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Sample records for t-test pearson correlation

  1. Correlation Structure of Fractional Pearson Diffusions

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic solution to a diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the first time derivative is replaced by a Caputo fractional derivative of order less than one, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops an explicit formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long range dependent, with a correlation that falls off like a power law, whose exponent equals the order of the fractional derivative. PMID:24089586

  2. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The…

  3. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The

  4. Ghost imaging based on Pearson correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Liu, Xue-Feng; Li, Long-Zhen; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2015-05-01

    Correspondence imaging is a new modality of ghost imaging, which can retrieve a positive/negative image by simple conditional averaging of the reference frames that correspond to relatively large/small values of the total intensity measured at the bucket detector. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a more rigorous and general approach in which a ghost image is retrieved by calculating a Pearson correlation coefficient between the bucket detector intensity and the brightness at a given pixel of the reference frames, and at the next pixel, and so on. Furthermore, we theoretically provide a statistical interpretation of these two imaging phenomena, and explain how the error depends on the sample size and what kind of distribution the error obeys. According to our analysis, the image signal-to-noise ratio can be greatly improved and the sampling number reduced by means of our new method. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122902).

  5. Approximating Pearson Product-Moment Correlations from Kendall's Tau and Spearman's Rho.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupinski, Melvin T.; Dunlap, William P.

    1996-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo methods demonstrated that a formula presented by M. G. Kendall for estimating Pearson's rho from tau is somewhat more accurate than a formula presented by K. Pearson for estimating Pearson's rho from a Spearman's rho coefficient. Implications for meta-analysis of correlations are discussed. (SLD)

  6. Robustness of Two Formulas to Correct Pearson Correlation for Restriction of Range

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    tran, minh

    2011-01-01

    Many research studies involving Pearson correlations are conducted in settings where one of the two variables has a restricted range in the sample. For example, this situation occurs when tests are used for selecting candidates for employment or university admission. Often after selection, there is interest in correlating the selection variable,…

  7. Requirements for a Cocitation Similarity Measure, with Special Reference to Pearson's Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Per; Jarneving, Bo; Rousseau, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    Criticizes the use of Pearson's correlation coefficient in author cocitation analysis (ACA), a technique used to analyze the intellectual structure of a given scientific field, and sets forth two natural requirements that a similarity measure applied in ACA should satisfy. Uses real and hypothetical data to obtain counterexamples to both…

  8. Gender and Age Analyses of NIRS/STAI Pearson Correlation Coefficients at Resting State.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Fuchita, Y; Ichikawa, K; Fukuda, Y; Takemura, N; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    According to the valence asymmetry hypothesis, the left/right asymmetry of PFC activity is correlated with specific emotional responses to mental stress and personality traits. In a previous study we measured spontaneous oscillation of oxy-Hb concentrations in the bilateral PFC at rest in normal adults employing two-channel portable NIRS and computed the laterality index at rest (LIR). We investigated the Pearson correlation coefficient between the LIR and anxiety levels evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) test. We found that subjects with right-dominant activity at rest showed higher STAI scores, while those with left dominant oxy-Hb changes at rest showed lower STAI scores such that the Pearson correlation coefficient between LIR and STAI was positive. This study performed Bootstrap analysis on the data and showed the following statistics of the target correlation coefficient: mean = 0.4925 and lower confidence limit = 0.177 with confidence level 0.05. Using the KS-test, we demonstrated that the correlation did not depend on age, whereas it did depend on gender. PMID:26782223

  9. Asymptotic Properties of Pearson's Rank-Variate Correlation Coefficient under Contaminated Gaussian Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rubao; Xu, Weichao; Zhang, Yun; Ye, Zhongfu

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness properties of Pearson's rank-variate correlation coefficient (PRVCC) in scenarios where one channel is corrupted by impulsive noise and the other is impulsive noise-free. As shown in our previous work, these scenarios that frequently encountered in radar and/or sonar, can be well emulated by a particular bivariate contaminated Gaussian model (CGM). Under this CGM, we establish the asymptotic closed forms of the expectation and variance of PRVCC by means of the well known Delta method. To gain a deeper understanding, we also compare PRVCC with two other classical correlation coefficients, i.e., Spearman's rho (SR) and Kendall's tau (KT), in terms of the root mean squared error (RMSE). Monte Carlo simulations not only verify our theoretical findings, but also reveal the advantage of PRVCC by an example of estimating the time delay in the particular impulsive noise environment. PMID:25393286

  10. MIrExpress: A Database for Gene Coexpression Correlation in Immune Cells Based on Mutual Information and Pearson Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luman; Mo, Qiaochu; Wang, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Most current gene coexpression databases support the analysis for linear correlation of gene pairs, but not nonlinear correlation of them, which hinders precisely evaluating the gene-gene coexpression strengths. Here, we report a new database, MIrExpress, which takes advantage of the information theory, as well as the Pearson linear correlation method, to measure the linear correlation, nonlinear correlation, and their hybrid of cell-specific gene coexpressions in immune cells. For a given gene pair or probe set pair input by web users, both mutual information (MI) and Pearson correlation coefficient (r) are calculated, and several corresponding values are reported to reflect their coexpression correlation nature, including MI and r values, their respective rank orderings, their rank comparison, and their hybrid correlation value. Furthermore, for a given gene, the top 10 most relevant genes to it are displayed with the MI, r, or their hybrid perspective, respectively. Currently, the database totally includes 16 human cell groups, involving 20,283 human genes. The expression data and the calculated correlation results from the database are interactively accessible on the web page and can be implemented for other related applications and researches. PMID:26881263

  11. Testing the significance of a correlation with nonnormal data: comparison of Pearson, Spearman, transformation, and resampling approaches.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Anthony J; Hittner, James B

    2012-09-01

    It is well known that when data are nonnormally distributed, a test of the significance of Pearson's r may inflate Type I error rates and reduce power. Statistics textbooks and the simulation literature provide several alternatives to Pearson's correlation. However, the relative performance of these alternatives has been unclear. Two simulation studies were conducted to compare 12 methods, including Pearson, Spearman's rank-order, transformation, and resampling approaches. With most sample sizes (n ≥ 20), Type I and Type II error rates were minimized by transforming the data to a normal shape prior to assessing the Pearson correlation. Among transformation approaches, a general purpose rank-based inverse normal transformation (i.e., transformation to rankit scores) was most beneficial. However, when samples were both small (n ≤ 10) and extremely nonnormal, the permutation test often outperformed other alternatives, including various bootstrap tests. PMID:22563845

  12. Pearson's Correlation between Three Variables; Using Students' Basic Knowledge of Geometry for an Exercise in Mathematical Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    When studying correlations, how do the three bivariate correlation coefficients between three variables relate? After transforming Pearson's correlation coefficient r into a Euclidean distance, undergraduate students can tackle this problem using their secondary school knowledge of geometry (Pythagoras' theorem and similarity of triangles).…

  13. A novel fractal image compression scheme with block classification and sorting based on Pearson's correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianji; Zheng, Nanning

    2013-09-01

    Fractal image compression (FIC) is an image coding technology based on the local similarity of image structure. It is widely used in many fields such as image retrieval, image denoising, image authentication, and encryption. FIC, however, suffers from the high computational complexity in encoding. Although many schemes are published to speed up encoding, they do not easily satisfy the encoding time or the reconstructed image quality requirements. In this paper, a new FIC scheme is proposed based on the fact that the affine similarity between two blocks in FIC is equivalent to the absolute value of Pearson's correlation coefficient (APCC) between them. First, all blocks in the range and domain pools are chosen and classified using an APCC-based block classification method to increase the matching probability. Second, by sorting the domain blocks with respect to APCCs between these domain blocks and a preset block in each class, the matching domain block for a range block can be searched in the selected domain set in which these APCCs are closer to APCC between the range block and the preset block. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can significantly speed up the encoding process in FIC while preserving the reconstructed image quality well. PMID:23797251

  14. Variation and pearson correlation coefficients of warner-bratzler shear force measurements within broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of texture properties related to tenderness at different locations within deboned broiler breast fillets have been used to validate techniques for texture analysis and establish correlations between different texture evaluation methods. However, it has been demonstrated that meat text...

  15. An automated Pearson's correlation change classification (APC3) approach for GC/MS metabonomic data using total ion chromatograms (TICs).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhaskaran David; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Ho, Paul C; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Yap, Chun Wei

    2013-05-21

    A fully automated and computationally efficient Pearson's correlation change classification (APC3) approach is proposed and shown to have overall comparable performance with both an average accuracy and an average AUC of 0.89 ± 0.08 but is 3.9 to 7 times faster, easier to use and have low outlier susceptibility in contrast to other dimensional reduction and classification combinations using only the total ion chromatogram (TIC) intensities of GC/MS data. The use of only the TIC permits the possible application of APC3 to other metabonomic data such as LC/MS TICs or NMR spectra. A RapidMiner implementation is available for download at http://padel.nus.edu.sg/software/padelapc3. PMID:23529371

  16. The Use of Time Series Analysis and t Tests with Serially Correlated Data Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolich, Mark J.; Weinstein, Carol S.

    1981-01-01

    Results of three methods of analysis applied to simulated autocorrelated data sets with an intervention point (varying in autocorrelation degree, variance of error term, and magnitude of intervention effect) are compared and presented. The three methods are: t tests; maximum likelihood Box-Jenkins (ARIMA); and Bayesian Box Jenkins. (Author/AEF)

  17. Computer aided diagnosis system for Alzheimer disease using brain diffusion tensor imaging features selected by Pearson's correlation.

    PubMed

    Graña, M; Termenon, M; Savio, A; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Echeveste, J; Pérez, J M; Besga, A

    2011-09-20

    The aim of this paper is to obtain discriminant features from two scalar measures of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data, Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and Mean Diffusivity (MD), and to train and test classifiers able to discriminate Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients from controls on the basis of features extracted from the FA or MD volumes. In this study, support vector machine (SVM) classifier was trained and tested on FA and MD data. Feature selection is done computing the Pearson's correlation between FA or MD values at voxel site across subjects and the indicative variable specifying the subject class. Voxel sites with high absolute correlation are selected for feature extraction. Results are obtained over an on-going study in Hospital de Santiago Apostol collecting anatomical T1-weighted MRI volumes and DTI data from healthy control subjects and AD patients. FA features and a linear SVM classifier achieve perfect accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in several cross-validation studies, supporting the usefulness of DTI-derived features as an image-marker for AD and to the feasibility of building Computer Aided Diagnosis systems for AD based on them. PMID:21839143

  18. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  19. Partial Roc Reveals Superiority of Mutual Rank of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient as a Coexpression Measure to Elucidate Functional Association of Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2013-01-01

    Gene coexpression analysis is a powerful approach to elucidate gene function. We have established and developed this approach using vast amount of publicly available gene expression data measured by microarray techniques. The coexpressed genes are used to estimate gene function of the guide gene or to construct gene coexpression networks. In the case to construct gene networks, researchers should introduce an arbitrary threshold of gene coexpression, because gene coexpression value is continuous value. In the viewpoint to introduce common threshold of gene coexpression, we previously reported rank of Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) is more useful than the original PCC value. In this manuscript, we re-assessed the measure of gene coexpression to construct gene coexpression network, and found that mutual rank (MR) of PCC showed better performance than rank of PCC and the original PCC in low false positive rate.

  20. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. PMID:25691415

  1. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, D.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  2. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  3. Fast computation of voxel-level brain connectivity maps from resting-state functional MRI using l₁-norm as approximation of Pearson's temporal correlation: proof-of-concept and example vector hardware implementation.

    PubMed

    Minati, Ludovico; Zacà, Domenico; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Jovicich, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    An outstanding issue in graph-based analysis of resting-state functional MRI is choice of network nodes. Individual consideration of entire brain voxels may represent a less biased approach than parcellating the cortex according to pre-determined atlases, but entails establishing connectedness for 1(9)-1(11) links, with often prohibitive computational cost. Using a representative Human Connectome Project dataset, we show that, following appropriate time-series normalization, it may be possible to accelerate connectivity determination replacing Pearson correlation with l1-norm. Even though the adjacency matrices derived from correlation coefficients and l1-norms are not identical, their similarity is high. Further, we describe and provide in full an example vector hardware implementation of l1-norm on an array of 4096 zero instruction-set processors. Calculation times <1000 s are attainable, removing the major deterrent to voxel-based resting-sate network mapping and revealing fine-grained node degree heterogeneity. L1-norm should be given consideration as a substitute for correlation in very high-density resting-state functional connectivity analyses. PMID:25023958

  4. Corneal endothelial dysfunction in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Shivani A; Gonzalez-Martin, Jose A; Shafiq, Ayad E; Chandna, Arvind; Willoughby, Colin E

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are associated with well recognized ocular manifestations. Pearson syndrome is an often fatal, multisystem, mitochondrial disorder that causes variable bone marrow, hepatic, renal and pancreatic exocrine dysfunction. Phenotypic progression of ocular disease in a 12-year-old male with Pearson syndrome is described. This case illustrates phenotypic drift from Pearson syndrome to Kearns-Sayre syndrome given the patient's longevity. Persistent corneal endothelial failure was noted in addition to ptosis, chronic external ophthalmoplegia and mid-peripheral pigmentary retinopathy. We propose that corneal edema resulting from corneal endothelial metabolic pump failure occurs within a spectrum of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:21936618

  5. Canonical Correlation Analysis as a General Linear Model: A Heuristic Lesson for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Kathleen T.; Taylor, Dianne L.

    1996-01-01

    A hypothesized data set is used to illustrate that canonical correlation analysis is a general linear model, subsuming other parametric procedures as special cases. Specific techniques included in analyses are t tests, Pearson correlation, multiple regression, analysis of variance, multivariate analysis of variance, and discriminant analysis. (SLD)

  6. Parental Socio-Economic Status as Correlate of Child Labour in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elegbeleye, O. S.; Olasupo, M. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental socio-economic status and child labour practices in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study employed survey method to gather data from 200 parents which constituted the study population. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test statistics were used for the data analyses. The outcome of the study…

  7. A Null Model for Pearson Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Andrea; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gene coexpression networks inferred by correlation from high-throughput profiling such as microarray data represent simple but effective structures for discovering and interpreting linear gene relationships. In recent years, several approaches have been proposed to tackle the problem of deciding when the resulting correlation values are statistically significant. This is most crucial when the number of samples is small, yielding a non-negligible chance that even high correlation values are due to random effects. Here we introduce a novel hard thresholding solution based on the assumption that a coexpression network inferred by randomly generated data is expected to be empty. The threshold is theoretically derived by means of an analytic approach and, as a deterministic independent null model, it depends only on the dimensions of the starting data matrix, with assumptions on the skewness of the data distribution compatible with the structure of gene expression levels data. We show, on synthetic and array datasets, that the proposed threshold is effective in eliminating all false positive links, with an offsetting cost in terms of false negative detected edges. PMID:26030917

  8. Bayesian Estimation Supersedes the "t" Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruschke, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian estimation for 2 groups provides complete distributions of credible values for the effect size, group means and their difference, standard deviations and their difference, and the normality of the data. The method handles outliers. The decision rule can accept the null value (unlike traditional "t" tests) when certainty in the estimate is

  9. Bayesian Estimation Supersedes the "t" Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruschke, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian estimation for 2 groups provides complete distributions of credible values for the effect size, group means and their difference, standard deviations and their difference, and the normality of the data. The method handles outliers. The decision rule can accept the null value (unlike traditional "t" tests) when certainty in the estimate is…

  10. 41. Historic American Buildings Survey E. R. Pearson, Photographer 1969 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Historic American Buildings Survey E. R. Pearson, Photographer 1969 THIRD FLOOR AND ATTIC FLOOR PLAN - Shaker Centre Family Dwelling House, West side of U.S. Route 68, South Union, Logan County, KY

  11. 40. Historic American Buildings Survey E. R. Pearson, Photographer January ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Historic American Buildings Survey E. R. Pearson, Photographer January 1970 THIRD FLOOR AND ATTIC FLOOR PLAN - Shaker Centre Family Dwelling House, West side of U.S. Route 68, South Union, Logan County, KY

  12. 16. TYPE F, BUILDING #516732 PEARSON ROAD, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. TYPE F, BUILDING #516-732 PEARSON ROAD, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, HALLWAY, NORTHWEST VIEW. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Brick Officers' Quarters, Types E & F, Area A, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  13. 20. Historic American Buildings Survey Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer 1970 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Historic American Buildings Survey Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer 1970 DINING ROOM DOORS (closed), LOOKING NORTH - Shaker Church Family Main Dwelling House, U.S. Route 20, Hancock, Berkshire County, MA

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer, 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer, 1968 ELEVATION, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Shaker Centre Family, Broom Shop, East side of Oxford Road, White Water Park, Hamilton County, OH

  15. Karl Pearson and eugenics: personal opinions and scientific rigor.

    PubMed

    Delzell, Darcie A P; Poliak, Cathy D

    2013-09-01

    The influence of personal opinions and biases on scientific conclusions is a threat to the advancement of knowledge. Expertise and experience does not render one immune to this temptation. In this work, one of the founding fathers of statistics, Karl Pearson, is used as an illustration of how even the most talented among us can produce misleading results when inferences are made without caution or reference to potential bias and other analysis limitations. A study performed by Pearson on British Jewish schoolchildren is examined in light of ethical and professional statistical practice. The methodology used and inferences made by Pearson and his coauthor are sometimes questionable and offer insight into how Pearson's support of eugenics and his own British nationalism could have potentially influenced his often careless and far-fetched inferences. A short background into Pearson's work and beliefs is provided, along with an in-depth examination of the authors' overall experimental design and statistical practices. In addition, portions of the study regarding intelligence and tuberculosis are discussed in more detail, along with historical reactions to their work. PMID:23179067

  16. Commercialising Comparison: Pearson Puts the TLC in Soft Capitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Anna; Sellar, Sam; Lingard, Bob

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a critical policy analysis of "The Learning Curve" (TLC) (2012), an initiative developed by the multinational edu-business, Pearson, in conjunction with the Economist Intelligence Unit. "TLC" exemplifies the commercialising of comparison and the efforts of edu-businesses to strategically position themselves…

  17. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation. PMID:25035146

  18. A New Family of Solvable Pearson-Dirichlet Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Caër, Gérard

    2011-07-01

    An n-step Pearson-Gamma random walk in ℝ d starts at the origin and consists of n independent steps with gamma distributed lengths and uniform orientations. The gamma distribution of each step length has a shape parameter q>0. Constrained random walks of n steps in ℝ d are obtained from the latter walks by imposing that the sum of the step lengths is equal to a fixed value. Simple closed-form expressions were obtained in particular for the distribution of the endpoint of such constrained walks for any d≥ d 0 and any n≥2 when q is either q = d/2 - 1 ( d 0=3) or q= d-1 ( d 0=2) (Le Caër in J. Stat. Phys. 140:728-751, 2010). When the total walk length is chosen, without loss of generality, to be equal to 1, then the constrained step lengths have a Dirichlet distribution whose parameters are all equal to q and the associated walk is thus named a Pearson-Dirichlet random walk. The density of the endpoint position of a n-step planar walk of this type ( n≥2), with q= d=2, was shown recently to be a weighted mixture of 1+ floor( n/2) endpoint densities of planar Pearson-Dirichlet walks with q=1 (Beghin and Orsingher in Stochastics 82:201-229, 2010). The previous result is generalized to any walk space dimension and any number of steps n≥2 when the parameter of the Pearson-Dirichlet random walk is q= d>1. We rely on the connection between an unconstrained random walk and a constrained one, which have both the same n and the same q= d, to obtain a closed-form expression of the endpoint density. The latter is a weighted mixture of 1+ floor( n/2) densities with simple forms, equivalently expressed as a product of a power and a Gauss hypergeometric function. The weights are products of factors which depends both on d and n and Bessel numbers independent of d.

  19. Reverend Doctor William Pearson in South Kilworth, Leicestershire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    William Pearson (1767-1847) was a 19th-century astronomer, renowned for his work in positional astronomy and the design of astronomical instruments, both practical and instructional. He was a co-founder in 1820 of the Astronomical Society of London, which later became the Royal Astronomical Society, where his portrait hangs. For 30 years of his astronomical career he was the Rector of South Kilworth, a village in Leicestershire, England, where he erected several observatory buildings, as well as extending the village church and building the village schoolroom. This paper documents his activities in South Kilworth.

  20. Space VLBI Observations of the Pearson-Readhead AGN Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, M. L.; Preston, R. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Piner, B. G.; Murphy, D. W.; Jones, D. J.; Meier, D. L.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Hirabayashi, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Inoue, M.

    1999-12-01

    We are using the VSOP mission to observe a complete sample of Pearson-Readhead Survey AGNs at 4.8 GHz to determine core brightness temperatures and parsec-scale jet properties. The Pearson-Readhead sample has been used for extensive ground-based VLBI survey studies, and is ideal for a VSOP survey because the sources are strong, the VSOP u-v coverages are especially good above +35o declination, and multi-epoch ground-based VLBI data and other existing supporting data on these sources exceed that of any other sample. To date we have imaged a majority of the 31 objects in our sample. In addition, we are obtaining matched-resolution 15 GHz observations using the VLBA at epochs close in time to the space VLBI observations to investigate the spectral indices of the source components at high resolution. We discuss our brightness temperature measurements obtained so far, and interpret our results in the framework of the standard relativistic beaming model for jets in radio-loud AGNs. We gratefully acknowledge the VSOP Project, which is led by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in cooperation with many organizations and radio telescopes around the world. This research was performed in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA.

  1. The Pearson walk with shrinking steps in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, C. A.; Redner, S.

    2010-01-01

    We study the shrinking Pearson random walk in two dimensions and greater, in which the direction of the Nth step is random and its length equals λN-1, with λ<1. As λ increases past a critical value λc, the endpoint distribution in two dimensions, P(r), changes from having a global maximum away from the origin to being peaked at the origin. The probability distribution for a single coordinate, P(x), undergoes a similar transition, but exhibits multiple maxima on a fine length scale for λ close to λc. We numerically determine P(r) and P(x) by applying a known algorithm that accurately inverts the exact Bessel function product form of the Fourier transform for the probability distributions.

  2. Shape modeling with family of Pearson distributions: Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidojevic, Sonja

    2014-10-01

    Two major effects of Langmuir wave electric field influence on spectral line shapes are appearance of depressions shifted from unperturbed line and an additional dynamical line broadening. More realistic and accurate models of Langmuir waves are needed to study these effects with more confidence. In this article we present distribution shapes of a high-quality data set of Langmuir waves electric field observed by the WIND satellite. Using well developed numerical techniques, the distributions of the empirical measurements are modeled by family of Pearson distributions. The results suggest that the existing theoretical models of energy conversion between an electron beam and surrounding plasma is more complex. If the processes of the Langmuir wave generation are better understood, the influence of Langmuir waves on spectral line shapes could be modeled better.

  3. Quadrupolar magic angle spinning NMR spectra fitted using the Pearson IV function.

    PubMed

    Mironenko, Roman M; Belskaya, Olga B; Talsi, Valentin P; Likholobov, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The Pearson IV function was used to fit the asymmetric solid-state (27)Al NMR spectra of alumina based catalysts. A high convergence (correlation coefficient is no less than 0.997) between experimental and simulated spectra was achieved. The decomposition of the (27)Al NMR spectra of zinc/aluminum mixed oxides with different Zn/Al molar ratio revealed an increased fraction (6-9%) of pentacoordinated aluminum atoms in these oxides as compared to γ-Al2O3. As the Zn/Al ratio is raised, the fraction of [AlO6] octahedral units decreases, while the fraction of [AlO4] tetrahedra increases. PMID:25454293

  4. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  5. Understanding Correlations: Two Computer Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Miriam D.; Strube, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes two QuickBASIC programs that provide students direct experience with interpreting correlation scatter-plots. Maintains that the programs can be used in classroom exercises to highlight factors that influence the size of a Pearson correlation coefficient. (CFR)

  6. Racial Harmony & Heroes: A Content Analysis of the Pearson Reading Program "Good Habits, Great Readers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosolt, Brandelyn; Love, Bettina L.

    2011-01-01

    Multicultural education is a term with a variety of definitions growing from a number of different disciplines. These authors conducted a content analysis of the Pearson reading program "Good Habits, Great Readers" for grades four and five. The qualitative approach of content analysis allowed researchers to examine text "through the…

  7. A Psychometric Measurement Model for Adult English Language Learners: Pearson Test of English Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Hye K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Rasch modeling to an examination of the psychometric properties of the "Pearson Test of English Academic" (PTE Academic). Analyzed were 140 test-takers' scores derived from the PTE Academic database. The mean age of the participants was 26.45 (SD = 5.82), ranging from 17 to 46. Conformity of the participants'…

  8. A Psychometric Measurement Model for Adult English Language Learners: Pearson Test of English Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Hye K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Rasch modeling to an examination of the psychometric properties of the "Pearson Test of English Academic" (PTE Academic). Analyzed were 140 test-takers' scores derived from the PTE Academic database. The mean age of the participants was 26.45 (SD = 5.82), ranging from 17 to 46. Conformity of the participants'

  9. The power of a paired t-test with a covariate

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, E. C.; Ayers, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Many researchers employ the paired t-test to evaluate the mean difference between matched data points. Unfortunately, in many cases this test in inefficient. This paper reviews how to increase the precision of this test through using the mean centered independent variable x, which is familiar to researchers that use analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). We add to the literature by demonstrating how to employ these gains in efficiency as a factor for use in finding the statistical power of the test. The key parameters for this factor are the correlation between the two measures and the variance ratio of the dependent measure on the predictor. The paper then demonstrates how to compute the gains in efficiency a priori to amend the power computations for the traditional paired t -test. We include an example analysis from a recent intervention, Families Preparing the New Generation (Familias Preparando la Nueva Generación). Finally, we conclude with an analysis of extant data to derive reasonable parameter values. PMID:25592936

  10. The power of a paired t-test with a covariate.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, E C; Ayers, Stephanie

    2015-03-01

    Many researchers employ the paired t-test to evaluate the mean difference between matched data points. Unfortunately, in many cases this test in inefficient. This paper reviews how to increase the precision of this test through using the mean centered independent variable x, which is familiar to researchers that use analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). We add to the literature by demonstrating how to employ these gains in efficiency as a factor for use in finding the statistical power of the test. The key parameters for this factor are the correlation between the two measures and the variance ratio of the dependent measure on the predictor. The paper then demonstrates how to compute the gains in efficiency a priori to amend the power computations for the traditional paired t-test. We include an example analysis from a recent intervention, Families Preparing the New Generation (Familias Preparando la Nueva Generación). Finally, we conclude with an analysis of extant data to derive reasonable parameter values. PMID:25592936

  11. Global-in-time solutions for the isothermal Matovich-Pearson equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feireisl, Eduard; Laurenot, Philippe; Mikeli?, Andro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the Matovich-Pearson equations describing the process of glass fibre drawing. These equations may be viewed as a 1D-reduction of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations including free boundary, valid for the drawing of a long and thin glass fibre. We concentrate on the isothermal case without surface tension. Then the Matovich-Pearson equations represent a nonlinearly coupled system of an elliptic equation for the axial velocity and a hyperbolic transport equation for the fluid cross-sectional area. We first prove existence of a local solution, and, after constructing appropriate barrier functions, we deduce that the fluid radius is always strictly positive and that the local solution remains in the same regularity class. This estimate leads to the global existence and uniqueness result for this important system of equations.

  12. When "t"-Tests or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Tests Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Fiona; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chan, Shun-Kai; Wade, Angie

    2010-01-01

    "t"-Tests are widely used by researchers to compare the average values of a numeric outcome between two groups. If there are doubts about the suitability of the data for the requirements of a "t"-test, most notably the distribution being non-normal, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test may be used instead. However, although often applied, both tests may…

  13. Using the Student's "t"-Test with Extremely Small Sample Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, J. C .F.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers occasionally have to work with an extremely small sample size, defined herein as "N" less than or equal to 5. Some methodologists have cautioned against using the "t"-test when the sample size is extremely small, whereas others have suggested that using the "t"-test is feasible in such a case. The present

  14. Using the Student's "t"-Test with Extremely Small Sample Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, J. C .F.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers occasionally have to work with an extremely small sample size, defined herein as "N" less than or equal to 5. Some methodologists have cautioned against using the "t"-test when the sample size is extremely small, whereas others have suggested that using the "t"-test is feasible in such a case. The present…

  15. When "t"-Tests or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Tests Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Fiona; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chan, Shun-Kai; Wade, Angie

    2010-01-01

    "t"-Tests are widely used by researchers to compare the average values of a numeric outcome between two groups. If there are doubts about the suitability of the data for the requirements of a "t"-test, most notably the distribution being non-normal, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test may be used instead. However, although often applied, both tests may

  16. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome in patients suspected to have Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Katelyn E; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Yuan, Daniel; Zon, Rebecca L; Storm, Kelsie; Mazur-Popinska, Magdalena; Andolina, Laura; Bubala, Halina; Golebiowska, Sydonia; Higman, Meghan A; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Kurre, Peter; Matysiak, Michal; Niewiadomska, Edyta; Pels, Salley; Petruzzi, Mary Jane; Pobudejska-Pieniazek, Aneta; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Fleming, Mark D; Gazda, Hanna T; Agarwal, Suneet

    2014-07-17

    Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative anemia in which mutations in ribosomal protein genes and GATA1 have been implicated. Both syndromes share several features including early onset of severe anemia, variable nonhematologic manifestations, sporadic genetic occurrence, and occasional spontaneous hematologic improvement. Because of the overlapping features and relative rarity of PS, we hypothesized that some patients in whom the leading clinical diagnosis is DBA actually have PS. Here, we evaluated patient DNA samples submitted for DBA genetic studies and found that 8 (4.6%) of 173 genetically uncharacterized patients contained large mtDNA deletions. Only 2 (25%) of the patients had been diagnosed with PS on clinical grounds subsequent to sample submission. We conclude that PS can be overlooked, and that mtDNA deletion testing should be performed in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with congenital anemia. PMID:24735966

  17. Fisher, Neyman-Pearson or NHST? A tutorial for teaching data testing.

    PubMed

    Perezgonzalez, Jose D

    2015-01-01

    Despite frequent calls for the overhaul of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST), this controversial procedure remains ubiquitous in behavioral, social and biomedical teaching and research. Little change seems possible once the procedure becomes well ingrained in the minds and current practice of researchers; thus, the optimal opportunity for such change is at the time the procedure is taught, be this at undergraduate or at postgraduate levels. This paper presents a tutorial for the teaching of data testing procedures, often referred to as hypothesis testing theories. The first procedure introduced is Fisher's approach to data testing-tests of significance; the second is Neyman-Pearson's approach-tests of acceptance; the final procedure is the incongruent combination of the previous two theories into the current approach-NSHT. For those researchers sticking with the latter, two compromise solutions on how to improve NHST conclude the tutorial. PMID:25784889

  18. Myopathology and a mitochondrial DNA deletion in the Pearson marrow and pancreas syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Vries, D D; Buzing, C J; Ruitenbeek, W; van der Wouw, M P; Sperl, W; Sengers, R C; Trijbels, J M; van Oost, B A

    1992-01-01

    A patient with the Pearson marrow and pancreas syndrome is presented. She showed an anaemia with neutropenia and thrombopenia, failure to thrive, diarrhoea, disturbed glucose homeostasis and lactic acidosis. An exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was lacking. The disease followed a fatal course. Biochemical investigations of skeletal muscle revealed a disturbed mitochondrial energy metabolism, while many ultrastructural abnormal features were observed in the muscle tissue. Molecular genetic studies showed a de novo deletion in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), different in size from the already published deletions and flanked by two 4 bp direct repeats, interspaced by 4-5 non-repeated nucleotides. mtDNA from 12 other tissues showed the same deletion in different percentages. No obvious relation between these percentages and tissue dysfunction was found. In spite of an open reading frame of 74 codons, only little transcription product of the genomic region resulting from the deletion was found. PMID:1483044

  19. Fisher, Neyman-Pearson or NHST? A tutorial for teaching data testing

    PubMed Central

    Perezgonzalez, Jose D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite frequent calls for the overhaul of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST), this controversial procedure remains ubiquitous in behavioral, social and biomedical teaching and research. Little change seems possible once the procedure becomes well ingrained in the minds and current practice of researchers; thus, the optimal opportunity for such change is at the time the procedure is taught, be this at undergraduate or at postgraduate levels. This paper presents a tutorial for the teaching of data testing procedures, often referred to as hypothesis testing theories. The first procedure introduced is Fisher's approach to data testing—tests of significance; the second is Neyman-Pearson's approach—tests of acceptance; the final procedure is the incongruent combination of the previous two theories into the current approach—NSHT. For those researchers sticking with the latter, two compromise solutions on how to improve NHST conclude the tutorial. PMID:25784889

  20. Relationship between Career Motivation and Perceived Spiritual Leadership in Health Professional Educators: A Correlational Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Baldacchino, Donia; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Jafari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Career motivation in university educators through efficient ways and appropriate with the educational system, is considered one of the important factors affecting education of students and their competence. This study aimed to determine the relationship between career motivation and spiritual leadership among a university of medical sciences in the west, Iran. Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional correlation study was conducted among the university educators of medical sciences in the west, Iran in 2012. All of the educators (N=230) were selected and recruited according to census method. The data were collected by two established self-completed questionnaires on spiritual leadership (SL) and career motivation. Data were analyzed statistically by parametric tests: Pearson correlation, independent student t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: The Pearson correlation test identified a significant relationship between educators’ career motivation and vision, altruistic love, hope/faith, meaning/calling and membership dimensions of spiritual leadership (p<0.05). The independent t-test detected a significant relationship between the ‘hope/faith’ (p=0.04) and organizational commitment (p=0.004) dimensions and the gender of educators. ANOVA revealed significant differences in educators’ years of work experience and their overall career motivation (p=0.003) and the dimension of ‘membership’ (p<0.04). A significant relationship was found in ‘altruistic love’ and ‘Hope/faith’, and the educators’ academic rank place in the university (p=0.03). Also a significant relationship was found in ‘vision’ (p=0.03) and ‘altruistic love’ (p=0.002) and ‘membership’ (p=0.04) dimensions, and the type of faculty. Conclusion: The results indicate that the dimensions of existence of spiritual leadership may have a positive relationship with educators’ career motivation. PMID:24576374

  1. IMPROVED INSULIN SENSITIVITY AFTER GASTRIC BYPASS CORRELATES WITH DECREASED TOTAL BODY FAT, BUT NOT WITH CHANGES IN FREE FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Omotosho, Philip; Torquati, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased plasma free fatty acids (FFA) are considered one of the key elements in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We hypothesize that, in diabetic patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), a postoperative decrease in FFA will correlate with improved insulin sensitivity (Si). Methods 30 obese (body mass index > 35 kg/m2) patients with a diagnosis of T2DM were studied preoperatively and 12 months after LRYGB in a prospective cohort study. Collected data included intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), total body composition by DEXA and plasma levels of FFA. Insulin sensitivity analysis from the IVGTT was estimated from minimal model analysis. Pre- and postoperative variables were compared using a paired sample t-test. Relationships between changes in variables were determined with Pearson's correlation test. Results Twelve months after LRYGB the study population showed a significant decrease in body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.001), FFA (P = 0.03), and total body fat (P = 0.03), with an increase in Si (P = 0.001). Postoperative changes in Si significantly correlated (Pearson's r = ?0.53, P=0.01) with change in total body fat, but not with changes in plasma FFA (Pearson's r = ?0.22, P= 0.31). Conclusions Our study challenges the notion that IR is mediated to a significant degree by changes in plasma FFA concentration. Instead, changes in adiposity and consequently changes in adipokines release can be the key players in determining remission of T2DM after RYGB. PMID:24317547

  2. A Pearson Random Walk with Steps of Uniform Orientation and Dirichlet Distributed Lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Caër, Gérard

    2010-08-01

    A constrained diffusive random walk of n steps in ℝ d and a random flight in ℝ d , which are equivalent, were investigated independently in recent papers (J. Stat. Phys. 127:813, 2007; J. Theor. Probab. 20:769, 2007, and J. Stat. Phys. 131:1039, 2008). The n steps of the walk are independent and identically distributed random vectors of exponential length and uniform orientation. Conditioned on the sum of their lengths being equal to a given value l, closed-form expressions for the distribution of the endpoint of the walk were obtained altogether for any n for d=1,2,4. Uniform distributions of the endpoint inside a ball of radius l were evidenced for a walk of three steps in 2D and of two steps in 4D. The previous walk is generalized by considering step lengths which have independent and identical gamma distributions with a shape parameter q>0. Given the total walk length being equal to 1, the step lengths have a Dirichlet distribution whose parameters are all equal to q. The walk and the flight above correspond to q=1. Simple analytical expressions are obtained for any d≥2 and n≥2 for the endpoint distributions of two families of walks whose q are integers or half-integers which depend solely on d. These endpoint distributions have a simple geometrical interpretation. Expressed for a two-step planar walk whose q=1, it means that the distribution of the endpoint on a disc of radius 1 is identical to the distribution of the projection on the disc of a point M uniformly distributed over the surface of the 3D unit sphere. Five additional walks, with a uniform distribution of the endpoint in the inside of a ball, are found from known finite integrals of products of powers and Bessel functions of the first kind. They include four different walks in ℝ3, two of two steps and two of three steps, and one walk of two steps in ℝ4. Pearson-Liouville random walks, obtained by distributing the total lengths of the previous Pearson-Dirichlet walks according to some specified probability law are finally discussed. Examples of unconstrained random walks, whose step lengths are gamma distributed, are more particularly considered.

  3. Log Pearson type 3 quantile estimators with regional skew information and low outlier adjustments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffis, V.W.; Stedinger, J.R.; Cohn, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    [1] The recently developed expected moments algorithm (EMA) [Cohn et al., 1997] does as well as maximum likelihood estimations at estimating log-Pearson type 3 (LP3) flood quantiles using systematic and historical flood information. Needed extensions include use of a regional skewness estimator and its precision to be consistent with Bulletin 17B. Another issue addressed by Bulletin 17B is the treatment of low outliers. A Monte Carlo study compares the performance of Bulletin 17B using the entire sample with and without regional skew with estimators that use regional skew and censor low outliers, including an extended EMA estimator, the conditional probability adjustment (CPA) from Bulletin 17B, and an estimator that uses probability plot regression (PPR) to compute substitute values for low outliers. Estimators that neglect regional skew information do much worse than estimators that use an informative regional skewness estimator. For LP3 data the low outlier rejection procedure generally results in no loss of overall accuracy, and the differences between the MSEs of the estimators that used an informative regional skew are generally modest in the skewness range of real interest. Samples contaminated to model actual flood data demonstrate that estimators which give special treatment to low outliers significantly outperform estimators that make no such adjustment.

  4. Comparison of the Mahalanobis Distance and Pearson's χ2 Statistic as Measures of Similarity of Isotope Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanzad Ghavidel, Fatemeh; Claesen, Jürgen; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    To extract a genuine peptide signal from a mass spectrum, an observed series of peaks at a particular mass can be compared with the isotope distribution expected for a peptide of that mass. To decide whether the observed series of peaks is similar to the isotope distribution, a similarity measure is needed. In this short communication, we investigate whether the Mahalanobis distance could be an alternative measure for the commonly employed Pearson's χ2 statistic. We evaluate the performance of the two measures by using a controlled MALDI-TOF experiment. The results indicate that Pearson's χ2 statistic has better discriminatory performance than the Mahalanobis distance and is a more robust measure.

  5. Quantitative comparison of the absorption spectra of the gas mixtures in analogy to the criterion of Pearson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yu. V.; Kuzmin, D. A.; Sandykova, E. A.; Shapovalov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    An approach to the reduction of the space of the absorption spectra, based on the original criterion for profile analysis of the spectra, was proposed. This criterion dates back to the known statistics chi-square test of Pearson. Introduced criterion allows to quantify the differences of spectral curves.

  6. Using the Pearson Distribution for Synthesis of the Suboptimal Algorithms for Filtering Multi-Dimensional Markov Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mit'kin, A. S.; Pogorelov, V. A.; Chub, E. G.

    2015-08-01

    We consider the method of constructing the suboptimal filter on the basis of approximating the a posteriori probability density of the multidimensional Markov process by the Pearson distributions. The proposed method can efficiently be used for approximating asymmetric, excessive, and finite densities.

  7. Use of "t"-Test and ANOVA in Career-Technical Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    Use of t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures in published research from three scholarly journals in career and technical education (CTE) during a recent 5-year period was examined. Information on post hoc analyses, reporting of effect size, alpha adjustments to account for multiple tests, power, and examination of assumptions…

  8. T.E.S.T.S. (Taking Every Student to Success): Another Way To Assess.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Lindy C.

    This article on the T.E.S.T.S. (Taking Every Student To Success) strategy promotes using a variety of assessment strategies in order to alleviate the stress students experience during exams, enabling those who are not "good test takers" to achieve a higher degree of success. If the primary purpose of giving a test is to determine whether or not a…

  9. Determining Differences in Efficacy of Two Disinfectants Using t-Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Michael A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment to compare the effectiveness of 95% ethanol to 20% bleach as disinfectants using t-tests for the statistical analysis of the data. Reports that bleach is a better disinfectant. Discusses the statistical and practical significance of the results. (JRH)

  10. Five-Point Likert Items: t Test versus Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, Joost C. F.; Dodou, Dimitra

    2010-01-01

    Likert questionnaires are widely used in survey research, but it is unclear whether the item data should be investigated by means of parametric or nonparametric procedures. This study compared the Type I and II error rates of the "t" test versus the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon (MWW) for five-point Likert items. Fourteen population distributions were…

  11. Filter design for the detection of compact sources based on the Neyman-Pearson detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caniego, M.; Herranz, D.; Barreiro, R. B.; Sanz, J. L.

    2005-05-01

    This paper considers the problem of compact source detection on a Gaussian background. We present a one-dimensional treatment (though a generalization to two or more dimensions is possible). Two relevant aspects of this problem are considered: the design of the detector and the filtering of the data. Our detection scheme is based on local maxima and it takes into account not only the amplitude but also the curvature of the maxima. A Neyman-Pearson test is used to define the region of acceptance, which is given by a sufficient linear detector that is independent of the amplitude distribution of the sources. We study how detection can be enhanced by means of linear filters with a scaling parameter, and compare some filters that have been proposed in the literature [the Mexican hat wavelet, the matched filter (MF) and the scale-adaptive filter (SAF)]. We also introduce a new filter, which depends on two free parameters (the biparametric scale-adaptive filter, BSAF). The value of these two parameters can be determined, given the a priori probability density function of the amplitudes of the sources, such that the filter optimizes the performance of the detector in the sense that it gives the maximum number of real detections once it has fixed the number density of spurious sources. The new filter includes as particular cases the standard MF and the SAF. As a result of its design, the BSAF outperforms these filters. The combination of a detection scheme that includes information on the curvature and a flexible filter that incorporates two free parameters (one of them a scaling parameter) improves significantly the number of detections in some interesting cases. In particular, for the case of weak sources embedded in white noise, the improvement with respect to the standard MF is of the order of 40 per cent. Finally, an estimation of the amplitude of the source (most probable value) is introduced and it is proven that such an estimator is unbiased and has maximum efficiency. We perform numerical simulations to test these theoretical ideas in a practical example and conclude that the results of the simulations agree with the analytical results.

  12. Reducing Bias and Error in the Correlation Coefficient Due to Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Hittner, James B.

    2015-01-01

    It is more common for educational and psychological data to be nonnormal than to be approximately normal. This tendency may lead to bias and error in point estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient. In a series of Monte Carlo simulations, the Pearson correlation was examined under conditions of normal and nonnormal data, and it was compared…

  13. Correlation between the Pharyngeal Airway Space and Head Posture after Surgery for Mandibular Prognathism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ming; Lai, Steven; Chen, Ker-Kong; Lee, Huey-Er

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between the pharyngeal airway space and head posture after mandibular setback surgery for mandibular prognathism. Materials and Methods. Serial lateral cephalograms of 37 patients with mandibular prognathism who underwent intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) were evaluated before (T1) and immediately (T2), between 6 weeks and 3 months (T3), and more than 1 year (T4) after surgery. Paired t-tests and Pearson's correlation analysis were used to evaluate the postoperative changes in all cephalometric parameters, including the mandible, hyoid, head posture (craniocervical angle), and pharyngeal airway space. Results. The mandible and hyoid were set back by 12.8 mm and 4.9 mm, respectively, at T2. Furthermore, the hyoid showed significant inferior movement of 10.7 mm, with an 8 mm increase in the tongue depth. The upper oropharyngeal airway (UOP) shortened by 4.1 mm, the lower oropharyngeal airway (LOP) by 1.7 mm, and the laryngopharyngeal airway by 2 mm. The craniocervical angle showed a significant increase of 2.8°. UOP and LOP showed a significant correlation with the craniocervical angle at T2 and T4. Conclusions. Our findings conclude that the oropharyngeal airway space is significantly decreased and correlated with a change in the head posture after mandibular setback surgery. PMID:25977919

  14. Performing T-tests to Compare Autocorrelated Time Series Data Collected from Direct-Reading Instruments.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Patrick; Cavanaugh, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Industrial hygienists now commonly use direct-reading instruments to evaluate hazards in the workplace. The stored values over time from these instruments constitute a time series of measurements that are often autocorrelated. Given the need to statistically compare two occupational scenarios using values from a direct-reading instrument, a t-test must consider measurement autocorrelation or the resulting test will have a largely inflated type-1 error probability (false rejection of the null hypothesis). A method is described for both the one-sample and two-sample cases which properly adjusts for autocorrelation. This method involves the computation of an "equivalent sample size" that effectively decreases the actual sample size when determining the standard error of the mean for the time series. An example is provided for the one-sample case, and an example is given where a two-sample t-test is conducted for two autocorrelated time series comprised of lognormally distributed measurements. PMID:26011524

  15. Estimating the sample size for a t-test using an internal pilot.

    PubMed

    Denne, J S; Jennison, C

    1999-07-15

    If the sample size for a t-test is calculated on the basis of a prior estimate of the variance then the power of the test at the treatment difference of interest is not robust to misspecification of the variance. We propose a t-test for a two-treatment comparison based on Stein's two-stage test which involves the use of an internal pilot to estimate variance and thus the final sample size required. We evaluate our procedure's performance and show that it controls the type I and II error rates more closely than existing methods for the same problem. We also propose a rule for choosing the size of the internal pilot, and show that this is reasonable in terms of the efficiency of the procedure. PMID:10407230

  16. A closer look at the effect of preliminary goodness-of-fit testing for normality for the one-sample t-test.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Justine; Kieser, Meinhard

    2011-11-01

    Student's one-sample t-test is a commonly used method when inference about the population mean is made. As advocated in textbooks and articles, the assumption of normality is often checked by a preliminary goodness-of-fit (GOF) test. In a paper recently published by Schucany and Ng it was shown that, for the uniform distribution, screening of samples by a pretest for normality leads to a more conservative conditional Type I error rate than application of the one-sample t-test without preliminary GOF test. In contrast, for the exponential distribution, the conditional level is even more elevated than the Type I error rate of the t-test without pretest. We examine the reasons behind these characteristics. In a simulation study, samples drawn from the exponential, lognormal, uniform, Student's t-distribution with 2 degrees of freedom (t(2) ) and the standard normal distribution that had passed normality screening, as well as the ingredients of the test statistics calculated from these samples, are investigated. For non-normal distributions, we found that preliminary testing for normality may change the distribution of means and standard deviations of the selected samples as well as the correlation between them (if the underlying distribution is non-symmetric), thus leading to altered distributions of the resulting test statistics. It is shown that for skewed distributions the excess in Type I error rate may be even more pronounced when testing one-sided hypotheses. PMID:21973094

  17. Correlation between cell cycle proteins and hMSH2 in actinic cheilitis and lip cancer.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Maria Luiza Diniz de Sousa; de Oliveira, Denise Hélen Imaculada Pereira; Sarmento, Dmitry José de Santana; Queiroz, Lélia Maria Guedes; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; da Silveira, Éricka Janine Dantas

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate and verify the relationship between the immunoexpression of hMSH2, p53 and p21 in actinic cheilitis (AC) and lower lip squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases. Forty AC and 40 SCC cases were submitted to immunoperoxidase method and quantitatively analyzed. Expression was compared by Mann-Whitney test, Student t test or one-way ANOVA. To correlate the variables, Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated. The expression of p53 and p21 showed no significant differences between histopathological grades of AC or lower lip SCC (p > 0.05). Immunoexpression of p53 was higher in SCC than in AC (p < 0.001), while p21 expression was more observed in AC when compared to SCC group (p = 0.006). The AC group revealed an inverse correlation between p53 and hMSH2 expression (r = -0.30, p = 0.006). Alterations in p53 and p21 expression suggest that these proteins are involved in lower lip carcinogenesis. Moreover, p53 and hMSH2 seem to be interrelated in early events of this process. PMID:26842232

  18. A Pearson-type goodness-of-fit test for stationary and time-continuous Markov regression models.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Hernández, R; Farewell, V T

    2002-07-15

    Markov regression models describe the way in which a categorical response variable changes over time for subjects with different explanatory variables. Frequently it is difficult to measure the response variable on equally spaced discrete time intervals. Here we propose a Pearson-type goodness-of-fit test for stationary Markov regression models fitted to panel data. A parametric bootstrap algorithm is used to study the distribution of the test statistic. The proposed technique is applied to examine the fit of a Markov regression model used to identify markers for disease progression in psoriatic arthritis. PMID:12111896

  19. Inductive inference or inductive behavior: Fisher and Neyman-Pearson approaches to statistical testing in psychological research (1940-1960).

    PubMed

    Halpin, Peter F; Stam, Henderikus J

    2006-01-01

    The application of statistical testing in psychological research over the period of 1940-1960 is examined in order to address psychologists' reconciliation of the extant controversy between the Fisher and Neyman-Pearson approaches. Textbooks of psychological statistics and the psychological journal literature are reviewed to examine the presence of what Gigerenzer (1993) called a hybrid model of statistical testing. Such a model is present in the textbooks, although the mathematically incomplete character of this model precludes the appearance of a similarly hybridized approach to statistical testing in the research literature. The implications of this hybrid model for psychological research and the statistical testing controversy are discussed. PMID:17286092

  20. Correlating and predicting psychiatric symptom ratings: Spearman's r versus Kendall's tau correlation.

    PubMed

    Arndt, S; Turvey, C; Andreasen, N C

    1999-01-01

    Simple correlations play a large role in the analysis of psychiatric data. They are used to predict outcome, validate new instruments, establish treatment efficacy and find symptom patterns. Researchers and data analysts often face a question about which correlation coefficient to use in a study but are often unaware of the strengths and weaknesses of the alternative correlation measures. The presence of outliers, nonconstant variance, skewed distributions and unequal n are common in psychiatric data and this poses severe problems for many classic statistical methods. We compare Pearson, Spearman and Kendall's correlation coefficients using a large sample of subjects with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were evaluated with 7 different psychiatric rating scales. Samples sizes ranging from 8 to 50 were evaluated using bootstrapping methods. The criteria for evaluation of the correlations were the type I error rates, power, bias and confidence interval width. Pearson's r did not always control for false positives at the nominal rate and was often unstable. Spearman's r performed better than Pearson's but provided a biased estimate of the true correlation. Spearman's r was also difficult to interpret. Our results suggest that Kendall's tau(b) has many advantages over Pearson's and Spearman's r; when applied to psychiatric data, tau(b) maintained adequate control of type I errors, was nearly as powerful as Pearson's r, provided much tighter confidence intervals and had a clear interpretation. PMID:10221741

  1. A novel mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with Pearson syndrome and neonatal diabetes mellitus provides insight into disease etiology, severity and progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Yu; Zhao, Si-Yu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Dong; Dong, Chang-Hu; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Pearson syndrome (PS) is a rare, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion disorder mainly affecting hematopoietic system and exocrine pancreas in early infancy, which is characterized by multi-organ involvement, variable manifestations and poor prognosis. Since the clinical complexity and uncertain outcome of PS, the ability to early diagnose and anticipate disease progression is of great clinical importance. We described a patient with severe anemia and hyperglycinemia at birth was diagnosed with neonatal diabetes mellitus, and later with PS. Genetic testing revealed that a novel mtDNA deletion existed in various non-invasive tissues from the patient. The disease course was monitored by mtDNA deletion heteroplasmy and mtDNA/nucleus DNA genome ratio in different tissues and at different time points, showing a potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Our findings suggest that for patient suspected for PS, it may be therapeutically important to first perform detailed mtDNA analysis on non-invasive tissues at the initial diagnosis and during disease progression. PMID:26016877

  2. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available background data (nb readings..., necessitates finding tb and tm from standard (one-tailed) tables where, tb=t-tables with (nb−1) degrees...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available background data (nb readings..., necessitates finding tb and tm from standard (one-tailed) tables where, tb=t-tables with (nb−1) degrees...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available background data (nb readings..., necessitates finding tb and tm from standard (one-tailed) tables where, tb = t-tables with (nb−1) degrees...

  5. Reassess the t Test: Interact with All Your Data via ANOVA.

    PubMed

    Brady, Siobhan M; Burow, Meike; Busch, Wolfgang; Carlborg, Örjan; Denby, Katherine J; Glazebrook, Jane; Hamilton, Eric S; Harmer, Stacey L; Haswell, Elizabeth S; Maloof, Julin N; Springer, Nathan M; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    Plant biology is rapidly entering an era where we have the ability to conduct intricate studies that investigate how a plant interacts with the entirety of its environment. This requires complex, large studies to measure how plant genotypes simultaneously interact with a diverse array of environmental stimuli. Successful interpretation of the results from these studies requires us to transition away from the traditional standard of conducting an array of pairwise t tests toward more general linear modeling structures, such as those provided by the extendable ANOVA framework. In this Perspective, we present arguments for making this transition and illustrate how it will help to avoid incorrect conclusions in factorial interaction studies (genotype × genotype, genotype × treatment, and treatment × treatment, or higher levels of interaction) that are becoming more prevalent in this new era of plant biology. PMID:26220933

  6. Novel 5.712 kb mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with Pearson syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Ryu, Hyejin; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Jiyeon; Lee, Jae Wook; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2015-05-01

    Pearson marrow?pancreas syndrome (PS) is a progressive multi?organ disorder caused by deletions and duplications of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). PS is often fatal in infancy, and the majority of patients with PS succumb to the disease before reaching three?years?of?age, due to septicemia, metabolic acidosis or hepatocellular insufficiency. The present report describes the case of a four?month?old infant with severe normocytic normochromic anemia, vacuolization of hematopoietic precursors and metabolic acidosis. After extensive clinical investigation, the patient was diagnosed with PS, which was confirmed by molecular analysis of mtDNA. The molecular analysis detected a novel large?scale (5.712 kb) deletion spanning nucleotides 8,011 to 13,722 of mtDNA, which lacked direct repeats at the deletion boundaries. The present report is, to the best of our knowledge, the first case reported in South Korea. PMID:25543536

  7. Nutritional assessment and its correlation with anthropometric measurements in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Koor, Behrooz Ebrahimzadeh; Nakhaie, Mohammad Reza; Babaie, Saied

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important problems in patients on hemodialysis (HD) is chronic malnutrition. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of malnutrition using a subjective global assessment (SGA) in HD patients referred to the Valie ASR Hospital, Arak, Iran. In this descriptive analysis study, 190 HD patients were selected with random sampling. SGA and anthropometric and biochemical measurements were assessed in all patients. Data were analyzed with the Chi-square and t-tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Of the 190 patients studied, 78 patients (41.1%) were male and 112 patients (58.9%) were female. Sixteen patients were detected to have adequate nutritional status (8.4%), 90 (47.4%) had mild malnutrition and 84 patients (44.2%) had moderate malnutrition. We found a significant negative correlation of SGA score with patient's weight (r = -0.147) and patient's body mass index (BMI) (r = -0.238). Also, it correlated significantly with duration of dialysis treatment (years) (r = 0.404). The SGA score showed a significant negative correlation with mid-arm circumference (MAC) (r = - 0.152). No significant correlation was found between SGA score and mid-arm muscle area. Our study showed that >50% of patients on maintenance HD had mild or moderate malnutrition. There was no case of severe malnutrition. Duration of dialysis treatment and some anthropometric indices (weight, BMI and MAC) also showed a significant correlation with SGA score, which are important to determine the nutritional status of HD patients. PMID:26178540

  8. Discrete Pearson distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.; Kastenbaum, M.A.

    1991-11-01

    These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

  9. Infiltrating mast cells correlate with angiogenesis in bone metastases from gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ammendola, Michele; Marech, Ilaria; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Zuccalà, Valeria; Luposella, Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Patruno, Rosa; Crovace, Alberto; Ruggieri, Eustachio; Zito, Alfredo Francesco; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sacco, Rosario; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    While gastric cancer is a well established angiogenesis driven tumor, no data has been published regarding angiogenesis stimulated by mast cells (MCs) positive for tryptase in bone metastases from gastric cancer patients (BMGCP). It is well established that MCs play a role in immune responses and more recently it was demonstrated that MCs have been involved in tumor angiogenesis. We analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in BMGCP diagnosed by histology. A series of 15 stage T3-4N2-3M1 (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Staging 7th Edition) BMGCP from bone biopsies were selected. Tumour tissue samples were evaluated by mean of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of MCs density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), MCs area positive to tryptase (MCAPT), microvascular density (MVD) and endothelial area (EA). A significant correlation between MCDPT, MCAPT, MVD and EA groups to each other was found by Pearson and t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.68 to 0.82; p-value ranged from 0.00 to 0.02). Our very preliminary data suggest that infiltrating MCs positive for tryptase may play a role in BMGCP angiogenesis, and could be further evaluated as a novel target of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:25648323

  10. Infiltrating Mast Cells Correlate with Angiogenesis in Bone Metastases from Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Marech, Ilaria; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Zuccalà, Valeria; Luposella, Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Patruno, Rosa; Crovace, Alberto; Ruggieri, Eustachio; Zito, Alfredo Francesco; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sacco, Rosario; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    While gastric cancer is a well established angiogenesis driven tumor, no data has been published regarding angiogenesis stimulated by mast cells (MCs) positive for tryptase in bone metastases from gastric cancer patients (BMGCP). It is well established that MCs play a role in immune responses and more recently it was demonstrated that MCs have been involved in tumor angiogenesis. We analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in BMGCP diagnosed by histology. A series of 15 stage T3-4N2-3M1 (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Staging 7th Edition) BMGCP from bone biopsies were selected. Tumour tissue samples were evaluated by mean of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of MCs density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), MCs area positive to tryptase (MCAPT), microvascular density (MVD) and endothelial area (EA). A significant correlation between MCDPT, MCAPT, MVD and EA groups to each other was found by Pearson and t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.68 to 0.82; p-value ranged from 0.00 to 0.02). Our very preliminary data suggest that infiltrating MCs positive for tryptase may play a role in BMGCP angiogenesis, and could be further evaluated as a novel target of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:25648323

  11. Partial correlation mapping of brain functional connectivity with resting state fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Zonglei; Tian, Jie; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Hui

    2007-03-01

    The methods to detect resting state functional connectivity presented so far mainly focus on Pearson correlation analysis which calculates Pearson Product Moment correlation coefficient between the time series of two distinct voxels or regions to measure the functional dependency between them. Due to artifacts and noises in the data, functional connectivity maps resulting from the Pearson correlation analysis may risk arising from the correlation of interfering signals other than the neural sources. In the paper, partial correlation analysis is proposed to map resting state functional connectivity. By eliminating of the contributions of interfering signals to pairwise correlations between different voxels or regions, partial correlation analysis allows us to measure the real functional connectivity induced by neural activity. Experiments with real fMRI data, demonstrate that mapping functional connectivity with partial correlation analysis leads to disappearance of a considerable part of the functional connectivity networks relative to that from Pearson correlation analysis and showing small, but consistent networks. The results indicate that partial correlation analysis could perform a better mapping of brain functional connectivity than Pearson correlation analysis.

  12. Comparisons of two moments-based estimators that utilize historical and paleoflood data for the log Pearson type III distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    England, J.F., Jr.; Salas, J.D.; Jarrett, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The expected moments algorithm (EMA) [Cohn et al., 1997] and the Bulletin 17B [Interagency Committee on Water Data, 1982] historical weighting procedure (B17H) for the log Pearson type III distribution are compared by Monte Carlo computer simulation for cases in which historical and/or paleoflood data are available. The relative performance of the estimators was explored for three cases: fixed-threshold exceedances, a fixed number of large floods, and floods generated from a different parent distribution. EMA can effectively incorporate four types of historical and paleoflood data: floods where the discharge is explicitly known, unknown discharges below a single threshold, floods with unknown discharge that exceed some level, and floods with discharges described in a range. The B17H estimator can utilize only the first two types of historical information. Including historical/paleoflood data in the simulation experiments significantly improved the quantile estimates in terms of mean square error and bias relative to using gage data alone. EMA performed significantly better than B17H in nearly all cases considered. B17H performed as well as EMA for estimating X100 in some limited fixed-threshold exceedance cases. EMA performed comparatively much better in other fixed-threshold situations, for the single large flood case, and in cases when estimating extreme floods equal to or greater than X500. B17H did not fully utilize historical information when the historical period exceeded 200 years. Robustness studies using GEV-simulated data confirmed that EMA performed better than B17H. Overall, EMA is preferred to B17H when historical and paleoflood data are available for flood frequency analysis.

  13. INTERPRETING THE DISTANCE CORRELATION RESULTS FOR THE COMBO-17 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Richards, Donald St. P.; Martínez-Gómez, Elizabeth E-mail: richards@stat.psu.edu

    2014-04-01

    The accurate classification of galaxies in large-sample astrophysical databases of galaxy clusters depends sensitively on the ability to distinguish between morphological types, especially at higher redshifts. This capability can be enhanced through a new statistical measure of association and correlation, called the distance correlation coefficient, which has more statistical power to detect associations than does the classical Pearson measure of linear relationships between two variables. The distance correlation measure offers a more precise alternative to the classical measure since it is capable of detecting nonlinear relationships that may appear in astrophysical applications. We showed recently that the comparison between the distance and Pearson correlation coefficients can be used effectively to isolate potential outliers in various galaxy data sets, and this comparison has the ability to confirm the level of accuracy associated with the data. In this work, we elucidate the advantages of distance correlation when applied to large databases. We illustrate how the distance correlation measure can be used effectively as a tool to confirm nonlinear relationships between various variables in the COMBO-17 database, including the lengths of the major and minor axes, and the alternative redshift distribution. For these outlier pairs, the distance correlation coefficient is routinely higher than the Pearson coefficient since it is easier to detect nonlinear relationships with distance correlation. The V-shaped scatter plots of Pearson versus distance correlation coefficients also reveal the patterns with increasing redshift and the contributions of different galaxy types within each redshift range.

  14. Relationship between the TCAP and the Pearson Benchmark Assessment in Elementary Students' Reading and Math Performance in a Northeastern Tennessee School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugger-Roberts, Cherith A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine if there was a relationship between the TCAP test and Pearson Benchmark assessment in elementary students' reading and language arts and math performance in a northeastern Tennessee school district. This study involved 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students. The study focused on the following…

  15. Analysis of correlated ROC areas in diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Song, H H

    1997-03-01

    This paper focuses on methods of analysis of areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Analysis of ROC areas should incorporate the correlation structure of repeated measurements taken on the same set of cases and the paucity of measurements per treatment resulting from an effective summarization of cases into a few area measures of diagnostic accuracy. The repeated nature of ROC data has been taken into consideration in the analysis methods previously suggested by Swets and Pickett (1982, Evaluation of Diagnostic Systems: Methods from Signal Detection Theory), Hanley and McNeil (1983, Radiology 148, 839-843), and DeLong, DeLong, and Clarke-Pearson (1988, Biometrics 44, 837-845). DeLong et al.'s procedure is extended to a Wald test for general situations of diagnostic testing. The method of analyzing jackknife pseudovalues by treating them as data is extremely useful when the number of area measures to be tested is quite small. The Wald test based on covariances of multivariate multisample U-statistics is compared with two approaches of analyzing pseudovalues, the univariate mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements and the three-way factorial ANOVA. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the three tests give good approximation to the nominal size at the 5% levels for large sample sizes, but the paired t-test using ROC areas as data lacks the power of the other three tests and Hanley and McNeil's method is inappropriate for testing diagnostic accuracies. The Wald statistic performs better than the ANOVAs of pseudovalues. Jackknifing schemes of multiple deletion where different structures of normal and diseased distributions are accounted for appear to perform slightly better than simple multiple-deletion schemes but no appreciable power difference is apparent, and deletion of too many cases at a time may sacrifice power. These methods have important applications in diagnostic testing in ROC studies of radiology and of medicine in general. PMID:9147602

  16. Evaluation of climate change on flood event by using parametric T-test and non-parametric Mann-Kendall test in Barcelonnette basin, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Azadeh; Glade, Thomas; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2010-09-01

    The existence of a trend in hydrological and meteorological time series is detected by statistical tests. The trend analysis of hydrological and meteorological series is important to consider, because of the effects of global climate change. Parametric or non-parametric statistical tests can be used to decide whether there is a statistically significant trend. In this paper, first a homogeneity analysis was performed by using the non-parametric Bartlett test. Then, trend detection was estimated by using non-parametric Mann-Kendall test. The null hypothesis in the Mann-Kendall test is that the data are independent and randomly ordered. The result of Mann-Kendall test was compared with the parametric T-Test for finding the existence of trend. To reach this purpose, the significance of trends was analyzed on monthly data of Ubaye river in Barcelonnette watershed in southeast of France at an elevation of 1132 m (3717 ft) during the period from 1928 to 2009 bases with the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test and parametric T-Test for river discharge and for meteorological data. The result shows that a rainfall event does not necessarily have an immediate impact on discharge. Visual inspection suggests that the correlation between observations made at the same time point is not very strong. In the results of the trend tests the p-value of the discharge is slightly smaller than the p-value of the precipitation but it seems that in both there is no statistically significant trend. In statistical hypothesis testing, a test statistic is a numerical summary of a set of data that reduces the data to one or a small number of values that can be used to perform a hypothesis test. Statistical hypothesis testing is determined if there is a significant trend or not. Negative test statistics and MK test in both precipitation and discharge data indicate downward trends. As conclusion we can say extreme flood event during recent years is strongly depending on: 1) location of the city: It is situated in an elongated form extending below mountain slopes and along a river channel. 2) Seasonal Changes: During spring, the melting of snow result in an increase water level in river channels and this will be amplified whenever a warm rainfall occurs. Then it could be conclude that climate change did not has a significant effect on flood in case study area Keywords: Trend, parametric and non parametric test, T-Test, Mann-Kendall test

  17. Correlation Analysis between Complex Relative Permittivity and Biochemical Components for Blood of Dialysis Patients before and after Hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Akira; Takata, Kazuyuki; Nagao, Hirotomo; Wang, Jianqing; Fujiwara, Osamu

    We previously measured for healthy subjects and patients who require hemodialysis the complex relative permittivity (εr´-jεr´´) of whole blood, and found that εr´-axis intercept εrt´ of straight line approximation to the Cole-Cole plots at frequencies from 200 MHz to 1GHz is significantly different with a level of less than 1% among its averaged values for healthy subjects and patients before and after dialysis, though any correlations between εrt´ and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine being used as main indices for hemodialysis evaluation have not so far been clarified. In this study, to make correlation analyses between the intercept εrt´ and blood biochemical components for nine patients before and after hemodialysis, we measured six kinds of their blood components including BUN and creatinine, and calculated their Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients for εrt´ along with significant probability P based on a t-test. It should be noted that P is a reference probability to determine whether or not a null hypothesis can be rejected, and that the P value of 0.05 is commonly used as a significance level for statistical test. As a result, we found that a strong correlation with P < 0.05 is observed between εrt´ and albumin, while there are not always significant correlations with P > 0.05 between εrt´ and other blood components including BUN and creatinine. Although albumin is not used as an index for hemodialysis efficiency, it can reflect water amount in blood vessels and liver operation. This finding implies that εrt´ could be used as an index for evaluating blood viscosity and liver function.

  18. A Correlation of Permanent Anterior Tooth Fracture with Type of Occlusion and Craniofacial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Rana, Vivek; Aggarwal, Abhai; Chandra, Lokesh

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: To assess the relationship of anterior tooth fractures with type of occlusion and craniofacial morphology. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on 76 subjects of age group 9 to 13 years with at least one fractured permanent anterior teeth. Lateral cephalograms were taken and study models were prepared for each subject with prior consent of their parents. Then cephalometric tracings were done and overjet was recorded through study models. Statistical analysis used: Standard error of mean (SEM) and unpaired t-test has been applied to test the significant difference between the seven parameters under consideration. Karl Pearson correlation test has also been used to correlate all the parameters used in this study with each other. All the tests were performed at 5 and 1% levels of significance. Results: Frequency of tooth fracture increases with increasing overjet. At 5% level of significance, significant difference were observed between the standard values and observed values for overjet measurement, SNA angle, SNB angle, ANB angle, upper incisor to NA (angle), upper incisor to NA (linear) and interincisal angle for overall data and also for both male and female data separately. Conclusion: Probability of permanent anterior tooth fracture increases with increasing overjet. A significant difference was observed between the standard value and the observed values of all parameters under consideration. How to cite this article: Chaturvedi R, Kumar A, Rana V, Aggarwal A, Chandra L. A Correlation of Permanent Anterior Tooth Fracture with Type of Occlusion and Craniofacial Morphology. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):80-84. PMID:25206197

  19. Correlation Assessment of Climate and Geographic Distribution of Tuberculosis Using Geographical Information System (GIS)

    PubMed Central

    BEIRANVAND, Reza; KARIMI, Asrin; DELPISHEH, Ali; SAYEHMIRI, Kourosh; SOLEIMANI, Samira; GHALAVANDI, Shahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) spread pattern is influenced by geographic and social factors. Nowadays Geographic Information System (GIS) is one of the most important epidemiological instrumentation identifying high-risk population groups and geographic areas of TB. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between climate and geographic distribution of TB in Khuzestan Province using GIS during 2005–2012. Methods: Through an ecological study, all 6363 patients with definite diagnosis of TB from 2005 until the end of September 2012 in Khuzestan Province, southern Iran were diagnosed. Data were recorded using TB- Register software. Tuberculosis incidence based on the climate and the average of annual rain was evaluated using GIS. Data were analyzed through SPSS software. Independent t-test, ANOVA, Linear regression, Pearson and Eta correlation coefficient with a significance level of less than 5% were used for the statistical analysis. Results: The TB incidence was different in various geographic conditions. The highest mean of TB cumulative incidence rate was observed in extra dry areas (P= 0.017). There was a significant inverse correlation between annual rain rate and TB incidence rate (R= −0.45, P= 0.001). The lowest TB incidence rate (0–100 cases per 100,000) was in areas with the average of annual rain more than 1000 mm (P= 0.003). Conclusion: The risk of TB has a strong relationship with climate and the average of annual rain, so that the risk of TB in areas with low annual rainfall and extra dry climate is more than other regions. Services and special cares to high-risk regions of TB are recommended. PMID:27057526

  20. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  1. Quantification and Correlation of Angiogenesis with Macrophages by Histomorphometric Method in Central and Peripheral Giant Cell Granuloma: An Immunohistochemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Krishanappa, Savita Jangal; Prakash, Smitha Gowdra; Channabasaviah, Girish Hemdal; Murgod, Sanjay; Pujari, Ravikumar; Kamat, Mamata Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Angiogenesis is a fundamental process that affects physiologic reactions and pathological processes such as tumour development and metastasis. It is the process of formation of new microvessel from the preexisting vessels. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate angiogenesis, macrophage index and correlate the impact of macrophages on angiogenesis in the central and peripheral giant cell granulomas by evaluating immunohistochemically microvessel density, microvessel perimeter and macrophage index. Materials and Methods Immunohistochemical analysis was carried on 20 cases of central and peripheral giant cell granulomas each for CD34 and CD68 proteins expression. Inferential statistical analysis was performed using Independent student t-test to assess the microvessel density, microvessel perimeter and macrophage index on continuous scale between Group I and Group II. Level of significance was determined at 5%. Further bivariate analysis using Pearson correlation test was carried out to see the relationship between microvessel density and macrophage index in each group. Results Microvessel density, micro vessel perimeter and macrophage index was higher in central giant cell granuloma compared to that of peripheral giant cell granuloma. Correlation between microvessel density and macrophage index among these two lesions was statistically insignificant. Conclusion Angiogenesis as well as the number of macrophages appeared to increase in Central Giant Cell Granuloma in present study. These findings suggest that macrophages may up regulate the angiogenesis in these giant cell granulomas and angiogenesis do have a role in clinical behaviour. However, we could not establish a positive correlation between microvessel density and macrophage index as the values were statistically insignificant. This insignificance may be presumed due to fewer samples taken for study. PMID:27134990

  2. Bootstrap Standard Error and Confidence Intervals for the Correlation Corrected for Range Restriction: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Wai; Chan, Daniel W.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The standard Pearson correlation coefficient is a biased estimator of the true population correlation, ?, when the predictor and the criterion are range restricted. To correct the bias, the correlation corrected for range restriction, r-sub(c), has been recommended, and a standard formula based on asymptotic results for estimating its standard…

  3. Counting Data and T-test Evaluation of Detection Limits and Their Effect on Data-Group Similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, J. P.; McSwiggen, P.; Valley, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    Four arbitrary collections of detrital zircons were analyzed by EMP, using high beam currents and long counting times to produce calculated 1-sigma detection limits (DL) for U, Th, and Pb of 174, 129, and 97 ppm, respectively. The spectrometer background position was determined by qualitative scans across element peaks. 300 analyses were collected: 100 for two collections and 50 for the others, and data manipulation and Student's t-test calculations for the groups were made using a spreadsheet program. The compositional results were U: 0-3.6 wt. %, Th: 0-0.32 wt. %, and below-DL for Pb. It was assumed that below-DL net-count results should cluster around 0. Histograms of net counts below-DL had non-zero means for all three elements, suggesting that the background measurements were incorrect: the maxima were offset from 0 by +20 cts/sec/nA for U and Th, and - 80 cts/sec/nA for Pb (negative net counts were reported, but below-DL results were returned as 0 wt. % by the EMP software). Above-DL wt. % data were regressed against count rates, all the net counts were shifted to set the below-DL mean at zero counts, and the overall (+ and -) wt. % values were recalculated according to the regression. The non-zero means for U and Th were thus reduced by 40 and 9 ppm, respectively. The mean Pb was -3.2 wt. %, calculated from the net counts and Pb (ca. 64 wt. %) of the crocoite standard; this result was unreasonable, but the count-rate data (containing no compositional interpretation) for Pb was used for t-tests. The difference between t-test results from data including 0 wt. % values and from count-rate values was significant. For example, the inclusion of numerous 0 wt. % data in a group with low U concentrations biased the mean and standard deviation to suggest that the group was distinct, but the use of net count rates showed that the group was similar to another group with low but detectible U. Wt. % results for Pb were meaningless due to the calibration error, but the net-count data allowed comparison and discrimination between groups based on t- test calculations.

  4. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....314 12.706 2 2.920 4.303 3 2.353 3.182 4 2.132 2.776 5 2.015 2.571 6 1.943 2.447 7 1.895 2.365 8 1.860 2.306 9 1.833 2.262 10 1.812 2.228 11 1.796 2.201 12 1.782 2.179 13 1.771 2.160 14 1.761 2.145 15 1...-Fisher Students' t-test IV Appendix IV to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  5. Distance correlation methods for discovering associations in large astrophysical databases

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Richards, Mercedes T.; Richards, Donald St. P. E-mail: mrichards@astro.psu.edu

    2014-01-20

    High-dimensional, large-sample astrophysical databases of galaxy clusters, such as the Chandra Deep Field South COMBO-17 database, provide measurements on many variables for thousands of galaxies and a range of redshifts. Current understanding of galaxy formation and evolution rests sensitively on relationships between different astrophysical variables; hence an ability to detect and verify associations or correlations between variables is important in astrophysical research. In this paper, we apply a recently defined statistical measure called the distance correlation coefficient, which can be used to identify new associations and correlations between astrophysical variables. The distance correlation coefficient applies to variables of any dimension, can be used to determine smaller sets of variables that provide equivalent astrophysical information, is zero only when variables are independent, and is capable of detecting nonlinear associations that are undetectable by the classical Pearson correlation coefficient. Hence, the distance correlation coefficient provides more information than the Pearson coefficient. We analyze numerous pairs of variables in the COMBO-17 database with the distance correlation method and with the maximal information coefficient. We show that the Pearson coefficient can be estimated with higher accuracy from the corresponding distance correlation coefficient than from the maximal information coefficient. For given values of the Pearson coefficient, the distance correlation method has a greater ability than the maximal information coefficient to resolve astrophysical data into highly concentrated horseshoe- or V-shapes, which enhances classification and pattern identification. These results are observed over a range of redshifts beyond the local universe and for galaxies from elliptical to spiral.

  6. Meta-Analysis of Correlations Revisited: Attempted Replication and Extension of Field's (2001) Simulation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafdahl, Adam R.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2 Monte Carlo studies of fixed- and random-effects meta-analysis for correlations, A. P. Field (2001) ostensibly evaluated Hedges-Olkin-Vevea Fisher-[zeta] and Schmidt-Hunter Pearson-r estimators and tests in 120 conditions. Some authors have cited those results as evidence not to meta-analyze Fisher-[zeta] correlations, especially with…

  7. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  8. Sleep Quality and Emotional Correlates in Taiwanese Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients 1 Week and 1 Month after Hospital Discharge: A Repeated Descriptive Correlational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Lin; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality is a common health problem for coronary artery bypass graft patients, however few studies have evaluated sleep quality during the period immediately following hospital discharge. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate changes in sleep quality and emotional correlates in coronary artery bypass graft patients in Taiwan at 1 week and 1 month after hospital discharge. Methods We used a descriptive correlational design for this study. One week after discharge, 87 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery completed two structured questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Three weeks later (1 month after discharge) the patients completed the surveys again. Pearson correlations, t-tests, ANOVA and linear multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results A majority of the participants had poor sleep quality at 1 week (82.8%) and 1 month (66.7%) post-hospitalization, based on the global score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Despite poor sleep quality at both time-points the sleep quality at 1 month was significantly better than at 1-week post hospitalization. Poorer sleep quality correlated with older age, poorer heart function, anxiety and depression. The majority of participants had normal levels of anxiety at 1 week (69.0%) and 1 month (88.5%) as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. However, some level of depression was seen at 1 week (78.1%) and 1 month (59.7%). Depression was a significant predictor of sleep quality at 1 week; at 1 month after hospital discharge both anxiety and depression were significant predictors of sleep quality. Conclusion Sleep quality, anxiety and depression all significantly improved 1 month after hospital discharge. However, more than half of the participants continued to have poor sleep quality and some level of depression. Health care personnel should be encouraged to assess sleep and emotional status in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery and offer them appropriate management strategies to improve sleep and reduce anxiety and depression. PMID:26291524

  9. Distribution of the two-sample t-test statistic following blinded sample size re-estimation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kaifeng

    2016-05-01

    We consider the blinded sample size re-estimation based on the simple one-sample variance estimator at an interim analysis. We characterize the exact distribution of the standard two-sample t-test statistic at the final analysis. We describe a simulation algorithm for the evaluation of the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis at given treatment effect. We compare the blinded sample size re-estimation method with two unblinded methods with respect to the empirical type I error, the empirical power, and the empirical distribution of the standard deviation estimator and final sample size. We characterize the type I error inflation across the range of standardized non-inferiority margin for non-inferiority trials, and derive the adjusted significance level to ensure type I error control for given sample size of the internal pilot study. We show that the adjusted significance level increases as the sample size of the internal pilot study increases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26865383

  10. Measurement of Waist and Hip Circumference with a Body Surface Scanner: Feasibility, Validity, Reliability, and Correlations with Markers of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, Lina; Steinbrecher, Astrid; Pischon, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Objective Body surface scanners (BS), which visualize a 3D image of the human body, facilitate the computation of numerous body measures, including height, waist circumference (WC) and hip circumference (HC). However, limited information is available regarding validity and reliability of these automated measurements (AM) and their correlation with parameters of the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) compared to traditional manual measurements (MM). Methods As part of a cross-sectional feasibility study, AM of WC, HC and height were assessed twice in 60 participants using a 3D BS (VitussmartXXL). Additionally, MM were taken by trained personnel according to WHO guidelines. Participants underwent an interview, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and blood pressure measurement. Blood samples were taken to determine HbA1c, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and uric acid. Validity was assessed based on the agreement between AM and MM, using Bland-Altman-plots, correlation analysis, and paired t-tests. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) based on two repeated AM. Further, we calculated age-adjusted Pearson correlation for AM and MM with fat mass, systolic blood pressure, HbA1c, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and uric acid. Results Body measures were higher in AM compared to MM but both measurements were strongly correlated (WC, men, difference = 1.5cm, r = 0.97; women, d = 4.7cm, r = 0.96; HC, men, d = 2.3cm, r = 0.97; women, d = 3.0cm; r = 0.98). Reliability was high for all AM (nearly all ICC>0.98). Correlations of WC, HC, and the waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with parameters of MetS were similar between AM and MM; for example the correlation of WC assessed by AM with HDL-cholesterol was r = 0.35 in men, and r = -0.48 in women, respectively whereas correlation of WC measured manually with HDL cholesterol was r = -0.41 in men, and r = -0.49 in women, respectively. Conclusions Although AM of WC, HC, and WHR are higher when compared to MM based on WHO guidelines, our data indicate good validity, excellent reliability, and similar correlations to parameters of the MetS. PMID:25749283

  11. Correlation of iron deposition and change of gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging techniques: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haodi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the correlation between iron deposition and the change of gliocyte metabolism in healthy subjects’ basal ganglia region, by using 3D-enhanced susceptibility weighted angiography (ESWAN) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Material and methods Seventy-seven healthy volunteers (39 female and 38 male subjects; age range: 24–82 years old) were enrolled in the experiment including ESWAN and proton MRS sequences, consent for which was provided by themselves or their guardians. For each subject, the mean phase value gained by ESWAN was used to evaluate the iron deposition; choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and mI/Cr ratios gained by 1H-MRS were used to evaluate gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region of both sides. The paired t test was used to test the difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region. Linear regression was performed to evaluate the relation between mean phase value and age. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the relationship between the result of ESWAN and 1H-MRS. Results There was no difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region in the mean phase value and Cho/Cr. But in mI/Cr the mean phase value of each nucleus in bilateral basal ganglia decreased with increasing age. There are 16 r-values between the mean phase value and Cho/Cr and mI/Cr in bilateral basal ganglia region. And each of all p-values is less than 0.001 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Iron deposition in the bilateral basal ganglia is associated with the change of gliocyte metabolism with increasing age. Iron deposition in each nucleus of the basal ganglia region changes with age. PMID:26925133

  12. Odontometric Sexual Dimorphism: A Sibling Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sonali; Dinkar, Ajit D.; Bedi, Sumit

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Background: Teeth form an excellent material for anthropological, genetic, odontologic and forensic investigations. The aim of this study was to establish the genetic control of sexual dimorphism in tooth size amongst siblings of Goan children in age range of 14-22 years. Materials and Methods: Twenty-two sibling pairs were selected (22 males and 22 females) to assess genetic control of sexual dimorphism in tooth size. Alginate impressions were obtained for maxillary and mandibular arches and study models were prepared. Measurements were done using Zoom Digimatic Vernier Calipers with a resolution of 0.01 mm. Statistical Analysis: Correlation between mesiodistal and buccolingual tooth sizes amongst siblings was calculated using Pearsons correlation coefficient. Results: A statistically significant association was found between Mesiodistal Widths of Permanent Maxillary Right and Left Second Molars and between Maxillary Right and Left First Premolars amongst sibling pairs. A statistically significant association was also found between Buccolingual Widths of Mandibular Right and Left First Premolars amongst sibling pairs. This statistically significant correlation found amongst siblings establishes a genetic control over sexual dimorphism in these teeth. Conclusion: The genetic basis of sexual dimorphism in human dentition was ascertained as a significant correlation was found between mesio-distal and bucco-lingual widths of premolars between sibling pairs. PMID:24783145

  13. Test Review: Wagner, R. K., Torgesen, J. K., Rashotte, C. A., & Pearson, N. A., "Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing-2nd Ed. (CTOPP-2)." Austin, Texas: Pro-Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Rachel H.; Meisinger, Elizabeth B.; Tarar, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing-Second Edition (CTOPP-2; Wagner, Torgesen, Rashotte, & Pearson, 2013) is a norm-referenced test that measures phonological processing skills related to reading for individuals aged 4 to 24. According to its authors, the CTOPP-2 may be used to identify individuals who are markedly below their…

  14. Test Review: Wagner, R. K., Torgesen, J. K., Rashotte, C. A., & Pearson, N. A., "Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing-2nd Ed. (CTOPP-2)." Austin, Texas: Pro-Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Rachel H.; Meisinger, Elizabeth B.; Tarar, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing-Second Edition (CTOPP-2; Wagner, Torgesen, Rashotte, & Pearson, 2013) is a norm-referenced test that measures phonological processing skills related to reading for individuals aged 4 to 24. According to its authors, the CTOPP-2 may be used to identify individuals who are markedly below their

  15. The Social Correlates of Lexical Borrowing in Spanish in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varra, Rachel Marie

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates lexical borrowing in Spanish in New York. English-origin lexical material was extracted from a stratified sample of 146 Spanish-speaking informants of different ages, national origins, classes, etc., living in New York City. ANOVAs and Pearson correlations determined whether lexical borrowing frequency and the type…

  16. Quantifying meta-correlations in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Preis, Tobias; Gur-Gershgoren, Gitit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2012-08-01

    Financial markets are modular multi-level systems, in which the relationships between the individual components are not constant in time. Sudden changes in these relationships significantly affect the stability of the entire system, and vice versa. Our analysis is based on historical daily closing prices of the 30 components of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) from March 15th, 1939 until December 31st, 2010. We quantify the correlation among these components by determining Pearson correlation coefficients, to investigate whether mean correlation of the entire portfolio can be used as a precursor for changes in the index return. To this end, we quantify the meta-correlation - the correlation of mean correlation and index return. We find that changes in index returns are significantly correlated with changes in mean correlation. Furthermore, we study the relationship between the index return and correlation volatility - the standard deviation of correlations for a given time interval. This parameter provides further evidence of the effect of the index on market correlations and their fluctuations. Our empirical findings provide new information and quantification of the index leverage effect, and have implications to risk management, portfolio optimization, and to the increased stability of financial markets.

  17. Measurement of the internal adaptation of resin composites using micro-CT and its correlation with polymerization shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Park, S H

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the internal adaptation of dentin-composite interfaces with various resin composite materials under conditions of thermomechanical loading was analyzed nondestructively using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and these results were compared with analyses of microgaps after sectioning. Additionally, the correlation of internal adaptation with polymerization shrinkage strain and stress was evaluated. Four nonflowable resins, Gradia Direct (GD), Filtek P90 (P9), Filtek Z350 (Z3), and Charisma (CH), and two flowable resins, SDR (SD) and Tetric N-Flow (TF) were used. First, the polymerization shrinkage strain and stress were measured. Then, Class I cavities were prepared in 48 premolars. They were divided randomly into six groups, and the cavities were filled with composites using XP bond. To evaluate the internal adaptation, tooth specimens were immersed in a 25% silver nitrate solution, and micro-CT analysis was performed before and after thermomechanical loading. The silver nitrate penetration (%SP) was measured. After buccolingual sectioning and rhodamine penetration of the specimen, the rhodamine penetration (%RP) was measured using a stereo-microscope. One-way analysis of variance was then used to compare the polymerization shrinkage strain, stress, %SP, and %RP among the groups at a 95% confidence level. A paired t-test was used to compare the %SP before and after thermomechanical loading. Pearson correlation analysis was used to compare the correlation between polymerization shrinkage strain/stress and %SP or %RP to a 95% confidence level. Evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage strain demonstrated that P9 < Z3 ≤ GD < CH ≤ SD < TF (p<0.05); similarly, evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage stress showed that P9 ≤ GD ≤ Z3 ≤ CH ≤ SD < TF (p<0.05). The %SP showed that P9 ≤ GD ≤ Z3 < CH ≤ SD < TF (p<0.05) before loading and that P9 ≤ GD ≤ Z3 ≤ CH ≤ SD < TF (p<0.05) after loading. There was a significant difference between the before-loading and after-loading measurements in all groups (p<0.05). Additionally, there was a positive correlation between the %SP and the %RP (r=0.810, p<0.001). Conclusively, the polymerization shrinkage stress and strain were found to be closely related to the internal adaptation of the resin composite restorations. The newly proposed model for the evaluation of internal adaptation using micro-CT and silver nitrate may provide a new measurement for evaluating the internal adaptation of restorations in a nondestructive way. PMID:24111809

  18. Asymmetric correlation matrices: an analysis of financial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livan, G.; Rebecchi, L.

    2012-06-01

    We analyse the spectral properties of correlation matrices between distinct statistical systems. Such matrices are intrinsically non-symmetric, and lend themselves to extend the spectral analyses usually performed on standard Pearson correlation matrices to the realm of complex eigenvalues. We employ some recent random matrix theory results on the average eigenvalue density of this type of matrix to distinguish between noise and non-trivial correlation structures, and we focus on financial data as a case study. Namely, we employ daily prices of stocks belonging to the American and British stock exchanges, and look for the emergence of correlations between two such markets in the eigenvalue spectrum of their non-symmetric correlation matrix. We find several non trivial results when considering time-lagged correlations over short lags, and we corroborate our findings by additionally studying the asymmetric correlation matrix of the principal components of our datasets.

  19. Correcting Four Similar Correlational Measures for Attenuation Due to Errors of Measurement in the Dependent Variable: Eta, Epsilon, Omega, and Intraclass r.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Julian C.; Livingston, Samuel A.

    Besides the ubiquitous Pearson product-moment r, there are a number of other measures of relationship that are attenuated by errors of measurement and for which the relationship between true measures can be estimated. Among these are the correlation ratio (eta squared), Kelley's unbiased correlation ratio (epsilon squared), Hays' omega squared,…

  20. Electrophysiological Correlates of Behavioral Comfort Levels in Cochlear Implantees: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Raghunandhan, S; Ravikumar, A; Kameswaran, Mohan; Mandke, Kalyani; Ranjith, R

    2015-09-01

    Indications for cochlear implantation have expanded today to include very young children and those with syndromes/multiple handicaps. Programming the implant based on behavioral responses may be tedious for audiologists in such cases, wherein matching an effective MAP and appropriate MAP becomes the key issue in the habilitation program. In 'Difficult to MAP' scenarios, objective measures become paramount to predict optimal current levels to be set in the MAP. We aimed, (a) to study the trends in multi-modal electrophysiological tests and behavioral responses sequentially over the first year of implant use, (b) to generate normative data from the above, (c) to correlate the multi-modal electrophysiological thresholds levels with behavioral comfort levels, and (d) to create predictive formulae for deriving optimal comfort levels (if unknown), using linear and multiple regression analysis. This prospective study included ten profoundly hearing impaired children aged between 2 and 7 years with normal inner ear anatomy and no additional handicaps. They received the Advanced Bionics HiRes 90K Implant with Harmony Speech processor and used HiRes-P with Fidelity 120 strategy. They underwent, Impedance Telemetry, Neural Response Imaging, Electrically Evoked Stapedial Response Telemetry and Electrically Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response tests at 1, 4, 8 and 12 months of implant use, in conjunction with behavioral Mapping. Trends in electrophysiological and behavioral responses were analyzed using paired t test. By Karl Pearson's correlation method, electrode-wise correlations were derived for NRI thresholds versus Most Comfortable Levels (M-Levels) and offset based (apical, mid-array and basal array) correlations for EABR and ESRT thresholds versus M-Levels were calculated over time. These were used to derive predictive formulae by linear and multiple regression analysis. Such statistically predicted M-Levels were compared with the behaviorally recorded M-Levels among the cohort, using Cronbach's Alpha Reliability test method for confirming the efficacy of this method. NRI, ESRT and EABR thresholds showed statistically significant positive correlations with behavioral M-Levels, which improved with implant use over time. These correlations were used to derive predicted M-Levels using regression analysis. Such predicted M-Levels were found to be in proximity to the actual behavioral M-Levels recorded among this cohort and proved to be statistically reliable. When clinically applied, this method was found to be successful among subjects of our study group. Although there existed disparities of a few clinical units, between the actual and predicted comfort levels among the subjects, this statistical method was able to provide a working MAP, close to the behavioral MAP used by these children. The results help to infer that behavioral measurements are mandatory to program cochlear implantees, but in cases where they are difficult to obtain, this study method may be used as reference for obtaining additional inputs, in order to set an optimal MAP. The study explores the trends and correlations between electrophysiological tests and behavioral responses, recorded over time among a cohort of cochlear implantees and provides a statistical method which may be used as a guideline to predict optimal behavioral levels in difficult situations among future implantees. In 'Difficult to MAP' scenarios, following a protocol of sequential behavioral programming, in conjunction with electrophysiological correlates will provide the best outcomes. PMID:26405653

  1. Influence of radiopacity of dental composites on the diagnosis of secondary caries: the correlation between objective and subjective analyses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A D; Esteves, R G; Poiate, I A V P; Portero, P P; Almeida, S M

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to objectively evaluate the radiopacity of different dental composites and their subjective influence on diagnosing secondary caries-like lesions and how these results correlate. For objective analysis, three resin specimens (1 mm thick, with a 4-mm internal diameter) were made with four composites: 1) Charisma; 2) Filtek Z250; 3) Prisma AP.H; and 4) Glacier. Three human teeth were selected and then mesio-distally sectioned (1 mm thick) to make the dental specimens. An aluminum (Al) wedge (12 steps, 1 mm thick, 99.8% purity) was used as an internal standard to calculate the radiopacity. For subjective analysis, 20 human teeth were selected and then prepared with a mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity, with half the teeth receiving a round cavity to simulate the carious lesion. The MOD was restored using the composites at four different times. Standardized radiographs were acquired and then digitized (300 dpi and eight-bit TIFF) for both analyses. A histogram objectively measured the pixel intensity values of the images, which were converted into millimeters of Al using linear regressions. Eight observers subjectively evaluated the images using a five-point rating scale to diagnose the caries. The data were statistically analyzed using the Student t-test, the Kappa test, diagnostic testing, and the Pearson correlation coefficient (α=0.05). All materials showed radiopacity values compatible with dental tissues (p>0.05); Glacier was similar to dentin and Prisma AP.H was similar to enamel, while the remaining materials showed a middle radiopacity. Prisma AP.H and Glacier differed (p<0.05) in relation to their accuracy to caries diagnosis, with Glacier having greater accuracy. There was a correlation between objective and subjective analyses with negative linear dependence. An increase in the material's radiopacity could have a subjectively negative influence on the diagnosis of secondary caries; thus, an ideal radiopacity for a dental composite is closer to the dentin image and produces similar attenuation to X-rays than does dentin. PMID:23713807

  2. On the insignificance of Herschel's sunspot correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2013-08-01

    We examine William Herschel's hypothesis that solar-cycle variation of the Sun's irradiance has a modulating effect on the Earth's climate and that this is, specifically, manifested as an anticorrelation between sunspot number and the market price of wheat. Since Herschel first proposed his hypothesis in 1801, it has been regarded with both interest and skepticism. Recently, reports have been published that either support Herschel's hypothesis or rely on its validity. As a test of Herschel's hypothesis, we seek to reject a null hypothesis of a statistically random correlation between historical sunspot numbers, wheat prices in London and the United States, and wheat farm yields in the United States. We employ binary-correlation, Pearson-correlation, and frequency-domain methods. We test our methods using a historical geomagnetic activity index, well known to be causally correlated with sunspot number. As expected, the measured correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity would be an unlikely realization of random data; the correlation is "statistically significant." On the other hand, measured correlations between sunspot number and wheat price and wheat yield data would be very likely realizations of random data; these correlations are "insignificant." Therefore, Herschel's hypothesis must be regarded with skepticism. We compare and contrast our results with those of other researchers. We discuss procedures for evaluating hypotheses that are formulated from historical data.

  3. More accurate, calibrated bootstrap confidence intervals for correlating two autocorrelated climate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsdottir, Kristin B.; Mudelsee, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    Estimation of the Pearson's correlation coefficient between two time series to evaluate the influences of one time depended variable on another is one of the most often used statistical method in climate sciences. Various methods are used to estimate confidence interval to support the correlation point estimate. Many of them make strong mathematical assumptions regarding distributional shape and serial correlation, which are rarely met. More robust statistical methods are needed to increase the accuracy of the confidence intervals. Bootstrap confidence intervals are estimated in the Fortran 90 program PearsonT (Mudelsee, 2003), where the main intention was to get an accurate confidence interval for correlation coefficient between two time series by taking the serial dependence of the process that generated the data into account. However, Monte Carlo experiments show that the coverage accuracy for smaller data sizes can be improved. Here we adapt the PearsonT program into a new version called PearsonT3, by calibrating the confidence interval to increase the coverage accuracy. Calibration is a bootstrap resampling technique, which basically performs a second bootstrap loop or resamples from the bootstrap resamples. It offers, like the non-calibrated bootstrap confidence intervals, robustness against the data distribution. Pairwise moving block bootstrap is used to preserve the serial correlation of both time series. The calibration is applied to standard error based bootstrap Student's t confidence intervals. The performances of the calibrated confidence intervals are examined with Monte Carlo simulations, and compared with the performances of confidence intervals without calibration, that is, PearsonT. The coverage accuracy is evidently better for the calibrated confidence intervals where the coverage error is acceptably small (i.e., within a few percentage points) already for data sizes as small as 20. One form of climate time series is output from numerical models which simulate the climate system. The method is applied to model data from the high resolution ocean model, INALT01 where the relationship between the Agulhas Leakage and the North Brazil Current is evaluated. Preliminary results show significant correlation between the two variables when there is 10 year lag between them, which is more or less the time that takes the Agulhas Leakage water to reach the North Brazil Current. Mudelsee, M., 2003. Estimating Pearson's correlation coefficient with bootstrap confidence interval from serially dependent time series. Mathematical Geology 35, 651-665.

  4. Predicting missing links via correlation between nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    As a fundamental problem in many different fields, link prediction aims to estimate the likelihood of an existing link between two nodes based on the observed information. Since this problem is related to many applications ranging from uncovering missing data to predicting the evolution of networks, link prediction has been intensively investigated recently and many methods have been proposed so far. The essential challenge of link prediction is to estimate the similarity between nodes. Most of the existing methods are based on the common neighbor index and its variants. In this paper, we propose to calculate the similarity between nodes by the Pearson correlation coefficient. This method is found to be very effective when applied to calculate similarity based on high order paths. We finally fuse the correlation-based method with the resource allocation method, and find that the combined method can substantially outperform the existing methods, especially in sparse networks.

  5. Correlation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method for processing complex radar data with a computer using correlation functions is reviewed. Parameters including data storage, data reduction, and real time operation are addressed. Since complex auto- and cross-correlation functions are calculated and stored, almost no information is lost. These also can be analyzed in terms of the full correlation analysis of the spaced-antenna-drifts technique. The proposed approach therefore appears to be very feasible to suit most Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar applications.

  6. Late Holocene earthquake history of the Brigham City segment of the Wasatch fault zone at the Hansen Canyon, Kotter Canyon, and Pearsons Canyon trench sites, Box Elder County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; McDonald, Greg N.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Of the five central segments of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) having evidence of recurrent Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes, the Brigham City segment (BCS) has the longest elapsed time since its most recent surface-faulting event (~2.1 kyr) compared to its mean recurrence time between events (~1.3 kyr). Thus, the BCS has the highest time-dependent earthquake probability of the central WFZ. We excavated trenches at three sites––the Kotter Canyon and Hansen Canyon sites on the north-central BCS and Pearsons Canyon site on the southern BCS––to determine whether a surface-faulting earthquake younger than 2.1 ka occurred on the BCS. Paleoseismic data for Hansen Canyon and Kotter Canyon confirm that the youngest earthquake on the north-central BCS occurred before 2 ka, consistent with previous north-central BCS investigations at Bowden Canyon and Box Elder Canyon. At Hansen Canyon, the most recent earthquake is constrained to 2.1–4.2 ka and had 0.6–2.5 m of vertical displacement. At Kotter Canyon, we found evidence for two events at 2.5 ± 0.3 ka and 3.5 ± 0.3 ka, with an average displacement per event of 1.9–2.3 m. Paleoseismic data from Pearsons Canyon, on the previously unstudied southern BCS, indicate that a post-2 ka earthquake ruptured this part of the segment. The Pearsons Canyon earthquake occurred at 1.2 ± 0.04 ka and had 0.1–0.8 m of vertical displacement, consistent with our observation of continuous, youthful scarps on the southern 9 km of the BCS having 1–2 m of late Holocene(?) surface offset. The 1.2-ka earthquake on the southern BCS likely represents rupture across the Weber–Brigham City segment boundary from the penultimate Weber-segment earthquake at about 1.1 ka. The Pearsons Canyon data result in a revised length of the BCS that has not ruptured since 2 ka (with time-dependent probability implications), and provide compelling evidence of at least one segment-boundary failure and multi-segment rupture on the central WFZ. Our paleoseismic investigations of the BCS clarify the timing, displacement, and extent of late Holocene earthquakes on the segment, and importantly, confirm the long elapsed time since the most recent earthquake on most of the BCS.

  7. Washington Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David M.; Boboltz, David

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Washington Correlator for 2012. The Washington Correlator provides up to 80 hours of attended processing per week plus up to 40 hours of unattended operation, primarily supporting Earth Orientation and astrometric observations. In 2012, the major programs supported include the IVS-R4, IVS-INT, APSG, and CRF observing sessions.

  8. Gene differential coexpression analysis based on biweight correlation and maximum clique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Differential coexpression analysis usually requires the definition of 'distance' or 'similarity' between measured datasets. Until now, the most common choice is Pearson correlation coefficient. However, Pearson correlation coefficient is sensitive to outliers. Biweight midcorrelation is considered to be a good alternative to Pearson correlation since it is more robust to outliers. In this paper, we introduce to use Biweight Midcorrelation to measure 'similarity' between gene expression profiles, and provide a new approach for gene differential coexpression analysis. Firstly, we calculate the biweight midcorrelation coefficients between all gene pairs. Then, we filter out non-informative correlation pairs using the 'half-thresholding' strategy and calculate the differential coexpression value of gene, The experimental results on simulated data show that the new approach performed better than three previously published differential coexpression analysis (DCEA) methods. Moreover, we use the maximum clique analysis to gene subset included genes identified by our approach and previously reported T2D-related genes, many additional discoveries can be found through our method. PMID:25474074

  9. An analysis of factors correlated with the achievement of the goal standard for the science portion of the Connecticut Academic Performance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetz, Barbara Fotta

    2001-07-01

    This study sought to identify factors that could be used to predict the success of students on the science portion of the grade ten Connecticut Academic Performance Test (CAPT). While the Connecticut State Department of Education measures student achievement in mathematics, reading and writing in grades 4, 6, and 8, science is assessed only in the grade ten CAPT. Since the CAPT science test does not identify specific areas in need of improvement, it is not possible to determine causes for low test scores. To address this, the study investigated the predictive values of the grade eight Mastery Tests in mathematics and reading, the student ability scores of the Otis-Lennon School Ability Index, and grades in prior science courses. The research sample consisted of five hundred and twenty-five students, member of the graduating classes of 2000 and 2001 in a large suburban high school. Students in the study had participated in the district testing program and their scores for the grade seven Otis-Lennon School Ability Test (OLSAT), the grade eight Connecticut Mastery Tests (CMT) and the grade ten Connecticut Academic Performance Tests (CAPT) were available for analysis. This study investigated correlations between student achievement on the CMT and the science subtest of the CAPT, between OLSAT scores and the CAPT science scores, and between grades in ninth grade science and CAPT science scores. Scores were disaggregated by gender and by course level. Hypotheses 1, 2, 3 and 4 investigated the Pearson Product Moment Correlations of the OLSAT, CMT and course grades with scores on the science portion of the CAPT. Hypothesis 5 compared the scores of male and female students, using the t-test of independent sample means. Calculations showed moderate correlations for hypotheses 1--4, and the hypotheses were accepted. Hypothesis 5 was accepted for one class and rejected for the other. On the whole, female students received higher course grades and lower standardized test grades. Recommendations included the use of reading strategies to improve comprehension, the inclusion of inquiry-based science activities in the curriculum, and the development of valid and reliable classroom assessments that allow students to apply their content knowledge in authentic tasks. The suggestion that cultural and social factors could account for differences in scores of male and female students warrants further study.

  10. Collective Correlations of Brodmann Areas fMRI Study with RMT-Denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burda, Z.; Kornelsen, J.; Nowak, M. A.; Porebski, B.; Sboto-Frankenstein, U.; Tomanek, B.; Tyburczyk, J.

    We study collective behavior of Brodmann regions of human cerebral cortex using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Random Matrix Theory (RMT). The raw fMRI data is mapped onto the cortex regions corresponding to the Brodmann areas with the aid of the Talairach coordinates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the Pearson correlation matrix for 41 different Brodmann regions is carried out to determine their collective activity in the idle state and in the active state stimulated by tapping. The collective brain activity is identified through the statistical analysis of the eigenvectors to the largest eigenvalues of the Pearson correlation matrix. The leading eigenvectors have a large participation ratio. This indicates that several Broadmann regions collectively give rise to the brain activity associated with these eigenvectors. We apply random matrix theory to interpret the underlying multivariate data.

  11. Water quality, selected chemical characteristics, and toxicity of base flow and urban stormwater in the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins, Greene County, Missouri, August 1999 to August 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Joseph M.; Johnson, Byron Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The chemistry and toxicity of base flow and urban stormwater were characterized to determine if urban stormwater was degrading the water quality of the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins in and near the city of Springfield, Greene County, Missouri. Potentially toxic components of stormwater (nutrients, trace metals, and organic compounds) were identified to help resource managers identify and minimize the sources of toxicants. Nutrient loading to the James River from these two basins (especially the Wilsons Creek Basin) is of some concern because of the potential to degrade downstream water quality. Toxicity related to dissolved trace metal constituents in stormwater does not appear to be a great concern in these two basins. Increased heterotrophic activity, the result of large densities of fecal indicator bacteria introduced into the streams after storm events, could lead to associated dissolved oxygen stress of native biota. Analysis of stormwater samples detected a greater number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than were present in base-flow samples. The number and concentrations of pesticides detected in both the base-flow and stormwater samples were similar.Genotoxicity tests were performed to determine the bioavilability of chemical contaminants and determine the potential harmful effects on aquatic biota of Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek. Genotoxicity was determined from dialysates from both long-term (approximately 30 days) and storm-event (3 to 5 days) semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) samples that were collected in each basin. Toxicity tests of SPMD samples indicated evidence of genotoxins in all SPMD samples. Hepatic activity assessment of one long-term SPMD sample indicated evidence of contaminant uptake in fish. Chemical analyses of the SPMD samples found that relatively few pesticides and pesticide metabolites had been sequestered in the lipid material of the SPMD; however, numerous PAHs and VOCs were detected in both the long-term and the storm-event exposures. It is suspected, based on the compounds detected in the SPMDs and the water samples, that the observed genotoxicity is largely the result of PAHs and VOCs that were probably derived from petroleum inputs or combustion sources. Therefore the water quality and thus the aquatic environments in the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins are being degraded by urban derived contaminants.

  12. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  13. Correlation between three color coordinates of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2014-11-01

    The objective was to determine whether there were significant correlations in the three color coordinates within each of two color coordinate systems, such as the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* system, and the lightness, chroma, and hue angle system, of human vital teeth. The color of six maxillary and six mandibular anterior teeth was measured by the Shade Vision System. Pearson correlations between each pair of the color coordinates were determined (?=0.01). The influence of two color coordinates on the other color coordinate was determined with a multiple regression analysis (?=0.01). Based on correlation analyses, all the color coordinate pairs showed significant correlations except for the chroma and hue angle pair. The CIE L* was negatively correlated with the CIE a*, b*, and chroma, but positively correlated with the hue angle. The CIE a* was positively correlated with the CIE b* and chroma. Tooth color coordinates were correlated each other. Lighter teeth were less chromatic both in the CIE a* and b* coordinates. Therefore, it was postulated that the three color coordinates of human teeth were harmonized within certain color attribute ranges, and a lack of correlations in these coordinates might indicate external/internal discolorations and/or anomalies of teeth.

  14. Gates, Pearson Partner on Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    As states and school districts grapple with how to teach the skills outlined in the new common standards, two foundations have announced a partnership aimed at crafting complete, online curricula for those standards in mathematics and English/language arts that span nearly every year of a child's precollegiate education. The announcement last…

  15. Can Twitter Be a Source of Information on Allergy? Correlation of Pollen Counts with Tweets Reporting Symptoms of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Names of Antihistamine Drugs.

    PubMed

    Gesualdo, Francesco; Stilo, Giovanni; D'Ambrosio, Angelo; Carloni, Emanuela; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Velardi, Paola; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Tozzi, Alberto E

    2015-01-01

    Pollen forecasts are in use everywhere to inform therapeutic decisions for patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). We exploited data derived from Twitter in order to identify tweets reporting a combination of symptoms consistent with a case definition of ARC and those reporting the name of an antihistamine drug. In order to increase the sensitivity of the system, we applied an algorithm aimed at automatically identifying jargon expressions related to medical terms. We compared weekly Twitter trends with National Allergy Bureau weekly pollen counts derived from US stations, and found a high correlation of the sum of the total pollen counts from each stations with tweets reporting ARC symptoms (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.95) and with tweets reporting antihistamine drug names (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.93). Longitude and latitude of the pollen stations affected the strength of the correlation. Twitter and other social networks may play a role in allergic disease surveillance and in signaling drug consumptions trends. PMID:26197474

  16. Correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loussert Fonta, Céline; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-09-01

    In recent years correlative microscopy, combining the power and advantages of different imaging system, e.g., light, electrons, X-ray, NMR, etc., has become an important tool for biomedical research. Among all the possible combinations of techniques, light and electron microscopy, have made an especially big step forward and are being implemented in more and more research labs. Electron microscopy profits from the high spatial resolution, the direct recognition of the cellular ultrastructure and identification of the organelles. It, however, has two severe limitations: the restricted field of view and the fact that no live imaging can be done. On the other hand light microscopy has the advantage of live imaging, following a fluorescently tagged molecule in real time and at lower magnifications the large field of view facilitates the identification and location of sparse individual cells in a large context, e.g., tissue. The combination of these two imaging techniques appears to be a valuable approach to dissect biological events at a submicrometer level. Light microscopy can be used to follow a labelled protein of interest, or a visible organelle such as mitochondria, in time, then the sample is fixed and the exactly same region is investigated by electron microscopy. The time resolution is dependent on the speed of penetration and fixation when chemical fixatives are used and on the reaction time of the operator for cryo-fixation. Light microscopy can also be used to identify cells of interest, e.g., a special cell type in tissue or cells that have been modified by either transfections or RNAi, in a large population of non-modified cells. A further application is to find fluorescence labels in cells on a large section to reduce searching time in the electron microscope. Multiple fluorescence labelling of a series of sections can be correlated with the ultrastructure of the individual sections to get 3D information of the distribution of the marked proteins: array tomography. More and more efforts are put in either converting a fluorescence label into an electron dense product or preserving the fluorescence throughout preparation for the electron microscopy. Here, we will review successful protocols and where possible try to extract common features to better understand the importance of the individual steps in the preparation. Further the new instruments and software, intended to ease correlative light and electron microscopy, are discussed. Last but not least we will detail the approach we have chosen for correlative microscopy. PMID:26072116

  17. Correlation spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  18. On correlated reaction sets and coupled reaction sets in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Hosseini, Zhaleh

    2015-08-01

    Two reactions are in the same "correlated reaction set" (or "Co-Set") if their fluxes are linearly correlated. On the other hand, two reactions are "coupled" if nonzero flux through one reaction implies nonzero flux through the other reaction. Flux correlation analysis has been previously used in the analysis of enzyme dysregulation and enzymopathy, while flux coupling analysis has been used to predict co-expression of genes and to model network evolution. The goal of this paper is to emphasize, through a few examples, that these two concepts are inherently different. In other words, except for the case of full coupling, which implies perfect correlation between two fluxes (R(2) = 1), there are no constraints on Pearson correlation coefficients (CC) in case of any other type of (un)coupling relations. In other words, Pearson CC can take any value between 0 and 1 in other cases. Furthermore, by analyzing genome-scale metabolic networks, we confirm that there are some examples in real networks of bacteria, yeast and human, which approve that flux coupling and flux correlation cannot be used interchangeably. PMID:25747383

  19. Explore Interregional EEG Correlations Changed by Sport Training Using Feature Selection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ji

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the interregional correlation changed by sport training through electroencephalography (EEG) signals using the techniques of classification and feature selection. The EEG data are obtained from students with long-time professional sport training and normal students without sport training as baseline. Every channel of the 19-channel EEG signals is considered as a node in the brain network and Pearson Correlation Coefficients are calculated between every two nodes as the new features of EEG signals. Then, the Partial Least Square (PLS) is used to select the top 10 most varied features and Pearson Correlation Coefficients of selected features are compared to show the difference of two groups. Result shows that the classification accuracy of two groups is improved from 88.13% by the method using measurement of EEG overall energy to 97.19% by the method using EEG correlation measurement. Furthermore, the features selected reveal that the most important interregional EEG correlation changed by training is the correlation between left inferior frontal and left middle temporal with a decreased value. PMID:26880880

  20. Explore Interregional EEG Correlations Changed by Sport Training Using Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated the interregional correlation changed by sport training through electroencephalography (EEG) signals using the techniques of classification and feature selection. The EEG data are obtained from students with long-time professional sport training and normal students without sport training as baseline. Every channel of the 19-channel EEG signals is considered as a node in the brain network and Pearson Correlation Coefficients are calculated between every two nodes as the new features of EEG signals. Then, the Partial Least Square (PLS) is used to select the top 10 most varied features and Pearson Correlation Coefficients of selected features are compared to show the difference of two groups. Result shows that the classification accuracy of two groups is improved from 88.13% by the method using measurement of EEG overall energy to 97.19% by the method using EEG correlation measurement. Furthermore, the features selected reveal that the most important interregional EEG correlation changed by training is the correlation between left inferior frontal and left middle temporal with a decreased value. PMID:26880880

  1. Morphological and molecular data for three species of the Microphallidae (Trematoda: Digenea) in Australia, including the first descriptions of the cercariae of Maritrema brevisacciferum Shimazu et Pearson, 1991 and Microphallus minutus Johnston, 1948.

    PubMed

    Kudlai, Olena; Cutmore, Scott C; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Cercariae and metacercariae of three species of the Microphallidae Travassos, 1920 were found in snails and crustaceans from tributaries of the Brisbane River, Queensland, Australia. Specimens of Maritrema brevisacciferum Shimazu et Pearson, 1991 and Microphallus minutus Johnston, 1948, which have previously been reported in Queensland, were found as cercariae in the tateid gastropod Posticobia brazieri (Smith) and as metacercariae of M. brevisacciferum in the atyid shrimp Caridina indistincta Calman and of M. minutus in the parastacid crayfish Cherax dispar Reik. Combined analysis of morphological and molecular data, based on newly generated ITS2 and partial 28S rDNA data, linked cercariae and metacercariae for both species. This is the first report of the first intermediate hosts of M. brevisacciferum and M. minutus. Infections of another unidentified microphallid metacercariae, Microphallidae gen. sp., were found in P. brazieri and C. indistincta. The sequences of metacercarial isolates from both hosts were identical. The data on the Microphallidae from Australia and species that develop in freshwater invertebrates were examined in detail. PMID:26447840

  2. Applying Deeper Learning and Confucian Values in Enhancing School Effectiveness: Empirical Results and Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Li-An; Lin, Chin-Yen; Kuo, Tsung-Hsien; Kuo, Yen-Ku; Kuo, Yen-Lin

    2008-01-01

    The study investigates how school teachers' personal background influences their deeper learning capacity and the school effectiveness. Furthermore, the study examines the correlation between teachers' learning capacity and school effectiveness. Four sets of analyses are performed: t tests, one-way ANOVAs, Pearson correlations, and stepwise…

  3. Does APO ε4 correlate with MRI changes in Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Doody, R; Azher, S; Haykal, H; Dunn, J; Liao, T; Schneider, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the relation between APO E genotype and MRI white matter changes in Alzheimer's disease. The APO ε4 allele is correlated with amyloid angiopathy and other neuropathologies in Alzheimer's disease and could be associated with white matter changes. If so, there should be a dose effect.
METHODS—104 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) in this Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre were studied. Patients received MRI and APO E genotyping by standardised protocols. Axial MRI was scored (modified Schelten's scale) for the presence and degree of white matter changes and atrophy in several regions by a neuroradiologist blinded to genotype. Total white matter and total atrophy scores were also generated. Data analysis included Pearson's correlation for regional and total imaging scores and analysis of variance (ANOVA) (or Kruskal-Wallis) and χ2 for demographic and disease related variables.
RESULTS—30 patients had no ε4, 53 patients were heterozygous, and 21 patients were homozygous. The three groups did not differ in sex distribution, age of onset, age at MRI, MMSE, clinical dementia rating, or modified Hachinski ischaemia scores. There were no significant correlations between total or regional white matter scores and APO E genotype (Pearson correlation).
CONCLUSIONS—No correlation between total or regional white matter scores and APO E genotype was found. The pathogenesis of white matter changes in Alzheimer's disease may be independent of APO E genotype.

 PMID:11032626

  4. Closure and ratio correlation analysis of lunar chemical and grain size data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Major element and major element plus trace element analyses were selected from the lunar data base for Apollo 11, 12 and 15 basalt and regolith samples. Summary statistics for each of the six data sets were compiled, and the effects of closure on the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient were investigated using the Chayes and Kruskal approximation procedure. In general, there are two types of closure effects evident in these data sets: negative correlations of intermediate size which are solely the result of closure, and correlations of small absolute value which depart significantly from their expected closure correlations which are of intermediate size. It is shown that a positive closure correlation will arise only when the product of the coefficients of variation is very small (less than 0.01 for most data sets) and, in general, trace elements in the lunar data sets exhibit relatively large coefficients of variation.

  5. Sella size and jaw bases - Is there a correlation???

    PubMed Central

    Neha; Mogra, Subraya; Shetty, Vorvady Surendra; Shetty, Siddarth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sella turcica is an important cephalometric structure and attempts have been made in the past to correlate its dimensions to the malocclusion. However, no study has so far compared the size of sella to the jaw bases that determine the type of malocclusion. The present study was undertaken to find out any such correlation if it exists. Materials and Methods: Lateral cephalograms of 110 adults consisting of 40 Class I, 40 Class II, and 30 Class III patients were assessed for the measurement of sella length, width, height, and area. The maxillary length, mandibular ramus height, and body length were also measured. The sella dimensions were compared among three malocclusion types by one-way ANOVA. Pearson correlation was calculated between the jaw size and sella dimensions. Furthermore, the ratio of jaw base lengths and sella area were calculated. Results and Conclusion: Mean sella length, width and area were found to be greatest in Class III, followed by Class I and least in Class II though the results were not statistically significant. 3 out of 4 measured dimensions of sella, correlated significantly with mandibular ramus and body length each. However, only one dimension of sella showed significant correlation with maxilla. The mandibular ramus and body length show a nearly constant ratio to sella area (0.83–0.85, 0.64–0.65, respectively) in all the three malocclusions. Thus, mandible has a definite and better correlation to the size of sella turcica. PMID:27041903

  6. Robust asymptotic sampling theory for correlations in pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Keen, K J; Elston, Robert C

    2003-10-30

    Methods to unravel the genetic determinants of non-Mendelian diseases lie at the next frontier of statistical approaches for human genetics. It is generally agreed that, before proceeding with segregation or linkage analysis, the trait under study ought to be shown to exhibit familial correlation. By coding dichotomous traits as binary variables, a single robust approach in the estimation of pedigree correlations, rather than two distinct approaches, can be used to assess the potential heritability of a trait, and, latterly, to examine the mode of inheritance. The asymptotic theory to conduct hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for correlations among different members of nuclear families is well established but is applicable only if the nuclear families are independent. As a further contribution to the literature, we derive the asymptotic sampling distribution of correlations between random variables among arbitrary pairs of members in extended families for the Pearson product-moment estimator with generalized weights. This derivation is done without assuming normality of the traits. The sampling distribution is shown to be asymptotically normal to first order, and hence large-sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals with estimates of the variances and correlation coefficients are proposed. Discussion concludes with an example and a suggestion for future research. PMID:14518025

  7. Correlation of zinc with oxidative stress biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Llopis-González, Agustín; González-Albert, Verónica; López-Izquierdo, Raúl; González-Manzano, Isabel; Cháves, Javier; Huerta-Biosca, Vicente; Martin-Escudero, Juan C

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension and smoking are related with oxidative stress (OS), which in turn reports on cellular aging. Zinc is an essential element involved in an individual's physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of zinc levels in serum and urine with OS and cellular aging and its effect on the development of hypertension. In a Spanish sample with 1500 individuals, subjects aged 20-59 years were selected, whose zinc intake levels fell within the recommended limits. These individuals were classified according to their smoking habits and hypertensive condition. A positive correlation was found (Pearson's C=0.639; p=0.01) between Zn serum/urine quotient and oxidized glutathione levels (GSSG). Finally, risk of hypertension significantly increased when the GSSG levels exceeded the 75 percentile; OR=2.80 (95%CI=1.09-7.18) and AOR=3.06 (95%CI=0.96-9.71). Low zinc levels in serum were related with OS and cellular aging and were, in turn, to be a risk factor for hypertension. PMID:25774936

  8. Optimal portfolio strategy with cross-correlation matrix composed by DCCA coefficients: Evidence from the Chinese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuelian; Liu, Zixian

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new estimator of correlation matrix is proposed, which is composed of the detrended cross-correlation coefficients (DCCA coefficients), to improve portfolio optimization. In contrast to Pearson's correlation coefficients (PCC), DCCA coefficients acquired by the detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) method can describe the nonlinear correlation between assets, and can be decomposed in different time scales. These properties of DCCA make it possible to improve the investment effect and more valuable to investigate the scale behaviors of portfolios. The minimum variance portfolio (MVP) model and the Mean-Variance (MV) model are used to evaluate the effectiveness of this improvement. Stability analysis shows the effect of two kinds of correlation matrices on the estimation error of portfolio weights. The observed scale behaviors are significant to risk management and could be used to optimize the portfolio selection.

  9. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Usage and Achievement of Turkish Students in Pisa 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aypay, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the ICT usage and academic achievement of Turkish students in PISA 2006 data. The sample of the study included 4942 students from 160 schools. Frequencies, independent samples t-tests, ANOVAs, pearson correlation coefficients, exploratory factor analysis, and regression analysis were used. A high percentage…

  10. Type II Robustness of H0: Rho=0 for Non-Normal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wren, Stephanie D.

    2010-01-01

    Is the t test statistic for the Pearson Product Moment Correlation Coefficient robust to errors of the second kind? This investigation indirectly measured the effects of power through a type 2 error rate robustness study. The results were revealing. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC.…

  11. Substance Abuse Counselors and Moral Reasoning: Hypothetical and Authentic Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Shari M.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the assumption that the level of moral reasoning (Defining Issues Test; J. R. Rest, 1986) used in solving hypothetical and authentic dilemmas is similar for substance abuse counselors (N = 188). The statistical analyses used were paired-sample t tests, Pearson product-moment correlation, and simultaneous multiple…

  12. Are the Best Higher Education Journals Really the Best? A Meta-Analysis of Writing Quality and Readability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Mack C., II; Schuh, John H.

    This study examined the relationship between writing quality, readability, and selectivity in 17 higher education journals. Readability was assessed through two indexes of readability. Data were analyzed using zero-order Pearson product-moment correlations, independent two sample t-tests, and analysis of covariance. Findings show that quality of…

  13. Correlation between gene expression and GO semantic similarity.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, José L; Segura, Víctor; Podhorski, Adam; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Mato, José M; Martínez-Cruz, Luis A; Corrales, Fernando J; Rubio, Angel

    2005-01-01

    This research analyzes some aspects of the relationship between gene expression, gene function, and gene annotation. Many recent studies are implicitly based on the assumption that gene products that are biologically and functionally related would maintain this similarity both in their expression profiles as well as in their Gene Ontology (GO) annotation. We analyze how accurate this assumption proves to be using real publicly available data. We also aim to validate a measure of semantic similarity for GO annotation. We use the Pearson correlation coefficient and its absolute value as a measure of similarity between expression profiles of gene products. We explore a number of semantic similarity measures (Resnik, Jiang, and Lin) and compute the similarity between gene products annotated using the GO. Finally, we compute correlation coefficients to compare gene expression similarity against GO semantic similarity. Our results suggest that the Resnik similarity measure outperforms the others and seems better suited for use in Gene Ontology. We also deduce that there seems to be correlation between semantic similarity in the GO annotation and gene expression for the three GO ontologies. We show that this correlation is negligible up to a certain semantic similarity value; then, for higher similarity values, the relationship trend becomes almost linear. These results can be used to augment the knowledge provided by clustering algorithms and in the development of bioinformatic tools for finding and characterizing gene products. PMID:17044170

  14. Spatial correlation structure of monthly rainfall at a mesoscale region of north-eastern Bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Vojtěch; Máca, Petr; Hanel, Martin; Pech, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    The spatial correlation structure of monthly rainfall was analysed using data from 38 rain gauges located in north-eastern Bohemia. Three different inter-station correlation measures—Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient and Kendall's tau rank correlation coefficient—were estimated using monthly rainfall records from a recent 31-year period. Six different theoretical parametric correlation models were identified using the nonlinear least squares method. The spatial correlation structure was described using the fitted parameters. Comparison of estimated correlation models showed that, as measured by standard error, the best fitted was a two-parameter exponential model. The relationships between parameters of the exponential two-parameter model were further explored and described. The temporal variability of correlation showed trends in the fitted parameters over the studied period. On a seasonal basis, the correlation between the stations was stronger in autumn and winter than in spring and summer. The spatial variability of estimated parameters revealed that parameters of Matérn and two-parameter exponential models were dependent on altitude.

  15. Correlation Between University Students' Kinematic Achievement and Learning Styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çirkinoǧlu, A. G.; Dem&ircidot, N.

    2007-04-01

    In the literature, some researches on kinematics revealed that students have many difficulties in connecting graphs and physics. Also some researches showed that the method used in classroom affects students' further learning. In this study the correlation between university students' kinematics achieve and learning style are investigated. In this purpose Kinematics Achievement Test and Learning Style Inventory were applied to 573 students enrolled in general physics 1 courses at Balikesir University in the fall semester of 2005-2006. Kinematics Test, consists of 12 multiple choose and 6 open ended questions, was developed by researchers to assess students' understanding, interpreting, and drawing graphs. Learning Style Inventory, a 24 items test including visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles, was developed and used by Barsch. The data obtained from in this study were analyzed necessary statistical calculations (T-test, correlation, ANOVA, etc.) by using SPSS statistical program. Based on the research findings, the tentative recommendations are made.

  16. Diagnosis of cystocele--the correlation between clinical and radiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Altman, Daniel; Mellgren, Anders; Kierkegaard, Jonas; Zetterstrm, Jan; Falconer, Christian; Lpez, Annika

    2004-01-01

    In patients with genital prolapse involving several compartments simultaneously, radiologic investigation can be used to complement the clinical assessment. Contrast medium in the urinary bladder enables visualization of the bladder base at cystodefecoperitoneography (CDP). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between clinical examination using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) and CDP. Thirty-three women underwent clinical assessment and CDP. Statistical analysis using Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r) demonstrated a wide variability between the current definition of cystocele at CDP and POP-Q ( r=0.67). An attempt to provide an alternative definition of cystocele at CDP had a similar outcome ( r=0.63). The present study demonstrates a moderate correlation between clinical and radiologic findings in patients with anterior vaginal wall prolapse. It does not support the use of bladder contrast at radiologic investigation in the routine preoperative assessment of patients with genital prolapse. PMID:14752591

  17. Correlation Between Pain, Fear of Falling and Disability in Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bharat Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ascertain if there is a correlation between low back pain (LBP), fear of falling, and disability so that the patients with LBP are aware of the fact that other problems may occur with LBP. Hence, steps can be taken for decreasing the fear of falling and disability in order to improve the condition of patients. Methods A sample size of 100 patients with low back pain, with a range of ages from 40 to 73 years, participated in the study. The Falls Efficacy Scale was used to assess the fear of falling and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess the disability and pain in LBP individuals. Results The Pearson correlation analysis signifies the relationship between pain, fear of falling, and disability in LBP. Conclusion First, LBP increases the fear of falling. Second, LBP can result in a person becoming disabled. Third, the fear of falling and disability are correlated with each other. PMID:26605180

  18. Mucocutaneous Manifestations of HIV and the Correlation with WHO Clinical Staging in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oninla, Olumayowa Abimbola

    2014-01-01

    Skin diseases are indicators of HIV/AIDS which correlates with WHO clinical stages. In resource limited environment where CD4 count is not readily available, they can be used in assessing HIV patients. The study aims to determine the mucocutaneous manifestations in HIV positive patients and their correlation with WHO clinical stages. A prospective cross-sectional study of mucocutaneous conditions was done among 215 newly diagnosed HIV patients from June 2008 to May 2012 at adult ART clinic, Wesley Guild Hospital Unit, OAU Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ilesha, Osun State, Nigeria. There were 156 dermatoses with oral/oesophageal/vaginal candidiasis (41.1%), PPE (24.4%), dermatophytic infections (8.9%), and herpes zoster (3.8%) as the most common dermatoses. The proportions of dermatoses were 4.5%, 21.8%, 53.2%, and 20.5% in stages 1–4, respectively. A significant relationship (using Pearson's Chi square with P value <0.05) was obtained between dermatoses and WHO clinical stages. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed a positive correlation between the number of dermatoses and the WHO clinical stages. Dermatoses can therefore serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers in resource limited settings to initiate HAART in clinical stages 3 and 4. PMID:25587439

  19. Quantum correlations from classically correlated states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, G.; Majtey, A. P.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.

    2014-07-01

    Consider a bipartite quantum system with at least one of its two components being itself a composite system. By tracing over part of one (or both) of these two subsystems it is possible to obtain a reduced (separable) state that exhibits quantum correlations even if the original state of the full system is endowed only with classical correlations. This effect, first pointed out by Li and Luo in (2008), is of considerable interest because there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that quantum correlations in non-entangled, mixed states may constitute a useful resource to implement non trivial information related tasks. Here we conduct a systematic exploration of the aforementioned effect for particular families of states of quantum systems of low dimensionality (three qubits states). In order to assess the non-classicality of the correlations of the reduced states we use an indicator of quantum correlations based upon the state disturbances generated by the measurement of local observables. We show, for a three-qubit system, that there exists a relationship between the classical mutual information of the original classically correlated states and the maximum quantum correlation exhibited by the reduced states.

  20. Codes with special correlation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumert, L. D.

    1964-01-01

    Uniform binary codes with special correlation including transorthogonality and simplex code, Hadamard matrices and difference sets uniform binary codes with special correlation including transorthogonality and simplex code, Hadamard matrices and difference sets

  1. Optomechanical Quantum Correlation Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, T. P.; Grutter, K. E.; Davanco, M. I.; Srinivasan, K.; Taylor, J. M.

    We present an optomechanical approach for producing accurate thermometry over a wide temperature range using quantum Brownian motion. Optical measurements induce quantum correlations in an optomechanical system when quantum-limited intensity fluctuations of a probe laser drive mechanical motion. The size of the correlations in the weak probe limit are dictated by the scale of individual phonons. We have recently measured optomechanical quantum correlations in the cross correlation spectrum between the amplitude and phase fluctuations of a single probe laser interacting with a silicon nitride optomechanical crystal. These correlations are independent of thermally-induced Brownian motion. However, Brownian motion does simultaneously produce much larger correlation signals between other optical quadratures. A comparison of the size of thermally-induced correlations to quantum correlations allows us to absolutely calibrate Brownian motion thermometry to the mechanical energy quantization scale.

  2. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  3. Underestimating Correlation from Scatterplots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strahan, Robert F.; Hansen, Chris J.

    1979-01-01

    Eighty graduate students and faculty estimated the correlation coefficient for each of 13 computer-printed scatterplots. As predicted, subjects underestimated the degree of actual correlation. With substantial moderation by a method-of-presentation factor, this underestimation was most pronounced in the middle of the correlational range.…

  4. Spatial correlations in multifractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cates, M. E.; Deutsch, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Spatial correlations within multifractals or fractal measures are considered. It is shown how scaling dimensions can be used to predict scaling laws for spatial correlation functions. It is concluded that the overlaid singularity picture does not provide an adequate description of the spatial properties of multifractals, and that blob concepts seem to provide a much more suitable description of multifractal correlations.

  5. VLBI Correlators in Kashima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekido, Mamoru; Takefuji, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Kashima Space Technology Center (KSTC) is making use of two kinds of software correlators, the multi-channel K5/VSSP software correlator and the fast wide-band correlator 'GICO3,' for geodetic and R&D VLBI experiments. Overview of the activity and future plans are described in this paper.

  6. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  7. Measuring mixing patterns in complex networks by Spearman rank correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Yao; Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we utilize Spearman rank correlation coefficient to measure mixing patterns in complex networks. Compared with the widely used Pearson coefficient, Spearman coefficient is rank-based, nonparametric, and size-independent. Thus it is more effective to assess linking patterns of diverse networks, especially for large-size networks. We demonstrate this point by testing a variety of empirical and artificial networks. Moreover, we show that normalized Spearman ranks of stubs are subject to an interesting linear rule where the correlation coefficient is just the Spearman coefficient. This compelling linear relationship allows us to directly produce networks with any prescribed Spearman coefficient. Our method apparently has an edge over the well known uncorrelated configuration model.

  8. Investigation of the correlation between the different mechanical properties of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Ae; Goo, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the different mechanical properties with the filler fraction of various resin composites. Mechanical properties of eighteen different resin composites were investigated in this study; flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), fracture toughness (FT), compressive strength (CS), diametral tensile strength (DTS), Barcol hardness (BH), Vickers hardness (HV), and Knoop hardness (HK). The mean values of mechanical properties and the filler fractions (V(f )) obtained from the literature and the manufacturer were analyzed using Pearson's correlation test at p<0.01. The relationships were compared with the data retrieved from previous studies. Strong correlations between Vf and BH/HV/HK and V(f) and FM were evident in the results of the present study and these results were supported by the retrieved data from previous studies. The other relationships between mechanical properties, such as that between FS and FM and between CS and HV were not significant. PMID:23370870

  9. High-resolution correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    In the basic correlation process a sequence of time-lag-indexed correlation coefficients are computed as the inner or dot product of segments of two signals. The time-lag(s) for which the magnitude of the correlation coefficient sequence is maximized is the estimated relative time delay of the two signals. For discrete sampled signals, the delay estimated in this manner is quantized with the same relative accuracy as the clock used in sampling the signals. In addition, the correlation coefficients are real if the input signals are real. There have been many methods proposed to estimate signal delay to more accuracy than the sample interval of the digitizer clock, with some success. These methods include interpolation of the correlation coefficients, estimation of the signal delay from the group delay function, and beam forming techniques, such as the MUSIC algorithm. For spectral estimation, techniques based on phase differentiation have been popular, but these techniques have apparently not been applied to the correlation problem . We propose a phase based delay estimation method (PBDEM) based on the phase of the correlation function that provides a significant improvement of the accuracy of time delay estimation. In the process, the standard correlation function is first calculated. A time lag error function is then calculated from the correlation phase and is used to interpolate the correlation function. The signal delay is shown to be accurately estimated as the zero crossing of the correlation phase near the index of the peak correlation magnitude. This process is nearly as fast as the conventional correlation function on which it is based. For real valued signals, a simple modification is provided, which results in the same correlation accuracy as is obtained for complex valued signals.

  10. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  11. The SNAP Index Does Not Correlate with the State Behavioral Scale in Intubated and Sedated Children

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Cecilia; Shabanova, Veronika; Giuliano, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ensuring appropriate levels of sedation for critically ill children is integral to pediatric critical care. Traditionally, clinicians have used subjective scoring tools to assess sedation levels. The SNAP II uses dual frequency processed electroencephalography to evaluate brain activity and may provide an objective assessment of sedation levels. Objective This study attempts to find an objective method to monitor sedation in critically ill pediatric patients. We compared the SNAP II, a processed electroencephalography device, with the State Behavioral Scale (SBS), a subjective sedation scoring tool. We hypothesize that the SNAP II correlates with the SBS and has less observer bias. Methods This was an IRB approved prospective, observational study. Patients receiving intravenous sedation while being mechanically ventilated were enrolled after informed consent. After the SNAP II monitoring electrodes were attached, blinded bedside nurses assessed sedation levels using the SBS. SNAP indices were collected and compared with SBS scores to determine correlation. Results We compared 417 paired data points from 15 patients using Pearson's correlation and Least Squares Means to determine correlation between the SBS and SNAP indices. No correlation was observed. Using covariance model patterning for repeated measures to adjust for covariates again showed no correlation. Conclusion The SNAP index does not correlate with SBS scores in our PICU. Its use cannot be recommended to measure levels of sedation in our population. Future research should continue to explore objective ways of measuring sedation in critically ill children. PMID:24103039

  12. Correlation between lidar-derived intensity and passive optical imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, Jeremy P.; Kim, Angela M.; Kruse, Fred A.; Olsen, Richard C.

    2014-06-01

    When LiDAR data are collected, the intensity information is recorded for each return, and can be used to produce an image resembling those acquired by passive imaging sensors. This research evaluated LiDAR intensity data to determine its potential for use as baseline imagery where optical imagery are unavailable. Two airborne LiDAR datasets collected at different point densities and laser wavelengths were gridded and compared with optical imagery. Optech Orion C200 laser data were compared with a corresponding 1541 nm spectral band from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Optech ALTM Gemini LiDAR data collected at 1064 nm were compared to the WorldView-2 (WV-2) 949 - 1043 nm NIR2 band. Intensity images were georegistered and spatially resampled to match the optical data. The Pearson Product Moment correlation coefficient was calculated between datasets to determine similarity. Comparison for the full LiDAR datasets yielded correlation coefficients of approximately 0.5. Because LiDAR returns from vegetation are known to be highly variable, a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was calculated utilizing the optical imagery, and intensity and optical imagery were separated into vegetation and nonvegetation categories. Comparison of the LiDAR intensity for non-vegetated areas to the optical imagery yielded coefficients greater than 0.9. These results demonstrate that LiDAR intensity data may be useful in substituting for optical imagery where only LiDAR is available.

  13. Statistical functions and relevant correlation coefficients of clearness index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Diego; Zaaiman, Willem; Colli, Alessandra; Heiser, John; Smith, Scott

    2015-08-01

    This article presents a statistical analysis of the sky conditions, during years from 2010 to 2012, for three different locations: the Joint Research Centre site in Ispra (Italy, European Solar Test Installation - ESTI laboratories), the site of National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden (Colorado, USA) and the site of Brookhaven National Laboratories in Upton (New York, USA). The key parameter is the clearness index kT, a dimensionless expression of the global irradiance impinging upon a horizontal surface at a given instant of time. In the first part, the sky conditions are characterized using daily averages, giving a general overview of the three sites. In the second part the analysis is performed using data sets with a short-term resolution of 1 sample per minute, demonstrating remarkable properties of the statistical distributions of the clearness index, reinforced by a proof using fuzzy logic methods. Successively some time-dependent correlations between different meteorological variables are presented in terms of Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, and introducing a new one.

  14. Local available quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundarain, Douglas F.; de Guevara, María L. Ladrón

    2015-12-01

    In this work, local available quantum correlations are studied. They are defined in terms of mutual information of bipartite local measurements done over an optimal local basis complementary to the local basis which defines the respective classical correlations. For two qubits, it is always possible to choose the basis of classical correlations as the set of eigenvectors of σ _z (the third Pauli matrix) and complementary bases become the sets of eigenvectors of the observables orthogonal to σ _z. It is shown that all states with zero local available quantum correlations are separable but not necessarily strictly classical; this fact puts this kind of correlations in the middle between discord and entanglement. Since in many cases it may suffice to know whether a given state has quantum correlations, the structure of the states with zero local available quantum correlations is presented. It is also shown that there is a close connection between local available quantum correlations and the protocol of entanglement activation developed by Piani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 106:220403, 2011). If a state satisfies the sufficient condition for the entanglement swapping associated with this protocol, this state has nonzero local available quantum correlations.

  15. Fuzzy correlation analysis with realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yue Y.; Fan, Xinrui; Zheng, Ying N.

    1998-10-01

    The fundamental concept of fuzzy correlation is briefly discussed. Based on the correlation coefficient of classic correlation, polarity correlation and fuzzy correlation, the relationship between the correlations are analyzed. A fuzzy correlation analysis has the merits of both rapidity and accuracy as some amplitude information of random signals has been utilized. It has broad prospects for application. The form of fuzzy correlative analyzer with NLX 112 fuzzy data correlator and single-chip microcomputer is introduced.

  16. Correlation between functional disability and quality of life in patients with adhesive capsulitis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the correlation between functional disability and quality of life of patients with adhesive capsulitis. METHODS: Two instruments (WHOQOL-BREF and DASH) were applied to evaluate the quality of life and functional capacity of patients with adhesive capsulitis. Inclusion criteria were age between 35 and 75 years old and achievement of shoulder imaging. Each domain of the WHOQOL-BREF was correlated with DASH. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for parametric variables and Spearman's correlation coefficient was used when at least one variable had a non-normal distribution. The level of significance was p <0.05. RESULTS: Forty three patients with mean age of 54.7 years old were evaluated. The mean values found in the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains of the WHOQOL-BREF and DASH were 45.3, 63.9, 68.2, 60.2 and 61.6, respectively. A moderate negative correlation was found between DASH and the physical domain of WHOQOL-BREF (r= - 0.583, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The only domain where WHOQOL-BREF correlates with DASH is the physical domain, suggesting that measures to promote the improvement of functional capacity may lead to better quality of life of patients with adhesive capsulitis. Level of Evidence IV, Prospective Study. PMID:27069405

  17. Correlations Between General Joint Hypermobility and Joint Hypermobility Syndrome and Injury in Contemporary Dance Students.

    PubMed

    Ruemper, Alia; Watkins, Katherine

    2012-12-01

    The first objective of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of general joint hypermobility (GJH) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in BA Dance Theatre 1st and 3rd year students at a contemporary dance conservatory. The second objective was to determine the statistical correlation between GJH, JHS, and injury in this population. A total of 85 (female, N = 78; male, N = 7) contemporary dance students participated in the study. The Beighton score (with a forward flexion test modification) was used to determine GJH, and the Brighton criteria were used to verify JHS. Participants completed a self-reported injury questionnaire that included type of injury (physical complaint, medical diagnosis, or time-loss) and injury frequency. Statistical analysis (Pearson correlation) was used to correlate GJH, JHS, and frequency-of-injury scores. Overall, 69% of the students were found to have GJH, and 33% had JHS. A statistical correlation of r = + 0.331 (p < 0.01) was found between JHS and injury. No significant correlation was found between GJH and injury. This is the first study to look at these correlations in contemporary dance students and suggests that screening programs should include the Brighton criteria to identify JHS in these dancers. Subsequent injury tracking and injury prevention programs would then provide data for further research in this area. PMID:26731093

  18. Correlation of Space Shuttle Landing Performance with Post-Flight Cardiovascular Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCluskey, R.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Microgravity induces cardiovascular adaptations resulting in orthostatic intolerance on re-exposure to normal gravity. Orthostasis could interfere with performance of complex tasks during the re-entry phase of Shuttle landings. This study correlated measures of Shuttle landing performance with post-flight indicators of orthostatic intolerance. Methods: Relevant Shuttle landing performance parameters routinely recorded at touchdown by NASA included downrange and crossrange distances, airspeed, and vertical speed. Measures of cardiovascular changes were calculated from operational stand tests performed in the immediate post-flight period on mission commanders from STS-41 to STS-66. Stand test data analyzed included maximum standing heart rate, mean increase in maximum heart rate, minimum standing systolic blood pressure, and mean decrease in standing systolic blood pressure. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated with the null hypothesis that there was no statistically significant linear correlation between stand test results and Shuttle landing performance. A correlation coefficient? 0.5 with a p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There were no significant linear correlations between landing performance and measures of post-flight cardiovascular dysfunction. Discussion: There was no evidence that post-flight cardiovascular stand test data correlated with Shuttle landing performance. This implies that variations in landing performance were not due to space flight-induced orthostatic intolerance.

  19. Cosmic rays activity and monthly number of deaths: a correlative study.

    PubMed

    Stoupel, E; Israelevich, P; Petrauskiene, J; Kalediene, R; Abramson, E; Gabbay, U; Sulkes, J

    2002-01-01

    We studied the relation between the intensity of cosmic rays, the level of solar/geomagnetic activity, and the monthly numbers of deaths in a large hospital in Israel and in all Lithuania. The Israeli data include 30526 hospital deaths, two groups of fatal suicides (2359, 2763), and 15435 suicidal attempts for two periods of 108 and 236 consecutive months. The national data for the entire Republic of Lithuania include 424925 deaths for the period of 120 consecutive months. Cosmic rays intensity was measured by an Apatity neutron monitor. We obtained the data on solar, geomagnetic radiovawe propagation, ionosphere ionization hours, proton flux of two energy levels (>90 and 60 MeV) from the National Geophysical Data Center at Goddard Space Flight Center, National Space Environment Center at Boulder, Colorado, USA, and from the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Russia. We calculated Pearson coefficients and their probabilities for correlation between monthly space activity level and monthly number of male and female deaths from different causes. Cosmic rays activity revealed significant negative correlation with solar/geomagnetic activity indices and related physical phenomena levels. This activity strongly correlated with flux of protons with the energies >90 MeV proton flux and did not exhibit significant correlation with 60 MeV proton fluxes. Cosmic rays intensity correlation with monthly numbers of deaths was strong for noncardiovascular deaths, suicides, and traffic accidents. The correlation was much weaker for deaths caused by ishemic heart disease and strokes. PMID:12099402

  20. Does leadership effectiveness correlates with leadership styles in healthcare executives of Iran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership is essential to passing through obstacles facing the health field.The current health care system in Iran has major problems and gaps in the field of effective leadership. The aim of this study was to evaluate hospital managers’ leadership style through selfassessment and to determine the correlation between leadership styles with healthcare executives’ leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness. Methods: In this cross-sectional study a self-administered questionnaire completed by all internal healthcare executives of all teaching and non-teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Questionnaire was composed to determine demographic information, leadership style questions, leadership effectiveness and leadership readiness. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Results: According to the findings, the dominant style of healthcare executives was transformational leadership style (with a score of 4.34). The leadership effectiveness was estimated at about 4.36 that shows the appropriate level of leadership effectiveness. There was a significant correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.244) between leadership readiness and transformational leadership style (p<0.05). Also, there was a significant correlation between leadership effectiveness with transformational (0.051) and transactional (0.216) styles. Conclusion: There was a correlation between leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness with leadership styles. Application of this research will be crucial to universities and healthcare executives. This study suggests that strengthening the scientific basis is essential for leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness in healthcare system. PMID:26000260

  1. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  2. Explorations in Statistics: Correlation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This sixth installment of "Explorations in Statistics" explores correlation, a familiar technique that estimates the magnitude of a straight-line relationship between two variables. Correlation is meaningful only when the…

  3. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and

  4. Explorations in statistics: correlation.

    PubMed

    Curran-Everett, Douglas

    2010-12-01

    Learning about statistics is a lot like learning about science: the learning is more meaningful if you can actively explore. This sixth installment of Explorations in Statistics explores correlation, a familiar technique that estimates the magnitude of a straight-line relationship between two variables. Correlation is meaningful only when the two variables are true random variables: for example, if we restrict in some way the variability of one variable, then the magnitude of the correlation will decrease. Correlation cannot help us decide if changes in one variable result in changes in the second variable, if changes in the second variable result in changes in the first variable, or if changes in a third variable result in concurrent changes in the first two variables. Correlation can help provide us with evidence that study of the nature of the relationship between x and y may be warranted in an actual experiment in which one of them is controlled. PMID:21098385

  5. Strongly-correlated heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Electronic phase behavior in correlated-electron systems is a fundamental problem of condensed matter physics. The change in the phase behavior near surfaces and interfaces, i.e., {\\em electronic reconstruction}, is therefore the fundamental issue of the correlated-electron surface or interface science. In addition to basic science, understanding of such a phase behavior is of crucial importance for potential devices exploiting the novel properties of the correlated systems. In this article, we present a general overview of the field, and then discuss the recent theoretical progress mainly focusing on the correlation effects. We illustrate the general concept of {\\em electronic reconstruction} by studying model heterostructures consisting of strongly-correlated systems. Future directions for research are also discussed.

  6. Correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Soldatov, S.; Vowinkel, B.; Mueller, P.

    2010-11-15

    In high temperature fusion plasmas the transport of energy and particles is commonly believed to be driven by turbulence. Turbulence quantities as correlation length and decorrelation time are important for the confinement properties of a plasma. Besides other diagnostics, correlation reflectometry has proven to be a suitable tool for the measurement of turbulence properties. At the medium sized Toroidal EXperiment for Technical Oriented Research (TEXTOR) the existing correlation reflectometry has been recently upgraded. A new reflectometer based on a microwave synthesizer has been developed and installed for the investigation of turbulence properties in a fusion plasma. Together with the existing reflectometer the measurement of radial correlation length and decorrelation time becomes available. Both reflectometers are computer controlled and allow to program individual frequency sequences and the duration of each frequency step. With the existing poloidal antenna array at {theta}=0 deg. and on top of the vacuum vessel, the system allows the measurement of radial correlation and poloidal correlations at the same time. First experiments have been performed and the results on the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in a fusion plasma are presented.

  7. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  8. Haystack Observatory VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titus, Mike; Cappallo, Roger; Corey, Brian; Dudevoir, Kevin; Niell, Arthur; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Haystack Correlator during 2012. Highlights include finding a solution to the DiFX InfiniBand timeout problem and other DiFX software development, conducting a DBE comparison test following the First International VLBI Technology Workshop, conducting a Mark IV and DiFX correlator comparison, more broadband delay experiments, more u- VLBI Galactic Center observations, and conversion of RDV session processing to the Mark IV/HOPS path. Non-real-time e-VLBI transfers and engineering support of other correlators continued.

  9. Partial Correlation-Based Retinotopically Organized Resting-State Functional Connectivity Within and Between Areas of the Visual Cortex Reflects More Than Cortical Distance.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Debra Ann; Lam, Jack; Lewis, Lindsay B; Carbonell, Felix; Mendola, Janine D; Shmuel, Amir

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) between cortical areas. Recent evidence suggests that synchronous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent fMRI reflect functional organization at a scale finer than that of visual areas. In this study, we investigated whether RSFCs within and between lower visual areas are retinotopically organized and whether retinotopically organized RSFC merely reflects cortical distance. Subjects underwent retinotopic mapping and separately resting-state fMRI. Visual areas V1, V2, and V3, were subdivided into regions of interest (ROIs) according to quadrants and visual field eccentricity. Functional connectivity (FC) was computed based on Pearson's linear correlation (correlation), and Pearson's linear partial correlation (correlation between two time courses after the time courses from all other regions in the network are regressed out). Within a quadrant, within visual areas, all correlation and nearly all partial correlation FC measures showed statistical significance. Consistently in V1, V2, and to a lesser extent in V3, correlation decreased with increasing eccentricity separation. Consistent with previously reported monkey anatomical connectivity, correlation/partial correlation values between regions from adjacent areas (V1-V2 and V2-V3) were higher than those between nonadjacent areas (V1-V3). Within a quadrant, partial correlation showed consistent significance between regions from two different areas with the same or adjacent eccentricities. Pairs of ROIs with similar eccentricity showed higher correlation/partial correlation than pairs distant in eccentricity. Between dorsal and ventral quadrants, partial correlation between common and adjacent eccentricity regions within a visual area showed statistical significance; this extended to more distant eccentricity regions in V1. Within and between quadrants, correlation decreased approximately linearly with increasing distances separating the tested ROIs. Partial correlation showed a more complex dependence on cortical distance: it decreased exponentially with increasing distance within a quadrant, but was best fit by a quadratic function between quadrants. We conclude that RSFCs within and between lower visual areas are retinotopically organized. Correlation-based FC is nonselectively high across lower visual areas, even between regions that do not share direct anatomical connections. The mechanisms likely involve network effects caused by the dense anatomical connectivity within this network and projections from higher visual areas. FC based on partial correlation, which minimizes network effects, follows expectations based on direct anatomical connections in the monkey visual cortex better than correlation. Last, partial correlation-based retinotopically organized RSFC reflects more than cortical distance effects. PMID:26415043

  10. Correlates of anxiety and depression among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Sagar, Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Context: Research has established the relation between diabetes and depression. Both diabetes and anxiety/depression are independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Aims: The present study aims at assessing the prevalence of anxiety/depression among outpatients receiving treatment for type 2 diabetes. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in the endocrinology outpatient department of an urban tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: The instruments used included a semi-structured questionnaire, HbA1c levels, fasting blood glucose and postprandial blood glucose, Brief Patient Health Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to find out the correlations. ANOVA was carried out for the in between group comparisons. Results: There was a significant correlation between the HADS-Anxiety scale and Body Mass Index (BMI) with a correlation coefficient of 0.34 (P = 0.008). Also, a significant correlation existed between HADS-Depression scale and BMI (correlation coefficient, 0.36; P = 0.004). Significant correlation were observed between the duration of daily physical exercise and HADS-Anxiety (coefficient of correlation, -0.25; P = 0.04) scores. HADS-Anxiety scores were found to be related to HbA1c levels (correlation-coefficient, 0.41; P = 0.03) and postprandial blood glucose levels (correlation-coefficient, 0.51; P = 0.02). Conclusions: Monitoring of biochemical parameters like HbA1c and postprandial blood glucose levels and BMI could be a guide to development of anxiety in these patients. Also, physical exercise seems to have a protective effect on anxiety in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21847456

  11. Bleed-through correction for rendering and correlation analysis in multi-colour localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dahan; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Parent, Matthew T.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-colour localization microscopy has enabled sub-diffraction studies of colocalization between multiple biological species and quantification of their correlation at length scales previously inaccessible with conventional fluorescence microscopy. However, bleed-through, or misidentification of probe species, creates false colocalization and artificially increases certain types of correlation between two imaged species, affecting the reliability of information provided by colocalization and quantified correlation. Despite the potential risk of these artefacts of bleed-through, neither the effect of bleed-through on correlation nor methods of its correction in correlation analyses has been systematically studied at typical rates of bleed-through reported to affect multi-colour imaging. Here, we present a reliable method of bleed-through correction applicable to image rendering and correlation analysis of multi-colour localization microscopy. Application of our bleed-through correction shows our method accurately corrects the artificial increase in both types of correlations studied (Pearson coefficient and pair correlation), at all rates of bleed-through tested, in all types of correlations examined. In particular, anti-correlation could not be quantified without our bleed-through correction, even at rates of bleed-through as low as 2%. Demonstrated with dichroic-based multi-colour FPALM here, our presented method of bleed-through correction can be applied to all types of localization microscopy (PALM, STORM, dSTORM, GSDIM, etc.), including both simultaneous and sequential multi-colour modalities, provided the rate of bleed-through can be reliably determined. PMID:26185614

  12. Bleed-through correction for rendering and correlation analysis in multi-colour localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dahan; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Parent, Matthew T.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2013-09-01

    Multi-colour localization microscopy has enabled sub-diffraction studies of colocalization between multiple biological species and quantification of their correlation at length scales previously inaccessible with conventional fluorescence microscopy. However, bleed-through, or misidentification of probe species, creates false colocalization and artificially increases certain types of correlation between two imaged species, affecting the reliability of information provided by colocalization and quantified correlation. Despite the potential risk of these artefacts of bleed-through, neither the effect of bleed-through on correlation nor methods for its correction in correlation analyses have been systematically studied at typical rates of bleed-through reported to affect multi-colour imaging. Here, we present a reliable method of bleed-through correction applicable to image rendering and correlation analysis of multi-colour localization microscopy. Application of our bleed-through correction shows that our method accurately corrects the artificial increase in both types of correlation studied (Pearson coefficient and pair correlation), at all rates of bleed-through tested, in all types of correlation examined. In particular, anti-correlation could not be quantified without our bleed-through correction, even at rates of bleed-through as low as 2%. While it is demonstrated with dichroic-based multi-colour FPALM here, our presented method of bleed-through correction can be applied to all types of localization microscopy (PALM, STORM, dSTORM, GSDIM, etc), including both simultaneous and sequential multi-colour modalities, provided the rate of bleed-through can be reliably determined.

  13. Ozone Correlative Measurements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the necessary parameters for the correlation of data on Earth ozone. Topics considered were: (1) measurement accuracy; (2) equipment considerations (SBUV); and (3) ground based measurements to support satellite data.

  14. Compact Optical Correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Kirsch, James C.

    1989-02-01

    In the past 15 years, a dozen or so designs have been proposed for compact optical correlators. Of these, maybe one-third of them have actually been built and only a few of those tested. This paper will give an overview of some of the systems that have been built as well as mention some promising early and current designs that have not been built. The term compact, as used in the title of this paper, will be applied very loosely; to mean smaller than a laboratory size optical table. To date, only one correlator has been built and tested that actually can be called miniature. This softball size correlator was built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation for the U. S. Army Missile Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. More will be said about this correlator in following sections.

  15. Correlations and droplet growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, M.

    1985-01-01

    Consideration is given to the time development of a system in which small spheres of a stable phase grow out of a supersaturated melt. The spheres then grow and shrink in a manner similar to Ostwald ripening. The growth process of pairs of particles in an effective background accounts for can be used to explain the long time correlations which develop in the system. The correlations broaden the distribution of particles sizes, even for relatively dilute systems.

  16. Tsukuba VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The K5/VSSP software correlator (Figure 1), located in Tsukuba, Japan, is operated by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). It is fully dedicated to processing the geodetic VLBI sessions of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. All of the weekend IVS Intensives (INT2) and the Japanese domestic VLBI observations organized by GSI were processed at the Tsukuba VLBI Correlator.

  17. Electronic correlations in manganites

    PubMed

    Held; Vollhardt

    2000-05-29

    The influence of local electronic correlations on the properties of colossal magnetoresistive manganites is investigated. To this end, a ferromagnetic two-band Kondo lattice model is supplemented with the local Coulomb repulsion missing in this model and is analyzed within dynamical mean-field theory. Results for the spectral function, optical conductivity, and the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition show that electronic correlations have drastic effects and may explain some experimental observations. PMID:10990894

  18. Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging parameters with neural status in Pott’s spine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nikhil; Saini, Namita Singh; Kumar, Sudhir; Rajagopalan, Mukunth; Chakraborti, Kanti Lal; Jain, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used in cervical trauma and spondylotic myelopathy, and it has been found to correlate with neural deficit and prognosticate neural recovery. Such a correlation has not been studied in Pott’s spine with paraplegia. Hence, this prospective study has been used to find correlation of DTI parameters with neural deficit in these patients. Methods: Thirty-four patients of spinal TB were enrolled and DTI was performed before the start of treatment and after six months. Fractional anisotropy (FA), Mean diffusivity (MD), and Tractography were studied. Neurological deficit was graded by the Jain and Sinha scoring. Changes in FA and MD at and below the site of lesion (SOL) were compared to above the SOL (control) using the unpaired t-test. Pre-treatment and post-treatment values were also compared using the paired t-test. Correlation of DTI parameters with neurological score was done by Pearson’s correlation. Subjective assessment of Tractography images was done. Results: Mean average FA was not significantly decreased at the SOL in patients with paraplegia as compared to control. After six months of treatment, a significant decrease (p = 0.02) in mean average FA at the SOL compared to pre-treatment was seen. Moderate positive correlation (r = 0.49) between mean average FA and neural score after six months of treatment was found. Tractography images were not consistent with severity of paraplegia. Conclusion: Unlike spondylotic myelopathy and trauma, epidural collection and its organized inflammatory tissue in Pott’s spine precludes accurate assessment of diffusion characteristics of the compressed cord.

  19. The ALMA correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoffier, R. P.; Comoretto, G.; Webber, J. C.; Baudry, A.; Broadwell, C. M.; Greenberg, J. H.; Treacy, R. R.; Cais, P.; Quertier, B.; Camino, P.; Bos, A.; Gunst, A. W.

    2007-02-01

    Aims: The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is an international astronomy facility to be used for detecting and imaging all types of astronomical sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths at a 5000-m elevation site in the Atacama Desert of Chile. Our main aims are: describe the correlator sub-system which is that part of the ALMA system that combines the signal from up to 64 remote individual radio antennas and forms them into a single instrument; emphasize the high spectral resolution and the configuration flexibility available with the ALMA correlator. Methods: The main digital signal processing features and a block diagram of the correlator being constructed for the ALMA radio astronomy observatory are presented. Tables of observing modes and spectral resolutions offered by the correlator system are given together with some examples of multi-resolution spectral modes. Results: The correlator is delivered by quadrants and the first quadrant is being tested while most of the other printed circuit cards required by the system have been produced. In its final version the ALMA correlator will process the outputs of up to 64 antennas using an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz in each of two polarizations per antenna. In the frequency division mode, unrivalled spectral flexibility together with very high resolution (3.8 kHz) and up to 8192 spectral points are achieved. In the time division mode high time resolution is available with minimum data dump rates of 16 ms for all cross-products.

  20. Correlations of Cervical Sagittal Alignment before and after Occipitocervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Takachika; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Oshima, Yasushi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective radiographic study. Objective To investigate changes and correlations of cervical sagittal alignment including T1 slope before and after occipitocervical corrective surgery. We also investigated the relevance for preoperative planning. Methods We conducted a retrospective radiographic analysis of 27 patients who underwent surgery for occipitocervical deformity. There were 7 men and 20 women with a mean age of 56.0 years. Mean follow-up was 68.0 months (range 24 to 120). The radiographic parameters measured before surgery and at final follow-up included McGregor slope, T1 slope, occipito (O)-C2 angle, O-C7 angle, and C2-C7 angle. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to examine the correlation between the radiographic parameters. Results There was a stronger positive correlation between the T1 slope and the O-C7 angle both preoperatively and postoperatively (r = 0.72 and r = 0.83, respectively) than between the T1 slope and the C2-C7 angle (r = 0.60 and r = 0.76, respectively). The O-C2 angle and C2-C7 angle had inverse correlations to each other both pre- and postoperatively (r =  - 0.50 and -0.45). McGregor slope and T1 slope did not significantly change postoperatively at final follow-up. Increase in O-C2 angle after surgery (mean change, 10.7 degrees) inversely correlated with decrease in postoperative C2-C7 angle (mean change, 12.2 degrees). As result of these complementary changes, O-C7 angle did not statistically change. Conclusions Our results suggest that the O-C7 angle is regulated by T1 slope and the corresponding O-C7 angle is divided into the O-C2 and C2-C7 angles, which have inverse correlation to each other and then maintain McGregor slope (horizontal gaze). PMID:27190739

  1. Correlation of salivary immunoglobulin A against lipopolysaccharide of Porphyromonas gingivalis with clinical periodontal parameters

    PubMed Central

    Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S.; Baheti, Abhinav S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A major challenge in clinical periodontics is to find a reliable molecular marker of periodontal tissue destruction. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess, whether any correlation exists between salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) level against lipopolysaccharide of Porphyromonas gingivalis and clinical periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment loss). Materials and Methods: Totally, 30 patients with chronic periodontitis were included for the study based on clinical examination. Unstimulated saliva was collected from each study subject. Probing depth and clinical attachment loss were recorded in all selected subjects using University of North Carolina-15 periodontal probe. Extraction and purification of lipopolysaccharide were done from the standard strain of P. gingivalis (ATCC 33277). Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the level of IgA antibodies against lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis in the saliva of each subject by coating wells of ELISA kit with extracted lipopolysaccharide antigen. Statistical Analysis: The correlation between salivary IgA and clinical periodontal parameters was checked using Karl Pearson's correlation coefficient method and regression analysis. Results: The significant correlation was observed between salivary IgA level and clinical periodontal parameters in chronic periodontitis patients. Conclusion: A significant strong correlation was observed between salivary IgA against lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis and clinical periodontal parameters which suggest that salivary IgA level against lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis can be used to predict the severity of periodontal destruction in chronic periodontitis patients. PMID:26321825

  2. The Correlation between Emotional Intelligence and Instable Personality in Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Haj Hosseini, Fatemeh; Mehdizadeh Zare Anari, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background Substance dependence has recently turned into one of the most important social problems. Clinical findings have shown personality traits, social relations, attitudes and values, along with emotional intelligence factors such as emotions, feelings, emotions management, challenging with problems, problem solving, tolerating psychological pressure, impulse control, self esteem and interpersonal relations, to affect substance dependence. Consequently, understanding the meaning and developing tools for assessment of emotional intelligence are significantly vital in human psychological health. This study aimed to investigate the relation between emotional intelligence and instable personality in substance abusers. Methods The present correlational study selected 80 male addicts through available sampling. The subjects referred to the Therapeutic Community Center and Kimia, Yas, and Aban Clinics in Yazd, Iran. Their emotional intelligence and personality were evaluated by BarOn questionnaire and Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ) for adults, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess the correlations between different factors. Findings There was a negative significant correlation (P = 0.050) between emotional intelligence and instable personality in substance abusers. Problem solving and optimism (P = 0.001), interpersonal relation (P = 0.010), self esteem (P = 0.013), and realities (P = 0.017) had significant effects on instable personality. Conclusion Based on our findings, emotional intelligence was significantly correlated with instable personality in substance abusers. However, using more accurate tools in order to assess all aspects of personality can give better results. PMID:24494128

  3. Human gene correlation analysis (HGCA): A tool for the identification of transcriptionally co-expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics and high-throughput technologies such as microarray studies allow the measure of the expression levels of large numbers of genes simultaneously, thus helping us to understand the molecular mechanisms of various biological processes in a cell. Findings We calculate the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r-value) between probe set signal values from Affymetrix Human Genome Microarray samples and cluster the human genes according to the r-value correlation matrix using the Neighbour Joining (NJ) clustering method. A hyper-geometric distribution is applied on the text annotations of the probe sets to quantify the term overrepresentations. The aim of the tool is the identification of closely correlated genes for a given gene of interest and/or the prediction of its biological function, which is based on the annotations of the respective gene cluster. Conclusion Human Gene Correlation Analysis (HGCA) is a tool to classify human genes according to their coexpression levels and to identify overrepresented annotation terms in correlated gene groups. It is available at: http://biobank-informatics.bioacademy.gr/coexpression/. PMID:22672625

  4. Covariate Adjusted Correlation Analysis with Application to FMR1 Premutation Female Carrier Data

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Nguyen, Danh V.; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J.; Carroll, Raymond J.; Hagerman, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Motivated by molecular data on female premutation carriers of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, we present a new method of covariate adjusted correlation analysis to examine the association of messenger RNA (mRNA) and number of CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene. The association between the molecular variables in female carriers needs to adjust for activation ratio (ActRatio), a measure which accounts for the protective effects of one normal X chromosome in females carriers. However, there are inherent uncertainties in the exact effects of ActRatio on the molecular measures of interest. To account for these uncertainties, we develop a flexible adjustment that accommodates both additive and multiplicative effects of ActRatio nonparametrically. The proposed adjusted correlation uses local conditional correlations, which are local method of moments estimators, to estimate the Pearson correlation between two variables adjusted for a third observable covariate. The local method of moments estimators are averaged to arrive at the final covariate adjusted correlation estimator, which is shown to be consistent. We also develop a test to check the nonparametric joint additive and multiplicative adjustment form. Simulation studies illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method. (Application to FMR1 premutation data on 165 female carriers indicates that the association between mRNA and CGG repeat after adjusting for ActRatio is stronger.) Finally, the results provide independent support for a specific jointly additive and multiplicative adjustment form for ActRatio previously proposed in the literature. PMID:19173699

  5. Correlates of the health statuses of the faculty at midlife

    PubMed Central

    Galeon, Galvin Alaan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Between the school years of 2009-2012, the turnover record of the University of San Jose-Recoletos (USJ-R), Cebu City, Philippines showed that permanent faculty members who left the institution were all midlifers. Their reasons varied from health issues to greener pasture elsewhere. Materials and Methods: This study then sought to explore the health statuses of the faculty midlifers of the USJ-R. The data were collected through survey conducted among the 106 faculty midlifers of the university. This study applied multivariate analyses to the survey data using Pearson-moment of correlation to determine the relationship between the sociodemographic profile of the research participants and their health statuses. Results: This research revealed that faculty midlifers are generally well physically. They showed emotional maturity and have positive outlook toward midlife. More so, their health conditions are significantly related with their sex, age, years of teaching, educational attainment, and income. Conclusion: At midlife, the faculty members of USJ-R can still generally be considered physically well. Thus, if they are well-managed, they can become relevant and better contributors to the attainment of the basic goals and objectives of the educational institution and the educational system in general. PMID:27134476

  6. Correlations for the Stroop Color and Word Test with measures of reading and language achievement.

    PubMed

    Leverett, J Patrick; Lassiter, Kerry S; Buchanan, Gray M

    2002-04-01

    The present investigation examined the relationships for scores on the Stroop Color and Word Test with measures of reading and language achievement within an adult population. The Stroop Color and Word Test, Nelson-Denny Reading Test, Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised, and Wide Range Achievement Test-3 were administered to 99 men ranging in age from 18 to 27 years. Pearson product-moment correlations indicated that the Stroop Word task was positively associated with scores on the WRAT-3 Spelling task, the Woodcock-Johnson Basic and Broad Reading tasks, and the Nelson-Denny Rcading Rate and Comprehension tasks. These and other significant relationships were discussed in terms of possible implications regarding the assessment of reading achievement. PMID:12027339

  7. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of??-0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of??-0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of??-0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely. PMID:26540441

  8. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  9. Correlates of cognitive change

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Although there has been considerable interest in identifying potential correlates of cognitive change, results of past studies have been inconsistent. The present study incorporated a number of methodological features intended to maximize sensitivity to detect characteristics of individuals with different amounts of cognitive change. Cognitive change in five cognitive abilities was analyzed with second-order latent growth curve models applied to data from a moderately large sample of healthy adults ranging from 18 to 99 years of age (N’s of 4,802 with one occasion, 2,265 with two occasions, and 1,128 with three occasions). There was significant individual difference variance in the longitudinal changes in several cognitive abilities, even in separate analyses of individuals between 18 and 39, 40 and 64, and over 65 years of age. Potential correlates of change included measures of self-rated health, vision, mood, personality, and lifestyle. Most of the potential correlates of change had high reliability, and several analyses were based on even more reliable factors determined by the variance common to multiple measures. Despite favorable conditions for detecting correlates of change, there was little evidence that cognitive change was moderated by any of the variables examined. Possible reasons for the inconsistent results regarding correlates of cognitive change are discussed. PMID:24219021

  10. Nonclassicality of Temporal Correlations.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Stephen; Kosowski, Adrian; Markiewicz, Marcin; Paterek, Tomasz; Przysiężna, Anna

    2015-09-18

    The results of spacelike separated measurements are independent of distant measurement settings, a property one might call two-way no-signaling. In contrast, timelike separated measurements are only one-way no-signaling since the past is independent of the future but not vice versa. For this reason some temporal correlations that are formally identical to nonclassical spatial correlations can still be modeled classically. We propose a new formulation of Bell's theorem for temporal correlations; namely, we define nonclassical temporal correlations as the ones which cannot be simulated by propagating in time the classical information content of a quantum system given by the Holevo bound. We first show that temporal correlations between results of any projective quantum measurements on a qubit can be simulated classically. Then we present a sequence of general measurements on a single m-level quantum system that cannot be explained by propagating in time an m-level classical system and using classical computers with unlimited memory. PMID:26430975

  11. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświecimka, Paweł; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient ρDCCA has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, nonstationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analog of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient ρDCCA works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without the possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of ρDCCA that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis, respectively. The resulting new coefficient ρq not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations but also allows one to identify the range of detrended fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two signals under study. We show how the coefficient ρq works in practical situations by applying it to stochastic time series representing processes with long memory: autoregressive and multiplicative ones. Such processes are often used to model signals recorded from complex systems and complex physical phenomena like turbulence, so we are convinced that this new measure can successfully be applied in time-series analysis. In particular, we present an example of such application to highly complex empirical data from financial markets. The present formulation can straightforwardly be extended to multivariate data in terms of the q -dependent counterpart of the correlation matrices and then to the network representation.

  12. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświęcimka, Paweł; Drożdż, Stanisław

    2015-11-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient ρ(DCCA) has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, nonstationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analog of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient ρ(DCCA) works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without the possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of ρ(DCCA) that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis, respectively. The resulting new coefficient ρ(q) not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations but also allows one to identify the range of detrended fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two signals under study. We show how the coefficient ρ(q) works in practical situations by applying it to stochastic time series representing processes with long memory: autoregressive and multiplicative ones. Such processes are often used to model signals recorded from complex systems and complex physical phenomena like turbulence, so we are convinced that this new measure can successfully be applied in time-series analysis. In particular, we present an example of such application to highly complex empirical data from financial markets. The present formulation can straightforwardly be extended to multivariate data in terms of the q-dependent counterpart of the correlation matrices and then to the network representation. PMID:26651752

  13. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  14. Correlation-based inference for linkage disequilibrium with multiple alleles.

    PubMed

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Pudovkin, Alexander; Weir, Bruce S

    2008-09-01

    The correlation between alleles at a pair of genetic loci is a measure of linkage disequilibrium. The square of the sample correlation multiplied by sample size provides the usual test statistic for the hypothesis of no disequilibrium for loci with two alleles and this relation has proved useful for study design and marker selection. Nevertheless, this relation holds only in a diallelic case, and an extension to multiple alleles has not been made. Here we introduce a similar statistic, R2, which leads to a correlation-based test for loci with multiple alleles: for a pair of loci with k and m alleles, and a sample of n individuals, the approximate distribution of n(k - 1)(m - 1)/(km)R2 under independence between loci is chi2(k-1(m-1). One advantage of this statistic is that it can be interpreted as the total correlation between a pair of loci. When the phase of two-locus genotypes is known, the approach is equivalent to a test for the overall correlation between rows and columns in a contingency table. In the phase-known case, R2 is the sum of the squared sample correlations for all km 2 x 2 subtables formed by collapsing to one allele vs. the rest at each locus. We examine the approximate distribution under the null of independence for R2 and report its close agreement with the exact distribution obtained by permutation. The test for independence using R2 is a strong competitor to approaches such as Pearson's chi square, Fisher's exact test, and a test based on Cressie and Read's power divergence statistic. We combine this approach with our previous composite-disequilibrium measures to address the case when the genotypic phase is unknown. Calculation of the new multiallele test statistic and its P-value is very simple and utilizes the approximate distribution of R2. We provide a computer program that evaluates approximate as well as "exact" permutational P-values. PMID:18757931

  15. Correlation among auto-refractor, wavefront aberration, and subjective manual refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ren, Qiushi

    2005-01-01

    Three optometry methods which include auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective manual refraction were studied and compared in measuring low order aberrations of 60 people"s 117 normal eyes. Paired t-test and linear regression were used to study these three methods" relationship when measuring myopia with astigmatism. In order to make the analysis more clear, we divided the 117 normal eyes into different groups according to their subjective manual refraction and redid the statistical analysis. Correlations among three methods show significant in sphere, cylinder and axis in all groups, with sphere"s correlation coefficients largest(R>0.98, P<0.01) and cylinder"s smallest (0.90t-test before grouping showed the difference of three optometry methods in measuring sphere was significant (P<0.01) while axis"s difference was not significant (P>0.01). Auto-refractor had significant change from the other two methods when measuring cylinder (P<0.01). The results after grouping differed a little from the analysis among total people. Although three methods showed significant change from each other in certain parameters, the amplitude of these differences were not large, which indicated that the coherence of auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective refraction is good. However, we suggested that wavefront aberration measurement could be a good starting point of optometry, subjective refraction is still necessary for refinement.

  16. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... within cells that use oxygen to convert the energy from food into a form cells can use. This process is called oxidative phosphorylation . Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within the nucleus (nuclear DNA), mitochondria also have a small amount of ...

  18. Coefficients of Association Analogous to Pearson's r for Nonparametric Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavig, Gordon; Acock, Alan C.

    1980-01-01

    Two r coefficients of association are discussed. One of the coefficients can be applied to any nonparametric test statistic (NTS) in which a normal approximation equation is appropriate. The other coefficient is applicable to any NTS in which exact probabilities are known. (Author/RL)

  19. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luders, Eileen; Narr, Katherine L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    With the advancement of image acquisition and analysis methods in recent decades, unique opportunities have emerged to study the neuroanatomical correlates of intelligence. Traditional approaches examining global measures have been complemented by insights from more regional analyses based on pre-defined areas. Newer state-of-the-art approaches

  20. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luders, Eileen; Narr, Katherine L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    With the advancement of image acquisition and analysis methods in recent decades, unique opportunities have emerged to study the neuroanatomical correlates of intelligence. Traditional approaches examining global measures have been complemented by insights from more regional analyses based on pre-defined areas. Newer state-of-the-art approaches…

  1. Correlates of Adolescent Parenting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Janet S.; Herz, Elicia J.

    1987-01-01

    Studied correlates of teenage parenting in self-selected sample of 177 teenage parents. Parental race, punitive attitudes toward child rearing, and parental age were statistically significant predictors of total Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment scores. Older, white adolescent mothers with less punitive attitudes toward child…

  2. Rocket Auroral Correlator Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBelle, James

    2003-01-01

    Dartmouth College provided a multi-channel high- and low- frequency wave receivers, including active sensors on deployable booms, to the Rocket Auroral Correlator Experiment launched from Poker Flat, Alaska, in January 2002. College also performed preliminary analysis of the data. Details are outlined in chronological order.

  3. Correlates of School Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    As part of a continuing series of research studies on stress in schools, this study examined the construct validity of peripheral temperature at the fingertips as a measure of school stress. Measurements were made in classes selected at random from 11 volunteer schools in South Carolina. Three types of correlational studies were undertaken: (1)…

  4. CORRELATION AND REGRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Webcast entitled Statistical Tools for Making Sense of Data, by the National Nutrient Criteria Support Center, N-STEPS (Nutrients-Scientific Technical Exchange Partnership. The section "Correlation and Regression" provides an overview of these two techniques in the context of nut...

  5. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable.

  6. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable. PMID:23039631

  7. Quantitative correlation of breast tissue parameters using magnetic resonance and X-ray mammography.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, S. J.; Bronskill, M. J.; Byng, J. W.; Yaffe, M. J.; Boyd, N. F.

    1996-01-01

    Previous investigators have shown that there is a strong association between the fraction of fibroglandular tissue within the breast as determined by X-ray mammography (per cent density) and breast cancer risk. In this study, the quantitative correlation between per cent density and two objective magnetic resonance (MR) parameters of breast tissue, relative water content and mean T2 relaxation time, as investigated for 42 asymptomatic subjects. Using newly developed, rapid techniques MR measurements were performed on a volume-of-interest incorporating equal, representative portions of both breasts. X-ray mammograms of each subject were digitised and analysed semiautomatically to determine per cent density. Relative water content showed a strong positive correlation with per cent density (Pearson correlation coefficient rp = 0.79, P < 0.0001) and mean T2 value showed a strong negative correlation with per cent density (rp = -0.61, P < 0.0001). The MR and X-ray parameters were also associated with sociodemographic and anthropometric risk factors for breast cancer (P < 0.05). The potential use of MR parameters to assess risk of breast cancer and to provide a frequent, non-hazardous monitor of breast parenchyma is discussed. Images Figure 2 PMID:8546901

  8. Molar bite force and its correlation with signs of temporomandibular dysfunction in mixed and permanent dentition.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L J; Pastore, M G; Bonjardim, L R; Castelo, P M; Gavião, M B D

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate molar bite force (BF) magnitude and its correlation to the signs of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD), gender, weight, height and age in 101 students ranging in age from 6 to 18 years (32 boys/21 girls with mixed dentition and 23 boys/25 girls with permanent dentition). TMD clinical signs were evaluated using the Craniomandibular Index (CMI), and two subscales, the Dysfunction Index (DI) and the Palpation Index (PI). BF was determined with a pressurized tube connected to a sensor (MPX5700-Motorola SPS). anova, Tukey's test, and Pearson's and Spearman's coefficients were evaluated. BF was higher in the permanent dentition (P < 0.05). There was no difference in BF between genders within the groups, but boys with permanent dentition had higher values than children with mixed dentition (P < 0.05). The girls with permanent dentition presented negative correlation in BF with PI and CMI (P < 0.05). BF was positively correlated with weight, height and age in the permanent dentition group (P < 0.05). It was concluded that BF increased from mixed to permanent dentition, with an assumed enhancing influence of body variables and ageing. The TMD signs in older girls were correlated to decreasing BF, suggesting an influence of muscle tenderness preventing subjects from exerting maximum BF. PMID:17824888

  9. Stature and gender determination and their correlation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Kiran; Shetty, Devi Charan; Wadhwan, Vijay; Jain, Anshi; Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2014-01-01

    Background: When the body has been mutilated, it is common to have the extremities or head amputated from the trunk. In concern with forensic odontology, an estimate must have been made based on the correlation of osteometry along with odontometry in determining sex, race and stature. Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate and correlate height and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Microbiology, I.T.S Center for Dental studies and Research, Muradnagar, Ghaziabad (UP) with the representative study subjects of 60 patients as 30 males and 30 females in the age group of 15-25 years. The selected parameters were measured and then correlated to investigate stature and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Results: On linear regression analysis, the selected parameters were found to be statistically significant predictor of height. It was also established by Karl Pearson's coefficient correlation that the left mandibular canine index for female was statistically significant to show sexual dimorphism. Conclusion: In the emerging field of forensic odontology, skull anthropometry, odontometry exhibits stature determination and strong sexual dimorphism. PMID:25125917

  10. Media coverage and hospital notifications: Correlation analysis and optimal media impact duration to manage a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinling; Tang, Sanyi; Gabriele, Sandra; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-02-01

    News reporting has the potential to modify a community's knowledge of emerging infectious diseases and affect peoples' attitudes and behavior. Here we developed a quantitative approach to evaluate the effects of media on such behavior. Statistically significant correlations between the number of new hospital notifications, during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza epidemic in the Shaanxi province of China, and the number of daily news items added to eight major websites were found from Pearson correlation and cross-correlation analyses. We also proposed a novel model to examine the implication for transmission dynamics of these correlations. The model incorporated the media impact function into the intensity of infection, and enhanced the traditional epidemic SEIR model with the addition of media dynamics. We used a nonlinear least squares estimation to identify the best-fit parameter values in the model from the observed data. We also carried out the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to determine key parameters during early phase of the disease outbreak for the final outcome of the outbreak with media impact. The findings confirm the importance of responses by individuals to the media reports, with behavior changes having important consequence for the emerging infectious disease control. Therefore, for mitigating emerging infectious diseases, media reports should be focused on how to guide people's behavioral changes, which are critical for limiting the spread of disease. PMID:26582723

  11. Overdiagnosing of femoroacetabular impingement: correlation between clinical presentation and computed tomography in symptomatic patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Richard Prazeres; Adam, Guilherme Pradi; de Castillo, Roberto André Ulhôa; Codonho, Daniel; Ganev, Gerson Gandhi; de Vicenzi, Luiz Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objective To correlate the angles between the acetabulum and the proximal femur in symptomatic patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), using computed tomography (CT). Methods We retrospectively evaluated 103 hips from 103 patients, using multislice CT to measure the acetabular age, acetabular version (in its supraequatorial portion and in its middle third), femoral neck version, cervical-diaphyseal and alpha angles and the acetabular depth. For the statistical analysis, we used the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results There were inverse correlations between the following angles: (1) acetabular coverage versus alpha angle (p = 0.019); (2) acetabular version (supraequatorial) versus alpha angle (p = 0.049). For patients with femoral anteversion lower than 15 degrees: (1) acetabular version (supraequatorial) versus alpha angle (p = 0.026); (2) acetabular version (middle third) versus alpha angle (p = 0.02). For patients with acetabular version (supraequatorial) lower than 10 degrees: (1) acetabular version (supraequatorial) versus alpha angle (p = 0.004); (2) acetabular version (middle third) versus alpha angle (p = 0.009). Conclusion There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between the acetabular version and alpha angles (the smaller the acetabular anteversion angle was, the larger the alpha angle was) in symptomatic patients, thus supporting the hypothesis that FAI occurs when cam and pincer findings due to acetabular retroversion are seen simultaneously, and that the latter alone does not cause FAI, which leads to overdiagnosis in these cases. PMID:27069890

  12. Diversity of the Vaginal Microbiome Correlates With Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Richard W.; Fukushima, Marilyn; Jiang, Hui; Fung, Eula; Rand, Larry; Johnson, Brittni; Vo, Kim Chi; Caughey, Aaron B.; Hilton, Joan F.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive tract infection is a major initiator of preterm birth (PTB). The objective of this prospective cohort study of 88 participants was to determine whether PTB correlates with the vaginal microbiome during pregnancy. Total DNA was purified from posterior vaginal fornix swabs during gestation. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers, followed by chain-termination sequencing. Bacteria were identified by comparing contig consensus sequences with the Ribosomal Database Project. Dichotomous responses were summarized via proportions and continuous variables via means ± standard deviation. Mean Shannon Diversity index differed by Welch t test (P = .00016) between caucasians with PTB and term gestation. Species diversity was greatest among African Americans (P = .0045). Change in microbiome/Lactobacillus content and presence of putative novel/noxious bacteria did not correlate with PTB. We conclude that uncultured vaginal bacteria play an important role in PTB and race/ethnicity and sampling location are important determinants of the vaginal microbiome. PMID:23715799

  13. Multi baseline Grid Software Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritaka, Kimura; Nakajima, Junichi; Kondo, Tetsuro

    Software VLBI correlation is regarded as a solution for next generation VLBI. With a flexibility of the software correlation programming, appropriate scientific correlations by scientists are possible as well as the post processing. As the first experiment to handle Gbps VLBI data, multi baseline Grid correlator have been developing at CRL. The performance of software correlation adopted multi CPUs, SIMD architectures and Grid computing technology has nearly reached hardware correlator performance.

  14. Interval estimation for rank correlation coefficients based on the probit transformation with extension to measurement error correction of correlated ranked data.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Bernard; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-02-10

    The Spearman (rho(s)) and Kendall (tau) rank correlation coefficient are routinely used as measures of association between non-normally distributed random variables. However, confidence limits for rho(s) are only available under the assumption of bivariate normality and for tau under the assumption of asymptotic normality of tau. In this paper, we introduce another approach for obtaining confidence limits for rho(s) or tau based on the arcsin transformation of sample probit score correlations. This approach is shown to be applicable for an arbitrary bivariate distribution. The arcsin-based estimators for rho(s) and tau (denoted by rho(s,a), tau(a)) are shown to have asymptotic relative efficiency (ARE) of 9/pi2 compared with the usual estimators rho(s) and tau when rho(s) and tau are, respectively, 0. In some nutritional applications, the Spearman rank correlation between nutrient intake as assessed by a reference instrument versus nutrient intake as assessed by a surrogate instrument is used as a measure of validity of the surrogate instrument. However, if only a single replicate (or a few replicates) are available for the reference instrument, then the estimated Spearman rank correlation will be downwardly biased due to measurement error. In this paper, we use the probit transformation as a tool for specifying an ANOVA-type model for replicate ranked data resulting in a point and interval estimate of a measurement error corrected rank correlation. This extends previous work by Rosner and Willett for obtaining point and interval estimates of measurement error corrected Pearson correlations. PMID:16596580

  15. Hand skeletal maturity and its correlation with mandibular dental development

    PubMed Central

    Pousti, Maryam; Adelianfar, Elahe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assessment of pubertal status and pubertal growth spurt in orthodontic patients has a considerable impact on the diagnosis, treatment plan and the outcome of orthodontic treatments. Hand-wrist radiography is routinely used to evaluate skeletal development. Some studies have shown that there is an association between bone development and different stages of dental calcification; therefore, the stages of dental calcification can be used as the first tool for diagnosis, in case there is an association. This study was performed with the aim to evaluate the association between the phases of dental development and the stages of skeletal maturity. Study design: In this study, a total of 52 patients (26 males and 26 females), referring to Mashhad School of Dentistry for orthodontic treatment, were evaluated; the subjects were within the age range of 9-14 years. Hand-wrist radiographic evaluation of skeletal maturation was performed using Fishman method. Also, the Demirjian method was used to identify the stages of dental calcification by panoramic radiographs. Independent t-test and Spearman correlation coefficient were used for data analyses. Results: The mean age of males and females was 11.05 1.05 and 10.62 1.12 years, respectively (p=0.156). The Spearman correlation coefficients between skeletal maturity indicators (SMIs) and developmental stages of mandibular left and right canines and second molars were significant in males only (p<0.05). Also, correlation coefficients were significant between adductor sesamoid ossification and mandibular right and left canines developmental stages in males (p<0.05). Conclusions: Findings of this study showed that the correlation between dental developmental stages and skeletal maturity only were significant in males; thus, different skeletal maturity patterns in males and females might be perceptible. Key words:Skeletal maturation, hand-wrist radiography, panoramic radiography. PMID:25136430

  16. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  17. Digital demodulator-correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Goldstein, R. M.; Hubbard, W. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for demodulation and correlation of a code modulated 10 MHz signal is presented. The apparatus is comprised of a sample and hold analog-to-digital converter synchronized by a frequency coherent 40 MHz pulse to obtain four evenly spaced samples of each of the signal. Each sample is added or subtracted to or from one of four accumulators to or from the separate sums. The correlation functions are then computed. As a further feature of the invention, multipliers are each multiplied by a squarewave chopper signal having a period that is long relative to the period of the received signal to foreclose contamination of the received signal by leakage from either of the other two terms of the multipliers.

  18. Correlation between the Mini Mental State Examination-Korean version and the Measurement of Quality of the Environment in the institutionalized elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the correlation between the cognitive level of the elderly and their attitude towards the living environment. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 80 elderly people hospitalized in a nursing home in K city, South Korea, participated in this study. Pearson correlation analysis was used to test the relationships between scores on the Mini Mental State Examination-Korean Version and Measurement of Quality of the Environment (facilitators and obstacles). [Results] A positive and moderately strong correlation (r = 0.462) was found between scores on the Mini Mental State Examination and the Measurement of Quality of the Environment (obstacle). [Conclusion] In a nursing home, patients with relatively higher cognitive levels can perceive more obstacles in the surrounding environment. PMID:26696742

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of Depressive Symptoms and Resiliency among African American Women in a Community-Based Primary Health Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Kisha B.; Bradford, L. Dianne; Hall, Stephanie P.; Belton, Allyson S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional pilot study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms and resiliency among 290 African American women (AAW) in a community-based primary health care center. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlation, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Findings indicate that depressive symptoms are experienced by 49% of the participants, while 10% indicated a history of suicidal ideation. Participants had moderately high resiliency scores that had a statistically significant inverse relationship with depressive symptoms. This suggests that resiliency is potentially a protective factor for depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were positively correlated with participants’ diagnosis of at least one chronic disease. The strongest predictors of depressive symptoms were previous diagnoses of a mental health condition and unemployment. This study identifies risk and potential protective factors for depression among a clinic sample of AAW. PMID:24241263

  20. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  1. Cots Correlator Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Kjeld; Overeem, Ruud

    2004-06-01

    Moore’s law is best exploited by using consumer market hardware. In particular, the gaming industry pushes the limit of processor performance thus reducing the cost per raw flop even faster than Moore’s law predicts. Next to the cost benefits of Common-Of-The-Shelf (COTS) processing resources, there is a rapidly growing experience pool in cluster based processing. The typical Beowulf cluster of PC’s supercomputers are well known. Multiple examples exists of specialised cluster computers based on more advanced server nodes or even gaming stations. All these cluster machines build upon the same knowledge about cluster software management, scheduling, middleware libraries and mathematical libraries. In this study, we have integrated COTS processing resources and cluster nodes into a very high performance processing platform suitable for streaming data applications, in particular to implement a correlator. The required processing power for the correlator in modern radio telescopes is in the range of the larger supercomputers, which motivates the usage of supercomputer technology. Raw processing power is provided by graphical processors and is combined with an Infiniband host bus adapter with integrated data stream handling logic. With this processing platform a scalable correlator can be built with continuously growing processing power at consumer market prices.

  2. Neural correlates of gratitude

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Glenn R.; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others. PMID:26483740

  3. Neural Correlates of Hate

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Semir; Romaya, John Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we address an important but unexplored topic, namely the neural correlates of hate. In a block-design fMRI study, we scanned 17 normal human subjects while they viewed the face of a person they hated and also faces of acquaintances for whom they had neutral feelings. A hate score was obtained for the object of hate for each subject and this was used as a covariate in a between-subject random effects analysis. Viewing a hated face resulted in increased activity in the medial frontal gyrus, right putamen, bilaterally in premotor cortex, in the frontal pole and bilaterally in the medial insula. We also found three areas where activation correlated linearly with the declared level of hatred, the right insula, right premotor cortex and the right fronto-medial gyrus. One area of deactivation was found in the right superior frontal gyrus. The study thus shows that there is a unique pattern of activity in the brain in the context of hate. Though distinct from the pattern of activity that correlates with romantic love, this pattern nevertheless shares two areas with the latter, namely the putamen and the insula. PMID:18958169

  4. Energy calibration via correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be less than ~ 0.1 keV. Energy calibration via correlation can be applied to any kind of calibration spectra and shows a robust behavior at low counting statistics. It enables a fast and accurate calibration that can be used to monitor the spectroscopic properties of a detector system in near realtime.

  5. A Correlational Analysis of Tethered Swimming, Swim Sprint Performance and Dry-land Power Assessments.

    PubMed

    Loturco, I; Barbosa, A C; Nocentini, R K; Pereira, L A; Kobal, R; Kitamura, K; Abad, C C C; Figueiredo, P; Nakamura, F Y

    2016-03-01

    Swimmers are often tested on both dry-land and in swimming exercises. The aim of this study was to test the relationships between dry-land, tethered force-time curve parameters and swimming performances in distances up to 200 m. 10 young male high-level swimmers were assessed using the maximal isometric bench-press and quarter-squat, mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat and countermovement jumps (dry-land assessments), peak force, average force, rate of force development (RFD) and impulse (tethered swimming) and swimming times. Pearson product-moment correlations were calculated among the variables. Peak force and average force were very largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m swimming performances (r=- 0.82 and -0.74, respectively). Average force was very-largely/largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m performances (r=- 0.85 and -0.67, respectively). RFD and impulse were very-largely correlated with the 50-m time (r=- 0.72 and -0.76, respectively). Tethered swimming parameters were largely correlated (r=0.65 to 0.72) with mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat-jump and countermovement jumps. Finally, mean propulsive power in jump-squat was largely correlated (r=- 0.70) with 50-m performance. Due to the significant correlations between dry-land assessments and tethered/actual swimming, coaches are encouraged to implement strategies able to increase leg power in sprint swimmers. PMID:26669251

  6. Bootstrapped Deattenuated Correlation: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Veprinsky, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Correlation attenuation due to measurement error and a corresponding correction, the deattenuated correlation, have been known for over a century. Nevertheless, the deattenuated correlation remains underutilized. A few studies in recent years have investigated factors affecting the deattenuated correlation, and a couple of them provide alternative…

  7. Correlation between Chronological Age, Dental Age and Skeletal Age among Monozygoyic and Dizygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mohit; Divyashree, R; Abhilash, PR; A Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem; Murali, KV

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronological age, dental development, height and weight measurements, sexual maturation characteristics and skeletal age are some biological indicators that have been used to identify time of growth. Many researchers have agreed that skeletal maturity is closely related to the craniofacial growth, and bones of hand and wrist are reliable parameters in assessing it. The complete hand and wrist radiograph involves 30 bones and assessment of these bones is one elaborate task. The present study is therefore, undertaken to assess the correlation between the chronological age, dental age and skeletal ages among different types of twins. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 60 subjects (30 twins) aged 8 to 16 years, divided into group of 10 monozygotic, 10 dizygotic and 10 mixed sex twins. The sample was selected from Twin Survey- 2008 conducted by Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Chennai. Their zygosity was determined by sex, blood groups and by the parent. The chronological age was measured by the date of birth given by the parents. Panoramic and hand wrist x-rays were taken. Dental age was assessed by Demerjian et al method and skeletal age by Greulich and Pyle method. The correlation among twins in dental and skeletal ages with the chronological age was assessed using Correlation Coefficient and Student's't' Test. Results: The obtained data was fed into the computer and statistical analysis was done for the same using the SPSS version 10.0. Statistical significance was tested at P<0.05 level. Mean and Standard Deviation, Correlation Coefficient, Student's't' Test statistical methods were employed. The result showed highly significant 'p' value as <0.001 in all the correlations except for mixed pairs. Descriptive statistics in most of the areas demonstrated a non-significant result between zygosity groups. Conclusion: There is a correlation existing between the individual’s chronological age, dental age and skeletal age and correlation also exists in the twin pairs of the same zygosity and among each pair but no correlation exists between different zygotic twins. How to cite this article: Gupta M, Divyashree R, Abhilash P R, Bijle M N A, Murali K V. Correlation between Chronological Age, Dental Age and Skeletal Age among Monozygoyic and Dizygotic Twins. J Int Oral Health 2013; 3(1):16-22. PMID:24155573

  8. "Intrinsic" correlations and their temporal evolutions between winter-time PNA/EPW and winter drought in the west United States.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lin; Fu, Zuntao; Yuan, Naiming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, relations between winter-time Pacific-Northern America pattern (PNA)/East Pacific wave-train (EPW) and winter-time drought in the west United States over the period of 1951-2010 are analyzed. Considering traditional Pearson's Correlation Coefficient can be influenced by non-stationarity and nonlinearity, a recently proposed method, Detrended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA) is applied. With DPCCA, we analyzed the "intrinsic" correlations between PNA/EPW and the winter drought with possible effects of ENSO and PDO removed. We found, i) significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 5-6 years after removing the effects of ENSO, ii) and significant negative correlations between PNA/EPW and drought on time scales of 15-25 years after removing the effects of PDO. By further studying the temporal evolutions of the "intrinsic" correlations, we found on time scales of 5-6 years, the "intrinsic" correlations between PNA/EPW and drought can vary severely with time, but for most time, the correlations are negative. While on interdecadal (15-25 years) time scales, after the effects of PDO removed, unlike the relations between PNA and drought, the "intrinsic" correlations between EPW and drought takes nearly homogeneous-sign over the whole period, indicating a better model can be designed by using EPW. PMID:26813741

  9. Unbalanced Homodyne Correlation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, B.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    A method is introduced that allows one to measure normal-ordered moments of the displaced photon-number operator up to higher orders, without the need of photon-number resolving detectors. It is based on unbalanced homodyne correlation measurements, with the local oscillator being replaced by a displaced dephased laser. The measured moments yield a simple approximation of quasiprobabilities, representing the full quantum state. Quantum properties of light are efficiently certified through normal-ordered observables directly accessible by our method, which is illustrated for a weakly squeezed vacuum and a single-photon-added thermal state.

  10. Flatbands under Correlated Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy EFB, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ? 1 /ln (E -EFB) , (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at EFB . Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions.

  11. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  12. Correlative Measurements Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The GSFC Correlative Measurements Program at the Wallops Flight Facility was represented on the Satellite/Satellite Intercomparisons Working Group. The Correlative Measurements Program uses the Rocket Ozonesonde (ROCOZ-A) and the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) balloon borne ozonesonde to measure the vertical profile of ozone amount in the atmosphere. The balloon work is described in a separate report. The ROCOZ-A instrument was used for many years to provide in situ truth data for various satellite ozone measuring systems, such as SBUV on Nimbus-7, SAGE-II, SBUV-II on the NOAA series of polar orbiting satellites, SME, LIMS, etc. The particular data sets of interest to the Ozone Trends Panel Working Group were collected at Natal, Brazil. The major results produced for and used by the Ozone Trends Panel are shown. The ROCOZ-A average ozone density profile is plotted versus altitude on the left. ECC ozonesondes were used for the portion of the profile below 20 km, the lower limit for ROCOZ-A. The difference between SAGE-II and ROCOZ-A average density profiles is shown.

  13. Grayscale Optical Correlator Workbench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Zhou, Hanying; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    Grayscale Optical Correlator Workbench (GOCWB) is a computer program for use in automatic target recognition (ATR). GOCWB performs ATR with an accurate simulation of a hardware grayscale optical correlator (GOC). This simulation is performed to test filters that are created in GOCWB. Thus, GOCWB can be used as a stand-alone ATR software tool or in combination with GOC hardware for building (target training), testing, and optimization of filters. The software is divided into three main parts, denoted filter, testing, and training. The training part is used for assembling training images as input to a filter. The filter part is used for combining training images into a filter and optimizing that filter. The testing part is used for testing new filters and for general simulation of GOC output. The current version of GOCWB relies on the mathematical software tools from MATLAB binaries for performing matrix operations and fast Fourier transforms. Optimization of filters is based on an algorithm, known as OT-MACH, in which variables specified by the user are parameterized and the best filter is selected on the basis of an average result for correct identification of targets in multiple test images.

  14. CONDITIONAL DISTANCE CORRELATION

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqin; Pan, Wenliang; Hu, Wenhao; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Statistical inference on conditional dependence is essential in many fields including genetic association studies and graphical models. The classic measures focus on linear conditional correlations, and are incapable of characterizing non-linear conditional relationship including non-monotonic relationship. To overcome this limitation, we introduces a nonparametric measure of conditional dependence for multivariate random variables with arbitrary dimensions. Our measure possesses the necessary and intuitive properties as a correlation index. Briefly, it is zero almost surely if and only if two multivariate random variables are conditionally independent given a third random variable. More importantly, the sample version of this measure can be expressed elegantly as the root of a V or U-process with random kernels and has desirable theoretical properties. Based on the sample version, we propose a test for conditional independence, which is proven to be more powerful than some recently developed tests through our numerical simulations. The advantage of our test is even greater when the relationship between the multivariate random variables given the third random variable cannot be expressed in a linear or monotonic function of one random variable versus the other. We also show that the sample measure is consistent and weakly convergent, and the test statistic is asymptotically normal. By applying our test in a real data analysis, we are able to identify two conditionally associated gene expressions, which otherwise cannot be revealed. Thus, our measure of conditional dependence is not only an ideal concept, but also has important practical utility. PMID:26877569

  15. Anterior Insula GABA Levels Correlate with Emotional Aspects of Empathy: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fang; Chen, Luguang; Zheng, Li; Guo, Xiuyan; Li, Jianqi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Empathy is a multidimensional construct referring to the capacity to understand and share the emotional and affective states of another person. Cerebral γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic levels are associated with a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the role of the GABA system in different dimensions of empathy has not been investigated. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two right-handed healthy volunteers took part in this study. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine GABA concentrations in the anterior insula (AI) and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and to examine the relationship between the GABA concentrations and the subcomponents of empathy evaluated by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). Result: Pearson correlation analyses (two-tailed) showed that AI GABA was significantly associated with the empathy concern score (r = 0.584, p<0.05) and the personal distress score (r = 0.538, p<0.05) but not significantly associated with other empathy subscales. No significant correlation was found between ACC GABA and empathy subscores. Conclusion: Left AI GABA was positively correlated with the emotional aspects of empathy. These preliminary findings call into question whether AI GABA alterations might predict empathy dysfunction in major psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, which have been described as deficits in emotional empathic abilities. PMID:25419976

  16. The observed radio/gamma-ray emission correlation for blazars with the Fermi-LAT and the RATAN-600 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufakharov, T.; Mingaliev, M.; Sotnikova, Yu.; Naiden, Ya.; Erkenov, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the correlation between gamma-ray and radio band radiation for 123 blazars, using the Fermi-LAT first source catalogue (1FGL) and the RATAN-600 data obtained at the same period of time (within a few months). We found an apparent positive correlation for BL Lac and flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) sources from our sample through testing the value of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. The BL Lac objects show higher values of the correlation coefficient than FSRQs at all frequencies, except 21.7 GHz, and at all bands, except 10-100 GeV, typically at high confidence level (>99 per cent). At higher gamma-ray energies the correlation weakens and even becomes negative for BL Lacs and FSRQs. For BL Lac blazars, the correlation of the fluxes appeared to be more sensitive to the considered gamma-ray energy band, than to the frequency, while for FSRQ sources the correlation changed notably both with the considered radio frequency and gamma-ray energy band. We used a data randomization method to quantify the significance of the computed correlation coefficients. We find that the statistical significance of the correlations we obtained between the flux densities at all frequencies and the photon flux in all gamma-ray bands below 3 GeV is high for BL Lacs (chance probability ˜10-3-10-7). The correlation coefficient is high and significant for the 0.1-0.3 GeV band and low and insignificant for the 10-100 GeV band for both types of blazars for all considered frequencies.

  17. PREFACE: Correlated Electrons (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Kazumasa

    2007-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to results in the field of strongly correlated electron systems under multiple-environment. The physics of strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) has attracted much attention since the discovery of superconductivity in CeCu_2 Si_2 by Steglich and his co-workers a quater-century ago. Its interest has been intensified by the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in a series of cuprates with layered perovskite structure which are still under active debate. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter present some aspects of SCES physics on the basis of activities of a late project "Centre-Of-Excellence" supported by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Sports, Science, Culture and Technology of the Japanese Government). This project has been performed by a condensed matter physics group in the faculties of science and engineering science of Osaka University. Although this project also covers correlated phenomena in optics and nano-scale systems, we focus here on the issues of SCES related to superconductivity, mainly unconventional. The present issue covers the discussions on a new mechanism of superconductivity with electronic origin (critical valence fluctuation mechanism), interplay and unification of magnetism and superconductivity in SCES based on a systematic study of NQR under pressure, varieties of Fermi surface of Ce- and U-based SCES probed by the de Haas-van Alphen effect, electronic states probed by a bulk sensitive photoemission spectroscopy with soft X-ray, pressure induced superconductivity of heavy electron materials, pressure dependence of superconducting transition temperature based on a first-principle calculation, and new superconductors under very high-pressure. Some papers offer readers' reviews of the relevant fields and/or include new developments of this intriguing research field of SCES. Altogether, the papers within this issue outline some aspects of electronic states and superconductivity of SCES and related research fields, and the prospects of SCES physics. I hope that it will give an insight into the fascination of SCES research and a feeling for the advances made in the past years.

  18. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    SciTech Connect

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  19. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10-500 GeV fluxmore » and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.« less

  20. Psychiatric symptoms correlate with metabolic indices in the hippocampus and cingulate in patients with mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anglin, R E; Rosebush, P I; Noseworthy, M D; Tarnopolsky, M; Mazurek, M F

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction may have a critical role in the pathophysiology of major psychiatric illnesses. Patients with mitochondrial disorders offer a unique window through which we can begin to understand the association between psychiatric symptoms and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), we investigated metabolic indices in mitochondrial patients in regions of the brain that have been implicated in psychiatric illness: the caudate, cingulate cortex and hippocampus. In all, 15 patients with mitochondrial disorders and 15 age- and sex-matched controls underwent a comprehensive psychiatric assessment, including the administration of standardized psychiatric rating scales, followed by single voxel 1H-MRS of the caudate, cingulate cortex and hippocampus to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), myoinositol and glutamate+glutamine (Glx). Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to determine correlations between metabolites and the psychiatric rating scales. Anxiety symptoms in these patients correlated with higher GPC, Glx, myoinositol and Cr in the hippocampus. Impaired level of function as a result of psychiatric symptoms correlated with higher Glx and GPC in the cingulate cortex. In summary, we found remarkably consistent, and statistically significant, correlations between anxiety and metabolic indices in the hippocampus in patients with mitochondrial disorders, while overall impairment of functioning due to psychiatric symptoms correlated with metabolic markers in the cingulate cortex. These findings lend support to the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction in specific brain regions can give rise to psychiatric symptoms. In particular, they suggest that metabolic processes in the hippocampus may have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. PMID:23149451

  1. Correlation Between Vision and Cognitive Function in the Elderly: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Spierer, Oriel; Fischer, Naomi; Barak, Adiel; Belkin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between vision and cognition is not fully understood. Visual impairment in the elderly has been associated with impaired cognitive function, dementia, and Alzheimer disease. The aim was to study the correlation between near visual acuity (VA), refraction, and cognitive state in an elderly population.Subjects ≥75 years were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Refraction and near VA was tested. Cognitive function was evaluated with a version of the mini-mental state examination for the visually impaired (MMSE-blind). The eye with better VA and no cataract or refractive surgery was analyzed.One-hundred ninety subjects (81.6 ± 5.1 years, 69.5% female) were included. Good VA (≤J3) was associated with high MMSE-blind (>17) (OR = 3.18, 95% CI = 1.57-6.43, P = 0.001). This remained significant adjusting for sex, age, and years of education. Wearing reading glasses correlated significantly with high MMSE-blind after adjustment for sex and age (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.16-3.97, P = 0.016), but reached borderline significance after adjustment for education. There was a trend toward correlation between myopia and better MMSE-blind (r = -0.123, P = 0.09, Pearson correlation).Good VA and wearing glasses seem to correlate with better cognitive function. Reading glasses can serve as a protective factor against cognitive deterioration associated with sensory (visual) deprivation in old age. The association between myopia and cognition requires further investigation. PMID:26817872

  2. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Domínguez, A.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalogue based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalogue (together referred to as `VHE-like' sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4σ level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7σ). A correlation between 10 and 500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4σ and 2.6σ, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalogue, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalogue. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2 per cent less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity τ(E, z) ˜ 5, we estimate that the attenuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10 per cent. This decrease, although non-negligible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  3. Correlation between the Mechanical Properties and Structural Characteristics of Different Fiber Posts Systems.

    PubMed

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Rodrigues, Renata Borges; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cezar; Lourenço, Correr-Sobrinho; Soares, Carlos José

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength and flexural modulus of different fiber-reinforcement composite (FRC) posts and determine the correlation between mechanical properties and structural characteristics. Eleven brands of fiber posts were analyzed (n=10): Exacto Cônico (Angelus), DT Light SL (VDW), RelyX Fiber Post (3M-Espe), Glassix Radiopaque (Nordim), Para Post Fiber White (Coltène), FRC Postec Plus (Ivoclar), Aestheti-Plus Post (Bisco), Superpost Cônico Estriado (Superdont), Superpost Ultrafine (Superdont), Reforpost (Angelus), and White Post DC (FGM). The posts were loaded in three-point bending test to calculate the flexural strength and flexural modulus using a mechanical testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL) at 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Scott-Knot test (p<0.05). The cross-sections of the posts were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Correlation between the mechanical properties and each of the structural variables was calculated by Pearson's correlation coefficients (p<0.05). The flexural strength values ranged from 493 to 835 MPa and were directly correlated with the fiber/matrix ratio (p=0.011). The flexural modulus ranged from 4500 to 8824 MPa and was inversely correlated with the number of fibers per mm2 of post (p<0.001). It was concluded that the structural characteristics significantly affected the properties of the FRC posts. The structural characteristic and mechanical properties of fiber glass posts are manufacture-dependent. A linear correlation between flexural strength and fiber/matrix ratio, as well as the flexural modulus and the amount of fiber was found. PMID:27007345

  4. The Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness With Blood Pressure in a Chinese Hypertensive Population

    PubMed Central

    Gangwani, Rita A.; Lee, Jacky W.Y.; Mo, H.Y.; Sum, Rita; Kwong, Alfred S.K.; Wang, Jenny H.L.; Tsui, Wendy W.S.; Chan, Jonathan C.H.; Lai, Jimmy S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and blood pressure (BP) in subjects with systemic hypertension. Subjects with systemic hypertension on anti-hypertensive medications were screened by fundus photography and referred for glaucoma work-up if there was enlarged vertical cup-to-disc (VCDR) ratio ≥0.6, VCDR asymmetry ≥0.2, or optic disc hemorrhage. Workup included a complete ophthalmological examination, Humphrey visual field test, and RNFL thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. The intraocular pressure (IOP) and RNFL thicknesses (global and quadrant) were averaged from both eyes and the means were correlated with: the systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using Pearson correlation. Among 4000 screened hypertensive subjects, 133 were referred for glaucoma workup and 110 completed the workup. Of the 4000 screened subjects, 1.3% had glaucoma (0.9% had normal tension glaucoma [NTG], 0.2% had primary open angle glaucoma, and 0.2% had primary angle closure glaucoma), whereas 0.3% were NTG suspects. The SBP was negatively correlated with the mean superior RNFL thickness (P = 0.01). The DBP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P = 0.03), superior (P = 0.02), and nasal (P = 0.003) RNFL thickness. The MAP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P = 0.01), superior (P = 0.002), and nasal (P = 0.004) RNFL thickness while positively correlated with the mean IOP (P = 0.02). In medically treated hypertensive subjects, glaucoma was present in 1.3%, with NTG being most prevalent. MAP control may help with IOP lowering and RNFL preservation, although future prospective studies will be needed. PMID:26061324

  5. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and canmore » be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.« less

  6. [Anatomoclinical correlations of endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Attieh, E; Jaoude, R A; Yazbeck, C; Mansour, F; Abboud, J

    1999-12-01

    This is an epidemiological study of 1,498 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for different reasons. Between 1989 and 1996, 308 cases of endometriosis were identified among 1,498 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery. One hundred and five patients were admitted for pelvic pain, 794 for infertility, 319 patients had both on admission, and 280 were admitted for non-gynecologic complaints. The incidence of endometriosis is related to the chief complaint on admission. This disease has different clinical manifestations, different locations and different stages. The mean age in our series is greater than that reported by the literature. The symptoms are related to the location of the lesions but not the stage of the disease. Unlike pelvic pain, infertility is correlated to the stages of the disease. PMID:10676044

  7. Cross correlation flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kufta, R.J.

    1997-12-31

    Many methods of flow measurement require direct contact with the hot dirty gases, resulting in high maintenance costs and potential unreliability. The CODEL Model 502 Flow Monitors utilize an infra-red cross-correlation technique which requires no contact with the flue gases. The method resembles flow measurement with chemical dye or radio-active tracers, where the velocity is derived from the transport time of the tracer between two measuring points a known distance apart. However, instead of an artificial tracer being added, the naturally occurring fluctuations of the infra-red energy in the gas stream are used as the tracer. Fully purged transducers with no moving components make the system highly reliable and minimize maintenance requirements. The instrument is ideally suited to monitoring the flow rate of hot, dirty gases.

  8. Flatbands under correlated perturbations.

    PubMed

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i)states are expelled from the FB energy E_{FB}, (ii)the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ??1/ln(E-E_{FB}), (iii)the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv)mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at E_{FB}. Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions. PMID:25526142

  9. Surface topography, nano-mechanics and secondary structure of wheat gluten pretreated by alternate dual-frequency ultrasound and the correlation to enzymolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Bei; Zhou, Cunshan; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Xu, Kangkang; Ma, Haile; Ye, Xiaofei; Abdualrahman, Mohammed A Y

    2016-07-01

    The effects of alternate dual-frequency ultrasound (ADFU) pretreatment on the degree of hydrolysis (DH) of wheat gluten (WG) and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity were investigated in this research. The surface topography, nano-mechanics and secondary structure of WG were also determined using atomic force microscope (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD). The correlations of ACE inhibitory activity and DH with surface topography, nano-mechanics and secondary structure of WG were determined using Pearson's correlation analysis. The results showed that with an increase in either pretreatment duration or power, the ACE inhibitory activity of the hydrolysate also increases, reaching maximum at 10min and 150W/L, respectively, and then decreases thereafter. Similarly, AFM analysis showed that as the pretreatment duration or power increases, the surface roughness also increase and again a decrease occurs thereafter. As the pretreatment duration or power increased, the Young's modulus and adhesion of WG also increased and then declined. Young's modulus and adhesions average values were compared with ACE inhibitory activity reversely. The result of the CD spectra analysis exhibited losses in the relative percentage of α-helix of WG. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that the average values of Young's modulus and the relative percentage of α-helix correlated with ACE inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates linearly and significantly (P<0.05); the relative percentage of β-sheet correlated linearly with DH of WG significantly (P<0.05). In conclusion, ADFU pretreatment is an efficient method in proteolysis due to its physical and chemical effect on the Young's modulus, α-helix and β-sheet of WG. PMID:26964949

  10. Correlation between the ganglion cell complex and structural measures of the optic disc and retinal nerve fiber layer in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Bresciani-Battilana, Erica; Teixeira, Ivan C; Barbosa, Diego T Q; Caixeta-Umbelino, Cristiano; Paolera, Maurício D; Kasahara, Niro

    2015-10-01

    To correlate the ganglion cell complex (GCC) parameters with structural measures of the optic nerve head (ONH) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) as evaluated by Fourier-Domain optic coherence tomography (OCT). This retrospective study included patients with glaucoma, ocular hypertensive patients and glaucoma suspects who had previously undergone OCT examination with the RTVue-100. The parameters of GCC (average, superior, inferior, focal loss volume [FLV], global loss volume [GLV]) were correlated with the values of the ONH (cup volume, cup area, horizontal cup-to-disk ratio, vertical cup-to-disk ratio, and rim area) and RNFL (average, superior, and inferior) using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The sample included 74 eyes of 37 patients. All correlations between GCC parameters and RNFL were strong (r > 0.60). The correlation between GCC parameters and ONH were good for most parameters, except that for FLV and cup volume (r = 0.13), GLV and cup volume (r = 0.09), and GLV and cup area (r = 0.21). The GCC parameters can be used as structural measures of the glaucomatous optic neuropathy. PMID:25183459

  11. Correlations of unfavorable movement characteristics in warmblood foals and mares with routinely assessed conformation and performance traits.

    PubMed

    Becker, A-C; Stock, K F; Distl, O

    2013-01-01

    New movement traits reflecting unfavorable movement characteristics were defined on the basis of detailed movement evaluations (DME) of warmblood foals and mares performed in connection with regular breeding events of the Oldenburg horse breeding societies in 2009 and 2010. DME information was available for 3374 foals and 2844 mares and used for correlation analyses with conformation information on 1987 mares from studbook inspections (SBI) in 2009 and performance information on 2758 mares from mare performance tests (MPT) in 2000 to 2008. Analyses of variance revealed few significant differences between scores for SBI and MPT traits in mares without and with indications of imbalance (IMB) in general or specific findings like irregular tail tone or posture (TTP). SBI scores for general impression and development were significantly lower and MPT scores for trot under rider tended to be higher in IMB-positive mares. Genetic parameters were estimated in linear animal models with residual maximum likelihood. Additive genetic correlations and Pearson correlation coefficients between univariately predicted breeding values indicated unfavorable genetic correlations of IMB and TTP with dressage-related conformation and performance traits. For SBI and MPT traits, we found similarities between the correlation patterns for DME traits in foals and mares. The results implied that breeding of dressage horses may benefit from revision of current movement evaluation and consideration of specific movement characteristics. PMID:23031204

  12. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width is Independently Correlated With Diurnal QTc Variation in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanmin; Xiao, Qiang; Zeng, Wei; Guo, Huimei; Jiang, Ke; Zhong, Ming; Zhong, Jingquan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and diurnal corrected QT (QTc) variation in patients with coronary heart disease. This retrospective study included 203 patients who underwent coronary angiography between February 2013 and June 2014. RDW values and dynamic electrocardiography (Holter) results were collected to investigate the relationship between RDW and diurnal QTc variation. Patients were separated into three groups (A, B, and C) by binning their RDW values in an ascending order. RDW values, coronary artery scores and diurnal QTc variations were significantly different among these groups (P < 0.05). While coronary artery scores gradually rose with increased RDW, diurnal QTc variation decreased. Pearson's correlation analysis was applied to control for confounding factors, and multiple correlation analysis showed that coronary artery score was positively correlated with RDW (r = 0.130, P = 0.020), while it was not correlated with the diurnal QTc variation (r = −0.226, P = 0.681). RDW was negatively correlated with diurnal QTc variation (r = −0.197, P = 0.035). RDW is independently associated with diurnal QTc variation in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26061304

  13. COBAS() TaqMan() MTB, smear positivity grade and MGIT culture; correlation analyses of three methods for bacillary quantification.

    PubMed

    Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Kato, Tomoko; Takaki, Akiko; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yuka; Izumi, Kiyohiko; Yi, Lina; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the cycle threshold (Ct) value of the COBAS() TaqMan() MTB (TaqMan MTB), the mycobacterial smear positivity grade, and the time to detection (TTD) in the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) for quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). For 57 sputum samples, significant correlations were observed between the Ct value, the smear positivity grade, and the MGIT TTD (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient: rs=-0.940, P<0.001 and Pearson's correlation coefficient: rp=0.737, P<0.001). In addition, a correlation was observed between the number of bacteria estimated based on the smear positivity grade and the number of MTB bacilli calculated by the Ct value (rs=0.930, P<0.001). This study has demonstrated the possible estimation of the smear positivity grade and MGIT TTD using the Ct value of TaqMan MTB, which is based on a real-time PCR system, for diagnostic samples. PMID:26527538

  14. Magnitude correlations in global seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlis, N. V.

    2011-08-15

    By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

  15. Standard Errors for Matrix Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogasawara, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Derives the asymptotic standard errors and intercorrelations for several matrix correlations assuming multivariate normality for manifest variables and derives the asymptotic standard errors of the matrix correlations for two factor-loading matrices. (SLD)

  16. Lagged correlation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curme, Chester

    Technological advances have provided scientists with large high-dimensional datasets that describe the behaviors of complex systems: from the statistics of energy levels in complex quantum systems, to the time-dependent transcription of genes, to price fluctuations among assets in a financial market. In this environment, where it may be difficult to infer the joint distribution of the data, network science has flourished as a way to gain insight into the structure and organization of such systems by focusing on pairwise interactions. This work focuses on a particular setting, in which a system is described by multivariate time series data. We consider time-lagged correlations among elements in this system, in such a way that the measured interactions among elements are asymmetric. Finally, we allow these interactions to be characteristically weak, so that statistical uncertainties may be important to consider when inferring the structure of the system. We introduce a methodology for constructing statistically validated networks to describe such a system, extend the methodology to accommodate interactions with a periodic component, and show how consideration of bipartite community structures in these networks can aid in the construction of robust statistical models. An example of such a system is a financial market, in which high frequency returns data may be used to describe contagion, or the spreading of shocks in price among assets. These data provide the experimental testing ground for our methodology. We study NYSE data from both the present day and one decade ago, examine the time scales over which the validated lagged correlation networks exist, and relate differences in the topological properties of the networks to an increasing economic efficiency. We uncover daily periodicities in the validated interactions, and relate our findings to explanations of the Epps Effect, an empirical phenomenon of financial time series. We also study bipartite community structures in networks composed of market returns and news sentiment signals for 40 countries. We compare the degrees to which markets anticipate news, and news anticipate markets, and use the community structures to construct a recommender system for inputs to prediction models. Finally, we complement this work with novel investigations of the exogenous news items that may drive the financial system using topic models. This includes an analysis of how investors and the general public may interact with these news items using Internet search data, and how the diversity of stories in the news both responds to and influences market movements.

  17. Liquid-Crystal Optical Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1989-01-01

    Optical correlator uses commercially-available liquid-crystal television (LCTV) screen as spatial light modulator. Correlations with this device done at video frame rates, making such operations as bar-code recognition possible at reasonable cost. With further development, such correlator useful in automation, robotic vision, and optical image processing.

  18. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PMID:25314367

  19. Frontotemporal Dementia: Clinicopathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Mark S.; Farmer, Jennifer; Johnson, Julene K.; Clark, Christopher M.; Arnold, Steven E.; Coslett, H. Branch; Chatterjee, Anjan; Hurtig, Howard I.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Rosen, Howard J.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Miller, Bruce L.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Grossman, Murray

    2009-01-01

    Objective Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is characterized by impairments in social, behavioral, and/or language function, but postmortem studies indicate that multiple neuropathological entities lead to FTLD. This study assessed whether specific clinical features predict the underlying pathology. Methods A clinicopathological correlation was performed on 90 consecutive patients with a pathological diagnosis of frontotemporal dementia and was compared with an additional 24 cases accrued during the same time period with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD, but with pathology not typically associated with frontotemporal dementia. Results Postmortem examination showed multiple pathologies including tauopathies (46%), FTLD with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (29%), and Alzheimer’s disease (17%). The pathological groups manifested some distinct demographic, clinical, and neuropsychological features, although these attributes showed only a statistical association with the underlying pathology. FTLD with ubiquitin-positive inclusions was more likely to present with both social and language dysfunction, and motor neuron disease was more likely to emerge in these patients. Tauopathies were more commonly associated with an extrapyramidal disorder. Alzheimer’s disease was associated with relatively greater deficits in memory and executive function. Interpretation Clinical and neuropsychological features contribute to delineating the spectrum of pathology underlying a patient diagnosed with FTLD, but biomarkers are needed that, together with the clinical phenotype, can predict the underlying neuropathology. PMID:16718704

  20. Organochlorine compound residues in the eggs of broad-snouted caimans (Caiman latirostris) and correlation with measures of reproductive performance.

    PubMed

    Stoker, C; Repetti, M R; García, S R; Zayas, M A; Galoppo, G H; Beldoménico, H R; Luque, E H; Muñoz-de-Toro, M

    2011-06-01

    Organochlorine compounds (OCCs), like pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are persistent lipophilic chemicals classified as endocrine-disruptors. Caiman latirostris inhabits wetlands throughout north-eastern Argentina and may accumulate OCCs. The aims of this study were to determine OCC residues in the eggs of C. latirostris and to correlate OCC burden with clutch size, hatching success and hatchling survival as measures of reproductive performance. Fourteen caiman clutches were harvested from sites with different degrees of anthropogenic intervention on wetlands surrounding Paraná River tributaries. Two to four eggs by clutch were used to quantify OCCs. OCP residues were found in all clutches. The principal contributors to the OCPs burden were the DDT family (range BDL-153.0 ng g(-1) lipid) and oxychlordane (range BDL-34.3 ng g(-1) lipid). PCBs were present in 92.9% of the clutches (range BDL-136.6 ng g(-1) lipid). Both higher concentrations and higher diversity of pesticides, including endosulfan sulfate, were found in the nests harvested close to croplands. A negative correlation was found between clutch size and ∑OCCs (p=0.02, Pearson r=-0.53, r(2)=0.28), mainly due to the ∑OCPs (p=0.04, Pearson r=-0.54, r(2)=0.30). Since egg OCCs concentrations predict maternal burden, present findings suggest that higher OCCs exposure could lead to smaller clutches. Although, other factors like mother age could influence clutch size. Additionally, as caimans are a long-lived and non-migratory species, the maternal OCCs burden reflects the environmental status throughout their home range; thus, caiman eggs could be useful as a biomonitor of local contamination. PMID:21531435

  1. A sensitive and selective HPLC method for estimation of lamotrigine in human plasma and saliva: application to plasma-saliva correlation in epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Mallayasamy, Surulivel Rajan; Arumugamn, Karthik; Jain, Tarun; Rajakannan, Thiyagu; Bhat, Krishnamurthy; Gurumadhavrao, Padma; Devarakonda, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive and selective high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed and validated for estimation of lamotrigine (CAS 84057-84-1) in human plasma and saliva. The chromatographic separation was achieved with a reversed phase column and a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 20 mM ammonium acetate buffer pH 6.5 (30:70) with a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The calibration curve was linear within the working range for both plasma and saliva. The validated method has been successfully applied for a study of lamotrigine in human plasma and saliva to establish the correlation between these two matrices. A scatter plot of plasma versus salivary lamotrigine concentrations showed a gold linear relationship between them (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.6832, p < 0.001). PMID:21125809

  2. Direct measure of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-shui; Zhao, Haiqing

    2011-12-15

    The quantumness of the correlation known as quantum correlation is usually measured by quantum discord. So far various quantum discords can be roughly understood as indirect measure by some special discrepancy of two quantities. We present a direct measure of quantum correlation by revealing the difference between the structures of classically and quantum correlated states. Our measure explicitly includes the contributions of the inseparability and local nonorthogonality of the eigenvectors of a density matrix. Besides its relatively easy computability, our measure can provide a unified understanding of quantum correlation of all the present versions.

  3. Are secular correlations between sunspots, geomagnetic activity, and global temperature significant?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Mursula, K.; Tsai, V.C.; Perkins, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have led to speculation that solar-terrestrial interaction, measured by sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, has played an important role in global temperature change over the past century or so. We treat this possibility as an hypothesis for testing. We examine the statistical significance of cross-correlations between sunspot number, geomagnetic activity, and global surface temperature for the years 1868-2008, solar cycles 11-23. The data contain substantial autocorrelation and nonstationarity, properties that are incompatible with standard measures of cross-correlational significance, but which can be largely removed by averaging over solar cycles and first-difference detrending. Treated data show an expected statistically- significant correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, Pearson p < 10-4, but correlations between global temperature and sunspot number (geomagnetic activity) are not significant, p = 0.9954, (p = 0.8171). In other words, straightforward analysis does not support widely-cited suggestions that these data record a prominent role for solar-terrestrial interaction in global climate change. With respect to the sunspot-number, geomagnetic-activity, and global-temperature data, three alternative hypotheses remain difficult to reject: (1) the role of solar-terrestrial interaction in recent climate change is contained wholly in long-term trends and not in any shorter-term secular variation, or, (2) an anthropogenic signal is hiding correlation between solar-terrestrial variables and global temperature, or, (3) the null hypothesis, recent climate change has not been influenced by solar-terrestrial interaction. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Impact and correlation of environmental conditions on pollen counts in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Anjum; Khan, Muneeba; Zeb, Shaista; Imam, Asif Ali

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative and qualitative survey of airborne pollen was performed in the city of Karachi, and the pollen counts were correlated with different climatic conditions. The aim of the study was to determine the possible effect of meteorological factors on airborne pollen distribution in the atmosphere of Karachi city. Pollen sampling was carried out by using Burkard spore Trap for the period of August 2009 to July 2010, and a total of 2,922 pollen grains/m(3) were recorded. In this survey, 22 pollen types were recognized. The highest pollen count was contributed by Poaceae pollen type (1,242 pollen grains/m(3)) followed by Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae (948 pollen grains/m(3)), Cyperus rotundus (195 pollen grains/m(3)) and Prosopis juliflora (169 pollen grains/m(3)). Peak pollen season was in August showing a total of 709 pollen grains/m(3) and lowest pollen count was observed in January-2010. Pearson's chi-square test was performed for the possible correlation of pollen counts and climatic factors. The test revealed significant positive correlation of wind speed with pollen types of Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae; Brassica campestris; Asteraceae; and Thuja orientalis. While the correlation of "average temperature" showed significant positive value with Asteraceae and Tamarix indica pollen types. Negative correlation was observed between humidity/ precipitation and pollen types of Brassica campestris; Daucus carota; Ephedra sp.; and Tamarix indica. In the light of above updated data one could identify various aeroallergens present in the air of Karachi city. PMID:25530143

  5. Midwifery and Nursing Students’ Communication Skills and Life Orientation: Correlation with Stress Coping Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Gülsün; Kaya, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methods learnt by nursing and midwifery students’ such as communication skills, optimisim and coping with stress would be used in their profeesional life. It is very important to promote their positive thinking and communication skills to raise coping with stress. Objectives: This cross sectional study was performed to examine the nursing and midwifery students’ communication skills and optimistic life orientation and its correlation with coping strategies with stress. Materials and Methods: The study population included 2572 students who were studying in departments of nursing and midwifery in Istanbul. The sample was included 1419 students. Three questionnaires including Communication Skills Test, Life Orientation Test and Ways of Coping Inventory were used for data collection. The data were evaluated by calculating frequency, percentage, arithmetic mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Students’ total mean score from the Communication Skills Scale was 165.27 ± 15.39 and for the Life Orientation Test was 18.51 ± 4.54. There was a positive correlation between their Life Orientation scores and the scores for self confidence (r = 0.34, P < 0.001), optimistic approach (r = 0.42, P < 0.001), and seeking social help (r = 0.17, P < 0.001). Also there was a significant positive correlation between Communication skill scores and self confidence (r = 0.46, P < 0.001), optimistic (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) and seeking social help approaches (r = 0.29, P < 0.001), but there was a significant negative correlation between communication skill scores and scores for helpless (r = -0.29, P < 0.001) and submissive approaches (r = -0.36, P < 0.001). Conclusions: As scores of students in optimistic life orientation and communication skills increased self confidence approach, optimistic, and social support seeking scores increased, whereas helpless, and submissive scores decreased. PMID:25414859

  6. Correlations Between Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma and Other Cancers: An Ecological Study in Forty European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Pablo Fernandez-Crehuet; Serrano, Jose Luis Fernandez-Crehuet; Allam, Mohamed Farouk; Navajas, Rafael Fernandez-Crehuet

    2016-01-01

    Background: The presence of noncutaneous neoplasms does not seem to increase the risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma; however, it seems to be associated with the development of other hematological, brain, breast, uterine, and prostatic neoplasms. An ecological transversal study was conducted to study the geographic association between cutaneous malignant melanoma and 24 localizations of cancer in forty European countries. Methods: Cancer incidence rates were extracted from GLOBOCAN database of the International Agency for Research on Cancer. We analyzed the age-adjusted and gender-stratified incidence rates for different localizations of cancer in forty European countries and calculated their correlation using Pearson's correlation test. Results: In males, significant correlations were found between cutaneous malignant melanoma with testicular cancer (r = 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.68–0.89]), myeloma (r = 0.68 [95% CI: 0.46–0.81]), prostatic carcinoma (r = 0.66 [95% CI: 0.43–0.80]), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (r = 0.63 [95% CI: 0.39–0.78]). In females, significant correlations were found between cutaneous malignant melanoma with breast cancer (r = 0.80 [95% CI: 0.64–0.88]), colorectal cancer (r = 0.72 [95% CI: 0.52–0.83]), and NHL (r = 0.71 [95% CI: 0.50–0.83]). Conclusions: These correlations call to conduct new studies about the epidemiology of cancer in general and cutaneous malignant melanoma risk factors in particular. PMID:27217938

  7. Allowing for Correlations between Correlations in Random-Effects Meta-Analysis of Correlation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevost, A. Toby; Mason, Dan; Griffin, Simon; Kinmonth, Ann-Louise; Sutton, Stephen; Spiegelhalter, David

    2007-01-01

    Practical meta-analysis of correlation matrices generally ignores covariances (and hence correlations) between correlation estimates. The authors consider various methods for allowing for covariances, including generalized least squares, maximum marginal likelihood, and Bayesian approaches, illustrated using a 6-dimensional response in a series of…

  8. Correlations of correlations: Secondary autocorrelations in finite harmonic systems.

    PubMed

    Plyukhin, Dan; Plyukhin, Alex V

    2015-10-01

    The momentum or velocity autocorrelation function C(t) for a tagged oscillator in a finite harmonic system decays like that of an infinite system for short times, but exhibits erratic behavior at longer time scales. We introduce the autocorrelation function of the long-time noisy tail of C(t) ("a correlation of the correlation"), which characterizes the distribution of recurrence times. Remarkably, for harmonic systems with same-mass particles this secondary correlation may coincide with the primary correlation C(t) (when both functions are normalized) either exactly, or over a significant initial time interval. When the tagged particle is heavier than the rest, the equality does not hold, correlations show nonrandom long-time scale pattern, and higher-order correlations converge to the lowest normal mode. PMID:26565162

  9. Plasma 1,8-cineole correlates with cognitive performance following exposure to rosemary essential oil aroma

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mode of influence of the aromas of plant essential oils on human behaviour is largely unclear. This study was designed to assess the potential pharmacological relationships between absorbed 1,8-cineole following exposure to rosemary aroma, cognitive performance and mood. Methods Twenty healthy volunteers performed serial subtraction and visual information processing tasks in a cubicle diffused with the aroma of rosemary. Mood assessments were made pre and post testing, and venous blood was sampled at the end of the session. Pearson correlations were carried out between serum levels of 1,8-cineole, cognitive performance measures and change in mood scores. Results Here we show for the first time that performance on cognitive tasks is significantly related to concentration of absorbed 1,8-cineole following exposure to rosemary aroma, with improved performance at higher concentrations. Furthermore, these effects were found for speed and accuracy outcomes, indicating that the relationship is not describing a speed–accuracy trade off. The relationships between 1,8-cineole levels and mood were less pronounced, but did reveal a significant negative correlation between change in contentment and plasma 1,8-cineole levels. Conclusion These findings suggest that compounds absorbed from rosemary aroma affect cognition and subjective state independently through different neurochemical pathways. PMID:23983963

  10. Methylation profile of SNRPN gene and its correlation with weight and chronological age.

    PubMed

    Carobin, N V; Rubatino, F V M; Freitas, M L; de Oliveira, V T; Pietra, R X; Bosco, A A; Jehee, F S

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important epigenetic phenomenon, wherein genes or gene clusters are marked by DNA methylation during gametogenesis. This plays a major role in several functions of normal cells, including cell differentiation, X chromosome inactivation, and the maintenance of chromatin structure, in mammalian development. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible differences in SNRPN gene methylation profiles in non-obese and obese individuals, and in children and adults. Our results did not reveal any statistical correlations between the DNA methylation profiles of the SNRPN gene in children or adult obese and non-obese groups. However, a comparison of the methylation levels with the chronological age revealed statistically significant differences between the means of methylation in adults and children (46.20 ± 5.88 and 39.40 ± 2.87, respectively; P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation analysis indicated a positive association between the level of DNA methylation and the chronological age (R2 = 0.326; P < 0.001). Therefore, we concluded that the methylation profile of the SNRPN promoter (in blood) is not a useful biomarker for determining the predisposition of an individual to obesity. Additionally, we have confirmed that SNRPN methylation increases with age, which raises further questions regarding the role of SNRPN expression during the aging process. PMID:26535694

  11. A novel joint sparse partial correlation method for estimating group functional networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyun; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Advances in graph theory have provided a powerful tool to characterize brain networks. In particular, functional networks at group-level have great appeal to gain further insight into complex brain function, and to assess changes across disease conditions. These group networks, however, often have two main limitations. First, they are popularly estimated by directly averaging individual networks that are compromised by confounding variations. Secondly, functional networks have been estimated mainly through Pearson cross-correlation, without taking into account the influence of other regions. In this study, we propose a sparse group partial correlation method for robust estimation of functional networks based on a joint graphical models approach. To circumvent the issue of choosing the optimal regularization parameters, a stability selection method is employed to extract networks. The proposed method is, therefore, denoted as JGMSS. By applying JGMSS across simulated datasets, the resulting networks show consistently higher accuracy and sensitivity than those estimated using an alternative approach (the elastic-net regularization with stability selection, ENSS). The robustness of the JGMSS is evidenced by the independence of the estimated networks to choices of the initial set of regularization parameters. The performance of JGMSS in estimating group networks is further demonstrated with in vivo fMRI data (ASL and BOLD), which show that JGMSS can more robustly estimate brain hub regions at group-level and can better control intersubject variability than it is achieved using ENSS. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1162-1177, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26859311

  12. Is meat quality from Longissimus lumborum samples correlated with other cuts in horse meat?

    PubMed

    De Palo, Pasquale; Maggiolino, Aristide; Centoducati, Pasquale; Milella, Paola; Calzaretti, Giovanna; Tateo, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    The present work aims to investigate if the variation of each parameter in Longissimus lumborum muscle could correspond to the same or to a similar variation of the parameter in the other muscles. The work presents results of Pearson's correlations between Longissimus lumborum samples and other muscle samples, such as Biceps femoris, Rectus femoris, Semimembranosus, Supraspinatus and Semitendinosus in horse meat. A total of 27 male IHDH (Italian Heavy Draught Horse) breed foals were employed. They were slaughtered at 11 months of age and the above-mentioned muscles were sampled. The Longissimus lumborum muscle showed to be representative of other muscles and of the whole carcass for some chemical parameters (moisture, protein and ash) and for some fatty acids profile patterns such as C12:0, C14:0, total monounsaturated fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid, but poor correlations were recorded for intramuscular fat concentration, rheological and colorimetric parameters. Although almost all the qualitative parameters in meat are affected by the anatomical site and by the muscle, the Longissimus lumborum is often not representative in horse meat with regard to modifications of this parameters. PMID:26464235

  13. Human coronary plaque wall thickness correlated positively with flow shear stress and negatively with plaque wall stress: an IVUS-based fluid-structure interaction multi-patient study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture are believed to be associated with mechanical stress conditions. In this paper, patient-specific in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) coronary plaque image data were used to construct computational models with fluid-structure interaction (FSI) and cyclic bending to investigate correlations between plaque wall thickness and both flow shear stress and plaque wall stress conditions. Methods IVUS data were acquired from 10 patients after voluntary informed consent. The X-ray angiogram was obtained prior to the pullback of the IVUS catheter to determine the location of the coronary artery stenosis, vessel curvature and cardiac motion. Cyclic bending was specified in the model representing the effect by heart contraction. 3D anisotropic FSI models were constructed and solved to obtain flow shear stress (FSS) and plaque wall stress (PWS) values. FSS and PWS values were obtained for statistical analysis. Correlations with p < 0.05 were deemed significant. Results Nine out of the 10 patients showed positive correlation between wall thickness and flow shear stress. The mean Pearson correlation r-value was 0.278 ± 0.181. Similarly, 9 out of the 10 patients showed negative correlation between wall thickness and plaque wall stress. The mean Pearson correlation r-value was -0.530 ± 0.210. Conclusion Our results showed that plaque vessel wall thickness correlated positively with FSS and negatively with PWS. The patient-specific IVUS-based modeling approach has the potential to be used to investigate and identify possible mechanisms governing plaque progression and rupture and assist in diagnosis and intervention procedures. This represents a new direction of research. Further investigations using more patient follow-up data are warranted. PMID:24669780

  14. Phenotypic correlations between ovum pick-up in vitro production traits and pregnancy rates in Zebu cows.

    PubMed

    Vega, W H O; Quirino, C R; Serapião, R V; Oliveira, C S; Pacheco, A

    2015-01-01

    The growth of the Gyr breed in Brazil in terms of genetic gain for milk, along with conditions for market, has led to the use of ovum pick-up in vitro production (OPU-IVP) as a leader in biotechnology for the multiplication of genetic material. The aim of this study was to investigate phenotypic correlations between OPU-IVP-linked characteristics and pregnancy rates registered in an embryo transfer program using Gyr cows as oocyte donors. Data collected from 211 OPU sessions and 298 embryo transfers during the years 2012 and 2013 were analyzed and statistical analysis was performed. Estimates of simple Pearson correlations were calculated for NVcoc and PVcoc (number and proportion of viable cumulus-oocyte complexes, respectively); NcleavD4 and PcleavD4 (number and proportion of cleaved embryos on day 4 of culture, respectively); NTembD7 and PTembD7 (number and proportion of transferable embryos on day 7 of culture, respectively); NPrD30 and PPrD30 (number and proportion of pregnancies 30 days after transfer, respectively); and NPrD60 and PPrD60 (number and proportion of pregnancies 60 days after transfer, respectively). Moderate to moderately high correlations were found for all numerical characteristics, suggesting these as the most suitable parameters for selection of oocyte donors in Gyr programs. NVcoc is proposed as a selection trait due to positive correlations with percentage traits and pregnancy rates 30 and 60 days after transfer. PMID:26214412

  15. White matter volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia: a VBM-DARTEL study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the white matter (WM) volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia using voxel-based morphometry. A total of 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. MR image data were processed using SPM8 software with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through an exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm. The patients with schizophrenia showed significant decreases (P=0.042) in the WM volumes of the temporal lobe and superior frontal gyrus compared with the healthy controls. The WM volumes of the middle temporal gyrus were negatively correlated with the scores of both the Positive Subscale (Pearson's ρ=-0.68, P=0.001) and the Negative Subscale (ρ=-0.71, P=0.0005) in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. In addition, the scores of the General Psychopathology Subscale were negatively correlated with the WM volumes of the superior frontal gyrus (ρ=-0.68, P=0.0009). This study evaluated the WM volume of patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls using DARTEI-based voxel-based morphometry and also assessed the correlation of the localized WM volume changes with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. These findings will be useful to understand the neuropathology associated with WM abnormality in schizophrenia. PMID:26485094

  16. Psychosocial and demographic correlates of objectively measured physical activity in structured and unstructured after-school recreation sessions.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Richard R; Welk, Gregory J; Hastmann, Tanis J; Dzewaltowski, David A

    2011-07-01

    Most studies of psychosocial and demographic correlates of physical activity (PA) have examined relationships across various types of physical and social environments, rather than within a specific environmental behavior setting. The objective of this study was to investigate correlates of PA in structured and unstructured after-school recreation sessions. This study is cross-sectional. School records, questionnaires, and anthropometry were used to obtain demographic and psychosocial variables. Third and fourth-grade children (n = 230) from seven schools wore Actigraph GT1M accelerometers up to six times per year during after-school programming. Accelerometer data were processed to determine percentage of time in moderate-to-vigorous PA (T scores, reflective of an individual child's PA level relative to group mean, were computed for each session and averaged across sessions). Pearson correlations, point-biserial correlations, and mixed-model analyses were used to determine significant associations with PA for each session type (structured and unstructured). For structured sessions, gender, PA barriers self-efficacy, and PA enjoyment were significantly related to PA. For unstructured sessions, only gender was related to PA. Despite equivalent opportunities to participate in active recreation, boys were more active than girls, and children varied in PA level partly due to psychosocial factors. Our results showed that PA self-efficacy and enjoyment explained variability in structured PA sessions. PMID:21349765

  17. Nurse Managers’ Work Life Quality and Their Participation in Knowledge Management: A Correlational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Dehnavi, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between quality of work life and participation in knowledge management is unknown. Objectives: This study aimed to discover the association between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management. Materials and Methods: This was a correlational study. All nurse managers (71 people) from 11 hospitals affiliated with the Social Security Organization in Tehran, Iran, were included. They were asked to rate their participation in knowledge management and their quality of work life. Data was gathered by a researcher-made questionnaire (May-June 2012). The questionnaire was validated by content and construct validity approaches. Cronbach’s alpha was used to evaluate reliability. Finally, 50 questionnaires were analyzed. The answers were scored and analyzed using mean of scores, T-test, ANOVA (or nonparametric test, if appropriate), Pearson’s correlation coefficient and linear regression. Results: Nurse managers’ performance to implement knowledge management strategies was moderate. A significant correlation was found between quality of work life of nurse managers and their participation in implementing knowledge management strategies (r = 0.82; P < 0.001). The strongest correlations were found between implementation of knowledge management and participation of nurse managers in decision making (r = 0.82; P < 0.001). Conclusions: Improvement of nurse managers’ work life quality, especially in decision-making, may increase their participation in implementing knowledge management. PMID:25763267

  18. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  19. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  20. Closed sets of nonlocal correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Allcock, Jonathan; Linden, Noah; Brunner, Nicolas; Popescu, Sandu; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Vertesi, Tamas

    2009-12-15

    We present a fundamental concept - closed sets of correlations - for studying nonlocal correlations. We argue that sets of correlations corresponding to information-theoretic principles, or more generally to consistent physical theories, must be closed under a natural set of operations. Hence, studying the closure of sets of correlations gives insight into which information-theoretic principles are genuinely different, and which are ultimately equivalent. This concept also has implications for understanding why quantum nonlocality is limited, and for finding constraints on physical theories beyond quantum mechanics.

  1. Why Are Experts Correlated? Decomposing Correlations between Judges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broomell, Stephen B.; Budescu, David V.

    2009-01-01

    We derive an analytic model of the inter-judge correlation as a function of five underlying parameters. Inter-cue correlation and the number of cues capture our assumptions about the environment, while differentiations between cues, the weights attached to the cues, and (un)reliability describe assumptions about the judges. We study the relative…

  2. Improved Correlation of Strain Indices with Cognitive Dysfunction with Inclusion of Adventitial Layer with Carotid Plaque.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Mitchell, C C; Varghese, T; Jackson, D C; Rocque, B G; Hermann, B P; Dempsey, R J

    2016-05-01

    Plaque instability may lead to chronic embolization, which in turn may contribute to progressive cognitive decline. Accumulated strain tensor indices over a cardiac cycle within a pulsating carotid plaque may be viable biomarkers for the diagnosis of plaque instability. Using plaque-only carotid artery segmentations, we recently demonstrated that impaired cognitive function correlated significantly with maximum axial and lateral strain indices within a localized region of interest in plaque. Inclusion of the adventitial layer focuses our strain or instability measures on the vessel wall-plaque interface hypothesized to be a region with increased shearing forces and measureable instability. A hierarchical block-matching motion tracking algorithm developed in our laboratory was used to estimate accumulated axial, lateral, and shear strain distribution in plaques identified with the plaque-with-adventitia segmentation. Correlations of strain indices to the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status Total score were performed and compared with previous results. Overall, correlation coefficients (r) and significance (p) values improved for axial, lateral, and shear strain indices. Shear strain indices, however, demonstrated the largest improvement. The Pearson correlation coefficients for maximum shear strain and cognition improved from the previous plaque-only analyses of -0.432 and -0.345 to -0.795 and -0.717 with the plaque-with-adventitia segmentation for the symptomatic group and for all patients combined, respectively. Our results demonstrate the advantage of including adventitia for ultrasound carotid strain imaging providing improved association to parameters assessing cognitive impairment in patients. This supports theories of the importance of the vessel wall plaque interface in the pathophysiology of embolic disease. PMID:26025578

  3. Correlation of transcriptomic responses and metal bioaccumulation in Mytilus edulis L. reveals early indicators of stress.

    PubMed

    Poynton, Helen C; Robinson, William E; Blalock, Bonnie J; Hannigan, Robyn E

    2014-10-01

    Marine biomonitoring programs in the U.S. and Europe have historically relied on monitoring tissue concentrations of bivalves to monitor contaminant levels and ecosystem health. By integrating 'omic methods with these tissue residue approaches we can uncover mechanistic insight to link tissue concentrations to potential toxic effects. In an effort to identify novel biomarkers and better understand the molecular toxicology of metal bioaccumulation in bivalves, we exposed the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L., to sub-lethal concentrations (0.54 μM) of cadmium, lead, and a Cd+Pb mixture. Metal concentrations were measured in gill tissues at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and increased linearly over the 4 week duration. In addition, there was evidence that Pb interfered with Cd uptake in the mixture treatment. Using a 3025 sequence microarray for M. edulis, we performed transcriptomic analysis, identifying 57 differentially expressed sequences. Hierarchical clustering of these sequences successfully distinguished the different treatment groups demonstrating that the expression profiles were reproducible among the treatments. Enrichment analysis of gene ontology terms identified several biological processes that were perturbed by the treatments, including nucleoside phosphate biosynthetic processes, mRNA metabolic processes, and response to stress. To identify transcripts whose expression level correlated with metal bioaccumulation, we performed Pearson correlation analysis. Several transcripts correlated with gill metal concentrations including mt10, mt20, and contig 48, an unknown transcript containing a wsc domain. In addition, three transcripts directly involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) were induced in the metal treatments at 2 weeks and were further up-regulated at 4 weeks. Overall, correlation of tissue concentrations and gene expression responses indicates that as mussels accumulate higher concentrations of metals, initial stress responses are mobilized to protect tissues. However, given the role of UPR in apoptosis, it serves as an early indicator of stress, which once overwhelmed will result in adverse physiological effects. PMID:25016106

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN METAL-CERAMIC BOND STRENGTH AND COEFFICIENT OF LINEAR THERMAL EXPANSION DIFFERENCE

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Stella Crosara; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS) of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics) and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs) of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB) Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2), Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P), Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I) and Duceram (D) ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length) made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length) of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01) for the MCBS test results (MPa), with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72) than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10-6 °C-1) differences were: VBI (0.54), VBD (1.33), VB2I (-0.14), VB2D (0.63), PI (1.84) and PD (2.62). Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17) was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs. PMID:19274398

  5. Correlations between trans-membrane pressure (TMP) and sludge properties in submerged membrane electro-bioreactor (SMEBR) and conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shadi W; Elektorowicz, Maria; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2012-09-01

    The influence of sludge properties in SMEBR and conventional MBR pilot systems on membrane fouling was investigated. Generated data were analyzed using statistical analysis Pearson's product momentum correlation coefficient (r(p)). Analysis showed that TMP had strong direct (r(p)=0.9182) and inverse (r(p)=-0.9205) correlations to mean particle size diameter in MBR and SMEBR, respectively. TMP in SMEBR had a strong direct correlation to the sludge mixed liquor suspended solids concentration (MLSS) (r(p)=0.7757) while a weak direct correlation (r(p)=0.1940) was observed in MBR. SMEBR showed a moderate inverse correlation (r(p)=-0.6118) between TMP and soluble carbohydrates (EPS(c)) and a very weak direct correlation (r(p)=0.3448) to soluble proteins (EPS(p)). Conversely, EPS(p) in MBR had more significant impact (r(p)=0.4856) on membrane fouling than EPS(c) (r(p)=0.3051). The results provide insight into optimization of operational conditions in SMEBR system to overcome membrane fouling. PMID:22797086

  6. Deep pain sensitivity is correlated with oral-health-related quality of life but not with prosthetic factors in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Costa, Yuri Martins; Porporatti, André Luís; Hilgenberg-Sydney, Priscila Brenner; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Low pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) is considered a risk factor for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and is influenced by psychological variables. Objectives To correlate deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles with prosthetic factors and Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in completely edentulous subjects. Material and Methods A total of 29 complete denture wearers were recruited. The variables were: a) Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) of the masseter and temporalis; b) retention, stability, and tooth wear of dentures; c) Vertical Dimension of Occlusion (VDO); d) Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) adapted to orofacial pain. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficient, the Spearman Rank correlation coefficient, the Point-Biserial correlation coefficient, and the Bonferroni correction (α=1%) were applied to the data. Results The mean age (standard deviation) of the participants was of 70.1 years (9.5) and 82% of them were females. There were no significant correlations with prosthetic factors, but significant negative correlations were found between the OHIP and the PPT of the anterior temporalis (r=-0.50, 95% CI-0.73 to 0.17, p=0.005). Discussion The deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles in complete dentures wearers is associated with OHRQoL, but not with prosthetic factors. PMID:26814457

  7. Polarization correlations of Dirac particles

    SciTech Connect

    Caban, Pawel; Dziegielewska, Agnieszka; Karmazyn, Anna; Okrasa, Malgorzata

    2010-03-15

    We calculate the polarization correlation function in the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type experiments with relativistic spin-1/2 particles. This function depends monotonically on the particle momenta. Moreover, we also show that the polarization correlation function violates the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality and the degree of this violation can depend on the particle momenta and the motion of observers.

  8. Correlation filters for orientation estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya; Lee, Andrew J.; Connelly, James M.

    1988-01-01

    An important task in many vision applications is that of rapidly estimating the orientation of an object with respect to some frame of reference. Because of their speed and parallel processing capabilities, optical correlators should prove valuable in this application. This paper considers two algorithms for object orientation estimation based on optical correlations and presents some initial simulation results.

  9. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  10. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  11. Personality Correlates of Polydrug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Dean G.; And Others

    Although the personality correlates of heroin addiction, LSD use, and marijuana smoking have been frequently investigated, relatively few data are available to describe the personality or lifestyle variables correlated with the pattern of polydrug abuse. In an attempt to gather such information, 17 polydrug users, selected from a group of 224…

  12. Optical Correlator Performs Novelty Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan Tsuen-Hsi; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1994-01-01

    Experimental real-time optical correlator performs correlation and novelty filtering in photorefractive crystal. Crystal oriented enabling cross-polarization diffraction: together with polarizing beam splitter, increases signal-to-noise ratio. Laser and optical components expand, collimate, and divide laser beam.

  13. Generalized Constrained Canonical Correlation Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio; Hwang, Heungsun

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a method for generalized constrained canonical correlation analysis (GCCANO) that incorporates external information on both rows and columns of data matrices. In this method, each set of variables is first decomposed into the sum of several submatrices according to the external information, and then canonical correlation analysis is…

  14. Correlations between corneal and optic nerve head variables in healthy subjects and patients with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Jañez, Luis; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Berrozpe-Villabona, Clara; Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose Maria; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Garcia-Sanchez, Julian; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To correlate corneal variables (determined using the Pentacam) with optic nerve head (ONH) variables determined using the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) in healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Measurements were made in 75 healthy eyes and 73 eyes with POAG and correlations examined through Pearson correlation coefficients between the two sets of variables in the two subject groups. The corneal variables determined were corneal volume (CVol), central corneal thickness (CCT), overall corneal thickness (OvCT), the mean thickness of a circular zone centered at the corneal apex of 1 mm radius (zone I) and the mean thickness of several concentric rings, also centered at the apex until the limbus, each of 1 mm width (zones II to VI respectively). The ONH variables were determined using the HRT. RESULTS The following pairs of variables were correlated in the control group: CCT-disc area (DAr) (-0.48; P<0.0001), Zone I-DAr (-0.503; P<0.0001) and Zone II-DAr (-0.443; P<0.0001); and in the POAG group: CCT-cup-to-disc area ratio (CDRa) (-0.402; P<0.0001), Zone I-CDRa (-0.418; P<0.0001), Zone II-CDRa (-0.405; P=0.006), Zone I-cup shape measure (CSM) (-0.415; P=0.002), Zone II-CSM (-0.405; P=0.001), Zone IV-height variation contour (HVC) (0.378; P=0.002); Zone V-HVC (0.388, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In the healthy subjects, significant negative correlation was detected between central and paracentral corneal thickness and optic disc area. In contrast, the POAG patients showed significant negative correlation between central and paracentral corneal thickness and the cup-disc ratio and CSM, and positive correlation between peripheral corneal thickness and HVC. PMID:26682165

  15. Correlated Oxide Physics and Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, J. H.; Walker, F. J.; Ahn, C. H.

    2014-07-01

    Transition metal oxides exhibit a range of correlated phenomena with applications to novel electronic devices that possess remarkable functionalities. This article reviews recent progress in elucidating both mechanisms that govern correlated behavior in transition metal oxides and advancements in device fabrication that have enabled strong correlations to be controlled through applied electric fields. Advancements in the growth of transition-metal-oxide films and artificial heterostructures have enabled superconductivity, magnetism, and metal-insulator transitions to be controlled in cuprates, manganites, and vanadates by using the electric field effect. In addition, interfaces between transition metal oxides have recently emerged as a setting in which strong correlations can be manipulated in two dimensions to realize unusual quantum-ordered phases. Finally, key relationships between structure and transport in ultrathin films of transition metal oxides have been elucidated. Coupling the structural degrees of freedom in oxides to applied electric fields thus opens new pathways to control correlated behavior in devices.

  16. Medial thalamic 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock correlates with subsequent learned helpless behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione,M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Schulz, D.; Dewey, S.L.; Henn, F.A.

    2009-12-06

    The learned helplessness paradigm has been repeatedly shown to correlate with neurobiological aspects of depression in humans. In this model, rodents are exposed inescapable foot-shock in order to reveal susceptibility to escape deficit, defined as 'learned helplessness' (LH). Few methods are available to probe the neurobiological aspects underlying the differences in susceptibility in the living animal, thus far being limited to studies examining regional neurochemical changes with microdialysis. With the widespread implementation of small animal neuroimaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), it is now possible to explore the living brain on a systems level to define regional changes that may correlate with vulnerability to stress. In this study, 12 wild type Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 minutes of inescapable foot-shock followed by metabolic imaging using 2-deoxy-2[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) 1 hour later. The escape test was performed on these rats 48 hours later (to accommodate radiotracer decay), where they were given the opportunity to press a lever to shut off the shock. A region of interest (ROI) analysis was used to investigate potential correlations (Pearson Regression Coefficients) between regional 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock and subsequent learned helpless behavior (time to finish the test; number of successful lever presses within 20 seconds of shock onset). ROI analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between time to finish and 18-FDG uptake, and a negative correlation between lever presses and uptake, in the medial thalamic area (p=0.033, p=0.036). This ROI included the paraventricular thalamus, mediodorsal thalamus, and the habenula. In an effort to account for possible spillover artifact, the posterior thalamic area (including ventral medial and lateral portions) was also evaluated but did not reveal significant correlations (p=0.870, p=0.897). No other significant correlations were found in additional regions analyzed including the nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, substantia nigra, and amygdala. These data suggest that medial thalamic 18-FDG uptake during inescapable shock may contribute to subsequent escape deficits, and are not confounded by shock effects per se, since all animals received the same treatment prior to scanning. We have previously explored 18-FDG differences following the escape test session which also showed hyperactivity in the medial thalamus of learned helpless animals compared to non-learned helpless, and included additional cortical-limbic changes. Given the neuroanatomical connections between the medial thalamus (and habenula) with the prefrontal cortex and monoaminergic brain stem, one possible speculation is that abnormal neuronal activity in these areas during stress may set in motion circuitry changes that correlate with learned helpless behavior.

  17. Correlations Between Echocardiographic Systolic and Diastolic Function with Cardiac Catheterization in Biventricular Congenital Heart Patients.

    PubMed

    Nadorlik, H; Stiver, C; Khan, S; Miao, Y; Holzer, R; Cheatham, J P; Cua, C L

    2016-04-01

    Newer echocardiographic techniques may allow for more accurate assessment of left ventricular (LV) function. Adult studies have correlated these echocardiographic measurements with invasive data, but minimal data exist in the pediatric congenital heart population. Purpose of this study was to evaluate which echocardiographic measurements correlated best with LV systolic and diastolic catheterization parameters. Patients with two-ventricle physiology who underwent simultaneous echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization were included. Images were obtained in the four-chamber view. LV systolic echocardiographic data included ejection fraction, displacement, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) s' wave, global longitudinal strain, and strain rate (SR) s' wave. Diastolic echocardiographic data included mitral E and A waves, TDI e' and a' waves, and SRe' and SRa' waves. E/TDI e', TDI e'/TDI a', E/SRe', and SRe'/SRa' ratios were also calculated. Catheterization dP/dt was used as a marker for systolic function, and LV end-diastolic pressure (EDP) was used as a marker for diastolic function. Correlations of the echocardiographic and catheterization values were performed using Pearson correlation. Twenty-nine patients were included (14 females, 15 males). Median age at catheterization was 3.4 years (0.04-17.4 years). dP/dt was 1258 ± 353 mmHg/s, and LVEDP was 10.8 ± 2.4 mmHg. There were no significant correlations between catheterization dP/dt and systolic echocardiographic parameters. LVEDP correlated significantly with SRe' (r = -0.4, p = 0.03), SRa' (r = -0.4, p = 0.03), and E/SRe' (r = 0.5, p = 0.004). In pediatric congenital heart patients, catheterization dP/dt did not correlate with echocardiographic measurements of LV systolic function. Further studies are needed to determine which echocardiographic parameter best describes LV systolic function in this population. Strain rate analysis significantly correlated with LVEDP. Strain rate analysis should be considered as an alternative method to estimate LVEDP in this patient population. PMID:26921064

  18. 25 ns software correlator for photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magatti, Davide; Ferri, Fabio

    2003-02-01

    A 25 ns time resolution, multi-tau software correlator developed in LABVIEW based on the use of a standard photon counting unit, a fast timer/counter board (6602-PCI National Instrument) and a personal computer (PC) (1.5 GHz Pentium 4) is presented and quantitatively discussed. The correlator works by processing the stream of incoming data in parallel according to two different algorithms: For large lag times (τ⩾100 μs), a classical time-mode (TM) scheme, based on the measure of the number of pulses per time interval, is used; differently, for τ⩽100 μs a photon-mode (PM) scheme is adopted and the time sequence of the arrival times of the photon pulses is measured. By combining the two methods, we developed a system capable of working out correlation functions on line, in full real time for the TM correlator and partially in batch processing for the PM correlator. For the latter one, the duty cycle depends on the count rate of the incoming pulses, being ˜100% for count rates ⩽3×104 Hz, ˜15% at 105 Hz, and ˜1% at 106 Hz. For limitations imposed by the fairly small first-in, first-out (FIFO) buffer available on the counter board, the maximum count rate permissible for a proper functioning of the PM correlator is limited to ˜105 Hz. However, this limit can be removed by using a board with a deeper FIFO. Similarly, the 25 ns time resolution is only limited by maximum clock frequency available on the 6602-PCI and can be easily improved by using a faster clock. When tested on dilute solutions of calibrated latex spheres, the overall performances of the correlator appear to be comparable with those of commercial hardware correlators, but with several nontrivial advantages related to its flexibility, low cost, and easy adaptability to future developments of PC and data acquisition technology.

  19. Correlation transfer: Development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, R. L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Reguigui, N. M.; Dorri-Nowkoorani, F.; Nobbmann, U.

    1994-12-01

    A correlation transfer equation for multiple scattering of light through suspensions of diffusing particles is derived from multiple scattering theory. Because of the formal similarity between the correlation equation and the radiative transfer equation, radiative transport solution techniques are applied to obtain solutions for the field correlation function in isotropic one-dimensional media. A three-term Legendre expansion for the angularly dependent single scattering function (g(sup 1)) in the correlation integral equation is used to obtain approximate numerical solutions for the correlation function. Graphical results are presented for the correlation in both the forward and backward directions for a finite medium and for backscattering in the case of an infinite medium. Experimental results are also presented and they show improved agreement with the three-term Legendre expansion of g(sup 1) as compared to the one or two-term expansions. Correlation transfer results are shown to agree well with both the diffusion limit and the single scattering limit predictions.

  20. Correlation of Palatal Rugoscopy with Gender, Palatal Vault Height and ABO Blood Groups in Three Different Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, KG; Verma, P; Bansal, N; Basavaraju, S; Sachdeva, SK; Khosa, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palatal rugae (PR) are asymmetrical irregular elevations, recorded during maxillary cast fabrication, that can be used for identification purpose if previous comparative sources are available. Aim: This study investigated uniqueness of PR patterns in relation to gender, palatal vault forms, and ABO blood groups in three (North-East [N-E], Northern and Western) populations of India. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted on randomly selected 90 students, 30 from each sub population. Design - The palatal vault was recorded as Types I, II, and III. The maxillary casts were analyzed for each subject. The blood group of each subject was also recorded. Pearson's correlation coefficient tests were performed on cross-tabulations to evaluate significant relationship among different variables. Results: The PR number was more among females with an insignificant correlation among gender and mean rugae size on both sides. Types I and II hard palate vaults were seen associated with straight forwardly directed PR pattern, while Type III with curved forwardly directed PR. On the right side, straight rugae shape was most common type. On the left side, straight rugae shape was most common in Northern population while in N-E and Western populations curved rugae was the dominating type. A highly significant correlation was found between ABO blood groups and different PR patterns. Conclusions: PR possesses unique characteristics and can be used along with palatal vault forms as well as ABO blood groups for racial and individualistic soft tissue oral print in forensic cases. PMID:25328791

  1. Correlates of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain-Computer Interface Accuracy in a Multi-Class Personalization Framework.

    PubMed

    Weyand, Sabine; Chau, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) provide individuals with a means of interacting with a computer using only neural activity. To date, the majority of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) BCIs have used prescribed tasks to achieve binary control. The goals of this study were to evaluate the possibility of using a personalized approach to establish control of a two-, three-, four-, and five-class NIRS-BCI, and to explore how various user characteristics correlate to accuracy. Ten able-bodied participants were recruited for five data collection sessions. Participants performed six mental tasks and a personalized approach was used to select each individual's best discriminating subset of tasks. The average offline cross-validation accuracies achieved were 78, 61, 47, and 37% for the two-, three-, four-, and five-class problems, respectively. Most notably, all participants exceeded an accuracy of 70% for the two-class problem, and two participants exceeded an accuracy of 70% for the three-class problem. Additionally, accuracy was found to be strongly positively correlated (Pearson's) with perceived ease of session (ρ = 0.653), ease of concentration (ρ = 0.634), and enjoyment (ρ = 0.550), but strongly negatively correlated with verbal IQ (ρ = -0.749). PMID:26483657

  2. Evaluation of static and dynamic MRI for assessing response of bone sarcomas to preoperative chemotherapy: Correlation with histological necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Priyadarshi; Malhotra, Atul; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, Lokesh; Patro, Dilip Kumar; Elangovan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Preoperative chemotherapy plays a key role in management of bone sarcomas. Postoperative evaluation of histological necrosis has been the gold standard method of assessing response to preoperative chemotherapy. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing response preoperatively. Materials and Methods: Our study included 14 patients (12 osteosarcomas and 2 malignant fibrous histiocytomas) with mean age of 21.8 years, treated with preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery. They were evaluated with static and dynamic MRI twice, before starting chemotherapy and again prior to surgery. Change in tumor volume and slope of signal intensity - time curve were calculated and correlated with percentage of histological necrosis using Pearson correlation test. Results: The change in dynamic MRI slope was significant (P = 0.001). Also, ≥60% reduction in slope of the curve proved to be an indicator of good histological response [positive predictive value (PPV) =80%]. Change in tumor volume failed to show significant correlation (P = 0.071). Although it showed high negative predictive value (NPV = 85.7%), PPV was too low (PPV = 57.14%). Conclusions: Dynamic MRI correctly predicts histological necrosis after administration of preoperative chemotherapy to bone sarcomas. Hence, it can be used as a preoperative indicator of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. On the other hand, volumetric assessment by static MRI is not an effective predictor of histological necrosis. This study proves the superiority of dynamic contrast-enhanced study over volumetric study by MRI. PMID:26288521

  3. Correlation, Cost Risk, and Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1992-01-01

    The geometric viewpoint identifies the choice of a correlation matrix for the simulation of cost risk with the pairwise choice of data vectors corresponding to the parameters used to obtain cost risk. The correlation coefficient is the cosine of the angle between the data vectors after translation to an origin at the mean and normalization for magnitude. Thus correlation is equivalent to expressing the data in terms of a non orthogonal basis. To understand the many resulting phenomena requires the use of the tensor concept of raising the index to transform the measured and observed covariant components into contravariant components before vector addition can be applied. The geometric viewpoint also demonstrates that correlation and covariance are geometric properties, as opposed to purely statistical properties, of the variates. Thus, variates from different distributions may be correlated, as desired, after selection from independent distributions. By determining the principal components of the correlation matrix, variates with the desired mean, magnitude, and correlation can be generated through linear transforms which include the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix. The conversion of the data to a non orthogonal basis uses a compound linear transformation which distorts or stretches the data space. Hence, the correlated data does not have the same properties as the uncorrelated data used to generate it. This phenomena is responsible for seemingly strange observations such as the fact that the marginal distributions of the correlated data can be quite different from the distributions used to generate the data. The joint effect of statistical distributions and correlation remains a fertile area for further research. In terms of application to cost estimating, the geometric approach demonstrates that the estimator must have data and must understand that data in order to properly choose the correlation matrix appropriate for a given estimate. There is a general feeling by employers and managers that the field of cost requires little technical or mathematical background. Contrary to that opinion, this paper demonstrates that a background in mathematics equivalent to that needed for typical engineering and scientific disciplines at the masters or doctorate level is appropriate within the field of cost risk.

  4. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, J.S.; Frank, D.O.; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G.J.M.; Rhee, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning. PMID:24063885

  5. Correlation of neurocognitive function and brain parenchyma volumes in children surviving cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; White, Holly A.; Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2002-04-01

    This research builds on our hypothesis that white matter damage and associated neurocognitive symptoms, in children treated for cancer with cranial spinal irradiation, spans a continuum of severity that can be reliably probed using non-invasive MR technology. Quantitative volumetric assessments of MR imaging and psychological assessments were obtained in 40 long-term survivors of malignant brain tumors treated with cranial irradiation. Neurocognitive assessments included a test of intellect (Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), attention (Conner's Continuous Performance Test), and memory (California Verbal Learning Test). One-sample t-tests were conducted to evaluate test performance of survivors against age-adjusted scores from the test norms; these analyses revealed significant impairments in all apriori selected measures of intelligence, attention, and memory. Partial correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationships between brain tissues volumes (normal appearing white matter (NAWM), gray matter, and CSF) and neurocognitive function. Global intelligence (r = 0.32, p = 0.05) and global attentional (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) were significantly positively correlated with NAWM volumes, whereas global memory was significantly positively correlated with overall brain parenchyma (r = 0.38, p = 0.04). We conclude that quantitative assessment of MR examinations in survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial irradiation reveal that loss of NAWM is associated with decreased intellectual and attentional deficits, whereas overall parenchyma loss, as reflected by increased CSF and decreased white matter, is associated with memory-related deficits.

  6. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kimbell, J S; Frank, D O; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G J M; Rhee, J S

    2013-10-18

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning. PMID:24063885

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of School Bullying Victimization in Xi'an, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuhong; Chan, Ko Ling

    2015-01-01

    This study used the data from a representative sample to estimate the prevalence of child bullying victimization in Xi'an, China. Data on social demographic information and the experiences of different types of bullying victimization were collected from a randomly selected sample with 3,175 middle school students aged 15-17 years by self-administrated questionnaires. t Test, χ2 test, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to test group differences and examine the correlates of bullying victimization. Results show that 54.9% and 44.6% of Chinese children have been bullied in a lifetime and in the preceding year, respectively. Correlates for direct and relational bullying victimization includes male participants, father's lower education level, father's unemployment, having one or more siblings, smoking, depression, borderline personality trait, posttraumatic stress disorder, and from rural schools. Overall, the prevalence of child bullying victimization in China is substantial. The multiple correlates suggest prevention and intervention of bullying victimization in a holistic and comprehensive way. PMID:26159148

  8. Set Correlation and Contingency Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jacob

    1988-01-01

    Set correlation is explored as an option in analysis of two-way contingency tables. It includes measures of strength of association, significance tests and estimation, power analysis, and computer programs. (SLD)

  9. Digital correlator with fewer IC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apple, G. G.; Rubin, L.

    1979-01-01

    Digital correlator requires only few integrated circuits to determine synchronization of two 24-bit digital words. Circuit is easily reduced or expanded to accommodate shorter or longer words and can be utilized in industrial and commercial data processing and telecommunications.

  10. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-10-15

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case.

  11. Electronic correlations in the ironpnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Qazilbash, M. M.; Hamlin, J. J.; Baumbach, R. E.; Zhang, Lijun; Singh, David J; Maple, M. B.; Basov, D. N.

    2009-01-01

    In correlated metals derived from Mott insulators, the motion of an electron is impeded by Coulomb repulsion due to other electrons. This phenomenon causes a substantial reduction in the electron's kinetic energy, leading to remarkable experimental manifestations in optical spectroscopy. The high-transition-temperature (Tc) superconducting cuprates are perhaps the most studied examples of such correlated metals. The occurrence of high-Tc superconductivity in the iron pnictides puts a spotlight on the relevance of correlation effects in these materials. Here, we present an infrared and optical study on single crystals of the iron pnictide superconductor LaFePO. We find clear evidence of electronic correlations in metallic LaFePO with the kinetic energy of the electrons reduced to half of that predicted by band theory of nearly free electrons. We deduce that electronic many-body effects are important in the iron pnictides despite the absence of a Mott transition.

  12. OA01.25.The first direct experimental evidence correlating ayurveda based tridosha prakriti, with western constitutional psychology somatotypes

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Kashinath G; Bhargav, Hemant; Ramarao, Nagendra Hongasandra; Rizzo-Sierra; Basavakatti, Ramakrishna R

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Ayurveda is one of the most ancient systems of medical health care. The basic principles, diagnosis of the diseases and their treatment are based on individual prakriti (constitutional type). Ayurveda further classifies the prakriti of an individual on the basis of a set of psychosomatic attributes of personality, depending on whether this individual belongs to Vata, Pitta, or Kapha prakriti, or any combination of them (Patwardhan et al., 2005). The appropriate prakriti assessment is done by several means including questionnaires (Rastogi, 2012; Shilpa and Venkatesha-Murthy, 2011). We aimed to obtain experimental evidence correlating Ayurveda based tridosha-prakriti with western constitutional psychology somatotypes (Rizzo-Sierra, 2011). Method: We employed our Tridosha-prakriti questionnaire (Ramakrishna and Nagendra, 2012), and compared its results with a set of body composition parameters: Height, body weight, body mass index (BMI), muscle mass, fat mass, and fat percentage in normal healthy volunteers (25 males and 25 females, mean age was 26 (± 4) and 25 (± 6) years respectively). Moreover, two-tailed Pearson's correlations were investigated to match the extreme prakriti types with the western constitutional psychology somatotypes, through the mentioned body composition measures. Result: Significant negative correlations were observed between the percentage of Vata attributes as per the questionnaire in the individuals and their BMI, body weight and fat mass respectively (p<0.05). Similarly, there was a significant positive correlation between the percentage of Pitta attributes with the height, body weight, and muscle mass respectively. Also, a significant positive correlation was observed between the percentage of Kapha attributes with fat mass and fat percentage, along with a negative correlation with height. Conclusion: We provide evidence-linking Ayurveda to modern constitutional psychology. In this way, a concept such as prakriti is suggested to lie behind the body mass composition of an individual, and deserves attention within the scientific community.

  13. Correlated nucleons in configuration space

    SciTech Connect

    Muether, Herbert; Sick, Ingo

    2004-10-01

    Several recent studies have dealt with the effects of short-range correlations on the momentum distribution of nucleons in nuclei. Here we investigate the correlation effects on the density and spectral distribution in coordinate space. A combination of experimental data and spectral functions calculated from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions allows us to resolve a recently uncovered discrepancy with occupation of quasiparticle states derived from (e,e{sup '}p) data.

  14. Distributing fully optomechanical quantum correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzola, L.; Paternostro, M.

    2011-06-15

    We present a scheme to prepare quantum correlated states of two mechanical systems based on the pouring of preavailable all-optical entanglement into the state of two micromirrors belonging to remote and noninteracting optomechanical cavities. We show that, under realistic experimental conditions, the protocol allows for the preparation of a genuine quantum state of a composite mesoscopic system whose nonclassical features extend beyond the occurrence of entanglement. We finally discuss a way to access such mechanical correlations.

  15. NASA SERC digital correlator projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canaris, John

    1992-01-01

    Interest in custom digital correlator processors is growing, in both the radio astronomy and earth sensing communities, as scientists realize that VLSI technology is available to them. This paper presents three digital correlator projects currently underway at the NASA SERC for VLSI Systems Design. The projects are as follows: a 60MHz chip for the ESTAR satellite; a 100MHz, 1024 channel autocorrelator; and a 64 MHz, VLSI system consisting of 8 32- channel complex crosscorrelators including phase rotators.

  16. Classical, Quantum and Superquantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardi, Giancarlo; Romano, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the origin of quantum correlations is expected to allow a better comprehension of the physical principles underlying quantum mechanics. In this work, we reconsider the possibility of devising "crypto-nonlocal theories", using a terminology firstly introduced by Leggett. We generalize and simplify the investigations on this subject which can be found in the literature. At their deeper level, such theories allow nonlocal correlations which can overcome the quantum limit.

  17. Classical, Quantum and Superquantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardi, Giancarlo; Romano, Raffaele

    2012-04-01

    A deeper understanding of the origin of quantum correlations is expected to allow a better comprehension of the physical principles underlying quantum mechanics. In this work, we reconsider the possibility of devising "crypto-nonlocal theories", using a terminology firstly introduced by Leggett. We generalize and simplify the investigations on this subject which can be found in the literature. At their deeper level, such theories allow nonlocal correlations which can overcome the quantum limit.

  18. A Correlation of Community College Math Readiness and Student Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jayna Nicole

    Although traditional college students are more prepared for college-level math based on college admissions tests, little data have been collected on nontraditional adult learners. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between math placement tests and community college students' success in math courses and persistence to degree or certificate completion. Guided by Tinto's theory of departure and student retention, the research questions addressed relationships and predictability of math Computer-adaptive Placement Assessment and Support System (COMPASS) test scores and students' performance in math courses, persistence in college, and degree completion. After conducting correlation and regression analyses, no significant relationships were identified between COMPASS Math test scores and students' performance (n = 234) in math courses, persistence in college, or degree completion. However, independent t test and chi-squared analyses of the achievements of college students who tested into Basic Math (n = 138) vs. Introduction to Algebra (n = 96) yielded statistically significant differences in persistence (p = .039), degree completion (p < .001), performance (p = .008), and progress ( p = .001), indicating students who tested into Introduction to Algebra were more successful and persisted more often to degree completion. In order to improve instructional methods for Basic Math courses, a 3-day professional development workshop was developed for math faculty focusing on current, best practices in remedial math instruction. Implications for social change include providing math faculty with the knowledge and skills to develop new instructional methods for remedial math courses. A change in instructional methods may improve community college students' math competencies and degree achievement.

  19. Nonglobal correlations in collider physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called nonglobal effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these nonglobal correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in e+e- collisions, though it is more widely applicable. The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to nonglobal correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these nonglobal correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of nonperturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. This procedure illuminates the source of nonglobal correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.

  20. Nonglobal correlations in collider physics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moult, Ian; Larkoski, Andrew J.

    2016-01-13

    Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called non-global effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these non-global correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in e+e- collisions, though itmore » is more widely applicable.The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to non-global correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these non-global correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. As a result, this procedure illuminates the source of non-global correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.« less

  1. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, S. M.; Crosse, B.; Emrich, D.; Pallot, D.; Wayth, R. B.; Clark, M. A.; Tremblay, S. E.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Bunton, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; deSouza, L.; Ewell-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Koenig, R.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a Square Kilometre Array Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. The MWA consists of 4 096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays, and others by Graphics Processing Units housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 tera floating point operations per second. The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB day-1 of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper, we outline the correlator design, signal path, and processing elements and present the data format for the internal and external interfaces.

  2. Correlation between nipple elevation and breast resection weight: How to preoperatively plan breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Moio, Mariagrazia; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Breast hypertrophy is often associated with functional limitations. Beyond the aesthetic concerns, breast reduction can improve symptoms and self-esteem. In different countries, health-care system regulations have fixed the threshold for reimbursement in 500 g of predicted tissue resection for each breast. Different preoperative measurements have been proposed to predict breast-tissue weight to be removed, showing a variable correlation with post-operative evaluation. We describe a reliable, simple measurement to predict the quantity of breast reduction in grams, which can be applicable to any surgical technique. A total of 128 patients undergoing bilateral breast reduction were evaluated. The correlation between the preoperative nipple-areola complex (NAC) lift distance and the weight of removed breast tissue was tested with linear regression and Pearson's test. Other anthropometric measurements were tested as a control. The ratio between resected grams and lift distance was explored to find a multiplication coefficient to be used at preoperative planning. The mean resection weight was 686.65 g. The mean NAC-lift distance was 7.6 cm. Positive correlation between the NAC-lift distance and the weight of breast tissue removed was found (r: 0.87; p < 0.001). The mean weight of the removed breast tissue (g) per centimetre of NAC lift was 81 g/cm in the group between 6 and 12 cm and 70 g/cm in the group with >12 cm of lift distance. The NAC-lift distance is a single, objective, repeatable measure that can provide a reliable prediction of breast-tissue grams to be removed; it helps in classifying breast-reduction indications. PMID:25997557

  3. Correlates of Bone Mineral Density and Sagittal Spinal Balance in the Aged

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yung; Lee, Gangpyo; Aguinaldo, Jhoan; Lee, Kun-Jai

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and sagittal spinal balance in the Korean elderly population. Methods The retrospective study included subjects aged 60 years and above, who had whole-spine lateral radiography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) within a year's gap between each other. Sagittal vertical axis (SVA) for evaluation of sagittal spinal balance and five spinopelvic parameters were measured through radiography. The presence of compression fracture was identified. Correlations of BMD T-scores with SVA and with the spinopelvic parameters were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC). Linear regression analyses were performed between SVA and the clinical and radiologic variables. Results One hundred twenty-two subjects (42 males and 80 females; mean age, 69.93±5.5 years) were included in the study. BMD, femur or spine, was not correlated with SVA or any spinopelvic parameters in both genders (PCC<±0.2), except that spine BMD in men was associated with sacral slope. Univariate regression analysis revealed association between SVA and lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, and compression fractures in both genders; it was also associated with age and pelvic incidence in females and with sacral slope in males. Multivariate linear regression model showed lumbar lordosis and compression fracture as variables affecting SVA in both sexes; pelvic incidence was another factor affecting SVA in women only. Conclusion BMD was not associated with sagittal spinal balance in the aged. Sagittal spinal balance was explained partly by lumbar lordosis and compression fracture. Further study is warranted to understand progression of sagittal imbalance with age. PMID:25750878

  4. Higher plasma level of STIM1, OPG are correlated with stent restenosis after PCI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibin; Jiang, Zhian; Liu, Xiangdong; Yang, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Object: Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) is one of the most effective treatments for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), but the high rate of In Stent Restenosis (ISR) has plagued clinicians after PCI. We aim to investigate the correlation of plasma Stromal Interaction Molecular 1 (STIM1) and Osteoprotegerin (OPG) level with stent restenosis after PCI. Methods: A total of 100 consecutive patients with Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) received PCI procedure were recruited. Coronary angiography was performed 8 months after their PCI. Then patients were divided into 2 groups: observation group was composed by patients who existing postoperative stenosis after intervention; Control group was composed by patients with no postoperative stenosis. The plasma levels of STIM, OPG in all patients were tested before and after intervention. Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analysis were performed to analysis the correlation between STIM, OPG level and postoperative stenosis. Results: 35 cases were divided into observation group and other 65 were divided into control group. The plasma levels of STIM, OPG have no statistical difference before their PCI procedure, but we observed higher level of High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) existed in observation group. We observed higher level of plasma STIM, OPG in observation group when compared with control group after PCI procedure (P < 0.05). Regression analysis demonstrated that Hs-CRP, STIM1, OPG are independent risk factors for ISR. Conclusion: Elevated levels of plasma STIM1, OPG are independent risk factors for ISR in patients received PCI, which could provide useful information for the restenosis control after PCI. PMID:26885040

  5. A Correlational Study of Scoliosis and Trunk Balance in Adult Patients with Mandibular Deviation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Na; Wang, Wenyong; Ding, Yin; Sun, Shiyao

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have confirmed that patients with mandibular deviation often have abnormal morphology of their cervical vertebrae. However, the relationship between mandibular deviation, scoliosis, and trunk balance has not been studied. Currently, mandibular deviation is usually treated as a single pathology, which leads to poor clinical efficiency. We investigated the relationship of spine coronal morphology and trunk balance in adult patients with mandibular deviation, and compared the finding to those in healthy volunteers. 35 adult patients with skeletal mandibular deviation and 10 healthy volunteers underwent anterior X-ray films of the head and posteroanterior X-ray films of the spine. Landmarks and lines were drawn and measured on these films. The axis distance method was used to measure the degree of scoliosis and the balance angle method was used to measure trunk balance. The relationship of mandibular deviation, spine coronal morphology and trunk balance was evaluated with the Pearson correlation method. The spine coronal morphology of patients with mandibular deviation demonstrated an “S” type curve, while a straight line parallel with the gravity line was found in the control group (significant difference, p<0.01). The trunk balance of patients with mandibular deviation was disturbed (imbalance angle >1°), while the control group had a normal trunk balance (imbalance angle <1°). There was a significant difference between the two groups (p<0.01). The degree of scoliosis and shoulder imbalance correlated with the degree of mandibular deviation, and presented a linear trend. The direction of mandibular deviation was the same as that of the lateral bending of thoracolumbar vertebrae, which was opposite to the direction of lateral bending of cervical vertebrae. Our study shows the degree of mandibular deviation has a high correlation with the degree of scoliosis and trunk imbalance, all the three deformities should be clinically evaluated in the management of mandibular deviation. PMID:23555836

  6. The Correlation Between Perceived Social Support and Illness Uncertainty in People with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Moosa; Rassouli, Maryam; Bahri, Narges; Mohammadipoor, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Illness uncertainty is a source of a chronic and pervasive psychological stress for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWH), and largely affects their quality of life and the ability to cope with the disease. Based on the uncertainty in illness theory, the social support is one of the illness uncertainty antecedents, and influences the level of uncertainty perceived by patients. Aim: To examine uncertainty in PLWH and its correlation with social support in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional correlational study was conducted with 80 PLWH presenting to AIDS Research Center, Tehran, Iran in 2013. The data collected using illness uncertainty and social support inventories were analyzed through Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results: The results showed a high level of illness uncertainty in PLWH and a negative significant correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty (P = 0.01, r = -0.29). Conclusion: Uncertainty is a serious aspect of illness experience in Iranian PLWH. Providing adequate, structured information to patients as well as opportunities to discuss their concerns with other PLWH and receive emotional support from their health care providers may be worthwhile. PMID:26009679

  7. Correlation of Beta-2 Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Tumor-Free Surgical Margin and at the Invasive Front of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Calderón, Diego Mauricio; Lauand, Gustavo Amaral; Assao, Agnes; Suárez-Peñaranda, José-Manuel; Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; García-García, Abel; Marana, Aparecido Nilceu; Nonogaki, Suely; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Background. The beta-2 adrenergic receptor is expressed by neoplastic cells and is correlated with a wide spectrum of tumor cell mechanisms including proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, migration, and metastasis. Objectives. The present study aimed to analyze the expression of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) in tumor-free surgical margins of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) and at the invasive front. Sixty-two patients diagnosed with OSCC, confirmed by biopsy, were selected for the study. The clinicopathological data and clinical follow-up were obtained from medical records and their association with β2-AR expression was verified by the chi-square test or Fischer's exact test. To verify the correlation of β2-AR expression in tumor-free surgical margins and at the invasive front of OSCCs, Pearson's correlation coefficient test was applied. Results. The expression of β2-AR presented a statistically significant correlation between the tumor-free surgical margins and the invasive front of OSCC (r = 0.383; p = 0.002). The immunohistochemical distribution of β2-AR at the invasive front of OSCC was also statistically significant associated with alcohol (p = 0.038), simultaneous alcohol and tobacco consumption (p = 0.010), and T stage (p = 0.014). Conclusions. The correlation of β2-AR expression in OSCC and tumor-free surgical margins suggests a role of this receptor in tumor progression and its expression in normal oral epithelium seems to be constitutive. PMID:27042179

  8. The correlation between organizational justice and trust among employees of rehabilitation clinics in hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khiavi, Farzad Faraji; Shakhi, Kamal; Dehghani, Roohallah; Zahiri, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Organizational justice is an intricate concept that refers to fair and ethical conduct of individuals within organizations. No research has been conducted on the variables associated with organizational justice in rehabilitation clinics. Thus, the aim of this research was to determine the correlation between organizational justice and organizational trust among the employees of rehabilitation clinics in hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. Methods This was a cross-sectional research, and it was conducted on 140 rehabilitation staff members of hospital clinics in Ahvaz. The data were gathered using organizational justice and trust questionnaires. The data were analyzed using the independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and Pearson’s product-moment correlation SPSS software. Results Significant correlations between procedure and interaction justice and organizational trust were identified (p < 0.001). Distributive justice showed small correlation with trust (r = 0.25, p < 0.021). Organizational justice was significantly associated with organizational trust (r = 0.42, p < 0.001). Organizational justice was not significantly related to any demographic variable (p > 0.05). Conclusion There was a positive, medium, and significant correlation between organizational justice and trust. It is suggested that rehabilitation clinics’ managers develop plans to increase their organizational justice subscales in order to develop organizational trust among their employees. PMID:27053997

  9. Sample Size Tables, "t" Test, and a Prevalent Psychometric Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.; Hillman, Stephen B.

    Psychology studies often have low statistical power. Sample size tables, as given by J. Cohen (1988), may be used to increase power, but they are based on Monte Carlo studies of relatively "tame" mathematical distributions, as compared to psychology data sets. In this study, Monte Carlo methods were used to investigate Type I and Type II error…

  10. My Child Doesn't Test Well. Carnegie Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Lloyd

    2007-01-01

    The writer examines a variety of reasons why test performance may not always be a valid measure of a person's competence or potential. Citing that a sizable percentage of students perform well in their schoolwork but poorly on standardized, multiple-choice tests, Bond defines and discusses four candidates as source factors for the phenomenon: (1)…

  11. Correlating information contents of gene ontology terms to infer semantic similarity of gene products.

    PubMed

    Gan, Mingxin

    2014-01-01

    Successful applications of the gene ontology to the inference of functional relationships between gene products in recent years have raised the need for computational methods to automatically calculate semantic similarity between gene products based on semantic similarity of gene ontology terms. Nevertheless, existing methods, though having been widely used in a variety of applications, may significantly overestimate semantic similarity between genes that are actually not functionally related, thereby yielding misleading results in applications. To overcome this limitation, we propose to represent a gene product as a vector that is composed of information contents of gene ontology terms annotated for the gene product, and we suggest calculating similarity between two gene products as the relatedness of their corresponding vectors using three measures: Pearson's correlation coefficient, cosine similarity, and the Jaccard index. We focus on the biological process domain of the gene ontology and annotations of yeast proteins to study the effectiveness of the proposed measures. Results show that semantic similarity scores calculated using the proposed measures are more consistent with known biological knowledge than those derived using a list of existing methods, suggesting the effectiveness of our method in characterizing functional relationships between gene products. PMID:24963342

  12. Analysis-preserving video microscopy compression via correlation and mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chong; Zhong, Alfred; Cribb, Jeremy; Osborne, Lukas D; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, Richard; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Taylor, Russell M

    2015-12-01

    The large amount video data produced by multi-channel, high-resolution microscopy system drives the need for a new high-performance domain-specific video compression technique. We describe a novel compression method for video microscopy data. The method is based on Pearson's correlation and mathematical morphology. The method makes use of the point-spread function (PSF) in the microscopy video acquisition phase. We compare our method to other lossless compression methods and to lossy JPEG, JPEG2000, and H.264 compression for various kinds of video microscopy data including fluorescence video and brightfield video. We find that for certain data sets, the new method compresses much better than lossless compression with no impact on analysis results. It achieved a best compressed size of 0.77% of the original size, 25× smaller than the best lossless technique (which yields 20% for the same video). The compressed size scales with the video's scientific data content. Further testing showed that existing lossy algorithms greatly impacted data analysis at similar compression sizes. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1055-1061, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26435032

  13. Structural characteristics and external correlates of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form.

    PubMed

    Smits, Dave; Luyckx, Koen; Smits, Dirk; Stinckens, Nele; Claes, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Controversy remains on the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Form (WAI-S). In the present study we first examined the factor structure and reliability of WAI-S scores in a sample of 557 Flemish mental health consumers. Subsequently, we investigated the relationship between early alliance quality and client's psychological dysfunctioning (symptomatic distress, interpersonal functioning and personality pathology). Participants completed the Outcome Questionnaire and the Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Short Form at start of treatment. The WAI-S was completed after the third treatment session. The structure of the WAI-S was examined using confirmatory factor analysis. Four different factor models were compared. Internal consistencies of the scales were ascertained using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Pearson correlations were calculated to determine the relationships between alliance ratings and the independent variables. CFA resulted in a two-factor model, with a Bond component (Contact) and a Task-Goal (Contract) component. Reliability of the WAI-S subscale scores proved to be very good. Symptomatic distress, interpersonal dysfunctioning and personality traits were associated to the Contract component of the alliance, but not to the Contact component. Clinical implications, limitations and suggestions for further research are formulated. PMID:25642928

  14. Fatty acid correlates of temperament in adolescent boys with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Sumich, Alex L; Matsudaira, Toshiko; Heasman, Bryony; Gow, Rachel V; Ibrahimovic, Almira; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Crawford, Michael A; Taylor, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Atypical fatty acid metabolism has been reported in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), however, its relationship with temperament in this population is unclear. The current study investigated the association between blood levels of fatty acids implicated in brain structure and function (omega-3, omega-6, omega-9) and personality traits of stability (neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness) and plasticity (extraversion and openness). Twenty right-handed adolescent boys with ADHD completed a self-report NEO-FFI personality questionnaire, and had fatty acid content assessed from red blood using gas chromatography. Pearson's correlations showed no significant associations between omega-3 levels and personality. After correction for multiple comparisons, Adrenic Acid (C22:4n6) was inversely associated with stability. Oleic acid (C18:1n9) was positively associated with plasticity. Results are in line with a role of fatty acids in brain function. They suggest that those fatty acids that are involved in myelination (Adrenic, Oleic) have the strongest associations with temperament in adolescents with ADHD. PMID:23566869

  15. Correlations among Stress Parameters, Meat and Carcass Quality Parameters in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dokmanovic, Marija; Baltic, Milan Z.; Duric, Jelena; Ivanovic, Jelena; Popovic, Ljuba; Todorovic, Milica; Markovic, Radmila; Pantic, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Relationships among different stress parameters (lairage time and blood level of lactate and cortisol), meat quality parameters (initial and ultimate pH value, temperature, drip loss, sensory and instrumental colour, marbling) and carcass quality parameters (degree of rigor mortis and skin damages, hot carcass weight, carcass fat thickness, meatiness) were determined in pigs (n = 100) using Pearson correlations. After longer lairage, blood lactate (p<0.05) and degree of injuries (p<0.001) increased, meat became darker (p<0.001), while drip loss decreased (p<0.05). Higher lactate was associated with lower initial pH value (p<0.01), higher temperature (p<0.001) and skin blemishes score (p<0.05) and more developed rigor mortis (p<0.05), suggesting that lactate could be a predictor of both meat quality and the level of preslaughter stress. Cortisol affected carcass quality, so higher levels of cortisol were associated with increased hot carcass weight, carcass fat thickness on the back and at the sacrum and marbling, but also with decreased meatiness. The most important meat quality parameters (pH and temperature after 60 minutes) deteriorated when blood lactate concentration was above 12 mmol/L. PMID:25656214

  16. Community Detection for Correlation Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Mel; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-04-01

    A challenging problem in the study of complex systems is that of resolving, without prior information, the emergent, mesoscopic organization determined by groups of units whose dynamical activity is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. The existing techniques to filter correlations are not explicitly oriented towards identifying such modules and can suffer from an unavoidable information loss. A promising alternative is that of employing community detection techniques developed in network theory. Unfortunately, this approach has focused predominantly on replacing network data with correlation matrices, a procedure that we show to be intrinsically biased because of its inconsistency with the null hypotheses underlying the existing algorithms. Here, we introduce, via a consistent redefinition of null models based on random matrix theory, the appropriate correlation-based counterparts of the most popular community detection techniques. Our methods can filter out both unit-specific noise and system-wide dependencies, and the resulting communities are internally correlated and mutually anticorrelated. We also implement multiresolution and multifrequency approaches revealing hierarchically nested subcommunities with "hard" cores and "soft" peripheries. We apply our techniques to several financial time series and identify mesoscopic groups of stocks which are irreducible to a standard, sectorial taxonomy; detect "soft stocks" that alternate between communities; and discuss implications for portfolio optimization and risk management.

  17. Recirculating cross-correlation detector

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, W.H. Jr.; Roberts, M.J.

    1985-01-18

    A digital cross-correlation detector is provided in which two time-varying signals are correlated by repetitively comparing data samples stored in digital form to detect correlation between the two signals. The signals are sampled at a selected rate converted to digital form, and stored in separate locations in separate memories. When the memories are filled, the data samples from each memory are first fed word-by-word through a multiplier and summing circuit and each result is compared to the last in a peak memory circuit and if larger than the last is retained in the peak memory. Then the address line to leading signal memory is offset by one byte to affect one sample period delay of a known amount in that memory and the data in the two memories are then multiplied word-by-word once again and summed. If a new result is larger than a former sum, it is saved in the peak memory together with the time delay. The recirculating process continues with the address of the one memory being offset one additional byte each cycle until the address is shifted through the length of the memory. The correlation between the two signals is indicated by the peak signal stored in the peak memory together with the delay time at which the peak occurred. The circuit is faster and considerably less expensive than comparable accuracy correlation detectors.

  18. Generalized minimum miscibility pressure correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Glaso, O.

    1984-03-01

    Correlations for predicting minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) are important tools in the selection of candidate reservoirs for gas miscible flooding. It is important that such correlations be accurate. Several CO2 MMP correlations have been published. None of these can be used with enough confidence for final project design, but are useful for screening and preliminary work. Correlations published on CO2 miscible flooding show temperature to be the most important parameter, but they disagree with regard to the effect of oil type. Compared with CO2 miscible flooding, little has been published on high-pressure hydrocarbon gas miscible flooding, and no correlation is available for predicting MMP with lean hydrocarbon gases or nitrogen. In 1960, Benham and coworkers presented empirical curves from which miscibility conditions can be estimated for reservoir oils being displaced by rich gas within a pressure range of 1500 to 3000 psia. From Benham's data, the proposed equations have been derived for predicting MMP. These equations are a result of curve fitting Benham's data. 22 references.

  19. Electronic correlations in Hund metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanfarillo, L.; Bascones, E.

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the nature of correlations in Hund metals and its relationship with Mott physics we analyze the electronic correlations in multiorbital systems as a function of intraorbital interaction U , Hund's coupling JH, and electronic filling n . We show that the main process behind the enhancement of correlations in Hund metals is the suppression of the double occupancy of a given orbital, as it also happens in the Mott insulator at half-filling. However, contrary to what happens in Mott correlated states the reduction of the quasiparticle weight Z with JH can happen in spite of increasing charge fluctuations. Therefore, in Hund metals the quasiparticle weight and the mass enhancement are not good measurements of the charge localization. Using simple energetic arguments we explain why the spin polarization induced by Hund's coupling produces orbital decoupling. We also discuss how the behavior at moderate interactions, with correlations controlled by the atomic spin polarization, changes at large U and JH due to the proximity to a Mott insulating state.

  20. Coregulation of host-response genes in integument: switchover of gene expression correlation pattern and impaired immune responses induced by dipteran parasite infection in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Anitha; Pradeep, Appukuttan Nair R; Awasthi, Arvind K; Murthy, Geetha N; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M; Sasibhushan, Sirigineedi; Rao, Guruprasad C

    2014-05-01

    The activation of host response proteins against parasitic infection is dependent on the coregulation of immune gene expression. The infection of commercially important silkworm Bombyx mori through endoparasite Exorista bombycis enhanced host-response gene expression in integument early in the infection and was lowered asymptotically. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed heterogeneity while explaining ∼80 % variance among expression timings. PCA showed positive and negative correlation with gene expression and differentiated transcriptional timings, and revealed cross talk within the immune system. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant linear correlation (mean R (2) = >0.7; P < 0.004) between the expression of 16 pairs of genes in control, while the relation switched over to curvilinear due to parasitism. The genes showed pleiotropic interaction among them, with four genes each for prophenoloxidase activating enzyme (PPAE) and caspase. Besides, after parasitism, exclusive correlation of five gene pairs including PPAE-Spatzle pair (R (2) = 0.9; P < 0.011) was observed in the integument. In integument, the phenol oxidase (PO) activity showed a positive correlation with the tyrosine level (R (2) = 0.410; P < 0.002) and a curvilinear relation (R (2) = 0.745; P < 0.0002) with the expanding lysis area. The PO activity was positively correlated with BmToll expression and negatively correlated with paralytical peptide expression, revealing polygenic influence. Caspase expression was tightly regulated by signal genes in control integument, whereas they were deregulated after infection. Switchover from linear to curvilinear correlation and the appearance of new gene correlations in parasitized integument revealed deviation from gene coregulation, leading to impaired immune responses, characterized by lowered gene expression and varied phenotypic consequences. PMID:24310719

  1. Scatter factor protein levels in human breast cancers: clinicopathological and biological correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Y.; Jin, L.; Fuchs, A.; Joseph, A.; Hastings, H. M.; Goldberg, I. D.; Rosen, E. M.

    1996-01-01

    Scatter factor (SF) is an invasogenic and angiogenic cytokine the cellular receptor of which is encoded by a proto-oncogene (c-met). We measured the immunoreactive SF content (nanograms of SF per milligram of protein) in tissue extracts from 166 breast cancers and correlated the values with various known prognostic parameters. Invasive cancers had nearly four times greater SF content than did ductal carcinoma in situ, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.02, two-tailed t-test). However, there were no significant differences in SF content among different histological types of invasive cancer. Invasive cancers that had spread to axillary lymph nodes exhibited higher SF content than did invasive cancers without regional spread (P < 0.02), but the difference in SF content between node-positive and node-negative tumors was not as great as that between invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ tumors. There was a trend toward increased SF content in larger primary tumors as compared with smaller tumors, but statistical comparison revealed borderline significance (0.05 < P < 1.0). There was no significant correlation between SF content and other parameters, including estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, DNA ploidy, S phase, or Scarff-Bloom-Richardson score. We also measured the content of von Willebrand factor (a marker of blood vessels) and interleukin-1 beta (a pro-inflammatory cytokine) in the same tumor extracts. SF content showed a strong positive correlation with von Willebrand factor content (P < 0.001) but did not appear to be correlated with interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that SF is correlated with several other clinicopathological indicators of aggressive tumor behavior, consistent with the hypothesis that SF is a biological factor that may play a role in breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:8909259

  2. Quark Spin-Orbit Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorc, Cdric

    2015-02-01

    The proton spin puzzle issue focused the attention on the parton spin and orbital angular momentum contributions to the proton spin. However, a complete characterization of the proton spin structure requires also the knowledge of the parton spin-orbit correlation. We showed that this quantity can be expressed in terms of moments of measurable parton distributions. Using the available phenomenological information about the valence quarks, we concluded that this correlation is negative, meaning that the valence quark spin and kinetic orbital angular momentum are, in average, opposite. The quark spin-orbit correlation can also be expressed more intuitively in terms of relativistic phase-space distributions, which can be seen as the mother distributions of the standard generalized and transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions. We present here for the first time some examples of the general multipole decomposition of these phase-space distributions.

  3. Biometric verification with correlation filters.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Kumar, B V K; Savvides, Marios; Xie, Chunyan; Venkataramani, Krithika; Thornton, Jason; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2004-01-10

    Using biometrics for subject verification can significantly improve security over that of approaches based on passwords and personal identification numbers, both of which people tend to lose or forget. In biometric verification the system tries to match an input biometric (such as a fingerprint, face image, or iris image) to a stored biometric template. Thus correlation filter techniques are attractive candidates for the matching precision needed in biometric verification. In particular, advanced correlation filters, such as synthetic discriminant function filters, can offer very good matching performance in the presence of variability in these biometric images (e.g., facial expressions, illumination changes, etc.). We investigate the performance of advanced correlation filters for face, fingerprint, and iris biometric verification. PMID:14735958

  4. Unified theory of plasma correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, M. A.; Liboff, R. L.

    1983-06-01

    A unified approach to the theory of correlations in a plasma is presented, based on the BBKGY hierarchy. The theory is applied to a one-component plasma with the Coulomb interaction modified to include effects of the background. Closed integro-differential equations in space and time are obtained for the two-particle correlation function in both the strong and weak coupling limits. In the weak-coupling domain, gamma <<1, the time-independent analysis returns the well-known linearized Debye-Huckle result, where gamma is the plasma parameter. In the strong-coupling domain gamma >1, the resulting two-particle total correlation function exhibits decaying oscillatory behavior for particle separation of the order of the effective interparticle range.

  5. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Vogts, Angela; Kröhnert, Katharina; Hillion, François; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Wessels, Johannes T.

    2014-04-01

    The isotopic composition of different materials can be imaged by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In biology, this method is mainly used to study cellular metabolism and turnover, by pulsing the cells with marker molecules such as amino acids labelled with stable isotopes (15N, 13C). The incorporation of the markers is then imaged with a lateral resolution that can surpass 100 nm. However, secondary ion mass spectrometry cannot identify specific subcellular structures like organelles, and needs to be correlated with a second technique, such as fluorescence imaging. Here, we present a method based on stimulated emission depletion microscopy that provides correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy (COIN) images. We use this approach to study the protein turnover in different organelles from cultured hippocampal neurons. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy can be applied to a variety of biological samples, and should therefore enable the investigation of the isotopic composition of many organelles and subcellular structures.

  6. Softc: An Operational Software Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    Softc has been used operationally for spacecraft navigation at JPL for over 2 years and will be JPL's Mark 5 correlator next year. Softc was written to be as close to an ideal correlator as possible, making approximations only below 10(exp -13) seconds. The program can correlate real USB, real LSB, or complex I/Q data sampled with 1, 2, 4. or 8-bit resolution, and was developed with strong debugging tools that made final debugging relatively quick. Softc's algorithms and program structure are fully documented. Timing tests on a recent Intel CPU show Softc processes 8 lags of 1-bit sampled data at 10 MSamples/sec, independent of sample rate.

  7. Correlative Fluorescence and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schirra, Randall T.; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associate with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology have led to rapid improvement in the protocols and have ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation – integration. PMID:25271959

  8. Physiological correlates of golf performance.

    PubMed

    Wells, Greg D; Elmi, Maryam; Thomas, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Golf is now a sport where physical training is an integral component of elite players' practice and contributes to the ability to play at a high level consistently and without injury. Relationships between physical conditioning and golf performance have not been reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to identify physiological correlates of golf performance in elite golfers under laboratory (ball speed and distance) and tournament conditions (average score, greens in regulation, short game measures, and putting accuracy).The correlation analysis revealed significant associations between mass, height, body mass index, sit height, arm length, and predicted Vo2max and golf measures. Significant correlations were noted between anterior abdominal muscle endurance and driver carry distance (r = 0.38; P = 0.04) and average putt distance after a chip shot (r = -0.44; P = 0.03), between dominant side abdominal muscle endurance and average putt distance after a chip shot (r = -0.43; P = 0.03), and between nondominant-side abdominal muscle endurance and average putt distance after a sand shot (r = -0.59; P = 0.001). Further correlations were found among sit and reach and driver carry distance (r = -0.36; P = 0.04), 5-iron ball speed (r = - 0.41; P = 0.02), 5-iron carry distance (r = -0.44; P = 0.01), and score (r = 0.43; P = 0.03). Correlation analysis revealed significant associations among peripheral muscle test results, golf driver results, 5-iron ball measures, score, and putting efficacy.These results may be important for developing training programs based on sound physiological rationale and for the development of talent identification programs. Results suggest that core strength and stability, flexibility, balance, and peripheral muscle strength are correlated with golf performance and should be included in golf training programs. PMID:19387406

  9. Correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Bruno P; Cronemberger, Sebastião; Kanadani, Fabio N

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes. Methods Ninety eyes from 90 patients were included. Thirty patients had been recently diagnosed with glaucoma and had no previous history of treatment for ocular hypotension, 30 had elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) without evidence of glaucoma, and 30 had normal IOP (<21 mmHg) with no detectable glaucomatous damage. Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT), dynamic contour tonometry (DCT), blood pressure measurement, pachymetry, Humphrey visual field, and routine ophthalmic examination was performed in each patient. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and IOP. The ocular pulse amplitude was given by DCT. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to compare the glaucomatous and ocular hypertensive groups, and comparisons with the normal IOP group were done using the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean IOP by DCT was 22.7 ± 4.3 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 22.3 ± 2.8 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 14.3 ± 1.6 mmHg in the control group. Mean IOP by GAT was 19.0 ± 5.1 mmHg for glaucoma, 22.4 ± 2.1 mmHg for ocular hypertension, and 12.9 ± 2.2 mmHg for controls. Mean ocular pulse amplitude was 3.4 ± 1.2 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 3.5 ± 1.2 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 2.6 ± 0.9 mmHg in the control group. Mean ocular perfusion pressure was 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 50.2 ± 7.0 mmHg in controls. No significant correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude was found in any of the groups (P = 0.865 and r = −0.032, P = 0.403 and r = −0.156, P = 0.082 and ρ = −0.307 for glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes, respectively). Conclusion There is no significant correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude values in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, or normal eyes. IOP values measured by GAT correlate with those measured by DCT. PMID:23966769

  10. Petascale cross correlation in software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsdell, Benjamin R.; Clark, M. A.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2014-04-01

    The exascale computational demands of back-end processing in the era of the SKA and HERA, headlined by the needs of cross-correlation, are likely to require solutions that differ significantly from traditional approaches on smaller arrays. The rapid growth of massively-parallel general-purpose computing hardware presents an alternative to ASIC- or FPGA-based designs and promises several advantages. In this talk we present strong scaling results for an FX correlator that runs entirely in software on GPU-based off-the-shelf HPC clusters.

  11. Pairing correlations and effective mass

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Sagawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-05-15

    We study the effect of effective mass on pairing correlations in the ground states of superfluid nuclei {sup 124}Sn and {sup 136}Sn. Various parameter sets of Skyrme interactions and relativistic Lagrangians are adopted to study pairing correlations across a wide range of effective mass. It is shown that surface-type pairing interaction gives an almost constant pairing gap as a function of the effective mass, while volume-type pairing interaction shows rather strong dependence of the pairing gap upon the effective mass. The local pair potentials of various effective interactions are also examined in relation to the effective mass.

  12. Top Quark Spin Correlations - Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2012-02-01

    The top quark decay width (G{sub F}m{sub t}{sup 3} {approx} 1 GeV) is much larger than the QCD hadronization scale ({Lambda}{sub QCD} {approx} 0.1 GeV) and much larger than the spin decorrelation scale ({Lambda}{sub QCD}{sup 2}/m{sub t} {approx} 0.1 MeV). Therefore, spin correlations in top quark pair production are reflected in angular correlations of the decay products, see [1] and [2].

  13. Correlation properties of loose groups

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, M.A.G.; Da Costa, L.N. )

    1990-02-01

    The two-point spatial correlation function for loose groups of galaxies is computed, using the recently compiled catalog of groups in the southern hemisphere. It is found that the correlation function for groups has a similar slope to that of galaxies but with a smaller amplitude, confirming an earlier result obtained from a similar analysis of the CfA group catalog. This implies that groups of galaxies are more randomly distributed than galaxies, which may be consistent with the predictions of Kashlinsky (1987) for a gravitational clustering scenario for the formation of large-scale structures. 21 refs.

  14. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-01

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit.

  15. Converting Coherence to Quantum Correlations.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiajun; Yadin, Benjamin; Girolami, Davide; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2016-04-22

    Recent results in quantum information theory characterize quantum coherence in the context of resource theories. Here, we study the relation between quantum coherence and quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation which appears even in nonentangled states. We prove that the creation of quantum discord with multipartite incoherent operations is bounded by the amount of quantum coherence consumed in its subsystems during the process. We show how the interplay between quantum coherence consumption and creation of quantum discord works in the preparation of multipartite quantum correlated states and in the model of deterministic quantum computation with one qubit. PMID:27152781

  16. Total Phenytoin concentration is not well correlated with active free drug in critically-ill head trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Kourosh; Hadi, Farin; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Beigmohammadi, Mohammad-Taghi; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Farhudi, Shirin; Hendoui, Narjes; Najafi, Atabak; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Phenytoin is an antiepileptic drug used widely for prophylaxis and treatment of seizure after neurotrauma. Phenytoin has a complex pharmacokinetics and monitoring of its serum concentrations is recommended during treatment. Total phenytoin concentration is routinely measured for monitoring of therapy. In this study, we evaluated the correlation between phenytoin total and free concentrations in neurotrauma critically-ill patients to determine whether the phenytoin total concentration is a reliable predictor of free drug, which is responsible for the therapeutic effects. Methods: A total of 40 adult head trauma patients evaluated for free (unbound) and total serum phenytoin concentrations. Patients were divided into two groups. Group A consists of 20 unconscious patients with severe head injury under mechanical ventilation and Group B consists of 20 conscious self-ventilated patients. Correlation and agreement between total and free phenytoin plasma concentrations were analyzed. Findings: Pearson correlation analysis and Bland-Altman test showed weak to moderate correlation (r = 0.528) and poor agreement between free and total phenytoin concentrations in patients with severe trauma and higher Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores (Group A) and good correlation (r = 0.817) and moderate agreement in patients with mild to moderate trauma and lower APACHE II scores (Group B). Conclusion: Our results indicated that total phenytoin serum concentration is not a reliable therapeutic goal for drug monitoring in severely-ill head trauma patients even in the absence of hypoalbuminemia, renal and hepatic failure. It seems justifiable to measure free phenytoin concentration in all severely ill neurotrauma patients. PMID:24991615

  17. Correlation Analysis between Tibet AS-γ TeV Cosmic Ray and WMAP Nine-year Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qian-Qing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-08-01

    The WMAP team subtracted template-based foreground models to produce foreground-reduced maps, and masked point sources and uncertain sky regions directly; however, whether foreground residuals exist in the WMAP foreground-reduced maps is still an open question. Here, we use Pearson correlation coefficient analysis with AS-γ TeV cosmic ray (CR) data to probe possible foreground residuals in the WMAP nine-year data. The correlation results between the CR and foreground-contained maps (WMAP foreground-unreduced maps, WMAP template-based, and Maximum Entropy Method foreground models) suggest that: (1) CRs can trace foregrounds in the WMAP data; (2) at least some TeV CRs originate from the Milky Way; (3) foregrounds may be related to the existence of CR anisotropy (loss-cone and tail-in structures); (4) there exist differences among different types of foregrounds in the decl. range of <15°. Then, we generate 10,000 mock cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps to describe the cosmic variance, which is used to measure the effect of the fluctuations of all possible CMB maps to the correlations between CR and CMB maps. Finally, we do correlation analysis between the CR and WMAP foreground-reduced maps, and find that: (1) there are significant anticorrelations; and (2) the WMAP foreground-reduced maps are credible. However, the significant anticorrelations may be accidental, and the higher signal-to-noise ratio Planck SMICA map cannot reject the hypothesis of accidental correlations. We therefore can only conclude that the foreground residuals exist with ∼95% probability.

  18. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Correlates with Conventional Helical Computed Tomography in Evaluation of Lipiodol Accumulation in HCC after Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Toru; Abe, Satoshi; Hoshii, Asami; Yamada, Yumi; Iiduka, Akihiko; Nemoto, Takeo; Takeda, Keiko; Yoshida, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The amount of drug-loaded lipiodol in an HCC tumor post-transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) correlates with the risk of local tumor recurrence. Lipiodol enhancement of a tumor on conventional CT, measured in Hounsfield units (HU), can predict tumor response. Here we investigate whether cone-beam CT (CBCT) can also be used to predict tumor response, providing the benefit of being able to optimize the patient’s treatment plan intra-procedurally. Methods A total of 82 HCC nodules (82 patients), ≤5 cm in diameter, were treated with balloon-occluded TACE using miriplatin between December 2013 and November 2014. For each patient, both CBCT and conventional CT images were obtained post-TACE. The degree of correlation between CBCT and conventional CT was determined by comparing identical regions of interest for each imaging modality using pixel values. Results The pixel values from conventional CT and CBCT were highly correlated, with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.912 (p<0.001). The location of the nodules within the liver did not affect the results; the correlation coefficient was 0.891 (p<0.001) for the left lobe and 0.926 (p<0.001) for the right lobe. The mean pixel value for conventional CT was 439 ± 279 HU, and the mean pixel value for CBCT was 416 ± 311 HU. Conclusions CBCT may be used as a substitute for conventional CT to quantitatively evaluate the amount of drug-loaded lipiodol within an HCC nodule and, hence, the efficacy of TACE treatment. The major benefit of using CBCT is the ability to predict the likelihood of local recurrence intra-procedurally, enabling subsequent treatment optimization. PMID:26752696

  19. Correlation of Simulation Examination to Written Test Scores for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Testing: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Suzanne L.; Anderson, Craig L.; Yang, Luanna; Canales, Cecilia; Amin, Alpesh; Lotfipour, Shahram; McCoy, C. Eric; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traditional Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) courses are evaluated using written multiple-choice tests. High-fidelity simulation is a widely used adjunct to didactic content, and has been used in many specialties as a training resource as well as an evaluative tool. There are no data to our knowledge that compare simulation examination scores with written test scores for ACLS courses. Objective To compare and correlate a novel high-fidelity simulation-based evaluation with traditional written testing for senior medical students in an ACLS course. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study to determine the correlation between simulation-based evaluation and traditional written testing in a medical school simulation center. Students were tested on a standard acute coronary syndrome/ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest scenario. Our primary outcome measure was correlation of exam results for 19 volunteer fourth-year medical students after a 32-hour ACLS-based Resuscitation Boot Camp course. Our secondary outcome was comparison of simulation-based vs. written outcome scores. Results The composite average score on the written evaluation was substantially higher (93.6%) than the simulation performance score (81.3%, absolute difference 12.3%, 95% CI [10.6–14.0%], p<0.00005). We found a statistically significant moderate correlation between simulation scenario test performance and traditional written testing (Pearson r=0.48, p=0.04), validating the new evaluation method. Conclusion Simulation-based ACLS evaluation methods correlate with traditional written testing and demonstrate resuscitation knowledge and skills. Simulation may be a more discriminating and challenging testing method, as students scored higher on written evaluation methods compared to simulation. PMID:26594288

  20. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  1. Detecting differential and correlated protein expression in label-free shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Langston, Michael A; Uberbacher, Edward; Hettich, Robert L; Samatova, Nagiza F

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed a relationship between protein abundance and sampling statistics, such as sequence coverage, peptide count, and spectral count, in label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) shotgun proteomics. The use of sampling statistics offers a promising method of measuring relative protein abundance and detecting differentially expressed or coexpressed proteins. We performed a systematic analysis of various approaches to quantifying differential protein expression in eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae and prokaryotic Rhodopseudomonas palustris label-free LC-MS/MS data. First, we showed that, among three sampling statistics, the spectral count has the highest technical reproducibility, followed by the less-reproducible peptide count and relatively nonreproducible sequence coverage. Second, we used spectral count statistics to measure differential protein expression in pairwise experiments using five statistical tests: Fisher's exact test, G-test, AC test, t-test, and LPE test. Given the S. cerevisiae data set with spiked proteins as a benchmark and the false positive rate as a metric, our evaluation suggested that the Fisher's exact test, G-test, and AC test can be used when the number of replications is limited (one or two), whereas the t-test is useful with three or more replicates available. Third, we generalized the G-test to increase the sensitivity of detecting differential protein expression under multiple experimental conditions. Out of 1622 identified R. palustris proteins in the LC-MS/MS experiment, the generalized G-test detected 1119 differentially expressed proteins under six growth conditions. Finally, we studied correlated expression of these 1119 proteins by analyzing pairwise expression correlations and by delineating protein clusters according to expression patterns. Through pairwise expression correlation analysis, we demonstrated that proteins co-located in the same operon were much more strongly coexpressed than those from different operons. Combining cluster analysis with existing protein functional annotations, we identified six protein clusters with known biological significance. In summary, the proposed generalized G-test using spectral count sampling statistics is a viable methodology for robust quantification of relative protein abundance and for sensitive detection of biologically significant differential protein expression under multiple experimental conditions in label-free shotgun proteomics. PMID:17081042

  2. Abdominal Wall Endometrioma: Ultrasonographic Features and Correlation with Clinical Findings

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Genç, Berhan; Yalaz, Seyhan; Şahin, Neslin; Sezer, Taylan Özgür; Solak, İlhami

    2013-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of abdominal wall endometrioma (AWE) is often confused with other surgical conditions. Certain factors relating to knowledge of the clinical history of the disease make correct diagnosis and treatment difficult. Aims: To present the clinical findings and ultrasonographic (US) features of AWE with special emphasis on size-related features. Study Design: This study reviewed abdominal wall endometriomas during a 2-year period in the Radiology Department of Sifa University Hospital, Izmir. Methods: Eleven women (mean age 32.6 years) with 12 scar endometriomas (mean diameter 29.2 mm) were consecutively evaluated by US and Colour Doppler examination (CDUS) prior to surgery. Lesions were grouped into large (≥3 cm) and small nodules. Vascularisation was classified as location (central, peripheral and mixed) and severity (absent, moderately vascular and hypervascular). In each patient, the nature of pain (absent, cyclic: associated with menstruation and continuous), historical and clinical data were documented. Four patients underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging and their findings were presented. Fisher’s exact test, χ2 test for categorical data and the unpaired T-test for continuous variables were used for statistical analysis. Results: In all the women, US of the AWE showed the presence of a solid hypoechoic mass (less echogenic than the surrounding hyperechoic fat) within the abdominal wall. There was a significant correlation between AWE sizes with repeated caesareans and the mean time between the last operation and admission to hospital (p<0.05). Large endometriomas showed increased central vascularity (p<0.05). Cyclic pain was more frequent in small lesions, whereas continuous pain was more commonly found in patients with larger lesions (p<0.05). Conclusion: AWE is often misdiagnosed clinically because endometriosis may occur years after the caesarean section, the pain is often non-cyclic in nature, and there is not always a palpable tender mass. The sonographic and Doppler findings, along with proper correlation with clinical data, may substantially contribute to the correct diagnosis of endometrioma. PMID:25207093

  3. The BRCA1 Ashkenazi founder mutations occur on common haplotypes and are not highly correlated with anonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms likely to be used in genome-wide case-control association studies

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lutécia H Mateus; Pineda, Marbin A; Rowe, William H; Fonseca, Libia R; Greene, Mark H; Offit, Kenneth; Ellis, Nathan A; Zhang, Jinghui; Collins, Andrew; Struewing, Jeffery P

    2007-01-01

    Background We studied linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns at the BRCA1 locus, a susceptibility gene for breast and ovarian cancer, using a dense set of 114 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 5 population groups. We focused on Ashkenazi Jews in whom there are known founder mutations, to address the question of whether we would have been able to identify the 185delAG mutation in a case-control association study (should one have been done) using anonymous genetic markers. This mutation is present in approximately 1% of the general Ashkenazi population and 4% of Ashkenazi breast cancer cases. We evaluated LD using pairwise and haplotype-based methods, and assessed correlation of SNPs with the founder mutations using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results BRCA1 is characterized by very high linkage disequilibrium in all populations spanning several hundred kilobases. Overall, haplotype blocks and pair-wise LD bins were highly correlated, with lower LD in African versus non-African populations. The 185delAG and 5382insC founder mutations occur on the two most common haplotypes among Ashkenazim. Because these mutations are rare, even though they are in strong LD with many other SNPs in the region as measured by D-prime, there were no strong associations when assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficient, r (maximum of 0.04 for the 185delAG). Conclusion Since the required sample size is related to the inverse of r, this suggests that it would have been difficult to map BRCA1 in an Ashkenazi case-unrelated control association study using anonymous markers that were linked to the founder mutations. PMID:17916242

  4. Simplified Correlator For Ranging Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Smith, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Improved correlating subsystem of pseudorandom-code ranging system made possible by advent of fast, custom-made, very-large-scale integrated circuits. Performs far fewer arithmetical operations, contains much less specialized analog and digital circuitry, and used with large number of different codes.

  5. Sample Size and Correlational Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard B.; Doherty, Michael E.; Friedrich, Jeff C.

    2008-01-01

    In 4 studies, the authors examined the hypothesis that the structure of the informational environment makes small samples more informative than large ones for drawing inferences about population correlations. The specific purpose of the studies was to test predictions arising from the signal detection simulations of R. B. Anderson, M. E. Doherty,…

  6. Compact coherent optical correlator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upatnieks, Juris; Abshier, James O.

    1988-05-01

    A real-time coherent optical correlator was designed, fabricated and tested. The correlator features 30 separate filters, low-light level real-time operation, and a compact design. The correlator is packaged in a cylinder 15 cm in diameter by 30 cm long, excluding imaging lens. Each of the two laser diode coherent light sources is imaged to 15 locations with holographic optical elements (HOEs). The HOEs perform a number of functions usually requiring several optical components. The HOEs correct the aspect ratio of the laser diode beams, perform the functions of collimating and Fourier transform lenses, multiplex the light beam to form multiple Fourier transforms, and correct a variety of system aberrations. Low-light operation is achieved with a microchannel image intensifier in front of a liquid crystal light modulator. This arrangement allows the correlator to operate over a wide range of light levels, from full sunlight to dusk. The image intensifier, however, reduces system resolution and response time. A computer controlled filter maker system was designed to automate filter recording. The computer, a small PC-type, controls the position of the recording plate, the reference beam angle, dwell and exposure times, and checks light source and shutter operation.

  7. Estimating correlation under interval uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalal-Kamali, Ali; Kreinovich, Vladik

    2013-05-01

    In many engineering situations, we are interested in finding the correlation ρ between different quantities x and y based on the values xi and yi of these quantities measured in different situations i. Measurements are never absolutely accurate; it is therefore necessary to take this inaccuracy into account when estimating the correlation ρ. Sometimes, we know the probabilities of different values of measurement errors, but in many cases, we only know the upper bounds Δxi and Δyi on the corresponding measurement errors. In such situations, after we get the measurement results x and y, the only information that we have about the actual (unknown) values xi and yi is that they belong to the corresponding intervals [x-Δxi,x+Δxi] and [y-Δyi,y+Δyi]. Different values from these intervals lead, in general, to different values of the correlation ρ. It is therefore desirable to find the range [ρ̲ ,ρ¯] of possible values of the correlation when xi and yi take values from the corresponding intervals. In general, the problem of computing this range is NP-hard. In this paper, we provide a feasible (=polynomial-time) algorithm for computing at least one of the endpoints of this interval: for computing ρ¯ when ρ¯>0 and for computing ρ̲ when ρ̲ <0.

  8. Time correlators from deferred measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehri, D.; Lebedev, A. V.; Lesovik, G. B.; Blatter, G.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated measurements that typically occur in two-time or multitime correlators rely on von Neumann's projection postulate, telling how to restart the system after an intermediate measurement. We invoke the principle of deferred measurement to describe an alternative procedure in which coevolving quantum memories extract system information through entanglement, combined with a final readout of the memories described by Born's rule. Our approach to repeated quantum measurements respects the unitary evolution of quantum mechanics during intermediate times, unifies the treatment of strong and weak measurements, and reproduces the projected and (anti)symmetrized correlators in the two limits. As an illustration, we apply our formalism to the calculation of the electron charge correlator in a mesoscopic physics setting, where single electron pulses assume the role of flying memory qubits. We propose an experimental setup that reduces the measurement of the time correlator to the measurement of currents and noise, exploiting the (pulsed) injection of electrons to cope with the challenge of performing short-time measurements.

  9. Clinical correlates with diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, L

    1987-01-01

    Three types of clinical studies were carried out to better understand diaper dermatitis in a general infant population. In 'snapshot' clinical studies, skin condition under the diaper was evaluated at a given point in time across a large base of infants. Correlations were sought between diaper dermatitis incidence and severity and a number of factors, including sex, diet, maturity, type of diaper, history of allergy, contact with fecal matter, presence of Candida albicans, and diaper change frequency. Severe diaper rash correlated strongly with the presence of C. albicans, and the frequency of rash correlated with duration of contact with feces and inversely with diaper change frequency. Diaper rash peaked at ages 9-12 months and was lower for breast-fed than for formula-fed infants. Exclusive use of disposable diapers correlated with lower rash levels than when some or all cloth diapers were used. In a longitudinal study, infants were observed daily for 50 days in order to determine the frequency and duration of rash episodes. In this study, the tendency for some infants to be rash-prone was clearly indicated. In a third type of study, over 10,000 infant visits to physicians' offices were used to record skin condition. Results showed a three-to fourfold increase in diaper rash if the child had diarrhea during the previous 48 h. PMID:3299331

  10. Tetrachoric Correlation: A Permutation Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Michael A.; Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    An exact permutation test is provided for the tetrachoric correlation coefficient. Comparisons with the conventional test employing Student's t distribution demonstrate the necessity of using the permutation approach for small sample sizes and/or disproportionate marginal frequency totals. (Contains 4 tables.)

  11. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  12. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  13. Multilevel Modeling with Correlated Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Frees, Edward W.

    2007-01-01

    When there exist omitted effects, measurement error, and/or simultaneity in multilevel models, explanatory variables may be correlated with random components, and standard estimation methods do not provide consistent estimates of model parameters. This paper introduces estimators that are consistent under such conditions. By employing generalized…

  14. Multilevel Modeling with Correlated Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Frees, Edward W.

    2007-01-01

    When there exist omitted effects, measurement error, and/or simultaneity in multilevel models, explanatory variables may be correlated with random components, and standard estimation methods do not provide consistent estimates of model parameters. This paper introduces estimators that are consistent under such conditions. By employing generalized

  15. Resistant multiple sparse canonical correlation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Jacob; Replogle, Joseph; Chandler, Gabriel; Hardin, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a multivariate technique that takes two datasets and forms the most highly correlated possible pairs of linear combinations between them. Each subsequent pair of linear combinations is orthogonal to the preceding pair, meaning that new information is gleaned from each pair. By looking at the magnitude of coefficient values, we can find out which variables can be grouped together, thus better understanding multiple interactions that are otherwise difficult to compute or grasp intuitively. CCA appears to have quite powerful applications to high-throughput data, as we can use it to discover, for example, relationships between gene expression and gene copy number variation. One of the biggest problems of CCA is that the number of variables (often upwards of 10,000) makes biological interpretation of linear combinations nearly impossible. To limit variable output, we have employed a method known as sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA), while adding estimation which is resistant to extreme observations or other types of deviant data. In this paper, we have demonstrated the success of resistant estimation in variable selection using SCCA. Additionally, we have used SCCA to find multiple canonical pairs for extended knowledge about the datasets at hand. Again, using resistant estimators provided more accurate estimates than standard estimators in the multiple canonical correlation setting. R code is available and documented at https://github.com/hardin47/rmscca. PMID:26963062

  16. Organizational Correlates of Implementation of Colocation of Mental Health and Primary Care in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Erick G.; Heslin, Kevin C.; Chang, Evelyn; Fenwick, Karissa; Yano, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the role of organizational factors in the ability of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinics to implement colocated mental health care in primary care settings (PC-MH). The study used data from the VHA Clinical Practice Organizational Survey collected in 2007 from 225 clinic administrators across the United States. Clinic degree of implementation of PC-MH was the dependent variable, whereas independent variables included policies and procedures, organizational context, and leaders’ perceptions of barriers to change. Pearson bivariate correlations and multivariable linear regression were used to test hypotheses. Results show that depression care training for primary care providers and clinics’ flexibility and participation were both positively correlated with implementation of PC-MH. However, after accounting for other factors, regressions show that only training primary care providers in depression care was marginally associated with degree of implementation of PC-MH (p = 0.051). Given the importance of this topic for implementing integrated care as part of health care reform, these null findings underscore the need to improve theory and testing of more proximal measures of colocation in future work. PMID:25096986

  17. Correlation between manual muscle strength and interleukin-6 (IL-6) plasma levels in elderly community-dwelling women.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Narciso, Fabrícia Mendes Silva; Oliveira, Daniela Matos Garcia; Coelho, Fernanda Matos; Souza, Danielle da Glória de; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa

    2009-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of muscle mass related to aging and leads to muscle performance decline. An increase in inflammatory mediator levels, especially of IL-6, has been associated to reduced muscle strength in the elderly. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to correlate IL-6 plasma levels with manual muscle strength (MMS) in 63 community-dwelling elderly women. (71.2+/-7.4years). IL-6 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and MMS was measured using the JAMAR dynamometer. Pearson's test was used to explore the relationship between the outcomes at the significance level of alpha=0.05. IL-6 levels (2.56+/-3.44pg/ml) and MMS (22.86+/-4.62kgf) exhibited an inverse correlation (r=-0.2673 and p=0.0373). The increase in IL-6 plasma levels possibly contributed toward the reduction in manual muscle strength among the elderly women studied. PMID:18462819

  18. Dynamics of electricity market correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Escarela-Perez, R.; Espinosa-Perez, G.; Urrea, R.

    2009-06-01

    Electricity market participants rely on demand and price forecasts to decide their bidding strategies, allocate assets, negotiate bilateral contracts, hedge risks, and plan facility investments. However, forecasting is hampered by the non-linear and stochastic nature of price time series. Diverse modeling strategies, from neural networks to traditional transfer functions, have been explored. These approaches are based on the assumption that price series contain correlations that can be exploited for model-based prediction purposes. While many works have been devoted to the demand and price modeling, a limited number of reports on the nature and dynamics of electricity market correlations are available. This paper uses detrended fluctuation analysis to study correlations in the demand and price time series and takes the Australian market as a case study. The results show the existence of correlations in both demand and prices over three orders of magnitude in time ranging from hours to months. However, the Hurst exponent is not constant over time, and its time evolution was computed over a subsample moving window of 250 observations. The computations, also made for two Canadian markets, show that the correlations present important fluctuations over a seasonal one-year cycle. Interestingly, non-linearities (measured in terms of a multifractality index) and reduced price predictability are found for the June-July periods, while the converse behavior is displayed during the December-January period. In terms of forecasting models, our results suggest that non-linear recursive models should be considered for accurate day-ahead price estimation. On the other hand, linear models seem to suffice for demand forecasting purposes.

  19. The relationship between English language learning strategies and proficiency of pre-university students: A study case of UMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-07-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between language learning strategies and proficiency in English. Fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were judged based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) Results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  20. Flood/drought event identification using an effective indicator based on the correlations between multiple time scales of the Standardized Precipitation Index and river discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuefeng; Chen, Xingwei; Chen, Ying; Liu, Meibing; Gao, Lu

    2015-12-01

    In order to further investigate the capability of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) to identify flood/drought events, monthly precipitation data from 26 precipitation stations and monthly discharge data from four hydrological stations from 1960 to 2006 in the Minjiang River basin were used to analyze the correlations between multiple time scales of the SPI and river discharge. The SPI series that had a maximum correlation with discharge was chosen to detect flood/drought events in the basin, and the results were compared to historical flood/drought events. The results indicated the following. (1) High Pearson correlations between the SPI and discharge were identified at shorter time scales (1 to 3 months), and the maximum correlation was found on the time scale of 2 months. (2) Five floods among the six largest historical flood events in the Minjiang River basin were identified with the 2-month SPI, but the SPI does have shortcomings in identifying more general floods. The SPI also identified major drought events that were consistent with historical data. This demonstrates that the 2-month SPI is an effective indicator for the identification of major flood/drought events in the Minjiang River basin.

  1. Correlation between Self-Citation and Impact Factor in Iranian English Medical Journals in WoS and ISC: A Comparative Approach

    PubMed Central

    GHAZI MIRSAEID, Seyed Javad; MOTAMEDI, Nadia; RAMEZAN GHORBANI, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this study, the impact of self-citation (Journal and Author) on impact factor of Iranian English Medical journals in two international citation databases, Web of Science (WoS) and Islamic world science citation center (ISC), were compared by citation analysis. Methods: Twelve journals in WoS and 26 journals in ISC databases indexed between the years (20062009) were selected and compared. For comparison of self-citation rate in two databases, we used Wilcoxon and Mann-whitney tests. We used Pearson test for correlation of self-citation and IF in WoS, and the Spearmans correlation coefficient for the ISC database. Covariance analysis was used for comparison of two correlation tests. P. value was 0.05 in all of tests. Results: There was no significant difference between self-citation rates in two databases (P>0.05). Findings also showed no significant difference between the correlation of Journal self-citation and impact factor in two databases (P=0.526) however, there was significant difference between the authors self-citation and impact factor in these databases (P<0.001). Conclusion: The impact of Authors self-citation in the Impact Factor of WoS was higher than the ISC. PMID:26587498

  2. Correlates of posttraumatic growth among African Americans living with HIV/AIDS in Mississippi1

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Shenell D.; Williams, Bryman E.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun

    2015-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with HIV face a host of challenges post-diagnosis. At risk for negative psychological outcomes, persons living with HIV/AIDS may also experience posttraumatic growth (i.e., positive cognitive and emotional changes that may occur following HIV diagnosis). African Americans, in particular, experience poorer psychosocial and behavioral outcomes and greater HIV-related health disparities, and also tend to report more posttraumatic growth than European Americans. This exploratory study examined demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral correlates of posttraumatic growth among 45 African American adults living with HIV in Mississippi. Statistical methods included correlational analyses and independent sample t-tests. As measured by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, posttraumatic growth was associated with several demographic (i.e., age, education, employment, income), psychosocial (i.e., social support, coping self-efficacy, psychological distress [negative]), and behavioral variables (i.e., church attendance, abstinence from drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes). Findings indicate that African Americans living with HIV in underserved, under-resourced areas are capable of perceiving posttraumatic growth post-diagnosis. Moreover, research has shown that perceived positive growth is associated with important sociocultural, psychosocial, and behavioral factors that directly and/or indirectly influence health and treatment outcomes. Implications of findings are discussed. PMID:26523161

  3. Histological evaluation of pulp tissue from second primary molars correlated with clinical and radiographic caries findings

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Vellore Kannan; Anwar, Khurshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Managing dental caries in young children is demanding due to the elusions present on the right diagnostic criteria for treatment. The present study evaluated the histological status of pulp tissues extracted from primary second molar with caries involvement. Histological findings are correlated with clinical and radiographic assessment. Materials and Methods: Simple experimental study was conducted on upper or lower second primary molars with occlusal (22 teeth) or proximal (22 teeth) dental caries. Selected children were below 6 years of age. Percentage of caries involvement, residual dentin thickness (RDT), radiographic assessment of interradicular and periapical areas, clinical caries depth and signs and symptoms are the parameters considered for comparing with the histological findings. The specimens were grouped based on the nature of the inflammatory process as acute or chronic. The data were analyzed by Student t-test to compare histological types of inflammation with clinical parameters. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Four cases revealed severe acute inflammation in coronal and relatively mild acute inflammation in radicular pulp. In the rest of the specimen coronal and radicular pulp had similar acute or chronic inflammatory changes. Histological evidence of pulpitis correlated with dental caries depth of ≥80%, RDT of ≤1 mm, radiographic rarefactions in the interradicular regions and symptoms of pain. Conclusion: Primary second molars with more than two-third caries involvement with symptoms of pain histologically showed inflammation of both coronal and radicular pulp tissues in all cases. PMID:24932190

  4. Correlation of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Mo; Kim, Suhn-yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 31 stroke patients. The subjects received an explanation of the procedures and methods and provided informed consent before the experiment. A measurement board was used to determine the the proprioception deficit of the knee as a proprioception test. The proprioception test consisted of a passive and active angle reproduction test. A manual muscle test and modified Ashworth scale were used to evaluate knee muscle strength and spasticity level. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test and Spearman correlation. [Results] The results of this study revealed a significant difference between the affected side and non-affected side in the passive angle reproduction test and a significant difference in the correlation of the proprioception level with muscle strength and spasticity level. [Conclusion] This study indicates that the knee proprioception level is associated with spasticity and muscle strength in stroke patients. PMID:26504273

  5. In Vivo Fluorescence Correlation and Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mütze, Jörg; Ohrt, Thomas; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    In this manuscript, we describe the application of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS), Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy (FCCS), and scanning FCS (sFCS) to two in vivo systems. In the first part, we describe the application of two-photon standard and scanning FCS in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The differentiation of a single fertilized egg into a complex organism in C. elegans is regulated by a number of protein-dependent processes. The oocyte divides asymmetrically into two daughter cells of different developmental fate. Two of the involved proteins, PAR-2 and NMY-2, are studied. The second investigated system is the mechanism of RNA interference in human cells. An EGFP based cell line that allows to study the dynamics and localization of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with FCS in vivo is created, which has so far been inaccessible with other experimental methods. Furthermore, Fluorescence Cross-Correlation Spectroscopy is employed to highlight the asymmetric incorporation of labeled siRNAs into RISC.

  6. Separating Spike Count Correlation from Firing Rate Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Ventura, Valérie; Smith, Matthew A.; Kass, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Populations of cortical neurons exhibit shared fluctuations in spiking activity over time. When measured for a pair of neurons over multiple repetitions of an identical stimulus, this phenomenon emerges as correlated trial-to-trial response variability via spike count correlation (SCC). However, spike counts can be viewed as noisy versions of firing rates, which can vary from trial to trial. From this perspective, the SCC for a pair of neurons becomes a noisy version of the corresponding firing-rate correlation (FRC). Furthermore, the magnitude of the SCC is generally smaller than that of the FRC, and is likely to be less sensitive to experimental manipulation. We provide statistical methods for disambiguating time-averaged drive from within-trial noise, thereby separating FRC from SCC. We study these methods to document their reliability, and we apply them to neurons recorded in vivo from area V4, in an alert animal. We show how the various effects we describe are reflected in the data: within-trial effects are largely negligible, while attenuation due to trial-to-trial variation dominates, and frequently produces comparisons in SCC that, because of noise, do not accurately reflect those based on the underlying FRC. PMID:26942746

  7. Separating Spike Count Correlation from Firing Rate Correlation.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Giuseppe; Ventura, Valérie; Smith, Matthew A; Kass, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Populations of cortical neurons exhibit shared fluctuations in spiking activity over time. When measured for a pair of neurons over multiple repetitions of an identical stimulus, this phenomenon emerges as correlated trial-to-trial response variability via spike count correlation (SCC). However, spike counts can be viewed as noisy versions of firing rates, which can vary from trial to trial. From this perspective, the SCC for a pair of neurons becomes a noisy version of the corresponding firing rate correlation (FRC). Furthermore, the magnitude of the SCC is generally smaller than that of the FRC and is likely to be less sensitive to experimental manipulation. We provide statistical methods for disambiguating time-averaged drive from within-trial noise, thereby separating FRC from SCC. We study these methods to document their reliability, and we apply them to neurons recorded in vivo from area V4 in an alert animal. We show how the various effects we describe are reflected in the data: within-trial effects are largely negligible, while attenuation due to trial-to-trial variation dominates and frequently produces comparisons in SCC that, because of noise, do not accurately reflect those based on the underlying FRC. PMID:26942746

  8. Neurocognitive correlates of white matter in children surviving cancer: a quantitative MR imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Shan, Zuyao Y.; Wu, Shengjie; Helton, Susan; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2005-04-01

    Due to the inherent risk of central nervous system (CNS) dissemination, children treated for either acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or malignant brain tumors (BT) receive aggressive CNS therapy. The primary objective of this study was to confirm a previously observed association between reduced volumes of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and intellectual and attentional deficits in survivors. A combined MR imaging set consisting of T1, T2, and PD images were collected for 221 children (110 BT; 112 ALL). MR imaging sets were segmented with a hybrid neural network algorithm and volumetric measurements were calculated for five slices centered on the basal ganglia. Summary measures of Overall Index, Omissions, d" (attentiveness), and beta (risk-taking) were derived from the computer-administered Conners" Continuous Performance Test (CPT). Age-corrected estimates of Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) were also obtained. Pearson correlation analyses were performed between each neurocognitive measure and the volume of NAWM. The correlation between FSIQ and NAWM failed to reach statistical significance for the BT group but was highly significant for the more homogeneous ALL group. Larger Omission rates, decreased attentiveness and more risk taking were significantly associated with lower NAWM volumes in both groups of survivors. Long-term survivors are at increased risk for cognitive delays or deficits, which oftentimes impair future academic performance, employment, and quality of life. These long-term adverse effects of treatment appear to be due to a diminished ability to acquire new information and may be secondary to deficits in attention, which is thought to be supported by interhemispheric and intrahemispheric white matter tracts.

  9. Enamel lesion parameter correlations between polychromatic micro-CT and TMR.

    PubMed

    Hamba, H; Nikaido, T; Sadr, A; Nakashima, S; Tagami, J

    2012-06-01

    Transverse microradiography (TMR) is considered as the gold standard technique for the evaluation of enamel lesions. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) has the advantage of non-destructive measurements, but the beam-hardening effect with polychromatic x-rays is a major drawback. To date, no study has validated µCT against TMR. The objective of this study was to validate µCT measurements of enamel lesions under various x-ray conditions and software beam-hardening correction (BHC) against TMR. Human molars with natural white-spot lesions were scanned for 5 min by µCT at 100 kV in different conditions: 50 µA (0.5-mm Al filter), 165 µA (0.5-mm Al/0.3-mm Cu), and 200 µA (0.5-mm Al/0.4-mm Cu), with or without BHC. Grayscale values were converted into mineral density values using phantoms. Thin sections at the same positions were then prepared for TMR. Lesion depth (LD; µm) and mineral loss (ΔZ; vol%µm) were compared between µCT and TMR by Pearson's correlations. µCT measurements correlated well with TMR under all conditions (p < 0.001, r > 0.86 for LD and ΔZ), except for 0.5-mm Al without BHC (p > 0.05). Even without BHC, combined Al/Cu filters successfully reduced the beam-hardening effect. µCT can be used as a non-destructive alternative to TMR with comparable parameters for the study of enamel lesions. PMID:22476867

  10. Correlation between radiographic risk for glenoid component loosening and clinical scores in shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Campi, Fabrizio; Paladini, Paolo; Lollino, Nicola; Fauci, Francesco; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    Glenoid component loosening is the weak point in the failure of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). In this study we analyse the radiographic risk factors observed on 86 cemented polyethylene glenoid components and their relationship with clinical signs at a mean follow-up of 5.8 years. Clinical assessment included Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and Constant-Murley score. Radiograms were taken to detect periprosthetic radiolucency, tilt, medial displacement and polyethylene thinning. Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were calculated for statistical analysis. In 61 patients (71%) lucent lines were less than 2 mm wide (grade 2) and in 6 cases (7%) they were >or=2 mm wide (grade 3 and 4). Thinning of the polyethylene was found in 11 cases (13%), glenoid tilt in 6 cases (7%) and medial migration of the component in 5 cases (6%). Complete glenoid prosthetic loosening was found in 3 cases (3.5%) associated with polyethylene wear and glenoid bone loss. The Constant-Murley score associated with radiolucency grade 3 and 4 was less than 45% (38.39 +/- 8.9) (p < 0.05), while a score less than 56% (30.72 +/- 8.7) was found in patients with glenoid tilt and medial migration (p < 0.01). The mean SST score was 4.8 +/- 2.8 in case of glenoid tilt and migration of the component (p < 0.01). Removal of the glenoid component and conversion to hemiarthroplasty or reverse prostheses is suggested in painful glenoid loosening. An exhaustive analysis of radiograms is essential to detect early and late complications or risk factors of glenoid loosening. PMID:19711167

  11. Correlation of cystatin C and creatinine based estimates of renal function in children with hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hossein-Emad; Dehghan, Arash; Karimian, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The use of a simple and accurate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating method aiming minute assessment of renal function can be of great clinical importance. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the association of a GFR estimating by equation that includes only cystatin C (Gentian equation) to equation that include only creatinine (Schwartz equation) among children. Patients and Methods: A total of 31 children aged from 1 day to 5 years with the final diagnosis of unilateral or bilateral hydronephrosis referred to Besat hospital in Hamadan, between March 2010 and February 2011 were consecutively enrolled. Schwartz and Gentian equations were employed to determine GFR based on plasma creatinine and cystatin C levels, respectively. Results: The proportion of GFR based on Schwartz equation was 70.19± 24.86 ml/min/1.73 m2, while the level of this parameter based on Gentian method and using cystatin C was 86.97 ± 21.57 ml/min/1.73 m2. The Pearson correlation coefficient analysis showed a strong direct association between the two levels of GFR measured by Schwartz equation based on serum creatinine level and Gentian method and using cystatin C (r = 0.594, P < 0.001). The linear association between GFR values measured with the two methods included cystatin C based GFR = 50.8+ 0.515 × Schwartz GFR. The correlation between GFR values measured by using serum creatinine and serum cystatin C measurements remained meaningful even after adjustment for patients’ gender and age (r = 0.724, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The equation developed based on cystatin C level is comparable with another equation, based on serum creatinine (Schwartz formula) to estimate GFR in children. PMID:27069964

  12. A Correlation Study of Student Attitudes Toward Science in a Southern State High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco-Southall, Crystal

    The purpose of this correlational research study was to examine the attitudes toward science of students in Grades 11 and 12 and to investigate if there were differences resulting from gender, grade level, ethnicity, and the level of the curriculum received in average or advanced placement (AP) honors science. The participants of this study consisted of 50 randomly selected male and female high school students who were enrolled in AP and average science classes in an urban Southern state high school. The study used the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA) instrument to measure students' attitudes toward science in seven categories including (a) Social Implications of Science, (b) Normality of Scientists, (c) Attitude Toward Scientific Inquiry, (d) Adoption of Scientific Attitudes, (e) Enjoyment of Science Lessons, (f) Leisure Interest in Science, and (g) Career Interest in Science. The quantitative component of the study allowed the researcher to determine whether there were gender differences in attitudes toward science based on the seven subscales and measuring different aspects of science attitudes. Statistical treatment of the TOSRA survey involved the use of descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and multiple and linear regression. Findings did not reveal significant gender differences on the total attitude scores although there were differences on several of the subscales. In addition, there were no significant differences in the mean attitude scores for grade level. However, the study did reveal differences in ethnicity and attitudes toward science. With regard to ethnicity, scores for Native Americans and Whites were higher than scores for Asians, African Americans, and Hispanics indicating that Native Americans and White students showed a more positive attitude toward science. Regarding the level of curriculum received by students who were exposed to advanced level science courses showed more positive attitudes toward science than those students who were enrolled in average science classes.

  13. Adenosine plasma level correlates with homocysteine and uric acid concentrations in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Fromonot, J; Deharo, P; Bruzzese, L; Cuisset, T; Quilici, J; Bonatti, S; Fenouillet, E; Mottola, G; Ruf, J; Guieu, R

    2016-03-01

    The role of hyperhomocysteinemia in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients remains unclear. The present study evaluated the relationship between homocysteine (HCys), adenosine plasma concentration (APC), plasma uric acid, and CAD severity evaluated using the SYNTAX score. We also evaluated in vitro the influence of adenosine on HCys production by hepatoma cultured cells (HuH7). Seventy-eight patients (mean age SD: 66.3 11.3; mean SYNTAX score: 19.9 12.3) and 30 healthy subjects (mean age: 61 13) were included. We incubated HuH7 cells with increasing concentrations of adenosine and addressed the effect on HCys level in cell culture supernatant. Patients vs. controls had higher APC (0.82 0.5 ?mol/L vs 0.53 0.14 ?mol/L; p < 0.01), HCys (15 7.6 ?mol/L vs 6.8 3 ?mol/L, p < 0.0001), and uric acid (242.6 97 vs 202 59, p < 0.05) levels. APC was correlated with HCys and uric acid concentrations in patients (Pearson's R = 0.65 and 0.52; p < 0.0001, respectively). The SYNTAX score was correlated with HCys concentration. Adenosine induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in HCys in cell culture. Our data suggest that high APC is associated with HCys and uric acid concentrations in CAD patients. Whether the increased APC participates in atherosclerosis or, conversely, is part of a protective regulation process needs further investigations. PMID:26762617

  14. Structural modulations in the rare-earth metal digermanides REAl1-xGe2 (RE = Gd-Tm, Lu, Y; 0.8 < x < 0.9). Correlations between long- and short-range vacancy ordering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiliang; Wang, Yingmin; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-02-01

    Rare-earth metal aluminum germanides with the general formula REAl(1-x)Ge(2) (RE = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu, and Y) have been synthesized by direct fusion of the corresponding elements. The structures have been studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED). The average structure represents a randomly "stuffed" variant of the orthorhombic ZrSi(2) structure type, also known as the CeNi(1-x)Si(2) type (Pearson symbol oC16; space group Cmcm). The SAED patterns for selected members of the family suggest the coexistence of commensurate and incommensurate structural modulations. The most prominent model for long-range vacancy ordering is the Tb(4)FeGe(8) type (Pearson symbol mP26; space group P21/n), which is the commensurate 4-fold superstructure of CeNi(1-x)Si(2) (x = (3)/4). Short-range correlations cause additional deviations in the 4-fold superlattice. These results shed more light on the structural complexity as a function of the aluminum vacancies and size of the rare-earth metal. Magnetic susceptibility measurements are presented and discussed. The measured ordering temperatures and calculated ones based on empirical rules and Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions are shown to be in close agreement. PMID:24964140

  15. Shear wave elastography results correlate with liver fibrosis histology and liver function reserve

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan-Hong; Hu, Xiang-Dong; Zhai, Lin; Liu, Ji-Bin; Qiu, Lan-Yan; Zu, Yuan; Liang, Si; Gui, Yu; Qian, Lin-Xue

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the correlation of shear wave elastography (SWE) results with liver fibrosis histology and quantitative function reserve. METHODS: Weekly subcutaneous injection of 60% carbon tetrachloride (1.5 mL/kg) was given to 12 canines for 24 wk to induce experimental liver fibrosis, with olive oil given to 2 control canines. At 24 wk, liver condition was evaluated using clinical biochemistry assays, SWE imaging, lidocaine metabolite monoethylglycine-xylidide (MEGX) test, and histologic fibrosis grading. Clinical biochemistry assays were performed at the institutional central laboratory for routine liver function evaluation. Liver stiffness was measured in triplicate from three different intercostal spaces and expressed as mean liver stiffness modulus (LSM). Plasma concentrations of lidocaine and its metabolite MEGX were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography repeated in duplicate. Liver biopsy samples were fixed in 10% formaldehyde, and liver fibrosis was graded using the modified histological activity index Knodell score (F0-F4). Correlations among histologic grading, LSM, and MEGX measures were analyzed with the Pearson linear correlation coefficient. RESULTS: At 24 wk liver fibrosis histologic grading was as follows: F0, n = 2 (control); F1, n = 0; F2, n = 3; F3, n = 7; and F4, n = 2. SWE LSM was positively correlated with histologic grading (r = 0.835, P < 0.001). Specifically, the F4 group had a significantly higher elastic modulus than the F3, F2, and F0 groups (P = 0.002, P = 0.003, and P = 0.006, respectively), and the F3 group also had a significantly higher modulus than the control F0 group (P = 0.039). LSM was negatively associated with plasma MEGX concentrations at 30 min (r = -0.642; P = 0.013) and 60 min (r = -0.651; P = 0.012), time to ½ of the maximum concentration (r = -0.538; P = 0.047), and the area under the curve (r = -0.636; P = 0.014). Multiple comparisons showed identical differences in these three measures: significantly lower with F4 (P = 0.037) and F3 (P = 0.032) as compared to F0 and significantly lower with F4 as compared to F2 (P = 0.032). CONCLUSION: SWE LSM shows a good correlation with histologic fibrosis grading and pharmacologic quantitative liver function reserve in experimental severe fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:27158202

  16. Correlation Between Cephalometric Measures and End-of-Treatment Facial Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Nan; Bai, Ding; Feng, Xue; Liu, Yue-Hua; Chen, Wen-Jing; Li, Song; Han, Guang-Li; Jiang, Ruo-Ping; Xu, Tian-Min

    2016-03-01

    Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontists evaluated 108 Chinese patients' facial attractiveness from set of photographs (frontal, lateral, and frontal smiling photos) taken at the end of orthodontic treatment. These 108 patients, which contained an equal number of patients with Class I, II, and III malocclusion, were randomly selected from 6 orthodontic treatment centers throughout China. Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients (rs) analyses were performed to examine agreement in ranking between all judge pairs. Pearson correlation and multivariate regression were performed to examine the correlation between cephalometric measures and end-of-treatment Photo Attractiveness Rank.96.68% judge pairs showed moderate correlated (+0.4 ≤ rs < +0.7) subjective rankings. Cephalometric measures significantly correlated with end-of-treatment Photo Attractiveness Rank included interincisal angle (r = 0.330, P < 0.05), L1/MP° (r = 0.386, P < 0.05), L1-NBmm (r = 0.451, P < 0.01), L1/NB° (r = 0.374, P < 0.05), and profile angle (r = 0.353, P < 0.05) in Class I patients with an explained variance of 32.8%, and ANB angle (r = 0.432, P < 0.01), angle of convexity (r = 0.448, P < 0.01), profile angle (r = 0.488, P < 0.01), Li to E-line (r = 0.374, P < 0.05), Li to B-line (r = 0.543, P < 0.01), and Z angle (r = 0.543, P < 0.01) in Class II patient with an explained variance of 43.3%.There was less association than expected between objective measurements on the lateral cephalograms and clinicians' rankings of facial attractiveness on clinical photography in Chinese patients. Straight-stand lower incisor was desired for facial attractiveness of Class I malocclusion; and sagittal relationship and lip prominence influence the esthetics of Class II malocclusion in Chinese population. PMID:26872281

  17. An IL6-correlated signature in serous epithelial ovarian cancer associates with growth factor response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most lethal gynecological cancers; the majority of EOC is the serous histotype and diagnosed at advanced stage. IL6 is the cytokine that has been found most frequently associated with carcinogenesis and progression of serous EOCs. IL6 is a growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic factor, and high plasma levels of IL6 in advanced stage EOCs correlate with poor prognosis. The objective of the present study was to identify IL6 co-regulated genes and gene network/s in EOCs. Results We applied bioinformatics tools on 7 publicly available data sets containing the gene expression profiles of 1262 EOC samples. By Pearson's correlation analysis we identified, in EOCs, an IL6-correlated gene signature containing 40 genes mainly associated with proliferation. 33 of 40 genes were also significantly correlated in low malignant potential (LMP) EOCs, while 7 genes, named C5AR1, FPR1, G0S2, IL8, KLF2, MMP19, and THBD were IL6-correlated only in advanced stage EOCs. Among the 40-gene signature EGFR ligand HBEGF, genes of the EGR family members and genes encoding for negative feedback regulators of growth factor signaling were included. The results obtained by Gene Set Enrichment and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses enabled the identification, respectively, of gene sets associated with ‘early growth factor response’ for the 40-gene signature, and a biological network related to ‘thrombosis and cardiovascular disease’ for the 7-gene signature. In agreement with these results, selected genes from the identified signatures were validated in vitro by real time RT-PCR in serous EOC cell lines upon stimulation with EGF. Conclusions Serous EOCs, independently of their aggressiveness, co-regulate IL6 expression together with that of genes associated to growth factor signaling, arguing for the hypothesis that common mechanism/s driven by EGFR ligands characterize both advanced-stage and LMP EOCs. Only advanced-stage EOCs appeared to be characterized by a scenario that involves genes which are so far associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular disease, thus suggesting that this pathway is implicated in the growth and/or spread of more aggressive tumors. We have discovered novel activated signaling pathways that drive the expression of IL6 and of co-regulated genes and are possibly involved in the pathobiology of EOCs. PMID:23889749

  18. Correlation and Agreement of Handheld Spirometry with Laboratory Spirometry in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guang-Shing; Campbell, Angela P; Xie, Hu; Stednick, Zach; Callais, Cheryl; Leisenring, Wendy M; Englund, Janet A; Chien, Jason W; Boeckh, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Early detection of subclinical lung function decline may help identify allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients who are at increased risk for late noninfectious pulmonary complications, including bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. We evaluated the use of handheld spirometry in this population. Allogeneic HCT recipients enrolled in a single-center observational trial performed weekly spirometry with a handheld spirometer for 1 year after transplantation. Participants performed pulmonary function tests in an outpatient laboratory setting at 3 time points: before transplantation, at day 80 after transplantation, and at 1 year after transplantation. Correlation between the 2 methods was assessed by Pearson and Spearman correlations; agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 437 subjects had evaluable pulmonary function tests. Correlation for forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) was r = .954 (P < .0001) at day 80 and r = .931 (P < .0001) at 1 year when the handheld and laboratory tests were performed within 1 day of each other. Correlation for handheld forced expiratory volume in 6 seconds (FEV6) with laboratory forced vital capacity was r = .914 (P < .0001) at day 80 and r = .826 (P < .0001) at 1 year. The bias, or the mean difference (handheld minus laboratory), for FEV1 at day 80 and 1 year was -.13 L (limits of agreement, -.63 to .37) and -.10 L (limits of agreement, -.77 to .56), respectively. FEV6 showed greater bias at day 80 (-.51 L [limits of agreement, -1.44 to .42]) and 1 year (-.40 L [limits of agreement, -1.81 to 1.01]). Handheld spirometry correlated well with laboratory spirometry after allogeneic HCT and may be useful for self-monitoring of patients for early identification of airflow obstruction. PMID:26748162

  19. [Clinico-histologic-morphometric correlations in pulmonary arteries among patients with heart malformations ].

    PubMed

    Fischbach, H; Hoffmeister, H M; Hoffmeister, H E; Apitz, J; Schmidt, C

    1982-01-01

    To improve the evaluation of grades of pulmonary vascular lesions in congenital heart malformations, we studied the extent to which there is a measurable relationship between pressure conditions in the pulmonary circulation and the area of the media in small and medium-sized pulmonary arteries, and the possibility of a correlation between the subjective evaluation of grades of hypertensive pulmonary vascular lesions according to Heath and Edwards (1958). Material and methods. The lungs in 68 children (mean age, 22.7 months) with congenital malformations of the heart or great vessels resulting in pulmonary hypertension were examined. The lungs were fixed in a 4% formalin solution passed via the trachea under a constant filling pressure of 150 cm H2O. Peripheral as well as central tissue was removed from all lobes of the lungs; the specimens were stained with Elastica-van Gieson. The extent of hypertensive pulmonary vasculopathy was staged, without knowledge of the pressure conditions, according to the grading system developed by Heath and Edwards. The diameter and the area of all muscular arteries with diameters smaller or larger than 100 micron were measured using a semiautomatic measurement device for quantitative morphometric analysis (MOP/AM 01). Cardiac catheter values were available for all cases. The quotient of systolic pressures in the pulmonary artery and the aorta was taken as the measure of hemodynamic conditions in the pulmonary circulation. The Pearson-Bravais correlation coefficient (r) was computed from the respective area quotient and the corresponding pressure values. In addition, the coefficient of determination (r2) and regression functions were determined. Results. A linear correlation (r = 0.70) exists between the pressure quotient (Psyst. pulm. art./ Psyst. aorta) and the vessel area quotient (media area/total area). The correlation is expressed by the following functions: x = 1.89 y - 0.08 y = 0.26 x + 0.24 Using the Heath and Edwards grading, the following frequencies were obtained: Grade 0: 21, Grade I: 7, Grade II: 16, Grade III: 15, Grade IV: 6, and 3 children were undeterminable. No relationship exists between the grades and certain heart malformations. In spite of the fact that hypertensive vasculopathy becomes progressively more severe as the child grows older, we found four cases of Grade IV in children under the age of one. On the whole, a comparison of the measured area quotients and the Heath and Edwards grading showed a good correlation. Although we considered only pressure quotients and no other hemodynamic parameters, conclusions can be drawn about the operability of congenital heart malformations based on these findings. Using measured pressure values, the morphologic state of the pulmonary arteries can be approximately evaluated. PMID:7122326

  20. Quantitative Ultrashort Echo Time (UTE) MRI of Human Cortical Bone: Correlation with Porosity and Biomechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won C.; Chen, Peter C.; Chung, Christine B.; Masuda, Koichi; D’Lima, Darryl; Du, Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In this study we describe the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate short and long T2* components as well as the water content of cortical bone. Fourteen human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia were sectioned to produce 44 rectangular slabs of cortical bone for quantitative UTE MR imaging, micro computed tomography (μCT), and biomechanical testing. A two-dimensional (2D) UTE pulse sequence with a minimal nominal TE of 8 μs was used together with bi-component analysis to quantify the bound and free water in cortical bone using a clinical 3T scanner. Total water concentration was measured using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. UTE MR measures of water content (total, free and bound), T2* (short and long), and short and long T2* fractions were compared to porosity assessed with μCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation. Porosity significantly correlated positively with total (R2=0.23; P<0.01) and free (R2=0.31; P<0.001) water content as well as long T2* fraction (R2=0.25; P<0.001), and negatively with short T2* fraction and short T2* (R2=0.24; P<0.01). Failure strain significantly correlated positively with short T2* (R2=0.29; P<0.001), ultimate stress significantly correlated negatively with total (R2=0.25; P<0.001) and bound (R2=0.22; P<0.01) water content, and failure energy significantly correlated positively with both short (R2=0.30; P<0.001) and long (R2=0.17; P<0.01) T2* values. These results suggest that UTE MR measures are sensitive to the structure and failure properties of human cortical bone, and may provide a novel way of evaluating cortical bone quality. PMID:22190232

  1. Correlation of the interdental and the interradicular bone loss: A radiovisuographic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Vishakha; Malhotra, Ranjan; Kapoor, Anoop; Mankotia, Chahat Singh; Bither, Rupika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presence of furcation involvement indicates advanced periodontitis, and a potentially less-favorable prognosis, for the affected tooth and its diagnosis has always been an enigma. The present study was carried out to measure and correlate the interdental and interradicular bone loss in patients suffering from periodontitis using radiovisuography (RVG) for the purpose of early furcation diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients suffering from chronic generalized periodontitis and with furcation involvement in mandibular molars were selected. Under standardized conditions, RVGs were taken and the morphologic measurements defining the furcation areas were recorded and analyzed. Result: Interradicular bone loss of about 0.8 mm or more, was observed in the study subjects only when the bone loss at the interdental area was minimal of 3.7 mm. The correlation between the interradicular and the interdental bone loss was statistically highly significant (T-test, P < 0.001). A stronger correlation was observed in subjects above 40 years of age as compared with the younger subjects. There was not much difference in the degree of correlation between the interradicular and the interdental bone loss when compared in the context of gender. Conclusion: The very first millimeter of interradicular bone loss was seen when the interdental bone loss was around 4 mm. Therefore, to detect the earliest lesions of furcations, the interdental bone loss can be kept as an approximate guide for the comprehensive diagnosis and management of such sites/patients. The current investigation paves the path for future longitudinal studies with larger samples to ascertain these findings. PMID:25210264

  2. Softness Correlations Across Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancic, Robert; Shavit, Amit; Rieser, Jennifer; Schoenholz, Samuel; Cubuk, Ekin; Durian, Douglas; Liu, Andrea; Riggleman, Robert

    In disordered systems, it is believed that mechanical failure begins with localized particle rearrangements. Recently, a machine learning method has been introduced to identify how likely a particle is to rearrange given its local structural environment, quantified by softness. We calculate the softness of particles in simulations of atomic Lennard-Jones mixtures, molecular Lennard-Jones oligomers, colloidal systems and granular systems. In each case, we find that the length scale characterizing spatial correlations of softness is approximately a particle diameter. These results provide a rationale for why localized rearrangements--whose size is presumably set by the scale of softness correlations--might occur in disordered systems across many length scales. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46199.

  3. Elastic image registration using correlations.

    PubMed

    Weaver, J B; Healy, D M; Periaswamy, S; Kostelec, P J

    1998-08-01

    We have developed a multiscale algorithm for elastic registration of images. Rigid registration has many applications but it is often limited by distortions in the images. For example, different views of the same object produce distortions. Common examples of slightly different views producing a distortion can be found in medical imaging, such as matching a current mammogram or chest radiograph with one from a previous year, and in remote sensing, such as matching images taken from different satellite positions. We have developed two methods of elastic registration. Both are multiscale but one used an iterative minimization of the local error and the other uses a windowed correlation. We present preliminary results of the elastic registration method used on windowed correlations. PMID:9735435

  4. Clinicopathologic Correlates of Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-07-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension, incurring significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Our understanding of this disease has evolved substantially during the past decade. Recently, the molecular basis of primary aldosteronism has begun to be unraveled, with the discovery of mutations in potassium channel (KCNJ5), ATPases (ATP1A1, ATP2B3), and calcium channel (CACNA1D), and aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The most recent data suggest that 95% of cases are sporadic, whereas 5% of cases are hereditary. Pathologic correlates of primary aldosteronism include adrenal cortical hyperplasia, adenoma, and carcinoma. Although the most common clinical presentation is bilateral adrenal cortical hyperplasia, this entity is usually treated medically. Therefore, in the setting of primary aldosteronism, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas and the odd occasional carcinoma. This review provides an update on the current knowledge of primary aldosteronism and discusses the clinicopathologic correlations of this important disease. PMID:26125435

  5. Correlation of cavitating centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zika, V. J.

    1984-06-01

    The foreknowledge of the minimum NPSH ('net positive suction head') required for a cavitation-free performance of centrifugal pumps is important for a safe and sound operation of these machines. The required NPSH varies from pump to pump, from fluid to fluid, and from temperature to temperature of the pumped fluid. This is known as the thermodynamic effect. The methods currently used for the correlation and analysis of this condition are not always reliable because of the multi-variable nature of the cavitation process. In this paper, two new methods are proposed which lead to more consistent correlations of the required minimum NPSH; thus they can also be used for more dependable predictions of the net positive suction head for any pump, fluid and temperature. The predictions by the two methods do not coincide, but outline a narrow band of probability, within which the actual test points are invariably located.

  6. Thermodynamic cost of creating correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Marcus; Perarnau-Llobet, Mart; Hovhannisyan, Karen V.; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Klckl, Claude; Brunner, Nicolas; Acn, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the fundamental limitations imposed by thermodynamics for creating correlations. Considering a collection of initially uncorrelated thermal quantum systems, we ask how much classical and quantum correlations can be obtained via a cyclic Hamiltonian process. We derive bounds on both the mutual information and entanglement of formation, as a function of the temperature of the systems and the available energy. While for a finite number of systems there is a maximal temperature allowing for the creation of entanglement, we show that genuine multipartite entanglementthe strongest form of entanglement in multipartite systemscan be created at any finite temperature when sufficiently many systems are considered. This approach may find applications, e.g. in quantum information processing, for physical platforms in which thermodynamic considerations cannot be ignored.

  7. Delayed Choice with Correlated Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rssler, O. E.

    1988-02-01

    A new experiment in the foundations of quantum mechanics is proposed. The existence of correlated photons -first seen by Wheeler -can be taken as a hint to devise a ``double-wing'' delayed choice experiment in Wheeler's sense. A path choice (polarization choice) measurement made on the one side should then block an interference type measurement made on the other side (``distant choice''). A precondition for the combined measurement to work in theory is that the correlated photons used are of the ``prepolarized'' (Selleri) rather than the ``unpolarized'' (Bhm) type. A first EPR experiment involving prepolarized photons was recently performed by Alley and Shih. It may be used as a partial experiment within the proposed experiment.

  8. Correlations in avalanche critical points.

    PubMed

    Cerruti, Benedetta; Vives, Eduard

    2009-07-01

    Avalanche dynamics and related power-law statistics are ubiquitous in nature, arising in phenomena such as earthquakes, forest fires, and solar flares. Very interestingly, an analogous behavior is associated with many condensed-matter systems, such as ferromagnets and martensites. Bearing it in mind, we study the prototypical random-field Ising model at T=0. We find a finite correlation between waiting intervals and the previous avalanche size. This correlation is not found in other models for avalanches but it is experimentally found in earthquakes and in forest fires. Our study suggests that this effect occurs in critical points that are at the end of a first-order discontinuity separating two regimes: one with high activity from another with low activity. PMID:19658651

  9. CMS results on multijet correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Safronov, Grigory

    2015-04-10

    We present recent CMS measurements on multijet correlations using forward and low-p{sub T} jets, focusing on searches for BFKL and saturation phenomena. In pp collisions at √(s)=7 TeV, azimuthal correlations in dijets separated in rapidity by up to 9.4 units were measured. The results are compared to BFKL- and DGLAP-based predictions. In pp collisions at √(s)=8 TeV, cross sections for jets with p{sub T} > 21 GeV and |y| < 4.7, and for track-jets with p{sub T} > 1 GeV (minijets) are presented. The minijet results are sensitive to the bound imposed by the total inelastic cross section, and are compared to various models for taming the growth of the 2 → 2 cross section at low p{sub T}.

  10. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  11. Uranium nitride fuel swelling correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Steven B.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Matthews, R. Bruce

    1990-02-01

    A volumetric swelling correlation for UN fuel with Nb-1% Zr and PWC-11 cladding materials for application to space nuclear power systems was developed as: ?V/ V(%) = 4.7 10 -11TaV3.12Bu 0.83?0.5, where Tav is the volume averaged fuel temperature in K, Bu is the fuel burnup (at%), and ? is the as-fabricated fuel density (% of theoretical). This swelling correlation was within 25% of the data at burnups in excess of 1.12 at%. However, the scatter of the data at lower burnups resulted in a deviation as high as 60%. The reported swelling behavior of the Ta-111 clad fuel pins was consistent with that of the Nb-1% Zr and PWC-11 clad fuel pins. Analysis of W-26% Re clad UN fuel pins was inconclusive because of large scatter and inconsistencies in the data, and reported cladding failures in some tests.

  12. Bootstrapping N=2 chiral correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, Madalena; Liendo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We apply the numerical bootstrap program to chiral operators in four-dimensional N=2 SCFTs. In the first part of this work we study four-point functions in which all fields have the same conformal dimension. We give special emphasis to bootstrapping a specific theory: the simplest Argyres-Douglas fixed point with no flavor symmetry. In the second part we generalize our setup and consider correlators of fields with unequal dimension. This is an example of a mixed correlator and allows us to probe new regions in the parameter space of N=2 SCFTs. In particular, our results put constraints on relations in the Coulomb branch chiral ring and on the curvature of the Zamolodchikov metric.

  13. Drizzle correlations with giant nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Jha, Vandana; Noble, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Giant nuclei (GN) concentrations (NGN) below RICO small cumulus clouds were substantially correlated with drizzle drop concentrations (Nd), especially at higher cloud altitudes. The NGN-Nd correlation coefficients (R) progressively increased with altitude whereas R for CCN concentrations with Nd were negative with mostly decreasing magnitudes at increasing altitudes. These results indicate that the positive influence of GN [or CCN with low critical supersaturations (Sc)] on Nd is greater than the negative influence of high Sc CCN on Nd at high cloud altitudes where there are more drizzle drops. This work has implications not only for fundamental cloud physics but also for climate change; i.e., global warming and the indirect aerosol effect as well as geoengineering and hygroscopic cloud seeding.

  14. Exascale cross correlation in software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, M. A.; Barsdell, B. R.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2014-04-01

    The exascale computational demands of back-end processing in the era of the SKA headlined by the needs of cross-correlation, are likely to require solutions that differ significantly from traditional approaches on smaller arrays. Software approaches are already capable of achieving petascale processing using massively-parallel general-purpose computing hardware. We discuss the advantages and practical issues surrounding this approach and probe what will ultimately be needed to reach the exascale.

  15. Clinical Correlations in Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    MINCIU, Ioana

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of persistent (but not necessarily unchanged), movement, posture, muscle tone and motor skills disorders non-progressive, with early onset, due to non-progressive impairments, occurring on an immature brain or a brain under development (prenatal, perinatal, postnatal during the first 3-4 years of life). It is associated to a variable extent with: cognitive disorders, epilepsy, sensory deficits, behaviour disorders. Aim: The study of the correlations between the clinical forms/subtypes of CP, comorbidities, and severity of functional impairment. Material and method: It is a retrospective trial aimed only at patients with the diagnosis of cerebral palsy admitted at Paediatric Neurology Clinic of the "Alexandru Obregia" Clinical Hospital in 2010. Results, discussions and conclusions: Patients with cerebral palsy corresponding with the criteria for inclusion: 379. The spastic CP type has prevailed. Comorbidities like mental retardation, epilepsy, and ophthalmic disorders were found with greater frequency than in the studies in the literature. The unilateral spastic form was statistically correlated with slight functional impairment (GMFCS I), with the absence of comorbidities or mild mental retardation, or with focal epilepsy when there is epilepsy. The bilateral spastic, tetraparetic and dyskinetic forms were correlated significantly with severe functional impairment (GMFCS IV, V), with profound or severe retardation, microcephaly, swallowing disorders, statural, ponderal hypotrophy, blindness and epilepsy. The bilateral spastic paraparetic form, which in the literature is mentioned as having fewer associated disorders (for example strabismus, slight retardation), when there is severe functional impairment, it may have the same comorbidities as the tetraparetic form (similar to the cases studied in the hospital). Comorbidities are the main admission cause and it correlates with the severity and prognosis. PMID:23483832

  16. Spectral correlations: understanding oscillatory contributions.

    PubMed

    Mehlig, B; Wilkinson, M

    2001-04-01

    We give a different derivation of a relation obtained using a supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model by Andreev and Altshuler [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 902 (1995)], which connects smooth and oscillatory components of spectral correlation functions. We show that their result is not specific to the random matrix theory. Also, we show that despite an apparent contradiction, the results obtained using their formula are consistent with earlier perspectives on random matrix models. PMID:11308898

  17. Correlated Temporal and Spectral Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean H.

    2007-01-01

    The variability of neutron star and black hole X-ray sources has several dimensions, because of the roles played by different important time-scales. The variations on time scales of hours, weeks, and months, ranging from 50% to orders of magnitude, arise out of changes in the flow in the disk. The most important driving forces for those changes are probably various possible instabilities in the disk, though there may be effects with other dominant causes. The changes in the rate of flow appear to be associated with changes in the flow's configuration, as the accreting material approaches the compact object, for there are generally correlated changes in both the Xray spectra and the character of the faster temporal variability. There has been a lot of progress in tracking these correlations, both for Z and Atoll neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and for black hole binaries. I will discuss these correlations and review briefly what they tell us about the physical states of the systems.

  18. Wolfram syndrome: a clinicopathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Saumil N.; Adams, Joe C.; Joseph, Jeffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome or DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as well as diabetes insipidus and deafness in many cases. We report the post-mortem neuropathologic findings of a patient with Wolfram syndrome and correlate them with his clinical presentation. In the hypothalamus, neurons in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei were markedly decreased and minimal neurohypophyseal tissue remained in the pituitary. The pontine base and inferior olivary nucleus showed gross shrinkage and neuron loss, while the cerebellum was relatively unaffected. The visual system had moderate to marked loss of retinal ganglion neurons, commensurate loss of myelinated axons in the optic nerve, chiasm and tract, and neuron loss in the lateral geniculate nucleus but preservation of the primary visual cortex. The patient’s inner ear showed loss of the organ of Corti in the basal turn of the cochleae and mild focal atrophy of the stria vascularis. These findings correlated well with the patient’s high-frequency hearing loss. The pathologic findings correlated closely with the patient’s clinical symptoms and further support the concept of Wolfram syndrome as a neurodegenerative disorder. Our findings extend prior neuropathologic reports of Wolfram syndrome by providing contributions to our understanding of eye, inner ear and olivopontine pathology in this disease. PMID:19449020

  19. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation-integration. Curr. Protoc. Cytom. 70:12.36.1-12.36.10. 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25271959

  20. Neuropsychological correlates of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R A; Rosenbaum, A; Kane, R L; Warnken, W J; Benjamin, S

    1999-01-01

    Neuropsychological functioning was assessed in 39 males who had committed domestic violence (batterers) and compared to 63 nonviolent (both maritally discordant and satisfied) subjects recruited by advertisement. Subjects were subsequently divided into two groups (head injured, nonhead injured) and these groups were also contrasted as a function of batterer status. Tests were administered to assess for cognitive and behavioral functions, including executive dysfunction, hypothesized to be a factor contributing to propensity for violence. Questionnaires and structured clinical interviews were used to assess marital discord, emotional distress, and violent behaviors. Batterers differed from nonbatterers across several cognitive domains: executive, learning, memory, and verbal functioning. Batterers were reliably discriminated from nonbatterers based on three neuropsychological tasks: Digit Symbol, Recognition Memory Test-Words, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Neuropsychological performance was the strongest correlate of domestic violence of all clinical variables measured. However, the inclusion of two other variables, severity of emotional distress and history of head injury, together with the neuropsychological indices provided the strongest correlation with batterers status. Among batterers, neuropsychological performance did not vary as a function of head injury status, indicating that while prior head injury was correlated with batterer status, it was not the sole basis for their impairments. The findings suggest that current cognitive status, prior brain injury, childhood academic problems, as well as psychosocial influences, contribute along with coexisting emotional distress to a propensity for domestic violence. PMID:10751047

  1. Supervised multi-view canonical correlation analysis (sMVCCA): integrating histologic and proteomic features for predicting recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, George; Singanamalli, Asha; Wang, Haibo; Feldman, Michael D; Master, Stephen R; Shih, Natalie N C; Spangler, Elaine; Rebbeck, Timothy; Tomaszewski, John E; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present a new methodology to facilitate prediction of recurrent prostate cancer (CaP) following radical prostatectomy (RP) via the integration of quantitative image features and protein expression in the excised prostate. Creating a fused predictor from high-dimensional data streams is challenging because the classifier must 1) account for the "curse of dimensionality" problem, which hinders classifier performance when the number of features exceeds the number of patient studies and 2) balance potential mismatches in the number of features across different channels to avoid classifier bias towards channels with more features. Our new data integration methodology, supervised Multi-view Canonical Correlation Analysis (sMVCCA), aims to integrate infinite views of highdimensional data to provide more amenable data representations for disease classification. Additionally, we demonstrate sMVCCA using Spearman's rank correlation which, unlike Pearson's correlation, can account for nonlinear correlations and outliers. Forty CaP patients with pathological Gleason scores 6-8 were considered for this study. 21 of these men revealed biochemical recurrence (BCR) following RP, while 19 did not. For each patient, 189 quantitative histomorphometric attributes and 650 protein expression levels were extracted from the primary tumor nodule. The fused histomorphometric/proteomic representation via sMVCCA combined with a random forest classifier predicted BCR with a mean AUC of 0.74 and a maximum AUC of 0.9286. We found sMVCCA to perform statistically significantly (p < 0.05) better than comparative state-of-the-art data fusion strategies for predicting BCR. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated improved BCR-free survival prediction for the sMVCCA-fused classifier as compared to histology or proteomic features alone. PMID:25203987

  2. Gene Expression and Correlation of Pten and Fabp4 in Liver, Muscle, and Adipose Tissues of Type 2 Diabetes Rats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Di; Zhang, Chuan-ling; Gao, Ying-chun; Liu, Xiao-ying; Li, Cai-ping; Huangfu, Jian; Xiao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this work was to study the Fabp4 and Pten gene expression and correlation in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Material/Methods Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=12/group): a control group fed a normal diet for 8 weeks and an experimental group fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet for 8 weeks and that received 25 mg/kg streptozotocin by intraperitoneal injection to induce T2DM. The random blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, and fasting insulin levels were measured. The expression of Pten and Fabp4 in the liver, muscle, and epididymal adipose tissues was estimated by real-time quantitative PCR. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis was used to investigate the expression correlation between Pten and Fabp4 in T2DM rats. Results The gene expressions of Pten and Fabp4 in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of T2DM rats were all significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Pten was highly expressed in the muscles and Fabp4 was highly expressed in muscle and adipose tissues. Furthermore, expressions of Fabp4 and Pten in the muscle and adipose tissues of T2DM rats were positively correlated (P<0.05), but not in the liver. Conclusions The increased expression of PTEN and FABP4 in the adipose and muscles of T2DM rats may play an important role in the insulin resistance of T2DM. However, the mechanism by which these 2 genes function in T2DM needs further study. PMID:26591002

  3. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion require us to understand electrochemistry on the scale of a single atom; and we already know that the only prospect for effective high temperature superconductivity involves strongly correlated materials. Even novel IT technologies are now seen to have value not just for novel function but also for efficiency. While strongly correlated electron systems continue to excite researchers and the public alike due to the fundamental science issues involved, it seems increasingly likely that support for the science will be leveraged by its impact on energy and sustainability. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Strongly correlated electron systemsSiddharth S Saxena and P B Littlewood Magnetism, f-electron localization and superconductivity in 122-type heavy-fermion metalsF Steglich, J Arndt, O Stockert, S Friedemann, M Brando, C Klingner, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Wirth, S Kirchner and Q Si High energy pseudogap and its evolution with doping in Fe-based superconductors as revealed by optical spectroscopyN L Wang, W Z Hu, Z G Chen, R H Yuan, G Li, G F Chen and T Xiang Structural investigations on YbRh2Si2: from the atomic to the macroscopic length scaleS Wirth, S Ernst, R Cardoso-Gil, H Borrmann, S Seiro, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Kirchner, U Burkhardt, Y Grin and F Steglich Confinement of chiral magnetic modulations in the precursor region of FeGeH Wilhelm, M Baenitz, M Schmidt, C Naylor, R Lortz, U K Rößler, A A Leonov and A N Bogdanov Antiferromagnetism in metals: from the cuprate superconductors to the heavy fermion materialsSubir Sachdev, Max A Metlitski and Matthias Punk Superconducting gap structure of the 115s revisitedF Ronning, J-X Zhu, Tanmoy Das, M J Graf, R C Albers, H B Rhee and W E Pickett Nonmagnetic ground states and phase transitions in the caged compounds PrT2Zn20 (T = Ru, Rh and Ir)T Onimaru, K T Matsumoto, N Nagasawa, Y F Inoue, K Umeo, R Tamura, K Nishimoto, S Kittaka, T Sakakibara and T Takabatake New universality class of quantum criticality in Ce- and Yb-based heavy fermionsShinji Watanabe and Kazumasa Miyake

  4. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  5. Manifest and concealed correlations in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A. C.; Iguain, J. L.

    1998-11-01

    The quantum covariance function is used to study correlations in quantum systems. Besides the obvious correlations due to the conservation of some quantity, the appearance of concealed quantum correlations like non-locality or non-separability is studied. The choice of an appropriate basis allows a complete analysis relating correlations with conservation laws and factorizability.

  6. Measures and models for angular correlation and angular-linear correlation. [correlation of random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Wehrly, T.

    1976-01-01

    Population models for dependence between two angular measurements and for dependence between an angular and a linear observation are proposed. The method of canonical correlations first leads to new population and sample measures of dependence in this latter situation. An example relating wind direction to the level of a pollutant is given. Next, applied to pairs of angular measurements, the method yields previously proposed sample measures in some special cases and a new sample measure in general.

  7. Correlation of phantom-based and log file patient-specific QA with complexity scores for VMAT.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christina E; Irvine, Denise M; McGarry, Conor K

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for this study was to reduce physics workload relating to patient- specific quality assurance (QA). VMAT plan delivery accuracy was determined from analysis of pre- and on-treatment trajectory log files and phantom-based ionization chamber array measurements. The correlation in this combination of measurements for patient-specific QA was investigated. The relationship between delivery errors and plan complexity was investigated as a potential method to further reduce patient-specific QA workload. Thirty VMAT plans from three treatment sites - prostate only, prostate and pelvic node (PPN), and head and neck (H&N) - were retrospectively analyzed in this work. The 2D fluence delivery reconstructed from pretreatment and on-treatment trajectory log files was compared with the planned fluence using gamma analysis. Pretreatment dose delivery verification was also car- ried out using gamma analysis of ionization chamber array measurements compared with calculated doses. Pearson correlations were used to explore any relationship between trajectory log file (pretreatment and on-treatment) and ionization chamber array gamma results (pretreatment). Plan complexity was assessed using the MU/ arc and the modulation complexity score (MCS), with Pearson correlations used to examine any relationships between complexity metrics and plan delivery accu- racy. Trajectory log files were also used to further explore the accuracy of MLC and gantry positions. Pretreatment 1%/1 mm gamma passing rates for trajectory log file analysis were 99.1% (98.7%-99.2%), 99.3% (99.1%-99.5%), and 98.4% (97.3%-98.8%) (median (IQR)) for prostate, PPN, and H&N, respectively, and were significantly correlated to on-treatment trajectory log file gamma results (R = 0.989, p < 0.001). Pretreatment ionization chamber array (2%/2 mm) gamma results were also significantly correlated with on-treatment trajectory log file gamma results (R = 0.623, p < 0.001). Furthermore, all gamma results displayed a significant correlation with MCS (R > 0.57, p < 0.001), but not with MU/arc. Average MLC position and gantry angle errors were 0.001 0.002 mm and 0.025 0.008 over all treatment sites and were not found to affect delivery accuracy. However, vari- ability in MLC speed was found to be directly related to MLC position accuracy. The accuracy of VMAT plan delivery assessed using pretreatment trajectory log file fluence delivery and ionization chamber array measurements were strongly correlated with on-treatment trajectory log file fluence delivery. The strong corre- lation between trajectory log file and phantom-based gamma results demonstrates potential to reduce our current patient-specific QA. Additionally, insight into MLC and gantry position accuracy through trajectory log file analysis and the strong cor- relation between gamma analysis results and the MCS could also provide further methodologies to both optimize the VMAT planning and QA process. PMID:25493524

  8. Variable Selection through Correlation Sifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jim C.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    Many applications of computational biology require a variable selection procedure to sift through a large number of input variables and select some smaller number that influence a target variable of interest. For example, in virology, only some small number of viral protein fragments influence the nature of the immune response during viral infection. Due to the large number of variables to be considered, a brute-force search for the subset of variables is in general intractable. To approximate this, methods based on ℓ1-regularized linear regression have been proposed and have been found to be particularly successful. It is well understood however that such methods fail to choose the correct subset of variables if these are highly correlated with other "decoy" variables. We present a method for sifting through sets of highly correlated variables which leads to higher accuracy in selecting the correct variables. The main innovation is a filtering step that reduces correlations among variables to be selected, making the ℓ1-regularization effective for datasets on which many methods for variable selection fail. The filtering step changes both the values of the predictor variables and output values by projections onto components obtained through a computationally-inexpensive principal components analysis. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of our method on synthetic datasets and on novel applications in virology. These include HIV viral load analysis based on patients' HIV sequences and immune types, as well as the analysis of seasonal variation in influenza death rates based on the regions of the influenza genome that undergo diversifying selection in the previous season.

  9. Correlation-induced spectral changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Emil; James, Daniel F. V.

    1996-06-01

    This paper presents a review of research, both theoretical and experimental, concerning the influence of coherence properties of fluctuating light sources and of correlation properties of scattering media on the spectra of radiated and scattered fields. Much of this research followed a discovery made in 1986, that the spectrum of light may change on propagation, even in free space. More than 100 papers on this topic have been published to date and many of them are reviewed, or at least mentioned, in this article. After an introduction and a summary of some of the main mathematical results relating to second-order coherence theory of statistically stationary optical fields, spectral changes that may take place on superposing fields produced by two partially correlated sources are discussed. Spectral effects in fields produced by two-dimensional secondary sources and by three-dimensional primary sources are then considered. The section which follows describes spectral changes that may arise when polychromatic light is scattered on media whose physical properties vary randomly either in space and/or in time. A review is also presented of recent research, which has revealed that under certain circumstances the changes in the spectrum of light scattered on random media may imitate the Doppler effect, even though the source, the medium and the observer are all at rest with respect to one another. In the final section a brief review is given of a new emerging technique sometimes called spatial-coherence spectroscopy. It is based on the discovery that it is possible, under certain circumstances, to determine field correlations from spectral measurements.

  10. The crystallography of correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, David A.; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2015-05-01

    Classical crystallography can determine structures as complicated as multi-component ribosomal assemblies with atomic resolution, but is inadequate for disordered systems--even those as simple as water ice--that occupy the complex middle ground between liquid-like randomness and crystalline periodic order. Correlated disorder nevertheless has clear crystallographic signatures that map to the type of disorder, irrespective of the underlying physical or chemical interactions and material involved. This mapping hints at a common language for disordered states that will help us to understand, control and exploit the disorder responsible for many interesting physical properties.

  11. Pairing Correlations at High Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hai-Liang; Dong, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Fan, Ping; Yuan, Da-Qing; Zhu, Shen-Yun; Zhang, Huan-Qiao; Petrache, C. M.; Ragnarsson, I.; Carlsson, B. G.

    The pairing correcting energies at high spins in 161Lu and 138Nd are studied by comparing the results of the cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky (CNS) and cranked-Nilsson-Strutinsky-Bogoliubov (CNSB) models. It is concluded that the Coriolis effect rather than the rotational alignment effect plays a major role in the reduction of the pairing correlations in the high spin region. Then we proposed an average pairing correction method which not only better reproduces the experimental data comparing with the CNS model but also enables a clean-cut tracing of the configurations thus the full-spin-range discussion on the various rotating bands.

  12. Multi-boson correlation sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Vincenzo; Laibacher, Simon

    2016-03-01

    We give a full description of the problem of multi-boson correlation sampling (MBCS) at the output of a random interferometer for single input photons in arbitrary multi-mode pure states. The MBCS problem is the task of sampling at the interferometer output from the probability distribution associated with polarization- and time-resolved detections. We discuss the richness of the physics and the complexity of the MBCS problem for non-identical input photons. We also compare the MBCS problem with the standard boson sampling problem, where the input photons are assumed to be identical and the system is "classically" averaging over the detection times and polarizations.

  13. Biological correlates of binge eating.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, S Z

    1995-01-01

    Eating disorders are associated with numerous biological perturbations; however, sorting out cause from effect is difficult. Neuroendocrine and metabolic abnormalities are seen in both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, but they have not been described in binge eating disorder, in which neither starvation nor compensatory behaviors are present. Although these findings may reflect biologic differences among subgroups of binge eaters, an alternative explanation is that many of the biological correlates of binge eating are the result of metabolic derangement secondary to starvation and/or purging. The identification of binge eating disorder provides an opportunity to study the causes and concomitants of binge eating in the absence of compensatory behaviors. PMID:8820523

  14. Speeding up local correlation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kats, Daniel

    2014-12-28

    We present two techniques that can substantially speed up the local correlation methods. The first one allows one to avoid the expensive transformation of the electron-repulsion integrals from atomic orbitals to virtual space. The second one introduces an algorithm for the residual equations in the local perturbative treatment that, in contrast to the standard scheme, does not require holding the amplitudes or residuals in memory. It is shown that even an interpreter-based implementation of the proposed algorithm in the context of local MP2 method is faster and requires less memory than the highly optimized variants of conventional algorithms.

  15. Noise on Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Starchev; Ricka; Buffle

    2001-01-01

    The time dependence of the noise and the signal-to-noise (SN) ratio of the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) autocorrelation function is obtained from replica measurements of standard dextran solutions. The noise dependence on the delay time is fitted by a hyperbolic function with two fitting parameters. The dependence of these parameters on concentration, fluorescence intensity, and accumulation time is obtained experimentally. The behavior of SN at zero delay time agrees well with the theoretical predictions reported in the literature. The obtained data are useful for the quantitative evaluation of the FCS data fits, as well as for simulation of the FCS autocorrelation functions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11112305

  16. Precision protection through indirect correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of the quantum Fisher information of the parameters of the initial atomic state is studied, in the framework of open quantum systems, for a pair of static two-level atoms coupled to a bath of fluctuating vacuum scalar fields. Our results show that the correlations between the two atoms as well as the precision limit in quantum metrology are determined by the separation between the two atoms. Remarkably, when the separation between the two atoms approaches zero, the quantum Fisher information, thus the precision limit of the estimation of the parameters of the initial atomic state will be survived from the vacuum fluctuations after long time evolution.

  17. Preselected Sub-Poissonian Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavicic, Mladen

    1996-01-01

    The simplest possible photon-number-squeezed states containing only two photons and exhibiting sub-poissonian statistics with the Fano factor approaching 0.5 have been used for a proposal of a loophole-free Bell experiment requiring only 67 percent of detection efficiency. The states are obtained by the fourth order interference first of two downconverted photons at an asymmetrical beam splitter and thereupon of two photons from two independent singlets at an asymmetrical beam splitter. In the latter set-up, the other two photons which nowhere interacted and whose paths never crossed appear entangled in a singlet-like correlated state.

  18. The oscillating cluster correlation function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, J.

    To investigate the distribution of matter the author has used a new redshift compilation of rich clusters of galaxies by Andernach, Tago and Stengler-Larrea (1995). This is the largest and deepest three-dimensional survey available presently. Using this dataset, he has compiled a new catalogue of superclusters of galaxies (Einasto et al., 1997), calculated the nearest neighbour and void diameter distribution (Einasto et al., 1997), and determined the cluster correlation function and power spectrum (Einasto et al., 1997). Here he gives a short summary of principal results of these studies.

  19. Development of "active correlation" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    With reaching to extremely high intensities of heavy-ion beams new requirements for the detection system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) will definitely be set. One of the challenges is how to apply the "active correlations" method to suppress beam associated background products without significant losses in the whole long-term experiment efficiency value. Different scenarios and equations to develop the method according this requirement are under consideration in the present paper. The execution time to estimate the dead time parameter associated with the optimal choice of the life-time parameter is presented.

  20. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed during SCES 2010. As we learned, past dogmas about strongly correlated materials and phenomena must be re-examined with an open and inquisitive mind. Invited speakers and respected leaders in the field were invited to contribute to this special issue and we have insisted that they present new data, ideas, or perspectives, as opposed to simply an overview of their past work. As with the conference, this special issue touches upon recent developments of strongly correlated electron systems in d-electron materials, such as Sr3Ru2O7, graphene, and the new Fe-based superconductors, but it is dominated by topics in f-electron compounds. Contributions reflect the growing appreciation for the influence of disorder and frustration, the need for organizing principles, as well as detailed investigations on particular materials of interest and, of course, new materials. As this special issue could not possibly capture the full breadth and depth that the conference had to offer, it is being published simultaneously with an issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series containing 157 manuscripts in which all poster presenters at SCES 2010 were invited to contribute. Since this special issue grew out of the 2010 SCES conference, we take this opportunity to give thanks. This conference would not have been possible without the hard work of the SCES 2010 Program Committee, International and National Advisory Committees, Local Committee, and conference organizers, the New Mexico Consortium. We thank them as well as those organizations that generously provided financial support: ICAM-I2CAM, Quantum Design, Lakeshore, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Department of Energy National Laboratories at Argonne, Berkeley, Brookhaven, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge. Of course, we especially thank the participants for bringing new ideas and new results, without which SCES 2010 would not have been possible. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Spin-orbit coupling and k-dependent Zeeman splitting in strontium ruthenate Emil J Rozbicki, James F Annett, Jean-René Souquet and Andrew P Mackenzie Thermodynamics of itinerant metamagnetic transitions A M Berridge Magnon-mediated pairing and isotope effect in iron-based superconductors Jiansheng Wu and Philip Phillips Nernst quantum oscillations in bulk semi-metals Zengwei Zhu, Huan Yang, Aritra Banerjee, Liam Malone, Benoît Fauqué and Kamran Behnia Signatures of a quantum Griffiths phase in a d-metal alloy close to its ferromagnetic quantum critical point Almut Schroeder, Sara Ubaid-Kassis and Thomas Vojta Influence of super-ohmic dissipation on a disordered quantum critical point Thomas Vojta, José A Hoyos, Priyanka Mohan and Rajesh Narayanan The van Hemmen-Kondo model for disordered cerium systems S G Magalhaes, F M Zimmer and B Coqblin Chemical pressure, dilution and disorder in the heavy fermion compounds Ce3 - xLaxPd20Si6 (x = 1/3, 2/3) H Winkler, K-A Lorenzer, S Laumann, J Custers, A Prokofiev and S Paschen Magnetism of fine particles of Kondo lattices, obtained by high-energy ball-milling E V Sampathkumaran, K Mukherjee, Kartik K Iyer, Niharika Mohapatra and Sitikantha D Das Heavy fermion scaling: uranium versus cerium and ytterbium compounds J M Lawrence, C H Wang, A D Christianson and E D Bauer Temperature dependence of hybridization gaps in metallic heavy-fermion systems Xiaodong Yang, Peter S Riseborough and Tomasz Durakiewicz Low-energy properties of the Kondo lattice model O Bodensiek, R Žitko, R Peters and T Pruschke Temperature dependence of the zero-bias anomaly in the Anderson-Hubbard model: insights from an ensemble of two-site systems R Wortis and W A Atkinson A charge density wave in the hidden order state of URu2Si2 Jung-Jung Su, Yonatan Dubi, Peter Wölfle and Alexander V Balatsky Field-induced suppression of the heavy-fermion state in YbRh2Si2 Gertrud Zwicknagl Discontinuous Hall coefficient at the quantum critical point in YbRh2Si2 Sven Friedemann, Niels Oeschler, Steffen Wirth, Cornelius Krellner, Christoph Geibel, Frank Steglich, Silke Paschen, Stefan Kirchner and Qimiao Si Roles of critical valence fluctuations in Ce- and Yb-based heavy fermion metals Shinji Watanabe and Kazumasa Miyake Unconventional quantum criticality in the pressure-induced heavy-fermion superconductor CeRhIn5 Tuson Park, V A Sidorov, H Lee, F Ronning, E D Bauer, J L Sarrao and J D Thompson Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state Youichi Yanase and Manfred Sigrist Magnetic transition and spin fluctuations in the unconventional antiferromagnetic compound Yb3Pt4 S Zhao, D E MacLaughlin, O O Bernal, J M Mackie, C Marques, Y Janssen and M C Aronson The non-centrosymmetric heavy fermion ferromagnet Sm2Fe12P7 M Janoschek, R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, I K Lum and M B Maple Magnetic, thermal, and transport properties of the actinide based noncentrosymmetric compounds Th2Fe12P7 and U2Fe12P7 R E Baumbach, J J Hamlin, M Janoschek, I K Lum and M B Maple Magnetic order in Pu2M3Si5 (M = Co, Ni) E D Bauer, P H Tobash, J N Mitchell, J A Kennison, F Ronning, B L Scott and J D Thompson

  1. Pack hike test finishing time for Australian firefighters: pass rates and correlates of performance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M; Petersen, A; Abbiss, C R; Netto, K; Payne, W; Nichols, D; Aisbett, B

    2011-03-01

    The pack hike test (PHT, 4.83 km hike wearing a 20.4-kg load) was devised to determine the job readiness of USA wildland firefighters. This study measured PHT performance in a sample of Australian firefighters who currently perform the PHT (career land management firefighters, LMFF) and those who do not (suburban/regional volunteer firefighters, VFF). The study also investigated the relationships between firefighters' PHT performance and their performance across a range of fitness tests for both groups. Twenty LMFF and eighteen age-, body mass-, and height-matched VFF attempted the PHT, and a series of muscular endurance, power, strength and cardiorespiratory fitness tests. Bivariate correlations between the participants' PHT finishing time and their performance in a suite of different fitness tests were determined using Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. The mean PHT finishing time for LMFF (42.2 ± 2.8 min) was 9 ± 14% faster (p = 0.001) than for VFF (46.1 ± 3.6 min). The pass rate (the percentage of participants who completed the PHT in under 45 min) for LMFF (90%) was greater than that of VFF (39%, p = 0.001). For LMFF, VO(2peak) in L min(-1)(r = -0.66, p = 0.001) and the duration they could sustain a grip 'force' of 25 kg (r = -0.69, p = 0.001) were strongly correlated with PHT finishing time. For VFF, VO(2peak) in mL kg(-1) min(-1)(r = -0.75, p = 0.002) and the duration they could hold a 1.2-m bar attached to 45.5 kg in a 'hose spray position' (r = -0.69, p = 0.004) were strongly correlated with PHT finishing time. This study shows that PHT fitness-screening could severely limit the number of VFF eligible for duty, compromising workforce numbers and highlights the need for specific and valid firefighter fitness standards. The results also demonstrate the strong relationships between PHT performance and firefighters' cardiorespiratory fitness and local muscular endurance. Those preparing for the PHT should focus their training on these fitness components in the weeks and months prior to undertaking the PHT. PMID:20888552

  2. Measurement and Correlation of Ambient VOCs in Windsor, Ontario, Canada and Detroit, Michigan, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. J.; You, H.; Xu, X.; Molaroni, S.; Lemke, L.; Weglicki, L.; Krouse, H.; Krajenta, R.

    2009-05-01

    An air quality study has been carried out in Windsor, Ontario, Canada and Detroit, Michigan, USA as part of a pilot research study undertaken by the Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium (GeoDHOC), a multidisciplinary, international effort aimed at understanding the health effects of air pollution in urban environments. Exposure to volatile organic compounds has long been associated with adverse health conditions such as atrophy of skeletal muscles, loss of coordination, neurological damage, dizziness, throat, nose, and eye irritation, nervous system depression, liver damage, and respiratory symptoms. Twenty-six species of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored during a 2-week period in September, 2008 at 100 sites across Windsor and Detroit, using 3M # 3500 Organic Vapour Monitors. Ten species with highest concentrations were selected for further investigation; Toluene (mean concentration =4.14 μm/m3), (m+p)-Xylene (2.30 μm/m3), Hexane (1.87 μm/m3), Benzene (1.37 μm/m3), 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene (0.87 μm/m3), Dichloromethane (0.77 μm/m3), Ethylbenzene (0.68 μm/m3), o-Xylene (0.63 μm/m3), n-Decane (0.42 μm/m3), and 1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene (0.39 μm/m3). Comparison to a similar investigation in Sarnia, Ontario in October 2005 revealed that the mean concentrations of VOCs were higher in Windsor-Detroit for all species by a significant margin (31-958%), indicating substantial impact of local industrial and vehicular emissions in the WindsorVDetroit area. For most VOCs, the concentrations were higher in Detroit than in Windsor. The mean concentration of total VOC was 9.7 μm/m3 in Windsor, which is slightly higher than that in Sarnia in 2005 (7.9 um/m3), whilst total VOC concentration in Detroit was much higher (16.5 μm/m3). There were strong correlations among several of the 10 species, with the highest Pearson correlation coefficients (r=0.78 - 0.99, p<0.05) amongst the BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) group, suggesting common sources of these species. The BTEX correlation for this study was in good agreement with that from the Sarnia results (Spearman rank correlation coefficient r=0.75 - 0.99), suggesting that one species may act as a proxy for the others in geographically similar regions.

  3. Correlated metals as transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Yuanjun; Guo, Lu; Zhao, Weiwei; Barnes, Anna; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Eaton, Craig; Zheng, Yuanxia; Brahlek, Matthew; Haneef, Hamna F; Podraza, Nikolas J; Chan, Moses H W; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Rabe, Karin M; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The fundamental challenge for designing transparent conductors used in photovoltaics, displays and solid-state lighting is the ideal combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity. Satisfying these competing demands is commonly achieved by increasing carrier concentration in a wide-bandgap semiconductor with low effective carrier mass through heavy doping, as in the case of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). Here, an alternative design strategy for identifying high-conductivity, high-transparency metals is proposed, which relies on strong electron-electron interactions resulting in an enhancement in the carrier effective mass. This approach is experimentally verified using the correlated metals SrVO3 and CaVO3, which, despite their high carrier concentration (>2.2 × 10(22) cm(-3)), have low screened plasma energies (<1.33 eV), and demonstrate excellent performance when benchmarked against ITO. A method is outlined to rapidly identify other candidates among correlated metals, and strategies are proposed to further enhance their performance, thereby opening up new avenues to develop transparent conductors. PMID:26657329

  4. Dipolar correlations in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cui; Galli, Giulia

    2014-08-28

    We present an analysis of the dipolar correlations in water as a function of temperature and density and in the presence of simple ionic solutes, carried out using molecular dynamics simulations and empirical potentials. We show that the dipole-dipole correlation function of the liquid exhibits sizable oscillations over nanodomains of about 1.5 nm radius, with several isosbestic points as a function of temperature; the size of the nanodomains is nearly independent on temperature and density, between 240 and 400 K and 0.9 and 1.3 g/cm{sup 3}, but it is substantially affected by the presence of solvated ions. In the same range of thermodynamic conditions, the decay time (τ) of the system dipole moment varies by a factor of about 30 and 1.5, as a function of temperature and density, respectively. At 300 K, we observed a maximum in τ as a function of density, and a corresponding shallow maximum in the tetrahedral order parameter, in a range where the diffusion coefficient, the pressure and the dielectric constant increase monotonically.

  5. The dynamics of correlated novelties.

    PubMed

    Tria, F; Loreto, V; Servedio, V D P; Strogatz, S H

    2014-01-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called "expanding the adjacent possible". The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution. PMID:25080941

  6. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie; Smith, Randy J.; Warren, John B.; Elliott, Donald

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  7. A correlated nickelate synaptic transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jian; Ha, Sieu D.; Zhou, You; Schoofs, Frank; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by biological neural systems, neuromorphic devices may open up new computing paradigms to explore cognition, learning and limits of parallel computation. Here we report the demonstration of a synaptic transistor with SmNiO3, a correlated electron system with insulator-metal transition temperature at 130°C in bulk form. Non-volatile resistance and synaptic multilevel analogue states are demonstrated by control over composition in ionic liquid-gated devices on silicon platforms. The extent of the resistance modulation can be dramatically controlled by the film microstructure. By simulating the time difference between postneuron and preneuron spikes as the input parameter of a gate bias voltage pulse, synaptic spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning behaviour is realized. The extreme sensitivity of electrical properties to defects in correlated oxides may make them a particularly suitable class of materials to realize artificial biological circuits that can be operated at and above room temperature and seamlessly integrated into conventional electronic circuits.

  8. Correlation dimension-based classifier.

    PubMed

    Jirina, Marcel; Jirina, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    Correlation dimension (CD), singularity exponents, also called scaling exponents, are widely used in multifractal chaotic series analysis. CD and other measures of effective dimensionality are used for characterization of data in applications. A direct use of CD to multidimensional data classification has not been hitherto presented. There are observations that the correlation integral is a distribution function of distances between all pairs of data points, and that by using polynomial expansion of distance with exponent equal to the CD this distribution is transformed into locally uniform. The classifier is based on consideration that the influence of neighbor points of some class on the probability that the query point belongs to this class is inversely proportional to its distance to the CD, power. New classification approach is based on summing up all these influences for each class. We prove that a resulting formula gives an estimate of probability of the class, not a measure of membership to a class only, to which the query point belongs. For this assertion to be valid, it is necessary that exponent of the polynomial transformation must be the CD. We also propose an averaging approach that speeds up computation of the CD especially for large data sets. It is demonstrated that the CD-based classifier can outperform more sophisticated classifiers. PMID:25415936

  9. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tria, F.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2014-07-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called ``expanding the adjacent possible''. The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution.

  10. ASTROCHEMICAL CORRELATIONS IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Gaches, Brandt A. L.; Offner, Stella S. R.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.; Bisbas, Thomas G. E-mail: soffner@astro.umass.edu E-mail: tb@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the spectral correlations between different species used to observe molecular clouds. We use hydrodynamic simulations and a full chemical network to study the abundances of over 150 species in typical Milky Way molecular clouds. We perform synthetic observations in order to produce emission maps of a subset of these tracers. We study the effects of different lines of sight and spatial resolution on the emission distribution and perform a robust quantitative comparison of the species to each other. We use the Spectral Correlation Function (SCF), which quantifies the root mean squared difference between spectra separated by some length scale, to characterize the structure of the simulated cloud in position-position-velocity (PPV) space. We predict the observed SCF for a broad range of observational tracers, and thus identify homologous species. In particular, we show that the pairs C and CO, C{sup +} and CN, and NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}CS have very similar SCFs. We measure the SCF slope variation as a function of beam size for all species and demonstrate that the beam size has a distinct effect on different species emission. However, for beams of up to 10'', placing the cloud at 1 kpc, the change is not large enough to move the SCF slopes into different regions of parameter space. The results from this study provide observational guidance for choosing the best tracer to probe various cloud length scales.

  11. Correlated metals as transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Yuanjun; Guo, Lu; Zhao, Weiwei; Barnes, Anna; Zhang, Hai-Tian; Eaton, Craig; Zheng, Yuanxia; Brahlek, Matthew; Haneef, Hamna F.; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Chan, Moses H. W.; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Rabe, Karin M.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The fundamental challenge for designing transparent conductors used in photovoltaics, displays and solid-state lighting is the ideal combination of high optical transparency and high electrical conductivity. Satisfying these competing demands is commonly achieved by increasing carrier concentration in a wide-bandgap semiconductor with low effective carrier mass through heavy doping, as in the case of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). Here, an alternative design strategy for identifying high-conductivity, high-transparency metals is proposed, which relies on strong electron-electron interactions resulting in an enhancement in the carrier effective mass. This approach is experimentally verified using the correlated metals SrVO3 and CaVO3, which, despite their high carrier concentration (>2.2 × 1022 cm-3), have low screened plasma energies (<1.33 eV), and demonstrate excellent performance when benchmarked against ITO. A method is outlined to rapidly identify other candidates among correlated metals, and strategies are proposed to further enhance their performance, thereby opening up new avenues to develop transparent conductors.

  12. PREFACE: Correlation Dynamics in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Ichimura, Munetake

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on `Correlation Dynamics in Nuclei' was held at the Sanjo Kaikan, the University of Tokyo, from the 31 January to 4 February 2005. This symposium was organized on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Configuration Mixing theory of Arima and Horie. The symposium was hosted by the University of Tokyo, and supported by the Inoue Foundation for Science, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments and future prospects in physics of correlation dynamics in nuclei, including topics such as effective interactions, shell model studies of configuration mixing and spin-isospin modes in nuclei. It was shown in many ways and angles that the Arima-Horie theory has been a starting point of a variety of developments of the studies in these fields over many decades. The developments have been enhanced by the expansion of computational capabilities and the progress in accelerators, detectors and radioactive beam facilities. We enjoyed 28 excellent and lively invited talks and 30 oral presentations in the symposium with about 90 participants. A special session was dedicated to celebrate the 80th birthday of Professor Igal Talmi, who made invaluable and pioneering works in the shell model theory. Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium very successful.

  13. The Neurogenetic Correlates of Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandy, John K.

    2013-09-01

    The neurogenetic correlates of consciousness (NgCC) is a new field of consciousness studies that focuses on genes that have an effect on or are involved in the continuum of neuron-based consciousness. A framework of consciousness based on the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) has already been established by Francis Crick and Christof Kock. In this work I propose that there are NgCC underlying the NCC which are both active during the conscious experience. So how are genes involved? There are two significant connections between DNA and neurons that are involved in the conscious experience. First, any brain system can be adversely affected by underlying genetic abnormalities which can be expressed in an individual at birth, in adulthood, or later in life. Second, the DNA molecule does not lay dormant while the neuron runs on autopilot. DNA is active in translating and transcribing RNA and protein products that are utilized during neuron functioning. Without these products being continuously produced by the DNA during a conscious experience the neurons would cease to function correctly and be rendered unable to provide a continuum of human consciousness. Consequently, in addition to NCC, NgCC must be factored in when appreciating a conscious event. In this work I will discuss and explain some NgCC citing several examples.

  14. The correlation between effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with renal scintigraphy 99mTc-DTPA study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnasari, D.; Nazir, F.; Toresano, L. O. H. Z.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic renal diseases in Indonesia has an increasing annual trend, because it is frequently unrecognized and often co-exists with other disease. GFR and ERPF are parameters currently utilized to estimate renal function at routine renal scintigraphy 99m-Tc DTPA study. This study used 99m-Tc DTPA to measure GFR and ERPF. The purpose of this study was to find the correlation between ERPF and GFR, for ERPF analysis with Schlegel's method, and GFR analysis with Gate's method, as well as to find correction factor between both variables. Analysis of renal scintigraphy has been performed at Department of Nuclear Medicine Pertamina Center Hospital to thirty patient images acquired from 2014 to 2015 which were analyzed retrospectively data, using gamma camera dual head with counting method from renal scintigraphy 99m-Tc DTPA study. The calculation was executed by means of both display and manual calculation. Pearson's statistical analysis resulted on Positive Correlation for all data, with ERPF and GFR (display) showing Strongly Positive Correlation (r = 0.82; p- value < 0.05). Standard deviation was found to be 27.58 and 107.64 for GFR and ERPF (display), respectively. Our result indicated that the use of 99mTc-DTPA measure ERPF was not recommended.

  15. Minor polar compounds in extra virgin olive oil: correlation between HPLC-DAD-MS and the Folin-Ciocalteu spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Stefano; Ieri, Francesca; Romani, Annalisa

    2014-01-29

    Minor polar compounds of 88 extra virgin olive oils were analyzed by HPLC-DAD-MS (high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry) and by the Folin-Ciocalteu (FC) spectrophotometric method, to validate and evaluate, for olive oils, the linear association between FC and HPLC data. The Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between HPLC and FC results. The highest, positive R were related with deacetoxyoleuropein aglycone (R = 0.93) and oleuropein aglycone (R = 0.93) as single compounds and with the sum of orthodiphenols (R = 0.94) and the sum of all compounds (R = 0.95), showing that both estimations of total phenols content are reliably correlated, regardless for the absolute contents and are independent of the relative composition of the phenolic fraction. On the other hand the HPLC quantifications of apigenin and lignans showed no significant correlation with FC. These results, supported also by principal component analysis, may suggest caution about the interpretation of FC results to compare olive oils with very different phenolic profiles. PMID:24405086

  16. A Method to Correlate mRNA Expression Datasets Obtained from Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples: A Matter of Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Dana A. M.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Smid, Marcel; de Weerd, Vania; van der Weiden, Marcel; Meijer - van Gelder, Marion E.; Martens, John W. M.; Foekens, John A.; Kros, Johan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling of tumors is a successful tool for the discovery of new cancer biomarkers and potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Reliable profiling is preferably performed on fresh frozen (FF) tissues in which the quality of nucleic acids is better preserved than in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material. However, since snap-freezing of biopsy materials is often not part of daily routine in pathology laboratories, one may have to rely on archival FFPE material. Procedures to retrieve the RNAs from FFPE materials have been developed and therefore, datasets obtained from FFPE and FF materials need to be made compatible to ensure reliable comparisons are possible. Aim To develop an efficient method to compare gene expression profiles obtained from FFPE and FF samples using the same platform. Methods Twenty-six FFPE-FF sample pairs of the same tumors representing various cancer types, and two FFPE-FF sample pairs of breast cancer cell lines, were included. Total RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was carried out using Illumina’s Whole-Genome cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (WG-DASL) V3 arrays, enabling the simultaneous detection of 24,526 mRNA transcripts. A sample exclusion criterion was created based on the expression of 11 stably expressed reference genes. Pearson correlation at the probe level was calculated for paired FFPE-FF, and three cut-off values were chosen. Spearman correlation coefficients between the matched FFPE and FF samples were calculated for three probe lists with varying levels of significance and compared to the correlation based on all measured probes. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to verify performance of the included probe lists to compare matched FPPE-FF samples. Results Twenty-seven FFPE-FF pairs passed the sample exclusion criterion. From the profiles of 27 FFPE and FF matched samples, the best correlating probes were identified for various levels of significance (Pearson P<0.01, n = 1,432; P<0.05, n = 2,530; and P<0.10, n = 3,351 probes). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the 27 pairs using the resulting probes yielded 25, 21, and 19 correctly clustered pairs, respectively, compared to 1 pair when all probes were used. Conclusion The proposed method enables comparison of gene expression profiles of FFPE and/or FF origin measured on the same platform. PMID:26716838

  17. Co-Overexpression of GEP100 and AMAP1 Proteins Correlates with Rapid Local Recurrence after Breast Conservative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Rumiko; Nam, Jin-Min; Ito, Yoichi M.; Hatanaka, Kanako C.; Hashimoto, Ari; Handa, Haruka; Otsuka, Yutaro; Hashimoto, Shigeru; Onodera, Yasuhito; Hosoda, Mitsuchika; Onodera, Shunsuke; Shimizu, Shinichi; Tanaka, Shinya; Shirato, Hiroki; Tanino, Mishie; Sabe, Hisataka

    2013-01-01

    A major problem of current cancer research and therapy is prediction of tumor recurrence after initial treatment, rather than the simple biological characterization of the malignancy and proliferative properties of tumors. Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a well-approved, standard treatment for patients with early stages of breast cancer, which consists of lumpectomy and whole-breast irradiation. In spite of extensive studies, only 'age' and 'Ki-67 positivity' have been identified to be well correlated with local recurrence after BCT. An Arf6 pathway, activated by GEP100 under receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and employs AMAP1 as its effector, is crucial for invasion and metastasis of some breast cancer cells. This pathway activates ?1 integrins and perturbs E-cadherin-based adhesions, hence appears to be integral for epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT). We here show that expression of the Arf6 pathway components statistically correlates with rapid local recurrence after BCT. We retrospectively analyzed four hundred seventy-nine patients who received BCT in Hokkaido University Hospital, and found 20 patients had local recurrence. We then analyzed pathological samples of patients who experienced local recurrence by use of Kaplan-Meier analysis, Stepwise regression analysis and the t-test, coupled with immunostaining, and found that co-overexpression of GEP100 and AMAP1 correlates with rapidity of the local recurrence. Their margin-status, node-positivity, and estrogen receptor (ER)- or progesterone receptor (PgR)-positivity did not correlated with the rapidity. This study is the first to show that expression of a certain set of proteins correlates with the rapidity of local recurrence. Our results are useful not only for prediction, but highlight the possibility of developing novel strategies to block local recurrence. We also discuss why mRNAs encoding these proteins have not been identified to correlate with local recurrence by previous conventional gene expression profiling analyses. PMID:24116160

  18. Long-range correlations in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsytovich, V.N.; de Angelis, U.; Bingham, R.; Resendes, D.

    1997-11-01

    The correlations in dusty plasmas in the gaseous state is considered. It is shown that the long-ranged correlations of dust particles, contrary to usual matter, start to form in a weakly correlated state, leading finally to the formation of dust crystals and dust liquids with not strong but intermediate strength correlations. The physical mechanism leading to long-ranged correlations is the dust attraction due to shadow effects of the plasma particle fluxes. An analytic theory for the long-ranged dust density correlation function is developed and the numerical results for a broad range of dust densities and plasma temperatures are presented. The long-ranged correlations induced by dust for electron densities, ion densities, and dust charges are also investigated, and the results for electron density correlations are presented in a way that permits measurement of the long-ranged correlation function in laser and radio-wave scattering experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Development of Software Correlator for KJJVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, J. H.; Oh, S. J.; Roh, D. G.; Kang, Y. W.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Chung, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator (KJJVC) is being developed by collaborating KASI (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute), Korea, and NAOJ(National Observatory of Japan), Japan. In early 2010, KJJVC will work in normal operation. In this study, we developed the software correlator which is based on VCS (VLBI Correlation Subsystem) hardware specification as the core component of KJJVC. The main specification of software correlator is 8 Gbps, 8192 output channels, and 262,144-points FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) function same as VCS. And the functional algorithm which is same as specification of VCS and arithmetic register are adopted in this software correlator. To verify the performance of developed software correlator, the correlation experiments were carried out using the spectral line and continuum sources which were observed by VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), NAOJ. And the experimental results were compared to the output of Mitaka FX correlator by referring spectrum shape, phase rate, and fringe detection and so on. Through the experimental results, we confirmed that the correlation results of software correlator are the same as Mitaka FX correlator and verified the effectiveness of it. In future, we expect that the developed software correlator will be the possible software correlator of KVN (Korean VLBI Network) with KJJVC by introducing the correlation post-processing and modifying the user interface as like GUI (Graphic User Interface).

  20. Simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) in Primary and Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bremicker, K.; Höckel, M.; Barthel, H.; Kluge, R.; Kahn, T.; Sabri, O.; Stumpp, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Previous non–simultaneous PET/MR studies have shown heterogeneous results about the correlation between standardized uptake values (SUVs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). The aim of this study was to investigate correlations in patients with primary and recurrent tumors using a simultaneous PET/MRI system which could lead to a better understanding of tumor biology and might play a role in early response assessment. Methods We included 31 patients with histologically confirmed primary (n = 14) or recurrent cervical cancer (n = 17) who underwent simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/MRI comprising DWI. Image analysis was performed by a radiologist and a nuclear physician who identified tumor margins and quantified ADC and SUV. Pearson correlations were calculated to investigate the association between ADC and SUV. Results 92 lesions were detected. We found a significant inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmin (r = -0.532, p = 0.05) in primary tumors as well as in primary metastases (r = -0.362, p = 0.05) and between SUVmean and ADCmin (r = -0.403, p = 0.03). In recurrent local tumors we found correlations for SUVmax and ADCmin (r = -0.747, p = 0.002) and SUVmean and ADCmin (r = -0.773, p = 0.001). Associations for recurrent metastases were not significant (p>0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the feasibility of fast and reliable measurement of SUV and ADC with simultaneous PET/MRI. In patients with cervical cancer we found significant inverse correlations for SUV and ADC which could play a major role for further tumor characterization and therapy decisions. PMID:26551527

  1. Correlation between HIV viral load and aminotransferases as liver damage markers in HIV infected naive patients: a concordance cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús; Grados-Chavarría, Bernardo Horacio; Fuentes-Allen, José Luis; Arroyo-Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Alfaro-Mejía, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in liver function tests could be produced exclusively by direct inflammation in hepatocytes, caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Mechanisms by which HIV causes hepatic damage are still unknown. Our aim was to determine the correlation between HIV viral load, and serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as markers of hepatic damage in HIV naive infected patients. We performed a concordance cross-sectional study. Patients with antiviral treatment experience, hepatotoxic drugs use or co-infection were excluded. We used a Pearson's correlation coefficient to calculate the correlation between aminotransferases serum levels with HIV viral load. We enrolled 59 patients, 50 men and 9 women seen from 2006 to 2008. The mean (± SD) age of our subjects was 34.24 ± 9.5, AST 37.73 ± 29.94 IU/mL, ALT 43.34 ± 42.41 IU/mL, HIV viral load 199,243 ± 292,905 copies/mL, and CD4+ cells count 361 ± 289 cells/mm3. There was a moderately strong, positive correlation between AST serum levels and HIV viral load (r = 0.439, P < 0.001); and a weak correlation between ALT serum levels and HIV viral load (r = 0.276, P = 0.034); after adjusting the confounders in lineal regression model the correlation remained significant. Our results suggest that there is an association between HIV viral load and aminotransferases as markers of hepatic damage; we should improved recognition, diagnosis and potential therapy of hepatic damage in HIV infected patients. PMID:19878552

  2. Angularly anisotropic correlation in granular packings

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chengjie; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Li, Jindong; Wang, Yujie; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2014-12-01

    We present an x-ray microtomography study of the three-dimensional structural correlations in monodisperse granular packings. By measuring an orientation-dependent pair correlation function, we find that the local structure shows an angularly anisotropic orientation correlation. The correlation is strongest along the major axis of the local Minkowski tensor of the Voronoi cell. It turns out that this anisotropic correlation is consistent with the existence of some locally favored structures. The study suggests the importance of high-order structural correlations in random granular packings.

  3. Thoracic range of motion, stability, and correlation to imaging-determined degeneration.

    PubMed

    Healy, Andrew T; Mageswaran, Prasath; Lubelski, Daniel; Rosenbaum, Benjamin P; Matheus, Virgilio; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The degenerative process of the spinal column results in instability followed by a progressive loss of segmental motion. Segmental degeneration is associated with intervertebral disc and facet changes, which can be quantified. Correlating this degeneration with clinical segmental motion has not been investigated in the thoracic spine. The authors sought to determine if imaging-determined degeneration would correlate with native range of motion (ROM) or the change in ROM after decompressive procedures, potentially guiding clinical decision making in the setting of spine trauma or following decompressive procedures in the thoracic spine. METHODS Multidirectional flexibility tests with image analysis were performed on thoracic cadaveric spines with intact ib cage. Specimens consisted of 19 fresh frozen human cadaveric spines, spanning C-7 to L-1. ROM was obtained for each specimen in axial rotation (AR), flexion-extension (FE), and lateral bending (LB) in the intact state and following laminectomy, unilateral facetectomy, and unilateral costotransversectomy performed at either T4-5 (in 9 specimens) or T8-9 (in 10 specimens). Image grading of segmental degeneration was performed utilizing 3D CT reconstructions. Imaging scores were obtained for disc space degeneration, which quantified osteophytes, narrowing, and endplate sclerosis, all contributing to the Lane disc summary score. Facet degeneration was quantified using the Weishaupt facet summary score, which included the scoring of facet osteophytes, narrowing, hypertrophy, subchondral erosions, and cysts. RESULTS The native ROM of specimens from T-1 to T-12 (n = 19) negatively correlated with age in AR (Pearson's r coefficient = -0.42, p = 0.070) and FE (r = -0.42, p = 0.076). When regional ROM (across 4 adjacent segments) was considered, the presence of disc osteophytes negatively correlated with FE (r = -0.69, p = 0.012), LB (r = -0.82, p = 0.001), and disc narrowing trended toward significance in AR (r = -0.49, p = 0.107). Facet characteristics, scored using multiple variables, showed minimal correlation to native ROM (r range from -0.45 to +0.19); however, facet degeneration scores at the surgical level revealed strong negative correlations with regional thoracic stability following decompressive procedures in AR and LB (Weishaupt facet summary score: r = -0.52 and r = -0.71; p = 0.084 and p = 0.010, respectively). Disc degeneration was not correlated (Lane disc summary score: r = -0.06, p = 0.861). CONCLUSIONS Advanced age was the most important determinant of decreasing native thoracic ROM, whereas imaging characteristics (T1-12) did not correlate with the native ROM of thoracic specimens with intact rib cages. Advanced facet degeneration at the surgical level did correlate to specimen stability following decompressive procedures, and is likely indicative of the terminal stages of segmental degeneration. PMID:25978074

  4. Analysis of intraindividual and intraspecific variation in semicircular canal dimensions using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Kelli L; Orkin, Joseph D; Ryan, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    The semicircular canal system tracks head rotation and provides sensory input for the reflexive stabilization of gaze and posture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the intraspecific and intraindividual variation in the size of the three semicircular canals. The right and left temporal bones were extracted from 31 individuals of the short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda) and scanned on a high-resolution x-ray computed tomography system. The radius of curvature was calculated for each of the three semicircular canals for each side. Paired t-tests and independent sample t-tests indicated no significant differences in canal size between the right and left canals of the same individuals or between those of males and females of the same species. Pearson product moment correlation analyses demonstrated that there was no significant correlation between canal size and body mass in this sample. PMID:19619167

  5. Macroscopic limit of nonclassical correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzyński, Paweł; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir

    2016-02-01

    We consider macroscopic correlations in a bipartite system consisting of 2 N particles described by a generalized probabilistic theory. In particular, we discuss a case of N Popescu-Rohrlich boxes shared between two parties. We characterize macroscopic measurements as collective measurements of the same property on all the boxes in the same region. Such measurements are assumed to reveal only the average value of the measured collective property. We show that for two measurements per observer and N ≥2 there always exists a joint probability distribution explaining all observable data and therefore the system admits local hidden variables. Next, we generalize this result to include measurement of fluctuations and additional measurement settings. Finally, we discuss our result in the context of previous works in which contradictory results were presented.

  6. Investigation of correlation classification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A two-step classification algorithm for processing multispectral scanner data was developed and tested. The first step is a single pass clustering algorithm that assigns each pixel, based on its spectral signature, to a particular cluster. The output of that step is a cluster tape in which a single integer is associated with each pixel. The cluster tape is used as the input to the second step, where ground truth information is used to classify each cluster using an iterative method of potentials. Once the clusters have been assigned to classes the cluster tape is read pixel-by-pixel and an output tape is produced in which each pixel is assigned to its proper class. In addition to the digital classification programs, a method of using correlation clustering to process multispectral scanner data in real time by means of an interactive color video display is also described.

  7. Correlation method of electrocardiogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinadko, Marina M.; Timochko, Katerina B.

    2002-02-01

    The electrocardiograph method is the informational source for functional heart state characteristics. The electrocardiogram parameters are the integrated map of many component characteristics of the heart system and depend on disturbance requirements of each device. In the research work the attempt of making the skeleton diagram of perturbation of the heart system is made by the characteristic description of its basic components and connections between them through transition functions, which are written down by the differential equations of the first and second order with the purpose to build-up and analyze electrocardiogram. Noting the vector character of perturbation and the various position of heart in each organism, we offer own coordinate system connected with heart. The comparative analysis of electrocardiogram was conducted with the usage of correlation method.

  8. Correlation effects in metallic cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2014-03-01

    The electronic contribution to the cohesive energy of a correlated metal is the sum of the transition energies for adding successive electrons at successive Fermi levels until the system reaches its final electron density. This can be computed as the integral of energy over the projected density of transitions for adding single electrons to localized orbitals. In the case of independent electrons, this reduces to the usual integral over the projected density of states. As an example, cohesive energies for some simple transition metal structures are calculated using the recursion method* with a Hubbard repulsion between electrons. * Phys. Rev. B 61, 7953-64 Work supported by the Richmond F. Snyder gift to the University of Oregon.

  9. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  10. Whiteheadian approach to Bell's correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Malin, S.

    1988-10-01

    Certain properties of the Bell-type correlations and, in particular, the impossibility of using them to transmit signals faster than light, are investigated from the point of view of the conceptual structure of quantum mechanics and of Whitehead's process philosophy. The collapses of quantum states are shown to correspond to perspectives of different frames of reference on a Whiteheadian process of self creation of actual entities. The analysis suggests a fundamental limitation on the capacity to describe the propagation of influences among the results of measurements at space-like separation. It is further shown that, if Whitehead's framework is modified in a specific way, it accounts very well for the apparent existence of superluminal influences, and for the impossibility of using them for superluminal communication.

  11. Physiological correlates of mental workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to assess the basis of and techniques for physiological assessment of mental workload. The study findings reviewed had shortcomings involving one or more of the following basic problems: (1) physiologic arousal can be easily driven by nonworkload factors, confounding any proposed metric; (2) the profound absence of underlying physiologic models has promulgated a multiplicity of seemingly arbitrary signal processing techniques; (3) the unspecified multidimensional nature of physiological "state" has given rise to a broad spectrum of competing noncommensurate metrics; and (4) the lack of an adequate definition of workload compels physiologic correlations to suffer either from the vagueness of implicit workload measures or from the variance of explicit subjective assessments. Using specific studies as examples, two basic signal processing/data reduction techniques in current use, time and ensemble averaging are discussed.

  12. Vibration analysis using digital correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Lehner, David L.; Dudderar, T. Dixon; Matthys, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of a computer-based optical method for locating the positions of nodes and antinodes in vibrating members. Structured light patterns are projected at an angle onto the vibrating surface using a 35 mm slide projector. The vibrating surface and the projected images are captured in a time averaged photograph which is subsequently digitized. The inherent fringe patterns are filtered to determine amplitudes of vibration, and computer programs are used to compare the time averaged images to images recorded prior to excitation to locate nodes and antinodes. Some of the influences of pattern regularity on digital correlation are demonstrated, and a speckle-based method for determining the mode shapes and the amplitudes of vibration with variable sensitivity is suggested.

  13. Multiagency VLBI Correlator Facility opens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, William E.

    A new $1.2 million facility to process geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observational data was dedicated August 25, 1986, at the U.S. Naval Observatory headquarters, Washington, D.C., by representatives of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The new facility will provide timely correlation of the data tapes produced by the POLARIS (Polar (Motion) Analysis by Radio Interferometric Surveying) earth orientation monitoring network. The new facility will also be used to process VLBI data collected by the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP) and by NRL and USNO programs in astrometry and basic research.

  14. A Two Factor ANOVA-like Test for Correlated Correlations: CORANOVA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen; Gur, Ruben C.

    2004-01-01

    Testing homogeneity of correlations with Fisher's Z is inappropriate when correlations are themselves correlated. Suppose measurements of brain activation and performance are taken before and during a verbal memory task. Of interest are changes in activity gradients in specific regions, R1, R2, R3, and performance, V. The "correlated correlations"…

  15. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  16. Correlated randomness and switching phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Havlin, S.; Mallamace, F.; Kumar, P.; Plerou, V.; Preis, T.

    2010-08-01

    One challenge of biology, medicine, and economics is that the systems treated by these serious scientific disciplines have no perfect metronome in time and no perfect spatial architecture-crystalline or otherwise. Nonetheless, as if by magic, out of nothing but randomness one finds remarkably fine-tuned processes in time and remarkably fine-tuned structures in space. Further, many of these processes and structures have the remarkable feature of “switching” from one behavior to another as if by magic. The past century has, philosophically, been concerned with placing aside the human tendency to see the universe as a fine-tuned machine. Here we will address the challenge of uncovering how, through randomness (albeit, as we shall see, strongly correlated randomness), one can arrive at some of the many spatial and temporal patterns in biology, medicine, and economics and even begin to characterize the switching phenomena that enables a system to pass from one state to another. Inspired by principles developed by A. Nihat Berker and scores of other statistical physicists in recent years, we discuss some applications of correlated randomness to understand switching phenomena in various fields. Specifically, we present evidence from experiments and from computer simulations supporting the hypothesis that water’s anomalies are related to a switching point (which is not unlike the “tipping point” immortalized by Malcolm Gladwell), and that the bubbles in economic phenomena that occur on all scales are not “outliers” (another Gladwell immortalization). Though more speculative, we support the idea of disease as arising from some kind of yet-to-be-understood complex switching phenomenon, by discussing data on selected examples, including heart disease and Alzheimer disease.

  17. Posttreatment FDG-PET Uptake in the Supraglottic and Glottic Larynx Correlates With Decreased Quality of Life After Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dornfeld, Ken Hopkins, Shane; Simmons, Joel; Spitz, Douglas R.; Menda, Yusuf; Graham, Michael; Smith, Russell; Funk, Gerry; Karnell, Lucy; Karnell, Michael; Dornfeld, Maude; Yao Min; Buatti, John

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Inflammation and increased metabolic activity associated with oxidative stress in irradiated normal tissues may contribute to both complications following radiotherapy and increased glucose uptake as detected by posttherapy fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging. We sought to determine whether increased glucose uptake in normal tissues after chemoradiotherapy is associated with increased toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy and free of recurrence at 1 year were studied. FDG-PET imaging was obtained at 3 and 12 months posttreatment. Standardized uptake value (SUV) levels were determined at various head and neck regions. Functional outcome was measured using a quality of life questionnaire and weight loss and type of diet tolerated 1 year after therapy. A one-tailed Pearson correlation test was used to examine associations between SUV levels and functional outcome measures. Results: Standardized uptake value levels in the supraglottic and glottic larynx from FDG-PET imaging obtained 12 months posttreatment were inversely associated with quality of life measures and were correlated with a more restricted diet 1 year after therapy. SUV levels at 3 months after therapy did not correlate with functional outcome. Increases in SUV levels in normal tissues between 3 and 12 months were commonly found in the absence of recurrence. Conclusion: Altered metabolism in irradiated tissues persists 1 year after therapy. FDG-PET scans may be used to assess normal tissue damage following chemoradiotherapy. These data support investigating hypermetabolic conditions associated with either inflammation, oxidative stress, or both, as causal agents for radiation-induced normal tissue damage.

  18. A poor correlation exists between oscillometric and radial arterial blood pressure as measured by the Philips MP90 monitor.

    PubMed

    Mireles, Samuel A; Jaffe, Richard A; Drover, David R; Brock-Utne, John G

    2009-06-01

    In anesthesia and critical care, invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring is the gold standard against which other methods of monitoring are compared. In this assessment of the Philips MP90 monitor, the objective was to determine whether or not oscillometric measurements were within the accuracy standards set by the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and the British Hypertension Society (BHS). Three hundred and one invasive and noninvasive paired measurements were obtained from eleven adult patients on the neurosurgical service at Stanford University Medical Center. Bland-Altman plots were created to assess agreement between the two measurement systems. Paired correlation analysis, bias and precision calculations were performed. Oscillometric blood pressure measurements correlated with arterial measurements yielding Pearson r values of 0.68, 0.67 and 0.62 for systolic, diastolic and mean pressures, respectively (P < 0.01.) Mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were -3.8 mmHg +/- 13.6, -2.4 mmHg +/- 10.0, and 4.0 mmHg +/- 13.1 for systolic, diastolic and mean pressures, respectively. The mean difference for these measurements was correlation between noninvasive and invasive measurements of arterial blood pressure as measured with a cuff and radial arterial cannula using the Philips MP90 monitor. These inaccuracies could lead to unnecessary interventions, or lack of appropriate interventions in anesthetic management. Further study is needed to specify the absolute inaccuracy of the monitor, and to determine if accuracy between the two methods varies with patient co-morbidities, surgical procedures, or anesthetic management. PMID:19396553

  19. Correlation between serum 25(OH)D values and lupus disease activity: an original article and a systematic review with meta-analysis focusing on serum VitD confounders.

    PubMed

    Sahebari, M; Nabavi, N; Salehi, M

    2014-10-01

    Notwithstanding that several original studies and some systematic reviews have been undertaken on the subject "correlation between serum values of vitamin D (VitD) and lupus disease activity," there is still no consensus on the importance of sectional measurement of serum VitD in the prediction of disease activity and important confounders in estimation of serum VitD. Medline, Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases were searched from 1995 to 2013. The following medical subject heading (MeSH) terms and/or text words were used: "Vitamin D" OR "25OHD" OR "25(OH)D" combined with "systemic lupus erythematosus" OR "lupus" OR "SLE." References cited in the identified articles were also manually searched. Human studies in any language were included. Original research on this topic was also carried out on 82 lupus patients, considering important VitD confounders according to our systematic review and we included them in the meta-analysis. A total of 35 studies were registered for this study. Only 11 of these pointed to this correlation by Pearson test. The pooled Pearson correlation (r) of associations between disease activity and VitD was -0.365 (95% CI: -0.536, -0.165) with significant heterogeneity (p = 0.001 I (2 )= 93%). Sensitivity analysis resulted in no significant differences. The most important adjustable confounders considered by researchers were drugs, especially hydroxychloroquine, prednisolone and supplementary VitD, body mass index (BMI) and proteinuria or renal function. Only proteinuria was reported to influence VitD concentration strongly. BMI was another probable influencing factor. Our original research presented no correlation between VitD and SLEDAI (p = 0.68, r s = 0.003). This meta-analysis demonstrated that most of the studies on the relationship between VitD and lupus disease activity that found no correlation did not present the details of the statistics. However, analyzing 11 studies, most of which found a reverse correlation and reported it in detail, and our study found a weak reverse correlation between those two items. Systematic review of confounders showed that BMI, medications and kidney involvement were the most remarkable ones reported by researchers. PMID:24961748

  20. Organic pollutants and their correlation with stable isotopes in vegetation from King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Cipro, Caio V Z; Yogui, Gilvan Takeshi; Bustamante, Paco; Taniguchi, Satie; Sericano, José L; Montone, Rosalinda Carmela

    2011-10-01

    Vegetation samples from King George Island, Antarctica (62°05'S, 058°23'W) were collected in the austral summer of 2004-2005. Lichens (Usnea aurantiaco-atra and Usnea antarctica), mosses (Sanionia uncinata, Syntrichia princeps and Brachytecium sp.), and one angiosperm (Colobanthus quitensis) species were analyzed for persistent organic pollutants as well as δ(13)C and δ(15)N stable isotopes. The following contaminants were found above the method detection limit (MDL): HCB (0.141-1.06 ng g(-1) dry weight), HCHs (Pearson's correlation showed significant results for some contaminants (e.g. HCHs/HCB and PCBs/DDTs) and suggested the influence of the origin of both nitrogen and pollutants, notably taking secondary sources (animal excrements/remains, for instance) into consideration. PMID:21868055