issue discussions are based on material available in the public domain.

  4. An overview of recent patents on musculoskeletal interface tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rao, Rohit T; Browe, Daniel P; Lowe, Christopher J; Freeman, Joseph W

    2016-02-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues, e.g., between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article, we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose. PMID:26577344

  5. TARDEC's Intelligent Ground Systems overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Jeffrey F.

    2009-05-01

    The mission of the Intelligent Ground Systems (IGS) Area at the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) is to conduct technology maturation and integration to increase Soldier robot control/interface intuitiveness and robotic ground system robustness, functionality and overall system effectiveness for the Future Combat System Brigade Combat Team, Robotics Systems Joint Project Office and game changing capabilities to be fielded beyond the current force. This is accomplished through technology component development focused on increasing unmanned ground vehicle autonomy, optimizing crew interfaces and mission planners that capture commanders' intent, integrating payloads that provide 360 degree local situational awareness and expanding current UGV tactical behavior, learning and adaptation capabilities. The integration of these technology components into ground vehicle demonstrators permits engineering evaluation, User assessment and performance characterization in increasingly complex, dynamic and relevant environments to include high speed on road or cross country operations, all weather/visibility conditions and military operations in urban terrain (MOUT). Focused testing and experimentation is directed at reducing PM risk areas (safe operations, autonomous maneuver, manned-unmanned collaboration) and transitioning technology in the form of hardware, software algorithms, test and performance data, as well as User feedback and lessons learned.

  6. Systems special investigation group overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, James B.; Dursch, Harry; Edelman, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The Systems Special Investigation Group (SIG) has undertaken investigations in the four major engineering disciplines represented by LDEF hardware: electrical, mechanical, thermal, and optical systems. Testing was planned for the highest possible level of assembly, and top level system tests for nearly all systems were performed at this time. Testing to date was performed on a mix of LDEF and individual experimenter systems. No electrical or mechanical system level failures attributed to the spaceflight environment were detected by the Systems SIG. Some low cost electrical components were used successfully, although relays were a continuing problem. Extensive mechanical galling was observed, but no evidence of coldwelding was identified. A working index of observed systems anomalies was created and will be used to support the tracking and resolution of these effects. LDEF hardware currently available to the Systems SIG includes most of the LDEF facility systems hardware, and some significant experimenter hardware as well. A series of work packages was developed for each of several subsystem types where further testing is of critical interest. The Systems SIG is distributing a regular newsletter to the greater LDEF community in order to maintain coherence in an investigation which is widely scattered both in subject matter and in geography. Circulation of this informal document has quadrupled in its first year.

  7. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. As part of the NASA Technical Standards Program activities, engineering lessons learned datasets have been identified from a number of sources. These are being searched and screened for those having a relation to Technical Standards. This paper will address some of these Systems Engineering Lessons Learned and how they are being related to Technical Standards within the NASA Technical Standards Program, including linking to the Agency's Interactive Engineering Discipline Training Courses and the life cycle for a flight vehicle development program.

  8. Systems special investigation group overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, James B.; Dursch, Harry; Edelman, Joel

    1991-01-01

    The Systems Special Investigation Group (SIG) has undertaken investigations in the four major engineering disciplines represented in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) hardware: electrical, mechanical, thermal, and optical systems. Testing was planned for the highest possible level of assembly, and top level system tests for nearly all systems were performed at this time. To date, testing was performed on a mix of LDEF and individual experimenter systems. No electrical or mechanical system level failures attributed to the spaceflight environment have yet been detected. Some low cost electrical components were used successfully, although relays were a continuing problem. Mechanical galling was observed unexpectedly, but no evidence of cold welding was identified yet. A working index of observed systems anomalies was created and will be used to support the tracking and resolution of these effects. The LDEF hardware currently available to the Systems SIG includes most of the LDEF systems hardware, and some significant experimenter hardware as well. A series of work packages was developed for each of several subsystem types where further testing is of critical interest. The System SIG is distributing a regular newsletter to the greater LDEF community in order to maintain coherence in an investigation which is widely scattered both in subject matter and in geography. Circulation of this informal document has quadrupled in its first year.

  9. DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project Overview 83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project is presented. The background and objectives of the project are reviewed. Project activities are described and technical progress and status are presented and assessed. Prospects for achieving the objective 30 percent fuel economy improvement are considered good. The key remaining technology issues are primarily related to life, reliability and cost, such as piston rod seals, and low cost heat exchanges. Previously announced in STAR as N83-27924

  10. DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project overview '83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project is presented. The background and objectives of the project are reviewed. Project activities are described and technical progress and status are presented and assessed. Prospects for achieving the objective 30% fuel economy improvement are considered good. The key remaining technology issues are primarily related to life, reliability and cost, such as piston rod seals, and low cost heat exchanges.

  11. An Overview of NASA Engine Ice-Crystal Icing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    Ice accretions that have formed inside gas turbine engines as a result of flight in clouds of high concentrations of ice crystals in the atmosphere have recently been identified as an aviation safety hazard. NASA s Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has made plans to conduct research in this area to address the hazard. This paper gives an overview of NASA s engine ice-crystal icing research project plans. Included are the rationale, approach, and details of various aspects of NASA s research.

  12. An overview of NASA intermittent combustion engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A.; Wintucky, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper overviews the current program, whose objective is to establish the generic technology base for advanced aircraft I.C. engines of the early 1990's and beyond. The major emphasis of this paper is on development of the past two years. Past studies and ongoing confirmatory experimental efforts are reviewed, which show unexpectly high potential when modern aerospace technologies are applied to inherently compact and balanced I.C. engine configurations. Currently, the program is focussed on two engine concepts the stratified-charge, multi-fuel rotary, and the lightweight two-stroke diesel. A review is given of contracted and planned high performance one-rotor and one-cylinder test engine work addressing several levels of technology. Also reviewed are basic supporting efforts, e.g., the development and experimental validation of computerized airflow and combustion process models, being performed in-house at Lewis Research Center and by university grants.

  13. Process Control System Cyber Security Standards - An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Evans

    2006-05-01

    The use of cyber security standards can greatly assist in the protection of process control systems by providing guidelines and requirements for the implementation of computer-controlled systems. These standards are most effective when the engineers and operators, using the standards, understand what each standard addresses. This paper provides an overview of several standards that deal with the cyber security of process measurements and control systems.

  14. AN OVERVIEW OF THE SNS ACCELERATOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH, H.; LUDWIG, H.; MAHLER, G.; PAI, C.; PEARSON, C.; RANK, J.; TUOZZOLO, J.; WEI, J.

    2006-06-23

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS*) is an accelerator-based neutron source currently nearing completion at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed in 2006, the SNS will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. SNS is a collaborative effort between six U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and offered a unique opportunity for the mechanical engineers to work with their peers from across the country. This paper presents an overview of the overall success of the collaboration concentrating on the accelerator ring mechanical engineering along with some discussion regarding the relative merits of such a collaborative approach. Also presented are a status of the mechanical engineering installation and a review of the associated installation costs.

  15. Tissue engineering and peripheral nerve reconstruction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Geuna, Stefano; Gnavi, Sara; Perroteau, Isabelle; Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Nerve repair is no more regarded as merely a matter of microsurgical reconstruction. To define this evolving reconstructive/regenerative approach, the term tissue engineering is being increasingly used since it reflects the search for interdisciplinary and integrated treatment strategies. However, the drawback of this new approach is its intrinsic complexity, which is the result of the variety of scientific disciplines involved. This chapter presents a synthetic overview of the state of the art in peripheral nerve tissue engineering with a look forward at the most promising innovations emerging from basic science investigation. This review is intended to set the stage for the collection of papers in the thematic issue of the International Review of Neurobiology that is focused on the various interdisciplinary approaches in peripheral nerve tissue engineering. PMID:24083430

  16. Nuclear propulsion systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

    1992-12-31

    The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960`s and early 1970`s was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

  17. Nuclear propulsion systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, W.W.; Neuman, J.E.: Van Haaften, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program of the 1960's and early 1970's was dramatically successful, with no major failures during the entire testing program. This success was due in large part to the successful development of a systems engineering process. Systems engineering, properly implemented, involves all aspects of the system design and operation, and leads to optimization of theentire system: cost, schedule, performance, safety, reliability, function, requirements, etc. The process must be incorporated from the very first and continued to project completion. This paper will discuss major aspects of the NERVA systems engineering effort, and consider the implications for current nuclear propulsion efforts.

  18. Systems engineering management plans.

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Tamara S.

    2009-10-01

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) is a comprehensive and effective tool used to assist in the management of systems engineering efforts. It is intended to guide the work of all those involved in the project. The SEMP is comprised of three main sections: technical project planning and control, systems engineering process, and engineering specialty integration. The contents of each section must be tailored to the specific effort. A model outline and example SEMP are provided. The target audience is those who are familiar with the systems engineering approach and who have an interest in employing the SEMP as a tool for systems management. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with an appreciation for the use and importance of the SEMP, as well as provide a framework that can be used to create the management plan.

  19. Developing Data System Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J.; Byrnes, J. B.; Kobler, B.

    2011-12-01

    In the early days of general computer systems for science data processing, staff members working on NASA's data systems would most often be hired as mathematicians. Computer engineering was very often filled by those with electrical engineering degrees. Today, the Goddard Space Flight Center has special position descriptions for data scientists or as they are more commonly called: data systems engineers. These staff members are required to have very diverse skills, hence the need for a generalized position description. There is always a need for data systems engineers to develop, maintain and operate the complex data systems for Earth and space science missions. Today's data systems engineers however are not just mathematicians, they are computer programmers, GIS experts, software engineers, visualization experts, etc... They represent many different degree fields. To put together distributed systems like the NASA Earth Observing Data and Information System (EOSDIS), staff are required from many different fields. Sometimes, the skilled professional is not available and must be developed in-house. This paper will address the various skills and jobs for data systems engineers at NASA. Further it explores how to develop staff to become data scientists.

  20. Rover nuclear rocket engine program: Overview of rover engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finseth, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The results of nuclear rocket development activities from the inception of the ROVER program in 1955 through the termination of activities on January 5, 1973 are summarized. This report discusses the nuclear reactor test configurations (non cold flow) along with the nuclear furnace demonstrated during this time frame. Included in the report are brief descriptions of the propulsion systems, test objectives, accomplishments, technical issues, and relevant test results for the various reactor tests. Additionally, this document is specifically aimed at reporting performance data and their relationship to fuel element development with little or no emphasis on other (important) items.

  1. Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) is provided that contains information on NLAS' objectives and relevance, structural components and position in the launch vehicle stack, and details on its three main components.

  2. An overview of the Small Engine Component Technology (SECT) studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanco, M. R.; Wintucky, W. T.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the joint NASA/Army SECT Studies were to identify high payoff technologies for year 2000 small gas turbine engine applications and to provide a technology plan for guiding future research and technology efforts applicable to rotorcraft, commuter and general aviation aircraft and cruise missiles. Competitive contracts were awarded to Allison, AVCO Lycoming, Garrett, Teledyne CAE and Williams International. This paper presents an overview of the contractors' study efforts for the commuter, rotorcraft, cruise missile, and auxiliary power (APU) applications with engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range. Reference aircraft, missions and engines were selected. Advanced engine configurations and cycles with projected year 2000 component technologies were evaluated and compared with a reference engine selected by the contractor. For typical commuter and rotorcraft applications, fuel savings of 22 percent to 42 percent can be attained. For $1/gallon and $2/gallon fuel, reductions in direct operating cost range from 6 percent to 16 percent and from 11 percent to 17 percent respectively. For subsonic strategic cruise missile applications, fuel savings of 38 percent to 54 percent can be achieved which allows 35 percent to 60 percent increase in mission range and life cycle cost reductions of 40 percent to 56 percent. High payoff technologies have been identified for all applications.

  3. What is systems engineering?

    SciTech Connect

    Bahill, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    Systems Engineering is an interdisciplinary process that ensures that the customers` needs are satisfied throughout a system`s entire life cycle. This process includes: understanding customer needs; stating the problem; specifying requirements; defining performance and cost measures, prescribing tests, validating requirements, conducting design reviews, exploring alternative concepts, sensitivity analyses, functional decomposition, system design, designing and managing interfaces, system integration, total system test, configuration management, risk management, reliability analysis; total quality management; project management; and documentation. Material for this paper was gathered from senior Systems Engineers at Sandia National Laboratories.

  4. Overview of DOE's large stationary Stirling engine development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherka, K. L.; Holtz, R. E.; Bunker, W.

    This paper summarizes the results to date of a program, sponsored by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy, to develop large stationary Stirling engine power systems. Primary applications for such power plants include cogeneration and total energy systems, with a major advantage being their ability to employ solid coal and other non-scarce fuels in an environmentally acceptable manner. The major effort in the Stirling engine development program was an industry-based design competition, involving three independent contractual teams. Conceptual designs for state-of-the-art coal-fired Stirling engine systems were developed and all three design teams recommended development of 373 kW modules as base units, which can be coupled together to form individual Stirling engines up to 2238 kW in size. Heat transport system design concepts were also developed for integrating engine hot-end sections with coal combustors.

  5. Rotary engine cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Charles (Inventor); Gigon, Richard M. (Inventor); Blum, Edward J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rotary engine has a substantially trochoidal-shaped housing cavity in which a rotor planetates. A cooling system for the engine directs coolant along a single series path consisting of series connected groups of passages. Coolant enters near the intake port, passes downwardly and axially through the cooler regions of the engine, then passes upwardly and axially through the hotter regions. By first flowing through the coolest regions, coolant pressure is reduced, thus reducing the saturation temperature of the coolant and thereby enhancing the nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanism which predominates in the high heat flux region of the engine during high power level operation.

  6. Aircraft Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the detailed simulation of Aircraft Turbofan Engine. The objectives were to develop a detailed flow model of a full turbofan engine that runs on parallel workstation clusters overnight and to develop an integrated system of codes for combustor design and analysis to enable significant reduction in design time and cost. The model will initially simulate the 3-D flow in the primary flow path including the flow and chemistry in the combustor, and ultimately result in a multidisciplinary model of the engine. The overnight 3-D simulation capability of the primary flow path in a complete engine will enable significant reduction in the design and development time of gas turbine engines. In addition, the NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) multidisciplinary integration and analysis are discussed.

  7. Combustion engine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, John (Inventor); Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A flow through catalytic reactor which selectively catalytically decomposes methanol into a soot free hydrogen rich product gas utilizing engine exhaust at temperatures of 200 to 650 C to provide the heat for vaporizing and decomposing the methanol is described. The reactor is combined with either a spark ignited or compression ignited internal combustion engine or a gas turbine to provide a combustion engine system. The system may be fueled entirely by the hydrogen rich gas produced in the methanol decomposition reactor or the system may be operated on mixed fuels for transient power gain and for cold start of the engine system. The reactor includes a decomposition zone formed by a plurality of elongated cylinders which contain a body of vapor permeable, methanol decomposition catalyst preferably a shift catalyst such as copper-zinc.

  8. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  9. Overview of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of delamination mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings has been developed for diesel engine applications through rig tests, structural analysis modeling, nondestructive evaluation, and engine evaluation of various thermal barrier coatings. This knowledge has resulted in improved thermal barrier coatings which survive abusive cyclic fatigue tests in high output diesel engines. Although much conflicting literature now exists regarding the impact of thermal barrier coatings on engine performance and fuel consumption, the changes in fuel consumption appear to be less than a few percent and can be negative for state-of-the-art diesel engines. The ability of the thermal barrier coating to improve fuel economy tends to be dependent on a number of factors including the fuel injection system, combustion chamber design, and the initial engine fuel economy. Limited investigations on state-of-the-art diesel engines have indicated that the surface connected porosity and coating surface roughness may influence engine fuel economy. Current research efforts on thermal barrier coatings are primarily directed at reducing in-cylinder heat rejection, thermal fatigue protection of underlying metal surfaces and a possible reduction in diesel engine emissions. Significant efforts are still required to improve the plasma spray processing capability and the economics for complex geometry diesel engine components.

  10. An overview of NASA intermittent combustion engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A.; Wintucky, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper overviews the current program, whose objective is to establish the generic technology base for advanced aircraft I.C. engines of the early 1990's and beyond. The major emphasis of this paper is on development of the past two years. Past studies and ongoing confirmatory experimental efforts are reviewed, which show unexpectedly high potential when modern aerospace technologies are applied to inherently compact and balanced I.C. engine configurations. Currently, the program is focussed on two engine concepts, the stratified-charge, multi-fuel rotary and the lightweight two-stroke diesel. A review is given of contracted and planned high performance one-rotor and one-cylinder test engine work addressing several levels of technology. Also reviewed are basic supporting efforts, e.g., the development and experimental validation of computerized airflow and combustion process models, being performed in-house at Lewis Research Center and by university grants. Previously announced in STAR as N84-24583

  11. The engineering of cybernetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Robert L.

    2002-05-01

    This tutorial develops a logical basis for the engineering of systems that operate cybernetically. The term cybernetic system has a clear quantitative definition. It is a system that dynamically matches acquired information to selected actions relative to a computational issue that defines the essential purpose of the system or machine. This notion requires that information and control be further quantified. The logic of questions and assertions as developed by Cox provides one means of doing this. The design and operation of cybernetic systems can be understood by contrasting these kinds of systems with communication systems and information theory as developed by Shannon. The joint logic of questions and assertions can be seen to underlie and be common to both information theory as applied to the design of discrete communication systems and to a theory of discrete general systems. The joint logic captures a natural complementarity between systems that transmit and receive information and those that acquire and act on it. Specific comparisons and contrasts are made between the source rate and channel capacity of a communication system and the acquisition rate and control capacity of a general system. An overview is provided of the joint logic of questions and assertions and the ties that this logic has to both conventional information theory and to a general theory of systems. I-diagrams, the interrogative complement of Venn diagrams, are described as providing valuable reasoning tools. An initial framework is suggested for the design of cybernetic systems. Two examples are given to illustrate this framework as applied to discrete cybernetic systems. These examples include a predator-prey problem as illustrated through "The Dog Chrysippus Pursuing its Prey," and the derivation of a single-neuron system that operates cybernetically and is biologically plausible. Future areas of research are highlighted which require development for a mature engineering framework.

  12. Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials on Plants Growth: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat Golestan

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level. PMID:25202734

  13. Innovative Design of Complex Engineering Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The document contains the proceedings of the training workshop on Innovative Design of Complex Engineering Systems. The workshop was held at the Peninsula Higher Education Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 23 and 24, 2004. The workshop was jointly sponsored by Old Dominion University and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to a) provide broad overviews of the diverse activities related to innovative design of high-tech engineering systems; and b) identify training needs for future aerospace work force development in the design area. The format of the workshop included fifteen, half-hour overview-type presentations, a panel discussion on how to teach and train engineers in innovative design, and three exhibits by commercial vendors.

  14. An overview of reliability assessment and control for design of civil engineering structures

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.V. Jr.; Grigoriadis, K.M.; Bergman, L.A.; Skelton, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    Random variations, whether they occur in the input signal or the system parameters, are phenomena that occur in nearly all engineering systems of interest. As a result, nondeterministic modeling techniques must somehow account for these variations to ensure validity of the solution. As might be expected, this is a difficult proposition and the focus of many current research efforts. Controlling seismically excited structures is one pertinent application of nondeterministic analysis and is the subject of the work presented herein. This overview paper is organized into two sections. First, techniques to assess system reliability, in a context familiar to civil engineers, are discussed. Second, and as a consequence of the first, active control methods that ensure good performance in this random environment are presented. It is the hope of the authors that these discussions will ignite further interest in the area of reliability assessment and design of controlled civil engineering structures.

  15. Observing System Simulation Experiments: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) will be given, with focus on calibration and validation of OSSE frameworks. Pitfalls and practice will be discussed, including observation error characteristics, incestuousness, and experimental design. The potential use of OSSEs for investigation of the behaviour of data assimilation systems will be explored, including some results from experiments using the NASAGMAO OSSE.

  16. NEMS - National Energy Modeling System: An Overview

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2009 a summary description of NEMS and each of its components. NEMS is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of energy markets for the midterm period through 2030. The NEMS is used to produce the Annual Energy Outlook.

  17. Systems engineering and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, B.S.; Fabrycky, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    An introduction to systems is provided and tools for systems analysis are considered, taking into account system definitions and concepts, approaches for bringing systems into being, models in systems analysis, economic analysis techniques, mathematical modeling and optimization, probability and statistics, queuing theory and analysis, and control concepts and techniques. The system design process is discussed along with the design for operational feasibility, systems engineering management, and system design case studies. Attention is given to conceptual design, preliminary system design, detail design and development, system test and evaluation, design for reliability, design for maintainability, design for supportability, design for economic feasibility, communication system design, finite population system design, energy storage system design, and procurement-inventory system design.

  18. Engineering scalable biological systems

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology is focused on engineering biological organisms to study natural systems and to provide new solutions for pressing medical, industrial and environmental problems. At the core of engineered organisms are synthetic biological circuits that execute the tasks of sensing inputs, processing logic and performing output functions. In the last decade, significant progress has been made in developing basic designs for a wide range of biological circuits in bacteria, yeast and mammalian systems. However, significant challenges in the construction, probing, modulation and debugging of synthetic biological systems must be addressed in order to achieve scalable higher-complexity biological circuits. Furthermore, concomitant efforts to evaluate the safety and biocontainment of engineered organisms and address public and regulatory concerns will be necessary to ensure that technological advances are translated into real-world solutions. PMID:21468204

  19. Readings in Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This present collection was inspired by seven papers prepared by the NASA Alumni League, illustrating the members' systems engineering experience. These papers make up the heart of this collection. We have supplemented them with papers describing industry processes and other governmental practices to illustrate the diversity of systems engineering as it is formulated and practiced. This is one discipline that clearly benefits from cross-fertilization and infusion of new ideas. There is also a wide variety of tools and techniques described herein, some standard and some unique.

  20. Overview of the Main Propulsion System for the NASA Ares I Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jason E.; Swanson, Luke A.

    2009-01-01

    A functional overview of the Main Propulsion System (MPS) of the NASA Ares I Upper Stage is provided. In addition to a simple overview of the key MPS functions and design philosophies, major lessons learned are discussed. The intent is to provide a technical overview with enough detail to allow engineers outside of the MPS Integrated Product Team (IPT) to develop a rough understanding of MPS operations, components, design philosophy, and lessons learned.

  1. An Overview of the Literature: Research in P-12 Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza Díaz, Noemi V.; Cox, Monica F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive overview of preschool to 12th grade (P-12) engineering education literature published between 2001 and 2011. Searches were conducted through education and engineering library engines and databases as well as queries in established publications in engineering education. More than 50 publications were found,…

  2. NASA space information systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dana L.

    1987-01-01

    A major objective of NASA space missions is the gathering of information that when analyzed, compared, and interpreted furthers man's knowledge of his planet and surrounding universe. A space information system is the combination of data gathering, data processing, and data transport capabilities that interact to provide the underlying services that enable that advancement in understanding. Past space projects have been characterized by rather disjoint data systems that often did not satisfy user requirements. NASA has learned from those experiences, however, and now is conceptualizing a new generation of sophisticated, integrated space information systems suitable to the wide range of near future space endeavors. This paper examines the characteristics of recent data systems and, based upon that characterization, outlines the scope and attributes of future systems. A description if offered of the information system for the Space Station Program as one real example of such advanced capabilities.

  3. Launch Abort System Flight Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Hayes, Peggy; Bosworth, John T.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is an overview of the Launch Abort System (LAS) for the Constellation Program. The purpose of the paper is to review the planned tests for the LAS. The program will evaluate the performance of the crew escape functions of the Launch Abort System (LAS) specifically: the ability of the LAS to separate from the crew module, to gather flight test data for future design and implementation and to reduce system development risks.

  4. Overview of the NASA astrophysics data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomphrey, Rick B.

    1991-01-01

    Overview of the NASA Astrophysics Data Systems (ADS) is presented in the form of view graphs. The following subject areas are covered: The problem; the ADS project; architectural approach; elements of the solution; status of the effort; and the future plans.

  5. Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan; Chistensen, Dana; Hannegan, Bryan; Garret, Bobi; Kroposki, Ben; Symko-Davies, Martha; Post, David; Hammond, Steve; Kutscher, Chuck; Wipke, Keith

    2014-06-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the right tool, at the right time... a first-of-its-kind facility that addresses the challenges of large-scale integration of clean energy technologies into the energy systems that power the nation.

  6. Energy Systems Integration Facility Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, Dan; Chistensen, Dana; Hannegan, Bryan; Garret, Bobi; Kroposki, Ben; Symko-Davies, Martha; Post, David; Hammond, Steve; Kutscher, Chuck; Wipke, Keith

    2014-02-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the right tool, at the right time... a first-of-its-kind facility that addresses the challenges of large-scale integration of clean energy technologies into the energy systems that power the nation.

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear propulsion background; schedule for the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) project; NEP for the Space Exploration Initiative; NEP on-going systems tasks; 20KWe mission/system study; and agenda.

  8. NASA Systems Engineering Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide general guidance and information on systems engineering that will be useful to the NASA community. It provides a generic description of Systems Engineering (SE) as it should be applied throughout NASA. A goal of the handbook is to increase awareness and consistency across the Agency and advance the practice of SE. This handbook provides perspectives relevant to NASA and data particular to NASA. The coverage in this handbook is limited to general concepts and generic descriptions of processes, tools, and techniques. It provides information on systems engineering best practices and pitfalls to avoid. There are many Center-specific handbooks and directives as well as textbooks that can be consulted for in-depth tutorials. This handbook describes systems engineering as it should be applied to the development and implementation of large and small NASA programs and projects. NASA has defined different life cycles that specifically address the major project categories, or product lines, which are: Flight Systems and Ground Support (FS&GS), Research and Technology (R&T), Construction of Facilities (CoF), and Environmental Compliance and Restoration (ECR). The technical content of the handbook provides systems engineering best practices that should be incorporated into all NASA product lines. (Check the NASA On-Line Directives Information System (NODIS) electronic document library for applicable NASA directives on topics such as product lines.) For simplicity this handbook uses the FS&GS product line as an example. The specifics of FS&GS can be seen in the description of the life cycle and the details of the milestone reviews. Each product line will vary in these two areas; therefore, the reader should refer to the applicable NASA procedural requirements for the specific requirements for their life cycle and reviews. The engineering of NASA systems requires a systematic and disciplined set of processes that are applied recursively and

  9. Overview of NASA MSFC IEC Federated Engineering Collaboration Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moushon, Brian; McDuffee, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The MSFC IEC federated engineering framework is currently developing a single collaborative engineering framework across independent NASA centers. The federated approach allows NASA centers the ability to maintain diversity and uniqueness, while providing interoperability. These systems are integrated together in a federated framework without compromising individual center capabilities. MSFC IEC's Federation Framework will have a direct affect on how engineering data is managed across the Agency. The approach is directly attributed in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAB) finding F7.4-11 which states the Space Shuttle Program has a wealth of data sucked away in multiple databases without a convenient way to integrate and use the data for management, engineering, or safety decisions. IEC s federated capability is further supported by OneNASA recommendation 6 that identifies the need to enhance cross-Agency collaboration by putting in place common engineering and collaborative tools and databases, processes, and knowledge-sharing structures. MSFC's IEC Federated Framework is loosely connected to other engineering applications that can provide users with the integration needed to achieve an Agency view of the entire product definition and development process, while allowing work to be distributed across NASA Centers and contractors. The IEC DDMS federation framework eliminates the need to develop a single, enterprise-wide data model, where the goal of having a common data model shared between NASA centers and contractors is very difficult to achieve.

  10. Network command processing system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nam, Yon-Woo; Murphy, Lisa D.

    1993-01-01

    The Network Command Processing System (NCPS) developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ground Network (GN) stations is a spacecraft command system utilizing a MULTIBUS I/68030 microprocessor. This system was developed and implemented at ground stations worldwide to provide a Project Operations Control Center (POCC) with command capability for support of spacecraft operations such as the LANDSAT, Shuttle, Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, and Nimbus-7. The NCPS consolidates multiple modulation schemes for supporting various manned/unmanned orbital platforms. The NCPS interacts with the POCC and a local operator to process configuration requests, generate modulated uplink sequences, and inform users of the ground command link status. This paper presents the system functional description, hardware description, and the software design.

  11. Rocket engine condition monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagar, S.K.; Alcock, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is expected that the Rocket Engine Condition Monitoring System (RECMS) program will define engine monitoring technologies and an integration approach which can be applied to engine development in support of advanced launch system objectives. The RECMS program approaches engine monitoring as a system which is fully integrated with the engine controller, vehicle monitoring system, and ground processing systems to ensure mission success in addition to engine reliability. The system components are monitored through health and performance sensors; they are analyzed with the diagnostic and prognostic algorithms and demonstrated by system testing with hardware from other advanced development programs.

  12. An Overview of Space Power Systems for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Scott, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Power is a critical commodity for all engineering efforts and is especially challenging in the aerospace field. This paper will provide a broad brush overview of some of the immediate and important challenges to NASA missions in the field of aerospace power, for generation, energy conversion, distribution, and storage. NASA s newest vehicles which are currently in the design phase will have power systems that will be developed from current technology, but will have the challenges of being light-weight, energy-efficient, and space-qualified. Future lunar and Mars "outposts" will need high power generation units for life support and energy-intensive exploration efforts. An overview of the progress in concepts for power systems and the status of the required technologies are discussed.

  13. Hermes thermal protection system overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumette, Daniel; Cretenet, Jean-Claude

    The HERMES thermal protection system for the reentry is a new challenge for the designer. Compared to the system operational to day which is the U.S. Orbiter, the smaller size and higher cross range of HERMES are inducing higher working temperatures and a longer duration for the hot phase of the reentry. Hence the overall weight of the TPS system is comparatively more critical than on the Orbiter. On the other hand since the conception of the Orbiter a lot of new materials, namely ceramic composites, have been developped, and may lead to more efficient concepts of TPS. In the initial studies on HERMES TPS systems a lot of possibilites were considered, including External passive TPS, Hot structures, Active TPS. This selection has been now shortlisted to three basic concepts, with a number of variant or back ups still under consideration: • Ceramic composites hot structures for the nose, leading edges, fins and control surfaces • External insulation : composite ceramic shingles covering a lightweight thermal insulation (or rigid surface insulation (tiles) as a back up solution) for the hot undersurfaces and part of the upper surface. • Flexible surface insulation for the lower temperature upper surfaces. The paper presents details on the concepts being studied, the optimisation methods and the concept selection criteria.

  14. Overview of Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Joe

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the work done at NASA's Glenn Research Center on the ultra-efficient engine technology (UEET) program. The intent at the program's outset in 1998 was to establish a foundation for the next generation of aircraft engines for both commercial and military applications. A primary focus of this program was to be the development and utilization of technologies which would improve both subsonic and high-speed flight capabilities. Included in the presentation are details on the development of propulsion systems for varied types of aircraft, and results from attempts at reduction of emissions.

  15. Overview of Langley systems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, Samuel D.

    1992-01-01

    Late in 1990, the NASA Systems Integration Group began functioning and the aircraft systems studies entered a second phase. This group proposed tightly coordinated Ames/Langley/Lewis/industry studies that would address a series of tasks to evaluate progress, recommend appropriate direction, and emphasize changes in technology elements based on system level payoffs and potential success assessments. Based on technical and economic assessment studies of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) to date, Mach 2.4 was chosen as the primary focus for the High Speed Research Program with Mach numbers 2.0 and 1.6 being backups in case of technology shortfalls. Langley has established an interdisciplinary team to strengthen the multidisciplinary aspects of aircraft design and analysis. The vehicle focus of this team is the HSCT. At Langley, early HSCT studies focused on turbojet powered aircraft. They also concluded that variable sweep wing concepts require 50/50 subsonic/supersonic to payoff for Mach 3.0 concept. Progress has been good in low sonic boom concepts.

  16. SSME Automated Engine Calibration System (AECS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, William D.

    1992-07-01

    An algorithm is derived for the real-time calibration of the engine fuel flowmeter and the engine mixture ratio during Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) ground testing. Because currently used calibration methods are post-test operations, there exists no fail-safe way of predicting at what mixture ratio a planned test will run. It is proposed that the algorithm developed here be used as part of an Automated Engine Calibration System (AECS) which could ensure that nearly all SSME tests are run at the proper mixture ratio. In this way, AECS has the potential of increasing the efficiency of the SSME ground test program. In addition to the derivation of the algorithm, an overview of this calibration system is presented along with the list of test stand facility instrumentation necessary for AECS implementation.

  17. Space Station Freedom as an engineering experiment station: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Frank

    1992-01-01

    In this presentation, the premise that Space Station Freedom has great utility as an engineering experiment station will be explored. There are several modes in which it can be used for this purpose. The most obvious are space qualification, process development, in space satellite repair, and materials engineering. The range of engineering experiments which can be done at Space Station Freedom run the gamut from small process oriented experiments to full exploratory development models. A sampling of typical engineering experiments are discussed in this session. First and foremost, Space Station Freedom is an elaborate experiment itself, which, if properly instrumented, will provide engineering guidelines for even larger structures which must surely be built if humankind is truly 'outward bound.' Secondly, there is the test, evaluation and space qualification of advanced electric thruster concepts, advanced power technology and protective coatings which must of necessity be tested in the vacuum of space. The current approach to testing these technologies is to do exhaustive laboratory simulation followed by shuttle or unmanned flights. Third, the advanced development models of life support systems intended for future space stations, manned mars missions, and lunar colonies can be tested for operation in a low gravity environment. Fourth, it will be necessary to develop new protective coatings, establish construction techniques, evaluate new materials to be used in the upgrading and repair of Space Station Freedom. Finally, the industrial sector, if it is ever to build facilities for the production of commercial products, must have all the engineering aspects of the process evaluated in space prior to a commitment to such a facility.

  18. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These include (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies generic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, cost-shared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and (2) a free-piston Stirling space power technology feasibility demonstration project being conducted in support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), DOE, NASA, SP-100 project. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kW free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, design and fabrication under contract of a hydraulic output modification for RE-1000 engine tests, and a 1000-hour endurance test, under contract, of a 3 kWe free-piston Stirling/alternator engine. The newly initiated space power technology feasibility demonstration effort addresses the capability of scaling a free-piston Stirling/alternator system to about 25 kWe; developing thermodynamic cycle efficiency greater than or equal to 70 percent of Carnot at temperature ratios in the order of 1.5 to 2.0; achieving a power conversion unit specific weight of 6 kg/kWe; operating with noncontacting gas bearings; and dynamically balancing the system. Planned engine and component design and test efforts are described.

  19. Overview of NASA Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1984-08-01

    An overview of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) free-piston Stirling engine activities is presented. These include (1) a generic free-piston Stirling technology project being conducted to develop technologies generic to both space power and terrestrial heat pump applications in a cooperative, costshared effort with the Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and (2) a free-piston Stirling space power technology feasibility demonstration project being conducted in support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), DOE, NASA, SP-100 project. The generic technology effort includes extensive parametric testing of a 1 kW free-piston Stirling engine (RE-1000), development of a free-piston Stirling performance computer code, design and fabrication under contract of a hydraulic output modification for RE-1000 engine tests, and a 1000-hour endurance test, under contract, of a 3 kWe free-piston Stirling/alternator engine. The newly initiated space power technology feasibility demonstration effort addresses the capability of scaling a freepiston Stirling/alternator system to about 25 kWe; developing thermodynamic cycle efficiency greater than or equal to70 percent of Carnot at temperature ratios in the order of 1.5 to 2.0; achieving a power conversion unit specific weight of 6 kg/kWe; operating with noncontacting gas bearings; and dynamically balancing the system. Planned engine and component design and test efforts are described.

  20. Looking ahead in systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigenbaum, Donald S.

    1966-01-01

    Five areas that are discussed in this paper are: (1) the technological characteristics of systems engineering; (2) the analytical techniques that are giving modern systems work its capability and power; (3) the management, economics, and effectiveness dimensions that now frame the modern systems field; (4) systems engineering's future impact upon automation, computerization and managerial decision-making in industry - and upon aerospace and weapons systems in government and the military; and (5) modern systems engineering's partnership with modern quality control and reliability.

  1. Executive overview and introduction to the SMAP information system life-cycle and documentation standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the five volume set of Information System Life-Cycle and Documentation Standards is provided with information on its use. The overview covers description, objectives, key definitions, structure and application of the standards, and document structure decisions. These standards were created to provide consistent NASA-wide structures for coordinating, controlling, and documenting the engineering of an information system (hardware, software, and operational procedures components) phase by phase.

  2. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems cryocooler overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, J.; Tward, E.

    2010-09-01

    Mechanical long life cryocoolers are an enabling technology used to cool a wide variety of detectors in space applications. These coolers provide cooling over a range of temperatures from 2 K to 200 K, cooling powers from tens of mW to tens of watts. Typical applications are missile warning, Earth and climate sciences, astronomy and cryogenic propellant management. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) has delivered many of the US flight cooler systems and has 12 long life pulse tube and Stirling coolers on orbit with two having over 11 years of continuous operation. This paper will provide an overview of the NGAS cryocooler capabilities.

  3. Overview of the 1985 NASA Lewis Research Center SP-100 free-piston Stirling engine activities

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the 1985 (NASA) Lewis Research Center free-piston Stirling engine activities in support of the SP-100 Program is presented. The SP-100 program is being conducted in support of the Department of Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE), and NASA. This effort is keyed on the design, fabrication, assembly, and testing of a 25 kW(e) Stirling space-power technology-feasibility demonstrator engine. Another facet of the SP-100 project covers the status of a 9000-h goal endurance test conducted on a 2 kW(e) free-piston Stirling/linear alternator system employing hydrostatic gas bearings. Dynamic balancing of the RE-1000 engine (a 1 kW(e) free-piston Stirling engine) using a passive dynamic absorber is discussed, along with the results of a parametric study showing the relationships of Stirling power converter specific weight and efficiency as functions of Stirling engine heater to cooler temperature ratio. Planned tests are described covering a hydrodynamic gas bearing concept for potential SP-100 application.

  4. The EMMA Accelerator, a Diagnostic Systems Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, A.; Berg, J.; Bliss, N. Cox, G.; Dufau, M.; Gallagher, A.; Hill, C.; Jones, J.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Muratori, B.; Oates, A.; Shepherd B.; Smith, R.; Hock, K.; Holder, D.; Ibison, M., Kirkman I.; Borrell, R.; Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Wendt, M.

    2011-09-04

    The 'EMMA' Non-Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (ns-FFAG) international project is currently being commissioned at Daresbury Laboratory, UK. This accelerator has been equipped with a number of diagnostic systems to facilitate this. These systems include a novel time-domain-multiplexing BPM system, moveable screen systems, a time-of-flight instrument, Faraday cups, and injection/extraction tomography sections to analyze the single bunch beams. An upgrade still to implement includes the installation of wall current monitors. This paper gives an overview of these systems and shows some data and results from the diagnostics that have contributed to the successful demonstration of a serpentine acceleration by this novel accelerator.

  5. Engineering the LISA Project: Systems Engineering Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Jordan P.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a joint NASA/ESA mission to detect and measure gravitational waves with periods from 1 s to 10000 s. The systems engineering challenges of developing a giant interferometer, 5 million kilometers on a side, an: numerous. Some of the key challenges are presented in this paper. The organizational challenges imposed by sharing the engineering function between three centers (ESA ESTEC, NASA GSFC, and JPL) across nine time zones are addressed. The issues and approaches to allocation of the acceleration noise and measurement sensitivity budget terms across a traditionally decomposed system are discussed. Additionally, using LISA to detect gravitational waves for the first time presents significant data analysis challenges, many of which drive the project system design. The approach to understanding the implications of science data analysis on the system is also addressed.

  6. Releasing Creativity in an Interdisciplinary Systems Engineering Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, B. Serpil

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of a course in systems engineering and creative systems at Loughborough University. Explains the way that creativity is encouraged, the use of systems understanding, and a model for design processes. Includes examples of projects and student work. (DDR)

  7. ESA'S Biomass Mission System And Payload Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcioni, M.; Bensi, P.; Fois, F.; Gabriele, A.; Heliere, F.; Lin, C. C.; Massotti, L.; Scipal, K.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Explorers are the backbone of the science and research element of ESA's Living Planet Programme, providing an important contribution to the understanding of the Earth system. Following the User Consultation Meeting held in Graz, Austria on 5-6 March 2013, the Earth Science Advisory Committee (ESAC) has recommended implementing Biomass as the 7th Earth Explorer Mission within the frame of the ESA Earth Observation Envelope Programme. This paper will give an overview of the satellite system and its payload. The system technical description presented here is based on the results of the work performed during parallel Phase A system studies by two industrial consortia led by EADS Astrium Ltd. and Thales Alenia Space Italy. Two implementation concepts (respectively A and B) are described and provide viable options capable of meeting the mission requirements.

  8. Systems Engineering Leadership Development: Advancing Systems Engineering Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Phil; Whitfield, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Systems Engineering Leadership Development Program, with particular emphasis on the work being done in the development of systems engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center. There exists a lack of individuals with systems engineering expertise, in particular those with strong leadership capabilities, to meet the needs of the Agency's exploration agenda. Therefore there is a emphasis on developing these programs to identify and train systems engineers. The presentation reviews the proposed MSFC program that includes course work, and developmental assignments. The formal developmental programs at the other centers are briefly reviewed, including the Point of Contact (POC)

  9. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Smith, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Jointly acquired by NOAA & NASA, the next-generation civilian environmental satellite system, Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), will supply the afternoon orbit & ground system of the restructured NPOESS program. JPSS will replace NOAA's current POES satellites and the ground processing part of both POES & DoD's Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS)(DMSP replacement). JPSS sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and solar-geophysical data. The ground system, or JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), has 6 integrated product teams/segments: Command, Control & Communications (C3S); Interface Data Processing (IDPS); Field Terminal (FTS); Systems Engineering, Integration & Test (SEIT); Operations & Support (O&S); and Sustainment developed by Raytheon Intelligence & Information Systems. The IDPS will process JPSS data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA & DoD processing centers beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and through JPSS & DWSS eras. C3S will: manage overall JPSS & DWSS missions from control/status of space/ground assets to ensure timely delivery of high-quality data to IDPS; provide globally-distributed ground assets to collect/transport mission, telemetry and command data between satellites & processing locations; provide all commanding & state-of-health monitoring functions of NPP, JPSS and DWSS satellites, and delivery of mission data to each Central IDP and monitor/report system-wide health/status and data communications with external systems and between CGS segments. SEIT leads the overall effort, including: manage/coordinate/execute JPSS CGS activities with NASA participation/oversight; plan/conduct all activities related to systems engineering, develop & ensure completeness of JPSS CGS functional & technical baselines and perform integration, deployment, testing and verification; sponsor/support modeling & simulation, performance analysis and trade studies; provide engineering for the product

  10. Engineering the System and Technical Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 80% of the problems encountered in aerospace systems have been due to a breakdown in technical integration and/or systems engineering. One of the major challenges we face in designing, building, and operating space systems is: how is adequate integration achieved for the systems various functions, parts, and infrastructure? This Contractor Report (CR) deals with part of the problem of how we engineer the total system in order to achieve the best balanced design. We will discuss a key aspect of this question - the principle of Technical Integration and its components, along with management and decision making. The CR will first provide an introduction with a discussion of the Challenges in Space System Design and meeting the challenges. Next is an overview of Engineering the System including Technical Integration. Engineering the System is expanded to include key aspects of the Design Process, Lifecycle Considerations, etc. The basic information and figures used in this CR were presented in a NASA training program for Program and Project Managers Development (PPMD) in classes at Georgia Tech and at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Many of the principles and illustrations are extracted from the courses we teach for MSFC.

  11. Spacecraft systems engineering: An introduction to the process at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragomeni, Tony; Ryschkewitsch, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    The main objective in systems engineering is to devise a coherent total system design capable of achieving the stated requirements. Requirements should be rigid. However, they should be continuously challenged, rechallenged and/or validated. The systems engineer must specify every requirement in order to design, document, implement and conduct the mission. Each and every requirement must be logically considered, traceable and evaluated through various analysis and trade studies in a total systems design. Margins must be determined to be realistic as well as adequate. The systems engineer must also continuously close the loop and verify system performance against the requirements. The fundamental role of the systems engineer, however, is to engineer, not manage. Yet, in large, complex missions, where more than one systems engineer is required, someone needs to manage the systems engineers, and we call them 'systems managers.' Systems engineering management is an overview function which plans, guides, monitors and controls the technical execution of a project as implemented by the systems engineers. As the project moves on through Phases A and B into Phase C/D, the systems engineering tasks become a small portion of the total effort. The systems management role increases since discipline subsystem engineers are conducting analyses and reviewing test data for final review and acceptance by the systems managers.

  12. 40 CFR 86.1327-98 - Engine dynamometer test procedures; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test procedures; overview. 86.1327-98 Section 86.1327-98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for...

  13. An Overview of Magnetic Bearing Technology for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Daniel J.; Jansen, Mark J.; Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The idea of the magnetic bearing and its use in exotic applications has been conceptualized for many years, over a century, in fact. Patented, passive systems using permanent magnets date back over 150 years. More recently, scientists of the 1930s began investigating active systems using electromagnets for high-speed ultracentrifuges. However, passive magnetic bearings are physically unstable and active systems only provide proper stiffness and damping through sophisticated controllers and algorithms. This is precisely why, until the last decade, magnetic bearings did not become a practical alternative to rolling element bearings. Today, magnetic bearing technology has become viable because of advances in micro-processing controllers that allow for confident and robust active control. Further advances in the following areas: rotor and stator materials and designs which maximize flux, minimize energy losses, and minimize stress limitations; wire materials and coatings for high temperature operation; high-speed micro processing for advanced controller designs and extremely robust capabilities; back-up bearing technology for providing a viable touchdown surface; and precision sensor technology; have put magnetic bearings on the forefront of advanced, lubrication free support systems. This paper will discuss a specific joint program for the advancement of gas turbine engines and how it implies the vitality of magnetic bearings, a brief comparison between magnetic bearings and other bearing technologies in both their advantages and limitations, and an examination of foreseeable solutions to historically perceived limitations to magnetic bearing.

  14. High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) Test Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuniga, Fanny A.; Smith, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA High-Speed Research program developed the High-Lift Engine Aeroacoustics Technology (HEAT) program to demonstrate satisfactory interaction between the jet noise suppressor and high-lift system of a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration at takeoff, climb, approach and landing conditions. One scheme for reducing jet exhaust noise generated by an HSCT is the use of a mixer-ejector system which would entrain large quantities of ambient air into the nozzle exhaust flow through secondary inlets in order to cool and slow the jet exhaust before it exits the nozzle. The effectiveness of such a noise suppression device must be evaluated in the presence of an HSCT wing high-lift system before definitive assessments can be made concerning its acoustic performance. In addition, these noise suppressors must provide the required acoustic attenuation while not degrading the thrust efficiency of the propulsion system or the aerodynamic performance of the high-lift devices on the wing. Therefore, the main objective of the HEAT program is to demonstrate these technologies and understand their interactions on a large-scale HSCT model. The HEAT program is a collaborative effort between NASA-Ames, Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Douglas Aircraft Corp., Lockheed-Georgia, General Electric and NASA - Lewis. The suppressor nozzles used in the tests were Generation 1 2-D mixer-ejector nozzles made by General Electric. The model used was a 13.5%-scale semi-span model of a Boeing Reference H configuration.

  15. Natural computing for mechanical systems research: A tutorial overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, Keith; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Hensman, James J.

    2011-01-01

    A great many computational algorithms developed over the past half-century have been motivated or suggested by biological systems or processes, the most well-known being the artificial neural networks. These algorithms are commonly grouped together under the terms soft or natural computing. A property shared by most natural computing algorithms is that they allow exploration of, or learning from, data. This property has proved extremely valuable in the solution of many diverse problems in science and engineering. The current paper is intended as a tutorial overview of the basic theory of some of the most common methods of natural computing as they are applied in the context of mechanical systems research. The application of some of the main algorithms is illustrated using case studies. The paper also attempts to give some indication as to which of the algorithms emerging now from the machine learning community are likely to be important for mechanical systems research in the future.

  16. NASA System Engineering Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Jose

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's use of systems engineering for the complete life cycle of a project. Systems engineering is a methodical, disciplined approach for the design, realization, technical management, operations, and retirement of a system. Each phase of a NASA project is terminated with a Key decision point (KDP), which is supported by major reviews.

  17. An overview of expert systems. [artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevarter, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    An expert system is defined and its basic structure is discussed. The knowledge base, the inference engine, and uses of expert systems are discussed. Architecture is considered, including choice of solution direction, reasoning in the presence of uncertainty, searching small and large search spaces, handling large search spaces by transforming them and by developing alternative or additional spaces, and dealing with time. Existing expert systems are reviewed. Tools for building such systems, construction, and knowledge acquisition and learning are discussed. Centers of research and funding sources are listed. The state-of-the-art, current problems, required research, and future trends are summarized.

  18. Stirling engine heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, L.N.; Houtman, W.H.; Percival, W.H.

    1988-06-28

    A hot gas engine is described wherein a working gas flows back and forth in a closed path between a relatively cooler compression cylinder side of the engine and a relatively hotter expansion cylinder side of the engine and the path contains means including a heat source and a heat sink acting upon the gas in cooperation with the compression and expansion cylinders to cause the gas to execute a thermodynamic cycle wherein useful mechanical output power is developed by the engine, the improvement in the heat source which comprises a plurality of individual tubes each forming a portion of the closed path for the working gas.

  19. Automatic engine control system

    SciTech Connect

    Geary, W.C.; Mirsaiidi, M.V.; Redfern, T.; Wolfe, D.W.

    1986-01-14

    This patent describes an automatic control circuit for an internal combustion engine and clutch assembly. One component of this circuit is a timer for determining the time the engine is allowed to run and the clutch is engaged and a second period of time when the clutch is automatically disengaged. Associated with the timer is a starter means to start the engine during the first time period and a clutch actuating mechanism for engaging the clutch near the first time period initiation after the starter starts the engine. An engine shut down and clutch disengagement mechanism is also responsive to the first timer. The patent then goes on to describe a supplemental timer mechanism for determining a third and fourth period of time within the second time period such that the third period being when the engine is shut off and the fourth period being when the engine runs with clutch disengaged. The starter mechanism is responsive to the supplemental timer to start the engine at the beginning of the fourth period. A shut down means stops the engine at the beginning of the third period in response to the timer.

  20. Intelligent Engine Systems: Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Arnant P.

    2008-01-01

    The overall requirements necessary for sensing bearing distress and the related criteria to select a particular rotating sensor were established during the phase I. The current phase II efforts performed studies to evaluate the Robustness and Durability Enhancement of the rotating sensors, and to design, and develop the Built-in Telemetry System concepts for an aircraft engine differential sump. A generic test vehicle that can test the proposed bearing diagnostic system was designed, developed, and built. The Timken Company, who also assisted with testing the GE concept of using rotating sensors for the differential bearing diagnostics during previous phase, was selected as a subcontractor to assist General Electric (GE) for the design, and procurement of the test vehicle. A purchase order was prepared to define the different sub-tasks, and deliverables for this task. The University of Akron was selected to provide the necessary support for installing, and integrating the test vehicle with their newly designed test facility capable of simulating the operating environment for the planned testing. The planned testing with good and damaged bearings will be on hold pending further continuation of this effort during next phase.

  1. Overview of waste heat utilization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy truck diesel engine rejects a significant fraction of its fuel energy in the form of waste heat. Historically, the Department of Energy has supported technology efforts for utilization of the diesel exhaust heat. Specifically, the Turbocompound and the Organic Rankine Cycle System (ORCS) have demonstrated that meaningful improvements in highway fuel economy can be realized through waste heat utilization. For heat recovery from the high temperature exhaust of future adiabatic diesel engines, the DOE/NASA are investigating a variety of alternatives based on the Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling power cycles. Initial screening results indicate that systems of this type offer a fuel savings advantage over the turbocompound system. Capital and maintenance cost projections, however, indicate that the alternative power cycles are not competitive on an economic payback basis. Plans call for continued analysis in an attempt to identify a cost effective configuration with adequate fuel savings potential.

  2. Radioisotope Power Systems Program: A Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamley, John A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program continues to plan, mature research in energy conversion, and partners with the Department of Energy (DOE) to make RPS ready and available to support the exploration of the solar system in environments where the use of conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet potential future mission needs. Recent programs responsibilities include providing investment recommendations to NASA stakeholders on emerging thermoelectric and Stirling energy conversion technologies and insight on NASA investments at DOE in readying a generator for the Mars 2020 mission. This presentation provides an overview of the RPS Program content and status and the approach used to maintain the readiness of RPS to support potential future NASA missions.

  3. Waste Management System overview for future spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingelfinger, A. L.; Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Waste Management Systems (WMS) for post Apollo spacecraft will be significantly more sophisticated and earthlike in user procedures. Some of the features of the advanced WMS will be accommodation of both males and females, automatic operation, either tissue wipe or anal wash, measurement and sampling of urine, feces and vomitus for medical analysis, water recovery, and solids disposal. This paper presents an overview of the major problems of and approaches to waste management for future spacecraft. Some of the processes discussed are liquid/gas separation, the Dry-John, the Hydro-John, automated sampling, vapor compression distillation, vacuum distillation-catalytic oxidation, incineration, and the integration of the above into complete systems.

  4. GENIE Flight Test Results and System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Tye; Paschall, Stephen, II; Crain, Timothy P., II; Demars, Kyle; Bishop, Robert

    2011-01-01

    NASA has envisioned a suite of lander test vehicles that will be flown in Earth s atmosphere to incrementally demonstrate applicable lunar lander performance in the terrestrial environment. As each terrestrial rocket progresses in maturity, relevant space flight technology matures to a higher technology readiness level, preparing it for inclusion on a future lunar lander design.. NASA s "Project M" lunar mission concept flew its first terrestrial rocket, RR1, in June 2010 in Caddo Mills, Texas. The Draper Laboratory built GENIE (Guidance Embedded Navigator Integration Environment) successfully demonstrated accurate, real time, embedded performance of Project M navigation and guidance algorithms in a highly dynamic environment. The RR1 vehicle, built by Armadillo Aerospace, performed a successful 60 second free flight and gave the team great confidence in Project M s highly reliable and robust GNC system design and implementation. This paper provides an overview of the GENIE system and describes recent flight performance test results onboard the RR1 terrestrial rocket.

  5. Micro-system inertial sensing technology overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, James Joe

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of Micro-System technology as it applies to inertial sensing. Transduction methods are reviewed with capacitance and piezoresistive being the most often used in COTS Micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) inertial sensors. Optical transduction is the most recent transduction method having significant impact on improving sensor resolution. A few other methods are motioned which are in a R&D status to hopefully allow MEMS inertial sensors to become viable as a navigation grade sensor. The accelerometer, gyroscope and gravity gradiometer are the type of inertial sensors which are reviewed in this report. Their method of operation and a sampling of COTS sensors and grade are reviewed as well.

  6. Spacecraft Power Systems Engineering: Solutions for NASA's Manned Space Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of spacecraft power systems is presented, with a focus on applications in the manned space program. The topics include: 1) History; 2) State-of-the-art; 3) Development directions; 4) Focus on applications in the manned space program led from JSC; 5) Power Systems Engineering Trade Space; 6) Power Generation and Energy Storage; 7) Power Distribution and Control; and 8) Actuation

  7. KSC Engineering Academy (KEA): Ares 1-X Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ess, Bob

    2007-01-01

    The presentation provides an overview of the ARES 1-X program. Videos include avionics ATVC actuator testing, GS damper retractor, GS vortex shedding, RoCS hot fire at WSTF, RoCS Peacekeeper tests, RoCS installation, thrust OSC, amd Ares 1-X fly through.

  8. Overview of thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yonushonis, T. M.

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of delamination mechanisms in thermal barrier coatings has been developed for diesel applications through nondestructive evaluation, structural analysis modeling and engine evaluation of various thermal barrier coatings. This knowledge has resulted in improved thermal barrier coatings which survive abusive cyclic fatigue tests in high output diesel engines. Significant efforts are still required to improve the plasma spray processing capability and the economics for complex geometry diesel engine components. Data obtained from advanced diesel engines on the effect of thermal barrier coatings on engine fuel economy and emission has not been encouraging. Although the underlying metal component temperatures have been reduced through the use of thermal barrier coating, engine efficiency and emission trends have not been promising.

  9. System identification of jet engines

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, N.

    2000-01-01

    System identification plays an important role in advanced control systems for jet engines, in which controls are performed adaptively using data from the actual engine and the identified engine. An identification technique for jet engine using the Constant Gain Extended Kalman Filter (CGEKF) is described. The filter is constructed for a two-spool turbofan engine. The CGEKF filter developed here can recognize parameter change in engine components and estimate unmeasurable variables over whole flight conditions. These capabilities are useful for an advanced Full Authority Digital Electric Control (FADEC). Effects of measurement noise and bias, effects of operating point and unpredicted performance change are discussed. Some experimental results using the actual engine are shown to evaluate the effectiveness of CGEKF filter.

  10. An overview of the Stirling engine heat pump program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes the recent developments in the Stirling engine-driven heat pump program activities sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This technology has displayed its ability to meet the thermal performance objectives. Enhance technology options guided by value engineering principles are being pursued toward the development of an economically viable household engine-driven heat pump. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Systems engineering technology for networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The report summarizes research pursued within the Systems Engineering Design Laboratory at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University between May 16, 1993 and January 31, 1994. The project was proposed in cooperation with the Computational Science and Engineering Research Center at Howard University. Its purpose was to investigate emerging systems engineering tools and their applicability in analyzing the NASA Network Control Center (NCC) on the basis of metrics and measures.

  12. NASA systems engineering handbook. Draft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Hammond, Walter E.; Mooz, Harold; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron; Cassingham, Randy (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide information on systems engineering that will be useful to NASA system engineers, especially new ones. Its primary objective is to provide a generic description of systems engineering as it should be applied throughout NASA. Field Center Handbooks are encouraged to provide center-specific details of implementation. For NASA system engineers to choose to keep a copy of this handbook at their elbows, it must provide answers that cannot be easily found elsewhere. Consequently, it provides NASA-relevant perspectives and NASA-particular data. NASA management instructions (NMI's) are referenced when applicable. This handbook's secondary objective is to serve as a useful companion to all of the various courses in systems engineering that are being offered under NASA's auspices. The coverage of systems engineering is general to techniques, concepts, and generic descriptions of processes, tools, and techniques. It provides good systems engineering practices, and pitfalls to avoid. This handbook describes systems engineering as it should be applied to the development of major NASA product and producing systems.

  13. NASA/DOE automotive Stirling engine project: Overview 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project is reviewed and its technical progress and status are presented. Key technologies in materials, seals, and piston rings are progressing well. Seven first-generation engines, and modifications thereto, have accumulated over 15,000 hr of test time, including 1100hr of in-vehicle testing. Results indicate good progress toward the program goals. The first second-generation engine is now undergoing initial testing. It is expected that the program goal of a 30-percent improvement in fuel economy will be achieved in tests of a second-generation engine in a Celebrity vehicle.

  14. DOE/NASA automotive Stirling engine project - Overview 86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    The DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project is reviewed and its technical progress and status are presented. Key technologies in materials, seals, and piston rings are progressing well. Seven first-generation engines, and modifications thereto, have accumulated over 15,000 hr of test time, including 1100 hr of in-vehicle testing. Results indicate good progress toward the program goals. The first second-generation engine is now undergoing initial testing. It is expected that the program goal of a 30-percent improvement in fuel economy will be achieved in tests of a second-generation engine in a Celebrity vehicle.

  15. System safety engineering analysis handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ijams, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The basic requirements and guidelines for the preparation of System Safety Engineering Analysis are presented. The philosophy of System Safety and the various analytic methods available to the engineering profession are discussed. A text-book description of each of the methods is included.

  16. Ecotoxicological impact of engineered nanomaterials in bivalve molluscs: An overview.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Gomes, Tânia; Sousa, Vânia Serrão; Mestre, Nélia C; Bebianno, Maria João

    2015-10-01

    The increasing production and application of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products over the past decade will inevitably lead to their release into aquatic systems and thereby cause the exposure to aquatic organisms, resulting in growing environmental and human health concern. Since bivalves are widely used in the monitoring of aquatic pollution, the aim of this review was to compile and analyse data concerning the ecotoxicity of ENMs using bivalve molluscs. The state of the art regarding the experimental approach, characterization, behaviour, fate, bioaccumulation, tissue and subcellular distribution and mechanisms of toxicity of ENMs in marine and freshwater bivalve molluscs is summarized to achieve a new insight into the mode of action of these nanoparticles in invertebrate organisms. This review shows that the studies about the toxic effects of ENMs in bivalves were conducted mainly with seawater species compared to freshwater ones and that the genus Mytilus is the main taxa used as a model system. There is no standardization of experimental approaches for toxicity testing and reviewed data indicate the need to develop standard protocols for ENMs ecotoxicological testing. In general, the main organ for ENM accumulation is the digestive gland and their cellular fate differs according to nano-specific properties, experimental conditions and bivalve species. Endosomal-lysosomal system and mitochondria are the major cellular targets of ENMs. Metal based ENMs mode of action is related mainly to the dissolution and/or release of the chemical component of the particle inducing immunotoxicity, oxidative stress and cellular injury to proteins, membrane and DNA damage. This review indicates that the aquatic environment is the potential ultimate fate for ENMs and confirms that bivalve molluscs are key model species for monitoring aquatic pollution by ENMs. PMID:26152602

  17. Automotive Stirling engine systems development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the Automotive Stirling Engine (ASE) program is to develop a Stirling engine for automotive use that provides a 30 percent improvement in fuel economy relative to a comparable internal-combustion engine while meeting emissions goals. This paper traces the engine systems' development efforts focusing on: (1) a summary of engine system performance for all Mod I engines; (2) the development, program conducted for the upgraded Mod I; and (3) vehicle systems work conducted to enhance vehicle fuel economy. Problems encountered during the upgraded Mod I test program are discussed. The importance of the EPA driving cycle cold-start penalty and the measures taken to minimize that penalty with the Mod II are also addressed.

  18. An Overview of NASA's Orbital Debris Engineering Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of Orbital debris engineering models. They are mathematical tools to assess orbital debris flux. It briefly reviews the history of the orbital debris engineering models, and reviews the new features in the current model (i.e., ORDEM2010).

  19. The National Energy Modeling System: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer-based, energy-economy modeling system of US energy markets for the midterm period of 1990 to 2010. NEMS projects the production, imports, conversion, consumption, and prices of energy, subject to assumptions on macroeconomic and financial factors, world energy markets, resource availability and costs, behavioral and technological choice criteria, cost and performance characteristics of energy technologies, and demographics. This report presents an overview of the structure and methodology of NEMS and each of its components. The first chapter provides a description of the design and objectives of the system. The second chapter describes the modeling structure. The remainder of the report summarizes the methodology and scope of the component modules of NEMS. The model descriptions are intended for readers familiar with terminology from economics, operations research, and energy modeling. Additional background on the development of the system is provided in Appendix A of this report, which describes the EIA modeling systems that preceded NEMS. More detailed model documentation reports for all the NEMS modules are also available from EIA.

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Directorate Overview: Launching the Future of Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    The Marshall Small Business Association (MSBA) serves as a central point of contact to inform and educate small businesses interested in pursuing contracting and subcontracting opportunities at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The MSBA meets quarterly to provide industry with information about how to do business with Marshall and to share specific information about Marshall s mission, which allows private businesses to envision how they might contribute. For the February 19 meeting, the Engineering Directorate will give an overview of its unique capabilities and how it is organized to provide maximum support for the programs and projects resident at Marshall, for example, the Space Shuttle Propulsion Office, Ares Projects Office, and Science and Mission Systems Office. This briefing provides a top-level summary of the work conducted by Marshall s largest organization, while explaining how resources are deployed to perform the volume of work under Marshall s purview.

  1. Engineering Floquet Hamiltonians in Cold Atom Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2016-05-01

    In this talk I will first give a brief overview of the Floquet theory, describing periodically driven systems. Then I will introduce the concept of the high-frequency expansion and will show how it generalizes the celebrated Schrieffer-Wolff transformation to driven systems. Using these tools I will illustrate how one can engineer non-trivial interacting Hamiltonians mostly in the context of cold atom systems and discuss some experimental examples. In the end I will talk about issues of heating and adiabaticity and show that there are very strong parallels between Floquet systems and disordered systems. In particular, I will argue that the heating transition is closely analogous to the many-body localization transition. AFOSR, ARO, NSF.

  2. Overview of free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaby, Jack G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of free-piston Stirling engine activities, directed toward space power applications. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Initial differences between predicted and experimental power outputs and power output influenced by variations in regenerators are discussed. Technology work was conducted on heat-exchanger concepts to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance the heat transfer in the heater. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space power converter. Projections are made for future space power requirements over the next few decades along with a recommendation to consider the use of dynamic power conversion systems, either solar or nuclear. A cursory comparison is presented showing the mass benefits of a Stirling system over a Brayton system for the same peak temperature and output power. A description of a study to investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space power module to the 150 kWe power range is presented.

  3. Engine health monitoring systems: Tools for improved maintenance management in the 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    The performance monitoring aspect of maintenance, characteristic of the engine health monitoring system are discussed. An overview of the system activities is presented and a summary of programs for improved monitoring in the 1980's are discussed.

  4. Engine systems and methods of operating an engine

    DOEpatents

    Scotto, Mark Vincent

    2015-08-25

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique method for operating an engine. Another embodiment is a unique engine system. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for engines and engine systems. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  5. Intraoral scanning systems - a current overview.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, M; Mehl, A; Mörmann, W H; Reich, S

    2015-01-01

    There is no doubt today about the possibilities and potential of digital impression-taking with the aid of intraoral optical impression systems, and the past few years have seen a considerable increase in the range of optical intraoral scanners available on the market. On the strength of numerous innovations and a wider range of indications in orthodontics and implantology, intraoral scanning systems appear to be a highly promising development for the future. Digital impression-taking with intraoral scanners has already shown itself in some respects to be clearly superior to conventional impression- taking. Particularly worthy of mention is the versatile integration of digital impressions into diagnostic and treatment concepts to provide a customizable healthcare solution for the patient. It remains exciting to look forward to future developments that will allow us to observe digital impression-taking--as with other digital applications already established in everyday life--becoming firmly established in the routine of dentistry and dental technology. This article presents an overview of the benefits and limitations of digital impression-taking using intraoral scanning systems, and includes a summary of all the relevant intraoral scanners available on the market at present. PMID:26110925

  6. Intelligent Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Ming

    2008-01-01

    A high bypass jet engine fan case represents one of the largest, heaviest single components in an engine. In addition to supporting the inlet and providing the fan flowpath, the most critical function is the containment of a failed fan blade. In this development program, a lightweight, low-cost composite containment case with diagnostic capabilities was developed, fabricated, and tested. The fan case design, containment methods, and diagnostic concepts evaluated in the initial Propulsion 21 program were improved and scaled up to a full case design.

  7. Space Station Freedom Attitude Determination and Control System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penrod, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom attitude determination and control system overview are presented. Topics covered include: highly dynamic plant; SSF flight attitudes; effectors; inertial attitude sensors; control system performance requirements; control system functional requirements; and controller architecture.

  8. Overview on the applications of random wave concept in coastal engineering

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Yoshimi

    2008-01-01

    When “coastal engineering” was recognized as a new discipline in 1950, the significant wave concept was the basic tool in dealing with wave actions on beach and structures. Description of sea waves as the random process with spectral and statistical analysis was gradually introduced in various engineering problems in coastal engineering through the 1970s and 1980s. Nowadays the random wave concept plays the central role in engineering manuals for maritime structure designs. The present paper overviews the historical development of random wave concept and its applications in coastal engineering. PMID:18997449

  9. Engineering Design Information System (EDIS) user' manual

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.S.; Short, R.D.

    1991-11-01

    This manual is a guide to the use of the Engineering Design Information System (EDIS). The system runs on the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., IBM 3084 unclassified computer. EDIS is in the second phase of implementation, which provides an index, storage, and retrieval system for engineering documents produced at various plants and laboratories operated by Energy Systems for the Department of Energy (DOE). The second phase also provides additional hard copy request functionality. Section 2.0 of this manual presents an overview of EDIS, describing the system's purpose; the functions it performs; hardware, software, and security requirements; and help and error functions. Section 3.0 describes how to access EDIS and how to operate system functions using Database 2 (DB2), Time Sharing Option (TSO), Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF), Soft Master viewing, and FT/Express file transfer features employed by this system. Appendix A lists the special hardware and software requirements that must be met to run the View function. Appendix B contains a description of the Soft Master viewing capabilities provided through the EDIS View function. Appendix C contains a list of special hardware and software requirements for the Store and Download functions of EDIS. Appendix D provides examples of the system error screens and help screens for valid codes used for screen entry. Appendix E contains a dictionary of data elements and descriptions.

  10. Overview of a hybrid underwater camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Philip; Hou, Weilin; Fournier, Georges; Dalgleish, Fraser; Butler, Derek; Pari, Sergio; Jamieson, Michael; Pike, David

    2014-05-01

    The paper provides an overview of a Hybrid Underwater Camera (HUC) system combining sonar with a range-gated laser camera system. The sonar is the BlueView P900-45, operating at 900kHz with a field of view of 45 degrees and ranging capability of 60m. The range-gated laser camera system is based on the third generation LUCIE (Laser Underwater Camera Image Enhancer) sensor originally developed by the Defence Research and Development Canada. LUCIE uses an eye-safe laser generating 1ns pulses at a wavelength of 532nm and at the rate of 25kHz. An intensified CCD camera operates with a gating mechanism synchronized with the laser pulse. The gate opens to let the camera capture photons from a given range of interest and can be set from a minimum delay of 5ns with increments of 200ps. The output of the sensor is a 30Hz video signal. Automatic ranging is achieved using a sonar altimeter. The BlueView sonar and LUCIE sensors are integrated with an underwater computer that controls the sensors parameters and displays the real-time data for the sonar and the laser camera. As an initial step for data integration, graphics overlays representing the laser camera field-of-view along with the gate position and width are overlaid on the sonar display. The HUC system can be manually handled by a diver and can also be controlled from a surface vessel through an umbilical cord. Recent test data obtained from the HUC system operated in a controlled underwater environment will be presented along with measured performance characteristics.

  11. Engine Data Interpretation System (EDIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cost, Thomas L.; Hofmann, Martin O.

    1990-01-01

    A prototype of an expert system was developed which applies qualitative or model-based reasoning to the task of post-test analysis and diagnosis of data resulting from a rocket engine firing. A combined component-based and process theory approach is adopted as the basis for system modeling. Such an approach provides a framework for explaining both normal and deviant system behavior in terms of individual component functionality. The diagnosis function is applied to digitized sensor time-histories generated during engine firings. The generic system is applicable to any liquid rocket engine but was adapted specifically in this work to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The system is applied to idealized data resulting from turbomachinery malfunction in the SSME.

  12. Systems engineering for very large systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewkowicz, Paul E.

    1993-01-01

    Very large integrated systems have always posed special problems for engineers. Whether they are power generation systems, computer networks or space vehicles, whenever there are multiple interfaces, complex technologies or just demanding customers, the challenges are unique. 'Systems engineering' has evolved as a discipline in order to meet these challenges by providing a structured, top-down design and development methodology for the engineer. This paper attempts to define the general class of problems requiring the complete systems engineering treatment and to show how systems engineering can be utilized to improve customer satisfaction and profit ability. Specifically, this work will focus on a design methodology for the largest of systems, not necessarily in terms of physical size, but in terms of complexity and interconnectivity.

  13. Automotive Stirling engine development program - Overview and status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nightingale, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of the automotive-Stirling-engine development program being undertaken by DOE and NASA Lewis is reviewed. The program goals and the reference-engine design are explained, and the modifications introduced to improve performance and lower manufacturing costs are discussed and illustrated, including part-power optimization; increased operating temperature (from 720 to 820 C); 45.4-kg weight reduction; elimination of Co and reduction of Cr used; and improved seals, ceramic components, and high-temperature alloys. The test program, some difficulties encountered, and results after 2042 h are summarized.

  14. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) version 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following; nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) engine system analysis program development; nuclear thermal propulsion engine analysis capability requirements; team resources used to support NESS development; expanded liquid engine simulations (ELES) computer model; ELES verification examples; NESS program development evolution; past NTP ELES analysis code modifications and verifications; general NTP engine system features modeled by NESS; representative NTP expander, gas generator, and bleed engine system cycles modeled by NESS; NESS program overview; NESS program flow logic; enabler (NERVA type) nuclear thermal rocket engine; prismatic fuel elements and supports; reactor fuel and support element parameters; reactor parameters as a function of thrust level; internal shield sizing; and reactor thermal model.

  15. Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS) version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Petrosky, Lyman J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following; nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) engine system analysis program development; nuclear thermal propulsion engine analysis capability requirements; team resources used to support NESS development; expanded liquid engine simulations (ELES) computer model; ELES verification examples; NESS program development evolution; past NTP ELES analysis code modifications and verifications; general NTP engine system features modeled by NESS; representative NTP expander, gas generator, and bleed engine system cycles modeled by NESS; NESS program overview; NESS program flow logic; enabler (NERVA type) nuclear thermal rocket engine; prismatic fuel elements and supports; reactor fuel and support element parameters; reactor parameters as a function of thrust level; internal shield sizing; and reactor thermal model.

  16. Microbial biofilms in intertidal systems: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.

    2000-07-01

    Intertidal marine systems are highly dynamic systems which are characterized by periodic fluctuations in environmental parameters. Microbial processes play critical roles in the remineralization of nutrients and primary production in intertidal systems. Many of the geochemical and biological processes which are mediated by microorganisms occur within microenvironments which can be measured over micrometer spatial scales. These processes are localized by cells within a matrix of extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS), collectively called a "microbial biofilm". Recent examinations of intertidal systems by a range of investigators using new approaches show an abundance of biofilm communities. The purpose of this overview is to examine recent information concerning the roles of microbial biofilms in intertidal systems. The microbial biofilm is a common adaptation of natural bacteria and other microorganisms. In the fluctuating environments of intertidal systems, biofilms form protective microenvironments and may structure a range of microbial processes. The EPS matrix of biofilm forms sticky coatings on individual sediment particles and detrital surfaces, which act as a stabilizing anchor to buffer cells and their extracellular processes during the frequent physical stresses (e.g., changes in salinity and temperature, UV irradiation, dessication). EPS is an operational definition designed to encompass a range of large microbially-secreted molecules having widely varying physical and chemical properties, and a range of biological roles. Examinations of EPS using Raman and Fourier-transform infared spectroscopy, and atomic-force microscopy suggest that some EPS gels possess physical and chemical properties which may hasten the development of sharp geochemical gradients, and contribute a protective effect to cells. Biofilm polymers act as a sorptive sponge which binds and concentrates organic molecules and ions close to cells. Concurrently, the EPS appear to localize

  17. Systems Engineering, Quality and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2015-01-01

    AS9100 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to aerospace test programs. There is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination or some type of lab or bench testing. If one examines how the systems engineering processes are implemented throughout a test program; and how these processes can be mapped to AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed.

  18. Overview of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) engineering design activities*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1988), ITER Documentation Series, No. 1] project is a multiphased project, presently proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement among the European Atomic Energy Community (EC), the Government of Japan (JA), the Government of the Russian Federation (RF), and the Government of the United States (US), ``the Parties.'' The ITER project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention, and has since been brought to a high level of development in all major fusion programs in the world. The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER design is being developed, with support from the Parties' four Home Teams and is in progress by the Joint Central Team. An overview of ITER Design activities is presented.

  19. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large-scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze major propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of designing systems, providing the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the numerical propulsion system simulation (NPSS), a modular and extensible framework for the integration of multicomponent and multidisciplinary analysis tools using geographically distributed resources such as computing platforms, data bases, and people. The analysis is currently focused on large-scale modeling of complete aircraft engines. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  20. An engineering data management system for IPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Comfort, D. L.; Shull, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the capabilities and software architecture of the IPAD information processor (IPIP) is presented. IPIP is a state-of-the-art data base management system that satisfies engineering requirements not addressed by present day commercial systems. It also significantly advances a number of capabilities that are offered commercially. IPIP capabilities range from support for multiple schemas and data models to support for distributed processing, configuration control, and data inventory management. IPIP exploits semantic commonality in features offered in various forms at different user interfaces in today's commercial systems. An integrated software architecture supports all user interfaces: programming languages, interactive data manipulation, and schema languages. This approach promotes simplicity and compactness in software and permits features to be offered symmetrically across all appropriate user interfaces.

  1. Dish/Stirling systems: Overview of an emerging commercial solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.W.; Diver, R.B.; Estrada, C.

    1995-11-01

    Dish/Stirling is a solar thermal electric technology which couples parabolic, point-focusing solar collectors and heat engines which employ the Stirling thermodynamic cycle. Since the late 1970s, the development of Dish/Stirling systems intended for commercial use has been in progress in Germany, Japan, and the US. In the next several years it is expected that one or more commercial systems will enter the market place. This paper provides a general overview of this emerging technology, including: a description of the fundamental principles of operation of Dish/Stirling systems; a presentation of the major components of the systems (concentrator, receiver, engine/alternator, and controls); an overview of the actual systems under development around the world, with a discussion of some of the technical issues and challenges facing the Dish/Stirling developers. A brief discussion is also presented of potential applications for small Dish/Stirling systems in northern Mexico.

  2. 1. OVERVIEW OF SYSTEM, SHOWING POWERHOUSE, SWITCH HOUSE, PENSTOCK CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW OF SYSTEM, SHOWING POWERHOUSE, SWITCH HOUSE, PENSTOCK CONSTRUCTION SCAR, AND HOUSING AREA, LOOKING EAST, SOMETIME AFTER 1910 Historic photograph no. SC8715, no date - Centerville Hydroelectric System, Butte Creek, Centerville, Butte County, CA

  3. System Engineering Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.; Bauer, Jonathan; Beougher, Nathan G.; Boe, Caleb; Canahui, Ricardo; Charles, John P.; Cooper, Zachary Davis Job; DeShaw, Mark A.; Fontanella, Luan Gasparetto; Friel, Mark; Goebel, Katie; Grant, Alex Martinsdacosta; Graves, Matt; Harms, Ryan Andrew; Hill, Aren; Lsely, Kevin Lee; Jose, Sonia; Klein, Andrew; Kolstad, Lauren Wickham; Lamp, Daniel A.; Lindquist, Mariangela Martin; Lopes, Daniel da Paula; Lourens, Rob; Matthews, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Iowa State University team, Team LunaCY, is composed of the following sub-teams: the main student organization, the Lunabotics Club; a senior mechanical engineering design course, ME 415; a senior multidisciplinary design course, ENGR 466; and a senior design course from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa. Team LunaCY designed and fabricated ART-E III, Astra Robotic Tractor- Excavator the Third, for the team's third appearance in the NASA Lunabotic Mining competition. While designing ART-E III, the team had four main goals for this year's competition:to reduce the total weight of the robot, to increase the amount of regolith simulant mined, to reduce dust, and to make ART-E III autonomous. After many designs and research, a final robot design was chosen that obtained all four goals of Team LunaCY. A few changes Team LunaCY made this year was to go to the electrical, computer, and software engineering club fest at Iowa State University to recruit engineering students to accomplish the task of making ART-E III autonomous. Team LunaCY chose to use LabView to program the robot and various sensors were installed to measure the distance between the robot and the surroundings to allow ART-E III to maneuver autonomously. Team LunaCY also built a testing arena to test prototypes and ART-E III in. To best replicate the competition arena at the Kennedy Space Center, a regolith simulant was made from sand, QuickCrete, and fly ash to cover the floor of the arena. Team LunaCY also installed fans to allow ventilation in the arena and used proper safety attire when working in the arena . With the additional practice in the testing arena and innovative robot design, Team LunaCY expects to make a strong appearance at the 2012 NASA Lunabotic Mining Competition. .

  4. Overview of free-piston Stirling engine technology for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is presented of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center (LeRC) free-piston Stirling engine activities directed toward space-power application. One of the major elements of the program is the development of advanced power conversion of which the Stirling cycle is a viable candidate. Under this program the status of the 25 kWe opposed-piston Space Power Demonstrator Engine (SPDE) is presented. Technology work is also conducted on heat-exchanger concepts, both design and fabrication, to minimize the number of joints as well as to enhance the heat transfer in the heater. Design parameters and conceptual design features are also presented for a 25 kWe, single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power converter. Projections are made for future space-power requirements over the next few decades along with a recommendation to consider the use of dynamic power-conversion systems - either solar or nuclear. A description of a study to investigate the feasibility of scaling a single-cylinder free-piston Stirling space-power module to the 150 kWe power range is presented.

  5. Overview of the Orion Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowal, T. John

    2010-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is being developed as part of the Constellation Exploration Program and will serve as the United States crewed transportation system to the International Space Station after the retirement of the Space Shuttle in 2010 and as the eventual means to return U.S. astronauts to the Moon. Therefore, Orion is being designed for reentry missions from both low Earth orbit and from Lunar-return trajectories. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of the Orion TPS, a critical component in the development of the spacecraft. The thermal protection system (TPS) that protects the crew module from the extreme environments associated with Earth atmospheric reentry consists of a forward heatshield and an aft backshell. The requirements that drive the design of the TPS will be discussed, including several key requirements that establish a precedent for U.S. human-rated spacecraft. For the first time in U.S. human spaceflight, a vehicle s TPS is being designed with a specific, derived requirement for reliability. Also, due to the increased presence of spacecraft in Earth s orbit in recent decades, requirements for micro-meteoroid/orbital debris damage tolerance are also a driving requirement that has affected the selection of portions of the TPS. The efforts to select materials and to define a preliminary design for both the heatshield and the backshell will be described. This will include a discussion of the design challenges presented by the numerous penetrations on both the backshell and the heatshield. Finally, the verification and validation plan which is currently under development to certify the TPS for human-rated missions will be outlined. To support the execution of this plan, a ground test campaign for both thermal and structural performance is being designed. This test campaign will directly support thermal and thermal/structural analyses that also are fundamental to the certification effort.

  6. Expert Systems: An Overview for Teacher-Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwig, Gary; Barron, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Provides an overview of expert systems for teacher librarians. Highlights include artificial intelligence and expert systems; the development of the MYCIN medical expert system; rule-based expert systems; the use of expert system shells to develop a specific system; and how to select an appropriate application for an expert system. (11 references)…

  7. Overview of Intelligent Systems and Operations Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallix, Joan; Dorais, Greg; Penix, John

    2004-01-01

    To achieve NASA's ambitious mission objectives for the future, aircraft and spacecraft will need intelligence to take the correct action in a variety of circumstances. Vehicle intelligence can be defined as the ability to "do the right thing" when faced with a complex decision-making situation. It will be necessary to implement integrated autonomous operations and low-level adaptive flight control technologies to direct actions that enhance the safety and success of complex missions despite component failures, degraded performance, operator errors, and environment uncertainty. This paper will describe the array of technologies required to meet these complex objectives. This includes the integration of high-level reasoning and autonomous capabilities with multiple subsystem controllers for robust performance. Future intelligent systems will use models of the system, its environment, and other intelligent agents with which it interacts. They will also require planners, reasoning engines, and adaptive controllers that can recommend or execute commands enabling the system to respond intelligently. The presentation will also address the development of highly dependable software, which is a key component to ensure the reliability of intelligent systems.

  8. Adaptive Systems Engineering: A Medical Paradigm for Practicing Systems Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    R. Douglas Hamelin; Ron D. Klingler; Christopher Dieckmann

    2011-06-01

    From its inception in the defense and aerospace industries, SE has applied holistic, interdisciplinary tools and work-process to improve the design and management of 'large, complex engineering projects.' The traditional scope of engineering in general embraces the design, development, production, and operation of physical systems, and SE, as originally conceived, falls within that scope. While this 'traditional' view has expanded over the years to embrace wider, more holistic applications, much of the literature and training currently available is still directed almost entirely at addressing the large, complex, NASA and defense-sized systems wherein the 'ideal' practice of SE provides the cradle-to-grave foundation for system development and deployment. Under such scenarios, systems engineers are viewed as an integral part of the system and project life-cycle from conception to decommissioning. In far less 'ideal' applications, SE principles are equally applicable to a growing number of complex systems and projects that need to be 'rescued' from overwhelming challenges that threaten imminent failure. The medical profession provides a unique analogy for this latter concept and offers a useful paradigm for tailoring our 'practice' of SE to address the unexpected dynamics of applying SE in the real world. In short, we can be much more effective as systems engineers as we change some of the paradigms under which we teach and 'practice' SE.

  9. Overview of additive manufacturing activities at MTU aero engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, Joachim; Dusel, Karl-Heinz; Satzger, Wilhelm

    2015-03-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a promising technology to produce parts easily and effectively, just by using metallic powder or wire as starting material and a sophisticated melting process. In contrast to milling or turning technologies complex shaped and hollow parts can be built up in one step. That reduces the production costs and allows the implementation of complete new 3D designs. Therefore AM is also of great interest for aerospace and aero engine industry. MTU Aero Engines has focused its AM activities to the selective laser melting technique (SLM). This technique uses metallic powder and a laser for melting and building up the part layer by layer. It is shown which lead part was selected for AM and how the first production line was established. A special focus is set on the quality assurance of the selective laser melting process. In addition to standard non-destructive inspection techniques a new online monitoring tool was developed and integrated into the SLM machines. The basics of this technique is presented.

  10. A software engineering approach to expert system design and verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.; Goodwin, Mary Ann

    1988-01-01

    Software engineering design and verification methods for developing expert systems are not yet well defined. Integration of expert system technology into software production environments will require effective software engineering methodologies to support the entire life cycle of expert systems. The software engineering methods used to design and verify an expert system, RENEX, is discussed. RENEX demonstrates autonomous rendezvous and proximity operations, including replanning trajectory events and subsystem fault detection, onboard a space vehicle during flight. The RENEX designers utilized a number of software engineering methodologies to deal with the complex problems inherent in this system. An overview is presented of the methods utilized. Details of the verification process receive special emphasis. The benefits and weaknesses of the methods for supporting the development life cycle of expert systems are evaluated, and recommendations are made based on the overall experiences with the methods.

  11. Evolution of a Unique Systems Engineering Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Caliva; James A. Murphy; Kyle B. Oswald

    2011-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering laboratory dedicated to supporting U.S. Department of Energy missions in nuclear and energy research, science, and national security. The INL’s Systems Engineering organization supports all of the various programs under this wide array of missions. As with any multifaceted organization, strategic planning is essential to establishing a consistent culture and a value discipline throughout all levels of the enterprise. While an organization can pursue operational excellence, product leadership or customer intimacy, it is extremely difficult to excel or achieve best-in-class at all three. In fact, trying to do so has resulted in the demise of a number of organizations given the very intricate balancing act that is necessary. The INL’s Systems Engineering Department has chosen to focus on customer intimacy where the customer’s needs are first and foremost and a more total solution is the goal. Frequently a total solution requires the employment of specialized tools to manage system complexity. However, it is only after understanding customer needs that tool selection and use would be pursued. This results in using both commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) tools and, in some cases, requires internal development of specialized tools. This paper describes how a unique systems engineering capability, through the development of customized tools, evolved as a result of this customer-focused culture. It also addresses the need for a common information model or analysis framework and presents an overview of the tools developed to manage and display relationships between entities, support trade studies through the application of utility theory, and facilitate the development of a technology roadmap to manage system risk and uncertainty.

  12. Apollo Command and Service Module Propulsion Systems Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Apollo Command and Service Module (CSM) propulsion systems is provided. The systems for CSM propulsion and control are defined, the times during the mission when each system is used are listed, and, the basic components and operation of the service propulsion system, SM reaction control system and CM reaction control system are described.

  13. Engine NOx reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Berriman, L.P.; Zabsky, J.M.; Davis, J.W.; Hylton, W.H.

    1993-07-06

    Apparatus for use with an engine having a power-generating portion that burns a hydrocarbon fuel and air and produces hot exhaust gases is described, having a catalytic converter device that includes a catalyst for enhancing reactions of components of said exhaust gases, and having a conduit that couples said power-generating portion to said catalytic converter device, for reducing pollution in the exhaust, wherein said power-generating portion comprises a plurality of cylinders in which said fuel and air are burned, a mechanism for applying fuel and air to said cylinders, and a plurality of exhaust valves through which burned fuel and air is exhausted and which are connected to said upstream end of said conduit, said conduit including a manifold which is connected to a plurality of said exhaust valves and a downstream conduit portion which connects said manifold to said catalytic converter device, comprising: a device coupled to said conduit, which stores ammonia and injects it into said conduit at a location where the exhaust gases have a substantially maximum temperature, but which is devoid of open flames, to mix with said hot exhaust gases and pass with them along said conduit and then through said catalyst, said location being closer to said power-generating portion than to said catalytic converter and lying in said manifold.

  14. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  15. The National Grid Project: A system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaither, Adam; Gaither, Kelly; Jean, Brian; Remotigue, Michael; Whitmire, John; Soni, Bharat; Thompson, Joe; Dannenhoffer,, John; Weatherill, Nigel

    1995-01-01

    The National Grid Project (NGP) is a comprehensive numerical grid generation software system that is being developed at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center (ERC) for Computational Field Simulation (CFS) at Mississippi State University (MSU). NGP is supported by a coalition of U.S. industries and federal laboratories. The objective of the NGP is to significantly decrease the amount of time it takes to generate a numerical grid for complex geometries and to increase the quality of these grids to enable computational field simulations for applications in industry. A geometric configuration can be discretized into grids (or meshes) that have two fundamental forms: structured and unstructured. Structured grids are formed by intersecting curvilinear coordinate lines and are composed of quadrilateral (2D) and hexahedral (3D) logically rectangular cells. The connectivity of a structured grid provides for trivial identification of neighboring points by incrementing coordinate indices. Unstructured grids are composed of cells of any shape (commonly triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra and hexahedra), but do not have trivial identification of neighbors by incrementing an index. For unstructured grids, a set of points and an associated connectivity table is generated to define unstructured cell shapes and neighboring points. Hybrid grids are a combination of structured grids and unstructured grids. Chimera (overset) grids are intersecting or overlapping structured grids. The NGP system currently provides a user interface that integrates both 2D and 3D structured and unstructured grid generation, a solid modeling topology data management system, an internal Computer Aided Design (CAD) system based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS), a journaling language, and a grid/solution visualization system.

  16. Industrial and Systems Engineering Applications in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the many applications of Industrial and Systems Engineering used for safe NASA missions is shown. The topics include: 1) NASA Information; 2) Industrial Engineering; 3) Systems Engineering; and 4) Major NASA Programs.

  17. Computer systems and software engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, Charles W.

    1988-01-01

    The High Technologies Laboratory (HTL) was established in the fall of 1982 at the University of Houston Clear Lake. Research conducted at the High Tech Lab is focused upon computer systems and software engineering. There is a strong emphasis on the interrelationship of these areas of technology and the United States' space program. In Jan. of 1987, NASA Headquarters announced the formation of its first research center dedicated to software engineering. Operated by the High Tech Lab, the Software Engineering Research Center (SERC) was formed at the University of Houston Clear Lake. The High Tech Lab/Software Engineering Research Center promotes cooperative research among government, industry, and academia to advance the edge-of-knowledge and the state-of-the-practice in key topics of computer systems and software engineering which are critical to NASA. The center also recommends appropriate actions, guidelines, standards, and policies to NASA in matters pertinent to the center's research. Results of the research conducted at the High Tech Lab/Software Engineering Research Center have given direction to many decisions made by NASA concerning the Space Station Program.

  18. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-01

    ASPEN (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes. ASPEN can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations. It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computationmore » of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The ASPEN Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.« less

  19. OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE AND RUN OUT WITH TRAVELING TORCH. MACHINE IS CASTING IN TWIN MOLD. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  20. An Overview of the Human Systems Integration Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the Human Systems Integration Division, and will highlight some of the human performance modeling efforts undertaken in previously presented MIDAS human performance modeling efforts.

  1. Diesel engine fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The film shows the basic structure of diesel systems, including the parts and operation of injectors and fuel pumps. It discusses Bosch, General Motors, and Excello Equipment. This title has been declared obsolete for use within the sponsoring agency, but may have content value for educational use.

  2. Diesel engine fuel systems

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The film shows the basic structure of diesel systems, including the parts and operation of injectors and fuel pumps. It discusses Bosch, General Motors, and Excello Equipment. This title has been declared obsolete for use within the sponsoring agency, but may have content value for educational use.

  3. A comparative overview of modal testing and system identification for control of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, J.-N.; Pappa, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative overview is presented of the disciplines of modal testing used in structural engineering and system identification used in control theory. A list of representative references from both areas is given, and the basic methods are described briefly. Recent progress on the interaction of modal testing and control disciplines is discussed. It is concluded that combined efforts of researchers in both disciplines are required for unification of modal testing and system identification methods for control of flexible structures.

  4. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  5. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  6. Overview of control design methods for smart structural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Vittal S.; Sana, Sridhar

    2001-08-01

    Smart structures are a result of effective integration of control system design and signal processing with the structural systems to maximally utilize the new advances in materials for structures, actuation and sensing to obtain the best performance for the application at hand. The research in smart structures is constantly driving towards attaining self adaptive and diagnostic capabilities that biological systems possess. This has been manifested in the number of successful applications in many areas of engineering such as aerospace, civil and automotive systems. Instrumental in the development of such systems are smart materials such as piezo-electric, shape memory alloys, electrostrictive, magnetostrictive and fiber-optic materials and various composite materials for use as actuators, sensors and structural members. The need for development of control systems that maximally utilize the smart actuators and sensing materials to design highly distributed and highly adaptable controllers has spurred research in the area of smart structural modeling, identification, actuator/sensor design and placement, control systems design such as adaptive and robust controllers with new tools such a neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms, linear matrix inequalities and electronics for controller implementation such as analog electronics, micro controllers, digital signal processors (DSPs) and application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) such field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and Multichip modules (MCMs) etc. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the state of control in smart structures. Different aspects of the development of smart structures such as applications, technology and theoretical advances especially in the area of control systems design and implementation will be covered.

  7. Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage/Upper Stage Engine Element Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McArthur, J. Craig

    2008-01-01

    The Ares I upper stage is an integral part of the Constellation Program transportation system. The upper stage provides guidance, navigation and control (GN and C) for the second stage of ascent flight for the Ares I vehicle. The Saturn-derived J-2X upper stage engine will provide thrust and propulsive impulse for the second stage of ascent flight for the Ares I launch vehicle. Additionally, the upper stage is responsible for the avionics system of the the entire Ares I. This brief presentation highlights the requirements, design, progress and production of the upper stage. Additionally, test facilities to support J-2X development are discussed and an overview of the operational and manufacturing flows are provided. Building on the heritage of the Apollo and Space Shuttle Programs, the Ares I Us and USE teams are utilizing extensive lessons learned to place NASA and the US into another era of space exploration. The NASA, Boeing and PWR teams are integrated and working together to make progress designing and building the Ares I upper stage to minimize cost, technical and schedule risks.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtalik, F. S.

    1988-01-01

    The role of systems engineering in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) development program at NASA Marshall is reviewed. The scientific objectives and overall characteristics of the HST are recalled, and particular attention is given to the early identification and correction of problems in the optical system, the pointing-control system (maneuvering and fine guidance), the rate-gyro assembly, reaction-wheel isolation, the battery reconditioning circuit, and optical cleanliness.

  9. Engineering intelligent tutoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Kimberly C.; Goodman, Bradley A.

    1993-01-01

    We have defined an object-oriented software architecture for Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS's) to facilitate the rapid development, testing, and fielding of ITS's. This software architecture partitions the functionality of the ITS into a collection of software components with well-defined interfaces and execution concept. The architecture was designed to isolate advanced technology components, partition domain dependencies, take advantage of the increased availability of commercial software packages, and reduce the risks involved in acquiring ITS's. A key component of the architecture, the Executive, is a publish and subscribe message handling component that coordinates all communication between ITS components.

  10. Systems engineering of the Thirty Meter Telescope for the construction phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Scott; Rogers, John; Thompson, Hugh; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos; MacMartin, Douglas; Wilde, Eric; Troy, Mitchell; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides an overview of the system design, architecture, and construction phase system engineering processes of the Thirty Meter Telescope project. We summarize the key challenges and our solutions for managing TMT systems engineering during the construction phase. We provide an overview of system budgets, requirements and interfaces, and the management thereof. The requirements engineering processes, including verification and plans for collection of technical data and testing during the assembly and integration phases, are described. We present configuration, change control and technical review processes, covering all aspects of the system design including performance models, requirements, and CAD databases.

  11. New opportunities for future small civil turbine engines - Overviewing the GATE studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of four independent studies that explore the opportunities for future General Aviation Turbine Engines (GATE) in the 150-1000 SHP class. Detroit Diesel Allison, Garrett/AiResearch, Teledyne CAE, and Williams Research participated along with several airframers. These studies forecasted the potential impact of advanced technology turbine engines in the post-1988 market, identified important aircraft and missions, desirable engine sizes, engine performance and cost goals. Parametric evaluations of various engine cycles, configurations, design features, and advanced technology elements defined baseline conceptual engines for each of the important missions identified by the market analysis. Both fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, and turboshaft, turboprop, and turbofan engines were considered. All four companies predicted sizable performance gains (e.g., 20% SFC decrease), and three predicted large engine cost reductions of sufficient magnitude to challenge the reciprocating engine in the 300-500 SHP class. Key technology areas were recommended for NASA support in order to realize these improvements.

  12. Jet engine air intake system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, N. E.; Latham, E. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An axisymmetric air intake system for a jet aircraft engine comprising a fixed cowl extending outwardly from the face of the engine, a centerbody coaxially disposed within the cowl, and an actuator for axially displacing the centerbody within the cowl was developed. The cowl and centerbody define a main airflow passageway therebetween, the configuration of which is changed by displacement of the centerbody. The centerbody includes a forwardly-located closeable air inlet which communicates with a centerbody auxiliary airflow passageway to provide auxiliary airflow to the engine. In one embodiment, a system for opening and closing the centerbody air inlet is provided by a dual-member centerbody, the forward member of which may be displaced axially with respect to the aft member.

  13. Computer Jet-Engine-Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disbrow, James D.; Duke, Eugene L.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    "Intelligent Computer Assistant for Engine Monitoring" (ICAEM), computer-based monitoring system intended to distill and display data on conditions of operation of two turbofan engines of F-18, is in preliminary state of development. System reduces burden on propulsion engineer by providing single display of summary information on statuses of engines and alerting engineer to anomalous conditions. Effective use of prior engine-monitoring system requires continuous attention to multiple displays.

  14. Overview of the physics and engineering design of NSTX upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, J. E.; Gerhardt, S.; Bell, M.; Bialek, J.; Brooks, A.; Canik, J.; Chrzanowski, J.; Denault, M.; Dudek, L.; Gates, D. A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hatcher, R.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kolemen, E.; Kugel, H.; Maingi, R.; Mardenfeld, M.; Mueller, D.; Nelson, B.; Neumeyer, C.; Ono, M.; Perry, E.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Sabbagh, S.; Smith, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Strykowsky, R.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.; Titus, P.; Tresemer, K.; Tritz, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Woolley, R.; Yuh, H.; Zhang, H.; Zhai, Y.; Zolfaghari, A.; the NSTX Team

    2012-08-01

    The spherical tokamak (ST) is a leading candidate for a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) due to its compact size and modular configuration. The National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) is a MA-class ST facility in the US actively developing the physics basis for an ST-based FNSF. In plasma transport research, ST experiments exhibit a strong (nearly inverse) scaling of normalized confinement with collisionality, and if this trend holds at low collisionality, high fusion neutron fluences could be achievable in very compact ST devices. A major motivation for the NSTX Upgrade (NSTX-U) is to span the next factor of 3-6 reduction in collisionality. To achieve this collisionality reduction with equilibrated profiles, NSTX-U will double the toroidal field, plasma current, and NBI heating power and increase the pulse length from 1-1.5 s to 5-8 s. In the area of stability and advanced scenarios, plasmas with higher aspect ratio and elongation, high βN, and broad current profiles approaching those of an ST-based FNSF have been produced in NSTX using active control of the plasma β and advanced resistive wall mode control. High non-inductive current fractions of 70% have been sustained for many current diffusion times, and the more tangential injection of the 2nd NBI of the Upgrade is projected to increase the NBI current drive by up to a factor of 2 and support 100% non-inductive operation. More tangential NBI injection is also projected to provide non-solenoidal current ramp-up as needed for an ST-based FNSF. In boundary physics, NSTX measures an inverse relationship between the scrape-off layer heat-flux width and plasma current that could unfavourably impact next-step devices. Recently, NSTX has successfully demonstrated substantial heat-flux reduction using a snowflake divertor configuration, and this type of divertor is incorporated in the NSTX-U design. The physics and engineering design supporting NSTX Upgrade is described.

  15. 2.0 AEDL Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Some engineering topics: Some Initial Thoughts. Capability Description. Capability State-of-the-Art. Capability Requirements. Systems Engineering. Capability Roadmap. Capability Maturity. Candidate Technologies. Metrics.

  16. Building America Systems Engineering Approach

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-15

    The Building America Research Teams use a systems engineering approach to achieve higher quality and energy savings in homes. Using these techniques, the energy consumption of new houses can be reduced by 40% or more with little or no impact on the cost of ownership.

  17. Overview of genetically engineered mouse models of colorectal carcinoma to enable translational biology and drug development.

    PubMed

    Roper, Jatin; Martin, Eric S; Hung, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical models for colorectal cancer (CRC) are critical for translational biology and drug development studies to characterize and treat this condition. Mouse models of human cancer are particularly popular because of their relatively low cost, short life span, and ease of use. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of CRC are engineered from germline or somatic modification of critical tumor suppressor genes and/or oncogenes that drive mutations in human disease. Detailed in this overview are the salient features of several useful colorectal cancer GEMMs and their value as tools for translational biology and preclinical drug development. PMID:24934606

  18. Management issues in systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Chamberlain, Robert G.; Aster, Robert; Bilardo, Vincent; Forsberg, Kevin; Mooz, Hal; Polaski, Lou; Wade, Ron

    1993-01-01

    When applied to a system, the doctrine of successive refinement is a divide-and-conquer strategy. Complex systems are sucessively divided into pieces that are less complex, until they are simple enough to be conquered. This decomposition results in several structures for describing the product system and the producing system. These structures play important roles in systems engineering and project management. Many of the remaining sections in this chapter are devoted to describing some of these key structures. Structures that describe the product system include, but are not limited to, the requirements tree, system architecture and certain symbolic information such as system drawings, schematics, and data bases. The structures that describe the producing system include the project's work breakdown, schedules, cost accounts and organization.

  19. Management System for Engineering Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, Tomonari

    In the context of independent profession based societies, ethics charter/codes of professional bodies have significant influence on the conduct of engineers. Contrarily in Japan, most of active engineers are in-house and feel immediate identity as the member of firm or institution, rather than professional bodies. Therefore, establishment and operation of engineering ethics management system (E2ms) is essential for incentive to make innovative and ethical decision with confidence. The paper introduces the outline of the educational kit for E2ms developed by the author. The kit aims to enhance ability of management relevant to E2ms. The kit also involves ten cases for case method teaching. The test use of the kit indicates the potential to create satisfactory educational achievement.

  20. Overview of NASA's Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA)Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jeffrey S.; Martin John G.

    2008-01-01

    Historically, the design of subsonic and supersonic aircraft has been divided into separate technical disciplines (such as propulsion, aerodynamics and structures) each of which performs their design and analysis in relative isolation from others. This is possible in most cases either because the amount of interdisciplinary coupling is minimal or because the interactions can be treated as linear. The design of hypersonic airbreathing vehicles, like NASA s X-43, is quite the opposite. Such systems are dominated by strong non-linear interactions between disciplines. The design of these systems demands that a multi-disciplinary approach be taken. Furthermore, increased analytical fidelity at the conceptual design phase is highly desirable as many of the non-linearities are not captured by lower fidelity tools. Only when these systems are designed from a true multi-disciplinary perspective can the real performance benefits be achieved and complete vehicle systems be fielded. Toward this end, the Vehicle Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has been developing the Integrated Design & Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment. IDEA is a collaborative environment for parametrically modeling conceptual and preliminary launch vehicle configurations using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. The environment integrates geometry, configuration, propulsion, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, trajectory, closure and structural analysis into a generative, parametric, unified computational model where data is shared seamlessly between the different disciplines. Plans are also in place to incorporate life cycle analysis tools into the environment which will estimate vehicle operability, reliability and cost. IDEA is currently being funded by NASA s Hypersonics Project, a part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program within the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. The environment is currently focused around a two-stage-to-orbit configuration

  1. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  2. Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Craig D.; And Others

    This document consists of the first section of a book written to educate and inform those in the helping professions on how to deal with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The two chapters in this first section present an overview of the AIDS crisis and provide a foundation for the rest of the book. "Emerging Trends: AIDS Today and in the…

  3. Aerothermodynamic systems engineering and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A reference source for various aspects of aerothermodynamic systems engineering and design is presented. Air conditioning load analysis is addressed, including physiological requirements, heat and cooling load equations, skin temperature computational methods, cooling loads due to radiation through transparent areas, heating and cooling loads due to internal sources, and practical considerations in the determination of overall heating and cooling loads. Refrigeration system design is considered, including air cycle systems, vapor cycle systems, combined vapor cycle and air cycle systems, and thermoelectric cooling. Heating methods is heating system design and low pressure and high pressure systems in air distribution system design are addressed. Procedures and equations commonly used for aerospace applications of these technologies are included.

  4. Information technology security system engineering methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.

    2003-01-01

    A methodology is described for system engineering security into large information technology systems under development. The methodology is an integration of a risk management process and a generic system development life cycle process. The methodology is to be used by Security System Engineers to effectively engineer and integrate information technology security into a target system as it progresses through the development life cycle. The methodology can also be used to re-engineer security into a legacy system.

  5. Data systems and computer science programs: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul H.; Hunter, Paul

    1991-01-01

    An external review of the Integrated Technology Plan for the Civil Space Program is presented. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: onboard memory and storage technology; advanced flight computers; special purpose flight processors; onboard networking and testbeds; information archive, access, and retrieval; visualization; neural networks; software engineering; and flight control and operations.

  6. An Overview of NASA's Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the design of subsonic and supersonic aircraft has been divided into separate technical disciplines (such as propulsion, aerodynamics and structures), each of which performs design and analysis in relative isolation from others. This is possible, in most cases, either because the amount of interdisciplinary coupling is minimal, or because the interactions can be treated as linear. The design of hypersonic airbreathing vehicles, like NASA's X-43, is quite the opposite. Such systems are dominated by strong non-linear interactions between disciplines. The design of these systems demands that a multi-disciplinary approach be taken. Furthermore, increased analytical fidelity at the conceptual design phase is highly desirable, as many of the non-linearities are not captured by lower fidelity tools. Only when these systems are designed from a true multi-disciplinary perspective, can the real performance benefits be achieved and complete vehicle systems be fielded. Toward this end, the Vehicle Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has been developing the Integrated Design and Engineering Analysis (IDEA) Environment. IDEA is a collaborative environment for parametrically modeling conceptual and preliminary designs for launch vehicle and high speed atmospheric flight configurations using the Adaptive Modeling Language (AML) as the underlying framework. The environment integrates geometry, packaging, propulsion, trajectory, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, engine and airframe subsystem design, thermal and structural analysis, and vehicle closure into a generative, parametric, unified computational model where data is shared seamlessly between the different disciplines. Plans are also in place to incorporate life cycle analysis tools into the environment which will estimate vehicle operability, reliability and cost. IDEA is currently being funded by NASA?s Hypersonics Project, a part of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program within the Aeronautics

  7. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  8. Heat engine generator control system

    DOEpatents

    Rajashekara, Kaushik; Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata; McMullen, Steven Robert; Raibert, Robert Joseph

    1998-01-01

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  9. Solar dish/engine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-04-01

    Solar dish/engine systems convert the energy from the sun into electricity at a very high efficiency. Using a mirror array formed into the shape of a dish, the solar dish focuses the sun`s rays onto a receiver. The receiver transmits the energy to an engine that generates electric power. Because of the high concentration ratios achievable with parabolic dishes and the small size of the receiver, solar dishes are efficient at collecting solar energy at very high temperatures. Tests of prototype systems and components at locations throughout the US have demonstrated net solar to electric conversion efficiencies as high as 30%. This is significantly higher than any other solar technology.

  10. Aircraft engine hot section technology: An overview of the HOST Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Hirschberg, Marvin H.

    1987-01-01

    NASA sponsored the Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project to address the need for improved durability in advanced aircraft engine combustors and turbines. Analytical and experimental activities aimed at more accurate prediction of the aerothermal environment, the thermomechanical loads, the material behavior and structural responses to loads, and life predictions for cyclic high-temperature operation were underway for the last 7 years. The project has involved representatives from six engineering disciplines who are spread across three work sectors (industry, academia, and NASA). The HOST Project not only initiated and sponsored 70 major activities, but was also the keystone in joining the multiple disciplines and work sectors to focus on critical research needs. A broad overview of the project is given along with initial indications of the project's impact.

  11. Aircraft engine hot section technology: An overview of the HOST Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Hirschberg, Marvin H.

    1990-01-01

    NASA sponsored the Turbine Engine Hot Section (HOST) project to address the need for improved durability in advanced aircraft engine combustors and turbines. Analytical and experimental activities aimed at more accurate prediction of the aerothermal environment, the thermomechanical loads, the material behavior and structural responses to loads, and life predictions for cyclic high temperature operation were conducted from 1980 to 1987. The project involved representatives from six engineering disciplines who are spread across three work disciplines - industry, academia, and NASA. The HOST project not only initiated and sponsored 70 major activities, but also was the keystone in joining the multiple disciplines and work sectors to focus on critical research needs. A broad overview of the project is given along with initial indications of the project's impact.

  12. Advanced System for Process Engineering

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-09-14

    PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 (Advanced System for Process Engineering) is a state of the art process simulator and economic evaluation package which was designed for use in engineering fossil energy conversion processes and has been ported to run on a PC. PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 can represent multiphase streams including solids, and handle complex substances such as coal. The system can perform steady state material and energy balances, determine equipment size and cost, and carry out preliminary economic evaluations.more » It is supported by a comprehensive physical property system for computation of major properties such as enthalpy, entropy, free energy, molar volume, equilibrium ratio, fugacity coefficient, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusion coefficient for specified phase conditions; vapor, liquid, or solid. The properties may be computed for pure components, mixtures, or components in a mixture, as appropriate. The PRO ASPEN/PC1.0 Input Language is oriented towards process engineers.« less

  13. SMAP Instrument Mechanical System Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slimko, Eric; French, Richard; Riggs, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch by the end of 2014, is being developed to measure the soil moisture and soil freeze/thaw state on a global scale over a three-year period. The accuracy, resolution, and global coverage of SMAP measurements are invaluable across many science and applications disciplines including hydrology, climate, carbon cycle, and the meteorological, environment, and ecology applications communities. The SMAP observatory is composed of a despun bus and a spinning instrument platform that includes both a deployable 6 meter aperture low structural frequency Astromesh reflector and a spin control system. The instrument section has engendered challenging mechanical system issues associated with the antenna deployment, flexible antenna pointing in the context of a multitude of disturbances, spun section mass properties, spin control system development, and overall integration with the flight system on both mechanical and control system levels. Moreover, the multitude of organizations involved, including two major vendors providing the spin subsystem and reflector boom assembly plus the flight system mechanical and guidance, navigation, and control teams, has led to several unique system engineering challenges. Capturing the key physics associated with the function of the flight system has been challenging due to the many different domains that are applicable. Key interfaces and operational concepts have led to complex negotiations because of the large number of organizations that integrate with the instrument mechanical system. Additionally, the verification and validation concerns associated with the mechanical system have had required far-reaching involvement from both the flight system and other subsystems. The SMAP instrument mechanical systems engineering issues and their solutions are described in this paper.

  14. A Study on Aircraft Engine Control Systems for Integrated Flight and Propulsion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yasushi; Kusakawa, Takeshi

    A flyable FADEC system engineering model incorporating Integrated Flight and Propulsion Control (IFPC) concept is developed for a highly maneuverable aircraft and a fighter-class engine. An overview of the FADEC system and functional assignments for its components such as the Engine Control Unit (ECU) and the Integrated Control Unit (ICU) are described. Overall system reliability analysis, convex analysis and multivariable controller design for the engine, fault detection/redundancy management, and response characteristics of a fuel system are addressed. The engine control performance of the FADEC is demonstrated by hardware-in-the-loop simulation for fast acceleration and thrust transient characteristics.

  15. Systems engineering: A problem of perception

    SciTech Connect

    Senglaub, M.

    1995-08-01

    The characterization of systems engineering as a discipline, process, procedure or a set of heuristics will have an impact on the implementation strategy, the training methodology, and operational environment. The systems engineering upgrade activities in the New Mexico Weapons Development Center and a search of systems engineering related information provides evidence of a degree of ambiguity in this characterization of systems engineering. A case is made in this article for systems engineering being the engineering discipline applied to the science of complexity. Implications of this characterization and some generic issues are delineated with the goal of providing an enterprise with a starting point for developing its business environment.

  16. Overview of fish immune system and infectious diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief overview of the fish immune system and the emerging or re-emerging bacterial, viral, parasitic and fungal diseases considered to currently have a negative impact on aquaculture is presented. The fish immune system has evolved with both innate (natural resistance) and adaptive (acquired) immu...

  17. LOW- AND MEDIUM-BTU GASIFICATION SYSTEMS: TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives an overview of low- and medium-Btu gasification systems. It describes systems or combinations of processes which are likely to be used for production of low- and medium-Btu gas from coal. This involves making judgments as to types of coals that will be processed,...

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Chen, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently places the Curiosity rove on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview to the MSL entry, descent and landing system design and preliminary flight performance results.

  19. Landsat 7 Science Data Processing: A System's Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweiss, Robert; Daniels, Nate; Derrick, Debora

    2000-01-01

    The Landsat Science Data Processing System, developed by NASA for the Landsat 7 Project provides science data handling infrastructure used at the EROS Data Center Landsat 7 Data Handling Facility of the USGS Department of Interior. This paper presents an overview the designs, architectures, and details of the various systems used in the processing of the Landsat 7 Science Data.

  20. An overview of NASA research on positive displacement general-aviation engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempke, E. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The research and technology program related to improved and advanced general aviation engines is described. Current research is directed at the near-term improvement of conventional air-cooled spark-ignition piston engines and at future alternative engine systems based on all-new spark-ignition piston engines, lightweight diesels, and rotary combustion engines that show potential for meeting program goals in the midterm and long-term future. The conventional piston engine activities involve efforts on applying existing technology to improve fuel economy, investigation of key processes to permit leaner operation and reduce drag, and the development of cost effective technology to permit flight at high-altitudes where fuel economy and safety are improved. The advanced engine concepts activities include engine conceptual design studies and enabling technology efforts on the critical or key technology items.

  1. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  2. LDEF systems special investigation group overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Jim; Dursch, Harry

    1995-01-01

    The Systems Special Investigation Group (Systems SIG), formed by the LDEF Project Office to perform post-flight analysis of LDEF systems hardware, was chartered to investigate the effects of the extended LDEF mission on both satellite and experiment systems and to coordinate and integrate all systems related analyses performed during post-flight investigations. The Systems SIG published a summary report in April, 1992 titled 'Analysis of Systems Hardware Flown on LDEF - Results of the Systems Special Investigation Group' that described findings through the end of 1991. The Systems SIG, unfunded in FY 92 and FY93, has been funded in FY 94 to update this report with all new systems related findings. This paper provides a brief summary of the highlights of earlier Systems SIG accomplishments and describes tasks the Systems SIG has been funded to accomplish in FY 94.

  3. Overview of remote data transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, Richard W.

    Remote data transmission systems for monitoring the environment are reviewed, including the Argos system, geostationary meteorological satellite systems, and the meteorburst technique which relies on micrometeor trails in the atmosphere to reflect radio messages between a hydrologic station and an interrogation site. The snow telemetry hydrologic data collection system, Landsat series of satellites, synchronous meteorological and geostationary operational environmental satellites are discussed. Specific elements of these systems are examined and major operators and users of the systems are identified.

  4. Optimization of coupled systems: A critical overview of approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balling, R. J.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1994-01-01

    A unified overview is given of problem formulation approaches for the optimization of multidisciplinary coupled systems. The overview includes six fundamental approaches upon which a large number of variations may be made. Consistent approach names and a compact approach notation are given. The approaches are formulated to apply to general nonhierarchic systems. The approaches are compared both from a computational viewpoint and a managerial viewpoint. Opportunities for parallelism of both computation and manpower resources are discussed. Recommendations regarding the need for future research are advanced.

  5. Multimedia Feedback Systems for Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gladwell, S.; Gottlieb, E.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Slutter, C.L.

    1998-12-15

    The World Wide Web has become a key tool for information sharing. Engineers and scientists are finding that the web is especially suited to publishing the graphical, multi-layered information that is typical of their work. Web pages are easier to distribute than hardcopy. Web movies have become more accessible, in many offices, than videos. Good VRML viewing software, bundled with most new PCs, has sufficient power to support many engineering needs. In addition to publishing information science and engineering has an important tradition of peer and customer review. Reports, drawings and graphs are typically printed, distributed, reviewed, marked up, and returned to the author. Adding review comments to paper is easy. When, however, the information is in electronic form, this ease of review goes away. It's hard to write on videos. It's even harder to write comments on animated 3D models. These feedback limitations reduce the value of the information overall. Fortunately, the web can also be a useful tool for collecting peer and customer review information. When properly formed, web reports, movies, and 3D animations can be readily linked to review notes. This paper describes three multimedia feed-back systems that Sandia National Laboratories has developed to tap that potential. Each system allows people to make context-sensitive comments about specific web content and electronically ties the comments back to the web content being referenced. The fuel system ties comments to specific web pages, the second system ties the comments to specific frames of digital movies, and the third ties the comments to specific times and viewpoints within 3D animations. In addition to the technologies, this paper describes how they are being used to support intelligent machine systems design at Sandia.

  6. Professional Issues in System Safety Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, John; Thomas, Martyn; Redmill, Felix

    For many years the profession of system safety engineering has been emerging. This paper argues that the time has now come when it requires recognition, a voice, proper governance and leadership. System safety engineering is an amalgam of many disciplines, in particular, software engineering, safety engineering and management, and systems engineering, and this paper shows that system safety engineering must address the most difficult aspects of all of these. But professional matters extend beyond merely technical considerations, and the paper concludes by showing why there is the need for a new professional body.

  7. Airbreathing combined cycle engine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohde, John

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force and NASA share a common interest in developing advanced propulsion systems for commercial and military aerospace vehicles which require efficient acceleration and cruise operation in the Mach 4 to 6 flight regime. The principle engine of interest is the turboramjet; however, other combined cycles such as the turboscramjet, air turborocket, supercharged ejector ramjet, ejector ramjet, and air liquefaction based propulsion are also of interest. Over the past months careful planning and program implementation have resulted in a number of development efforts that will lead to a broad technology base for those combined cycle propulsion systems. Individual development programs are underway in thermal management, controls materials, endothermic hydrocarbon fuels, air intake systems, nozzle exhaust systems, gas turbines and ramjet ramburners.

  8. Apollo Lunar Module Electrical Power System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives include: a) Describe LM Electrical System original specifications; b) Describe the decision to change from fuel cells to batteries and other changes; c) Describe the Electrical system; and d) Describe the Apollo 13 failure from the LM perspective.

  9. The Metric System--An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovey, Larry; Hovey, Kathi

    1983-01-01

    Sections look at: (1) Historical Perspective; (2) Naming the New System; (3) The Metric Units; (4) Measuring Larger and Smaller Amounts; (5) Advantage of Using the Metric System; (6) Metric Symbols; (7) Conversion from Metric to Customary System; (8) General Hints for Helping Children Understand; and (9) Current Status of Metric Conversion. (MP)

  10. The Integrated Library System: A Historical Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Richard S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses evolution of Integrated Library System (ILS) since its beginning at National Library of Medicine, highlighting events leading to ILS development; formative design stages, formation of Online Computer System; installation of ILS version 1.0 at Pentagon library; development of version 2.0, formation of Avatar Systems; OCLC's acquisition of…