Science.gov

Sample records for t-test pearson correlation

  1. The Evolution of Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kader, Gary D.; Franklin, Christine A.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an activity for developing the notion of association between two quantitative variables. By exploring a collection of scatter plots, the authors propose a nonstandard "intuitive" measure of association; and by examining properties of this measure, they develop the more standard measure, Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. The…

  2. Ghost imaging based on Pearson correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Liu, Xue-Feng; Li, Long-Zhen; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2015-05-01

    Correspondence imaging is a new modality of ghost imaging, which can retrieve a positive/negative image by simple conditional averaging of the reference frames that correspond to relatively large/small values of the total intensity measured at the bucket detector. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a more rigorous and general approach in which a ghost image is retrieved by calculating a Pearson correlation coefficient between the bucket detector intensity and the brightness at a given pixel of the reference frames, and at the next pixel, and so on. Furthermore, we theoretically provide a statistical interpretation of these two imaging phenomena, and explain how the error depends on the sample size and what kind of distribution the error obeys. According to our analysis, the image signal-to-noise ratio can be greatly improved and the sampling number reduced by means of our new method. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122902).

  3. Random matrix theory analysis of cross-correlations in the US stock market: Evidence from Pearson’s correlation coefficient and detrended cross-correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang-Jin; Xie, Chi; Chen, Shou; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Yang, Ming-Yan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we first build two empirical cross-correlation matrices in the US stock market by two different methods, namely the Pearson’s correlation coefficient and the detrended cross-correlation coefficient (DCCA coefficient). Then, combining the two matrices with the method of random matrix theory (RMT), we mainly investigate the statistical properties of cross-correlations in the US stock market. We choose the daily closing prices of 462 constituent stocks of S&P 500 index as the research objects and select the sample data from January 3, 2005 to August 31, 2012. In the empirical analysis, we examine the statistical properties of cross-correlation coefficients, the distribution of eigenvalues, the distribution of eigenvector components, and the inverse participation ratio. From the two methods, we find some new results of the cross-correlations in the US stock market in our study, which are different from the conclusions reached by previous studies. The empirical cross-correlation matrices constructed by the DCCA coefficient show several interesting properties at different time scales in the US stock market, which are useful to the risk management and optimal portfolio selection, especially to the diversity of the asset portfolio. It will be an interesting and meaningful work to find the theoretical eigenvalue distribution of a completely random matrix R for the DCCA coefficient because it does not obey the Mar?enko-Pastur distribution.

  4. Robustness of Two Formulas to Correct Pearson Correlation for Restriction of Range

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    tran, minh

    2011-01-01

    Many research studies involving Pearson correlations are conducted in settings where one of the two variables has a restricted range in the sample. For example, this situation occurs when tests are used for selecting candidates for employment or university admission. Often after selection, there is interest in correlating the selection variable,…

  5. Asymptotic Properties of Pearson's Rank-Variate Correlation Coefficient under Contaminated Gaussian Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rubao; Xu, Weichao; Zhang, Yun; Ye, Zhongfu

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness properties of Pearson's rank-variate correlation coefficient (PRVCC) in scenarios where one channel is corrupted by impulsive noise and the other is impulsive noise-free. As shown in our previous work, these scenarios that frequently encountered in radar and/or sonar, can be well emulated by a particular bivariate contaminated Gaussian model (CGM). Under this CGM, we establish the asymptotic closed forms of the expectation and variance of PRVCC by means of the well known Delta method. To gain a deeper understanding, we also compare PRVCC with two other classical correlation coefficients, i.e., Spearman's rho (SR) and Kendall's tau (KT), in terms of the root mean squared error (RMSE). Monte Carlo simulations not only verify our theoretical findings, but also reveal the advantage of PRVCC by an example of estimating the time delay in the particular impulsive noise environment. PMID:25393286

  6. Pearson's Correlation between Three Variables; Using Students' Basic Knowledge of Geometry for an Exercise in Mathematical Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    When studying correlations, how do the three bivariate correlation coefficients between three variables relate? After transforming Pearson's correlation coefficient r into a Euclidean distance, undergraduate students can tackle this problem using their secondary school knowledge of geometry (Pythagoras' theorem and similarity of triangles).…

  7. An Improved Pearson's Correlation Proximity-Based Hierarchical Clustering for Mining Biological Association between Genes

    PubMed Central

    Booma, P. M.; Prabhakaran, S.; Dhanalakshmi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Microarray gene expression datasets has concerned great awareness among molecular biologist, statisticians, and computer scientists. Data mining that extracts the hidden and usual information from datasets fails to identify the most significant biological associations between genes. A search made with heuristic for standard biological process measures only the gene expression level, threshold, and response time. Heuristic search identifies and mines the best biological solution, but the association process was not efficiently addressed. To monitor higher rate of expression levels between genes, a hierarchical clustering model was proposed, where the biological association between genes is measured simultaneously using proximity measure of improved Pearson's correlation (PCPHC). Additionally, the Seed Augment algorithm adopts average linkage methods on rows and columns in order to expand a seed PCPHC model into a maximal global PCPHC (GL-PCPHC) model and to identify association between the clusters. Moreover, a GL-PCPHC applies pattern growing method to mine the PCPHC patterns. Compared to existing gene expression analysis, the PCPHC model achieves better performance. Experimental evaluations are conducted for GL-PCPHC model with standard benchmark gene expression datasets extracted from UCI repository and GenBank database in terms of execution time, size of pattern, significance level, biological association efficiency, and pattern quality. PMID:25136661

  8. Correcting Two-Sample "z" and "t" Tests for Correlation: An Alternative to One-Sample Tests on Difference Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    In order to circumvent the influence of correlation in paired-samples and repeated measures experimental designs, researchers typically perform a one-sample Student "t" test on difference scores. That procedure entails some loss of power, because it employs N - 1 degrees of freedom instead of the 2N - 2 degrees of freedom of the…

  9. Variation and pearson correlation coefficients of warner-bratzler shear force measurements within broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of texture properties related to tenderness at different locations within deboned broiler breast fillets have been used to validate techniques for texture analysis and establish correlations between different texture evaluation methods. However, it has been demonstrated that meat text...

  10. An automated Pearson's correlation change classification (APC3) approach for GC/MS metabonomic data using total ion chromatograms (TICs).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhaskaran David; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Ho, Paul C; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Yap, Chun Wei

    2013-05-21

    A fully automated and computationally efficient Pearson's correlation change classification (APC3) approach is proposed and shown to have overall comparable performance with both an average accuracy and an average AUC of 0.89 ± 0.08 but is 3.9 to 7 times faster, easier to use and have low outlier susceptibility in contrast to other dimensional reduction and classification combinations using only the total ion chromatogram (TIC) intensities of GC/MS data. The use of only the TIC permits the possible application of APC3 to other metabonomic data such as LC/MS TICs or NMR spectra. A RapidMiner implementation is available for download at http://padel.nus.edu.sg/software/padelapc3. PMID:23529371

  11. Reconstructing gene regulatory networks from knock-out data using Gaussian Noise Model and Pearson Correlation Coefficient.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Salleh, Faridah Hani; Arif, Shereena Mohd; Zainudin, Suhaila; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-12-01

    A gene regulatory network (GRN) is a large and complex network consisting of interacting elements that, over time, affect each other's state. The dynamics of complex gene regulatory processes are difficult to understand using intuitive approaches alone. To overcome this problem, we propose an algorithm for inferring the regulatory interactions from knock-out data using a Gaussian model combines with Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC). There are several problems relating to GRN construction that have been outlined in this paper. We demonstrated the ability of our proposed method to (1) predict the presence of regulatory interactions between genes, (2) their directionality and (3) their states (activation or suppression). The algorithm was applied to network sizes of 10 and 50 genes from DREAM3 datasets and network sizes of 10 from DREAM4 datasets. The predicted networks were evaluated based on AUROC and AUPR. We discovered that high false positive values were generated by our GRN prediction methods because the indirect regulations have been wrongly predicted as true relationships. We achieved satisfactory results as the majority of sub-networks achieved AUROC values above 0.5. PMID:26278974

  12. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  13. IBMFS - Pearson Syndrome

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with Pearson Syndrome may have poor food absorption (malabsorption) and low white blood cell counts (neutropenia). Low red cell counts (anemia) can be a major problem, and low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) can also occur. Symptoms are often present in infancy. Liver and kidney disease usually develop. Examination of the bone marrow under the microscope reveals characteristic holes ("vacuoles") in many cells.

  14. Pearson's Functions to Describe FSW Weld Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lacombe, D.; Coupard, D.; Tcherniaeff, S.; Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new joining technique particularly for aluminium alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this study, the geometry of the weld has been investigated and modelled using Pearson's functions. It has been demonstrated that the Pearson's parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis and geometric constant) can be used to characterize the weld geometry and the tensile strength of the weld assembly. Pearson's parameters and process parameters are strongly correlated allowing to define a control process procedure for FSW assemblies which make radiographic or ultrasonic controls unnecessary. Finally, an optimisation using a Generalized Gradient Method allows to determine the geometry of the weld which maximises the assembly tensile strength.

  15. Fast computation of voxel-level brain connectivity maps from resting-state functional MRI using l?-norm as approximation of Pearson's temporal correlation: proof-of-concept and example vector hardware implementation.

    PubMed

    Minati, Ludovico; Zacà, Domenico; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Jovicich, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    An outstanding issue in graph-based analysis of resting-state functional MRI is choice of network nodes. Individual consideration of entire brain voxels may represent a less biased approach than parcellating the cortex according to pre-determined atlases, but entails establishing connectedness for 1(9)-1(11) links, with often prohibitive computational cost. Using a representative Human Connectome Project dataset, we show that, following appropriate time-series normalization, it may be possible to accelerate connectivity determination replacing Pearson correlation with l1-norm. Even though the adjacency matrices derived from correlation coefficients and l1-norms are not identical, their similarity is high. Further, we describe and provide in full an example vector hardware implementation of l1-norm on an array of 4096 zero instruction-set processors. Calculation times <1000 s are attainable, removing the major deterrent to voxel-based resting-sate network mapping and revealing fine-grained node degree heterogeneity. L1-norm should be given consideration as a substitute for correlation in very high-density resting-state functional connectivity analyses. PMID:25023958

  16. The Kalman Filter Justin Pearson

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    The Kalman Filter Justin Pearson SIAM Seminar on Algorithms in Computational Science Nov 24, 2014 #12;Outline · Linear systems · + Linear Recursive Estimation · = Kalman Filter #12;The Kalman Filter: accels, gyros dynamical system #12;The Kalman Filter is an efficient algorithm for estimating the state

  17. Parental Socio-Economic Status as Correlate of Child Labour in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elegbeleye, O. S.; Olasupo, M. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental socio-economic status and child labour practices in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study employed survey method to gather data from 200 parents which constituted the study population. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test statistics were used for the data analyses. The outcome of the study…

  18. 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Linear Equations

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Education, Inc. MATRIX NOTATION The essential information of a linear system can be recorded compactly1 1.1 © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. Linear Equations in Linear Algebra SYSTEMS OF LINEAR EQUATIONS #12;Slide 1.1- 2© 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. LINEAR EQUATION A linear equation in the variables

  19. Overview Terminology The Neyman-Pearson Lemma Simple Hypotheses

    E-print Network

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Overview Terminology The Neyman-Pearson Lemma Topic 17 Simple Hypotheses Terminology and the Neyman-Pearson Lemma 1 / 11 #12;Overview Terminology The Neyman-Pearson Lemma Outline Overview Terminology The Neyman-Pearson Lemma 2 / 11 #12;Overview Terminology The Neyman-Pearson Lemma Overview Statistical hypothesis testing

  20. 28 November 2007 Dear Dr Pearson,

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    28 November 2007 Dear Dr Pearson, I am writing to appeal for your help in ameliorating the STFC funding crisis, which I fear will have serious implications for science in the UK. I have previously been

  1. NCS Pearson: Scanning the Diet History Questionnaire

    Cancer.gov

    NCS Pearson is one source of scannable DHQ forms and scanning services. See Scanning the DHQ for information regarding other sources. Any new information we know of regarding economical printing, scanning, or data entry methods will be posted on this Web site as it becomes available.

  2. T test as a parametric statistic

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In statistic tests, the probability distribution of the statistics is important. When samples are drawn from population N (µ, ?2) with a sample size of n, the distribution of the sample mean X? should be a normal distribution N (µ, ?2/n). Under the null hypothesis µ = µ0, the distribution of statistics z=X¯-µ0?/n should be standardized as a normal distribution. When the variance of the population is not known, replacement with the sample variance s2 is possible. In this case, the statistics X¯-µ0s/n follows a t distribution (n-1 degrees of freedom). An independent-group t test can be carried out for a comparison of means between two independent groups, with a paired t test for paired data. As the t test is a parametric test, samples should meet certain preconditions, such as normality, equal variances and independence. PMID:26634076

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition; its prevalence is unknown. What are the genetic changes related to Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome? Pearson ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  4. 2005 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley

    E-print Network

    Shirley, Yancy

    Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley Eratosthenes measures Circumference of the Earth (c. 240 BC) Eratosthenes measured a value of 42,000 km (modern value 40,075 km) #12;© 2005 Pearson

  5. Bayesian Estimation Supersedes the "t" Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruschke, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian estimation for 2 groups provides complete distributions of credible values for the effect size, group means and their difference, standard deviations and their difference, and the normality of the data. The method handles outliers. The decision rule can accept the null value (unlike traditional "t" tests) when certainty in the estimate is…

  6. A Neyman-Pearson Approach to Statistical Learning Clayton Scott

    E-print Network

    Nowak, Robert

    lemma" of Cannon et al., we demonstrate that several concepts from statistical learning theory have by classical Neyman-Pearson (NP) hypothesis testing. In the spirit of statistical learning theory, we developA Neyman-Pearson Approach to Statistical Learning Clayton Scott and Robert Nowak Technical Report

  7. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 2 Solar Energy to Earth

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    © 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Learning Objectives · Distinguish between galaxies, stars, and planets. · Locate Earth in the Solar System and Galaxy. · Reconstruct Earth's annual orbit about the Sun. · Describe the Sun

  8. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Earth's Modern Atmosphere

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    Gases: Water Vapor (H2O) (0 to 4%), CO2 (0.038%). · 4Less: Odorless, Colorless, Tasteless, and Formless with increase of altitude. #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Pressure Pressure = mass× gravity area = volume × density × gravity area area force Pressure = #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Air Pressure Vertical

  9. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 6 Atmospheric and Oceanic

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    ;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Air Pressure · Atmospheric pressure is the force per unit area exerted. Atmospheric Pressure Profile #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Measure Air Pressure--Mercury Barometer · Seal Education, Inc. Driving Forces Within the Atmosphere · Gravity · Pressure gradient force · Coriolis force

  10. Pearson's Goodness of Fit Statistic as a Score Test Statistic

    E-print Network

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    Pearson's Goodness of Fit Statistic as a Score Test Statistic Gordon K. Smyth Abstract For any generalized linear model, the Pearson goodness of fit statistic is the score test statistic for testing; exponential family nonlinear model; saturated model. 1 Introduction Goodness of fit tests go back at least

  11. 2005 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley

    E-print Network

    Shirley, Yancy

    © 2005 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley The Big Bang Theory & Expansion is the unfolding of all space since the big bang, i.e. there is no edge. ·We are limited in our view see back... Radiation signature from 300,000 years after the Big Bang #12;© 2005 Pearson Education

  12. Chapter 9 Water Resources 2015 Pearson Education, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    is evapotranspiration (ET)? · Evapotranspiration is a collective term (evaporation + transpiration) for all Bare soil Vegetated evaporation evaporation transpiration uptake evaporation evaporation #12;© 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Transpiration Capillary rise is the rise in a liquid above the level of zero

  13. 45. Historic American Buildings Survey Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer 1970 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Historic American Buildings Survey Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer 1970 BUILT0IN STORAGE UNITS, FIRST ATTIC, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Shaker Church Family Main Dwelling House, U.S. Route 20, Hancock, Berkshire County, MA

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer, 1968 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey, Elmer R. Pearson, Photographer, 1968 ELEVATION, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Shaker Centre Family, Broom Shop, East side of Oxford Road, White Water Park, Hamilton County, OH

  15. Plotting Formula for Pearson Type III Distribution Considering Historical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Van Thanh-Van; In-na, Nophadol

    1992-01-01

    Proposes a plotting position formula for the Pearson type III distribution in the analysis of historical flood information. Presents results of a numerical example using actual flood data to confirm the appropriateness of the plotting formula. (24 references) (MDH)

  16. A Null Model for Pearson Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Andrea; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gene coexpression networks inferred by correlation from high-throughput profiling such as microarray data represent simple but effective structures for discovering and interpreting linear gene relationships. In recent years, several approaches have been proposed to tackle the problem of deciding when the resulting correlation values are statistically significant. This is most crucial when the number of samples is small, yielding a non-negligible chance that even high correlation values are due to random effects. Here we introduce a novel hard thresholding solution based on the assumption that a coexpression network inferred by randomly generated data is expected to be empty. The threshold is theoretically derived by means of an analytic approach and, as a deterministic independent null model, it depends only on the dimensions of the starting data matrix, with assumptions on the skewness of the data distribution compatible with the structure of gene expression levels data. We show, on synthetic and array datasets, that the proposed threshold is effective in eliminating all false positive links, with an offsetting cost in terms of false negative detected edges. PMID:26030917

  17. Karl Pearson and eugenics: personal opinions and scientific rigor.

    PubMed

    Delzell, Darcie A P; Poliak, Cathy D

    2013-09-01

    The influence of personal opinions and biases on scientific conclusions is a threat to the advancement of knowledge. Expertise and experience does not render one immune to this temptation. In this work, one of the founding fathers of statistics, Karl Pearson, is used as an illustration of how even the most talented among us can produce misleading results when inferences are made without caution or reference to potential bias and other analysis limitations. A study performed by Pearson on British Jewish schoolchildren is examined in light of ethical and professional statistical practice. The methodology used and inferences made by Pearson and his coauthor are sometimes questionable and offer insight into how Pearson's support of eugenics and his own British nationalism could have potentially influenced his often careless and far-fetched inferences. A short background into Pearson's work and beliefs is provided, along with an in-depth examination of the authors' overall experimental design and statistical practices. In addition, portions of the study regarding intelligence and tuberculosis are discussed in more detail, along with historical reactions to their work. PMID:23179067

  18. Biostatistik, WS 2010/2011 Der zwei-Stichproben-t-Test

    E-print Network

    Birkner, Matthias

    Biostatistik, WS 2010/2011 Der zwei-Stichproben-t-Test (t-Test f¨ur ungepaarte Stichproben;1 Wiederholung: Ein-Stichproben-t-Test 2 t-Test f¨ur ungepaarte Stichproben Beispiel: Backenz¨ahne von Hipparions Allgemein: ungepaarter t-Test mit Annahme gleicher Varianzen Bericht: t-Test ohne Annahme gleicher Varianz

  19. Biostatistik, WS 2013/2014 Der zwei-Stichproben-t-Test

    E-print Network

    Birkner, Matthias

    Biostatistik, WS 2013/2014 Der zwei-Stichproben-t-Test (t-Test f¨ur ungepaarte Stichproben;1 Wiederholung: Ein-Stichproben-t-Test 2 t-Test f¨ur ungepaarte Stichproben Beispiel: Backenz¨ahne von Hipparions Allgemein: ungepaarter t-Test mit Annahme gleicher Varianzen Bericht: t-Test ohne Annahme gleicher Varianz

  20. Canvas Training & Support Add Pearson MyLab to Canvas Course ACNS/Colorado State University

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Emily V.

    Canvas Training & Support Add Pearson MyLab to Canvas Course ACNS/Colorado State University module just for Pearson. #12;Canvas Training & Support Add Pearson MyLab to Canvas Course ACNS ACNS/Colorado State University November 2014 3 h) Click on the Pearson MyLab link in your module

  1. James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    James Pearson Duffy Department of Art and Art History 150 Art Building phone 313-577-2980 Detroit, Michigan 48202 fax 313-577-3491 web www.art.wayne.edu Please type or print clearly in ink when completing this form. Then, please scan the completed forms and email them to wayne. edu> with a copy to

  2. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 4 Atmosphere and Surface Energy

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    Pearson Education, Inc. The Greenhouse Effect and Atmospheric Warming · Atmosphere absorbs heat energy of albedo (reflectivity). · Analyze the effect of clouds and aerosols on atmospheric heating and cooling. · A real greenhouse traps heat inside. · Atmosphere delays transfer of heat from Earth into space. #12

  3. Spatial trends in Pearson Type III statistical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichty, R.W.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Spatial trends in the statistical parameters (mean, standard deviation, and skewness coefficient) of a Pearson Type III distribution of the logarithms of annual flood peaks for small rural basins (less than 90 km2) are delineated using a climate factor CT, (T=2-, 25-, and 100-yr recurrence intervals), which quantifies the effects of long-term climatic data (rainfall and pan evaporation) on observed T-yr floods. Maps showing trends in average parameter values demonstrate the geographically varying influence of climate on the magnitude of Pearson Type III statistical parameters. The spatial trends in variability of the parameter values characterize the sensitivity of statistical parameters to the interaction of basin-runoff characteristics (hydrology) and climate. -from Authors

  4. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation. PMID:25035146

  5. Shape modeling with family of Pearson distributions: Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidojevic, Sonja

    2014-10-01

    Two major effects of Langmuir wave electric field influence on spectral line shapes are appearance of depressions shifted from unperturbed line and an additional dynamical line broadening. More realistic and accurate models of Langmuir waves are needed to study these effects with more confidence. In this article we present distribution shapes of a high-quality data set of Langmuir waves electric field observed by the WIND satellite. Using well developed numerical techniques, the distributions of the empirical measurements are modeled by family of Pearson distributions. The results suggest that the existing theoretical models of energy conversion between an electron beam and surrounding plasma is more complex. If the processes of the Langmuir wave generation are better understood, the influence of Langmuir waves on spectral line shapes could be modeled better.

  6. Clopper-Pearson Bounds from HEP Data Cuts

    E-print Network

    Bernd A. Berg

    2000-10-24

    For the measurement of $N_s$ signals in $N$ events rigorous confidence bounds on the true signal probability $p_{\\rm exact}$ were established in a classical paper by Clopper and Pearson [Biometrica 26, 404 (1934)]. Here, their bounds are generalized to the HEP situation where cuts on the data tag signals with probability $P_s$ and background data with likelihood $P_b

  7. SALD 19A: JMP examples for two-sample t-test

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    SALD 19A: JMP examples for two-sample t-test #12;Introduction Notes #12;DO NOT COPY Copyright. All rights reserved. Slide 19A-10 Performing a two-sample t-test To perform a two-sample t-test. Deming and Stephen L. Morgan. All rights reserved. Slide 19A-11 Two-sample t-test output for equal group

  8. The power of a paired t-test with a covariate.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, E C; Ayers, Stephanie

    2015-03-01

    Many researchers employ the paired t-test to evaluate the mean difference between matched data points. Unfortunately, in many cases this test in inefficient. This paper reviews how to increase the precision of this test through using the mean centered independent variable x, which is familiar to researchers that use analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). We add to the literature by demonstrating how to employ these gains in efficiency as a factor for use in finding the statistical power of the test. The key parameters for this factor are the correlation between the two measures and the variance ratio of the dependent measure on the predictor. The paper then demonstrates how to compute the gains in efficiency a priori to amend the power computations for the traditional paired t-test. We include an example analysis from a recent intervention, Families Preparing the New Generation (Familias Preparando la Nueva Generación). Finally, we conclude with an analysis of extant data to derive reasonable parameter values. PMID:25592936

  9. SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    SALD 18A: JMP examples for one-sample t-test #12;Introduction Notes #12;DO NOT COPY Copyright calculation in JMP To perform a one-sample t-test, select from the data table main menu Analyze 18A-8 To perform a one-sample t-test in JMP, first perform a distribution analysis Under Select

  10. Contingency Plans for Air Traffic Management Karl Sundequist Blomdahl, Pierre Flener, and Justin Pearson

    E-print Network

    Flener, Pierre

    Pearson Department of Information Technology Uppsala University, Box 337, SE ­ 751 05 Uppsala, Sweden KarlContingency Plans for Air Traffic Management Karl Sundequist Blomdahl, Pierre Flener, and Justin.Sundequist Blomdahl.1559@student.uu.se, Pierre.Flener@it.uu.se, Justin.Pearson@it.uu.se Abstract We present two

  11. Robust mixture clustering using Pearson type VII distribution q Jianyong Sun a,d,

    E-print Network

    Kaban, Ata

    Robust mixture clustering using Pearson type VII distribution q Jianyong Sun a,d, , Ata Kabán b December 2008 Available online xxxx Communicated by W. Pedrycz Keywords: Robust mixture modeling Pearson type VII distribution Outlier detection Robust learning a b s t r a c t A mixture of Student t

  12. Robust mixture clustering using Pearson type VII distribution q Jianyong Sun a,d,

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Robust mixture clustering using Pearson type VII distribution q Jianyong Sun a,d, , Ata Kabán b December 2008 Available online 10 August 2010 Communicated by W. Pedrycz Keywords: Robust mixture modeling Pearson type VII distribution Outlier detection Robust learning a b s t r a c t A mixture of Student t

  13. Mitochondrial DNA deletion in a patient with combined features of Leigh and Pearson syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Blok, R.B.; Thorburn, D.R.; Danks, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    We describe a heteroplasmic 4237 bp mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion in an 11 year old girl who has suffered from progressive illness since birth. She has some features of Leigh syndrome (global developmental delay with regression, brainstem dysfunction and lactic acidosis), together with other features suggestive of Pearson syndrome (history of pancytopenia and failure to thrive). The deletion was present at a level greater than 50% in skeletal muscle, but barely detectable in skin fibroblasts following Southern blot analysis, and only observed in blood following PCR analysis. The deletion spanned nt 9498 to nt 13734, and was flanked by a 12 bp direct repeat. Genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III, NADH dehydrogenase subunits 3, 4L, 4 and 5, and tRNAs for glycine, arginine, histidine, serine({sup AGY}) and leucine({sup CUN}) were deleted. Southern blotting also revealed an altered Apa I restriction site which was shown by sequence analysis to be caused by G{r_arrow}A nucleotide substitution at nt 1462 in the 12S rRNA gene. This was presumed to be a polymorphism. No abnormalities of mitochondrial ultrastructure, distribution or of respiratory chain enzyme complexes I-IV in skeletal muscle were observed. Mitochondrial disorders with clinical features overlapping more than one syndrome have been reported previously. This case further demonstrates the difficulty in correlating observed clinical features with a specific mitochondrial DNA mutation.

  14. References and Notes 1. K. G. Pearson, Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 16, 265 (1993).

    E-print Network

    deYoung, Brad

    1993-01-01

    References and Notes 1. K. G. Pearson, Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 16, 265 (1993). 2. R. W. Sperry, J, Naturwissenschaften 70, 417 (1983). 31. We thank S. Atkinson, M. Burrows, C. Petersen, and S. Rogers for comments

  15. Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0-13-148521-0 La couche micro-architecture (Chapter 4)

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Michel

    Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0;Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights

  16. Using the Student's "t"-Test with Extremely Small Sample Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, J. C .F.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers occasionally have to work with an extremely small sample size, defined herein as "N" less than or equal to 5. Some methodologists have cautioned against using the "t"-test when the sample size is extremely small, whereas others have suggested that using the "t"-test is feasible in such a case. The present…

  17. When "t"-Tests or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Tests Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Fiona; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chan, Shun-Kai; Wade, Angie

    2010-01-01

    "t"-Tests are widely used by researchers to compare the average values of a numeric outcome between two groups. If there are doubts about the suitability of the data for the requirements of a "t"-test, most notably the distribution being non-normal, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test may be used instead. However, although often applied, both tests may…

  18. A new correlation coefficient for bivariate time-series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Orhan; Ceyhan, Elvan; Varli, Yusuf

    2014-11-01

    The correlation in time series has received considerable attention in the literature. Its use has attained an important role in the social sciences and finance. For example, pair trading in finance is concerned with the correlation between stock prices, returns, etc. In general, Pearson’s correlation coefficient is employed in these areas although it has many underlying assumptions which restrict its use. Here, we introduce a new correlation coefficient which takes into account the lag difference of data points. We investigate the properties of this new correlation coefficient. We demonstrate that it is more appropriate for showing the direction of the covariation of the two variables over time. We also compare the performance of the new correlation coefficient with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Detrended Cross-Correlation Analysis (DCCA) via simulated examples.

  19. Representation of ion implantation projected range profiles by Pearson distribution curves for silicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, M. D. J.; Ashworth, D. G.; Oven, R.

    1992-08-01

    Several authors have reported difficulties in fitting Pearson curves to implants into amorphous targets. However, we show that accurate Pearson curve fitting to simulations of projected range profiles in amorphous targets is possible when implant profiles are available for which optimised moments can be generated. In previous literature few comparisons can be found between Pearson curve fits and the original implant profiles whereas, in the current paper, comparisons are made with high-resolution simulated profiles for B, P and As implanted into amorphous Si. These profiles were derived using Monte-Carlo simulations each of 1,000,000 ion trajectories. Fit coefficients that allow the regeneration of Pearson curves, optimised to fit Monte-Carlo implant profiles, are provided for the ions, B, P, As and Sb implanted, with energies in the range 25-300 keV, into targets of amorphous Si, silicon dioxide and silicon nitride. Comparisons of infinite and optimised moments, for B and P implants, show that the best fit moments (and corresponding Pearson type) can only be determined as part of an optimisation process, and not from infinite moments directly (such as moments from a backward Boltzmann transport equation solver).

  20. Comparison of the Mahalanobis Distance and Pearson's ?2 Statistic as Measures of Similarity of Isotope Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanzad Ghavidel, Fatemeh; Claesen, Jürgen; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Valkenborg, Dirk

    2013-11-01

    To extract a genuine peptide signal from a mass spectrum, an observed series of peaks at a particular mass can be compared with the isotope distribution expected for a peptide of that mass. To decide whether the observed series of peaks is similar to the isotope distribution, a similarity measure is needed. In this short communication, we investigate whether the Mahalanobis distance could be an alternative measure for the commonly employed Pearson's ?2 statistic. We evaluate the performance of the two measures by using a controlled MALDI-TOF experiment. The results indicate that Pearson's ?2 statistic has better discriminatory performance than the Mahalanobis distance and is a more robust measure.

  1. Photosynthesis in Aspen Bark Author(s): L. C. Pearson and D. B. Lawrence

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Photosynthesis in Aspen Bark Author(s): L. C. Pearson and D. B. Lawrence Reviewed work(s): Source and extend access to American Journal of Botany. http://www.jstor.org #12;PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN ASPEN BARK1 L. C thesepigmentsper unit area of bark. A secondwas a simpleand rather crudetesttomeasuredifferencesinamountofstarch

  2. A Psychometric Measurement Model for Adult English Language Learners: Pearson Test of English Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pae, Hye K.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply Rasch modeling to an examination of the psychometric properties of the "Pearson Test of English Academic" (PTE Academic). Analyzed were 140 test-takers' scores derived from the PTE Academic database. The mean age of the participants was 26.45 (SD = 5.82), ranging from 17 to 46. Conformity of the participants'…

  3. Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent Stuart Pearson*w & Julio L. Betancourtz

    E-print Network

    Understanding arid environments using fossil rodent middens Stuart Pearson*w & Julio L. Betancourtz, Tucson, AZ 85745, U.S.A. (Received 16 November 2000, accepted 23 June 2001) American rodent middens have theory than Australian rodent middens. This relates to differences in the natural environment

  4. Karl Pearson's mathematization of inheritance: from ancestral heredity to Mendelian genetics (1895-1909).

    PubMed

    Magnello, M E

    1998-01-01

    Long-standing claims have been made for nearly the entire twentieth century that the biometrician, Karl Pearson, and colleague, W. F. R. Weldon, rejected Mendelism as a theory of inheritance. It is shown that at the end of the nineteenth century Pearson considered various theories of inheritance (including Francis Galton's law of ancestral heredity for characters underpinned by continuous variation), and by 1904 he 'accepted the fundamental idea of Mendel' as a theory of inheritance for discontinuous variation. Moreover, in 1909, he suggested a synthesis of biometry and Mendelism. Despite the many attempts made by a number of geneticists (including R. A. Fisher in 1936) to use Pearson's chi-square (X2, P) goodness-of-fit test on Mendel's data, which produced results that were 'too good to be true', Weldon reached the same conclusion in 1902, but his results were never acknowledged. The geneticist and arch-rival of the biometricians, Williams Bateson, was instead exceptionally critical of this work and interpreted this as Weldon's rejection of Mendelism. Whilst scholarship on Mendel, by historians of science in the last 18 years, has led to a balanced perspective of Mendel, it is suggested that a better balanced and more rounded view of the hereditarian-statistical work of Pearson, Weldon, and the biometricians is long overdue. PMID:11619806

  5. "Describing our whole experience": the statistical philosophies of W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson.

    PubMed

    Pence, Charles H

    2011-12-01

    There are two motivations commonly ascribed to historical actors for taking up statistics: to reduce complicated data to a mean value (e.g., Quetelet), and to take account of diversity (e.g., Galton). Different motivations will, it is assumed, lead to different methodological decisions in the practice of the statistical sciences. Karl Pearson and W. F. R. Weldon are generally seen as following directly in Galton's footsteps. I argue for two related theses in light of this standard interpretation, based on a reading of several sources in which Weldon, independently of Pearson, reflects on his own motivations. First, while Pearson does approach statistics from this "Galtonian" perspective, he is, consistent with his positivist philosophy of science, utilizing statistics to simplify the highly variable data of biology. Weldon, on the other hand, is brought to statistics by a rich empiricism and a desire to preserve the diversity of biological data. Secondly, we have here a counterexample to the claim that divergence in motivation will lead to a corresponding separation in methodology. Pearson and Weldon, despite embracing biometry for different reasons, settled on precisely the same set of statistical tools for the investigation of evolution. PMID:22035721

  6. The Beta Distribution,moment method, Karl Pearson and R.A.Fisher

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Kimiko o

    2007-01-01

    Simulation studies provide four moment approximating distributions to each of the four parameters of a beta distribution (Pearson Type I). Two of the parameters refer to origin and scale, two to shape (skewness and kurtosis). Type I random number generator is checked out, and the stability of moments of random samples of size n over cycles; particular attention is paid to shape parameter moments. In Type I region of validity (referred to skewness and kurtosis), moment methods become unstable in the neighborhood of Type III ({chi}{sup 2}) line, and ultimately abort. Thus extremely large variances and large higher moments arise. We probe the cause of this phenomenon. Simulation studies are turned to since alternative power series methods are forbiddingly complicated. However, use is made of the delta method to provide asymptotic variances of the estimators, and asymptotic variances of percentage points of the basic distribution. An account of work on the subject by K. Pearson, some of it a century ago, is given. In particular an important paper by Pearson and Filon provides some estimates of probable errors of moment parameter estimators such as the basic distribution parameters, the mode, the skewness and others. The heated controversy between Pearson and Fisher is considered.

  7. Philosophy of Science Association On After-Trial Criticisms of Neyman-Pearson Theory of Statistics

    E-print Network

    Mayo, Deborah

    Philosophy of Science Association On After-Trial Criticisms of Neyman-Pearson Theory of Statistics Author(s): Deborah G. Mayo Source: PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science of Chicago Press on behalf of the Philosophy of Science Association Stable URL: http

  8. updated on 8/6/2012 by L. Hall-Pearson I. INTRODUCTION

    E-print Network

    Bukauskas, Feliksas

    updated on 8/6/2012 by L. Hall-Pearson I. INTRODUCTION The Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University ("Einstein"), one of the nation's premier institutions for medical education, basic of Interest. In addition to medical education, a central academic activity of Einstein is discovery

  9. A LEAN ORGANIZATION TO STRENGTHEN THE BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Graham S Pearson

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    A LEAN ORGANIZATION TO STRENGTHEN THE BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION Graham S Pearson HSP Advisory Convention (BWC or BTWC) negotiating a Protocol to strengthen the Conven- tion have touched from time to time for a lean and effective organization to implement the Protocol to strengthen the BWC. It is emphasised

  10. Children with autism do not overimitate L. Marsh, A. Pearson, D. Ropar & A. Hamilton

    E-print Network

    Hamilton, Antonia

    Children with autism do not overimitate L. Marsh, A. Pearson, D. Ropar & A. Hamilton School object, typically developing (TD) children faithfully copy both necessary and visibly unnecessary actions to be causally transparent in their mechanism, young children's causal reasoning about novel objects is unclear

  11. Reducing Bias and Error in the Correlation Coefficient Due to Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Hittner, James B.

    2015-01-01

    It is more common for educational and psychological data to be nonnormal than to be approximately normal. This tendency may lead to bias and error in point estimates of the Pearson correlation coefficient. In a series of Monte Carlo simulations, the Pearson correlation was examined under conditions of normal and nonnormal data, and it was compared…

  12. Choosing the Best Correction Formula for the Pearson r[superscript 2] Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skidmore, Susan Troncoso; Thompson, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    In the present Monte Carlo simulation study, the authors compared bias and precision of 7 sampling error corrections to the Pearson r[superscript 2] under 6 x 3 x 6 conditions (i.e., population ? values of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9, respectively; population shapes normal, skewness = kurtosis = 1, and skewness = -1.5 with kurtosis = 3.5;…

  13. Is the Pearson r[squared] Biased, and if So, What Is the Best Correction Formula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhongmiao; Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In this study the authors investigated the use of 5 (i.e., Claudy, Ezekiel, Olkin-Pratt, Pratt, and Smith) R[squared] correction formulas with the Pearson r[squared]. The authors estimated adjustment bias and precision under 6 x 3 x 6 conditions (i.e., population [rho] values of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9; population shapes normal, skewness…

  14. Determining Differences in Efficacy of Two Disinfectants Using t-Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Michael A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment to compare the effectiveness of 95% ethanol to 20% bleach as disinfectants using t-tests for the statistical analysis of the data. Reports that bleach is a better disinfectant. Discusses the statistical and practical significance of the results. (JRH)

  15. that the Internet causes social isolation. This t test design would have had considerably more

    E-print Network

    Kiesler, Sara

    that the Internet causes social isolation. This t test design would have had considerably more: A social technol- ogy that reduces social involvement and psychological well-being? American Psy- chologist- partment of Psychology, Madonna Univer- sity, 36600 Schoolcraft Road, Livonia, MI 48150. Electronic mail

  16. Use of "t"-Test and ANOVA in Career-Technical Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    Use of t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures in published research from three scholarly journals in career and technical education (CTE) during a recent 5-year period was examined. Information on post hoc analyses, reporting of effect size, alpha adjustments to account for multiple tests, power, and examination of assumptions…

  17. Matrix Games: Correlation and Minimax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Max C.

    1973-01-01

    A game is presented in which computation by a stepping-stone method is used to solve minimax problems. An additional application of this game is used for finding the Pearson correlation coefficient by non-parametric techniques. The game provides considerable computational practice as well as a motivational problem solving situation. (JP)

  18. Correlation Between Hemoglobin and Fatigue in Women Undergoing Adjuvant Chemotherapy Without Erythropoietin-Stimulating–Agent Support

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Sarah; Bardwell, Wayne A.; Podbelewicz-Schuller, Yaffa; Mortimer, Joanne E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a common complication of adjuvant chemotherapy and compromises the quality of life of breast cancer survivors. We sought to correlate serial hemoglobin (Hb) levels with fatigue in a population of women on adjuvant chemotherapy, none of whom received erythropoietin-stimulating agents or red blood cell transfusions. Patients and Methods Seventy-five women participated in a study using quality-of-life questionnaires to assess changes in need for psychosocial support over time. Questionnaires were administered within 30 days of initiating adjuvant therapy and at 2, 6, and 12 months. Fatigue was assessed by the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Hemoglobin levels at each time point were captured retrospectively. Complete data are included for 40 of the 46 women who received adjuvant chemotherapy. Paired-samples t tests were conducted to compare mean SF-36 Energy/Fatigue scores between time points, and independent-samples t tests were conducted for comparisons against norms. Simple correlations (Pearson R) were conducted between SF-36 variables and Hb levels at each time point. Results At 2 months, 23.4% of women had Hb < 11 g/dL compared with 12.9% at 12 months. Compared with norms for women in the general population and breast cancer survivors, these women reported worse fatigue at baseline and at 2 and 6 months. A strong linear relationship was observed between Hb at 2 months and SF-36 Energy/Fatigue scores at 12 months (r = 0.71; P = .002). Conclusion Participants with high fatigue at 12 months had Hb levels at 2 months 13% lower than those with low fatigue. This finding suggests that chemotherapy-induced decline in Hb might be a marker of physiologic reserve. PMID:19073508

  19. Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0-13-148521-0 La couche micro-architecture (Chapter 4)

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Michel

    'une micro-architecture 5.Amélioration des performances Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, FifthTanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0

  20. Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0-13-148521-0 La couche micro-architecture (Chapter 4)

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Michel

    1 Tanenbaum, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0, Structured Computer Organization, Fifth Edition, (c) 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 0

  1. Pearson syndrome and mitochondrial encephalomyopathy in a patient with a deletion of mtDNA.

    PubMed Central

    McShane, M A; Hammans, S R; Sweeney, M; Holt, I J; Beattie, T J; Brett, E M; Harding, A E

    1991-01-01

    A patient is described who has features of Pearson syndrome and who presented in the neonatal period with a hypoplastic anemia. He later developed hepatic, renal, and exocrine pancreatic dysfunction. At the age of 5 years he developed visual impairment, tremor, ataxia, proximal muscle weakness, external ophthalmoplegia, and a pigmentary retinopathy (Kearns-Sayre syndrome). Muscle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathy. Analysis of mtDNA from leukocytes and muscle showed mtDNA heteroplasmy in both tissues, with one population of mtDNA deleted by 4.9 kb. The deleted region was bridged by a 13-nucleotide sequence occurring as a direct repeat in normal mtDNA. Both Pearson syndrome and Kearns-Sayre syndrome have been noted to be associated with deletions of mtDNA; they have not previously been described in the same patient. These observations indicate that the two disorders have the same molecular basis; the different phenotypes are probably determined by the initial proportion of deleted mtDNAs and modified by selection against them in different tissues. Images Figure 1 PMID:1985462

  2. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test IV Appendix IV...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available...and Medical Research” (1947, R. A. Fisher and F. Yates). [47 FR 32367,...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test IV Appendix IV...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available...and Medical Research” (1947, R. A. Fisher and F. Yates). [47 FR 32367,...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test IV Appendix IV...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available...and Medical Research” (1947, R. A. Fisher and F. Yates). [47 FR 32367,...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test IV Appendix IV...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available...and Medical Research” (1947, R. A. Fisher and F. Yates). [47 FR 32367,...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test IV Appendix IV...Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test Using all the available...and Medical Research” (1947, R. A. Fisher and F. Yates). [47 FR 32367,...

  7. Comparative Power of Student T Test and Mann-Whitney U Test for Unequal Sample Size and Variances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.

    1987-01-01

    A program obtained random samples from known populations, some of which violated the homogeneity assumption. Student t tests and Mann-Whitney U Tests were performed on the sample value. Where the t test led to incorrect decisions, the use of Mann-Whitney U test in its place led to poorer results. (JAZ)

  8. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome in patients suspected to have Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Katelyn E; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Yuan, Daniel; Zon, Rebecca L; Storm, Kelsie; Mazur-Popinska, Magdalena; Andolina, Laura; Bubala, Halina; Golebiowska, Sydonia; Higman, Meghan A; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Kurre, Peter; Matysiak, Michal; Niewiadomska, Edyta; Pels, Salley; Petruzzi, Mary Jane; Pobudejska-Pieniazek, Aneta; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Fleming, Mark D; Gazda, Hanna T; Agarwal, Suneet

    2014-07-17

    Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative anemia in which mutations in ribosomal protein genes and GATA1 have been implicated. Both syndromes share several features including early onset of severe anemia, variable nonhematologic manifestations, sporadic genetic occurrence, and occasional spontaneous hematologic improvement. Because of the overlapping features and relative rarity of PS, we hypothesized that some patients in whom the leading clinical diagnosis is DBA actually have PS. Here, we evaluated patient DNA samples submitted for DBA genetic studies and found that 8 (4.6%) of 173 genetically uncharacterized patients contained large mtDNA deletions. Only 2 (25%) of the patients had been diagnosed with PS on clinical grounds subsequent to sample submission. We conclude that PS can be overlooked, and that mtDNA deletion testing should be performed in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with congenital anemia. PMID:24735966

  9. Calculating and reporting effect sizes to facilitate cumulative science: a practical primer for t-tests and ANOVAs

    PubMed Central

    Lakens, Daniël

    2013-01-01

    Effect sizes are the most important outcome of empirical studies. Most articles on effect sizes highlight their importance to communicate the practical significance of results. For scientists themselves, effect sizes are most useful because they facilitate cumulative science. Effect sizes can be used to determine the sample size for follow-up studies, or examining effects across studies. This article aims to provide a practical primer on how to calculate and report effect sizes for t-tests and ANOVA's such that effect sizes can be used in a-priori power analyses and meta-analyses. Whereas many articles about effect sizes focus on between-subjects designs and address within-subjects designs only briefly, I provide a detailed overview of the similarities and differences between within- and between-subjects designs. I suggest that some research questions in experimental psychology examine inherently intra-individual effects, which makes effect sizes that incorporate the correlation between measures the best summary of the results. Finally, a supplementary spreadsheet is provided to make it as easy as possible for researchers to incorporate effect size calculations into their workflow. PMID:24324449

  10. Performance evaluation for epileptic electroencephalogram (EEG) detection by using Neyman-Pearson criteria and a support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-mei; Zhang, Chong-ming; Zou, Jun-zhong; Zhang, Jian

    2012-02-01

    The diagnosis of several neurological disorders is based on the detection of typical pathological patterns in electroencephalograms (EEGs). This is a time-consuming task requiring significant training and experience. A lot of effort has been devoted to developing automatic detection techniques which might help not only in accelerating this process but also in avoiding the disagreement among readers of the same record. In this work, Neyman-Pearson criteria and a support vector machine (SVM) are applied for detecting an epileptic EEG. Decision making is performed in two stages: feature extraction by computing the wavelet coefficients and the approximate entropy (ApEn) and detection by using Neyman-Pearson criteria and an SVM. Then the detection performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that the wavelet coefficients and the ApEn are features that represent the EEG signals well. By comparison with Neyman-Pearson criteria, an SVM applied on these features achieved higher detection accuracies.

  11. Infiltrating Mast Cells Correlate with Angiogenesis in Bone Metastases from Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Marech, Ilaria; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Zuccalà, Valeria; Luposella, Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Patruno, Rosa; Crovace, Alberto; Ruggieri, Eustachio; Zito, Alfredo Francesco; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sacco, Rosario; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    While gastric cancer is a well established angiogenesis driven tumor, no data has been published regarding angiogenesis stimulated by mast cells (MCs) positive for tryptase in bone metastases from gastric cancer patients (BMGCP). It is well established that MCs play a role in immune responses and more recently it was demonstrated that MCs have been involved in tumor angiogenesis. We analyzed infiltrating MCs and neovascularization in BMGCP diagnosed by histology. A series of 15 stage T3-4N2-3M1 (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Staging 7th Edition) BMGCP from bone biopsies were selected. Tumour tissue samples were evaluated by mean of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of MCs density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), MCs area positive to tryptase (MCAPT), microvascular density (MVD) and endothelial area (EA). A significant correlation between MCDPT, MCAPT, MVD and EA groups to each other was found by Pearson and t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.68 to 0.82; p-value ranged from 0.00 to 0.02). Our very preliminary data suggest that infiltrating MCs positive for tryptase may play a role in BMGCP angiogenesis, and could be further evaluated as a novel target of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:25648323

  12. [Clinical research XV. From the clinical judgment to the statistical model. Difference between means. Student's t test].

    PubMed

    Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Pérez-Rodríguez, Marcela; Talavera, Juan O

    2013-01-01

    Among the test to show differences between means, the Student t test is the most characteristic. Its basic algebraic structure shows the difference between two means weighted by their dispersion. In this way, you can estimate the p value and the 95 % confidence interval of the mean difference. An essential feature is that the variable from which the mean is going to be calculated must have a normal distribution. The Student t test is used to compare two unrelated means (compared between two maneuvers), this is known as t test for independent samples. It is also used to compare two related means (a comparison before and after a maneuver in just one group), what is called paired t test. When the comparison is between more than two means (three or more dependent means, or three or more independent means) an ANOVA test (or an analysis of variance) it is used to perform the analysis. PMID:23883459

  13. Correlation between changes in quality of life and symptomatic improvement in Chinese patients switched from typical antipsychotics to olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, William; Kadziola, Zbigniew; Ye, Wenye; Xue, Hai Bo; Liu, Li; Treuer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between changes in symptoms and changes in self-reported quality of life among Chinese patients with schizophrenia who were switched from a typical antipsychotic to olanzapine during usual outpatient care. Patients and methods This post hoc analysis was conducted using data from the Chinese subgroup (n=475) of a multicountry, 12-month, prospective, noninterventional, observational study. The primary publication previously reported the efficacy, safety, and quality of life among patients who switched from a typical antipsychotic to olanzapine. Patients with schizophrenia were included if their symptoms were inadequately controlled with a typical antipsychotic and they were switched to olanzapine. Symptom severity was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity scale (CGI-S). Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality of Life–Abbreviated (WHOQOL-BREF). Paired t-tests were performed to assess changes from baseline to endpoint. Pearson’s correlation coefficients (r) were used to assess the correlations between change in symptoms (BPRS and CGI-S scores) and change in HRQOL (WHOQOL-BREF scores). Results Symptoms and HRQOL both improved significantly over the 12 months of treatment (P<0.001). Significant correlations were observed between changes from baseline to end of study on the BPRS and the CGI-S and each of the WHOQOL-BREF four domain scores and two overall quality-of-life questions. The correlation coefficients ranged from r=?0.45 to r=?0.53 for the BPRS and WHOQOL-BREF. The correlation coefficients were slightly smaller between the CGI-S and WHOQOL-BREF, ranging from r=?0.33 to r=?0.40. Conclusion For patients with schizophrenia, assessing quality of life has the potential to add valuable information to the clinical assessment that takes into account the patient’s own perspective of well-being. PMID:25632235

  14. Excursions in Modern Mathematics, 7e: 3.2 -1Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. 3 The Mathematics of Sharing

    E-print Network

    Lee, Carl

    , Damian and Cleo go to the county fair. They buy jointly a raffle ticket and win a half chocolate­half strawberry cheesecake. Damian likes chocolate and strawberry equally well, so in his eyes the chocolate Mathematics, 7e: 3.2 - 5Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. However, Cleo hates chocolate so

  15. Log Pearson type 3 quantile estimators with regional skew information and low outlier adjustments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffis, V.W.; Stedinger, J.R.; Cohn, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    [1] The recently developed expected moments algorithm (EMA) [Cohn et al., 1997] does as well as maximum likelihood estimations at estimating log-Pearson type 3 (LP3) flood quantiles using systematic and historical flood information. Needed extensions include use of a regional skewness estimator and its precision to be consistent with Bulletin 17B. Another issue addressed by Bulletin 17B is the treatment of low outliers. A Monte Carlo study compares the performance of Bulletin 17B using the entire sample with and without regional skew with estimators that use regional skew and censor low outliers, including an extended EMA estimator, the conditional probability adjustment (CPA) from Bulletin 17B, and an estimator that uses probability plot regression (PPR) to compute substitute values for low outliers. Estimators that neglect regional skew information do much worse than estimators that use an informative regional skewness estimator. For LP3 data the low outlier rejection procedure generally results in no loss of overall accuracy, and the differences between the MSEs of the estimators that used an informative regional skew are generally modest in the skewness range of real interest. Samples contaminated to model actual flood data demonstrate that estimators which give special treatment to low outliers significantly outperform estimators that make no such adjustment.

  16. Reassess the t Test: Interact with All Your Data via ANOVA.

    PubMed

    Brady, Siobhan M; Burow, Meike; Busch, Wolfgang; Carlborg, Örjan; Denby, Katherine J; Glazebrook, Jane; Hamilton, Eric S; Harmer, Stacey L; Haswell, Elizabeth S; Maloof, Julin N; Springer, Nathan M; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    Plant biology is rapidly entering an era where we have the ability to conduct intricate studies that investigate how a plant interacts with the entirety of its environment. This requires complex, large studies to measure how plant genotypes simultaneously interact with a diverse array of environmental stimuli. Successful interpretation of the results from these studies requires us to transition away from the traditional standard of conducting an array of pairwise t tests toward more general linear modeling structures, such as those provided by the extendable ANOVA framework. In this Perspective, we present arguments for making this transition and illustrate how it will help to avoid incorrect conclusions in factorial interaction studies (genotype × genotype, genotype × treatment, and treatment × treatment, or higher levels of interaction) that are becoming more prevalent in this new era of plant biology. PMID:26220933

  17. INTERPRETING THE DISTANCE CORRELATION RESULTS FOR THE COMBO-17 SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Richards, Donald St. P.; Martínez-Gómez, Elizabeth E-mail: richards@stat.psu.edu

    2014-04-01

    The accurate classification of galaxies in large-sample astrophysical databases of galaxy clusters depends sensitively on the ability to distinguish between morphological types, especially at higher redshifts. This capability can be enhanced through a new statistical measure of association and correlation, called the distance correlation coefficient, which has more statistical power to detect associations than does the classical Pearson measure of linear relationships between two variables. The distance correlation measure offers a more precise alternative to the classical measure since it is capable of detecting nonlinear relationships that may appear in astrophysical applications. We showed recently that the comparison between the distance and Pearson correlation coefficients can be used effectively to isolate potential outliers in various galaxy data sets, and this comparison has the ability to confirm the level of accuracy associated with the data. In this work, we elucidate the advantages of distance correlation when applied to large databases. We illustrate how the distance correlation measure can be used effectively as a tool to confirm nonlinear relationships between various variables in the COMBO-17 database, including the lengths of the major and minor axes, and the alternative redshift distribution. For these outlier pairs, the distance correlation coefficient is routinely higher than the Pearson coefficient since it is easier to detect nonlinear relationships with distance correlation. The V-shaped scatter plots of Pearson versus distance correlation coefficients also reveal the patterns with increasing redshift and the contributions of different galaxy types within each redshift range.

  18. A Correlation of Permanent Anterior Tooth Fracture with Type of Occlusion and Craniofacial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Rana, Vivek; Aggarwal, Abhai; Chandra, Lokesh

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: To assess the relationship of anterior tooth fractures with type of occlusion and craniofacial morphology. Materials and methods: The study was conducted on 76 subjects of age group 9 to 13 years with at least one fractured permanent anterior teeth. Lateral cephalograms were taken and study models were prepared for each subject with prior consent of their parents. Then cephalometric tracings were done and overjet was recorded through study models. Statistical analysis used: Standard error of mean (SEM) and unpaired t-test has been applied to test the significant difference between the seven parameters under consideration. Karl Pearson correlation test has also been used to correlate all the parameters used in this study with each other. All the tests were performed at 5 and 1% levels of significance. Results: Frequency of tooth fracture increases with increasing overjet. At 5% level of significance, significant difference were observed between the standard values and observed values for overjet measurement, SNA angle, SNB angle, ANB angle, upper incisor to NA (angle), upper incisor to NA (linear) and interincisal angle for overall data and also for both male and female data separately. Conclusion: Probability of permanent anterior tooth fracture increases with increasing overjet. A significant difference was observed between the standard value and the observed values of all parameters under consideration. How to cite this article: Chaturvedi R, Kumar A, Rana V, Aggarwal A, Chandra L. A Correlation of Permanent Anterior Tooth Fracture with Type of Occlusion and Craniofacial Morphology. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(2):80-84. PMID:25206197

  19. Confidence interval and the Student's t-test Are you a blogger? Interested in participating in a paid blogging study?

    E-print Network

    Masci, Frank

    based on the population mean (Press et al. 1992, p. 465). Note that while this definition makes to confidence interval for a moment: If we want to find out the mean of a population, but ! the population://projectile.is.cs.cmu.edu/research/public/talks/t-test.htm #12;! the population is not accessible We can only

  20. Evaluation of climate change on flood event by using parametric T-test and non-parametric Mann-Kendall test in Barcelonnette basin, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Azadeh; Glade, Thomas; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2010-09-01

    The existence of a trend in hydrological and meteorological time series is detected by statistical tests. The trend analysis of hydrological and meteorological series is important to consider, because of the effects of global climate change. Parametric or non-parametric statistical tests can be used to decide whether there is a statistically significant trend. In this paper, first a homogeneity analysis was performed by using the non-parametric Bartlett test. Then, trend detection was estimated by using non-parametric Mann-Kendall test. The null hypothesis in the Mann-Kendall test is that the data are independent and randomly ordered. The result of Mann-Kendall test was compared with the parametric T-Test for finding the existence of trend. To reach this purpose, the significance of trends was analyzed on monthly data of Ubaye river in Barcelonnette watershed in southeast of France at an elevation of 1132 m (3717 ft) during the period from 1928 to 2009 bases with the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test and parametric T-Test for river discharge and for meteorological data. The result shows that a rainfall event does not necessarily have an immediate impact on discharge. Visual inspection suggests that the correlation between observations made at the same time point is not very strong. In the results of the trend tests the p-value of the discharge is slightly smaller than the p-value of the precipitation but it seems that in both there is no statistically significant trend. In statistical hypothesis testing, a test statistic is a numerical summary of a set of data that reduces the data to one or a small number of values that can be used to perform a hypothesis test. Statistical hypothesis testing is determined if there is a significant trend or not. Negative test statistics and MK test in both precipitation and discharge data indicate downward trends. As conclusion we can say extreme flood event during recent years is strongly depending on: 1) location of the city: It is situated in an elongated form extending below mountain slopes and along a river channel. 2) Seasonal Changes: During spring, the melting of snow result in an increase water level in river channels and this will be amplified whenever a warm rainfall occurs. Then it could be conclude that climate change did not has a significant effect on flood in case study area Keywords: Trend, parametric and non parametric test, T-Test, Mann-Kendall test

  1. Correlation between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Anxiety in the Elderly Inmates of Sanitaria in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Sedighe; Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Azimi, Somayyeh; Alavi, Kaveh; Ayoobi Valoogerdi, Hasan; Namazi, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by a chief complaint of oral burning/pain with no clinically observable oral mucosal lesions. The prevalence of BMS has been reported to be 2.5-5.1% in the general population and several psychological disorders have been reported as associated or predisposing factors for BMS. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between BMS and anxiety in the elderly residents of sani-taria in Tehran, Iran. Materials and methods In a cross-sectional analytical study, 50 patients with BMS were included along with 50 healthy individuals as controls. Inclusion criteria were: age over 60 years, burning sensation in the mouth, normal oral mu-cosa, absence of diabetes, satisfactory prosthesis, absence of iron deficiency and other nutrients, and no heavy smoking habits. Similar inclusion criteria were considered for the control group without any oral complaints. Burning/pain severity was assessed by a 100-mm visual analog scale and the severity of anxiety (state, trait, and total) was determined by Cattell's Anxiety Scale. Data was analyzed by t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Individuals with BMS assessed their burning/pain severity to be 27.4 mm (95% CI=25.2 - 29.6 mm). Standard-ized total anxiety scale in individuals with and without BMS (±SE for mean) was 5.9±0.2 and 4.6±0.3 with significant dif-ferences (p=0.001). Similar significant differences were observed in state and trait anxiety between the two groups. Conclusion It seems that both state and trait anxiety are associated with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:22991594

  2. An Inequality between the Weighted Average and the Rowwise Correlation Coefficient for Proximity Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krijnen, Wim P.

    1994-01-01

    To assess association between rows of proximity matrices, H. de Vries (1993) introduces weighted average and row-wise average variants for Pearson's product-moment correlation, Spearman's rank correlation, and Kendall's rank correlation. For all three, the absolute value of the first variant is greater than or equal to the second. (SLD)

  3. Pearson dismisses talk of STFC crisis : Research Fortnight : Feb 21 There is no crisis in physics funding and the Science and Technology Facilities Council's 80

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    funding and the Science and Technology Facilities Council's £80 million deficit is a "myth", Ian Pearson Environment Research Council could well pick up the tab for the ground based solar terrestrial physics

  4. Malnutrition-Inflammation Score and Quality of Life in Hemodialysis Patients: Is There Any Correlation?

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Zahra; Eftekhari, Mohammad Hassan; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi; Rezaeianzadeh, Abbas; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition, inflammation and poor quality of life are prevalent among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Health-related quality of life is an important determinant of hospitalization and mortality in HD patients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between quality of life and malnutrition-inflammation status according to subjective global assessment (SGA) and malnutrition-inflammation scores (MIS) in HD patients. Patients and Methods: We randomly selected 87 of 180 stable HD patients from two HD centers. Those on hemodialysis for at least three months and with malnutrition according to the SGA scores were included in this study. They were divided into two groups of mild to moderate malnutrition (n = 39) and severe malnutrition (n = 49) based on the SGA scores. Serum levels of transferrin, albumin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, kt/v, body mass index and malnutrition-inflammation scores were measured in all patients. Health-related quality of life was assessed by validated short form-12 (SF-12) questionnaire for each patient. These values were compared between the two groups of patients by independent sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. The correlations of nutritional variables with SGA and MIS scores were determined by Pearson and Spearman correlation tests. Results: There were no differences in measured parameters between the two groups except for MIS scores. Those with severe malnutrition showed higher MIS scores. All quality of life aspects and total scores (PCS, MCS) (rather than social functioning (SF) aspect) were significantly different between the two groups, which showed lower physical and mental scores in severely-malnourished patients. Physical functioning (PF), role limitations due to physical heath (RP), general health (GH), mental health (MH), SF, role limitation due to emotional health (RE), vitality (VT) aspects and total scores (PCS and MCS) had negative significant correlations with MIS and SGA scores (All P values < 0.05). No correlation was found between MIS and SGA scores and other measured variables. Conclusions: This study focused on important effects of malnutrition and inflammation on health-related quality of life aspects, both physically and mentally in HD patients. SGA and MIS are highly correlated with quality of life in HD patients. PMID:26034747

  5. A New Methodology of Spatial Cross-Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    Spatial correlation modeling comprises both spatial autocorrelation and spatial cross-correlation processes. The spatial autocorrelation theory has been well-developed. It is necessary to advance the method of spatial cross-correlation analysis to supplement the autocorrelation analysis. This paper presents a set of models and analytical procedures for spatial cross-correlation analysis. By analogy with Moran’s index newly expressed in a spatial quadratic form, a theoretical framework is derived for geographical cross-correlation modeling. First, two sets of spatial cross-correlation coefficients are defined, including a global spatial cross-correlation coefficient and local spatial cross-correlation coefficients. Second, a pair of scatterplots of spatial cross-correlation is proposed, and the plots can be used to visually reveal the causality behind spatial systems. Based on the global cross-correlation coefficient, Pearson’s correlation coefficient can be decomposed into two parts: direct correlation (partial correlation) and indirect correlation (spatial cross-correlation). As an example, the methodology is applied to the relationships between China’s urbanization and economic development to illustrate how to model spatial cross-correlation phenomena. This study is an introduction to developing the theory of spatial cross-correlation, and future geographical spatial analysis might benefit from these models and indexes. PMID:25993120

  6. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  7. Sleep Quality and Emotional Correlates in Taiwanese Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Patients 1 Week and 1 Month after Hospital Discharge: A Repeated Descriptive Correlational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Lin; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor sleep quality is a common health problem for coronary artery bypass graft patients, however few studies have evaluated sleep quality during the period immediately following hospital discharge. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate changes in sleep quality and emotional correlates in coronary artery bypass graft patients in Taiwan at 1 week and 1 month after hospital discharge. Methods We used a descriptive correlational design for this study. One week after discharge, 87 patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery completed two structured questionnaires: the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Three weeks later (1 month after discharge) the patients completed the surveys again. Pearson correlations, t-tests, ANOVA and linear multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Results A majority of the participants had poor sleep quality at 1 week (82.8%) and 1 month (66.7%) post-hospitalization, based on the global score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Despite poor sleep quality at both time-points the sleep quality at 1 month was significantly better than at 1-week post hospitalization. Poorer sleep quality correlated with older age, poorer heart function, anxiety and depression. The majority of participants had normal levels of anxiety at 1 week (69.0%) and 1 month (88.5%) as measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. However, some level of depression was seen at 1 week (78.1%) and 1 month (59.7%). Depression was a significant predictor of sleep quality at 1 week; at 1 month after hospital discharge both anxiety and depression were significant predictors of sleep quality. Conclusion Sleep quality, anxiety and depression all significantly improved 1 month after hospital discharge. However, more than half of the participants continued to have poor sleep quality and some level of depression. Health care personnel should be encouraged to assess sleep and emotional status in patients after coronary artery bypass surgery and offer them appropriate management strategies to improve sleep and reduce anxiety and depression. PMID:26291524

  8. Meta-Analysis of Correlations Revisited: Attempted Replication and Extension of Field's (2001) Simulation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafdahl, Adam R.; Williams, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2 Monte Carlo studies of fixed- and random-effects meta-analysis for correlations, A. P. Field (2001) ostensibly evaluated Hedges-Olkin-Vevea Fisher-[zeta] and Schmidt-Hunter Pearson-r estimators and tests in 120 conditions. Some authors have cited those results as evidence not to meta-analyze Fisher-[zeta] correlations, especially with…

  9. On the correlation of a naturally and an artificially dichotomized variable.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Rolf; Wirtz, Markus

    2004-11-01

    A method is suggested for estimating the correlation of a naturally (X) and an artificially (Y) dichotomized variable. It is assumed that a normal random variable (L) underlies the artificially dichotomized variable. The proposed correlation coefficient recovers the product moment correlation coefficient between X and L from a fourfold table of X and Y. The suggested correlation coefficient nu is contrasted with the phi correlation and the biserial eta. The biserial eta was proposed by Karl Pearson and is conceptually related to the new correlation coefficient. However, in addition, Pearson's biserial eta invokes the assumption that the marginal distribution of L is normal, which contradicts its basic assumptions and thus does not recover the true correlation of L and X. Finally, an approximation is provided to simplify the calculation of nu and its standard error. PMID:15511306

  10. Rutgers University and Pearson have partnered to build and grow complete online degree programs. The partnership includes five key components: marketing, enrollment services and executive coaching,

    E-print Network

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    . The partnership includes five key components: marketing, enrollment services and executive coaching, technology, learning design, and content creation. Marketing: Pearson has established an online presence for Rutgers package Enterprise reporting analytics ExamGuard (online assessment tool to aid with academic integrity

  11. Correlations between plasma endothelin-1 levels and breakthrough pain in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xue-bin; Peng, Tuo-chao; Huang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) may be involved in driving pain in patients with advanced cancer. However, a few studies focus on the role of ET-1 in breakthrough pain (BP). The aim of this pivotal study was to explore the correlation between the plasma (ET-1) level and BP intensity. A total of 40 patients were enrolled in the study, and they were divided into two groups: BP group and non-BP group. Moreover, 20 healthy adults were used as the normal control group. Pain intensity was measured using visual analog scale (VAS) scores of 1–10. Plasma ET-1 levels were detected by an ET radioimmunoassay kit. Subsequently, the correlation of ET-1 level with the VAS score and cancer types was analyzed by Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The plasma ET-1 level in the BP group (35.31±8.02 pg/mL) was higher than that in the non-BP group (29.51±6.78 pg/mL) and the normal control group (24.77±10.10 pg/mL, P<0.05). In addition, the VAS score in the BP group (7.45±0.82) was higher than that in the non-BP group (2.80±1.23, P<0.05). The plasma ET-1 level was positively correlated with the VAS score of the BP group (Pearson’s r=0.42). There was no significant correlation between the plasma ET-1 level and VAS score of the non-BP group (Pearson’s r=?0.22) or/and cancer types (P>0.05). The elevated plasma ET-1 levels were positively related to BP, and targeting ET-1 may provide a novel pain-reducing therapeutic treatment in BP. PMID:26677337

  12. A Study of Correlation of Various Growth Indicators with Chronological Age

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Navreet; Puri, Taruna; Gulati, Ritika; Kashyap, Rita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of chronological age with cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, frontal sinus width and antegonial notch depth and a correlation, if any, among the three variables. Materials and methods: The samples were derived from lateral cephalometric radiographs of 80 subjects (40 males, 40 females; age range: 10 to 19 years). Cervical vertebral development was evaluated by the method of Hassel and Farman, frontal sinus width was measured by the method described by Ertürk and antegonial notch depth as described by Singer et al. The Pearson’s correlation coefficients were estimated to assess the relationship of chronological age with cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, frontal sinus width and antegonial notch depth. Results: The Pearson’s correlation coefficient were 0.855 (p < 0.001) between chronological age and cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, and 0.333 (p < 0.001) between chronological age and frontal sinus width. Conclusion: A highly significant positive correlation was found between chronological age and cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, and between chronological age and frontal sinus width. Nonsignificant correlation was found between chronological age and antegonial notch depth. How to cite this article: Singh S, Sandhu N, Puri T, Gulati R, Kashyap R. A Study of Correlation of Various Growth Indicators with Chronological Age. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3): 190-195. PMID:26628853

  13. Discrete Pearson distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O. ); Shenton, L.R. ); Kastenbaum, M.A. , Basye, VA )

    1991-11-01

    These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

  14. Comparisons of two moments-based estimators that utilize historical and paleoflood data for the log Pearson type III distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    England, J.F., Jr.; Salas, J.D.; Jarrett, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    The expected moments algorithm (EMA) [Cohn et al., 1997] and the Bulletin 17B [Interagency Committee on Water Data, 1982] historical weighting procedure (B17H) for the log Pearson type III distribution are compared by Monte Carlo computer simulation for cases in which historical and/or paleoflood data are available. The relative performance of the estimators was explored for three cases: fixed-threshold exceedances, a fixed number of large floods, and floods generated from a different parent distribution. EMA can effectively incorporate four types of historical and paleoflood data: floods where the discharge is explicitly known, unknown discharges below a single threshold, floods with unknown discharge that exceed some level, and floods with discharges described in a range. The B17H estimator can utilize only the first two types of historical information. Including historical/paleoflood data in the simulation experiments significantly improved the quantile estimates in terms of mean square error and bias relative to using gage data alone. EMA performed significantly better than B17H in nearly all cases considered. B17H performed as well as EMA for estimating X100 in some limited fixed-threshold exceedance cases. EMA performed comparatively much better in other fixed-threshold situations, for the single large flood case, and in cases when estimating extreme floods equal to or greater than X500. B17H did not fully utilize historical information when the historical period exceeded 200 years. Robustness studies using GEV-simulated data confirmed that EMA performed better than B17H. Overall, EMA is preferred to B17H when historical and paleoflood data are available for flood frequency analysis.

  15. Measurement of the internal adaptation of resin composites using micro-CT and its correlation with polymerization shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Park, S H

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the internal adaptation of dentin-composite interfaces with various resin composite materials under conditions of thermomechanical loading was analyzed nondestructively using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and these results were compared with analyses of microgaps after sectioning. Additionally, the correlation of internal adaptation with polymerization shrinkage strain and stress was evaluated. Four nonflowable resins, Gradia Direct (GD), Filtek P90 (P9), Filtek Z350 (Z3), and Charisma (CH), and two flowable resins, SDR (SD) and Tetric N-Flow (TF) were used. First, the polymerization shrinkage strain and stress were measured. Then, Class I cavities were prepared in 48 premolars. They were divided randomly into six groups, and the cavities were filled with composites using XP bond. To evaluate the internal adaptation, tooth specimens were immersed in a 25% silver nitrate solution, and micro-CT analysis was performed before and after thermomechanical loading. The silver nitrate penetration (%SP) was measured. After buccolingual sectioning and rhodamine penetration of the specimen, the rhodamine penetration (%RP) was measured using a stereo-microscope. One-way analysis of variance was then used to compare the polymerization shrinkage strain, stress, %SP, and %RP among the groups at a 95% confidence level. A paired t-test was used to compare the %SP before and after thermomechanical loading. Pearson correlation analysis was used to compare the correlation between polymerization shrinkage strain/stress and %SP or %RP to a 95% confidence level. Evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage strain demonstrated that P9 < Z3 ? GD < CH ? SD < TF (p<0.05); similarly, evaluation of the polymerization shrinkage stress showed that P9 ? GD ? Z3 ? CH ? SD < TF (p<0.05). The %SP showed that P9 ? GD ? Z3 < CH ? SD < TF (p<0.05) before loading and that P9 ? GD ? Z3 ? CH ? SD < TF (p<0.05) after loading. There was a significant difference between the before-loading and after-loading measurements in all groups (p<0.05). Additionally, there was a positive correlation between the %SP and the %RP (r=0.810, p<0.001). Conclusively, the polymerization shrinkage stress and strain were found to be closely related to the internal adaptation of the resin composite restorations. The newly proposed model for the evaluation of internal adaptation using micro-CT and silver nitrate may provide a new measurement for evaluating the internal adaptation of restorations in a nondestructive way. PMID:24111809

  16. Analysis-Preserving Video Microscopy Compression via Correlation and Mathematical Morphology

    E-print Network

    Welch, Greg

    Analysis-Preserving Video Microscopy Compression via Correlation and Mathematical Morphology CHONG compression; image analysis ABSTRACT The large amount video data produced by multi-channel, high. We describe a novel compression method for video microscopy data. The method is based on Pearson

  17. Should we abandon the t-test in the analysis of gene expression microarray data: a comparison of variance modeling strategies.

    PubMed

    Jeanmougin, Marine; de Reynies, Aurelien; Marisa, Laetitia; Paccard, Caroline; Nuel, Gregory; Guedj, Mickael

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput post-genomic studies are now routinely and promisingly investigated in biological and biomedical research. The main statistical approach to select genes differentially expressed between two groups is to apply a t-test, which is subject of criticism in the literature. Numerous alternatives have been developed based on different and innovative variance modeling strategies. However, a critical issue is that selecting a different test usually leads to a different gene list. In this context and given the current tendency to apply the t-test, identifying the most efficient approach in practice remains crucial. To provide elements to answer, we conduct a comparison of eight tests representative of variance modeling strategies in gene expression data: Welch's t-test, ANOVA [1], Wilcoxon's test, SAM [2], RVM [3], limma [4], VarMixt [5] and SMVar [6]. Our comparison process relies on four steps (gene list analysis, simulations, spike-in data and re-sampling) to formulate comprehensive and robust conclusions about test performance, in terms of statistical power, false-positive rate, execution time and ease of use. Our results raise concerns about the ability of some methods to control the expected number of false positives at a desirable level. Besides, two tests (limma and VarMixt) show significant improvement compared to the t-test, in particular to deal with small sample sizes. In addition limma presents several practical advantages, so we advocate its application to analyze gene expression data. PMID:20838429

  18. Changes in Epithelium, Stroma, and Lumen Space Correlate More Strongly with Gleason Pattern and Are Stronger Predictors of Prostate ADC Changes than Cellularity Metrics.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aritrick; Watson, Geoffrey; Myint, Esther; Sved, Paul; McEntee, Mark; Bourne, Roger

    2015-12-01

    Purpose To investigate the hypothesis that the clinically observed decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with increasing prostate cancer Gleason grade can be attributed to an increasing volume of low-diffusivity epithelial cells and corresponding decreasing volumes of higher-diffusivity stroma and lumen space rather than to increased cell density. Materials and Methods Tissue samples were acquired after institutional ethics review committee approval and informed consent from patients were obtained. Nuclear count, nuclear area, and gland component volumes (epithelium, stroma, lumen space) were measured in tissue from 14 patients. Gland component volumes and cellularity metrics were correlated with Gleason pattern (Spearman rank correlation coefficient) and measured ADC (Pearson correlation coefficient) in six prostates ex vivo. Differences between metrics for cancerous tissue and those for normal tissue were assessed by using a two-tailed two-sample t test. Linear mixed models with a post hoc Fisher least significant difference test were used to assess differences between gland component volumes and cellularity metrics for multiple groups. To adjust for a clustering effect due to repeated measures, the organ mean value of the measured metric for each tissue type was used in the analysis. Results There were significant differences between Gleason patterns for gland component volumes (P < .05) but not nuclear count (P = .100) or area (P = .141). There was a stronger correlation of Gleason pattern with gland component volumes (n = 553) of epithelium (Spearman ? = 0.898, P < .001), stroma (? = -0.651, P < .001), and lumen space (? = -0.912, P = .007) than with the cellularity metrics (n = 288) nuclear area (? = 0.422, P = .133) or nuclear count (? = 0.082, P = .780). There was a stronger correlation between measured ADC and lumen volume (r = 0.688, P < .001) and epithelium volume (r = -0.647, P < .001) than between ADC and nuclear count (r = -0.598, P < .001) or nuclear area (r = -0.569, P < .001) (n = 57). Conclusion Differences in the gland compartment volumes of prostate tissue having distinct diffusivities, rather than changes in the conventionally cited "cellularity" metrics, are likely to be the major contributor to clinically observed variations of ADC in prostate tissue. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26110669

  19. Electrophysiological Correlates of Behavioral Comfort Levels in Cochlear Implantees: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Raghunandhan, S; Ravikumar, A; Kameswaran, Mohan; Mandke, Kalyani; Ranjith, R

    2015-09-01

    Indications for cochlear implantation have expanded today to include very young children and those with syndromes/multiple handicaps. Programming the implant based on behavioral responses may be tedious for audiologists in such cases, wherein matching an effective MAP and appropriate MAP becomes the key issue in the habilitation program. In 'Difficult to MAP' scenarios, objective measures become paramount to predict optimal current levels to be set in the MAP. We aimed, (a) to study the trends in multi-modal electrophysiological tests and behavioral responses sequentially over the first year of implant use, (b) to generate normative data from the above, (c) to correlate the multi-modal electrophysiological thresholds levels with behavioral comfort levels, and (d) to create predictive formulae for deriving optimal comfort levels (if unknown), using linear and multiple regression analysis. This prospective study included ten profoundly hearing impaired children aged between 2 and 7 years with normal inner ear anatomy and no additional handicaps. They received the Advanced Bionics HiRes 90K Implant with Harmony Speech processor and used HiRes-P with Fidelity 120 strategy. They underwent, Impedance Telemetry, Neural Response Imaging, Electrically Evoked Stapedial Response Telemetry and Electrically Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response tests at 1, 4, 8 and 12 months of implant use, in conjunction with behavioral Mapping. Trends in electrophysiological and behavioral responses were analyzed using paired t test. By Karl Pearson's correlation method, electrode-wise correlations were derived for NRI thresholds versus Most Comfortable Levels (M-Levels) and offset based (apical, mid-array and basal array) correlations for EABR and ESRT thresholds versus M-Levels were calculated over time. These were used to derive predictive formulae by linear and multiple regression analysis. Such statistically predicted M-Levels were compared with the behaviorally recorded M-Levels among the cohort, using Cronbach's Alpha Reliability test method for confirming the efficacy of this method. NRI, ESRT and EABR thresholds showed statistically significant positive correlations with behavioral M-Levels, which improved with implant use over time. These correlations were used to derive predicted M-Levels using regression analysis. Such predicted M-Levels were found to be in proximity to the actual behavioral M-Levels recorded among this cohort and proved to be statistically reliable. When clinically applied, this method was found to be successful among subjects of our study group. Although there existed disparities of a few clinical units, between the actual and predicted comfort levels among the subjects, this statistical method was able to provide a working MAP, close to the behavioral MAP used by these children. The results help to infer that behavioral measurements are mandatory to program cochlear implantees, but in cases where they are difficult to obtain, this study method may be used as reference for obtaining additional inputs, in order to set an optimal MAP. The study explores the trends and correlations between electrophysiological tests and behavioral responses, recorded over time among a cohort of cochlear implantees and provides a statistical method which may be used as a guideline to predict optimal behavioral levels in difficult situations among future implantees. In 'Difficult to MAP' scenarios, following a protocol of sequential behavioral programming, in conjunction with electrophysiological correlates will provide the best outcomes. PMID:26405653

  20. Influence of radiopacity of dental composites on the diagnosis of secondary caries: the correlation between objective and subjective analyses.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A D; Esteves, R G; Poiate, I A V P; Portero, P P; Almeida, S M

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to objectively evaluate the radiopacity of different dental composites and their subjective influence on diagnosing secondary caries-like lesions and how these results correlate. For objective analysis, three resin specimens (1 mm thick, with a 4-mm internal diameter) were made with four composites: 1) Charisma; 2) Filtek Z250; 3) Prisma AP.H; and 4) Glacier. Three human teeth were selected and then mesio-distally sectioned (1 mm thick) to make the dental specimens. An aluminum (Al) wedge (12 steps, 1 mm thick, 99.8% purity) was used as an internal standard to calculate the radiopacity. For subjective analysis, 20 human teeth were selected and then prepared with a mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity, with half the teeth receiving a round cavity to simulate the carious lesion. The MOD was restored using the composites at four different times. Standardized radiographs were acquired and then digitized (300 dpi and eight-bit TIFF) for both analyses. A histogram objectively measured the pixel intensity values of the images, which were converted into millimeters of Al using linear regressions. Eight observers subjectively evaluated the images using a five-point rating scale to diagnose the caries. The data were statistically analyzed using the Student t-test, the Kappa test, diagnostic testing, and the Pearson correlation coefficient (?=0.05). All materials showed radiopacity values compatible with dental tissues (p>0.05); Glacier was similar to dentin and Prisma AP.H was similar to enamel, while the remaining materials showed a middle radiopacity. Prisma AP.H and Glacier differed (p<0.05) in relation to their accuracy to caries diagnosis, with Glacier having greater accuracy. There was a correlation between objective and subjective analyses with negative linear dependence. An increase in the material's radiopacity could have a subjectively negative influence on the diagnosis of secondary caries; thus, an ideal radiopacity for a dental composite is closer to the dentin image and produces similar attenuation to X-rays than does dentin. PMID:23713807

  1. Aromaticity Parameters in Asphalt Binders Calculated From Profile Fitting X-ray Line Spectra Using Pearson VII and Pseudo-Voigt Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokoff, J.; Lewis, J. Courtenay

    2010-10-01

    The aromaticity and crystallite parameters in asphalt binders are calculated from data obtained after profile fitting x-ray line spectra using Pearson VII and pseudo-Voigt functions. The results are presented and discussed in terms of the peak profile fit parameters used, peak deconvolution procedure, and differences in calculated values that can arise owing to peak shape and additional peaks present in the pattern. These results have implications concerning the evaluation and performance of asphalt binders used in highways and road applications.

  2. Correlations between the Hand Test Pathology score and Personality Assessment Inventory scales for pain clinic patients.

    PubMed

    George, J M; Wagner, E E

    1995-06-01

    Pearson correlations between the Hand Test Pathology (PATH) score and Personality Assessment Inventory scales produced a cluster of relationships characteristic of an antisocial orientation. Likewise, PATH significantly differentiated between a "P" (Pathology) group flagged by a high Negative Impression score on the inventory, and an "N" (Normal) group of 100 pain patients. It was suggested that the interpretive simplicity of Hand Test scores renders the scores amenable to further correlational studies involving the inventory. PMID:7478899

  3. On the insignificance of Herschel's sunspot correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2013-08-01

    We examine William Herschel's hypothesis that solar-cycle variation of the Sun's irradiance has a modulating effect on the Earth's climate and that this is, specifically, manifested as an anticorrelation between sunspot number and the market price of wheat. Since Herschel first proposed his hypothesis in 1801, it has been regarded with both interest and skepticism. Recently, reports have been published that either support Herschel's hypothesis or rely on its validity. As a test of Herschel's hypothesis, we seek to reject a null hypothesis of a statistically random correlation between historical sunspot numbers, wheat prices in London and the United States, and wheat farm yields in the United States. We employ binary-correlation, Pearson-correlation, and frequency-domain methods. We test our methods using a historical geomagnetic activity index, well known to be causally correlated with sunspot number. As expected, the measured correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity would be an unlikely realization of random data; the correlation is "statistically significant." On the other hand, measured correlations between sunspot number and wheat price and wheat yield data would be very likely realizations of random data; these correlations are "insignificant." Therefore, Herschel's hypothesis must be regarded with skepticism. We compare and contrast our results with those of other researchers. We discuss procedures for evaluating hypotheses that are formulated from historical data.

  4. Genome-scale cluster analysis of replicated microarrays using shrinkage correlation coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianchao; Chang, Chunqi; Salmi, Mari L; Hung, Yeung Sam; Loraine, Ann; Roux, Stanley J

    2008-01-01

    Background Currently, clustering with some form of correlation coefficient as the gene similarity metric has become a popular method for profiling genomic data. The Pearson correlation coefficient and the standard deviation (SD)-weighted correlation coefficient are the two most widely-used correlations as the similarity metrics in clustering microarray data. However, these two correlations are not optimal for analyzing replicated microarray data generated by most laboratories. An effective correlation coefficient is needed to provide statistically sufficient analysis of replicated microarray data. Results In this study, we describe a novel correlation coefficient, shrinkage correlation coefficient (SCC), that fully exploits the similarity between the replicated microarray experimental samples. The methodology considers both the number of replicates and the variance within each experimental group in clustering expression data, and provides a robust statistical estimation of the error of replicated microarray data. The value of SCC is revealed by its comparison with two other correlation coefficients that are currently the most widely-used (Pearson correlation coefficient and SD-weighted correlation coefficient) using statistical measures on both synthetic expression data as well as real gene expression data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two leading clustering methods, hierarchical and k-means clustering were applied for the comparison. The comparison indicated that using SCC achieves better clustering performance. Applying SCC-based hierarchical clustering to the replicated microarray data obtained from germinating spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii, we discovered two clusters of genes with shared expression patterns during spore germination. Functional analysis suggested that some of the genetic mechanisms that control germination in such diverse plant lineages as mosses and angiosperms are also conserved among ferns. Conclusion This study shows that SCC is an alternative to the Pearson correlation coefficient and the SD-weighted correlation coefficient, and is particularly useful for clustering replicated microarray data. This computational approach should be generally useful for proteomic data or other high-throughput analysis methodology. PMID:18564431

  5. More accurate, calibrated bootstrap confidence intervals for correlating two autocorrelated climate time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsdottir, Kristin B.; Mudelsee, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    Estimation of the Pearson's correlation coefficient between two time series to evaluate the influences of one time depended variable on another is one of the most often used statistical method in climate sciences. Various methods are used to estimate confidence interval to support the correlation point estimate. Many of them make strong mathematical assumptions regarding distributional shape and serial correlation, which are rarely met. More robust statistical methods are needed to increase the accuracy of the confidence intervals. Bootstrap confidence intervals are estimated in the Fortran 90 program PearsonT (Mudelsee, 2003), where the main intention was to get an accurate confidence interval for correlation coefficient between two time series by taking the serial dependence of the process that generated the data into account. However, Monte Carlo experiments show that the coverage accuracy for smaller data sizes can be improved. Here we adapt the PearsonT program into a new version called PearsonT3, by calibrating the confidence interval to increase the coverage accuracy. Calibration is a bootstrap resampling technique, which basically performs a second bootstrap loop or resamples from the bootstrap resamples. It offers, like the non-calibrated bootstrap confidence intervals, robustness against the data distribution. Pairwise moving block bootstrap is used to preserve the serial correlation of both time series. The calibration is applied to standard error based bootstrap Student's t confidence intervals. The performances of the calibrated confidence intervals are examined with Monte Carlo simulations, and compared with the performances of confidence intervals without calibration, that is, PearsonT. The coverage accuracy is evidently better for the calibrated confidence intervals where the coverage error is acceptably small (i.e., within a few percentage points) already for data sizes as small as 20. One form of climate time series is output from numerical models which simulate the climate system. The method is applied to model data from the high resolution ocean model, INALT01 where the relationship between the Agulhas Leakage and the North Brazil Current is evaluated. Preliminary results show significant correlation between the two variables when there is 10 year lag between them, which is more or less the time that takes the Agulhas Leakage water to reach the North Brazil Current. Mudelsee, M., 2003. Estimating Pearson's correlation coefficient with bootstrap confidence interval from serially dependent time series. Mathematical Geology 35, 651-665.

  6. Predicting missing links via correlation between nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-10-01

    As a fundamental problem in many different fields, link prediction aims to estimate the likelihood of an existing link between two nodes based on the observed information. Since this problem is related to many applications ranging from uncovering missing data to predicting the evolution of networks, link prediction has been intensively investigated recently and many methods have been proposed so far. The essential challenge of link prediction is to estimate the similarity between nodes. Most of the existing methods are based on the common neighbor index and its variants. In this paper, we propose to calculate the similarity between nodes by the Pearson correlation coefficient. This method is found to be very effective when applied to calculate similarity based on high order paths. We finally fuse the correlation-based method with the resource allocation method, and find that the combined method can substantially outperform the existing methods, especially in sparse networks.

  7. Social Perception, Emotional Intelligence and Attachment Style: Does A Correlation Exist? 

    E-print Network

    Kamran, Emma Z

    2008-06-27

    had any relationship with SP, EI and AS. Age was found to significantly correlate with SP, in that participants’ score on the SPT increased in relation to the younger the participants’ ages. An independent t-test revealed that gender affected...

  8. Correlation between pain response and improvements in patient-reported outcomes and health-related quality of life in duloxetine-treated patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Kei; Fujikoshi, Shinji; Montgomery, William; Alev, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed whether quality of life (QoL) improvement in duloxetine-treated patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) correlates with the extent of pain relief. Methods Pooled data from three multicountry, double-blind, 12-week, placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine-treated (duloxetine 60 mg once daily; total number =335) patients with DPNP were analyzed. Based on improvement in 24-hour average pain scores, patients were stratified into four groups. Improvement in QoL, which was measured as the change from baseline in two patient-reported health outcome measures (Short Form [SF]-36 and five-dimension version of the EuroQol Questionnaire [EQ-5D]), was evaluated and compared among the four groups. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between improvement in pain scores and improvement in QoL. Results The group with more pain improvement generally showed greater mean change from baseline in all of the SF-36 scale scores and on the EQ-5D index. Pearson’s correlation coefficients ranged from 0.114 to 0.401 for the SF-36 scale scores (P<0.05), and it was 0.271 for the EQ-5D (P<0.001). Conclusion Improvement in pain scores was positively correlated with improvement in QoL and patient-reported outcomes in duloxetine-treated patients. PMID:26316756

  9. Correlation of Zinc with Oxidative Stress Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Llopis-González, Agustín; González-Albert, Verónica; López-Izquierdo, Raúl; González-Manzano, Isabel; Cháves, Javier; Huerta-Biosca, Vicente; Martin-Escudero, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and smoking are related with oxidative stress (OS), which in turn reports on cellular aging. Zinc is an essential element involved in an individual’s physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of zinc levels in serum and urine with OS and cellular aging and its effect on the development of hypertension. In a Spanish sample with 1500 individuals, subjects aged 20–59 years were selected, whose zinc intake levels fell within the recommended limits. These individuals were classified according to their smoking habits and hypertensive condition. A positive correlation was found (Pearson’s C = 0.639; p = 0.01) between Zn serum/urine quotient and oxidized glutathione levels (GSSG). Finally, risk of hypertension significantly increased when the GSSG levels exceeded the 75 percentile; OR = 2.80 (95%CI = 1.09–7.18) and AOR = 3.06 (95%CI = 0.96–9.71). Low zinc levels in serum were related with OS and cellular aging and were, in turn, to be a risk factor for hypertension.  PMID:25774936

  10. Gene differential coexpression analysis based on biweight correlation and maximum clique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Differential coexpression analysis usually requires the definition of 'distance' or 'similarity' between measured datasets. Until now, the most common choice is Pearson correlation coefficient. However, Pearson correlation coefficient is sensitive to outliers. Biweight midcorrelation is considered to be a good alternative to Pearson correlation since it is more robust to outliers. In this paper, we introduce to use Biweight Midcorrelation to measure 'similarity' between gene expression profiles, and provide a new approach for gene differential coexpression analysis. Firstly, we calculate the biweight midcorrelation coefficients between all gene pairs. Then, we filter out non-informative correlation pairs using the 'half-thresholding' strategy and calculate the differential coexpression value of gene, The experimental results on simulated data show that the new approach performed better than three previously published differential coexpression analysis (DCEA) methods. Moreover, we use the maximum clique analysis to gene subset included genes identified by our approach and previously reported T2D-related genes, many additional discoveries can be found through our method. PMID:25474074

  11. Can Twitter Be a Source of Information on Allergy? Correlation of Pollen Counts with Tweets Reporting Symptoms of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Names of Antihistamine Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gesualdo, Francesco; Stilo, Giovanni; D’Ambrosio, Angelo; Carloni, Emanuela; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Velardi, Paola; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Tozzi, Alberto E.

    2015-01-01

    Pollen forecasts are in use everywhere to inform therapeutic decisions for patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). We exploited data derived from Twitter in order to identify tweets reporting a combination of symptoms consistent with a case definition of ARC and those reporting the name of an antihistamine drug. In order to increase the sensitivity of the system, we applied an algorithm aimed at automatically identifying jargon expressions related to medical terms. We compared weekly Twitter trends with National Allergy Bureau weekly pollen counts derived from US stations, and found a high correlation of the sum of the total pollen counts from each stations with tweets reporting ARC symptoms (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.95) and with tweets reporting antihistamine drug names (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.93). Longitude and latitude of the pollen stations affected the strength of the correlation. Twitter and other social networks may play a role in allergic disease surveillance and in signaling drug consumptions trends. PMID:26197474

  12. Test Review: Wagner, R. K., Torgesen, J. K., Rashotte, C. A., & Pearson, N. A., "Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing-2nd Ed. (CTOPP-2)." Austin, Texas: Pro-Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickens, Rachel H.; Meisinger, Elizabeth B.; Tarar, Jessica M.

    2015-01-01

    The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing-Second Edition (CTOPP-2; Wagner, Torgesen, Rashotte, & Pearson, 2013) is a norm-referenced test that measures phonological processing skills related to reading for individuals aged 4 to 24. According to its authors, the CTOPP-2 may be used to identify individuals who are markedly below their…

  13. Pp. 799-826 in Kelt, D. a., E. P. Lessa, J. Salazar-Bravo, and J. L. Patton (eds.). 2007. the Quintessential Naturalist: Honoring the Life and Legacy of Oliver P. Pearson.

    E-print Network

    Steppan, Scott

    . the Quintessential Naturalist: Honoring the Life and Legacy of Oliver P. Pearson. University of California Publications in Zoology 134:1-981. a molecular reaPPraisal of The sysTemaTics of The leaf-eared mice PHYLLOTIS, and angel E. Spotorno ABSTRACT the tribe Phyllotini includes the ecologically abundant and well studied leaf

  14. Gaussian graphical modeling reveals specific lipid correlations in glioblastoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Nikola S.; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.; Böhm, Christian; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    Advances in high-throughput measurements of biological specimens necessitate the development of biologically driven computational techniques. To understand the molecular level of many human diseases, such as cancer, lipid quantifications have been shown to offer an excellent opportunity to reveal disease-specific regulations. The data analysis of the cell lipidome, however, remains a challenging task and cannot be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. We have developed a method to identify a lipid correlation network which is entirely disease-specific. A powerful method to correlate experimentally measured lipid levels across the various samples is a Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM), which is based on partial correlation coefficients. In contrast to regular Pearson correlations, partial correlations aim to identify only direct correlations while eliminating indirect associations. Conventional GGM calculations on the entire dataset can, however, not provide information on whether a correlation is truly disease-specific with respect to the disease samples and not a correlation of control samples. Thus, we implemented a novel differential GGM approach unraveling only the disease-specific correlations, and applied it to the lipidome of immortal Glioblastoma tumor cells. A large set of lipid species were measured by mass spectrometry in order to evaluate lipid remodeling as a result to a combination of perturbation of cells inducing programmed cell death, while the other perturbations served solely as biological controls. With the differential GGM, we were able to reveal Glioblastoma-specific lipid correlations to advance biomedical research on novel gene therapies.

  15. Memory effect and time correlations in breakdown initiation of DC glow discharge in argon and synthetic air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovi?, V. Lj.; Popovi?, B. ?.; Jovanovi?, A. P.; Stamenkovi?, S. N.; Stankov, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The memory effect and correlations of the statistical and formative time delay in argon and synthetic air DC glow discharge at low pressure were studied. The memory coefficients and ratios and Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients were determined, ranging from about unity at low relaxation times and vanishing at the saturation region of the memory curves (determined by the background ionization). It was shown that the statistical ts and the formative time delay tf are correlated variables and the positive correlation between them was confirmed experimentally and theoretically.

  16. Estimating membrane voltage correlations from extracellular spike trains.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Jessy D; Ringach, Dario L

    2003-04-01

    The cross-correlation coefficient between neural spike trains is a commonly used tool in the study of neural interactions. Two well-known complications that arise in its interpretation are 1) modulations in the correlation coefficient may result solely from changes in the mean firing rate of the cells and 2) the mean firing rates of the neurons impose upper and lower bounds on the correlation coefficient whose absolute values differ by an order of magnitude or more. Here, we propose a model-based approach to the interpretation of spike train correlations that circumvents these problems. The basic idea of our proposal is to estimate the cross-correlation coefficient between the membrane voltages of two cells from their extracellular spike trains and use the resulting value as the degree of correlation (or association) of neural activity. This is done in the context of a model that assumes the membrane voltages of the cells have a joint normal distribution and spikes are generated by a simple thresholding operation. We show that, under these assumptions, the estimation of the correlation coefficient between the membrane voltages reduces to the calculation of a tetrachoric correlation coefficient (a measure of association in nominal data introduced by Karl Pearson) on a contingency table calculated from the spike data. Simulations of conductance-based leaky integrate-and-fire neurons indicate that, despite its simplicity, the technique yields very good estimates of the intracellular membrane voltage correlation from the extracellular spike trains in biologically realistic models. PMID:12686584

  17. An anthropometric study to evaluate the correlation between the occlusal vertical dimension and length of the thumb

    PubMed Central

    Basnet, Bishal Babu; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Suwal, Pramita; Shrestha, Pragya; Baral, Dharanidhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Establishment of proper occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) is one of the important tasks for successful prosthodontic therapy. An ideal method for determining OVD in terms of cost, time, and instrument requirements has been sought in prosthodontics by various investigators. However, no such single method has been formulated. In the current anthropometric study, the relationship of the length of the thumb to the OVD was tested in two ethnic groups of Nepal, Aryans, and Mongoloids. The result of this study can be useful in determining proper OVD in edentulous patients. Aims and objectives The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation between the length of the thumb and OVD in Aryan and Mongoloid ethnic groups. The secondary aim was to compare the correlation between OVD and other anatomic measurements (eye–ear distance and pupil-to-rima oris distance) in these ethnicities. Materials and methods The OVD, thumb length, eye–ear distance and distance between pupil of eye and rima oris were measured in a total of 500 adult dentulous volunteers. The correlation between OVD and thumb length as well as other anatomic measurements was checked with Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship of OVD to the length of the thumb. Results The thumb length was significantly (P?0.05) correlated with strong and positive values (Pearson’s coefficient =0.874 in the whole population, 0.826 in Aryans, and 0.944 in Mongoloids). Regression analysis showed that thumb length was significantly related to OVD in both ethnic groups. Conclusion Within the limitations of the present study, the result implies that thumb length can be used as an adjunct for establishing OVD in the edentulous patients. PMID:25678817

  18. Correlative Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques.

  19. Correlative Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, T. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Gholinia, A.; Geurts, R.; Janus, M.; Slater, T.; Haigh, S. J.; Ornek, C.; Almuaili, F.; Engelberg, D. L.; Thompson, G. E.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly researchers are looking to bring together perspectives across multiple scales, or to combine insights from different techniques, for the same region of interest. To this end, correlative microscopy has already yielded substantial new insights in two dimensions (2D). Here we develop correlative tomography where the correlative task is somewhat more challenging because the volume of interest is typically hidden beneath the sample surface. We have threaded together x-ray computed tomography, serial section FIB-SEM tomography, electron backscatter diffraction and finally TEM elemental analysis all for the same 3D region. This has allowed observation of the competition between pitting corrosion and intergranular corrosion at multiple scales revealing the structural hierarchy, crystallography and chemistry of veiled corrosion pits in stainless steel. With automated correlative workflows and co-visualization of the multi-scale or multi-modal datasets the technique promises to provide insights across biological, geological and materials science that are impossible using either individual or multiple uncorrelated techniques. PMID:24736640

  20. Correlations among measures of cognitive ability, creativity, and academic achievement for gifted minority children.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, G B; Lopez, E

    1988-10-01

    This study explored the correlations among nonverbal reasoning ability, creativity, and academic achievement in gifted minority children, 89 girls and 71 boys in Grades 1 through 8 in a program for gifted. A random half of students from all grade levels were tested at the beginning of the year and the remaining half after 7 mo. with Raven Progressive Matrices, Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, and the California Achievement Test. Pearson correlations reflected limited relations among these variables except for a significant positive value between creativity and reading achievement. Suggestions for further study and implications for identification procedures and program development were provided. PMID:3217184

  1. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Flemming, Jeb H. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Gary D. (Tijeras, NM); Tigges, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  2. Closure and ratio correlation analysis of lunar chemical and grain size data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Major element and major element plus trace element analyses were selected from the lunar data base for Apollo 11, 12 and 15 basalt and regolith samples. Summary statistics for each of the six data sets were compiled, and the effects of closure on the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient were investigated using the Chayes and Kruskal approximation procedure. In general, there are two types of closure effects evident in these data sets: negative correlations of intermediate size which are solely the result of closure, and correlations of small absolute value which depart significantly from their expected closure correlations which are of intermediate size. It is shown that a positive closure correlation will arise only when the product of the coefficients of variation is very small (less than 0.01 for most data sets) and, in general, trace elements in the lunar data sets exhibit relatively large coefficients of variation.

  3. The correlation between alcohol consumption and risky sexual behaviors among people living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    GERBI, GEMECHU B.; HABTEMARIAM, TSEGAYE; TAMERU, BERHANU; NGANWA, DAVID; ROBNETT, VINAIDA

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if significant correlation exists between drinking any alcoholic beverage and risky sex among 326 AIDS patients. Participants completed anonymous surveys. The result of the regression and Pearson Correlation analyses revealed a significant positive correlation between drinking alcohol before sex and frequency of condom use (p < .0001). The number of sex partners respondents reported was also correlated with the frequency of alcohol use (p = .003). The result shows that the quantity of alcohol consumption was correlated with two indicators of risky sex: having multiple sexual partners (p < .0001) and having sexual intercourse without a condom (p < .001). Interventions are that integrate HIV risk reduction with alcohol risk reduction is very useful to minimize the risk of new HIV infections and/or manage existing infections. PMID:19693283

  4. Correlation of ultrasound estimated placental volume and umbilical cord blood volume in term pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pannopnut, Papinwit; Kitporntheranunt, Maethaphan; Paritakul, Panwara; Kongsomboon, Kittipong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between ultrasound measured placental volume and collected umbilical cord blood (UCB) volume in term pregnancy. Material and Methods An observational cross-sectional study of term singleton pregnant women in the labor ward at Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center was conducted. Placental thickness, height, and width were measured using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound and calculated for placental volume using the volumetric mathematic model. After the delivery of the baby, UCB was collected and measured for its volume immediately. Then, birth weight, placental weight, and the actual placental volume were analyzed. The Pearson’s correlation was used to determine the correlation between each two variables. Results A total of 35 pregnant women were eligible for the study. The mean and standard deviation of estimated placental volume and actual placental volume were 534±180 mL and 575±118 mL, respectively. The median UCB volume was 140 mL (range 98–220 mL). The UCB volume did not have a statistically significant correlation with the estimated placental volume (correlation coefficient 0.15; p=0.37). However, the UCB volume was significantly correlated with the actual placental volume (correlation coefficient 0.62; p<0.001) and birth weight (correlation coefficient 0.38; p=0.02). Conclusion The estimated placental volume by 2D ultrasound was not significantly correlated with the UCB volume. Further studies to establish the correlation between the UCB volume and the estimated placental volume using other types of placental imaging may be needed. PMID:26097385

  5. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Usage and Achievement of Turkish Students in Pisa 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aypay, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the ICT usage and academic achievement of Turkish students in PISA 2006 data. The sample of the study included 4942 students from 160 schools. Frequencies, independent samples t-tests, ANOVAs, pearson correlation coefficients, exploratory factor analysis, and regression analysis were used. A high percentage…

  6. Ninth and Tenth Grade Students' Mathematics Self-Efficacy Beliefs: The Sources and Relationships to Teacher Classroom Interpersonal Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Amanda Garrett

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the mix-methods action research study was to seek how the changes in students' perceptions about teacher classroom interpersonal behaviors, the four efficacy sources and mathematics self-efficacy beliefs were related. The methods used to accomplish this were: descriptive statistics, t-test, Pearson correlation coefficient…

  7. Inferring correlation networks from genomic survey data.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jonathan; Alm, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing based techniques, such as 16S rRNA gene profiling, have the potential to elucidate the complex inner workings of natural microbial communities - be they from the world's oceans or the human gut. A key step in exploring such data is the identification of dependencies between members of these communities, which is commonly achieved by correlation analysis. However, it has been known since the days of Karl Pearson that the analysis of the type of data generated by such techniques (referred to as compositional data) can produce unreliable results since the observed data take the form of relative fractions of genes or species, rather than their absolute abundances. Using simulated and real data from the Human Microbiome Project, we show that such compositional effects can be widespread and severe: in some real data sets many of the correlations among taxa can be artifactual, and true correlations may even appear with opposite sign. Additionally, we show that community diversity is the key factor that modulates the acuteness of such compositional effects, and develop a new approach, called SparCC (available at https://bitbucket.org/yonatanf/sparcc), which is capable of estimating correlation values from compositional data. To illustrate a potential application of SparCC, we infer a rich ecological network connecting hundreds of interacting species across 18 sites on the human body. Using the SparCC network as a reference, we estimated that the standard approach yields 3 spurious species-species interactions for each true interaction and misses 60% of the true interactions in the human microbiome data, and, as predicted, most of the erroneous links are found in the samples with the lowest diversity. PMID:23028285

  8. Late Holocene earthquake history of the Brigham City segment of the Wasatch fault zone at the Hansen Canyon, Kotter Canyon, and Pearsons Canyon trench sites, Box Elder County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; McDonald, Greg N.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Of the five central segments of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) having evidence of recurrent Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes, the Brigham City segment (BCS) has the longest elapsed time since its most recent surface-faulting event (~2.1 kyr) compared to its mean recurrence time between events (~1.3 kyr). Thus, the BCS has the highest time-dependent earthquake probability of the central WFZ. We excavated trenches at three sites––the Kotter Canyon and Hansen Canyon sites on the north-central BCS and Pearsons Canyon site on the southern BCS––to determine whether a surface-faulting earthquake younger than 2.1 ka occurred on the BCS. Paleoseismic data for Hansen Canyon and Kotter Canyon confirm that the youngest earthquake on the north-central BCS occurred before 2 ka, consistent with previous north-central BCS investigations at Bowden Canyon and Box Elder Canyon. At Hansen Canyon, the most recent earthquake is constrained to 2.1–4.2 ka and had 0.6–2.5 m of vertical displacement. At Kotter Canyon, we found evidence for two events at 2.5 ± 0.3 ka and 3.5 ± 0.3 ka, with an average displacement per event of 1.9–2.3 m. Paleoseismic data from Pearsons Canyon, on the previously unstudied southern BCS, indicate that a post-2 ka earthquake ruptured this part of the segment. The Pearsons Canyon earthquake occurred at 1.2 ± 0.04 ka and had 0.1–0.8 m of vertical displacement, consistent with our observation of continuous, youthful scarps on the southern 9 km of the BCS having 1–2 m of late Holocene(?) surface offset. The 1.2-ka earthquake on the southern BCS likely represents rupture across the Weber–Brigham City segment boundary from the penultimate Weber-segment earthquake at about 1.1 ka. The Pearsons Canyon data result in a revised length of the BCS that has not ruptured since 2 ka (with time-dependent probability implications), and provide compelling evidence of at least one segment-boundary failure and multi-segment rupture on the central WFZ. Our paleoseismic investigations of the BCS clarify the timing, displacement, and extent of late Holocene earthquakes on the segment, and importantly, confirm the long elapsed time since the most recent earthquake on most of the BCS.

  9. Diversity of the Vaginal Microbiome Correlates With Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Richard W.; Fukushima, Marilyn; Jiang, Hui; Fung, Eula; Rand, Larry; Johnson, Brittni; Vo, Kim Chi; Caughey, Aaron B.; Hilton, Joan F.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive tract infection is a major initiator of preterm birth (PTB). The objective of this prospective cohort study of 88 participants was to determine whether PTB correlates with the vaginal microbiome during pregnancy. Total DNA was purified from posterior vaginal fornix swabs during gestation. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers, followed by chain-termination sequencing. Bacteria were identified by comparing contig consensus sequences with the Ribosomal Database Project. Dichotomous responses were summarized via proportions and continuous variables via means ± standard deviation. Mean Shannon Diversity index differed by Welch t test (P = .00016) between caucasians with PTB and term gestation. Species diversity was greatest among African Americans (P = .0045). Change in microbiome/Lactobacillus content and presence of putative novel/noxious bacteria did not correlate with PTB. We conclude that uncultured vaginal bacteria play an important role in PTB and race/ethnicity and sampling location are important determinants of the vaginal microbiome. PMID:23715799

  10. Spatial correlation structure of monthly rainfall at a mesoscale region of north-eastern Bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Vojt?ch; Máca, Petr; Hanel, Martin; Pech, Pavel

    2015-07-01

    The spatial correlation structure of monthly rainfall was analysed using data from 38 rain gauges located in north-eastern Bohemia. Three different inter-station correlation measures—Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficient and Kendall's tau rank correlation coefficient—were estimated using monthly rainfall records from a recent 31-year period. Six different theoretical parametric correlation models were identified using the nonlinear least squares method. The spatial correlation structure was described using the fitted parameters. Comparison of estimated correlation models showed that, as measured by standard error, the best fitted was a two-parameter exponential model. The relationships between parameters of the exponential two-parameter model were further explored and described. The temporal variability of correlation showed trends in the fitted parameters over the studied period. On a seasonal basis, the correlation between the stations was stronger in autumn and winter than in spring and summer. The spatial variability of estimated parameters revealed that parameters of Matérn and two-parameter exponential models were dependent on altitude.

  11. Water quality, selected chemical characteristics, and toxicity of base flow and urban stormwater in the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins, Greene County, Missouri, August 1999 to August 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Joseph M.; Johnson, Byron Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The chemistry and toxicity of base flow and urban stormwater were characterized to determine if urban stormwater was degrading the water quality of the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins in and near the city of Springfield, Greene County, Missouri. Potentially toxic components of stormwater (nutrients, trace metals, and organic compounds) were identified to help resource managers identify and minimize the sources of toxicants. Nutrient loading to the James River from these two basins (especially the Wilsons Creek Basin) is of some concern because of the potential to degrade downstream water quality. Toxicity related to dissolved trace metal constituents in stormwater does not appear to be a great concern in these two basins. Increased heterotrophic activity, the result of large densities of fecal indicator bacteria introduced into the streams after storm events, could lead to associated dissolved oxygen stress of native biota. Analysis of stormwater samples detected a greater number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) than were present in base-flow samples. The number and concentrations of pesticides detected in both the base-flow and stormwater samples were similar.Genotoxicity tests were performed to determine the bioavilability of chemical contaminants and determine the potential harmful effects on aquatic biota of Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek. Genotoxicity was determined from dialysates from both long-term (approximately 30 days) and storm-event (3 to 5 days) semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) samples that were collected in each basin. Toxicity tests of SPMD samples indicated evidence of genotoxins in all SPMD samples. Hepatic activity assessment of one long-term SPMD sample indicated evidence of contaminant uptake in fish. Chemical analyses of the SPMD samples found that relatively few pesticides and pesticide metabolites had been sequestered in the lipid material of the SPMD; however, numerous PAHs and VOCs were detected in both the long-term and the storm-event exposures. It is suspected, based on the compounds detected in the SPMDs and the water samples, that the observed genotoxicity is largely the result of PAHs and VOCs that were probably derived from petroleum inputs or combustion sources. Therefore the water quality and thus the aquatic environments in the Pearson Creek and Wilsons Creek Basins are being degraded by urban derived contaminants.

  12. Correlation Between Pain, Fear of Falling and Disability in Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bharat Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ascertain if there is a correlation between low back pain (LBP), fear of falling, and disability so that the patients with LBP are aware of the fact that other problems may occur with LBP. Hence, steps can be taken for decreasing the fear of falling and disability in order to improve the condition of patients. Methods A sample size of 100 patients with low back pain, with a range of ages from 40 to 73 years, participated in the study. The Falls Efficacy Scale was used to assess the fear of falling and the Oswestry Disability Index was used to assess the disability and pain in LBP individuals. Results The Pearson correlation analysis signifies the relationship between pain, fear of falling, and disability in LBP. Conclusion First, LBP increases the fear of falling. Second, LBP can result in a person becoming disabled. Third, the fear of falling and disability are correlated with each other. PMID:26605180

  13. Correlation between p65 and TNF-? in patients with acute myelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    DONG, QIAO-MEI; LING, CHUN; ZHU, JUN-FANG; CHEN, XUAN; TANG, YAN; ZHAO, LI

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between the expression levels of p65 and TNF-? in patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and AML cell lines were investigated. The bone marrow samples of 30 AML patients and 10 non-leukemia controls were studied. The mRNA expression levels of p65 and TNF-? were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and Pearson's Correlation test was used to demonstrate the correlation between TNF-? and p65 expression levels in AML specimens. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to determine whether TNF-? and p65 expression levels could be used to differentiate AML samples from non-leukemia samples. MG132 and anti-TNF-? antibody were used to inhibit the expression of p65 and TNF-? in the AML cell line, HL-60. The expression of p65 and TNF-? were detected by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. The mRNA expression levels of p65 and TNF-? were significantly increased in AML patients compared with non-leukemia control bone marrow samples by RT-qPCR, and the two molecules expression pattern's exhibited sufficient predictive power to distinguish AML patients from non-leukemia control samples. Pearson's correlation analysis demonstrated that TNF-? expression was strongly correlated with p65 expression in AML bone marrow samples. In HL-60 cells, inhibition of TNF-? reduced the expression of p65; in addition, inhibition of p65 reduced the expression of TNF-? as assessed by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. p65 and TNF-? were highly expressed in AML patients, and these 2 molecules were strongly correlated. The present study indicates that p65 and TNF-? have potential as molecular markers to distinguish AML patients from non-leukemia control samples, and that these 2 molecules may be useful prognostic factor for patients with AML. PMID:26722330

  14. Quantum correlations from classically correlated states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, G.; Majtey, A. P.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.

    2014-07-01

    Consider a bipartite quantum system with at least one of its two components being itself a composite system. By tracing over part of one (or both) of these two subsystems it is possible to obtain a reduced (separable) state that exhibits quantum correlations even if the original state of the full system is endowed only with classical correlations. This effect, first pointed out by Li and Luo in (2008), is of considerable interest because there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that quantum correlations in non-entangled, mixed states may constitute a useful resource to implement non trivial information related tasks. Here we conduct a systematic exploration of the aforementioned effect for particular families of states of quantum systems of low dimensionality (three qubits states). In order to assess the non-classicality of the correlations of the reduced states we use an indicator of quantum correlations based upon the state disturbances generated by the measurement of local observables. We show, for a three-qubit system, that there exists a relationship between the classical mutual information of the original classically correlated states and the maximum quantum correlation exhibited by the reduced states.

  15. Correlates of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Brain–Computer Interface Accuracy in a Multi-Class Personalization Framework

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Sabine; Chau, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) provide individuals with a means of interacting with a computer using only neural activity. To date, the majority of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) BCIs have used prescribed tasks to achieve binary control. The goals of this study were to evaluate the possibility of using a personalized approach to establish control of a two-, three-, four-, and five-class NIRS–BCI, and to explore how various user characteristics correlate to accuracy. Ten able-bodied participants were recruited for five data collection sessions. Participants performed six mental tasks and a personalized approach was used to select each individual’s best discriminating subset of tasks. The average offline cross-validation accuracies achieved were 78, 61, 47, and 37% for the two-, three-, four-, and five-class problems, respectively. Most notably, all participants exceeded an accuracy of 70% for the two-class problem, and two participants exceeded an accuracy of 70% for the three-class problem. Additionally, accuracy was found to be strongly positively correlated (Pearson’s) with perceived ease of session (??=?0.653), ease of concentration (??=?0.634), and enjoyment (??=?0.550), but strongly negatively correlated with verbal IQ (??=??0.749). PMID:26483657

  16. Correlation of gestational age by sonographic measurement of fetal parameters in women in eastern Nepal with existing standard normograms.

    PubMed

    Karki, Dan Bahadur; Sharma, Umesh; Rauniyar, Raj Kumar

    2006-09-01

    This is the prospective study carried out to correlate gestational age by sonographic measurements of fetal parameters by normograms of Frank P Hadlock with the gestational age by Last Menstrual Period (LMP) (considered our standard) in various trimesters of normal pregnant women of eastern Nepal. Seventy normal pregnant women with regular menstrual cycles of eastern Nepal were evaluated in this study. Gestational age was calculated by Rempen (in case of Mean Sac Diameter) and Hadlock (in case of Biparietal Diameter, Head circumference, Femoral Length and Abdominal circumference) normograms. Calculations of gestational age was also done by LMP at the same time. Correlation of gestational age by Rempen and Hadlock with average of different fetal parameters in different trimesters was done with gestational age by LMP applying paired t test. On applying paired t test between gestational age by Mean Sac Diameter and Crown-Rump Length in the first trimesters, mean difference was only -3.58 days (significance < 0.01). It showed statistically significant difference though difference is little. Paired t test application in second trimester showed significant difference (-5.06 days) with gestational age by LMP at < 001 significance level. In 3rd trimesters, paired t test showed significant difference with gestational age by LMP with mean of difference -7.86 days. Significant difference between average gestational age by Hadlock and gestational age by LMP in 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy indicates that we should stantardise our measurements of different fetal parameters for estimation of gestational age. PMID:17203824

  17. Correlation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts Estimated From Skin Fluorescence in First-Degree Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Báez, Eileen A.; Shah, Shreepal; Felipe, Dania; Maynard, John; Chalew, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to assess the relationship of skin advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) between first-degree relatives estimated from skin fluorescence (SF) after adjustment for skin pigmentation. Study design: SF was excited by LEDs centered at 375, 405, and 420 nm from children with type 1 diabetes and their mothers. Data were adjusted to generate measures of skin intrinsic fluorescence (SIF) at the various excitation wavelengths, using 2 different pairs of correction coefficients for excitation (kx) and emission (km): kx = 0.5, km = 0.5 (not associated with skin pigmentation) and kx = 1.0, km = 0.0 (strongly associated with skin pigmentation). Pearson correlation analysis was performed, as well as a multiple variable analysis with maternal SIF adjusted for the effects of maternal age and race. Results: There were 50 matched pairs of children and their mothers. Children were 13.3 ± 3.7 years of age and there were 19 boys/31 girls and 15 black/35 white. Mothers were 41.8 ± 6.8 years of age. The age of mother and child was highly correlated, r = .64, P < .0001. In Pearson correlation analysis, child’s SIF (kx = 1.0, km = 0.0) the had strongest association with maternal SIF, while with SIF (kx = 0.5, km = 0.5) there was a trend for association. In the multiple variable model child SIF was associated with maternal SIF for all corrections and wavelengths but was stronger for kx = 1.0, km = 0.0. Conclusion: Even after adjustment for skin pigmentation and race, correlation of SIF between family members persists, suggesting that other genetic and/or environmental factors shared by parent and child may influence estimated skin AGEs. PMID:25411062

  18. Correlation analysis of clinical parameters with epigenetic modifications in the DUX4 promoter in FSHD

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E.; de Greef, Jessica C.; Shah, Bharati; van Engelen, Baziel G.M.; Yokomori, Kyoko; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify relationships between epigenetic parameters correlating with a relaxed chromatin state of the DUX4 promoter region and clinical severity as measured by a clinical severity score or muscle pathologic changes in D4Z4 contraction-dependent (FSHD1) and –independent (FSHD2) facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patients. Twenty primary fibroblast (5 control, 10 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) and 26 primary myoblast (9 control, 12 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) cultures originating from patients with FSHD and controls were analyzed. Histone modification levels were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We examined correlations between the chromatin compaction score (ChCS) defined by the H3K9me3:H3K4me2 ratio and an age corrected clinical severity score (CSS) or muscle pathology score (MPS). Possible relationships were investigated using linear regression analysis and significance was tested by Pearson’s product-moment coefficient.   We found a significant difference of the ChCS between controls and patients with FSHD1 and between controls and patients with FSHD2. Tissue specific differences in ChCS were also observed. We also found a near-significant relationship between ChCS and the age corrected CSS in fibroblasts but not in myoblasts. Surprisingly, we found a strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS. Our results confirm the D4Z4 chromatin relaxation previously shown to be associated with FSHD in a small number of samples. A possible relationship between clinical and epigenetic parameters could be established in patient fibroblasts, but not in myoblasts. The strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS suggests that this muscle can be used to study for surrogate markers of overall disease severity. PMID:22522912

  19. IAA Correlator Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surkis, Igor; Ken, Voitsekh; Melnikov, Alexey; Mishin, Vladimir; Sokolova, Nadezda; Shantyr, Violet; Zimovsky, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The activities of the six-station IAA RAS correlator include regular processing of national geodetic VLBI programs Ru-E, Ru-U, and Ru-F. The Ru-U sessions have been transferred in e-VLBI mode and correlated in the IAA Correlator Center automatically since 2011. The DiFX software correlator is used at the IAA in some astrophysical experiments.

  20. Correlation in business networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souma, Wataru; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Kaizoji, Taisei

    2006-10-01

    This paper considers business networks. Through empirical study, we show that business networks display characteristics of small-world networks and scale-free networks. In this paper, we characterize firms as sales and bankruptcy probabilities. A correlation between sales and a correlation between bankruptcy probabilities in business networks are also considered. The results reveal that the correlation between sales depends strongly on the type of network, whereas the correlation between bankruptcy probabilities does so only weakly.

  1. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  2. Morphological and molecular data for three species of the Microphallidae (Trematoda: Digenea) in Australia, including the first descriptions of the cercariae of Maritrema brevisacciferum Shimazu et Pearson, 1991 and Microphallus minutus Johnston, 1948.

    PubMed

    Kudlai, Olena; Cutmore, Scott C; Cribb, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Cercariae and metacercariae of three species of the Microphallidae Travassos, 1920 were found in snails and crustaceans from tributaries of the Brisbane River, Queensland, Australia. Specimens of Maritrema brevisacciferum Shimazu et Pearson, 1991 and Microphallus minutus Johnston, 1948, which have previously been reported in Queensland, were found as cercariae in the tateid gastropod Posticobia brazieri (Smith) and as metacercariae of M. brevisacciferum in the atyid shrimp Caridina indistincta Calman and of M. minutus in the parastacid crayfish Cherax dispar Reik. Combined analysis of morphological and molecular data, based on newly generated ITS2 and partial 28S rDNA data, linked cercariae and metacercariae for both species. This is the first report of the first intermediate hosts of M. brevisacciferum and M. minutus. Infections of another unidentified microphallid metacercariae, Microphallidae gen. sp., were found in P. brazieri and C. indistincta. The sequences of metacercarial isolates from both hosts were identical. The data on the Microphallidae from Australia and species that develop in freshwater invertebrates were examined in detail. PMID:26447840

  3. Statistical functions and relevant correlation coefficients of clearness index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Diego; Zaaiman, Willem; Colli, Alessandra; Heiser, John; Smith, Scott

    2015-08-01

    This article presents a statistical analysis of the sky conditions, during years from 2010 to 2012, for three different locations: the Joint Research Centre site in Ispra (Italy, European Solar Test Installation - ESTI laboratories), the site of National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden (Colorado, USA) and the site of Brookhaven National Laboratories in Upton (New York, USA). The key parameter is the clearness index kT, a dimensionless expression of the global irradiance impinging upon a horizontal surface at a given instant of time. In the first part, the sky conditions are characterized using daily averages, giving a general overview of the three sites. In the second part the analysis is performed using data sets with a short-term resolution of 1 sample per minute, demonstrating remarkable properties of the statistical distributions of the clearness index, reinforced by a proof using fuzzy logic methods. Successively some time-dependent correlations between different meteorological variables are presented in terms of Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients, and introducing a new one.

  4. Gates, Pearson Partner on Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    As states and school districts grapple with how to teach the skills outlined in the new common standards, two foundations have announced a partnership aimed at crafting complete, online curricula for those standards in mathematics and English/language arts that span nearly every year of a child's precollegiate education. The announcement last…

  5. Does leadership effectiveness correlates with leadership styles in healthcare executives of Iran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership is essential to passing through obstacles facing the health field.The current health care system in Iran has major problems and gaps in the field of effective leadership. The aim of this study was to evaluate hospital managers’ leadership style through selfassessment and to determine the correlation between leadership styles with healthcare executives’ leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness. Methods: In this cross-sectional study a self-administered questionnaire completed by all internal healthcare executives of all teaching and non-teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Questionnaire was composed to determine demographic information, leadership style questions, leadership effectiveness and leadership readiness. Descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. Results: According to the findings, the dominant style of healthcare executives was transformational leadership style (with a score of 4.34). The leadership effectiveness was estimated at about 4.36 that shows the appropriate level of leadership effectiveness. There was a significant correlation (correlation coefficient of 0.244) between leadership readiness and transformational leadership style (p<0.05). Also, there was a significant correlation between leadership effectiveness with transformational (0.051) and transactional (0.216) styles. Conclusion: There was a correlation between leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness with leadership styles. Application of this research will be crucial to universities and healthcare executives. This study suggests that strengthening the scientific basis is essential for leadership readiness and leadership effectiveness in healthcare system. PMID:26000260

  6. Correlation of Space Shuttle Landing Performance with Post-Flight Cardiovascular Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCluskey, R.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Microgravity induces cardiovascular adaptations resulting in orthostatic intolerance on re-exposure to normal gravity. Orthostasis could interfere with performance of complex tasks during the re-entry phase of Shuttle landings. This study correlated measures of Shuttle landing performance with post-flight indicators of orthostatic intolerance. Methods: Relevant Shuttle landing performance parameters routinely recorded at touchdown by NASA included downrange and crossrange distances, airspeed, and vertical speed. Measures of cardiovascular changes were calculated from operational stand tests performed in the immediate post-flight period on mission commanders from STS-41 to STS-66. Stand test data analyzed included maximum standing heart rate, mean increase in maximum heart rate, minimum standing systolic blood pressure, and mean decrease in standing systolic blood pressure. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated with the null hypothesis that there was no statistically significant linear correlation between stand test results and Shuttle landing performance. A correlation coefficient? 0.5 with a p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There were no significant linear correlations between landing performance and measures of post-flight cardiovascular dysfunction. Discussion: There was no evidence that post-flight cardiovascular stand test data correlated with Shuttle landing performance. This implies that variations in landing performance were not due to space flight-induced orthostatic intolerance.

  7. High-resolution correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    In the basic correlation process a sequence of time-lag-indexed correlation coefficients are computed as the inner or dot product of segments of two signals. The time-lag(s) for which the magnitude of the correlation coefficient sequence is maximized is the estimated relative time delay of the two signals. For discrete sampled signals, the delay estimated in this manner is quantized with the same relative accuracy as the clock used in sampling the signals. In addition, the correlation coefficients are real if the input signals are real. There have been many methods proposed to estimate signal delay to more accuracy than the sample interval of the digitizer clock, with some success. These methods include interpolation of the correlation coefficients, estimation of the signal delay from the group delay function, and beam forming techniques, such as the MUSIC algorithm. For spectral estimation, techniques based on phase differentiation have been popular, but these techniques have apparently not been applied to the correlation problem . We propose a phase based delay estimation method (PBDEM) based on the phase of the correlation function that provides a significant improvement of the accuracy of time delay estimation. In the process, the standard correlation function is first calculated. A time lag error function is then calculated from the correlation phase and is used to interpolate the correlation function. The signal delay is shown to be accurately estimated as the zero crossing of the correlation phase near the index of the peak correlation magnitude. This process is nearly as fast as the conventional correlation function on which it is based. For real valued signals, a simple modification is provided, which results in the same correlation accuracy as is obtained for complex valued signals.

  8. HIV Prevalence Correlates with High-Risk Sexual Behavior in Ethiopia's Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Chris R.; Tsoumanis, Achilleas; Schwartz, Ilan Steven

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV prevalence varies between 0.9 and 6.5% in Ethiopia’s eleven regions. Little has been published examining the reasons for this variation. Methods We evaluated the relationship between HIV prevalence by region and a range of risk factors in the 2005 and 2011 Ethiopian Demographic Health Surveys. Pearson’s correlation was used to assess the relationship between HIV prevalence and each variable. Results There was a strong association between HIV prevalence and three markers of sexual risk: mean lifetime number of partners (men: r = 0.87; P < 0.001; women: r = 0.60; P = 0.05); reporting sex with a non-married, non-cohabiting partner (men: r = 0.92; P < 0.001, women r = 0.93; P < 0.001); and premarital sex. Condom usage and HIV testing were positively associated with HIV prevalence, while the prevalence of circumcision, polygamy, age at sexual debut and male migration were not associated with HIV prevalence. Conclusion Variation in sexual behavior may contribute to the large variations in HIV prevalence by region in Ethiopia. Population-level interventions to reduce risky sexual behavior in high HIV incidence regions should be considered. PMID:26496073

  9. Fuzzy correlation analysis with realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yue Y.; Fan, Xinrui; Zheng, Ying N.

    1998-10-01

    The fundamental concept of fuzzy correlation is briefly discussed. Based on the correlation coefficient of classic correlation, polarity correlation and fuzzy correlation, the relationship between the correlations are analyzed. A fuzzy correlation analysis has the merits of both rapidity and accuracy as some amplitude information of random signals has been utilized. It has broad prospects for application. The form of fuzzy correlative analyzer with NLX 112 fuzzy data correlator and single-chip microcomputer is introduced.

  10. Bleed-through correction for rendering and correlation analysis in multi-colour localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dahan; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Parent, Matthew T.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-colour localization microscopy has enabled sub-diffraction studies of colocalization between multiple biological species and quantification of their correlation at length scales previously inaccessible with conventional fluorescence microscopy. However, bleed-through, or misidentification of probe species, creates false colocalization and artificially increases certain types of correlation between two imaged species, affecting the reliability of information provided by colocalization and quantified correlation. Despite the potential risk of these artefacts of bleed-through, neither the effect of bleed-through on correlation nor methods of its correction in correlation analyses has been systematically studied at typical rates of bleed-through reported to affect multi-colour imaging. Here, we present a reliable method of bleed-through correction applicable to image rendering and correlation analysis of multi-colour localization microscopy. Application of our bleed-through correction shows our method accurately corrects the artificial increase in both types of correlations studied (Pearson coefficient and pair correlation), at all rates of bleed-through tested, in all types of correlations examined. In particular, anti-correlation could not be quantified without our bleed-through correction, even at rates of bleed-through as low as 2%. Demonstrated with dichroic-based multi-colour FPALM here, our presented method of bleed-through correction can be applied to all types of localization microscopy (PALM, STORM, dSTORM, GSDIM, etc.), including both simultaneous and sequential multi-colour modalities, provided the rate of bleed-through can be reliably determined. PMID:26185614

  11. Almost quantum correlations.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Guryanova, Yelena; Hoban, Matty J; Acín, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Quantum theory is not only successfully tested in laboratories every day but also constitutes a robust theoretical framework: small variations usually lead to implausible consequences, such as faster-than-light communication. It has even been argued that quantum theory may be special among possible theories. Here we report that, at the level of correlations among different systems, quantum theory is not so special. We define a set of correlations, dubbed 'almost quantum', and prove that it strictly contains the set of quantum correlations but satisfies all-but-one of the proposed principles to capture quantum correlations. We present numerical evidence that the remaining principle is satisfied too. PMID:25697645

  12. Local available quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundarain, Douglas F.; de Guevara, María L. Ladrón

    2015-10-01

    In this work, local available quantum correlations are studied. They are defined in terms of mutual information of bipartite local measurements done over an optimal local basis complementary to the local basis which defines the respective classical correlations. For two qubits, it is always possible to choose the basis of classical correlations as the set of eigenvectors of ? _z (the third Pauli matrix) and complementary bases become the sets of eigenvectors of the observables orthogonal to ? _z . It is shown that all states with zero local available quantum correlations are separable but not necessarily strictly classical; this fact puts this kind of correlations in the middle between discord and entanglement. Since in many cases it may suffice to know whether a given state has quantum correlations, the structure of the states with zero local available quantum correlations is presented. It is also shown that there is a close connection between local available quantum correlations and the protocol of entanglement activation developed by Piani et al. (Phys Rev Lett 106:220403, 2011). If a state satisfies the sufficient condition for the entanglement swapping associated with this protocol, this state has nonzero local available quantum correlations.

  13. Correlation among auto-refractor, wavefront aberration, and subjective manual refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ren, Qiushi

    2005-01-01

    Three optometry methods which include auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective manual refraction were studied and compared in measuring low order aberrations of 60 people"s 117 normal eyes. Paired t-test and linear regression were used to study these three methods" relationship when measuring myopia with astigmatism. In order to make the analysis more clear, we divided the 117 normal eyes into different groups according to their subjective manual refraction and redid the statistical analysis. Correlations among three methods show significant in sphere, cylinder and axis in all groups, with sphere"s correlation coefficients largest(R>0.98, P<0.01) and cylinder"s smallest (0.90t-test before grouping showed the difference of three optometry methods in measuring sphere was significant (P<0.01) while axis"s difference was not significant (P>0.01). Auto-refractor had significant change from the other two methods when measuring cylinder (P<0.01). The results after grouping differed a little from the analysis among total people. Although three methods showed significant change from each other in certain parameters, the amplitude of these differences were not large, which indicated that the coherence of auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective refraction is good. However, we suggested that wavefront aberration measurement could be a good starting point of optometry, subjective refraction is still necessary for refinement.

  14. FEBRUARY 2001 S&T TEST REPORT

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Karel

    A STAR TOP ASTRO WEB SITES SHEDDING LIGHT ON DARK SKIES: · Build a "Dark Meter" · New Dark-Sky Rating NEW 102-MM TELESCOPE WATCH A PLANET BLOT OUT A STAR TOP ASTRO WEB SITES SHEDDING LIGHT ON DARK SKIES: · Build a "Dark Meter" · New Dark-Sky Rating Scale AURIGA'S SPARKLING STAR CLUSTERS NEW PUBLIC OBSERVATORY

  15. Human gene correlation analysis (HGCA): A tool for the identification of transcriptionally co-expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics and high-throughput technologies such as microarray studies allow the measure of the expression levels of large numbers of genes simultaneously, thus helping us to understand the molecular mechanisms of various biological processes in a cell. Findings We calculate the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r-value) between probe set signal values from Affymetrix Human Genome Microarray samples and cluster the human genes according to the r-value correlation matrix using the Neighbour Joining (NJ) clustering method. A hyper-geometric distribution is applied on the text annotations of the probe sets to quantify the term overrepresentations. The aim of the tool is the identification of closely correlated genes for a given gene of interest and/or the prediction of its biological function, which is based on the annotations of the respective gene cluster. Conclusion Human Gene Correlation Analysis (HGCA) is a tool to classify human genes according to their coexpression levels and to identify overrepresented annotation terms in correlated gene groups. It is available at: http://biobank-informatics.bioacademy.gr/coexpression/. PMID:22672625

  16. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of???0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of???0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of???0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  17. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Wood, T J; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients??=??80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of??-0.93 (p??=??0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of??-0.95 (p??=??0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of??-0.85 (p??=??0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely. PMID:26540441

  18. Correlates of Academic Procrastination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milgram, Norman A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Investigated concurrent correlates of academic procrastination in Israeli college preparatory students (n=113). Procrastination in one course of study was found to be moderately correlated with procrastination in another but not to procrastination in routine tasks of daily living. Procrastination was weakly related to emotional upset about it and…

  19. Apochromatic optical correlation.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, A; Wang, D; Lohmann, A W; Friesem, A A

    2000-06-01

    Optical correlation, or matched filtering, can now be applied more widely than before, because the light is now allowed to be totally incoherent, spatially and spectrally. Two such correlators were demonstrated recently. Their state of chromatic correction can be called achromatic, since the scaling error has two zero crossings within the visible range of wavelengths. We present a new apochromatic correlator, in which the scaling error has three zero crossings. The maximum error and the rms error are reduced by a factor of 5. Our apochromatic correlator is composed of two highly dispersive heavy flint lenses that are in contact with two diffractive lenses and two chromatic corrected refractive lenses. The uncommon combination of flint dispersion and diffractive dispersion enabled us to achieve apochromatic correction of the scaling factor of the correlator. PMID:18064180

  20. Detrended fluctuation analysis made flexible to detect range of cross-correlated fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapie?, Jaros?aw; O?wiecimka, Pawe?; Dro?d?, Stanis?aw

    2015-11-01

    The detrended cross-correlation coefficient ?DCCA has recently been proposed to quantify the strength of cross-correlations on different temporal scales in bivariate, nonstationary time series. It is based on the detrended cross-correlation and detrended fluctuation analyses (DCCA and DFA, respectively) and can be viewed as an analog of the Pearson coefficient in the case of the fluctuation analysis. The coefficient ?DCCA works well in many practical situations but by construction its applicability is limited to detection of whether two signals are generally cross-correlated, without the possibility to obtain information on the amplitude of fluctuations that are responsible for those cross-correlations. In order to introduce some related flexibility, here we propose an extension of ?DCCA that exploits the multifractal versions of DFA and DCCA: multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis, respectively. The resulting new coefficient ?q not only is able to quantify the strength of correlations but also allows one to identify the range of detrended fluctuation amplitudes that are correlated in two signals under study. We show how the coefficient ?q works in practical situations by applying it to stochastic time series representing processes with long memory: autoregressive and multiplicative ones. Such processes are often used to model signals recorded from complex systems and complex physical phenomena like turbulence, so we are convinced that this new measure can successfully be applied in time-series analysis. In particular, we present an example of such application to highly complex empirical data from financial markets. The present formulation can straightforwardly be extended to multivariate data in terms of the q -dependent counterpart of the correlation matrices and then to the network representation.

  1. Spatial and time correlation of thermometers and pluviometers in a weather network database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardivo, Gianmarco

    2015-04-01

    A basic issue that arises when analysing data bases from weather networks is the correlation system that characterizes the set of weather stations. Some statistical models being used for simulating temperature and precipitation or estimating missing data often exploit the Pearson's correlation coefficient, whereby a selection of predictors is carried out. In this paper, a specific analysis was made to understand the relationship between the distances (between the stations) and the correlation structure (of the network) and to assess the evolution of the stations ranking over the time from the network establishment, given that they were ranked on the basis of their correlation coefficient values with a target station. This study was first carried out over the whole of the Veneto region in Northeast Italy, and subsequently, it was repeated, subdividing the area into three main climatic zones: mountain, plain and coast. The variables that are involved in this study are the following: daily precipitation and daily maximum, mean and minimum temperature. Generally, the correlation coefficients of the database of precipitation are, on average, inversely proportional to the mean distances from the target station. Considering that the same behaviour was not detected on analysing the temperature database, the main results of this work can be summarized as follows: (1) the most correlated stations of precipitation are generally closer to a target station than the most correlated stations of temperature (entire area); (2) starting from 5.5 years after the network was established, the temperature variable is characterized by a high stability (over time) of the correlation rankings, up to a wide radius from the target station; (3) this trend is not so clear in precipitation data. However, when taking into account the first result, (4) generally, the most correlated stations are placed within the radius of stability, more frequently so for precipitation than for temperature.

  2. Effect Size Matters: Empirical Investigations to Help Researchers Make Informed Decisions on Commonly Used Statistical Techniques 

    E-print Network

    Skidmore, Susana Troncoso

    2011-02-22

    /cluster analysis. Among the statistical techniques chosen for further analyses, regression is the oldest technique having been introduced in 1885 by Sir Francis Galton (David, 1995) whose notable academic offspring was Karl Pearson. 15... Technique Year Author Introducing the Term regression 1885 Francis Galton correlation 1888 Francis Galton chi square (?2) 1900 Karl Person ANOVA 1918 Ronald Aylmer Fisher t test 1924 Ronald Aylmer Fisher a ANCOVA 1931 Arthur L. Bailey factor...

  3. Correlation reflectometry at TEXTOR.

    PubMed

    Krämer-Flecken, A; Soldatov, S; Vowinkel, B; Müller, P

    2010-11-01

    In high temperature fusion plasmas the transport of energy and particles is commonly believed to be driven by turbulence. Turbulence quantities as correlation length and decorrelation time are important for the confinement properties of a plasma. Besides other diagnostics, correlation reflectometry has proven to be a suitable tool for the measurement of turbulence properties. At the medium sized Toroidal EXperiment for Technical Oriented Research (TEXTOR) the existing correlation reflectometry has been recently upgraded. A new reflectometer based on a microwave synthesizer has been developed and installed for the investigation of turbulence properties in a fusion plasma. Together with the existing reflectometer the measurement of radial correlation length and decorrelation time becomes available. Both reflectometers are computer controlled and allow to program individual frequency sequences and the duration of each frequency step. With the existing poloidal antenna array at ?=0° and on top of the vacuum vessel, the system allows the measurement of radial correlation and poloidal correlations at the same time. First experiments have been performed and the results on the radial correlation length of density fluctuations in a fusion plasma are presented. PMID:21133466

  4. Interaural correlation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Culling, J F; Colburn, H S; Spurchise, M

    2001-08-01

    Sensitivity to differences in interaural correlation was measured for 1.3-ERB-wide bands of noise using a 2IFC task at six frequencies: 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1250, and 1500 Hz. The sensitivity index, d', was measured for discriminations between a number of fixed pairs of correlation values. Cumulative d' functions were derived for each frequency and condition. The d' for discriminating any two values of correlation may be recovered from the cumulative d' function by the difference between cumulative d''s for these values. Two conditions were employed: the noisebands were either presented in isolation (narrow-band condition) or in the context of broad, contiguous flanking bands of correlated noise (fringed condition). The cumulative d' functions showed greater sensitivity to differences in correlation close to 1 than close to 0 at low frequencies, but this difference was less pronounced in the fringed condition. Also, a more linear relationship was observed when cumulative d' was plotted as a function of the equivalent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in dB for each correlation value, rather than directly against correlation. The equivalent SNR was the SNR at which the interaural correlation in an NoS(pi) stimulus would equal the interaural correlation of the noise used in the experiment. The maximum cumulative d' declined above 750 Hz. This decline was steeper for the fringed than for the narrow-band condition. For the narrow-band condition, the total cumulative d' was variable across listeners. All cumulative d' functions were closely fitted using a simple two-parameter function. The complete data sets, averaged across listeners, from the fringed and narrow-band conditions were fitted using functions to describe the changes in these parameters over frequency, in order to produce an interpolated family of curves that describe sensitivity at frequencies between those tested. These curves predict the spectra recovered by the binaural system when complex sounds, such as speech, are masked by noise. PMID:11519570

  5. Correlation of the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination Given in July to Intern American Board of Emergency Medicine in-training Examination Scores: A Predictor of Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Katherine; Franzen, Doug; Heitz, Corey; Emery, Matthew; Poznanski, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is great variation in the knowledge base of Emergency Medicine (EM) interns in July. The first objective knowledge assessment during residency does not occur until eight months later, in February, when the American Board of EM (ABEM) administers the in-training examination (ITE). In 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) released the EM Advanced Clinical Examination (EM-ACE), an assessment intended for fourth-year medical students. Administration of the EM-ACE to interns at the start of residency may provide an earlier opportunity to assess the new EM residents’ knowledge base. The primary objective of this study was to determine the correlation of the NBME EM-ACE, given early in residency, with the EM ITE. Secondary objectives included determination of the correlation of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 or 2 scores with early intern EM-ACE and ITE scores and the effect, if any, of clinical EM experience on examination correlation. Methods This was a multi-institutional, observational study. Entering EM interns at six residencies took the EM-ACE in July 2013 and the ABEM ITE in February 2014. We collected scores for the EM-ACE and ITE, age, gender, weeks of clinical EM experience in residency prior to the ITE, and USMLE Step 1 and 2 scores. Pearson’s correlation and linear regression were performed. Results Sixty-two interns took the EM-ACE and the ITE. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient between the ITE and the EM-ACE was 0.62. R-squared was 0.5 (adjusted 0.4). The coefficient of determination was 0.41 (95% CI [0.3–0.8]). For every increase of one in the scaled EM-ACE score, we observed a 0.4% increase in the EM in-training score. In a linear regression model using all available variables (EM-ACE, gender, age, clinical exposure to EM, and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 scores), only the EM-ACE score was significantly associated with the ITE (p<0.05). We observed significant colinearity among the EM-ACE, ITE and USMLE scores. Gender, age and number of weeks of EM prior to the ITE had no effect on the relationship between EM-ACE and the ITE. Conclusion Given early during intern year, the EM-ACE score showed positive correlation with ITE. Clinical EM experience prior to the in-training exam did not affect the correlation. PMID:26594299

  6. The observed radio/gamma-ray emission correlation for blazars with the Fermi-LAT and the RATAN-600 data

    E-print Network

    Mufakharov, T; Sotnikova, Yu; Naiden, Ya; Erkenov, A

    2015-01-01

    We study the correlation between gamma-ray and radio band radiation for 123 blazars, using the Fermi-LAT first source catalog (1FGL) and the RATAN-600 data obtained at the same period of time (within a few months). We found an apparent positive correlation for BL Lac and flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) sources from our sample through testing the value of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. The BL Lac objects show higher values of the correlation coefficient than FSRQs at all frequencies, except 21.7 GHz, and at all bands, except $10-100$ GeV, typically at high confidence level (> 99%). At higher gamma-ray energies the correlation weakens and even becomes negative for BL Lacs and FSRQs. For BL Lac blazars, the correlation of the fluxes appeared to be more sensitive to the considered gamma-ray energy band, than to the frequency, while for FSRQ sources the correlation changed notably both with the considered radio frequency and gamma-ray energy band. We used a data randomization method to quant...

  7. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  8. Transformed Auto-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Gao, Yang

    2014-05-01

    A transformed auto-correlation method is presented here, where a received signal is transformed based on a priori reflecting model, and then the transformed signal is cross-correlated to its original one. If the model is correct, after transformation, the reflected signal will be coherent to the transmitted signal, with zero delay. A map of transformed auto-correlation function with zero delay can be generated in a given parametric space. The significant peaks in the map may indicate the possible reflectors nearby the central transmitter. The true values of the parameters of reflectors can be estimated at the same time.

  9. Powers of the Likelihood Ratio Test and the Correlation Test Using Empirical Bayes Estimates for Various Shrinkages in Population Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Combes, F P; Retout, S; Frey, N; Mentré, F

    2014-01-01

    We compared the powers of the likelihood ratio test (LRT) and the Pearson correlation test (CT) from empirical Bayes estimates (EBEs) for various designs and shrinkages in the context of nonlinear mixed-effect modeling. Clinical trial simulation was performed with a simple pharmacokinetic model with various weight (WT) effects on volume (V). Data sets were analyzed with NONMEM 7.2 using first-order conditional estimation with interaction and stochastic approximation expectation maximization algorithms. The powers of LRT and CT in detecting the link between individual WT and V or clearance were computed to explore hidden or induced correlations, respectively. Although the different designs and variabilities could be related to the large shrinkage of the EBEs, type 1 errors and powers were similar in LRT and CT in all cases. Power was mostly influenced by covariate effect size and, to a lesser extent, by the informativeness of the design. Further studies with more models are needed. PMID:24717242

  10. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable.

  11. Emerging correlation optics.

    PubMed

    Angelsky, Oleg V; Gbur, Gregory J; Polyanskii, Peter; Hanson, Steen G; Volyar, Alexander; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A; Mokhun, Igor

    2012-04-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting the state-of-the-art of correlation optics and showing synergetics between the theoretical background and experimental techniques. PMID:22505120

  12. Extractable Work from Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Hovhannisyan, Karen V.; Huber, Marcus; Skrzypczyk, Paul; Brunner, Nicolas; Acín, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Work and quantum correlations are two fundamental resources in thermodynamics and quantum information theory. In this work, we study how to use correlations among quantum systems to optimally store work. We analyze this question for isolated quantum ensembles, where the work can be naturally divided into two contributions: a local contribution from each system and a global contribution originating from correlations among systems. We focus on the latter and consider quantum systems that are locally thermal, thus from which any extractable work can only come from correlations. We compute the maximum extractable work for general entangled states, separable states, and states with fixed entropy. Our results show that while entanglement gives an advantage for small quantum ensembles, this gain vanishes for a large number of systems.

  13. Compact Optical Correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Kirsch, James C.

    1989-02-01

    In the past 15 years, a dozen or so designs have been proposed for compact optical correlators. Of these, maybe one-third of them have actually been built and only a few of those tested. This paper will give an overview of some of the systems that have been built as well as mention some promising early and current designs that have not been built. The term compact, as used in the title of this paper, will be applied very loosely; to mean smaller than a laboratory size optical table. To date, only one correlator has been built and tested that actually can be called miniature. This softball size correlator was built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation for the U. S. Army Missile Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. More will be said about this correlator in following sections.

  14. Network Maximal Correlation

    E-print Network

    Feizi, Soheil

    2015-09-21

    Identifying nonlinear relationships in large datasets is a daunting task particularly when the form of the nonlinearity is unknown. Here, we introduce Network Maximal Correlation (NMC) as a fundamental measure to capture ...

  15. Tsukuba VLBI Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The K5/VSSP software correlator (Figure 1), located in Tsukuba, Japan, is operated by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). It is fully dedicated to processing the geodetic VLBI sessions of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry. All of the weekend IVS Intensives (INT2) and the Japanese domestic VLBI observations organized by GSI were processed at the Tsukuba VLBI Correlator.

  16. Correlation between Chronological Age, Dental Age and Skeletal Age among Monozygoyic and Dizygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mohit; Divyashree, R; Abhilash, PR; A Bijle, Mohammed Nadeem; Murali, KV

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronological age, dental development, height and weight measurements, sexual maturation characteristics and skeletal age are some biological indicators that have been used to identify time of growth. Many researchers have agreed that skeletal maturity is closely related to the craniofacial growth, and bones of hand and wrist are reliable parameters in assessing it. The complete hand and wrist radiograph involves 30 bones and assessment of these bones is one elaborate task. The present study is therefore, undertaken to assess the correlation between the chronological age, dental age and skeletal ages among different types of twins. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 60 subjects (30 twins) aged 8 to 16 years, divided into group of 10 monozygotic, 10 dizygotic and 10 mixed sex twins. The sample was selected from Twin Survey- 2008 conducted by Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics, Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Chennai. Their zygosity was determined by sex, blood groups and by the parent. The chronological age was measured by the date of birth given by the parents. Panoramic and hand wrist x-rays were taken. Dental age was assessed by Demerjian et al method and skeletal age by Greulich and Pyle method. The correlation among twins in dental and skeletal ages with the chronological age was assessed using Correlation Coefficient and Student's't' Test. Results: The obtained data was fed into the computer and statistical analysis was done for the same using the SPSS version 10.0. Statistical significance was tested at P<0.05 level. Mean and Standard Deviation, Correlation Coefficient, Student's't' Test statistical methods were employed. The result showed highly significant 'p' value as <0.001 in all the correlations except for mixed pairs. Descriptive statistics in most of the areas demonstrated a non-significant result between zygosity groups. Conclusion: There is a correlation existing between the individual’s chronological age, dental age and skeletal age and correlation also exists in the twin pairs of the same zygosity and among each pair but no correlation exists between different zygotic twins. How to cite this article: Gupta M, Divyashree R, Abhilash P R, Bijle M N A, Murali K V. Correlation between Chronological Age, Dental Age and Skeletal Age among Monozygoyic and Dizygotic Twins. J Int Oral Health 2013; 3(1):16-22. PMID:24155573

  17. Media coverage and hospital notifications: Correlation analysis and optimal media impact duration to manage a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qinling; Tang, Sanyi; Gabriele, Sandra; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-02-01

    News reporting has the potential to modify a community?s knowledge of emerging infectious diseases and affect peoples' attitudes and behavior. Here we developed a quantitative approach to evaluate the effects of media on such behavior. Statistically significant correlations between the number of new hospital notifications, during the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza epidemic in the Shaanxi province of China, and the number of daily news items added to eight major websites were found from Pearson correlation and cross-correlation analyses. We also proposed a novel model to examine the implication for transmission dynamics of these correlations. The model incorporated the media impact function into the intensity of infection, and enhanced the traditional epidemic SEIR model with the addition of media dynamics. We used a nonlinear least squares estimation to identify the best-fit parameter values in the model from the observed data. We also carried out the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to determine key parameters during early phase of the disease outbreak for the final outcome of the outbreak with media impact. The findings confirm the importance of responses by individuals to the media reports, with behavior changes having important consequence for the emerging infectious disease control. Therefore, for mitigating emerging infectious diseases, media reports should be focused on how to guide people?s behavioral changes, which are critical for limiting the spread of disease. PMID:26582723

  18. Stature and gender determination and their correlation using odontometry and skull anthropometry

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Kiran; Shetty, Devi Charan; Wadhwan, Vijay; Jain, Anshi; Khanna, Kaveri Surya

    2014-01-01

    Background: When the body has been mutilated, it is common to have the extremities or head amputated from the trunk. In concern with forensic odontology, an estimate must have been made based on the correlation of osteometry along with odontometry in determining sex, race and stature. Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate and correlate height and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and Microbiology, I.T.S Center for Dental studies and Research, Muradnagar, Ghaziabad (UP) with the representative study subjects of 60 patients as 30 males and 30 females in the age group of 15-25 years. The selected parameters were measured and then correlated to investigate stature and gender from odontometry and anthropometric data of the skull. Results: On linear regression analysis, the selected parameters were found to be statistically significant predictor of height. It was also established by Karl Pearson's coefficient correlation that the left mandibular canine index for female was statistically significant to show sexual dimorphism. Conclusion: In the emerging field of forensic odontology, skull anthropometry, odontometry exhibits stature determination and strong sexual dimorphism. PMID:25125917

  19. Correlation between the Mini Mental State Examination-Korean version and the Measurement of Quality of the Environment in the institutionalized elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the correlation between the cognitive level of the elderly and their attitude towards the living environment. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 80 elderly people hospitalized in a nursing home in K city, South Korea, participated in this study. Pearson correlation analysis was used to test the relationships between scores on the Mini Mental State Examination-Korean Version and Measurement of Quality of the Environment (facilitators and obstacles). [Results] A positive and moderately strong correlation (r = 0.462) was found between scores on the Mini Mental State Examination and the Measurement of Quality of the Environment (obstacle). [Conclusion] In a nursing home, patients with relatively higher cognitive levels can perceive more obstacles in the surrounding environment. PMID:26696742

  20. Prevalence and Correlates of Depressive Symptoms and Resiliency among African American Women in a Community-Based Primary Health Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Kisha B.; Bradford, L. Dianne; Hall, Stephanie P.; Belton, Allyson S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional pilot study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms and resiliency among 290 African American women (AAW) in a community-based primary health care center. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlation, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Findings indicate that depressive symptoms are experienced by 49% of the participants, while 10% indicated a history of suicidal ideation. Participants had moderately high resiliency scores that had a statistically significant inverse relationship with depressive symptoms. This suggests that resiliency is potentially a protective factor for depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were positively correlated with participants’ diagnosis of at least one chronic disease. The strongest predictors of depressive symptoms were previous diagnoses of a mental health condition and unemployment. This study identifies risk and potential protective factors for depression among a clinic sample of AAW. PMID:24241263

  1. Terrain correlation suitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wang; McClintock, Robert L.

    1994-07-01

    Terrain-aided navigation (TAN), also referred to as terrain correlation, is a technique that has proven to be highly successful as a navigational aid for autonomous, unmanned guided missiles. Qualitatively speaking, the effectiveness of terrain correlation is a function of signal- to-noise (S/N) ratio. The signal is equivalent to terrain roughness, while the noise is the combination of reference map errors, radar altimeter errors, and INS altitude errors. However, it is not practical to use only a single parameter, such as S/N, to define the suitability of terrain correlation. This paper discusses the shortcomings of the conventional single-parameter approach to the terrain contour matching algorithm (TERCOM) used in cruise missile guidance systems scene selection. A more comprehensive technique is then presented that analyzes the terrain correlation suitability based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique. A figure-of-merit (FOM) for terrain correlation suitability, computed from sample statistics, is introduced and simulation results are provided to illustrate the feasibility of using a multi-parameter FOM technique. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed approach could provide a cost effective enhancement to the TAN-based mission planning process.

  2. Strongly correlated materials.

    PubMed

    Morosan, Emilia; Natelson, Douglas; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H; Si, Qimiao

    2012-09-18

    Strongly correlated materials are profoundly affected by the repulsive electron-electron interaction. This stands in contrast to many commonly used materials such as silicon and aluminum, whose properties are comparatively unaffected by the Coulomb repulsion. Correlated materials often have remarkable properties and transitions between distinct, competing phases with dramatically different electronic and magnetic orders. These rich phenomena are fascinating from the basic science perspective and offer possibilities for technological applications. This article looks at these materials through the lens of research performed at Rice University. Topics examined include: Quantum phase transitions and quantum criticality in "heavy fermion" materials and the iron pnictide high temperature superconductors; computational ab initio methods to examine strongly correlated materials and their interface with analytical theory techniques; layered dichalcogenides as example correlated materials with rich phases (charge density waves, superconductivity, hard ferromagnetism) that may be tuned by composition, pressure, and magnetic field; and nanostructure methods applied to the correlated oxides VO? and Fe?O?, where metal-insulator transitions can be manipulated by doping at the nanoscale or driving the system out of equilibrium. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting prospects for this class of materials. PMID:22893361

  3. Nonclassicality of Temporal Correlations.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Stephen; Kosowski, Adrian; Markiewicz, Marcin; Paterek, Tomasz; Przysi??na, Anna

    2015-09-18

    The results of spacelike separated measurements are independent of distant measurement settings, a property one might call two-way no-signaling. In contrast, timelike separated measurements are only one-way no-signaling since the past is independent of the future but not vice versa. For this reason some temporal correlations that are formally identical to nonclassical spatial correlations can still be modeled classically. We propose a new formulation of Bell's theorem for temporal correlations; namely, we define nonclassical temporal correlations as the ones which cannot be simulated by propagating in time the classical information content of a quantum system given by the Holevo bound. We first show that temporal correlations between results of any projective quantum measurements on a qubit can be simulated classically. Then we present a sequence of general measurements on a single m-level quantum system that cannot be explained by propagating in time an m-level classical system and using classical computers with unlimited memory. PMID:26430975

  4. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Luders, Eileen; Narr, Katherine L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    With the advancement of image acquisition and analysis methods in recent decades, unique opportunities have emerged to study the neuroanatomical correlates of intelligence. Traditional approaches examining global measures have been complemented by insights from more regional analyses based on pre-defined areas. Newer state-of-the-art approaches have further enhanced our ability to localize the presence of correlations between cerebral characteristics and intelligence with high anatomic precision. These in vivo assessments have confirmed mainly positive correlations, suggesting that optimally increased brain regions are associated with better cognitive performance. Findings further suggest that the models proposed to explain the anatomical substrates of intelligence should address contributions from not only (pre)frontal regions, but also widely distributed networks throughout the whole brain. PMID:20160919

  5. Nonlocality of quantum correlations

    E-print Network

    Streltsov, A; Roga, W; Bruß, D; Illuminati, F

    2012-01-01

    We show that only those composite quantum systems possessing nonvanishing quantum correlations have the property that any nontrivial local unitary evolution changes their global state. This type of nonlocality occurs also for states that do not violate a Bell inequality, such as, for instance, Werner states with a low degree of entanglement. We derive the exact relation between the global state change induced by local unitary evolutions and the amount of quantum correlations. We prove that the minimal change coincides with the geometric measure of discord, thus providing the latter with an operational interpretation in terms of the capability of a local unitary dynamics to modify a global state. We establish rigorously that Werner states are the maximally quantum correlated two-qubit states, and thus are the ones that maximize this novel type of nonlocality.

  6. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM)

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  7. Computational power of correlations

    E-print Network

    Janet Anders; Dan E. Browne

    2009-02-05

    We study the intrinsic computational power of correlations exploited in measurement-based quantum computation. By defining a general framework the meaning of the computational power of correlations is made precise. This leads to a notion of resource states for measurement-based \\textit{classical} computation. Surprisingly, the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt problems emerge as optimal examples. Our work exposes an intriguing relationship between the violation of local realistic models and the computational power of entangled resource states.

  8. Yangian symmetric correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicherin, D.; Kirschner, R.

    2013-12-01

    Similarity transformations and eigenvalue relations of monodromy operators composed of Jordan-Schwinger type L matrices are considered and used to define Yangian symmetric correlators of n-dimensional theories. Explicit expressions are obtained and relations are formulated. In this way basic notions of the Quantum inverse scattering method provide a convenient formulation for high symmetry and integrability not only in lower dimensions.

  9. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luders, Eileen; Narr, Katherine L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2009-01-01

    With the advancement of image acquisition and analysis methods in recent decades, unique opportunities have emerged to study the neuroanatomical correlates of intelligence. Traditional approaches examining global measures have been complemented by insights from more regional analyses based on pre-defined areas. Newer state-of-the-art approaches…

  10. Sensory Correlations in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Janet K.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Garver, Carolyn R.; Johnson, Danny G.; Andrews, Alonzo A.; Savla, Jayshree S.; Mehta, Jyutika A.; Schroeder, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between auditory, visual, touch, and oral sensory dysfunction in autism and their relationship to multisensory dysfunction and severity of autism. The Sensory Profile was completed on 104 persons with a diagnosis of autism, 3 to 56 years of age. Analysis showed a significant correlation between the different…

  11. The observed radio/gamma-ray emission correlation for blazars with the Fermi-LAT and the RATAN-600 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufakharov, T.; Mingaliev, M.; Sotnikova, Yu.; Naiden, Ya.; Erkenov, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study the correlation between gamma-ray and radio band radiation for 123 blazars, using the Fermi-LAT first source catalogue (1FGL) and the RATAN-600 data obtained at the same period of time (within a few months). We found an apparent positive correlation for BL Lac and flat-spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) sources from our sample through testing the value of the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. The BL Lac objects show higher values of the correlation coefficient than FSRQs at all frequencies, except 21.7 GHz, and at all bands, except 10-100 GeV, typically at high confidence level (>99 per cent). At higher gamma-ray energies the correlation weakens and even becomes negative for BL Lacs and FSRQs. For BL Lac blazars, the correlation of the fluxes appeared to be more sensitive to the considered gamma-ray energy band, than to the frequency, while for FSRQ sources the correlation changed notably both with the considered radio frequency and gamma-ray energy band. We used a data randomization method to quantify the significance of the computed correlation coefficients. We find that the statistical significance of the correlations we obtained between the flux densities at all frequencies and the photon flux in all gamma-ray bands below 3 GeV is high for BL Lacs (chance probability ˜10-3-10-7). The correlation coefficient is high and significant for the 0.1-0.3 GeV band and low and insignificant for the 10-100 GeV band for both types of blazars for all considered frequencies.

  12. Bootstrapped Deattenuated Correlation: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Veprinsky, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Correlation attenuation due to measurement error and a corresponding correction, the deattenuated correlation, have been known for over a century. Nevertheless, the deattenuated correlation remains underutilized. A few studies in recent years have investigated factors affecting the deattenuated correlation, and a couple of them provide alternative…

  13. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN VISUAL MAGNITUDES

    E-print Network

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    . This work refines and extends to a wider range of magnitudes our previous correlation law [1]. #12;WATER line). #12;CORRELATION LAW ­ ALL COMETS Water-production rates calculated with the correlation law as a function of the measured water-production rates. #12;CORRELATION LAW ­ RESIDUALS Residuals of the water

  14. ``A Desideratum in Spectrology'': an Editor's Lament in the Great Correlation Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVorkin, David

    2012-09-01

    Of all the known observable characteristics of the stars in the late 19th Century, classification by the appearance of their spectra was by far the most problematic. In 1904, Edwin Frost lamented that some 23 distinct classification systems had been created, yet none were universally accepted. In 1908, the applied mathematician Karl Pearson and a student evaluated correlations between spectra and other characteristics of the stars, hoping to ``look upon the stellar universe as an orderly whole ... by which we pass from chaos to an organised and locally differentiated cosmos.'' None of the major spectral systems, however, allowed them to draw any conclusions, other than state a high correlation with color. Yet, by 1917, astronomers were making correlations, and applying them, to make some pretty strong statements about the nature and history of the sidereal system as well as the lives of the stars. One of the strongest was the technique of spectroscopic parallaxes. But even its discoverer, Walter Sydney Adams, worried about what it all meant. Writing to Eddington in 1917, Adams wished that ``we had more physical knowledge regarding the interpretations of stellar spectra.'' And as E. A. Milne observed some years later, in retrospect, ``[t]here was a gap in the logical argument.'' My talk will address some historiographical issues arising from this phase in the development of modern astrophysics that hopefully will illuminate why the gap was closed in the way it was closed, and the effect it had on the continuing process of spectral classification.

  15. New Measurement for Correlation of Co-evolution Relationship of Subsequences in Protein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongyun; Yu, Xiaoqing; Dou, Yongchao; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Many computational tools have been developed to measure the protein residues co-evolution. Most of them only focus on co-evolution for pairwise residues in a protein sequence. However, number of residues participate in co-evolution might be multiple. And some co-evolved residues are clustered in several distinct regions in primary structure. Therefore, the co-evolution among the adjacent residues and the correlation between the distinct regions offer insights into function and evolution of the protein and residues. Subsequence is used to represent the adjacent multiple residues in one distinct region. In the paper, co-evolution relationship in each subsequence is represented by mutual information matrix (MIM). Then, Pearson's correlation coefficient: R value is developed to measure the similarity correlation of two MIMs. MSAs from Catalytic Data Base (Catalytic Site Atlas, CSA) are used for testing. R value characterizes a specific class of residues. In contrast to individual pairwise co-evolved residues, adjacent residues without high individual MI values are found since the co-evolved relationship among them is similar to that among another set of adjacent residues. These subsequences possess some flexibility in the composition of side chains, such as the catalyzed environment. PMID:26396121

  16. Autobiographical deficits correlate with gray matter volume in depressed and high risk participants.

    PubMed

    Young, Kymberly D; Bellgowan, Patrick S F; Bodurka, Jerzy; Drevets, Wayne C

    2015-11-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) overgenerality is a consistent neuropsychological feature of major depressive disorder (MDD) and is present in individuals at high-familial risk (HR) of developing MDD. Structural changes have been found in brain regions implicated in AM recall in MDDs and HRs. However, the relationship between selective regional gray matter volume (GMV) differences and AM recall deficits has not been examined. We examined this relationship in 27 HR, 43 unmedicated MDD and 47 low-risk healthy control participants as they completed an AM task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. FreeSurfer was used for automated anatomical image processing and volumetric quantification. Anatomical regions of interest for GMV analysis were selected based on regions most commonly activated in controls as they recall specific AMs according to a recent meta-analysis. Pearson correlations were calculated among volumetric and AM recall data. In HRs and MDDs, left hippocampal volume correlated positively with specific (HRs r?=?0.42; MDDs r?=?0.60) and inversely with categorical AM recall (HRs r?=?-0.51; MDDs r?=?-0.35). In MDDs, left precuneus volume also correlated positively with specific (r?=?0.49) and inversely with categorical (r?=?-0.35) AM recall. Our results suggest selective GMV alterations within the AM network may contribute to AM impairments observed in both HR and MDD individuals. PMID:25925269

  17. Correlation between BOLD-MRI and HIF expression level in renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Wang, Xingming; Wang, Shuai; Cheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Occupying about 2%~3% of all malignant tumors, renal carcinoma is the most common primary cancer in kidney. The oxidative level of tumor cells is of vital role for optimizing treatment plan, evaluating efficacy and predicting prognosis. This study thus investigated the R2* value in mouse renal carcinoma model and the correlation between tumor hypoxia and expression level of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). A total of 20 BALB/C nude mice (4~6 weeks old) were inoculated with human ACHN renal carcinoma cells to generate renal cancer model. After the tumor diameter reached 0.5 cm, all animals were examined by BOLD-MRI, both under normal inhalation (R2a*) and carbogen treatment (R2b*). The alternation of R2* values (?R2*=R2a* - R2b*) was calculated. Mice were then sacrificed for Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining targeting HIF-1? and HIF-2?. The positive score of HIF was then analyzed for its correlation with R2* value. In 18 mice finished both experiments, Pearson correlation analysis revealed significant negative correlation between R2a* and ?R2* (r=-0.48, P<0.05) and positive relationship between ?R2* and HIF-2? (r=0.38, P<0.05). HIF-1? level, however, did not correlated with tumor R* values. The positive correlation between ?R2* and HIF-2?, but not HIF-1?, suggested potential role of combined BOLD-MRI technique and HIF-1? staining in clinical diagnosis of renal carcinoma. HIF-2? may work as biological marker for renal cancer. PMID:26722605

  18. The Correlation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness With Blood Pressure in a Chinese Hypertensive Population

    PubMed Central

    Gangwani, Rita A.; Lee, Jacky W.Y.; Mo, H.Y.; Sum, Rita; Kwong, Alfred S.K.; Wang, Jenny H.L.; Tsui, Wendy W.S.; Chan, Jonathan C.H.; Lai, Jimmy S.M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the association between retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and blood pressure (BP) in subjects with systemic hypertension. Subjects with systemic hypertension on anti-hypertensive medications were screened by fundus photography and referred for glaucoma work-up if there was enlarged vertical cup-to-disc (VCDR) ratio ?0.6, VCDR asymmetry ?0.2, or optic disc hemorrhage. Workup included a complete ophthalmological examination, Humphrey visual field test, and RNFL thickness measurement by optical coherence tomography. The intraocular pressure (IOP) and RNFL thicknesses (global and quadrant) were averaged from both eyes and the means were correlated with: the systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using Pearson correlation. Among 4000 screened hypertensive subjects, 133 were referred for glaucoma workup and 110 completed the workup. Of the 4000 screened subjects, 1.3% had glaucoma (0.9% had normal tension glaucoma [NTG], 0.2% had primary open angle glaucoma, and 0.2% had primary angle closure glaucoma), whereas 0.3% were NTG suspects. The SBP was negatively correlated with the mean superior RNFL thickness (P?=?0.01). The DBP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P?=?0.03), superior (P?=?0.02), and nasal (P?=?0.003) RNFL thickness. The MAP was negatively correlated with the mean global (P?=?0.01), superior (P?=?0.002), and nasal (P?=?0.004) RNFL thickness while positively correlated with the mean IOP (P?=?0.02). In medically treated hypertensive subjects, glaucoma was present in 1.3%, with NTG being most prevalent. MAP control may help with IOP lowering and RNFL preservation, although future prospective studies will be needed. PMID:26061324

  19. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    SciTech Connect

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4? level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7?). A correlation between 10-500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4? and 2.6?, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity ?(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  20. Psychiatric symptoms correlate with metabolic indices in the hippocampus and cingulate in patients with mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anglin, R E; Rosebush, P I; Noseworthy, M D; Tarnopolsky, M; Mazurek, M F

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction may have a critical role in the pathophysiology of major psychiatric illnesses. Patients with mitochondrial disorders offer a unique window through which we can begin to understand the association between psychiatric symptoms and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), we investigated metabolic indices in mitochondrial patients in regions of the brain that have been implicated in psychiatric illness: the caudate, cingulate cortex and hippocampus. In all, 15 patients with mitochondrial disorders and 15 age- and sex-matched controls underwent a comprehensive psychiatric assessment, including the administration of standardized psychiatric rating scales, followed by single voxel 1H-MRS of the caudate, cingulate cortex and hippocampus to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), myoinositol and glutamate+glutamine (Glx). Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to determine correlations between metabolites and the psychiatric rating scales. Anxiety symptoms in these patients correlated with higher GPC, Glx, myoinositol and Cr in the hippocampus. Impaired level of function as a result of psychiatric symptoms correlated with higher Glx and GPC in the cingulate cortex. In summary, we found remarkably consistent, and statistically significant, correlations between anxiety and metabolic indices in the hippocampus in patients with mitochondrial disorders, while overall impairment of functioning due to psychiatric symptoms correlated with metabolic markers in the cingulate cortex. These findings lend support to the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction in specific brain regions can give rise to psychiatric symptoms. In particular, they suggest that metabolic processes in the hippocampus may have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. PMID:23149451

  1. Psychiatric symptoms correlate with metabolic indices in the hippocampus and cingulate in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Anglin, R E; Rosebush, P I; Noseworthy, M D; Tarnopolsky, M; Mazurek, M F

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction may have a critical role in the pathophysiology of major psychiatric illnesses. Patients with mitochondrial disorders offer a unique window through which we can begin to understand the association between psychiatric symptoms and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), we investigated metabolic indices in mitochondrial patients in regions of the brain that have been implicated in psychiatric illness: the caudate, cingulate cortex and hippocampus. In all, 15 patients with mitochondrial disorders and 15 age- and sex-matched controls underwent a comprehensive psychiatric assessment, including the administration of standardized psychiatric rating scales, followed by single voxel (1)H-MRS of the caudate, cingulate cortex and hippocampus to measure N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), myoinositol and glutamate+glutamine (Glx). Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to determine correlations between metabolites and the psychiatric rating scales. Anxiety symptoms in these patients correlated with higher GPC, Glx, myoinositol and Cr in the hippocampus. Impaired level of function as a result of psychiatric symptoms correlated with higher Glx and GPC in the cingulate cortex. In summary, we found remarkably consistent, and statistically significant, correlations between anxiety and metabolic indices in the hippocampus in patients with mitochondrial disorders, while overall impairment of functioning due to psychiatric symptoms correlated with metabolic markers in the cingulate cortex. These findings lend support to the notion that mitochondrial dysfunction in specific brain regions can give rise to psychiatric symptoms. In particular, they suggest that metabolic processes in the hippocampus may have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. PMID:23149451

  2. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Domínguez, A.

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalogue based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalogue (together referred to as `VHE-like' sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4? level. There is also a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7?). A correlation between 10 and 500 GeV flux and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4? and 2.6?, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalogue, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS Data Release 7 quasar catalogue. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2 per cent less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity ?(E, z) ˜ 5, we estimate that the attenuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10 per cent. This decrease, although non-negligible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.

  3. A correlation between hard gamma-ray sources and cosmic voids along the line of sight

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Furniss, A.; Sutter, P. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dominguez, A.

    2014-11-25

    We estimate the galaxy density along lines of sight to hard extragalactic gamma-ray sources by correlating source positions on the sky with a void catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Extragalactic gamma-ray sources that are detected at very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) or have been highlighted as VHE-emitting candidates in the Fermi Large Area Telescope hard source catalog (together referred to as “VHE-like” sources) are distributed along underdense lines of sight at the 2.4? level. There is a less suggestive correlation for the Fermi hard source population (1.7?). A correlation between 10-500 GeV fluxmore »and underdense fraction along the line of sight for VHE-like and Fermi hard sources is found at 2.4? and 2.6?, calculated from the Pearson correlation coefficients of r = 0.57 and 0.47, respectively. The preference for underdense sight lines is not displayed by gamma-ray emitting galaxies within the second Fermi catalog, containing sources detected above 100 MeV, or the SDSS DR7 quasar catalog. We investigate whether this marginal correlation might be a result of lower extragalactic background light (EBL) photon density within the underdense regions and find that, even in the most extreme case of a entirely underdense sight line, the EBL photon density is only 2% less than the nominal EBL density. Translating this into gamma-ray attenuation along the line of sight for a highly attenuated source with opacity ?(E, z) ~ 5, we estimate that the attentuation of gamma-rays decreases no more than 10%. This decrease, although non-neglible, is unable to account for the apparent hard source correlation with underdense lines of sight.« less

  4. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width is Independently Correlated With Diurnal QTc Variation in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanmin; Xiao, Qiang; Zeng, Wei; Guo, Huimei; Jiang, Ke; Zhong, Ming; Zhong, Jingquan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the relationship between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and diurnal corrected QT (QTc) variation in patients with coronary heart disease. This retrospective study included 203 patients who underwent coronary angiography between February 2013 and June 2014. RDW values and dynamic electrocardiography (Holter) results were collected to investigate the relationship between RDW and diurnal QTc variation. Patients were separated into three groups (A, B, and C) by binning their RDW values in an ascending order. RDW values, coronary artery scores and diurnal QTc variations were significantly different among these groups (P?Pearson's correlation analysis was applied to control for confounding factors, and multiple correlation analysis showed that coronary artery score was positively correlated with RDW (r?=?0.130, P?=?0.020), while it was not correlated with the diurnal QTc variation (r?=??0.226, P?=?0.681). RDW was negatively correlated with diurnal QTc variation (r?=??0.197, P?=?0.035). RDW is independently associated with diurnal QTc variation in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:26061304

  5. Correlation between central venous pressure and peripheral venous pressure with passive leg raise in patients on mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ali, Shahna; Ray, Utpal; Varshney, Ankur; Doley, Kashmiri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central venous pressure (CVP) assesses the volume status of patients. However, this technique is not without complications. We, therefore, measured peripheral venous pressure (PVP) to see whether it can replace CVP. Aims: To evaluate the correlation and agreement between CVP and PVP after passive leg raise (PLR) in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study in Intensive Care Unit. Methods: Fifty critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation were included in the study. CVP and PVP measurements were taken using a water column manometer. Measurements were taken in the supine position and subsequently after a PLR of 45°. Statistical Analysis: Pearson's correlation and Bland–Altman's analysis. Results: This study showed a fair correlation between CVP and PVP after a PLR of 45° (correlation coefficient, r = 0.479; P = 0.0004) when the CVP was <10 cmH2O. However, the correlation was good when the CVP was >10 cmH2O. Bland–Altman analysis showed 95% limits of agreement to be ?2.912–9.472. Conclusion: PVP can replace CVP for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients.

  6. COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) MTB, smear positivity grade and MGIT culture; correlation analyses of three methods for bacillary quantification.

    PubMed

    Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Kato, Tomoko; Takaki, Akiko; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yuka; Izumi, Kiyohiko; Yi, Lina; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the correlation between the cycle threshold (Ct) value of the COBAS(®) TaqMan(®) MTB (TaqMan MTB), the mycobacterial smear positivity grade, and the time to detection (TTD) in the Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) for quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). For 57 sputum samples, significant correlations were observed between the Ct value, the smear positivity grade, and the MGIT TTD (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient: rs = -0.940, P < 0.001 and Pearson's correlation coefficient: rp = 0.737, P < 0.001). In addition, a correlation was observed between the number of bacteria estimated based on the smear positivity grade and the number of MTB bacilli calculated by the Ct value (rs = 0.930, P < 0.001). This study has demonstrated the possible estimation of the smear positivity grade and MGIT TTD using the Ct value of TaqMan MTB, which is based on a real-time PCR system, for diagnostic samples. PMID:26527538

  7. Correlation function and mutual information

    E-print Network

    R. X. Dong; D. L. Zhou

    2010-08-27

    Correlation function and mutual information are two powerful tools to characterize the correlations in a quantum state of a composite system, widely used in many-body physics and in quantum information science, respectively. We find that these two tools may give different conclusions about the order of the degrees of correlation in two specific two-qubit states. This result implies that the orderings of bipartite quantum states according to the degrees of correlation depend on which correlation measure we adopt.

  8. Digital demodulator-correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Goldstein, R. M.; Hubbard, W. P. (inventors)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for demodulation and correlation of a code modulated 10 MHz signal is presented. The apparatus is comprised of a sample and hold analog-to-digital converter synchronized by a frequency coherent 40 MHz pulse to obtain four evenly spaced samples of each of the signal. Each sample is added or subtracted to or from one of four accumulators to or from the separate sums. The correlation functions are then computed. As a further feature of the invention, multipliers are each multiplied by a squarewave chopper signal having a period that is long relative to the period of the received signal to foreclose contamination of the received signal by leakage from either of the other two terms of the multipliers.

  9. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  10. Selective correlations; not voodoo.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J D; Benjamini, Y

    2014-12-01

    The problem of "voodoo" correlations-exceptionally high observed correlations in selected regions of the brain-is well recognized in neuroimaging. It arises when quantities of interest are estimated from the same data that was used to select them as interesting. In statistical terminology, the problem of inference following selection from the same data is that of selective inference. Motivated by the unwelcome side-effects of splitting the data- the recommended remedy-we adapt the recent developments in selective inference in order to construct confidence intervals (CIs) with good reproducibility prospects, even if selection and estimation are done with the same data. These intervals control the expected proportion of non-covered correlations in the selected voxels-the False Coverage Rate (FCR). They extend further toward zero than standard intervals, thus attenuating the impression made by highly biased observed correlations. They do so adaptively, in that they coincide with the standard CIs when far away from the selection point. We complement existing analytic proofs with a simulation, showing that the proposed intervals control the FCR in realistic social neuroscience problems. We also suggest a "confidence calibration plot", to allow the intervals to be reported in a clear and interpretable way. Applying the proposed methodology on a loss-aversion study, we demonstrate that with the sample size and selection type employed, selection bias is considerable. Finally, selective intervals are compared to the currently recommended data-splitting approach. We discover that our approach has more power and typically more informative, as no data is discarded. Computation of the intervals is implemented in an accompanying software package. PMID:25153699

  11. Time Integrating Digital Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Poohsan N.; Haugen, Paul R.; Betz, B. K.

    1983-11-01

    This paper introduces "Interlaced Counter Propagating (ICP) Systolic Array", a new architecture for high speed systolic digital correlator operation. The interlaced arrangement of Multiply/Accumulate Units (MAUs) allow the processor to achieve 100% efficiency in MAU usage without need for complicated clocking scheme. It also shows a pipelined multiply and accumulate hardware combined with ICP architecture which allows the throughput to exceed the one with an array of conventional MAUs.

  12. True RF correlation receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Chiang

    2009-05-01

    Interferoceiver is a true correlation receiver and capable of overcoming severe problems caused by conventional super heterodyne receivers, such as range inaccuracy, Doppler range ambiguity, fratricides, excessive clutter contamination, undue inter system interference, etc. We had discussed the above capabilities in our early publications. In this paper, we will present the experimental progresses on interferoceiver as well as encountered obstacles. The technological revolution in radar and electronic warfare is within sight.

  13. Distinctive Clinical Correlates of Psychotic Major Depression: The CRESCEND Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Hwa-Young; Sakong, Jeong-Kyu; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this investigation was to identify distinctive clinical correlates of psychotic major depression (PMD) as compared with non-psychotic major depression (NPMD) in a large cohort of Korean patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods We recruited 966 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea (CRESCEND) study. Diagnoses of PMD (n=24) and NPMD (n=942) were made with the DSM-IV definitions and confirmed with SCID. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (HAMD), anxiety (HAMA), global severity (CGI-S), suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck), functioning (SOFAS), and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). Using independent t-tests and ?2 tests, we compared clinical characteristics of patients with PMD and NPMD. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors independently associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Results PMD subjects were characterized by a higher rate of inpatient enrollment, and higher scores on many items on BPRS (somatic concern, anxiety, emotional withdrawal, guilt feelings, tension, depression, suspiciousness, hallucination, motor retardation, blunted affect and excitement) global severity (CGI-s), and suicidal ideation (SSI-Beck). The explanatory factor model revealed that high levels of tension, excitement, and suicidal ideation were associated with increased likelihood of PMD. Conclusion Our findings partly support the view that PMD has its own distinctive clinical manifestation and course, and may be considered a diagnostic entity separate from NPMD. PMID:25110501

  14. Neural correlates of gratitude

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Glenn R.; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, and is valued by religions and moral philosophies. It has been established that gratitude leads to benefits for both mental health and interpersonal relationships. It is thus important to elucidate the neurobiological correlates of gratitude, which are only now beginning to be investigated. To this end, we conducted an experiment during which we induced gratitude in participants while they underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. We hypothesized that gratitude ratings would correlate with activity in brain regions associated with moral cognition, value judgment and theory of mind. The stimuli used to elicit gratitude were drawn from stories of survivors of the Holocaust, as many survivors report being sheltered by strangers or receiving lifesaving food and clothing, and having strong feelings of gratitude for such gifts. The participants were asked to place themselves in the context of the Holocaust and imagine what their own experience would feel like if they received such gifts. For each gift, they rated how grateful they felt. The results revealed that ratings of gratitude correlated with brain activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, in support of our hypotheses. The results provide a window into the brain circuitry for moral cognition and positive emotion that accompanies the experience of benefitting from the goodwill of others. PMID:26483740

  15. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  16. Neural correlates of hate.

    PubMed

    Zeki, Semir; Romaya, John Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we address an important but unexplored topic, namely the neural correlates of hate. In a block-design fMRI study, we scanned 17 normal human subjects while they viewed the face of a person they hated and also faces of acquaintances for whom they had neutral feelings. A hate score was obtained for the object of hate for each subject and this was used as a covariate in a between-subject random effects analysis. Viewing a hated face resulted in increased activity in the medial frontal gyrus, right putamen, bilaterally in premotor cortex, in the frontal pole and bilaterally in the medial insula. We also found three areas where activation correlated linearly with the declared level of hatred, the right insula, right premotor cortex and the right fronto-medial gyrus. One area of deactivation was found in the right superior frontal gyrus. The study thus shows that there is a unique pattern of activity in the brain in the context of hate. Though distinct from the pattern of activity that correlates with romantic love, this pattern nevertheless shares two areas with the latter, namely the putamen and the insula. PMID:18958169

  17. No correlation between the diversity and productivity of assemblages: evidence from the phytophage and predator assemblages in various cotton agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Men, XingYuan; Ge, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Biodiversity research has shown that primary productivity increases with plant species number, especially in many experimental grassland systems. Here, we assessed the correlation between productivity and diversity of phytophages and natural enemy assemblages associated with planting date and intercropping in four cotton agroecosystems. Twenty-one pairs of data were used to determine Pearson correlations between species richness, total number of individuals, diversity indices and productivity for each assemblage every five days from 5 June to 15 September 2012. At the same trophic level, the productivity exhibited a significant positive correlation with species richness of the phytophage or predator assemblage. A significant correlation was found between productivity and total number of individuals in most cotton fields. However, no significant correlations were observed between productivity and diversity indices (including indices of energy flow diversity and numerical diversity) in most cotton fields for either the phytophage or the predator assemblages. Species richness of phytophage assemblage and total individual numbers were significantly correlated with primary productivity. Also, species richness of natural enemy assemblage and total number of individuals correlated with phytophage assemblage productivity. A negative but not significant correlation occurred between the indices of numerical diversity and energy flow diversity and lower trophic-level productivity in the cotton-phytophage and phytophage-predator assemblages for most intercropped cotton agroecosystems. Our results clearly showed that there were no correlations between diversity indices and productivity within the same or lower trophic levels within the phytophage and predator assemblages in cotton agroecosystems, and inter-cropped cotton fields had a stronger ability to support the natural enemy assemblage and potentially to reduce phytophages. PMID:25129809

  18. Cluster-cluster correlations and constraints on the correlation hierarchy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Gott, J. R., III

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that galaxies cluster around clusters at least as strongly as they cluster around galaxies imposes constraints on the hierarchy of correlation amplitudes in hierachical clustering models. The distributions which saturate these constraints are the Rayleigh-Levy random walk fractals proposed by Mandelbrot; for these fractal distributions cluster-cluster correlations are all identically equal to galaxy-galaxy correlations. If correlation amplitudes exceed the constraints, as is observed, then cluster-cluster correlations must exceed galaxy-galaxy correlations, as is observed.

  19. Assessment of Communications-related Admissions Criteria in a Three-year Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Tejada, Frederick R.; Lang, Lynn A.; Purnell, Miriam; Acedera, Lisa; Ngonga, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine if there is a correlation between TOEFL and other admissions criteria that assess communications skills (ie, PCAT variables: verbal, reading, essay, and composite), interview, and observational scores and to evaluate TOEFL and these admissions criteria as predictors of academic performance. Methods. Statistical analyses included two sample t tests, multiple regression and Pearson’s correlations for parametric variables, and Mann-Whitney U for nonparametric variables, which were conducted on the retrospective data of 162 students, 57 of whom were foreign-born. Results. The multiple regression model of the other admissions criteria on TOEFL was significant. There was no significant correlation between TOEFL scores and academic performance. However, significant correlations were found between the other admissions criteria and academic performance. Conclusion. Since TOEFL is not a significant predictor of either communication skills or academic success of foreign-born PharmD students in the program, it may be eliminated as an admissions criterion. PMID:26430273

  20. Alcoholism and Strongyloides stercoralis: Daily Ethanol Ingestion Has a Positive Correlation with the Frequency of Strongyloides Larvae in the Stools

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Carla Couzi; da Penha Zago-Gomes, Maria; Gonçalves, Carlos Sandoval; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima

    2010-01-01

    Background Significantly higher prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis has been reported in chronic alcoholic patients. The aim of this investigation was to report the prevalence of Strongyloides larvae in stools of chronic alcoholic patients with known daily ethanol intake. Methods From January 2001 through December 2003 the results of fecal examinations and the daily ethanol intake were retrieved from the records of 263 chronic alcoholic and from 590 non-alcoholic male patients that sought health care at the outpatients unit of the University Hospital C A Moraes. Alcoholic patients were separated into four groups, with 150g intervals between the groups according to the daily ethanol intake. Results (a) The frequency of Strongyloides was significantly higher in alcoholic patients than in control group (overall prevalence in alcoholic 20.5% versus 4.4% in control group; p?=?0.001). Even in the group with a daily intake of ethanol equal to or less than 150g the prevalence was higher than in control group, although non significant (9.5%, versus 4.4% in control group; p?=?0,071); (b) the prevalence of Strongyloides in alcoholic patients rises with the increase of ethanol intake (Pearson's Correlation Coefficient?=?0.956; p?=?0.022), even in patients without liver cirrhosis (Pearson's Correlation Coefficient?=?0.927; p?=?0.037). Conclusion These results confirm and reinforce the hypothesis that chronic alcoholism is associated with Strongyloides infection, which is in direct relationship with the severity of alcoholism, independently of the presence of liver cirrhosis. PMID:20582163

  1. Protease Activated Receptors 1 and 2 Correlate Differently with Breast Cancer Aggressiveness Depending on Tumor ER Status

    PubMed Central

    Lidfeldt, Jon; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Forsare, Carina; Malmström, Per; Fernö, Mårten; Belting, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Experimental models implicate protease activated receptors (PARs) as important sensors of the proteolytic tumor microenvironment during breast cancer development. However, the role of the major PARs, PAR-1 and PAR-2, in human breast tumors remains to be elucidated. Here, we have investigated how PAR-1 and PAR-2 protein expression correlate with established clinicopathological variables and patient outcome in a well-characterized cohort of 221 breast cancer patients. Univariable and multivariable hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by the Cox proportional hazards model, distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival by the Kaplan–Meier method, and survival in different strata was determined by the log-rank test. Associations between PARs and clinicopathological variables were analyzed using Pearson’s ?2-test. We find that PAR-2 associates with DDFS (HR = 3.1, P = 0.003), whereas no such association was found with PAR-1 (HR = 1.2, P = 0.6). Interestingly, the effect of PAR-2 was confined to the ER-positive sub-group (HR = 5.5, P = 0.003 vs. HR = 1.2 in ER-negative; P = 0.045 for differential effect), and PAR-2 was an independent prognostic factor specifically in ER-positive tumors (HR = 3.9, P = 0.045). On the contrary, PAR-1 correlated with worse prognosis specifically in the ER-negative group (HR = 2.6, P = 0.069 vs. HR = 0.5, P = 0.19 in ER-positive; P = 0.026 for differential effect). This study provides novel insight into the respective roles of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in human breast cancer and suggests a hitherto unknown association between PARs and ER signaling that warrants further investigation. PMID:26244666

  2. Correlation Analysis between Tibet AS-? TeV Cosmic Ray and WMAP Nine-year Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qian-Qing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-08-01

    The WMAP team subtracted template-based foreground models to produce foreground-reduced maps, and masked point sources and uncertain sky regions directly; however, whether foreground residuals exist in the WMAP foreground-reduced maps is still an open question. Here, we use Pearson correlation coefficient analysis with AS-? TeV cosmic ray (CR) data to probe possible foreground residuals in the WMAP nine-year data. The correlation results between the CR and foreground-contained maps (WMAP foreground-unreduced maps, WMAP template-based, and Maximum Entropy Method foreground models) suggest that: (1) CRs can trace foregrounds in the WMAP data; (2) at least some TeV CRs originate from the Milky Way; (3) foregrounds may be related to the existence of CR anisotropy (loss-cone and tail-in structures); (4) there exist differences among different types of foregrounds in the decl. range of <15°. Then, we generate 10,000 mock cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps to describe the cosmic variance, which is used to measure the effect of the fluctuations of all possible CMB maps to the correlations between CR and CMB maps. Finally, we do correlation analysis between the CR and WMAP foreground-reduced maps, and find that: (1) there are significant anticorrelations; and (2) the WMAP foreground-reduced maps are credible. However, the significant anticorrelations may be accidental, and the higher signal-to-noise ratio Planck SMICA map cannot reject the hypothesis of accidental correlations. We therefore can only conclude that the foreground residuals exist with ?95% probability.

  3. Are secular correlations between sunspots, geomagnetic activity, and global temperature significant?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Mursula, K.; Tsai, V.C.; Perkins, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have led to speculation that solar-terrestrial interaction, measured by sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, has played an important role in global temperature change over the past century or so. We treat this possibility as an hypothesis for testing. We examine the statistical significance of cross-correlations between sunspot number, geomagnetic activity, and global surface temperature for the years 1868-2008, solar cycles 11-23. The data contain substantial autocorrelation and nonstationarity, properties that are incompatible with standard measures of cross-correlational significance, but which can be largely removed by averaging over solar cycles and first-difference detrending. Treated data show an expected statistically- significant correlation between sunspot number and geomagnetic activity, Pearson p < 10-4, but correlations between global temperature and sunspot number (geomagnetic activity) are not significant, p = 0.9954, (p = 0.8171). In other words, straightforward analysis does not support widely-cited suggestions that these data record a prominent role for solar-terrestrial interaction in global climate change. With respect to the sunspot-number, geomagnetic-activity, and global-temperature data, three alternative hypotheses remain difficult to reject: (1) the role of solar-terrestrial interaction in recent climate change is contained wholly in long-term trends and not in any shorter-term secular variation, or, (2) an anthropogenic signal is hiding correlation between solar-terrestrial variables and global temperature, or, (3) the null hypothesis, recent climate change has not been influenced by solar-terrestrial interaction. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Impact and correlation of environmental conditions on pollen counts in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Perveen, Anjum; Khan, Muneeba; Zeb, Shaista; Imam, Asif Ali

    2015-02-01

    A quantitative and qualitative survey of airborne pollen was performed in the city of Karachi, and the pollen counts were correlated with different climatic conditions. The aim of the study was to determine the possible effect of meteorological factors on airborne pollen distribution in the atmosphere of Karachi city. Pollen sampling was carried out by using Burkard spore Trap for the period of August 2009 to July 2010, and a total of 2,922 pollen grains/m(3) were recorded. In this survey, 22 pollen types were recognized. The highest pollen count was contributed by Poaceae pollen type (1,242 pollen grains/m(3)) followed by Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae (948 pollen grains/m(3)), Cyperus rotundus (195 pollen grains/m(3)) and Prosopis juliflora (169 pollen grains/m(3)). Peak pollen season was in August showing a total of 709 pollen grains/m(3) and lowest pollen count was observed in January-2010. Pearson's chi-square test was performed for the possible correlation of pollen counts and climatic factors. The test revealed significant positive correlation of wind speed with pollen types of Amaranthaceae/Chenopodiaceae; Brassica campestris; Asteraceae; and Thuja orientalis. While the correlation of "average temperature" showed significant positive value with Asteraceae and Tamarix indica pollen types. Negative correlation was observed between humidity/ precipitation and pollen types of Brassica campestris; Daucus carota; Ephedra sp.; and Tamarix indica. In the light of above updated data one could identify various aeroallergens present in the air of Karachi city. PMID:25530143

  5. Quantum Correlations in Dimers

    E-print Network

    N. Doustimotlagh

    2015-03-19

    It has been proven that the quantum discord is a more general tool to capture non-classical correlation than quantum entanglement, because there is a non-zero quantum discord in several mixed states that could not be measured by quantum entanglement. But because of optimization part in formulating quantum discord, it is very difficult and nearly impossible to find quantum discord for some quantum states. So people proposed geometric quantum discord, which in a bipartite state could be describe as the distance of the states from the closest zero-discord state. To understand better geometric quantum discord, this paper is devoted to compare it with quantum discord and measurement induced non-locality that is in some sense dual to the geometric quantum discord. As studying the quantum correlation experimentally is one of the important thing in quantum information processing, so as our example for illustrating the difference of geometric quantum discord, quantum discord and measurement induced non-locality, our quantum system is a dimer (two spin-1/2 particles) in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  6. Adaptive pattern recognition correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Joseph

    1997-10-01

    Optical pattern recognition is significantly improved by exploiting the attributes of both optics and electronics in architectures containing combinations of optical systems and electronic processors. Essential interfaces for such hybrid systems are spatial light modulators and optoelectronic recording devices. These devices suffer from technological limitations that must be alleviated by suitably designed optical architectures and efficient processing algorithms. We review several correlator architectures and discuss their adaptability to hybrid systems. Due to the computational complexity encountered in such hybrid electro-optical systems, iterative optimization methods can be efficiently employed. Some of the algorithms presented are especially useful for treating real physical systems having properties that cannot be exactly defined or quantified. Algorithms that were successful in these architectures belong to two families, the basically stochastic algorithms and the projection-onto-constraint-sets algorithms. The former is particularly suitable for applications in hybrid electro- optical learning systems, while the latter is extremely powerful for the design of spatial filters with properties that are difficult to achieve by other means. A case study is given of an adaptive correlator for rotation-, scale-, and shift-invariant pattern recognition.

  7. Horizontal Correlation Analysis on Exponentiation

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Horizontal Correlation Analysis on Exponentiation Christophe Clavier1 , Benoit Feix2 , Georges such as the correlation factor on several segments extracted from a single execution curve of a known message RSA

  8. Magnitude correlations in global seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarlis, N. V.

    2011-08-15

    By employing natural time analysis, we analyze the worldwide seismicity and study the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We find that global seismicity exhibits nontrivial magnitude correlations for earthquake magnitudes greater than M{sub w}6.5.

  9. Correlations in coherent multiple scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, Richard; Feng, Shechao

    1994-03-01

    We present details of calculations and a comprehensive review on the various correlation functions for coherent electronic or classical wave transmission through a disordered scattering medium, in the diffusive limit ? ? l? ? L?, where ? is the wavelength, l? is the transport mean free path, and L? is the phase coherence length. The connection between mesoscopic conductance fluctuations in disordered metals and speckle pattern fluctuations for classical waves is reviewed. The short-range correlation function C(1) is shown to be responsible for the conventional speckle pattern fluctuations and the so called “memory effect”. The long-range correlation function C(2) is shown to dominate in the correlations and fluctuations of the total transmission coefficient. The “infinite range” background correlation function C(3) is shown to be related to the universal conductance fluctuations in disordered mesoscopic conductors. We also discuss many generalized correlation functions such as those for frequency correlations, spatial correlations, correlations in Fabry-Perot interferometer devices, and in reflection geometries. A special kind of correlation function, corresponding to the sensitivity of speckle pattern intensities to the motion of impurities, will also be reviewed. Finally, the equivalence between the angular correlation functions and the auto-correlation functions in “diffusing wave spectroscopy” will be discussed.

  10. Canonical Correlation: Terms and Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Richard C.; Hu, Yuehluen

    The use of terms to describe and interpret results from canonical correlation analysis has been inconsistent across research studies. This study assembled the terminology related to the use and interpretation of canonical correlation analysis from research articles, textbooks, and computer manuals. Research articles using canonical correlation

  11. Lack of correlation between microbial penetration method and electro chemical technique for assessment of leakage through the root canal fillings

    PubMed Central

    Kazemipoor, Maryam; Modaresi, Jalil; Zandi, Hengameh; Vasee, Narges; Farzaneh, Vaziri

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare microbial penetration method and electrochemical technique for evaluation of the apical seal. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 teeth were prepared using the step-back technique to ISO size 40 master apical files. The specimens were randomly divided into an experimental group, two positive and two negative controls. Root canals in the experimental and negative control group were filled with gutta-percha (GP) and sealer, using lateral condensation technique. In the positive control group, canals were filled with GP without any sealer. The external surface of each tooth was coated with two layers of the nail varnish, except for the access opening and the apical foramen. In the negative control group, the teeth were completely covered with nail varnish. The apical seal was recorded with two methods, each successively used on the same teeth: An electrochemical method and a bacterial penetration method. Statistical Analysis Used: The correlation of the electro chemical readings with the results obtained from bacterial micro leakage test was evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: Correlation coefficient of the measurements obtained from the two evaluation methods, was 0.23 (r = 0.23), so the correlation was not statistically significant (P = 0.275). Conclusions: This study shows that several studies by different methods are necessary before evaluation of the marginal leakage. PMID:24808699

  12. White matter volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia: a VBM-DARTEL study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang-Won; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the white matter (WM) volume change and its correlation with symptom severity in patients with schizophrenia using voxel-based morphometry. A total of 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. MR image data were processed using SPM8 software with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through an exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm. The patients with schizophrenia showed significant decreases (P=0.042) in the WM volumes of the temporal lobe and superior frontal gyrus compared with the healthy controls. The WM volumes of the middle temporal gyrus were negatively correlated with the scores of both the Positive Subscale (Pearson's ?=-0.68, P=0.001) and the Negative Subscale (?=-0.71, P=0.0005) in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. In addition, the scores of the General Psychopathology Subscale were negatively correlated with the WM volumes of the superior frontal gyrus (?=-0.68, P=0.0009). This study evaluated the WM volume of patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls using DARTEI-based voxel-based morphometry and also assessed the correlation of the localized WM volume changes with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. These findings will be useful to understand the neuropathology associated with WM abnormality in schizophrenia. PMID:26485094

  13. Phenotypic correlations between ovum pick-up in vitro production traits and pregnancy rates in Zebu cows.

    PubMed

    Vega, W H O; Quirino, C R; Serapião, R V; Oliveira, C S; Pacheco, A

    2015-01-01

    The growth of the Gyr breed in Brazil in terms of genetic gain for milk, along with conditions for market, has led to the use of ovum pick-up in vitro production (OPU-IVP) as a leader in biotechnology for the multiplication of genetic material. The aim of this study was to investigate phenotypic correlations between OPU-IVP-linked characteristics and pregnancy rates registered in an embryo transfer program using Gyr cows as oocyte donors. Data collected from 211 OPU sessions and 298 embryo transfers during the years 2012 and 2013 were analyzed and statistical analysis was performed. Estimates of simple Pearson correlations were calculated for NVcoc and PVcoc (number and proportion of viable cumulus-oocyte complexes, respectively); NcleavD4 and PcleavD4 (number and proportion of cleaved embryos on day 4 of culture, respectively); NTembD7 and PTembD7 (number and proportion of transferable embryos on day 7 of culture, respectively); NPrD30 and PPrD30 (number and proportion of pregnancies 30 days after transfer, respectively); and NPrD60 and PPrD60 (number and proportion of pregnancies 60 days after transfer, respectively). Moderate to moderately high correlations were found for all numerical characteristics, suggesting these as the most suitable parameters for selection of oocyte donors in Gyr programs. NVcoc is proposed as a selection trait due to positive correlations with percentage traits and pregnancy rates 30 and 60 days after transfer. PMID:26214412

  14. PREFACE: Correlated Electrons (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Kazumasa

    2007-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter is dedicated to results in the field of strongly correlated electron systems under multiple-environment. The physics of strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) has attracted much attention since the discovery of superconductivity in CeCu_2 Si_2 by Steglich and his co-workers a quater-century ago. Its interest has been intensified by the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in a series of cuprates with layered perovskite structure which are still under active debate. The present issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter present some aspects of SCES physics on the basis of activities of a late project "Centre-Of-Excellence" supported by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Sports, Science, Culture and Technology of the Japanese Government). This project has been performed by a condensed matter physics group in the faculties of science and engineering science of Osaka University. Although this project also covers correlated phenomena in optics and nano-scale systems, we focus here on the issues of SCES related to superconductivity, mainly unconventional. The present issue covers the discussions on a new mechanism of superconductivity with electronic origin (critical valence fluctuation mechanism), interplay and unification of magnetism and superconductivity in SCES based on a systematic study of NQR under pressure, varieties of Fermi surface of Ce- and U-based SCES probed by the de Haas-van Alphen effect, electronic states probed by a bulk sensitive photoemission spectroscopy with soft X-ray, pressure induced superconductivity of heavy electron materials, pressure dependence of superconducting transition temperature based on a first-principle calculation, and new superconductors under very high-pressure. Some papers offer readers' reviews of the relevant fields and/or include new developments of this intriguing research field of SCES. Altogether, the papers within this issue outline some aspects of electronic states and superconductivity of SCES and related research fields, and the prospects of SCES physics. I hope that it will give an insight into the fascination of SCES research and a feeling for the advances made in the past years.

  15. Clinicopathological correlates of hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder with potential complications on the skeletal, renal, neurocognitive and cardiovascular systems. While most cases (95%) occur sporadically, about 5% are associated with a hereditary syndrome: multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes (MEN-1, MEN-2A, MEN-4), hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT), familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH-1, FHH-2, FHH-3), familial hypercalciuric hypercalcaemia, neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism and isolated familial hyperparathyroidism. Recently, molecular mechanisms underlying possible tumour suppressor genes (MEN1, CDC73/HRPT2, CDKIs, APC, SFRPs, GSK3?, RASSF1A, HIC1, RIZ1, WT1, CaSR, GNA11, AP2S1) and proto-oncogenes (CCND1/PRAD1, RET, ZFX, CTNNB1, EZH2) have been uncovered in the pathogenesis of hyperparathyroidism. While bi-allelic inactivation of CDC73/HRPT2 seems unique to parathyroid malignancy, aberrant activation of cyclin D1 and Wnt/?-catenin signalling has been reported in benign and malignant parathyroid tumours. Clinicopathological correlates of primary hyperparathyroidism include parathyroid adenoma (80-85%), hyperplasia (10-15%) and carcinoma (<1-5%). Secondary hyperparathyroidism generally presents with diffuse parathyroid hyperplasia, whereas tertiary hyperparathyroidism reflects the emergence of autonomous parathyroid hormone (PTH)-producing neoplasm(s) from secondary parathyroid hyperplasia. Surgical resection of abnormal parathyroid tissue remains the only curative treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism, and parathyroidectomy specimens are frequently encountered in this setting. Clinical and biochemical features, including intraoperative PTH levels, number, weight and size of the affected parathyroid gland(s), are crucial parameters to consider when rendering an accurate diagnosis of parathyroid proliferations. This review provides an update on the expanding knowledge of hyperparathyroidism and highlights the clinicopathological correlations of this prevalent disease. PMID:26163537

  16. Direct measure of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang-shui; Zhao, Haiqing

    2011-12-15

    The quantumness of the correlation known as quantum correlation is usually measured by quantum discord. So far various quantum discords can be roughly understood as indirect measure by some special discrepancy of two quantities. We present a direct measure of quantum correlation by revealing the difference between the structures of classically and quantum correlated states. Our measure explicitly includes the contributions of the inseparability and local nonorthogonality of the eigenvectors of a density matrix. Besides its relatively easy computability, our measure can provide a unified understanding of quantum correlation of all the present versions.

  17. Beyond Weber's Law: A Second Look at Ranking Visualizations of Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kay, Matthew; Heer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Models of human perception - including perceptual "laws" - can be valuable tools for deriving visualization design recommendations. However, it is important to assess the explanatory power of such models when using them to inform design. We present a secondary analysis of data previously used to rank the effectiveness of bivariate visualizations for assessing correlation (measured with Pearson's r) according to the well-known Weber-Fechner Law. Beginning with the model of Harrison et al. [1], we present a sequence of refinements including incorporation of individual differences, log transformation, censored regression, and adoption of Bayesian statistics. Our model incorporates all observations dropped from the original analysis, including data near ceilings caused by the data collection process and entire visualizations dropped due to large numbers of observations worse than chance. This model deviates from Weber's Law, but provides improved predictive accuracy and generalization. Using Bayesian credibility intervals, we derive a partial ranking that groups visualizations with similar performance, and we give precise estimates of the difference in performance between these groups. We find that compared to other visualizations, scatterplots are unique in combining low variance between individuals and high precision on both positively- and negatively-correlated data. We conclude with a discussion of the value of data sharing and replication, and share implications for modeling similar experimental data. PMID:26390485

  18. Allowing for Correlations between Correlations in Random-Effects Meta-Analysis of Correlation Matrices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevost, A. Toby; Mason, Dan; Griffin, Simon; Kinmonth, Ann-Louise; Sutton, Stephen; Spiegelhalter, David

    2007-01-01

    Practical meta-analysis of correlation matrices generally ignores covariances (and hence correlations) between correlation estimates. The authors consider various methods for allowing for covariances, including generalized least squares, maximum marginal likelihood, and Bayesian approaches, illustrated using a 6-dimensional response in a series of…

  19. Analysis of delay correlation matrices

    E-print Network

    K. B. K. Mayya; R. E. Amritkar

    2006-01-13

    We construct and analyze symmetrized delay correlation matrices for empirical data sets for atmopheric and financial data to derive information about correlation between different entities of the time series over time. The information about correlations is obtained by comparing the results for the eigenvalue distribution with the analytical results for the independent, identically distributed random data sets. For the atmospheric case we find long term correlations between different entities of the multivariable time series. For the financial time series we find little correlations between different entities over a time delay beyond about two days. Most of the eigenvalues for the symmetrized delay correlation matrices for the financial data are symmetrically distributed about zero. The delay correlation results for the financial data are similar to the analytical results for the random data sets. However there are considerable deviations for the atmospheric data from the random case.

  20. More Voodoo correlations: when average-based measures inflate correlations.

    PubMed

    Brand, Andrew; Bradley, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo simulation was conducted to assess the extent that a correlation estimate can be inflated when an average-based measure is used in a commonly employed correlational design. The results from the simulation reveal that the inflation of the correlation estimate can be substantial, up to 76%. Additionally, data was re-analyzed from two previously published studies to determine the extent that the correlation estimate was inflated due to the use of an averaged based measure. The re-analyses reveal that correlation estimates had been inflated by just over 50% in both studies. Although these findings are disconcerting, we are somewhat comforted by the fact that there is a simple and easy analysis that can be employed to prevent the inflation of the correlation estimate that we have simulated and observed. PMID:24837177

  1. Correlations of correlations: Secondary autocorrelations in finite harmonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyukhin, Dan; Plyukhin, Alex V.

    2015-10-01

    The momentum or velocity autocorrelation function C (t ) for a tagged oscillator in a finite harmonic system decays like that of an infinite system for short times, but exhibits erratic behavior at longer time scales. We introduce the autocorrelation function of the long-time noisy tail of C (t ) ("a correlation of the correlation"), which characterizes the distribution of recurrence times. Remarkably, for harmonic systems with same-mass particles this secondary correlation may coincide with the primary correlation C (t ) (when both functions are normalized) either exactly, or over a significant initial time interval. When the tagged particle is heavier than the rest, the equality does not hold, correlations show nonrandom long-time scale pattern, and higher-order correlations converge to the lowest normal mode.

  2. Correlations between corneal and optic nerve head variables in healthy subjects and patients with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Jañez, Luis; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Berrozpe-Villabona, Clara; Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose Maria; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Garcia-Sanchez, Julian; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To correlate corneal variables (determined using the Pentacam) with optic nerve head (ONH) variables determined using the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) in healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Measurements were made in 75 healthy eyes and 73 eyes with POAG and correlations examined through Pearson correlation coefficients between the two sets of variables in the two subject groups. The corneal variables determined were corneal volume (CVol), central corneal thickness (CCT), overall corneal thickness (OvCT), the mean thickness of a circular zone centered at the corneal apex of 1 mm radius (zone I) and the mean thickness of several concentric rings, also centered at the apex until the limbus, each of 1 mm width (zones II to VI respectively). The ONH variables were determined using the HRT. RESULTS The following pairs of variables were correlated in the control group: CCT-disc area (DAr) (-0.48; P<0.0001), Zone I-DAr (-0.503; P<0.0001) and Zone II-DAr (-0.443; P<0.0001); and in the POAG group: CCT-cup-to-disc area ratio (CDRa) (-0.402; P<0.0001), Zone I-CDRa (-0.418; P<0.0001), Zone II-CDRa (-0.405; P=0.006), Zone I-cup shape measure (CSM) (-0.415; P=0.002), Zone II-CSM (-0.405; P=0.001), Zone IV-height variation contour (HVC) (0.378; P=0.002); Zone V-HVC (0.388, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In the healthy subjects, significant negative correlation was detected between central and paracentral corneal thickness and optic disc area. In contrast, the POAG patients showed significant negative correlation between central and paracentral corneal thickness and the cup-disc ratio and CSM, and positive correlation between peripheral corneal thickness and HVC. PMID:26682165

  3. Prevalence and Correlates of School Bullying Victimization in Xi'an, China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuhong; Chan, Ko Ling

    2015-01-01

    This study used the data from a representative sample to estimate the prevalence of child bullying victimization in Xi'an, China. Data on social demographic information and the experiences of different types of bullying victimization were collected from a randomly selected sample with 3,175 middle school students aged 15-17 years by self-administrated questionnaires. t Test, ?2 test, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to test group differences and examine the correlates of bullying victimization. Results show that 54.9% and 44.6% of Chinese children have been bullied in a lifetime and in the preceding year, respectively. Correlates for direct and relational bullying victimization includes male participants, father's lower education level, father's unemployment, having one or more siblings, smoking, depression, borderline personality trait, posttraumatic stress disorder, and from rural schools. Overall, the prevalence of child bullying victimization in China is substantial. The multiple correlates suggest prevention and intervention of bullying victimization in a holistic and comprehensive way. PMID:26159148

  4. Characterization of spatiotemporally complex gait patterns using cross-correlation signatures.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiwon; Dankowicz, Harry; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2012-05-01

    We hypothesize that spatiotemporal joint coupling patterns during gait are closely associated with musculoskeletal injury mechanics. Previous studies examining joint coupling, have primarily focused on coupling between single pairs of neighboring body segments or joints; thus falling short of characterizing the full spatiotemporal complexity across the entire gait apparatus. This study proposes the reliance on properties of the temporal cross-correlation of distinct joint variables as a means to characterize and detect differences in multiple segmental coupling pairs and to quantify how these couplings change between different gait conditions or test groups. In particular, for each subject, a characteristic diagram array is obtained whose entries include the maximum values of the cross-correlation between all pairs of joint variables as well as the associated phase shifts at which these maxima are recorded. Paired t-tests are then used to highlight significant differences in the corresponding entries between two gait conditions. In the present study, this technique was applied to angular displacement and velocity histories across 12 lower extremity joint variables, for healthy subjects with and without a brace on the right knee. As expected, the statistical analysis indicated that the temporal cross-correlations associated with the right knee-angle variables differed the most between the two gait conditions. In addition, significant differences (p<0.01) were found in the coupling between other pairs of joint variables, establishing a characteristic spatiotemporal signature for the changes from normative gait that result from reduced mobility at the knee. PMID:22390962

  5. Correlation of neurocognitive function and brain parenchyma volumes in children surviving cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; White, Holly A.; Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2002-04-01

    This research builds on our hypothesis that white matter damage and associated neurocognitive symptoms, in children treated for cancer with cranial spinal irradiation, spans a continuum of severity that can be reliably probed using non-invasive MR technology. Quantitative volumetric assessments of MR imaging and psychological assessments were obtained in 40 long-term survivors of malignant brain tumors treated with cranial irradiation. Neurocognitive assessments included a test of intellect (Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), attention (Conner's Continuous Performance Test), and memory (California Verbal Learning Test). One-sample t-tests were conducted to evaluate test performance of survivors against age-adjusted scores from the test norms; these analyses revealed significant impairments in all apriori selected measures of intelligence, attention, and memory. Partial correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationships between brain tissues volumes (normal appearing white matter (NAWM), gray matter, and CSF) and neurocognitive function. Global intelligence (r = 0.32, p = 0.05) and global attentional (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) were significantly positively correlated with NAWM volumes, whereas global memory was significantly positively correlated with overall brain parenchyma (r = 0.38, p = 0.04). We conclude that quantitative assessment of MR examinations in survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial irradiation reveal that loss of NAWM is associated with decreased intellectual and attentional deficits, whereas overall parenchyma loss, as reflected by increased CSF and decreased white matter, is associated with memory-related deficits.

  6. Is there a correlation between intravaginal ejaculatory latency time and enuresis? An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Serefoglu, Ege Can; Karacay, Safak; Ozdemir, Ahmet Tunc; Kalkan, Mehmet; Yencilek, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual dysfunction. Monosymptomatic enuresis (ME) is nocturnal bed wetting, without any daytime symptoms. Recent clinical studies report an association between lifelong PE and ME. The purpose of this study was to compare the intravaginal ejaculatory time (IELT) between lifelong PE in men with and without ME. The goal was to determine if there is an association between the severity of ME and of IELT. Material and methods A total of 137 men with lifelong PE were included in this study. Subjects were asked if they had childhood ME. The characteristics and mean IELTs of patients with and without ME were compared using the student's t–test, and the correlation between severity of ME and IELT was assessed with trend test. Results Of the 137 lifelong PE patients, 57 reported ME. There was a strong negative correlation in patients with ME between the severity of enuresis and IELT, with IELT being shorter in patients with severe ME. Conclusions A strong correlation between IELT and the severity of ME suggests a common underlying mechanism. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and elucidate the exact pathophysiology. PMID:24982787

  7. Correlation analysis of clinical parameters with epigenetic modifications in the DUX4 promoter in FSHD.

    PubMed

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E; de Greef, Jessica C; Shah, Bharati; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Yokomori, Kyoko; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of our study was to identify relationships between epigenetic parameters correlating with a relaxed chromatin state of the DUX4 promoter region and clinical severity as measured by a clinical severity score or muscle pathologic changes in D4Z4 contraction-dependent (FSHD1) and -independent (FSHD2) facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patients. Twenty primary fibroblast (5 control, 10 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) and 26 primary myoblast (9 control, 12 FSHD1 and 5 FSHD2) cultures originating from patients with FSHD and controls were analyzed. Histone modification levels were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We examined correlations between the chromatin compaction score (ChCS) defined by the H3K9me3:H3K4me2 ratio and an age corrected clinical severity score (CSS) or muscle pathology score (MPS). Possible relationships were investigated using linear regression analysis and significance was tested by Pearson's product-moment coefficient.   We found a significant difference of the ChCS between controls and patients with FSHD1 and between controls and patients with FSHD2. Tissue specific differences in ChCS were also observed. We also found a near-significant relationship between ChCS and the age corrected CSS in fibroblasts but not in myoblasts. Surprisingly, we found a strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS. Our results confirm the D4Z4 chromatin relaxation previously shown to be associated with FSHD in a small number of samples. A possible relationship between clinical and epigenetic parameters could be established in patient fibroblasts, but not in myoblasts. The strong correlation between the MPS of the vastus lateralis and the CSS suggests that this muscle can be used to study for surrogate markers of overall disease severity. PMID:22522912

  8. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PMID:25314367

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum levels correlate with cognitive performance in Parkinson’s disease patients with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alberto; Peppe, Antonella; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Zabberoni, Silvia; Scalici, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Angelucci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a trophic factor regulating cell survival and synaptic plasticity. Recent findings indicate that BDNF could be a potential regulatory factor for cognitive functioning in normal and/or neuropathological conditions. With regard to neurological disorders, recent data suggest that individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) may be affected by cognitive deficits and that they have altered BDNF production. Therefore, the hypothesis can be advanced that BDNF levels are associated with the cognitive state of these patients. With this in mind, the present study was aimed at exploring the relationship between BDNF serum levels and cognitive functioning in PD patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Thirteen PD patients with MCI were included in the study. They were administered an extensive neuropsychological test battery that investigated executive, episodic memory, attention, visual-spatial and language domains. A single score was obtained for each cognitive domain by averaging z-scores on tests belonging to that specific domain. BDNF serum levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed between BDNF serum levels and cognitive performance. Results showed a significant positive correlation between BDNF serum levels and both attention (p < 0.05) and executive (p < 0.05) domains. Moreover, in the executive domain we found a significant correlation between BDNF levels and scores on tests assessing working memory and self-monitoring/inhibition. These preliminary data suggest that BDNF serum levels are associated with cognitive state in PD patients with MCI. Given the role of BDNF in regulating synaptic plasticity, the present findings give further support to the hypothesis that this trophic factor may be a potential biomarker for evaluating cognitive changes in PD and other neurological syndromes associated with cognitive decline. PMID:26441580

  10. Momentum Correlations for Identical Fermions

    E-print Network

    Z. Yang; X. Sun; Y. Gao; S. Chen; J. Cheng

    2005-11-14

    The effects of intensity interferometry (HBT), which are mainly reflected by the measured momentum correlations, have been fully discussed since 1950's. The analogous momentum correlations between identical fermions are however less argued. Besides the fermion statistics, the momentum correlations between identical fermions are also determined by some other aspects, such as coulomb interaction, spin interactions and resonances formation. In this paper, we discussed the factors that influence the momentum correlations between $\\Lambda$'s, especially spin interaction. It is also argued that the momentum correlations between $\\Lambda$'s are affected significantly by the yield ratio of $\\Sigma^0/\\Lambda$, due to the limitation of experimental measurement. The mixture of $\\Sigma^0$'s and $\\Lambda$s would significantly weaken the measured two-particle momentum correlations of $\\Lambda$'s.

  11. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    E-print Network

    Ord, S M; Emrich, D; Pallot, D; Wayth, R B; Clark, M A; Tremblay, S E; Arcus, W; Barnes, D; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bhat, N D R; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A A; deSouza, L; Ewell-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Hindson, L; Hurley-Walker, H; Jacobs, D; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Kudryavtseva, N; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Pathikulangara, J; Pindor, B; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Remillard, R A; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2015-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio--astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia (WA). The MWA consists of 4096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and others by Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 TFLOPS (Tera FLoating point Operations Per Second). The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB/day of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper we outline the correlator design, signal path, and proce...

  12. SAW correlator spread spectrum receiver

    DOEpatents

    Brocato, Robert W

    2014-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlator spread-spectrum (SS) receiver is disclosed which utilizes a first demodulation stage with a chip length n and a second demodulation stage with a chip length m to decode a transmitted SS signal having a code length l=n.times.m which can be very long (e.g. up to 2000 chips or more). The first demodulation stage utilizes a pair of SAW correlators which demodulate the SS signal to generate an appropriate code sequence at an intermediate frequency which can then be fed into the second demodulation stage which can be formed from another SAW correlator, or by a digital correlator. A compound SAW correlator comprising two input transducers and a single output transducer is also disclosed which can be used to form the SAW correlator SS receiver, or for use in processing long code length signals.

  13. Strong correlations between incoherent vortices.

    PubMed

    Jesus-Silva, A J; Hickmann, J M; Fonseca, E J S

    2012-08-27

    We establish a correlation rule of which the value of the topological charge obtained in intensity correlation between two coherence vortices is such that this value is bounded by the topological charge of each coherence vortex. The original phase information is scrambled in each speckle pattern and unveiled using numerical intensity correlation. According to this rule, it is also possible to obtain a coherence vortex stable, an integer vortex, even when each incoherent vortex beam is instable, non-integer vortex. PMID:23037023

  14. Medial thalamic 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock correlates with subsequent learned helpless behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione,M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Schulz, D.; Dewey, S.L.; Henn, F.A.

    2009-12-06

    The learned helplessness paradigm has been repeatedly shown to correlate with neurobiological aspects of depression in humans. In this model, rodents are exposed inescapable foot-shock in order to reveal susceptibility to escape deficit, defined as 'learned helplessness' (LH). Few methods are available to probe the neurobiological aspects underlying the differences in susceptibility in the living animal, thus far being limited to studies examining regional neurochemical changes with microdialysis. With the widespread implementation of small animal neuroimaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), it is now possible to explore the living brain on a systems level to define regional changes that may correlate with vulnerability to stress. In this study, 12 wild type Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 minutes of inescapable foot-shock followed by metabolic imaging using 2-deoxy-2[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) 1 hour later. The escape test was performed on these rats 48 hours later (to accommodate radiotracer decay), where they were given the opportunity to press a lever to shut off the shock. A region of interest (ROI) analysis was used to investigate potential correlations (Pearson Regression Coefficients) between regional 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock and subsequent learned helpless behavior (time to finish the test; number of successful lever presses within 20 seconds of shock onset). ROI analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between time to finish and 18-FDG uptake, and a negative correlation between lever presses and uptake, in the medial thalamic area (p=0.033, p=0.036). This ROI included the paraventricular thalamus, mediodorsal thalamus, and the habenula. In an effort to account for possible spillover artifact, the posterior thalamic area (including ventral medial and lateral portions) was also evaluated but did not reveal significant correlations (p=0.870, p=0.897). No other significant correlations were found in additional regions analyzed including the nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, substantia nigra, and amygdala. These data suggest that medial thalamic 18-FDG uptake during inescapable shock may contribute to subsequent escape deficits, and are not confounded by shock effects per se, since all animals received the same treatment prior to scanning. We have previously explored 18-FDG differences following the escape test session which also showed hyperactivity in the medial thalamus of learned helpless animals compared to non-learned helpless, and included additional cortical-limbic changes. Given the neuroanatomical connections between the medial thalamus (and habenula) with the prefrontal cortex and monoaminergic brain stem, one possible speculation is that abnormal neuronal activity in these areas during stress may set in motion circuitry changes that correlate with learned helpless behavior.

  15. Photon correlations in multimode waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Poem, Eilon; Silberberg, Yaron

    2011-10-15

    We consider the propagation of classical and nonclassical light in multimode optical waveguides. We focus on the evolution of the few-photon correlation functions, which, much as the light-intensity distribution in such systems, evolve in a periodic manner, culminating in the ''revival'' of the initial correlation pattern at the end of each period. It is found that when the input state possesses nontrivial symmetries, the correlation revival period can be longer than that of the intensity, and thus the same intensity pattern can display different correlation patterns. We experimentally demonstrate this effect for classical, pseudothermal light, and compare the results with the predictions for nonclassical, quantum light.

  16. The relationship between English language learning strategies and proficiency of pre-university students: A study case of UMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiram, Johannah Jamalul; Sulaiman, Jumat; Swanto, Suyansah; Din, Wardatul Akmam

    2014-07-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the relationship between language learning strategies and proficiency in English. Fifty-six pre-university students (22 males, 34 females) of University Malaysia Sabah participated in this study. Oxford's Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) self-report questionnaire was adopted to identify the students' language learning strategies, whereas their proficiencies were judged based on their Malaysian University English Test (MUET) Results. Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and the t-test were utilized to make statistical interpretation about the relationship. The knowledge obtained from this study will be helpful for future studies on how to improve the quality of learning and proficiency in English.

  17. City-City Correlations to Introduce Galaxy-Galaxy Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.

    2014-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe, vividly displayed by the spatial distribution of galaxies, is characterised quanti- tatively by the two-point galaxy-galaxy correlation function. But the meaning of the correlation function is somewhat abstract because it does not have a ready analogy. This work computes the two-dimensional, two-point city-city correlation function for three populous regions of the United States, demonstrating that the city-city correlation function is analogous to the galaxy-galaxy correlation function determined from Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. City radii are analogous to galaxy cluster radii, and city-to-city distances are analogous to distances between galaxy clusters. Part of this work has been adapted for a lab suitable for non-experts.

  18. Evaluation of static and dynamic MRI for assessing response of bone sarcomas to preoperative chemotherapy: Correlation with histological necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Priyadarshi; Malhotra, Atul; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, Lokesh; Patro, Dilip Kumar; Elangovan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Preoperative chemotherapy plays a key role in management of bone sarcomas. Postoperative evaluation of histological necrosis has been the gold standard method of assessing response to preoperative chemotherapy. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing response preoperatively. Materials and Methods: Our study included 14 patients (12 osteosarcomas and 2 malignant fibrous histiocytomas) with mean age of 21.8 years, treated with preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery. They were evaluated with static and dynamic MRI twice, before starting chemotherapy and again prior to surgery. Change in tumor volume and slope of signal intensity - time curve were calculated and correlated with percentage of histological necrosis using Pearson correlation test. Results: The change in dynamic MRI slope was significant (P = 0.001). Also, ?60% reduction in slope of the curve proved to be an indicator of good histological response [positive predictive value (PPV) =80%]. Change in tumor volume failed to show significant correlation (P = 0.071). Although it showed high negative predictive value (NPV = 85.7%), PPV was too low (PPV = 57.14%). Conclusions: Dynamic MRI correctly predicts histological necrosis after administration of preoperative chemotherapy to bone sarcomas. Hence, it can be used as a preoperative indicator of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. On the other hand, volumetric assessment by static MRI is not an effective predictor of histological necrosis. This study proves the superiority of dynamic contrast-enhanced study over volumetric study by MRI. PMID:26288521

  19. Correlation of Palatal Rugoscopy with Gender, Palatal Vault Height and ABO Blood Groups in Three Different Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, KG; Verma, P; Bansal, N; Basavaraju, S; Sachdeva, SK; Khosa, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palatal rugae (PR) are asymmetrical irregular elevations, recorded during maxillary cast fabrication, that can be used for identification purpose if previous comparative sources are available. Aim: This study investigated uniqueness of PR patterns in relation to gender, palatal vault forms, and ABO blood groups in three (North-East [N-E], Northern and Western) populations of India. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted on randomly selected 90 students, 30 from each sub population. Design - The palatal vault was recorded as Types I, II, and III. The maxillary casts were analyzed for each subject. The blood group of each subject was also recorded. Pearson's correlation coefficient tests were performed on cross-tabulations to evaluate significant relationship among different variables. Results: The PR number was more among females with an insignificant correlation among gender and mean rugae size on both sides. Types I and II hard palate vaults were seen associated with straight forwardly directed PR pattern, while Type III with curved forwardly directed PR. On the right side, straight rugae shape was most common type. On the left side, straight rugae shape was most common in Northern population while in N-E and Western populations curved rugae was the dominating type. A highly significant correlation was found between ABO blood groups and different PR patterns. Conclusions: PR possesses unique characteristics and can be used along with palatal vault forms as well as ABO blood groups for racial and individualistic soft tissue oral print in forensic cases. PMID:25328791

  20. STUDIES OF DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS V. PAIRWISE CORRELATIONS OF EIGHT STRONG DIBs AND NEUTRAL HYDROGEN, MOLECULAR HYDROGEN, AND COLOR EXCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Scott D.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; York, Donald G.; Hobbs, L. M.; McCall, Benjamin J.; Dahlstrom, Julie; Welty, Daniel E.; Drosback, Meredith M.; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2011-01-20

    We establish correlations between equivalent widths of eight diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), and examine their correlations with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and E{sub B-V}. The DIBs are centered at {lambda}{lambda} 5780.5, 6204.5, 6283.8, 6196.0, 6613.6, 5705.1, 5797.1, and 5487.7, in decreasing order of Pearson's correlation coefficient with N(H) (here defined as the column density of neutral hydrogen), ranging from 0.96 to 0.82. We find the equivalent width (EW) of {lambda}5780.5 is better correlated with column densities of H than with E{sub B-V} or H{sub 2}, confirming earlier results based on smaller data sets. We show that the same is true for six of the seven other DIBs presented here. Despite this similarity, the eight strong DIBs chosen are not correlated well enough with each other to suggest they come from the same carrier. We further conclude that these eight DIBs are more likely to be associated with H than with H{sub 2}, and hence are not preferentially located in the densest, most UV shielded parts of interstellar clouds. We suggest that they arise from different molecules found in diffuse H regions with very little H{sub 2} (molecular fraction f < 0.01). Of the 133 stars with available data in our study, there are three with significantly weaker {lambda}5780.5 than our mean H-{lambda}5780.5 relationship, all of which are in regions of high radiation fields, as previously noted by Herbig. The correlations will be useful in deriving interstellar parameters when direct methods are not available. For instance, with care, the value of N(H) can be derived from W{sub {lambda}}(5780.5).

  1. The Correlation Between Perceived Social Support and Illness Uncertainty in People with Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sajjadi, Moosa; Rassouli, Maryam; Bahri, Narges; Mohammadipoor, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Illness uncertainty is a source of a chronic and pervasive psychological stress for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWH), and largely affects their quality of life and the ability to cope with the disease. Based on the uncertainty in illness theory, the social support is one of the illness uncertainty antecedents, and influences the level of uncertainty perceived by patients. Aim: To examine uncertainty in PLWH and its correlation with social support in Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional correlational study was conducted with 80 PLWH presenting to AIDS Research Center, Tehran, Iran in 2013. The data collected using illness uncertainty and social support inventories were analyzed through Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and regression analysis. Results: The results showed a high level of illness uncertainty in PLWH and a negative significant correlation between perceived social support and illness uncertainty (P = 0.01, r = -0.29). Conclusion: Uncertainty is a serious aspect of illness experience in Iranian PLWH. Providing adequate, structured information to patients as well as opportunities to discuss their concerns with other PLWH and receive emotional support from their health care providers may be worthwhile. PMID:26009679

  2. Regularized Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenhaus, Arthur; Tenenhaus, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Regularized generalized canonical correlation analysis (RGCCA) is a generalization of regularized canonical correlation analysis to three or more sets of variables. It constitutes a general framework for many multi-block data analysis methods. It combines the power of multi-block data analysis methods (maximization of well identified criteria) and…

  3. Correlation femtoscopy of small systems

    E-print Network

    Yu. M. Sinyukov; V. M. Shapoval

    2013-05-11

    The basic principles of the correlation femtoscopy, including its correspondence to the Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity interferometry, are re-examined. The main subject of the paper is an analysis of the correlation femtoscopy when the source size is as small as the order of the uncertainty limit. It is about 1 fm for the current high energy experiments. Then the standard femtoscopy model of random sources is inapplicable. The uncertainty principle leads to the partial indistinguishability and coherence of closely located emitters that affect the observed femtoscopy scales. In thermal systems the role of corresponding coherent length is taken by the thermal de Broglie wavelength that also defines the size of a single emitter. The formalism of partially coherent phases in the amplitudes of closely located individual emitters is used for the quantitative analysis. The general approach is illustrated analytically for the case of the Gaussian approximation for emitting sources. A reduction of the interferometry radii and a suppression of the Bose-Einstein correlation functions for small sources due to the uncertainty principle are found. There is a positive correlation between the source size and the intercept of the correlation function. The peculiarities of the non-femtoscopic correlations caused by minijets and fluctuations of the initial states of the systems formed in $pp$ and $e^+e^-$ collisions are also analyzed. The factorization property for the contributions of femtoscopic and non-femtoscopic correlations into complete correlation function is observed in numerical calculations in a wide range of the model parameters.

  4. Correlation Weights in Multiple Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Niels G.; Jones, Jeff A.

    2010-01-01

    A general theory on the use of correlation weights in linear prediction has yet to be proposed. In this paper we take initial steps in developing such a theory by describing the conditions under which correlation weights perform well in population regression models. Using OLS weights as a comparison, we define cases in which the two weighting…

  5. Psychophysical correlations, synchronicity and meaning.

    PubMed

    Atmanspacher, Harald

    2014-04-01

    The dual-aspect framework which Jung developed with Wolfgang Pauli implies that psychophysical phenomena are neither reducible to physical processes nor to conscious mental activity. Rather, they constitute a radically novel kind of phenomena, deriving from correlations between the physical and the mental. In synchronistic events, a particular subclass of psychophysical phenomena, these correlations are explicated as experienced meaning. PMID:24673273

  6. The Greenbergian Word Order Correlations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryer, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    An empirical study of word order correlations, based on a sample of 625 languages, determined exactly what pairs of elements correlate in order with the verb and object. An alternative to the Head-Dependent Theory is presented: the Branching Direction Theory, based on consistent ordering of phrasal and nonphrasal elements. (85 references)…

  7. Multi-particle critical correlations

    E-print Network

    Santos, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We study the role of multi-particle spatial correlations in the appearance of a liquid-vapour critical point. Our analysis is based on the exact infinite hierarchy of equations relating spatial integrals of $(k+1)$-particle correlations to the $k$-particle ones and their derivatives with respect to the density. Critical exponents corresponding to generalized compressibility equations resulting from the hierarchy are shown to grow linearly with the order of correlations. We prove that the critical behaviour requires taking into account correlation functions of arbitrary order. It is however only a necessary condition. Indeed, approximate closures of the hierarchy obtained by expressing higher order correlations in terms of lower order ones (Kirkwood's superposition approximation and its generalizations) turn out to be inconsistent with the critical behaviour.

  8. Squeezed particle-antiparticle correlations

    E-print Network

    Sandra S. Padula; Danuce M. Dudek; Otavio Socolowski Jr

    2009-01-08

    A novel type of correlation involving particle-antiparticle pairs was found out in the 1990's. Currently known as Squeezed or Back-to-Back Correlations (BBC), they should be present if the hadronic masses are modified in the hot and dense medium formed in high energy heavy ion collisions. Although well-established theoretically, such hadronic correlations have not yet been observed experimentally. In this phenomenological study we suggest a promising way to search for the BBC signal, by looking into the squeezed correlation function of phi phi and K^+ K^- pairs at RHIC energies, as function of the pair average momentum, K_{12}=(k_1+k_2)/2. The effects of in-medium mass-shift on the identical particle correlations (Hanbury-Brown & Twiss effect) are also discussed.

  9. Correlation between nipple elevation and breast resection weight: How to preoperatively plan breast reduction.

    PubMed

    Moio, Mariagrazia; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Breast hypertrophy is often associated with functional limitations. Beyond the aesthetic concerns, breast reduction can improve symptoms and self-esteem. In different countries, health-care system regulations have fixed the threshold for reimbursement in 500 g of predicted tissue resection for each breast. Different preoperative measurements have been proposed to predict breast-tissue weight to be removed, showing a variable correlation with post-operative evaluation. We describe a reliable, simple measurement to predict the quantity of breast reduction in grams, which can be applicable to any surgical technique. A total of 128 patients undergoing bilateral breast reduction were evaluated. The correlation between the preoperative nipple-areola complex (NAC) lift distance and the weight of removed breast tissue was tested with linear regression and Pearson's test. Other anthropometric measurements were tested as a control. The ratio between resected grams and lift distance was explored to find a multiplication coefficient to be used at preoperative planning. The mean resection weight was 686.65 g. The mean NAC-lift distance was 7.6 cm. Positive correlation between the NAC-lift distance and the weight of breast tissue removed was found (r: 0.87; p < 0.001). The mean weight of the removed breast tissue (g) per centimetre of NAC lift was 81 g/cm in the group between 6 and 12 cm and 70 g/cm in the group with >12 cm of lift distance. The NAC-lift distance is a single, objective, repeatable measure that can provide a reliable prediction of breast-tissue grams to be removed; it helps in classifying breast-reduction indications. PMID:25997557

  10. High Blood Glucose Levels Correlate with Tumor Malignancy in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ge; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Fan; Feng, Wen-Ming; Yao, Yunliang; Cui, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Shi, Qi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Research shows that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects the risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the clinicopathological features of CRC patients correlate with their blood glucose levels. Material/Methods We enrolled 391 CRC patients hospitalized in our center between 2008 and 2013. Data of their first fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postprandial glucose (2hPPG) level after admission, their clinicopathological features, and survival were collected. The correlations between blood glucose level and clinicopathological features were analyzed by Pearson chi-square analysis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. Results There were 116 out of the 391 CRC patients who had high blood glucose level (H-G group, 29.67%), among which 58 (14.83%), 18 (4.60%), and 40 (10.23%) were diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), respectively, while 275 (70.33%) patients had normal glucose level (N-G group). Compared with the N-G group, patients in the H-G group had larger tumor diameters and lower tumor differentiation (p<0.05). A higher ratio of patients in the H-G group also had more advanced TNM staging and more ulcerative CRC gross type (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed in patient overall survival among different glucose groups. No effect of insulin therapy on CRC development and patient survival was observed. Conclusions Blood glucose level in CRC patients correlates significantly with local tumor malignancy, but no significant effect on distant metastasis and patient overall survival was observed. PMID:26644185

  11. High Blood Glucose Levels Correlate with Tumor Malignancy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ge; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Fan; Feng, Wen-Ming; Yao, Yunliang; Cui, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Liang; Shi, Qi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research shows that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects the risk and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether the clinicopathological features of CRC patients correlate with their blood glucose levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 391 CRC patients hospitalized in our center between 2008 and 2013. Data of their first fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postprandial glucose (2hPPG) level after admission, their clinicopathological features, and survival were collected. The correlations between blood glucose level and clinicopathological features were analyzed by Pearson chi-square analysis. Patient survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analysis. RESULTS There were 116 out of the 391 CRC patients who had high blood glucose level (H-G group, 29.67%), among which 58 (14.83%), 18 (4.60%), and 40 (10.23%) were diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and impaired fasting glucose (IFG), respectively, while 275 (70.33%) patients had normal glucose level (N-G group). Compared with the N-G group, patients in the H-G group had larger tumor diameters and lower tumor differentiation (p<0.05). A higher ratio of patients in the H-G group also had more advanced TNM staging and more ulcerative CRC gross type (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed in patient overall survival among different glucose groups. No effect of insulin therapy on CRC development and patient survival was observed. CONCLUSIONS Blood glucose level in CRC patients correlates significantly with local tumor malignancy, but no significant effect on distant metastasis and patient overall survival was observed. PMID:26644185

  12. Correlation Dynamics of Green's Functions

    E-print Network

    Shun-Jin Wang; Wei Zuo; Wolfgang Cassing

    1994-01-17

    We generalize the methods used in the theory of correlation dynamics and establish a set of equations of motion for many-body correlation green's functions in the non-relativistic case. These non-linear and coupled equations of motion describe the dynamical evolution of correlation green's functions of different order and transparently show how many-body correlations are generated by the different interaction terms in a genuine nonperturbative framework. The nonperturbative results of the conventional green's function theory are included in the present formalism as two limiting cases (the so-called ladder diagram summation and ring diagram summation) as well as the familiar correlation dynamics of density-matrices in the equal time limit. We present explicit expressions for three- and four-body correlation functions that can be used to dynamically restore the trace relations for spin-symmetric fermi systems and study numerically the relative importance of two-, three- and four-body correlations for nuclear configurations close to the groundstate.

  13. 25 ns software correlator for photon and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magatti, Davide; Ferri, Fabio

    2003-02-01

    A 25 ns time resolution, multi-tau software correlator developed in LABVIEW based on the use of a standard photon counting unit, a fast timer/counter board (6602-PCI National Instrument) and a personal computer (PC) (1.5 GHz Pentium 4) is presented and quantitatively discussed. The correlator works by processing the stream of incoming data in parallel according to two different algorithms: For large lag times (??100 ?s), a classical time-mode (TM) scheme, based on the measure of the number of pulses per time interval, is used; differently, for ??100 ?s a photon-mode (PM) scheme is adopted and the time sequence of the arrival times of the photon pulses is measured. By combining the two methods, we developed a system capable of working out correlation functions on line, in full real time for the TM correlator and partially in batch processing for the PM correlator. For the latter one, the duty cycle depends on the count rate of the incoming pulses, being ˜100% for count rates ?3×104 Hz, ˜15% at 105 Hz, and ˜1% at 106 Hz. For limitations imposed by the fairly small first-in, first-out (FIFO) buffer available on the counter board, the maximum count rate permissible for a proper functioning of the PM correlator is limited to ˜105 Hz. However, this limit can be removed by using a board with a deeper FIFO. Similarly, the 25 ns time resolution is only limited by maximum clock frequency available on the 6602-PCI and can be easily improved by using a faster clock. When tested on dilute solutions of calibrated latex spheres, the overall performances of the correlator appear to be comparable with those of commercial hardware correlators, but with several nontrivial advantages related to its flexibility, low cost, and easy adaptability to future developments of PC and data acquisition technology.

  14. Correlation, Cost Risk, and Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1992-01-01

    The geometric viewpoint identifies the choice of a correlation matrix for the simulation of cost risk with the pairwise choice of data vectors corresponding to the parameters used to obtain cost risk. The correlation coefficient is the cosine of the angle between the data vectors after translation to an origin at the mean and normalization for magnitude. Thus correlation is equivalent to expressing the data in terms of a non orthogonal basis. To understand the many resulting phenomena requires the use of the tensor concept of raising the index to transform the measured and observed covariant components into contravariant components before vector addition can be applied. The geometric viewpoint also demonstrates that correlation and covariance are geometric properties, as opposed to purely statistical properties, of the variates. Thus, variates from different distributions may be correlated, as desired, after selection from independent distributions. By determining the principal components of the correlation matrix, variates with the desired mean, magnitude, and correlation can be generated through linear transforms which include the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the correlation matrix. The conversion of the data to a non orthogonal basis uses a compound linear transformation which distorts or stretches the data space. Hence, the correlated data does not have the same properties as the uncorrelated data used to generate it. This phenomena is responsible for seemingly strange observations such as the fact that the marginal distributions of the correlated data can be quite different from the distributions used to generate the data. The joint effect of statistical distributions and correlation remains a fertile area for further research. In terms of application to cost estimating, the geometric approach demonstrates that the estimator must have data and must understand that data in order to properly choose the correlation matrix appropriate for a given estimate. There is a general feeling by employers and managers that the field of cost requires little technical or mathematical background. Contrary to that opinion, this paper demonstrates that a background in mathematics equivalent to that needed for typical engineering and scientific disciplines at the masters or doctorate level is appropriate within the field of cost risk.

  15. The Interpretation of Correlation Data. 

    E-print Network

    Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

    1923-01-01

    the different kinds of correlat!'cn: the most work- able classification for the student of biological data to use is one group- kinds of correlation into two classes-genetic and non-genetic. 'he general features of the correlation table are shown and ;ions... with wheat. They further point out that though the earlier work indicated correlation between certain characters and yield, subsequent pure-line work showed that in general no one character is closely associated with yield, at least to such an extent...

  16. Correlation of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Mo; Kim, Suhn-yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 31 stroke patients. The subjects received an explanation of the procedures and methods and provided informed consent before the experiment. A measurement board was used to determine the the proprioception deficit of the knee as a proprioception test. The proprioception test consisted of a passive and active angle reproduction test. A manual muscle test and modified Ashworth scale were used to evaluate knee muscle strength and spasticity level. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test and Spearman correlation. [Results] The results of this study revealed a significant difference between the affected side and non-affected side in the passive angle reproduction test and a significant difference in the correlation of the proprioception level with muscle strength and spasticity level. [Conclusion] This study indicates that the knee proprioception level is associated with spasticity and muscle strength in stroke patients. PMID:26504273

  17. Correlates of posttraumatic growth among African Americans living with HIV/AIDS in Mississippi1

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Shenell D.; Williams, Bryman E.; Leu, Cheng-Shiun

    2015-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with HIV face a host of challenges post-diagnosis. At risk for negative psychological outcomes, persons living with HIV/AIDS may also experience posttraumatic growth (i.e., positive cognitive and emotional changes that may occur following HIV diagnosis). African Americans, in particular, experience poorer psychosocial and behavioral outcomes and greater HIV-related health disparities, and also tend to report more posttraumatic growth than European Americans. This exploratory study examined demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral correlates of posttraumatic growth among 45 African American adults living with HIV in Mississippi. Statistical methods included correlational analyses and independent sample t-tests. As measured by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, posttraumatic growth was associated with several demographic (i.e., age, education, employment, income), psychosocial (i.e., social support, coping self-efficacy, psychological distress [negative]), and behavioral variables (i.e., church attendance, abstinence from drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes). Findings indicate that African Americans living with HIV in underserved, under-resourced areas are capable of perceiving posttraumatic growth post-diagnosis. Moreover, research has shown that perceived positive growth is associated with important sociocultural, psychosocial, and behavioral factors that directly and/or indirectly influence health and treatment outcomes. Implications of findings are discussed. PMID:26523161

  18. Correlation of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Mo; Kim, Suhn-Yeop

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of knee proprioception with muscle strength and spasticity in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 31 stroke patients. The subjects received an explanation of the procedures and methods and provided informed consent before the experiment. A measurement board was used to determine the the proprioception deficit of the knee as a proprioception test. The proprioception test consisted of a passive and active angle reproduction test. A manual muscle test and modified Ashworth scale were used to evaluate knee muscle strength and spasticity level. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test and Spearman correlation. [Results] The results of this study revealed a significant difference between the affected side and non-affected side in the passive angle reproduction test and a significant difference in the correlation of the proprioception level with muscle strength and spasticity level. [Conclusion] This study indicates that the knee proprioception level is associated with spasticity and muscle strength in stroke patients. PMID:26504273

  19. Histological evaluation of pulp tissue from second primary molars correlated with clinical and radiographic caries findings

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Vellore Kannan; Anwar, Khurshid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Managing dental caries in young children is demanding due to the elusions present on the right diagnostic criteria for treatment. The present study evaluated the histological status of pulp tissues extracted from primary second molar with caries involvement. Histological findings are correlated with clinical and radiographic assessment. Materials and Methods: Simple experimental study was conducted on upper or lower second primary molars with occlusal (22 teeth) or proximal (22 teeth) dental caries. Selected children were below 6 years of age. Percentage of caries involvement, residual dentin thickness (RDT), radiographic assessment of interradicular and periapical areas, clinical caries depth and signs and symptoms are the parameters considered for comparing with the histological findings. The specimens were grouped based on the nature of the inflammatory process as acute or chronic. The data were analyzed by Student t-test to compare histological types of inflammation with clinical parameters. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Four cases revealed severe acute inflammation in coronal and relatively mild acute inflammation in radicular pulp. In the rest of the specimen coronal and radicular pulp had similar acute or chronic inflammatory changes. Histological evidence of pulpitis correlated with dental caries depth of ?80%, RDT of ?1 mm, radiographic rarefactions in the interradicular regions and symptoms of pain. Conclusion: Primary second molars with more than two-third caries involvement with symptoms of pain histologically showed inflammation of both coronal and radicular pulp tissues in all cases. PMID:24932190

  20. Correlations among Stress Parameters, Meat and Carcass Quality Parameters in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dokmanovic, Marija; Baltic, Milan Z.; Duric, Jelena; Ivanovic, Jelena; Popovic, Ljuba; Todorovic, Milica; Markovic, Radmila; Pantic, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Relationships among different stress parameters (lairage time and blood level of lactate and cortisol), meat quality parameters (initial and ultimate pH value, temperature, drip loss, sensory and instrumental colour, marbling) and carcass quality parameters (degree of rigor mortis and skin damages, hot carcass weight, carcass fat thickness, meatiness) were determined in pigs (n = 100) using Pearson correlations. After longer lairage, blood lactate (p<0.05) and degree of injuries (p<0.001) increased, meat became darker (p<0.001), while drip loss decreased (p<0.05). Higher lactate was associated with lower initial pH value (p<0.01), higher temperature (p<0.001) and skin blemishes score (p<0.05) and more developed rigor mortis (p<0.05), suggesting that lactate could be a predictor of both meat quality and the level of preslaughter stress. Cortisol affected carcass quality, so higher levels of cortisol were associated with increased hot carcass weight, carcass fat thickness on the back and at the sacrum and marbling, but also with decreased meatiness. The most important meat quality parameters (pH and temperature after 60 minutes) deteriorated when blood lactate concentration was above 12 mmol/L. PMID:25656214

  1. Correlations among Stress Parameters, Meat and Carcass Quality Parameters in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Dokmanovic, Marija; Baltic, Milan Z; Duric, Jelena; Ivanovic, Jelena; Popovic, Ljuba; Todorovic, Milica; Markovic, Radmila; Pantic, Srdan

    2015-03-01

    Relationships among different stress parameters (lairage time and blood level of lactate and cortisol), meat quality parameters (initial and ultimate pH value, temperature, drip loss, sensory and instrumental colour, marbling) and carcass quality parameters (degree of rigor mortis and skin damages, hot carcass weight, carcass fat thickness, meatiness) were determined in pigs (n = 100) using Pearson correlations. After longer lairage, blood lactate (p<0.05) and degree of injuries (p<0.001) increased, meat became darker (p<0.001), while drip loss decreased (p<0.05). Higher lactate was associated with lower initial pH value (p<0.01), higher temperature (p<0.001) and skin blemishes score (p<0.05) and more developed rigor mortis (p<0.05), suggesting that lactate could be a predictor of both meat quality and the level of preslaughter stress. Cortisol affected carcass quality, so higher levels of cortisol were associated with increased hot carcass weight, carcass fat thickness on the back and at the sacrum and marbling, but also with decreased meatiness. The most important meat quality parameters (pH and temperature after 60 minutes) deteriorated when blood lactate concentration was above 12 mmol/L. PMID:25656214

  2. Correlations in firm default behavior

    E-print Network

    Thirukkonda, Sreeram (Sreeram Radhakrishnan), 1975-

    2009-01-01

    Modeling credit risk using Structural and Reduced Form models has been a popular and apropos topic of research. This work makes an attempt to better understand correlations in firm default. A review of contemporary research ...

  3. Quantum Metrology in Correlated Environments

    E-print Network

    Dong Xie; An Min Wang

    2013-12-25

    We analytically obtain the precision bounds of frequency measurements in correlated Markovian and non-Markovian environments by using a variational approach. It is verified that in standard Ramsey spectroscopy setup, the metrological equivalence of product and maximally entangled states persists in maximally correlated Markovian and non-Markovian environments. We find that the optimal measurement can achieve a much higher resolution than standard Ramsey spectroscopy in the correlated environments. When the number of particles in the maximally entangled states is even, the precision bound decreases with interrogation time; and when the number is odd, the precision bound is independent of interrogation time, both in correlated Markovian and general non-Markovian environments. In addition, the opposite case can appear in some special non-Markovian environments.

  4. Acoustic Correlates of Information Structure.

    E-print Network

    Breen, Mara

    This paper reports three studies aimed at addressing three questions about the acoustic correlates of information structure in English: (1) do speakers mark information structure prosodically, and, to the extent they do; ...

  5. Digital correlator with fewer IC's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apple, G. G.; Rubin, L.

    1979-01-01

    Digital correlator requires only few integrated circuits to determine synchronization of two 24-bit digital words. Circuit is easily reduced or expanded to accommodate shorter or longer words and can be utilized in industrial and commercial data processing and telecommunications.

  6. Glassy correlations in nematic elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing; Goldbart, Paul; Mao, Xiaoming

    2009-03-01

    We address the physical properties of an isotropic melt or solution of nematogenic polymers that is then cross-linked beyond the vulcanization point. To do this, we construct a replica Landau theory involving a coupled pair of order- parameter fields: one describing vulcanization, the other describing local nematic order. Thermal nematic fluctuations, present at the time of cross-linking, are trapped by cross- linking into the vulcanized network. The resulting glassy nematic fluctuations are analyzed in the Gaussian approximation in two regimes. When the localization length is shorter than the thermal nematic correlation length, the nematic correlations are well captured as glassy correlations. In the opposite regime, fluctuations in the positions of the localized polymers partially wash out the glassy nematic correlations.

  7. Correlation of Simulation Examination to Written Test Scores for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Testing: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Suzanne L.; Anderson, Craig L.; Yang, Luanna; Canales, Cecilia; Amin, Alpesh; Lotfipour, Shahram; McCoy, C. Eric; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traditional Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) courses are evaluated using written multiple-choice tests. High-fidelity simulation is a widely used adjunct to didactic content, and has been used in many specialties as a training resource as well as an evaluative tool. There are no data to our knowledge that compare simulation examination scores with written test scores for ACLS courses. Objective To compare and correlate a novel high-fidelity simulation-based evaluation with traditional written testing for senior medical students in an ACLS course. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study to determine the correlation between simulation-based evaluation and traditional written testing in a medical school simulation center. Students were tested on a standard acute coronary syndrome/ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest scenario. Our primary outcome measure was correlation of exam results for 19 volunteer fourth-year medical students after a 32-hour ACLS-based Resuscitation Boot Camp course. Our secondary outcome was comparison of simulation-based vs. written outcome scores. Results The composite average score on the written evaluation was substantially higher (93.6%) than the simulation performance score (81.3%, absolute difference 12.3%, 95% CI [10.6–14.0%], p<0.00005). We found a statistically significant moderate correlation between simulation scenario test performance and traditional written testing (Pearson r=0.48, p=0.04), validating the new evaluation method. Conclusion Simulation-based ACLS evaluation methods correlate with traditional written testing and demonstrate resuscitation knowledge and skills. Simulation may be a more discriminating and challenging testing method, as students scored higher on written evaluation methods compared to simulation. PMID:26594288

  8. A Comparison of the Accuracy of Four Age Estimation Methods Based on Panoramic Radiography of Developing Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Javadinejad, Shahrzad; Sekhavati, Hajar; Ghafari, Roshanak

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Tooth development is widely used in determining age and state of maturity. Dental age is of high importance in forensic and pediatric dentistry and also orthodontic treatment planning .The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of four radiographic age estimation methods. Materials and methods. Orthopantomographic images of 537 healthy children (age: 3.9-14.5 years old) were evaluated. Dental age of the subjects was determined through Demirjian’s, Willem’s, Cameriere’s, and Smith’s methods. Differences and correlations between chronological and dental ages were assessed by paired t-tests and Pearson’s correlation analysis, respectively. Results. The mean chronological age of the subjects was 8.93 ± 2.04 years. Overestimations of age were observed following the use of Demirjian’s method (0.87 ± 1.00 years), Willem’s method (0.36 ± 0.87 years), and Smith’s method (0.06 ± 0.63 years). However, Cameriere’s method underestimated age by 0.19 ± 0.86 years. While paired t-tests revealed significant differences between the mean chronological age and ages determined by Demirjian’s, Willem’s, and Cameriere’s methods (P < 0.001), such a significant difference was absent between chronological age and dental age based on Smith’s method (P = 0.079). Pearson’s correlation analysis suggested linear correlations between chronological age and dental age determined by all four methods. Conclusion. Our findings indicated Smith’s method to have the highest accuracy among the four assessed methods. How-ever, all four methods can be used with acceptable accuracy. PMID:26236431

  9. Local Realism of Macroscopic Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, R.; Paterek, T.; Kay, A.; Kurzy?ski, P.; Kaszlikowski, D.

    2011-08-01

    We identify conditions under which correlations resulting from quantum measurements performed on macroscopic systems (systems composed of a number of particles of the order of the Avogadro number) can be described by local realism. We argue that the emergence of local realism at the macroscopic level is caused by an interplay between the monogamous nature of quantum correlations and the fact that macroscopic measurements do not reveal properties of individual particles.

  10. Correlating multispectral imaging and compositional data from the Mars Exploration Rovers and implications for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Bell, James F.

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to infer compositional information about distant targets based on multispectral imaging data, we investigated methods of relating Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Pancam multispectral remote sensing observations to in situ alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS)-derived elemental abundances and Mössbauer (MB)-derived abundances of Fe-bearing phases at the MER field sites in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The majority of the partial correlation coefficients between these data sets were not statistically significant. Restricting the targets to those that were abraded by the rock abrasion tool (RAT) led to improved Pearson’s correlations, most notably between the red-blue ratio (673 nm/434 nm) and Fe3+-bearing phases, but partial correlations were not statistically significant. Partial Least Squares (PLS) calculations relating Pancam 11-color visible to near-IR (VNIR; ?400-1000 nm) “spectra” to APXS and Mössbauer element or mineral abundances showed generally poor performance, although the presence of compositional outliers led to improved PLS results for data from Meridiani. When the Meridiani PLS model for pyroxene was tested by predicting the pyroxene content of Gusev targets, the results were poor, indicating that the PLS models for Meridiani are not applicable to data from other sites. Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) classification of Gusev crater data showed mixed results. Of the 24 Gusev test regions of interest (ROIs) with known classes, 11 had >30% of the pixels in the ROI classified correctly, while others were mis-classified or unclassified. k-Means clustering of APXS and Mössbauer data was used to assign Meridiani targets to compositional classes. The clustering-derived classes corresponded to meaningful geologic and/or color unit differences, and SIMCA classification using these classes was somewhat successful, with >30% of pixels correctly classified in 9 of the 11 ROIs with known classes. This work shows that the relationship between SWIR multispectral imaging data and APXS- and Mössbauer-derived composition/mineralogy is often weak, a perhaps not entirely unexpected result given the different surface sampling depths of SWIR imaging (uppermost few microns) vs. APXS (tens of ?m) and MB measurements (hundreds of ?m). Results from the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover’s ChemCam Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument may show a closer relationship to Mastcam SWIR multispectral observations, however, because the initial laser shots onto a target will analyze only the upper few micrometers of the surface. The clustering and classification methods used in this study can be applied to any data set to formalize the definition of classes and identify targets that do not fit in previously defined classes.

  11. Correlation of Shape and Size of Sella Turcica With the Type of Facial Skeletal Class in an Iranian Group

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Solmaz; Shahbeig, Shahrzad; Mohseni, Sudeh; Azimi, Fateme; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background: In orthodontic science, diagnosis of facial skeletal type (class I, II, and III) is essential to make the correct treatment plan that is usually expensive and complicated. Sometimes results from analysis of lateral cephalometry radiographies are not enough to discriminate facial skeletal types. In this situation, knowledge about the relationship between the shape and size of the sella turcica and the type of facial skeletal class can help to make a more definitive decision for treatment plan. Objectives: The present study was designed to investigate this relationship in patients referred to a dental school in Iran. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, cephalometric radiographies of 90 candidates for orthodontic treatment (44 females and 46 males) with an age range of 14 - 26 years and equal distribution in terms of class I, class II, and class III facial skeletal classification were selected. The shape, length, diameter, and depth of the sella turcica were determined on the radiographs. Linear dimensions were assessed by one-way analysis of variance while the correlation between the dimensions and age was investigated using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Sella turcica had normal morphology in 24.4% of the patients while irregularity (notching) in the posterior part of the dorsum sella was observed in 15.6%, double contour of sellar floor in 5.6%, sella turcica bridge in 23.3%, oblique anterior wall in 20% and pyramidal shape of the dorsum sella in 11.1% of the subjects. In total, 46.7% of class I patients had a normal shape of sella turcica, 23.3% of class II patients had an oblique anterior wall and a pyramidal shape of the dorsum sella, and 43.3% of class III individuals had sella turcica bridge (the greatest values). Sella turcica length was significantly greater in class III patients compared to class II and class I (P < 0.0001). However, depth and diameter of sella turcica were similar in class I, class II, and class III patients. Furthermore, age was significantly correlated to the diameter of sella turcica as greater diameters were observed in older ages (P < 0.04). Conclusion: A significant relationship exists between the type of facial skeletal classification and the shape of the sella turcica; as in class III patients, sella turcica bridge was reported with a higher frequency. Also, sella turcica had a significantly higher length in these patients than in those with class I and class II facial skeletal types. PMID:26557271

  12. Correlating multispectral imaging and compositional data from the Mars Exploration Rovers and implications for Mars Science Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Bell, James F., III

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to infer compositional information about distant targets based on multispectral imaging data, we investigated methods of relating Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Pancam multispectral remote sensing observations to in situ alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS)-derived elemental abundances and Mössbauer (MB)-derived abundances of Fe-bearing phases at the MER field sites in Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum. The majority of the partial correlation coefficients between these data sets were not statistically significant. Restricting the targets to those that were abraded by the rock abrasion tool (RAT) led to improved Pearson’s correlations, most notably between the red–blue ratio (673 nm/434 nm) and Fe3+-bearing phases, but partial correlations were not statistically significant. Partial Least Squares (PLS) calculations relating Pancam 11-color visible to near-IR (VNIR; ?400–1000 nm) “spectra” to APXS and Mössbauer element or mineral abundances showed generally poor performance, although the presence of compositional outliers led to improved PLS results for data from Meridiani. When the Meridiani PLS model for pyroxene was tested by predicting the pyroxene content of Gusev targets, the results were poor, indicating that the PLS models for Meridiani are not applicable to data from other sites. Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) classification of Gusev crater data showed mixed results. Of the 24 Gusev test regions of interest (ROIs) with known classes, 11 had >30% of the pixels in the ROI classified correctly, while others were mis-classified or unclassified. k-Means clustering of APXS and Mössbauer data was used to assign Meridiani targets to compositional classes. The clustering-derived classes corresponded to meaningful geologic and/or color unit differences, and SIMCA classification using these classes was somewhat successful, with >30% of pixels correctly classified in 9 of the 11 ROIs with known classes. This work shows that the relationship between SWIR multispectral imaging data and APXS- and Mössbauer-derived composition/mineralogy is often weak, a perhaps not entirely unexpected result given the different surface sampling depths of SWIR imaging (uppermost few microns) vs. APXS (tens of ?m) and MB measurements (hundreds of ?m). Results from the upcoming Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover’s ChemCam Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument may show a closer relationship to Mastcam SWIR multispectral observations, however, because the initial laser shots onto a target will analyze only the upper few micrometers of the surface. The clustering and classification methods used in this study can be applied to any data set to formalize the definition of classes and identify targets that do not fit in previously defined classes.

  13. Automated Gait and Balance Parameters Diagnose and Correlate with Severity in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Bernstein, Ira; Khemani, Pravin; Dewey, Richard B.; Querry, Ross; Chitnis, Shilpa; Dewey, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the suitability of instrumented gait and balance measures for diagnosis and estimation of disease severity in PD. Methods Each subject performed iTUG (instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go) and iSway (instrumented Sway) using the APDM® Mobility Lab. MDS-UPDRS parts II and III, a postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD) score, the mobility subscale of the PDQ-39, and Hoehn & Yahr stage were measured in the PD cohort. Two sets of gait and balance variables were defined by high correlation with diagnosis or disease severity and were evaluated using multiple linear and logistic regressions, ROC analyses, and t-tests. Results 135 PD subjects and 66 age-matched controls were evaluated in this prospective cohort study. We found that both iTUG and iSway variables differentiated PD subjects from controls (area under the ROC curve was 0.82 and 0.75 respectively) and correlated with all PD severity measures (R2 ranging from 0.18 to 0.61). Objective exam-based scores correlated more strongly with iTUG than iSway. The chosen set of iTUG variables was abnormal in very mild disease. Age and gender influenced gait and balance parameters and were therefore controlled in all analyses. Interpretation Our study identified sets of iTUG and iSway variables which correlate with PD severity measures and differentiate PD subjects from controls. These gait and balance measures could potentially serve as markers of PD progression and are under evaluation for this purpose in the ongoing NIH Parkinson Disease Biomarker Program. PMID:25082782

  14. Atrophy and lower regional perfusion of temporo-parietal brain areas are correlated with impairment in memory performances and increase of EEG upper alpha power in prodromal Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Vito Davide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Temporo-parietal cortex thinning is associated with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The increase of the EEG upper/low alpha power ratio has been associated with MCI due to AD subjects and to the atrophy of temporo-parietal brain areas. Moreover, subjects with a higher alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio showed lower brain perfusion than in the low alpha3/alpha2 group. The two groups have significantly different hippocampal volumes and correlation with the theta frequency activity. Methods: 74 adult subjects with MCI underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 27 of them underwent EEG recording and perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) evaluation. The alpha3/alpha2 power ratio as well as cortical thickness was computed for each subject. The difference in cortical thickness between the groups was estimated. Pearson’s r was used to assess the correlation topography between cortical thinning as well as between brain perfusion and memory impairment. Results: In the higher upper/low alpha group, memory impairment was more pronounced both in the MRI group and the SPECT MCI group. Moreover, it was correlated with greater cortical atrophy and lower perfusional rate in temporo-parietal cortex. Conclusion: High EEG upper/low alpha power ratio was associated with cortical thinning lower perfusion in temporo-parietal. Moreover, atrophy and lower perfusional rate were both significantly correlated with memory impairment in MCI subjects. The increase of EEG upper/low alpha frequency power ratio could be useful for identifying individuals at risk for progression to AD dementia and may be of value in the clinical context. PMID:26389016

  15. Does the intensity of diffuse thyroid gland uptake on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan predict the severity of hypothyroidism? Correlation between maximal standardized uptake value and serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Ankur; Choudhury, Partha Sarathi; Gupta, Manoj; Taywade, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Context: F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan and hypothyroidism. Aims: The aim was to determine whether the intensity of diffuse thyroid gland uptake on F-18 FDG PET/CT scans predicts the severity of hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 3868 patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT scans, between October 2012 and June 2013 in our institution for various oncological indications was done. Out of them, 106 (2.7%) patients (79 females, 27 males) presented with bilateral diffuse thyroid gland uptake as an incidental finding. These patients were investigated retrospectively and various parameters such as age, sex, primary cancer site, maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax), results of thyroid function tests (TFTs) and fine-needle aspiration cytology results were noted. The SUVmax values were correlated with serum thyroid stimulating hormone (S. TSH) levels using Pearson's correlation analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson's correlation analysis. Results: Clinical information and TFT (serum FT3, FT4 and TSH levels) results were available for 31 of the 106 patients (27 females, 4 males; mean age 51.5 years). Twenty-six out of 31 patients (84%) were having abnormal TFTs with abnormal TSH levels in 24/31 patients (mean S. TSH: 22.35 ?IU/ml, median: 7.37 ?IU/ml, range: 0.074-211 ?IU/ml). Among 7 patients with normal TSH levels, 2 patients demonstrated low FT3 and FT4 levels. No significant correlation was found between maximum standardized uptake value and TSH levels (r = 0.115, P > 0.05). Conclusions: Incidentally detected diffuse thyroid gland uptake on F-18 FDG PET/CT scan was usually associated with hypothyroidism probably caused by autoimmune thyroiditis. Patients should be investigated promptly irrespective of the intensity of FDG uptake with TFTs to initiate replacement therapy and a USG examination to look for any suspicious nodules. PMID:25589800

  16. The Murchison Widefield Array Correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ord, S. M.; Crosse, B.; Emrich, D.; Pallot, D.; Wayth, R. B.; Clark, M. A.; Tremblay, S. E.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Bunton, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; deSouza, L.; Ewell-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Herne, D.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kincaid, B. B.; Koenig, R.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Salah, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Stevens, J.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-03-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array is a Square Kilometre Array Precursor. The telescope is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. The MWA consists of 4 096 dipoles arranged into 128 dual polarisation aperture arrays forming a connected element interferometer that cross-correlates signals from all 256 inputs. A hybrid approach to the correlation task is employed, with some processing stages being performed by bespoke hardware, based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays, and others by Graphics Processing Units housed in general purpose rack mounted servers. The correlation capability required is approximately 8 tera floating point operations per second. The MWA has commenced operations and the correlator is generating 8.3 TB day-1 of correlation products, that are subsequently transferred 700 km from the MRO to Perth (WA) in real-time for storage and offline processing. In this paper, we outline the correlator design, signal path, and processing elements and present the data format for the internal and external interfaces.

  17. Correlation between Self-Citation and Impact Factor in Iranian English Medical Journals in WoS and ISC: A Comparative Approach

    PubMed Central

    GHAZI MIRSAEID, Seyed Javad; MOTAMEDI, Nadia; RAMEZAN GHORBANI, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this study, the impact of self-citation (Journal and Author) on impact factor of Iranian English Medical journals in two international citation databases, Web of Science (WoS) and Islamic world science citation center (ISC), were compared by citation analysis. Methods: Twelve journals in WoS and 26 journals in ISC databases indexed between the years (2006–2009) were selected and compared. For comparison of self-citation rate in two databases, we used Wilcoxon and Mann-whitney tests. We used Pearson test for correlation of self-citation and IF in WoS, and the Spearman’s correlation coefficient for the ISC database. Covariance analysis was used for comparison of two correlation tests. P. value was 0.05 in all of tests. Results: There was no significant difference between self-citation rates in two databases (P>0.05). Findings also showed no significant difference between the correlation of Journal self-citation and impact factor in two databases (P=0.526) however, there was significant difference between the author’s self-citation and impact factor in these databases (P<0.001). Conclusion: The impact of Author’s self-citation in the Impact Factor of WoS was higher than the ISC. PMID:26587498

  18. Reveal quantum correlation in complementary bases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shengjun; Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Yu, Sixia

    2014-01-01

    An essential feature of genuine quantum correlation is the simultaneous existence of correlation in complementary bases. We reveal this feature of quantum correlation by defining measures based on invariance under a basis change. For a bipartite quantum state, the classical correlation is the maximal correlation present in a certain optimum basis, while the quantum correlation is characterized as a series of residual correlations in the mutually unbiased bases. Compared with other approaches to quantify quantum correlation, our approach gives information-theoretical measures that directly reflect the essential feature of quantum correlation. PMID:24503595

  19. Organizational Correlates of Implementation of Colocation of Mental Health and Primary Care in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Erick G.; Heslin, Kevin C.; Chang, Evelyn; Fenwick, Karissa; Yano, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the role of organizational factors in the ability of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) clinics to implement colocated mental health care in primary care settings (PC-MH). The study used data from the VHA Clinical Practice Organizational Survey collected in 2007 from 225 clinic administrators across the United States. Clinic degree of implementation of PC-MH was the dependent variable, whereas independent variables included policies and procedures, organizational context, and leaders’ perceptions of barriers to change. Pearson bivariate correlations and multivariable linear regression were used to test hypotheses. Results show that depression care training for primary care providers and clinics’ flexibility and participation were both positively correlated with implementation of PC-MH. However, after accounting for other factors, regressions show that only training primary care providers in depression care was marginally associated with degree of implementation of PC-MH (p = 0.051). Given the importance of this topic for implementing integrated care as part of health care reform, these null findings underscore the need to improve theory and testing of more proximal measures of colocation in future work. PMID:25096986

  20. Immediate and delayed effects of risperidone on cerebral metabolism in neuroleptic naïve schizophrenic patients: correlations with symptom change

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, E; Lane, C; Ruth, T; Liddle, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Different symptom patterns have been shown to be associated with specific patterns of cerebral metabolic activity in schizophrenia. Treatment with various neuroleptic drugs results in decreased metabolism in frontal cortical regions. The temporal and regional relation between changes in metabolism and symptom improvement after treatment with risperidone was studied in eight previously unmedicated schizophrenic patients. Method: Cerebral metabolic activity was measured using PET before neuroleptic exposure, after the first dose of risperidone, and after 6 weeks of treatment. Pearson correlations were calculated for regions of significant change in metabolism and symptom change. Results: After 6 weeks of treatment significant deactivations were seen in the left lateral cortical frontal region and medial frontal cortex. Significant changes were detectable in the medial frontal region 90 minutes after the first dose of risperidone. Patients with higher baseline activity in the identified medial frontal cluster had higher baseline positive symptom scores and reduction in medial frontal metabolism was correlated with reduction in positive symptom score. Conclusion: The evidence suggests that the reduction in medial-frontal activity after treatment with risperidone is a direct effect of risperidone and not a consequence of symptom improvement. Reduction of medial frontal metabolism may be one of the physiological mechanisms by which risperidone alleviates symptoms of psychosis in schizophrenia. PMID:11784835

  1. Recirculating cross-correlation detector

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, W.H. Jr.; Roberts, M.J.

    1985-01-18

    A digital cross-correlation detector is provided in which two time-varying signals are correlated by repetitively comparing data samples stored in digital form to detect correlation between the two signals. The signals are sampled at a selected rate converted to digital form, and stored in separate locations in separate memories. When the memories are filled, the data samples from each memory are first fed word-by-word through a multiplier and summing circuit and each result is compared to the last in a peak memory circuit and if larger than the last is retained in the peak memory. Then the address line to leading signal memory is offset by one byte to affect one sample period delay of a known amount in that memory and the data in the two memories are then multiplied word-by-word once again and summed. If a new result is larger than a former sum, it is saved in the peak memory together with the time delay. The recirculating process continues with the address of the one memory being offset one additional byte each cycle until the address is shifted through the length of the memory. The correlation between the two signals is indicated by the peak signal stored in the peak memory together with the delay time at which the peak occurred. The circuit is faster and considerably less expensive than comparable accuracy correlation detectors.

  2. Community Detection for Correlation Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Mel; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-04-01

    A challenging problem in the study of complex systems is that of resolving, without prior information, the emergent, mesoscopic organization determined by groups of units whose dynamical activity is more strongly correlated internally than with the rest of the system. The existing techniques to filter correlations are not explicitly oriented towards identifying such modules and can suffer from an unavoidable information loss. A promising alternative is that of employing community detection techniques developed in network theory. Unfortunately, this approach has focused predominantly on replacing network data with correlation matrices, a procedure that we show to be intrinsically biased because of its inconsistency with the null hypotheses underlying the existing algorithms. Here, we introduce, via a consistent redefinition of null models based on random matrix theory, the appropriate correlation-based counterparts of the most popular community detection techniques. Our methods can filter out both unit-specific noise and system-wide dependencies, and the resulting communities are internally correlated and mutually anticorrelated. We also implement multiresolution and multifrequency approaches revealing hierarchically nested subcommunities with "hard" cores and "soft" peripheries. We apply our techniques to several financial time series and identify mesoscopic groups of stocks which are irreducible to a standard, sectorial taxonomy; detect "soft stocks" that alternate between communities; and discuss implications for portfolio optimization and risk management.

  3. Electronic correlations in Hund metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanfarillo, L.; Bascones, E.

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the nature of correlations in Hund metals and its relationship with Mott physics we analyze the electronic correlations in multiorbital systems as a function of intraorbital interaction U , Hund's coupling JH, and electronic filling n . We show that the main process behind the enhancement of correlations in Hund metals is the suppression of the double occupancy of a given orbital, as it also happens in the Mott insulator at half-filling. However, contrary to what happens in Mott correlated states the reduction of the quasiparticle weight Z with JH can happen in spite of increasing charge fluctuations. Therefore, in Hund metals the quasiparticle weight and the mass enhancement are not good measurements of the charge localization. Using simple energetic arguments we explain why the spin polarization induced by Hund's coupling produces orbital decoupling. We also discuss how the behavior at moderate interactions, with correlations controlled by the atomic spin polarization, changes at large U and JH due to the proximity to a Mott insulating state.

  4. Increased number of forkhead box P3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes correlates with high preoperative albumin level and better survival in patients with stage II or III colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-liang; Liu, Yan-yan; Gu, Yuan-long; Qin, Yu; Ji, Hong-fei; Wu, Li-hua; Qi, Ning; Su, Dan; Huang, Sun-hui; Zhang, Yan-qiao

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that test positive for forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) and elevated preoperative serum albumin levels have been positively associated with survival in colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed to investigate correlations among FOXP3+ TILs, preoperative serum albumin, overall survival, and other clinicopathological features of CRC patients. Surgical specimens from 340 stage II-III CRC patients were stained immunohistochemically for the presence of FOXP3+ TILs. Serum albumin levels were determined using an automatic biochemistry analyzer. Associations between various clinicopathological features and patient survival were analyzed via a Cox proportional hazards regression model. The correlation between FOXP3+ TILs and preoperative serum albumin was assessed using Pearson's correlation analysis. Survival curves were constructed by the Kaplan-Meier method. A high FOXP3+ TIL density (>15/five high-power fields), elevated preoperative serum albumin (?35 g/L), and proximal colon carcinoma were significantly associated with better survival, and high FOXP3+ TIL number and elevated preoperative serum albumin were independent predictors of better survival. The correlation between the number of FOXP3+ TILs and preoperative serum albumin level was significant but neither of these correlated with gender, age, tumor size, tumor differentiation, mucinous tumor, T4 stage, postoperative chemotherapy, or tumor location. Our findings suggest that increased FOXP3+ TILs and high preoperative serum albumin levels are independent prognostic markers for improved survival in CRC patients. Furthermore, the number of FOXP3+ TILs correlates with preoperative serum albumin levels in these patients. PMID:25697896

  5. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Sinem K.; Vogts, Angela; Kröhnert, Katharina; Hillion, François; Rizzoli, Silvio O.; Wessels, Johannes T.

    2014-04-01

    The isotopic composition of different materials can be imaged by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In biology, this method is mainly used to study cellular metabolism and turnover, by pulsing the cells with marker molecules such as amino acids labelled with stable isotopes (15N, 13C). The incorporation of the markers is then imaged with a lateral resolution that can surpass 100?nm. However, secondary ion mass spectrometry cannot identify specific subcellular structures like organelles, and needs to be correlated with a second technique, such as fluorescence imaging. Here, we present a method based on stimulated emission depletion microscopy that provides correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy (COIN) images. We use this approach to study the protein turnover in different organelles from cultured hippocampal neurons. Correlated optical and isotopic nanoscopy can be applied to a variety of biological samples, and should therefore enable the investigation of the isotopic composition of many organelles and subcellular structures.

  6. Softc: An Operational Software Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    Softc has been used operationally for spacecraft navigation at JPL for over 2 years and will be JPL's Mark 5 correlator next year. Softc was written to be as close to an ideal correlator as possible, making approximations only below 10(exp -13) seconds. The program can correlate real USB, real LSB, or complex I/Q data sampled with 1, 2, 4. or 8-bit resolution, and was developed with strong debugging tools that made final debugging relatively quick. Softc's algorithms and program structure are fully documented. Timing tests on a recent Intel CPU show Softc processes 8 lags of 1-bit sampled data at 10 MSamples/sec, independent of sample rate.

  7. Qubit channels with small correlations

    E-print Network

    Filippo Caruso; Vittorio Giovannetti; Chiara Macchiavello; Mary Beth Ruskai

    2008-05-13

    We introduce a class of quantum channels with correlations acting on pairs of qubits, where the correlation takes the form of a shift operator onto a maximally entangled state. We optimise the output purity and show that below a certain threshold the optimum is achieved by partially entangled states whose degree of entanglement increases monotonically with the correlation parameter. Above this threshold, the optimum is achieved by the maximally entangled state characterizing the shift. Although, a full analysis can only be done for the 2-norm, both numerical and heuristic arguments indicate that this behavior and the optimal inputs are independent of p>1 when the optimal output purity is measured using the p-norm.

  8. Quantum correlations and causal structures

    E-print Network

    Issam Ibnouhsein

    2015-10-13

    Recent works in foundations of quantum (field) theory and relativistic quantum information try to better grasp the interplay between the structure of quantum correlations and the constraints imposed by causality on physical operations. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the study of the conceptual implications of quantum nonlocality, a concept that subsumes that of entanglement in a certain way. We detail the recent information-theoretic approaches to understanding the structure of nonlocal correlations, and the issues the latter raise concerning the ability of local observers to isolate a system from its environment. Chapter 2 reviews in what sense imposing Poincare invariance affects entanglement detection and quantification procedures. This invariance ultimately forces a description of all quantum systems within the framework of quantum field theory, which leads to the impossibility of localized finite-energy states and to the divergence of all entanglement measures for local observers. We provide a solution to these two problems by showing that there exists a generic equivalence between a finite spatial resolution of the measurement apparatus and the exclusion of high-energy degrees of freedom from the definition of the observed system. This equivalence allows for an epistemic interpretation of the standard quantum formalism describing nonrelativistic localized systems and their correlations, hence a clarification of the origin of the finite measures of entanglement between such systems. Chapter 3 presents a recent theoretical framework that predicts the existence of correlations with indefinite causal order. In analogy to the information-theoretic approaches to nonlocal correlations, we introduce some principles that constrain the structure of such correlations, which is a first step toward a clear understanding of their physical origin.

  9. On the Nature of the mHz X-Ray QPOs from ULX M82 X-1: Evidence for Timing-Spectral (anti) Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2013-01-01

    Using all the archival XMM-Newton X-ray (3-10 keV) observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1 we searched for a correlation between its variable mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency and its energy spectral power-law index. These quantities are known to correlate in stellar mass black holes (StMBHs) exhibiting Type-C QPOs (approx 0.2-15 Hz). The detection of such a correlation would strengthen the identification of its mHz QPOs as Type-C and enable a more reliable mass estimate by scaling its QPO frequencies to those of Type-C QPOs in StMBHs of known mass. We resolved the count rates of M82 X-1 and a nearby bright ULX (source 5/X42.3+59) through surface brightness modeling and identify observations in which M82 X-1 was at least as bright as source 5. Using only those observations, we detect QPOs in the frequency range of 36-210 mHz during which the energy spectral power-law index varied from 1.7-2.2. Interestingly, we find evidence for an anti-correlation (Pearsons correlation coefficient = -0.95) between the power-law index and the QPO centroid frequency. While such an anti-correlation is observed in StMBHs at high Type-C QPO frequencies (approx 5-15 Hz), the frequency range over which it holds in StMBHs is significantly smaller (factor of approx 1.5-3) than the QPO range reported here from M82 X-1 (factor of 6). However, it remains possible that contamination from source 5 can bias our result. Joint Chandra/XMM-Newton observations in the future can resolve this problem and confirm the timing-spectral anti-correlation reported here.

  10. An IL6-correlated signature in serous epithelial ovarian cancer associates with growth factor response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most lethal gynecological cancers; the majority of EOC is the serous histotype and diagnosed at advanced stage. IL6 is the cytokine that has been found most frequently associated with carcinogenesis and progression of serous EOCs. IL6 is a growth-promoting and anti-apoptotic factor, and high plasma levels of IL6 in advanced stage EOCs correlate with poor prognosis. The objective of the present study was to identify IL6 co-regulated genes and gene network/s in EOCs. Results We applied bioinformatics tools on 7 publicly available data sets containing the gene expression profiles of 1262 EOC samples. By Pearson's correlation analysis we identified, in EOCs, an IL6-correlated gene signature containing 40 genes mainly associated with proliferation. 33 of 40 genes were also significantly correlated in low malignant potential (LMP) EOCs, while 7 genes, named C5AR1, FPR1, G0S2, IL8, KLF2, MMP19, and THBD were IL6-correlated only in advanced stage EOCs. Among the 40-gene signature EGFR ligand HBEGF, genes of the EGR family members and genes encoding for negative feedback regulators of growth factor signaling were included. The results obtained by Gene Set Enrichment and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses enabled the identification, respectively, of gene sets associated with ‘early growth factor response’ for the 40-gene signature, and a biological network related to ‘thrombosis and cardiovascular disease’ for the 7-gene signature. In agreement with these results, selected genes from the identified signatures were validated in vitro by real time RT-PCR in serous EOC cell lines upon stimulation with EGF. Conclusions Serous EOCs, independently of their aggressiveness, co-regulate IL6 expression together with that of genes associated to growth factor signaling, arguing for the hypothesis that common mechanism/s driven by EGFR ligands characterize both advanced-stage and LMP EOCs. Only advanced-stage EOCs appeared to be characterized by a scenario that involves genes which are so far associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular disease, thus suggesting that this pathway is implicated in the growth and/or spread of more aggressive tumors. We have discovered novel activated signaling pathways that drive the expression of IL6 and of co-regulated genes and are possibly involved in the pathobiology of EOCs. PMID:23889749

  11. A Correlation Study of Student Attitudes Toward Science in a Southern State High School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco-Southall, Crystal

    The purpose of this correlational research study was to examine the attitudes toward science of students in Grades 11 and 12 and to investigate if there were differences resulting from gender, grade level, ethnicity, and the level of the curriculum received in average or advanced placement (AP) honors science. The participants of this study consisted of 50 randomly selected male and female high school students who were enrolled in AP and average science classes in an urban Southern state high school. The study used the Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA) instrument to measure students' attitudes toward science in seven categories including (a) Social Implications of Science, (b) Normality of Scientists, (c) Attitude Toward Scientific Inquiry, (d) Adoption of Scientific Attitudes, (e) Enjoyment of Science Lessons, (f) Leisure Interest in Science, and (g) Career Interest in Science. The quantitative component of the study allowed the researcher to determine whether there were gender differences in attitudes toward science based on the seven subscales and measuring different aspects of science attitudes. Statistical treatment of the TOSRA survey involved the use of descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and multiple and linear regression. Findings did not reveal significant gender differences on the total attitude scores although there were differences on several of the subscales. In addition, there were no significant differences in the mean attitude scores for grade level. However, the study did reveal differences in ethnicity and attitudes toward science. With regard to ethnicity, scores for Native Americans and Whites were higher than scores for Asians, African Americans, and Hispanics indicating that Native Americans and White students showed a more positive attitude toward science. Regarding the level of curriculum received by students who were exposed to advanced level science courses showed more positive attitudes toward science than those students who were enrolled in average science classes.

  12. Neurocognitive correlates of white matter in children surviving cancer: a quantitative MR imaging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; Glass, John O.; Shan, Zuyao Y.; Wu, Shengjie; Helton, Susan; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2005-04-01

    Due to the inherent risk of central nervous system (CNS) dissemination, children treated for either acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or malignant brain tumors (BT) receive aggressive CNS therapy. The primary objective of this study was to confirm a previously observed association between reduced volumes of normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and intellectual and attentional deficits in survivors. A combined MR imaging set consisting of T1, T2, and PD images were collected for 221 children (110 BT; 112 ALL). MR imaging sets were segmented with a hybrid neural network algorithm and volumetric measurements were calculated for five slices centered on the basal ganglia. Summary measures of Overall Index, Omissions, d" (attentiveness), and beta (risk-taking) were derived from the computer-administered Conners" Continuous Performance Test (CPT). Age-corrected estimates of Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) were also obtained. Pearson correlation analyses were performed between each neurocognitive measure and the volume of NAWM. The correlation between FSIQ and NAWM failed to reach statistical significance for the BT group but was highly significant for the more homogeneous ALL group. Larger Omission rates, decreased attentiveness and more risk taking were significantly associated with lower NAWM volumes in both groups of survivors. Long-term survivors are at increased risk for cognitive delays or deficits, which oftentimes impair future academic performance, employment, and quality of life. These long-term adverse effects of treatment appear to be due to a diminished ability to acquire new information and may be secondary to deficits in attention, which is thought to be supported by interhemispheric and intrahemispheric white matter tracts.

  13. Correlation of mechanical impact responses and biomarker levels: A new model for biomarker evaluation in TBI.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Cohen, Abigail; Cavanaugh, John M

    2015-12-15

    A modified Marmarou impact acceleration model was used to help screen biomarkers to assess brain injury severity. Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a closed head injury from 1.25, 1.75 and 2.25m drop heights. Linear and angular responses of the head were measured in vivo. 24h after impact, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected. CSF and serum levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy (pNF-H), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and amyloid beta (A?) 1-42 were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared to controls, significantly higher CSF and serum pNF-H levels were observed in all impact groups, except between 1.25m and control in serum. Furthermore, CSF and serum pNF-H levels were significantly different between the impact groups. For GFAP, both CSF and serum levels were significantly higher at 2.25m compared to 1.75m, 1.25m and controls. There was no significant difference in CSF and serum GFAP levels between 1.75m and 1.25m, although both groups were significantly higher than control. TBI rats also showed significantly higher levels of IL-6 versus control in both CSF and serum, but no significant difference was observed between each impact group. Levels of A? were not significantly different between groups. Pearson's correlation analysis showed pNF-H and GFAP levels in CSF and serum had positive correlation with power (rate of impact energy), followed by average linear acceleration and surface righting (p<0.01), which were good predictors for traumatic axonal injury according to histologic assessment in our previous study, suggesting that they are directly related to the injury mechanism. The model used in this study showed a unique ability in elucidating the relationship between biomarker levels and severity of the mechanical trauma to the brain. PMID:26671128

  14. Top Quark Spin Correlations - Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2012-02-01

    The top quark decay width (G{sub F}m{sub t}{sup 3} {approx} 1 GeV) is much larger than the QCD hadronization scale ({Lambda}{sub QCD} {approx} 0.1 GeV) and much larger than the spin decorrelation scale ({Lambda}{sub QCD}{sup 2}/m{sub t} {approx} 0.1 MeV). Therefore, spin correlations in top quark pair production are reflected in angular correlations of the decay products, see [1] and [2].

  15. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  16. Orientational correlations in confined DNA

    E-print Network

    E. Werner; F. Persson; F. Westerlund; J. O. Tegenfeldt; B. Mehlig

    2012-10-05

    We study how the orientational correlations of DNA confined to nanochannels depend on the channel diameter D by means of Monte Carlo simulations and a mean-field theory. This theory describes DNA conformations in the experimentally relevant regime where the Flory-de Gennes theory does not apply. We show how local correlations determine the dependence of the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule upon D. Tapered nanochannels provide the necessary resolution in D to study experimentally how the extension of confined DNA molecules depends upon D. Our experimental and theoretical results are in qualitative agreement.

  17. Gene Expression and Correlation of Pten and Fabp4 in Liver, Muscle, and Adipose Tissues of Type 2 Diabetes Rats

    PubMed Central

    Su, Di; Zhang, Chuan-ling; Gao, Ying-chun; Liu, Xiao-ying; Li, Cai-ping; Huangfu, Jian; Xiao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this work was to study the Fabp4 and Pten gene expression and correlation in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Material/Methods Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=12/group): a control group fed a normal diet for 8 weeks and an experimental group fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet for 8 weeks and that received 25 mg/kg streptozotocin by intraperitoneal injection to induce T2DM. The random blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, and fasting insulin levels were measured. The expression of Pten and Fabp4 in the liver, muscle, and epididymal adipose tissues was estimated by real-time quantitative PCR. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis was used to investigate the expression correlation between Pten and Fabp4 in T2DM rats. Results The gene expressions of Pten and Fabp4 in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of T2DM rats were all significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Pten was highly expressed in the muscles and Fabp4 was highly expressed in muscle and adipose tissues. Furthermore, expressions of Fabp4 and Pten in the muscle and adipose tissues of T2DM rats were positively correlated (P<0.05), but not in the liver. Conclusions The increased expression of PTEN and FABP4 in the adipose and muscles of T2DM rats may play an important role in the insulin resistance of T2DM. However, the mechanism by which these 2 genes function in T2DM needs further study. PMID:26591002

  18. Incubation of selected fermentable fibres with feline faecal inoculum: correlations between in vitro fermentation characteristics and end products.

    PubMed

    Rochus, Kristel; Bosch, Guido; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Van de Velde, Hannelore; Depauw, Sarah; Xu, Jia; Fievez, Veerle; Van de Wiele, Tom; Hendriks, Wouter Hendrikus; Paul Jules Janssens, Geert; Hesta, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate correlations between fermentation characteristics and end products of selected fermentable fibres (three types of fructans, citrus pectin, guar gum), incubated with faecal inocula from donor cats fed two diets, differing in fibre and protein sources and concentrations. Cumulative gas production was measured over 72 h, fermentation end products were analysed at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h post-incubation, and quantification of lactobacilli, bifidobacteria and bacteroides in fermentation liquids were performed at 4 and 48 h of incubation. Partial Pearson correlations, corrected for inoculum, were calculated to assess the interdependency of the fermentation characteristics of the soluble fibre substrates. Butyric and valeric acid concentrations increased with higher fermentation rates, whereas acetic acid declined. Concentrations of butyric acid (highest in fructans) and propionic acid were inversely correlated with protein fermentation end products at several time points, whereas concentrations of acetic acid (highest in citrus pectin) were positively correlated with these products at most time points. Remarkably, a lack of clear relationship between the counts of bacterial groups and their typically associated products after 4 h of incubation was observed. Data from this experiment suggest that differences in fibre fermentation rate in feline faecal inocula coincide with typical changes in the profile of bacterial fermentation products. The observed higher concentrations of propionic and butyric acid as a result of fibre fermentation could possibly have beneficial effects on intestinal health, and may be confounded with a concurrent decrease in the production of putrefactive compounds. In conclusion, supplementing guar gum or fructans to a feline diet might be more advantageous compared with citrus pectin. However, in vivo research is warranted to confirm these conclusions in domestic cats. PMID:23952674

  19. Correlation between Radiologic Sign of Lumbar Lordosis and Functional Status in Patients with Chronic Mechanical Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Alireza; Farahangiz, Siamak; Pakniat Jahromi, Bita; Setayeshpour, Nazanin; Nasseri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A cross-sectional study. Purpose To describe the correlation between lumbar lordosis angle and functional status of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP). Overview of Literature There are different and conflicting opinions regarding the relationship between the degree of lumbar lordosis and functional status of patients with low back pain. Nonetheless, the severity of lordosis is still one of the routine physical exams considered in rehabilitation clinics. Methods The degree of lumbar lordosis of 150 patients with CMLBP was measured by means of Cobb's method using sagittal standing spinal radiographs. Subjects with probable secondary causes of low back pain (trauma, congenital anomaly, spinal infection, rheumatologic problems and history of spinal surgery) were excluded. Besides recording demographic data, their score of functional disability was estimated using Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, one of the most useful and reliable questionnaires. Comparison between these data was made regarding different age and gender groups. Results In this study, 119 subjects were female and 31 male, with an age range of 19-85 years. The average degree of lumbar lordosis was 44.69±11.43 and that of Oswestry disability index (ODI) 30.52%. Although we found a significant direct relationship between age and degree of lumbar lordosis (Pearson's correlation coefficient, p=0.016, r=0.197), while insignificant correlation was seen between the degree of lumbar lordosis and ODI (p=0.129). Conclusions There was no significant correlation between the degree of lumbar lordosis and the score of functional disability with regards to different age groups and gender. PMID:25346808

  20. Gene Expression and Correlation of Pten and Fabp4 in Liver, Muscle, and Adipose Tissues of Type 2 Diabetes Rats.

    PubMed

    Su, Di; Zhang, Chuan-Ling; Gao, Ying-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Li, Cai-Ping; Huangfu, Jian; Xiao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this work was to study the Fabp4 and Pten gene expression and correlation in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS Male Wistar rats (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=12/group): a control group fed a normal diet for 8 weeks and an experimental group fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet for 8 weeks and that received 25 mg/kg streptozotocin by intraperitoneal injection to induce T2DM. The random blood glucose, fasting blood glucose, and fasting insulin levels were measured. The expression of Pten and Fabp4 in the liver, muscle, and epididymal adipose tissues was estimated by real-time quantitative PCR. Pearson correlation coefficient analysis was used to investigate the expression correlation between Pten and Fabp4 in T2DM rats. RESULTS The gene expressions of Pten and Fabp4 in the liver, muscle, and adipose tissues of T2DM rats were all significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05). Pten was highly expressed in the muscles and Fabp4 was highly expressed in muscle and adipose tissues. Furthermore, expressions of Fabp4 and Pten in the muscle and adipose tissues of T2DM rats were positively correlated (P<0.05), but not in the liver. CONCLUSIONS The increased expression of PTEN and FABP4 in the adipose and muscles of T2DM rats may play an important role in the insulin resistance of T2DM. However, the mechanism by which these 2 genes function in T2DM needs further study. PMID:26591002

  1. Grossberg, S. & Pearson, L. LIST PARSE MODEL SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    - temporal boundary overlapping into the superior temporal sulcus (including area Spt; Hickok & Poeppel, 2004,d and 46 (Petrides & Pandya, 1994) in and around the principal sulcus of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) presentation are likely to involve the anterior superior temporal sulcus and inferotemporal region (e.g., areas

  2. Slides by Kevin Wayne. Copyright 2005 Pearson-Addison Wesley.

    E-print Network

    Kosecka, Jana

    two people. Reference: Valdis Krebs, http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_4/krebs 7 Ecological pair of nodes u and v, there is a path between u and v. 11 Cycles Def. A cycle is a path v1, v2, ..., vk-1, vk in which v1 = vk, k > 2, and the first k-1 nodes are all distinct. cycle C = 1-2-4-5-3-1 12

  3. Architectural by Alison Brooks Architects Landscape by Dan Pearson Studio

    E-print Network

    Flynn, E. Victor

    :2500 A3 2344_A 001_PL_I Existing Site Plan 1:10000 A3 - B 2344_A 002_PL_I Existing Site Plan 1:1000 A3 - B 2344_A 003_PL_I Existing Basement Plan 1:500 A3 - B 2344_A 004_PL_I Existing Mezzanine Level Plan 1:500 A3- B 2344_A 005_PL_I Existing Ground Floor Plan 1:500 A3 - B 2344_A 006_PL_I Existing First

  4. HelenPearson A study highlighting statistical gaffes in

    E-print Network

    García-Berthou, Emili

    cloned a human somatic cell, creating an embryo that they used to establish a stem-cell lineCyranoski,Tokyo Bioethicists are pushing for an investigation into the cloning work of a South Korean research team thera- peutic human embryonic cloning research," readsthestatementtheyissued. The questions, posted

  5. Distributed Signal Detection under the NeymanPearson Criterion

    E-print Network

    Blum, Rick

    (fl) = ff 2 #12; where P d (fl) = P rob(U 0 = 1jH 1 ) is the probability of detection obtained when fl is used, P f (fl) = P rob(U 0 = 1jH 0 ) is the probability of false alarm obtained when fl is used, and 0 probability density functions (pdfs) f X k (x k jH j ); j = 0; 1. Define D jk (x k ) = f X k (x k jH j ) X e u

  6. 2005 Pearson Education Inc., publishing as Addison-Wesley

    E-print Network

    Shirley, Yancy

    Dinosaurs go extinct (~65 Myrs ago) #12;Dec 31st 6pm First Hominids (~7-8 Myrs ago) #12;Dec 31st ~10 of galaxies in cluster indicate that up to 90% of the mass is "dark matter" #12;Expansion is Accelerating

  7. Chapter 12 The Dynamic Planet 2015 Pearson Education, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    the three main groups of rock, and diagram the rock cycle. · Introduce Wegener's Continental Drift Principle of Superposition Rock and sediment always are arranged with the youngest bed "superposed" toward the top of a rock formation and the oldest at the base, if there have not been disturbed. oldest youngest

  8. Negnevitsky, Pearson Education, 2005 1 CSC 4510 Machine Learning

    E-print Network

    Papalaskari, Mary-Angela

    : Gene(c Algorithms 1 CSC 4510 M.A. Papalaskari Villanova University Slides of this presenta what nature does. Holland was concerned with algorithms that manipulate strings of binary digits. Each artificial "chromosomes" consists of a number of "genes", and each gene is represented by 0 or 1: #12

  9. 2015 Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 7 Water and Atmospheric Moisture

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    of water: solid, liquid, and gas. · Define humidity and relative humidity. · Explain dew-point temperature temperature. · Relative humidity: Relativehumidity = Actual water vapor in the air Maximum water vapor · As the relative humidity is at 100%, air is at saturation. · At saturation, evaporation rate is equal

  10. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed during SCES 2010. As we learned, past dogmas about strongly correlated materials and phenomena must be re-examined with an open and inquisitive mind. Invited speakers and respected leaders in the field were invited to contribute to this special issue and we have insisted that they present new data, ideas, or perspectives, as opposed to simply an overview of their past work. As with the conference, this special issue touches upon recent developments of strongly correlated electron systems in d-electron materials, such as Sr3Ru2O7, graphene, and the new Fe-based superconductors, but it is dominated by topics in f-electron compounds. Contributions reflect the growing appreciation for the influence of disorder and frustration, the need for organizing principles, as well as detailed investigations on particular materials of interest and, of course, new materials. As this special issue could not possibly capture the full breadth and depth that the conference had to offer, it is being published simultaneously with an issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series containing 157 manuscripts in which all poster presenters at SCES 2010 were invited to contribute. Since this special issue grew out of the 2010 SCES conference, we take this opportunity to give thanks. This conference would not have been possible without the hard work of the SCES 2010 Program Committee, International and National Advisory Committees, Local Committee, and conference organizers, the New Mexico Consortium. We thank them as well as those organizations that generously provided financial support: ICAM-I2CAM, Quantum Design, Lakeshore, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and the Department of Energy National Laboratories at Argonne, Berkeley, Brookhaven, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge. Of course, we especially thank the participants for bringing new ideas and new results, without which SCES 2010 would not have been possible. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Spin-orbit coupling and k-dependent Zeeman splitting in strontium ruthenate Emil J Rozbicki, James F Annett, Jean-René Souquet an

  11. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion require us to understand electrochemistry on the scale of a single atom; and we already know that the only prospect for effective high temperature superconductivity involves strongly correlated materials. Even novel IT technologies are now seen to have value not just for novel function but also for efficiency. While strongly correlated electron systems continue to excite researchers and the public alike due to the fundamental science issues involved, it seems increasingly likely that support for the science will be leveraged by its impact on energy and sustainability. Strongly correlated electron systems contents Strongly correlated electron systemsSiddharth S Saxena and P B Littlewood Magnetism, f-electron localization and superconductivity in 122-type heavy-fermion metalsF Steglich, J Arndt, O Stockert, S Friedemann, M Brando, C Klingner, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Wirth, S Kirchner and Q Si High energy pseudogap and its evolution with doping in Fe-based superconductors as revealed by optical spectroscopyN L Wang, W Z Hu, Z G Chen, R H Yuan, G Li, G F Chen and T Xiang Structural investigations on YbRh2Si2: from the atomic to the macroscopic length scaleS Wirth, S Ernst, R Cardoso-Gil, H Borrmann, S Seiro, C Krellner, C Geibel, S Kirchner, U Burkhardt, Y Grin and F Steglich Confinement of chiral magnetic modulations in the precursor region of FeGeH Wilhelm, M Baenitz, M Schmidt, C Naylor, R Lortz, U

  12. Estimating Correlation under Interval Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    of Computer Science University of Texas at El Paso 500 W. University El Paso, TX 79968, USA ajalalkamali@miners. In general, the problem of computing this range is NP-hard. In this paper, we provide a feasible because they make the computations slightly simpler. Known facts about correlation: brief reminder

  13. Correlated Tunneling in Hydrogen Bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph A.; Car, Roberto

    2011-10-01

    We study the quantum nature of the protons participating in hydrogen bonds in several ice structures by analyzing the one particle density matrix. We find that in all cases, including ice Ih, the most common form of ice, and the high pressure phases, ice VIII, VII, and X, the system is ground-state dominated. However, while the dynamics is uncorrelated in the structures with standard asymmetric hydrogen bonds, such as ice Ih and VIII, local correlations among the protons characterize ice VII and, to a lesser extent, ice X in the so-called low barrier hydrogen bond regime. The correlations appear along the path to hydrogen bond symmetrization, when quantum fluctuations delocalize the proton on the two bond sides. The correlations derive from a strong requirement for local charge neutrality that favors concerted motion along the bonds. The resulting behavior deviates substantially from mean field theory, which would predict in ice VII coherent tunneling of the proton between the two bond sides, thereby causing an ionization catastrophe. Due to the correlations, the quantum state of the proton is entangled.

  14. Sample Size and Correlational Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard B.; Doherty, Michael E.; Friedrich, Jeff C.

    2008-01-01

    In 4 studies, the authors examined the hypothesis that the structure of the informational environment makes small samples more informative than large ones for drawing inferences about population correlations. The specific purpose of the studies was to test predictions arising from the signal detection simulations of R. B. Anderson, M. E. Doherty,…

  15. Multilevel Modeling with Correlated Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Frees, Edward W.

    2007-01-01

    When there exist omitted effects, measurement error, and/or simultaneity in multilevel models, explanatory variables may be correlated with random components, and standard estimation methods do not provide consistent estimates of model parameters. This paper introduces estimators that are consistent under such conditions. By employing generalized…

  16. A SEARCH FOR POSSIBLE CORRELATIONS

    E-print Network

    on observations collected with the Swiss telescope at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile Silla. This report describes a search for possible correlations between these satellite data and the high­quality photometric extinction coefficients obtained with the Swiss telescope at La Silla, having

  17. Correlation effects and bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovjev, G. M.; Molodtsov, S. V.

    2012-11-15

    Bound states in a simple quark model that are due to correlation effects are analyzed. The confining properties of this model in meson (quark-antiquark and diquark) channels manifest themselves at any quark momenta, and an extra potential field may only enhance the confining effect.

  18. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  19. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chasman, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions.

  20. Tetrachoric Correlation: A Permutation Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Michael A.; Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    An exact permutation test is provided for the tetrachoric correlation coefficient. Comparisons with the conventional test employing Student's t distribution demonstrate the necessity of using the permutation approach for small sample sizes and/or disproportionate marginal frequency totals. (Contains 4 tables.)

  1. Correlation-assisted quantum communication

    SciTech Connect

    Ziman, Mario; Buzek, Vladimir

    2003-04-01

    Quantum dense coding is considered to be one of the most remarkable demonstrations of the existence of quantum entanglement. In this paper, we analyze the role of correlations (both classical and quantum) in quantum communication protocols. We study how the capacity of a single-qubit quantum channel depends on correlations between Alice and Bob. In particular, we consider a scenario when Alice and Bob share a pair of qubits in a state such that Alice's qubit is in the state described by the density operator {rho}=(1/2)1+n-vector{center_dot}{sigma}-vector. We evaluate a capacity of the noiseless channel for two cases: (1) when Bob performs measurement just on the particle received from Alice, and (2) in the case when he utilizes correlations that have been established prior to the communication. We present a simple classical scenario which might serve as a prototype of quantum dense coding. We generalize our results also for qudits. In addition, we address some aspects of the issue of security in correlation-assisted communication protocols.

  2. Improved correlations for retrograde gases 

    E-print Network

    Crogh, Arne

    1996-01-01

    of liquid (FL). Second, a correlation to describe the molar distribution Of C7+ of a gas-condensate mixture as a function of carbon number (CN), the C6 mole fraction and the properties Of C7+ has been developed. For comparison, the Ahmed, et aL, and Whitson...

  3. Hadron Correlations and Parton Recombination

    E-print Network

    Rainer J. Fries

    2007-02-08

    Parton recombination has been found to be an extremely useful model to understand hadron production at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. It is particularly important to explore its connections with hard processes. This article reviews some of the aspects of the quark recombination model and places particular emphasis on hadron correlations.

  4. Correlation of phantom-based and log file patient-specific QA with complexity scores for VMAT.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Christina E; Irvine, Denise M; McGarry, Conor K

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for this study was to reduce physics workload relating to patient- specific quality assurance (QA). VMAT plan delivery accuracy was determined from analysis of pre- and on-treatment trajectory log files and phantom-based ionization chamber array measurements. The correlation in this combination of measurements for patient-specific QA was investigated. The relationship between delivery errors and plan complexity was investigated as a potential method to further reduce patient-specific QA workload. Thirty VMAT plans from three treatment sites - prostate only, prostate and pelvic node (PPN), and head and neck (H&N) - were retrospectively analyzed in this work. The 2D fluence delivery reconstructed from pretreatment and on-treatment trajectory log files was compared with the planned fluence using gamma analysis. Pretreatment dose delivery verification was also car- ried out using gamma analysis of ionization chamber array measurements compared with calculated doses. Pearson correlations were used to explore any relationship between trajectory log file (pretreatment and on-treatment) and ionization chamber array gamma results (pretreatment). Plan complexity was assessed using the MU/ arc and the modulation complexity score (MCS), with Pearson correlations used to examine any relationships between complexity metrics and plan delivery accu- racy. Trajectory log files were also used to further explore the accuracy of MLC and gantry positions. Pretreatment 1%/1 mm gamma passing rates for trajectory log file analysis were 99.1% (98.7%-99.2%), 99.3% (99.1%-99.5%), and 98.4% (97.3%-98.8%) (median (IQR)) for prostate, PPN, and H&N, respectively, and were significantly correlated to on-treatment trajectory log file gamma results (R = 0.989, p < 0.001). Pretreatment ionization chamber array (2%/2 mm) gamma results were also significantly correlated with on-treatment trajectory log file gamma results (R = 0.623, p < 0.001). Furthermore, all gamma results displayed a significant correlation with MCS (R > 0.57, p < 0.001), but not with MU/arc. Average MLC position and gantry angle errors were 0.001 ± 0.002 mm and 0.025° ± 0.008° over all treatment sites and were not found to affect delivery accuracy. However, vari- ability in MLC speed was found to be directly related to MLC position accuracy. The accuracy of VMAT plan delivery assessed using pretreatment trajectory log file fluence delivery and ionization chamber array measurements were strongly correlated with on-treatment trajectory log file fluence delivery. The strong corre- lation between trajectory log file and phantom-based gamma results demonstrates potential to reduce our current patient-specific QA. Additionally, insight into MLC and gantry position accuracy through trajectory log file analysis and the strong cor- relation between gamma analysis results and the MCS could also provide further methodologies to both optimize the VMAT planning and QA process.  PMID:25493524

  5. Storm: A Framework for Biologically-Inspired Cognitive Architecture Research Douglas Pearson (douglas.pearson@threepenny.net)

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Richard

    the development of cognitive architectures based on the structure and function of the brain. The goals to structures in the brain. We demonstrate a working implementation of the framework, where we have developed level posit direct mappings to structures and processes of neural systems in the brain. The achievements

  6. Lack of correlation between tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and leakage in roots filled with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Ricardo; da SILVA NETO, Ulisses Xavier; CARNEIRO, Everdan; FARINIUK, Luiz Fernando; WESTPHALEN, Vânia Portela Ditzel; CUNHA, Rodrigo Sanches

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze possible correlations among tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and apical leakage in fillings performed with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin. Material and Methods Sixty similar, extracted human mandibular central incisors were irrigated, instrumented and filled following the same protocol. First, apical leakage was quantified by fluid filtration tests. Then, these same specimens were sectioned for analysis of tubular dentine cement penetration and the middle thirds were submitted to push-out tests to analyze the adhesiveness of the fillings. Results In brief, the means and standard deviations with a confidence interval of 95% were as follows: tubular dentine cement penetration (8.875±4.540), adhesiveness (4.441±2.683) and apical leakage (0.318±0.215). The data were confronted using the Pearson's test (P>0.05), and it was possible to prove that there was no correlation between (1) tubular dentine cement penetration and apical leakage (r2: 0.08276), (2) tubular dentine cement penetration and adhesiveness (r2: -0.2412) and (3) adhesiveness and apical leakage (r2: 0.1340). Conclusion After analysis of these data, it could be observed that there exists no correlation among the variables analyzed in this study. PMID:24626245

  7. Respiratory correlated cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Zijp, Lambert; Remeijer, Peter; Herk, Marcel van

    2005-04-01

    A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner integrated with a linear accelerator is a powerful tool for image guided radiotherapy. Respiratory motion, however, induces artifacts in CBCT, while the respiratory correlated procedures, developed to reduce motion artifacts in axial and helical CT are not suitable for such CBCT scanners. We have developed an alternative respiratory correlated procedure for CBCT and evaluated its performance. This respiratory correlated CBCT procedure consists of retrospective sorting in projection space, yielding subsets of projections that each corresponds to a certain breathing phase. Subsequently, these subsets are reconstructed into a four-dimensional (4D) CBCT dataset. The breathing signal, required for respiratory correlation, was directly extracted from the 2D projection data, removing the need for an additional respiratory monitor system. Due to the reduced number of projections per phase, the contrast-to-noise ratio in a 4D scan reduced by a factor 2.6-3.7 compared to a 3D scan based on all projections. Projection data of a spherical phantom moving with a 3 and 5 s period with and without simulated breathing irregularities were acquired and reconstructed into 3D and 4D CBCT datasets. The positional deviations of the phantoms center of gravity between 4D CBCT and fluoroscopy were small: 0.13{+-}0.09 mm for the regular motion and 0.39{+-}0.24 mm for the irregular motion. Motion artifacts, clearly present in the 3D CBCT datasets, were substantially reduced in the 4D datasets, even in the presence of breathing irregularities, such that the shape of the moving structures could be identified more accurately. Moreover, the 4D CBCT dataset provided information on the 3D trajectory of the moving structures, absent in the 3D data. Considerable breathing irregularities, however, substantially reduces the image quality. Data presented for three different lung cancer patients were in line with the results obtained from the phantom study. In conclusion, we have successfully implemented a respiratory correlated CBCT procedure yielding a 4D dataset. With respiratory correlated CBCT on a linear accelerator, the mean position, trajectory, and shape of a moving tumor can be verified just prior to treatment. Such verification reduces respiration induced geometrical uncertainties, enabling safe delivery of 4D radiotherapy such as gated radiotherapy with small margins.

  8. Correlation between Voronoi volumes in disc packings

    E-print Network

    Song-Chuan Zhao; Stacy Sidle; Harry L. Swinney; Matthias Schröter

    2011-12-19

    We measure the two-point correlation of free Voronoi volumes in binary disc packings, where the packing fraction $\\phi_{\\rm avg}$ ranges from 0.8175 to 0.8380. We observe short-ranged correlations over the whole range of $\\phi_{\\rm avg}$ and anti-correlations for $\\phi_{\\rm avg}>0.8277$. The spatial extent of the anti-correlation increases with $\\phi_{\\rm avg}$ while the position of the maximum of the anti-correlation and the extent of the positive correlation shrink with $\\phi_{\\rm avg}$. We conjecture that the onset of anti-correlation corresponds to dilatancy onset in this system.

  9. Simultaneous [18F]FDG-PET/MRI: Correlation of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) and Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) in Primary and Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bremicker, K.; Höckel, M.; Barthel, H.; Kluge, R.; Kahn, T.; Sabri, O.; Stumpp, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Previous non–simultaneous PET/MR studies have shown heterogeneous results about the correlation between standardized uptake values (SUVs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs). The aim of this study was to investigate correlations in patients with primary and recurrent tumors using a simultaneous PET/MRI system which could lead to a better understanding of tumor biology and might play a role in early response assessment. Methods We included 31 patients with histologically confirmed primary (n = 14) or recurrent cervical cancer (n = 17) who underwent simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/MRI comprising DWI. Image analysis was performed by a radiologist and a nuclear physician who identified tumor margins and quantified ADC and SUV. Pearson correlations were calculated to investigate the association between ADC and SUV. Results 92 lesions were detected. We found a significant inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmin (r = -0.532, p = 0.05) in primary tumors as well as in primary metastases (r = -0.362, p = 0.05) and between SUVmean and ADCmin (r = -0.403, p = 0.03). In recurrent local tumors we found correlations for SUVmax and ADCmin (r = -0.747, p = 0.002) and SUVmean and ADCmin (r = -0.773, p = 0.001). Associations for recurrent metastases were not significant (p>0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the feasibility of fast and reliable measurement of SUV and ADC with simultaneous PET/MRI. In patients with cervical cancer we found significant inverse correlations for SUV and ADC which could play a major role for further tumor characterization and therapy decisions. PMID:26551527

  10. Measurement and Correlation of Ambient VOCs in Windsor, Ontario, Canada and Detroit, Michigan, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. J.; You, H.; Xu, X.; Molaroni, S.; Lemke, L.; Weglicki, L.; Krouse, H.; Krajenta, R.

    2009-05-01

    An air quality study has been carried out in Windsor, Ontario, Canada and Detroit, Michigan, USA as part of a pilot research study undertaken by the Geospatial Determinants of Health Outcomes Consortium (GeoDHOC), a multidisciplinary, international effort aimed at understanding the health effects of air pollution in urban environments. Exposure to volatile organic compounds has long been associated with adverse health conditions such as atrophy of skeletal muscles, loss of coordination, neurological damage, dizziness, throat, nose, and eye irritation, nervous system depression, liver damage, and respiratory symptoms. Twenty-six species of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored during a 2-week period in September, 2008 at 100 sites across Windsor and Detroit, using 3M # 3500 Organic Vapour Monitors. Ten species with highest concentrations were selected for further investigation; Toluene (mean concentration =4.14 ?m/m3), (m+p)-Xylene (2.30 ?m/m3), Hexane (1.87 ?m/m3), Benzene (1.37 ?m/m3), 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene (0.87 ?m/m3), Dichloromethane (0.77 ?m/m3), Ethylbenzene (0.68 ?m/m3), o-Xylene (0.63 ?m/m3), n-Decane (0.42 ?m/m3), and 1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene (0.39 ?m/m3). Comparison to a similar investigation in Sarnia, Ontario in October 2005 revealed that the mean concentrations of VOCs were higher in Windsor-Detroit for all species by a significant margin (31-958%), indicating substantial impact of local industrial and vehicular emissions in the WindsorVDetroit area. For most VOCs, the concentrations were higher in Detroit than in Windsor. The mean concentration of total VOC was 9.7 ?m/m3 in Windsor, which is slightly higher than that in Sarnia in 2005 (7.9 um/m3), whilst total VOC concentration in Detroit was much higher (16.5 ?m/m3). There were strong correlations among several of the 10 species, with the highest Pearson correlation coefficients (r=0.78 - 0.99, p<0.05) amongst the BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) group, suggesting common sources of these species. The BTEX correlation for this study was in good agreement with that from the Sarnia results (Spearman rank correlation coefficient r=0.75 - 0.99), suggesting that one species may act as a proxy for the others in geographically similar regions.

  11. The Decrement of Hemoglobin Concentration with Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Treatment Is Correlated with the Reduction of Albuminuria in Non-Diabetic Hypertensive Patients: Post-Hoc Analysis of ESPECIAL Trial

    PubMed Central

    An, Jung Nam; Hwang, Jin Ho; Lee, Jung Pyo; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Sejoong; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Suhnggwon; Park, Jung Hwan; Shin, Sung Joon; Lee, Sang Ho; Choi, Bum Soon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system exhibits a renoprotective effect; however, blockade of this system may also decrease hemoglobin (Hb) and erythropoietin (EPO) levels. We evaluated the correlation between reduced albuminuria and decreased hemoglobin concentrations after treatment with an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Two hundred forty-five non-diabetic hypertensive participants with established albuminuria and relatively preserved renal function were treated with an ARB (40 mg/day olmesartan) for eight weeks. Subsequent changes in various clinical parameters, including Hb, EPO, and albuminuria, were analyzed following treatment. After the 8-week treatment with an ARB, Hb and EPO levels significantly decreased. Patients with a greater decrease in Hb exhibited a greater reduction in 24-hour urinary albumin excretion compared with patients with less of a decrease or no decrease in Hb, whereas no associations with a decline in renal function and EPO levels were noted. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated a correlation between the reduction of urine albumin excretion and the decrease in Hb levels (after natural logarithm transformation, adjusted odds ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.21-2.56, P = 0.003). Linear regression analysis also supported this positive correlation (Pearson correlation analysis; R = 0.24, P < 0.001). Decreased Hb concentrations following ARB treatment were positively correlated with reduced albuminuria in non-diabetic hypertensive patients, regardless of decreased blood pressure and EPO levels or renal function decline. PMID:26098847

  12. Plane correlations in small colliding systems

    E-print Network

    Li Yan

    2015-06-11

    I propose event-plane correlations as a test of collectivity in small colliding systems: In d-Au and $^3$He-Au collisions, I predict a strong anti-correlation between elliptic and triangular flow, generated by the geometry of the light projectile. A significant anti-correlation is also predicted in central p-Pb collisions at the LHC, which is solely generated by fluctuations. Similar, but stronger correlation patterns are predicted in correlations involving dipolar flow.

  13. Correlation between Contingency Allowance and Change Orders 

    E-print Network

    Li, Lishan

    2014-08-05

    so that a negative correlation between %Initial Contingency and CPR is highly anticipated. [5] 4.2 Hypothesis of Correlation Analysis %Initial Contingency is negative correlated to CPR; %SA amount and %Premium cost are positively correlated... with CPR. In other words, comparing to supplemental agreement amount and premium cost, initial contingency is rather cost-effective proved by negative correlation between %initial contingency and CPR. 4.3 Data Resources Data analyzed in this paper...

  14. Yangian symmetric correlators, R operators and amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, R.

    2014-11-01

    Yangian symmetric correlators can be constructed by the action of Yang-Baxter R operators on trivial basic correlators. The example of a four-point correlator is given in two representations and the construction of the completely connected N point correlator is described. The helicity representation is dicussed and the relation of the four-point correlator to tree-level scattering amplitudes is shown.

  15. Psychological correlates of psychogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Binder, L M; Salinsky, M C; Smith, S P

    1994-08-01

    Psychological correlates of psychogenic seizures were studied. The MMPI, Portland Digit Recognition Test (PDRT; a forced choice measure of motivation), disability status, Face-Hand Test, and Finger Agnosia were compared in 53 patients with medically intractable seizure disorders who underwent intensive EEG monitoring. Using conventional neurologic criteria, 64% had diagnoses of epileptic seizures (ES) and 36% had psychogenic seizures (PS). PS patients were significantly higher in number of somatoform MMPI profiles and likelihood of applying for financial benefits, and significantly lower on the PDRT. PS patients made more Finger Agnosia errors. Differences on the Face-Hand Test were of borderline significance. The results support the existence of multiple psychometric correlates of PS. PMID:7962356

  16. Quantum information of cosmological correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eugene A.

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that the primordial perturbations sourced by inflation are driven to classicality by unitary evolution alone. However, their coupling with the environment such as photons and subsequent decoherence renders the cosmological correlations quantum, losing primordial information in the process. We argue that the quantumness of the resulting cosmological correlations is given by quantum discord, which captures nonclassical behavior beyond quantum entanglement. By considering the environment as a quantum channel in which primordial information contained in the perturbations is transmitted to us, we can then ask how much of this information is inaccessible. We show that this amount of information is given by the discord of the joint primordial perturbations-environment system. To illustrate these points, we model the joint system as a mixed bimodal Gaussian state, and show that quantum discord is dependent on the basis which decoherence occurs.

  17. A correlated nickelate synaptic transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jian; Ha, Sieu D.; Zhou, You; Schoofs, Frank; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by biological neural systems, neuromorphic devices may open up new computing paradigms to explore cognition, learning and limits of parallel computation. Here we report the demonstration of a synaptic transistor with SmNiO3, a correlated electron system with insulator-metal transition temperature at 130°C in bulk form. Non-volatile resistance and synaptic multilevel analogue states are demonstrated by control over composition in ionic liquid-gated devices on silicon platforms. The extent of the resistance modulation can be dramatically controlled by the film microstructure. By simulating the time difference between postneuron and preneuron spikes as the input parameter of a gate bias voltage pulse, synaptic spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning behaviour is realized. The extreme sensitivity of electrical properties to defects in correlated oxides may make them a particularly suitable class of materials to realize artificial biological circuits that can be operated at and above room temperature and seamlessly integrated into conventional electronic circuits.

  18. Ultraviolet divergences in cosmological correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Steven

    2011-03-15

    A method is developed for dealing with ultraviolet divergences in calculations of cosmological correlations, which does not depend on dimensional regularization. An extended version of the WKB approximation is used to analyze the divergences in these calculations, and these divergences are controlled by the introduction of Pauli-Villars regulator fields. This approach is illustrated in the theory of a scalar field with arbitrary self-interactions in a fixed flat-space Robertson-Walker metric with arbitrary scale factor a(t). Explicit formulas are given for the counterterms needed to cancel all dependence on the regulator properties, and an explicit prescription is given for calculating finite regulator-independent correlation functions. The possibility of infrared divergences in this theory is briefly considered.

  19. Correlated Temporal and Spectral Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean H.

    2007-01-01

    The variability of neutron star and black hole X-ray sources has several dimensions, because of the roles played by different important time-scales. The variations on time scales of hours, weeks, and months, ranging from 50% to orders of magnitude, arise out of changes in the flow in the disk. The most important driving forces for those changes are probably various possible instabilities in the disk, though there may be effects with other dominant causes. The changes in the rate of flow appear to be associated with changes in the flow's configuration, as the accreting material approaches the compact object, for there are generally correlated changes in both the Xray spectra and the character of the faster temporal variability. There has been a lot of progress in tracking these correlations, both for Z and Atoll neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and for black hole binaries. I will discuss these correlations and review briefly what they tell us about the physical states of the systems.

  20. Alzheimer's disease: a correlative study.

    PubMed Central

    Neary, D; Snowden, J S; Mann, D M; Bowen, D M; Sims, N R; Northen, B; Yates, P O; Davison, A N

    1986-01-01

    In a study of 17 patients with histologically proven Alzheimer's disease the relationship between psychological, pathological and chemical measures of disorder was examined. Severity of dementia, determined by mental test performance, correlated highly with pathological change in large cortical neurons (cell loss and reduction in nuclear and nucleolar volume and cytoplasmic RNA content), to a lesser extent with cortical senile plaque and neurofibrillary tangle frequency and reduction in acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis, and not with reduction in choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity. A strongly significant relationship was demonstrated between cell loss and reductions in nuclear and nucleolar volume and cytoplasmic RNA content. Reduction in CAT activity and senile plaque frequency were significantly correlated, thereby linking changes in the sub-cortical projection system of the nucleus basalis with the cortical pathology. The pattern of correlations suggests that the dementia of Alzheimer's disease is largely a reflection of the state of large cortical neurons, and it is argued that abnormalities in the latter may not be directly related to primary loss of cholinergic neurons in the subcortex. PMID:2420941

  1. The correlation of symptoms, pulmonary function tests and exercise testing with high-resolution computed tomography in patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Barney Thomas Jesudason; Thangakunam, Balamugesh; Cherian, Rekha A; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas

    2015-01-01

    Context: For the follow-up of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP), it is unclear which parameters of pulmonary function tests (PFT) and exercise testing would correlate best with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT).. Aim: To find out the correlation of symptom scores, PFTs and exercise testing with HRCT scoring in patients diagnosed as idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study done in pulmonary medicine outpatients department of a tertiary care hospital in South India. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who were diagnosed as IIP by a standard algorithm were included into the study. Cough and dyspnea were graded for severity and duration. Pulmonary function tests and exercise testing parameters were noted. HRCT was scored based on an alveolar score, an interstitial score and a total score. The HRCT was correlated with each of the clinical and physiologic parameters. Pearson's/Spearman's correlation coefficient was used for the correlation of symptoms and parameters of ABG, PFT and 6MWT with the HRCT scores. Results: A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Cough and dyspnea severity (r = 0.336 and 0.299), FVC (r = ?0.48), TLC (r = ?0.439) and DLCO and distance saturation product (DSP) (r = ?0.368) and lowest saturation (r = ?0.324) had significant correlation with total HRCT score. Among these, DLCO, particularly DLCO corrected % of predicted, correlated best with HRCT score (r = ?0.721).. Conclusion: Symptoms, PFT and exercise testing had good correlation with HRCT. DLCO corrected % of predicted correlated best with HRCT.

  2. Posttreatment FDG-PET Uptake in the Supraglottic and Glottic Larynx Correlates With Decreased Quality of Life After Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dornfeld, Ken Hopkins, Shane; Simmons, Joel; Spitz, Douglas R.; Menda, Yusuf; Graham, Michael; Smith, Russell; Funk, Gerry; Karnell, Lucy; Karnell, Michael; Dornfeld, Maude; Yao Min; Buatti, John

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: Inflammation and increased metabolic activity associated with oxidative stress in irradiated normal tissues may contribute to both complications following radiotherapy and increased glucose uptake as detected by posttherapy fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging. We sought to determine whether increased glucose uptake in normal tissues after chemoradiotherapy is associated with increased toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy and free of recurrence at 1 year were studied. FDG-PET imaging was obtained at 3 and 12 months posttreatment. Standardized uptake value (SUV) levels were determined at various head and neck regions. Functional outcome was measured using a quality of life questionnaire and weight loss and type of diet tolerated 1 year after therapy. A one-tailed Pearson correlation test was used to examine associations between SUV levels and functional outcome measures. Results: Standardized uptake value levels in the supraglottic and glottic larynx from FDG-PET imaging obtained 12 months posttreatment were inversely associated with quality of life measures and were correlated with a more restricted diet 1 year after therapy. SUV levels at 3 months after therapy did not correlate with functional outcome. Increases in SUV levels in normal tissues between 3 and 12 months were commonly found in the absence of recurrence. Conclusion: Altered metabolism in irradiated tissues persists 1 year after therapy. FDG-PET scans may be used to assess normal tissue damage following chemoradiotherapy. These data support investigating hypermetabolic conditions associated with either inflammation, oxidative stress, or both, as causal agents for radiation-induced normal tissue damage.

  3. Ultrafine particles near a major roadway in Raleigh, North Carolina: Downwind attenuation and correlation with traffic-related pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagler, G. S. W.; Baldauf, R. W.; Thoma, E. D.; Long, T. R.; Snow, R. F.; Kinsey, J. S.; Oudejans, L.; Gullett, B. K.

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter < 100 nm) and co-emitted pollutants from traffic are a potential health threat to nearby populations. During summertime in Raleigh, North Carolina, UFPs were simultaneously measured upwind and downwind of a major roadway using a spatial matrix of five portable industrial hygiene samplers (measuring total counts of 20-1000 nm particles). While the upper sampling range of the portable samplers extends past the defined "ultrafine" upper limit (100 nm), the 20-1000 nm number counts had high correlation (Pearson R = 0.7-0.9) with UFPs (10-70 nm) measured by a co-located research-grade analyzer and thus appear to be driven by the ultrafine range. Highest UFP concentrations were observed during weekday morning work commutes, with levels at 20 m downwind from the road nearly fivefold higher than at an upwind station. A strong downwind spatial gradient was observed, linearly approximated over the first 100 m as an 8% drop in UFP counts per 10 m distance. This result agreed well with UFP spatial gradients estimated from past studies (ranging 5-12% drop per 10 m). Linear regression of other vehicle-related air pollutants measured in near real-time (10-min averages) against UFPs yielded moderate to high correlation with benzene ( R2 = 0.76), toluene ( R2 = 0.49), carbon monoxide ( R2 = 0.74), nitric oxide ( R2 = 0.80), and black carbon ( R2 = 0.65). Overall, these results support the notion that near-road levels of UFPs are heavily influenced by traffic emissions and correlate with other vehicle-produced pollutants, including certain air toxics.

  4. Measures and models for angular correlation and angular-linear correlation. [correlation of random variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.; Wehrly, T.

    1976-01-01

    Population models for dependence between two angular measurements and for dependence between an angular and a linear observation are proposed. The method of canonical correlations first leads to new population and sample measures of dependence in this latter situation. An example relating wind direction to the level of a pollutant is given. Next, applied to pairs of angular measurements, the method yields previously proposed sample measures in some special cases and a new sample measure in general.

  5. A Two Factor ANOVA-like Test for Correlated Correlations: CORANOVA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen; Gur, Ruben C.

    2004-01-01

    Testing homogeneity of correlations with Fisher's Z is inappropriate when correlations are themselves correlated. Suppose measurements of brain activation and performance are taken before and during a verbal memory task. Of interest are changes in activity gradients in specific regions, R1, R2, R3, and performance, V. The "correlated correlations"…

  6. The Effect of Error Correlation on Interfactor Correlation in Psychometric Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westfall, Peter H.; Henning, Kevin S. S.; Howell, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how interfactor correlation is affected by error correlations. Theoretical and practical justifications for error correlations are given, and a new equivalence class of models is presented to explain the relationship between interfactor correlation and error correlations. The class allows simple, parsimonious modeling of error…

  7. OPTIMAL CORRELATION ESTIMATORS FOR QUANTIZED SIGNALS

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M. D.; Chou, H. H.; Gwinn, C. R. E-mail: cgwinn@physics.ucsb.edu

    2013-03-10

    Using a maximum-likelihood criterion, we derive optimal correlation strategies for signals with and without digitization. We assume that the signals are drawn from zero-mean Gaussian distributions, as is expected in radio-astronomical applications, and we present correlation estimators both with and without a priori knowledge of the signal variances. We demonstrate that traditional estimators of correlation, which rely on averaging products, exhibit large and paradoxical noise when the correlation is strong. However, we also show that these estimators are fully optimal in the limit of vanishing correlation. We calculate the bias and noise in each of these estimators and discuss their suitability for implementation in modern digital correlators.

  8. Prospective Study Validating Inter- and Intraobserver Variability of Tissue Compliance Meter in Breast Tissue of Healthy Volunteers: Potential Implications for Patients With Radiation-Induced Fibrosis of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Parashar, Bhupesh; Kulidzhanov, Fridon; Riley, Lillian; Christos, Paul J.; Fischer, Andrew; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Accurate detection of radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF) is crucial in management of breast cancer survivors. Tissue compliance meter (TCM) has been validated in musculature. We validate TCM in healthy breast tissue with respect to interobserver and intraobserver variability before applying it in RIF. Methods and Materials: Three medical professionals obtained three consecutive TCM measurements in each of the four quadrants of the right and left breasts of 40 women with no breast disease or surgical intervention. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) assessed interobserver variability. The paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficient (r) were used to assess intraobserver variability within each rater. Results: The median age was 45 years (range, 24-68 years). The median bra size was 35C (range, 32A-40DD). Of the participants, 27 were white (67%), 4 black (10%), 5 Asian (13%), and 4 Hispanic (10%). ICCs indicated excellent interrater reliability (low interobserver variability) among the three raters, by breast and quadrant (all ICC {>=}0.99). The paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficient both indicated low intraobserver variability within each rater (right vs. left breast), stratified by quadrant (all r{>=} 0.94, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The interobserver and intraobserver variability is small using TCM in healthy mammary tissue. We are now embarking on a prospective study using TCM in women with breast cancer at risk of developing RIF that may guide early detection, timely therapeutic intervention, and assessment of success of therapy for RIF.

  9. Variable Selection through Correlation Sifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jim C.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    Many applications of computational biology require a variable selection procedure to sift through a large number of input variables and select some smaller number that influence a target variable of interest. For example, in virology, only some small number of viral protein fragments influence the nature of the immune response during viral infection. Due to the large number of variables to be considered, a brute-force search for the subset of variables is in general intractable. To approximate this, methods based on ?1-regularized linear regression have been proposed and have been found to be particularly successful. It is well understood however that such methods fail to choose the correct subset of variables if these are highly correlated with other "decoy" variables. We present a method for sifting through sets of highly correlated variables which leads to higher accuracy in selecting the correct variables. The main innovation is a filtering step that reduces correlations among variables to be selected, making the ?1-regularization effective for datasets on which many methods for variable selection fail. The filtering step changes both the values of the predictor variables and output values by projections onto components obtained through a computationally-inexpensive principal components analysis. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of our method on synthetic datasets and on novel applications in virology. These include HIV viral load analysis based on patients' HIV sequences and immune types, as well as the analysis of seasonal variation in influenza death rates based on the regions of the influenza genome that undergo diversifying selection in the previous season.

  10. Preselected Sub-Poissonian Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavicic, Mladen

    1996-01-01

    The simplest possible photon-number-squeezed states containing only two photons and exhibiting sub-poissonian statistics with the Fano factor approaching 0.5 have been used for a proposal of a loophole-free Bell experiment requiring only 67 percent of detection efficiency. The states are obtained by the fourth order interference first of two downconverted photons at an asymmetrical beam splitter and thereupon of two photons from two independent singlets at an asymmetrical beam splitter. In the latter set-up, the other two photons which nowhere interacted and whose paths never crossed appear entangled in a singlet-like correlated state.

  11. Correlation dimension of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-04-19

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers. PMID:23679650

  12. [EEG correlates of social creativity].

    PubMed

    Razumnikova, O M; Finikov, S B

    2010-01-01

    EEG correlates of social creativity defined as ability to originally and flexibly interpret social significant situations were studied. It was found that the alpha2 and gamma2 rhythms are specific bands which make it possible to tell the difference between social creativity and control task. Solving socially significant problems in experimental conditions is accompanied by an increase in the power of the delta and gamma2 bands and desynchronization in the alpha2 band less pronounced in divergent tasks than during the interpretation of convergent visual stimuli. PMID:21434404

  13. Star polymers in correlated disorder

    E-print Network

    V. Blavats'ka; C. von Ferber; Yu. Holovatch

    2007-11-23

    We analyze the impact of a porous medium (structural disorder) on the scaling of the partition function of a star polymer immersed in a good solvent. We show that corresponding scaling exponents change if the disorder is long-range-correlated and calculate the exponents in the new universality class. A notable finding is that star and chain polymers react in qualitatively different manner on the presence of disorder: the corresponding scaling exponents increase for chains and decrease for stars. We discuss the physical consequences of this difference.

  14. Detecting Botnets Through Log Correlation

    E-print Network

    Al-Hammadi, Yousof

    2010-01-01

    Botnets, which consist of thousands of compromised machines, can cause significant threats to other systems by launching Distributed Denial of Service (SSoS) attacks, keylogging, and backdoors. In response to these threats, new effective techniques are needed to detect the presence of botnets. In this paper, we have used an interception technique to monitor Windows Application Programming Interface (API) functions calls made by communication applications and store these calls with their arguments in log files. Our algorithm detects botnets based on monitoring abnormal activity by correlating the changes in log file sizes from different hosts.

  15. An 18 million year record of vegetation and climate change in northwestern Canada and Alaska: Tectonic and global climatic correlates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, J.M.; Ager, T.A.; Adam, D.P.; Leopold, E.B.; Liu, Gaisheng; Jette, H.; Schweger, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    We reconstruct long-term vegetation/paleoclimatic trends, spanning the last 18 million years, in Alaska. Yukon and far western Northwest Territories. Twenty-one average percentage spectra for pollen and spores are assembled from eight surface/subsurface sections. The sections are dated independently or by correlation. Pollen and spore ratios indicate the direction of change in vegetation and climatic parameters growing season temperature (T(est)), tree canopy density (C(est)) and paludification at study sites (P(est)). A global warm peak ca. 15 Ma is shown by the abundance of thermophilous taxa, including Fagus and Quercus. A temperature decline immediately following 15 Ma parallels climatic reconstructions based on marine oxygen isotopes. Subsequent declines correlate to the Messinian event and the onset of late Pliocene Pleistocene glaciation. After 7 Ma herbs and shrubs become more important elements of the palynological assemblages, suggesting a more continental, colder/drier climate. However, a late Pliocene warm interval is evident. Vegetation/climatic changes during the early to late Miocene show synchrony with, and are most economically attributable to, global events. After 7 Ma, vegetation/climate change is attributed primarily to latest Miocene-to-Pleistocene uplift of the Alaska Range and St. Elias Mrs. The continuing influence of global climatic patterns is shown in the late Pliocene warm interval, despite uplift to the south. The opening of the Bering Strait ca. 3 Ma may have moderated the climate in the study area.

  16. Correlating river terrace remnants using an Equotip hardness tester: An example from the Miño River, northwestern Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Augusto Pérez; Gomes, Alberto; Trenhaile, Alan; Oliveira, Maria; Horacio, Jesus

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to distinguish river terrace levels based on clast hardness and degree of weathering measured with an Equotip hardness tester. The technique was applied to a series of terraces on the Miño River in the northwestern Iberian Peninsula, where the lack of suitable material, high degree of weathering, and intense iron cementation precluded routine dating. Detailed mapping demonstrated that terrace sediments occupy a range of altitudes that make assignment to a specific terrace, and/or correlation between levels, difficult. Statistical analysis of the Equotip hardness data from quartzite clasts using k-means clustering allowed four probable terrace levels to be identified; a series of t-tests generally supported these groupings. A fifth, lowermost terrace level, was not included in the analysis because of limited exposure above a reservoir. Clast hardness and degree of terrace weathering were generally consistent with progressive river downcutting. The occurrence of faulted sediments, however, suggested that terrace elevations were modified locally by post-depositional tectonic movements, which may explain why probable younger terraces in some sectors of the Miño River are at higher elevations than older terraces in adjacent sectors. The Equotip tester helped to resolve stratigraphic uncertainties and to assign deposits to specific terrace levels and was found to be a useful tool to distinguish and correlate river terraces.

  17. Correlation Between Health-Related Quality of Life in Veterans With Chronic Spinal Cord Injury and Their Caregiving Spouses

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Golhasani-Keshtan, Farideh; Shojaee, Bibi Soheila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, investigations have indicated that caring of a chronically ill family member strongly influences the health status and the quality of life (QOL) of the caregiving family members. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between health-related QOL of veterans with chronic spinal cord injury and their caregiving spouses. Patients and Methods: We designed a cross-sectional study including two groups; veterans with chronic spinal cord injury and their caregiving wives who were living in the city of Mashhad, Iran. The patients with spinal cord injury were veterans from the Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988). All the participants filled out the short form 36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire. A Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated for the scales of the two groups. Results: The mean age and standard deviation of veterans and their spouses were 48.5 ± 5.9 and 44.8 ± 7.2, respectively and their number of children ranged between 0-6. Our data analysis showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups in some domains of the SF-36, including PF, MH, PCS, MCS, BP and GH (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in RP, VT, SF and RE between the two groups. Conclusions: The results indicate that a decrease in health status level of veterans, physically and mentally, can affect the health-related QOL of their caregiving spouses. PMID:25738130

  18. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie (Rocky Point, NY); Smith, Randy J. (Wading River, NY); Warren, John B. (Port Jefferson, NY); Elliott, Donald (Hampton Bays, NY)

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  19. The Neurogenetic Correlates of Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandy, John K.

    2013-09-01

    The neurogenetic correlates of consciousness (NgCC) is a new field of consciousness studies that focuses on genes that have an effect on or are involved in the continuum of neuron-based consciousness. A framework of consciousness based on the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) has already been established by Francis Crick and Christof Kock. In this work I propose that there are NgCC underlying the NCC which are both active during the conscious experience. So how are genes involved? There are two significant connections between DNA and neurons that are involved in the conscious experience. First, any brain system can be adversely affected by underlying genetic abnormalities which can be expressed in an individual at birth, in adulthood, or later in life. Second, the DNA molecule does not lay dormant while the neuron runs on autopilot. DNA is active in translating and transcribing RNA and protein products that are utilized during neuron functioning. Without these products being continuously produced by the DNA during a conscious experience the neurons would cease to function correctly and be rendered unable to provide a continuum of human consciousness. Consequently, in addition to NCC, NgCC must be factored in when appreciating a conscious event. In this work I will discuss and explain some NgCC citing several examples.

  20. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tria, F.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2014-07-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called ``expanding the adjacent possible''. The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution.

  1. PREFACE: Correlation Dynamics in Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Ichimura, Munetake

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on `Correlation Dynamics in Nuclei' was held at the Sanjo Kaikan, the University of Tokyo, from the 31 January to 4 February 2005. This symposium was organized on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Configuration Mixing theory of Arima and Horie. The symposium was hosted by the University of Tokyo, and supported by the Inoue Foundation for Science, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments and future prospects in physics of correlation dynamics in nuclei, including topics such as effective interactions, shell model studies of configuration mixing and spin-isospin modes in nuclei. It was shown in many ways and angles that the Arima-Horie theory has been a starting point of a variety of developments of the studies in these fields over many decades. The developments have been enhanced by the expansion of computational capabilities and the progress in accelerators, detectors and radioactive beam facilities. We enjoyed 28 excellent and lively invited talks and 30 oral presentations in the symposium with about 90 participants. A special session was dedicated to celebrate the 80th birthday of Professor Igal Talmi, who made invaluable and pioneering works in the shell model theory. Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium very successful.

  2. Correlations in cosmic density fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, B. C.

    1994-01-01

    A method is proposed to place constraints on the functional form of the high-order correlation functions zeta(sub n) that arise in cosmic density fields at large scales. This technique is based on a mass-in-cell statistic and a difference of mass in partitions of a cell. The relationship between these measures is sensitive to the formal structure of the zeta(sub n) as well as their amplitudes. This relationship is quantified in several theoretical models of structure, based on the hierarchical clustering paradigm. The results lead to a test for specific types of hierarchical clustering that is sensitive to correlations of all orders. The method is applied to examples of simulated large-scaled structure dominated by cold dark matter. In the preliminary study, the hierarchical paradigm appears to be a realistic approximation over a broad range of the scales. Furthermore, there is evidence that graphs of low-order vertices are dominant. On the basis of simulated data a phenomological model is specified that gives a good representation of clustering from linear scales to the strongly clustered regime (zeta(sub 2) approximately 500).

  3. Differential biomarker expression in head and neck cancer correlates with anatomical localization.

    PubMed

    Tamás, László; Szentkúti, Gabriella; Eros, Mónika; Dános, Kornél; Brauswetter, Diána; Szende, Béla; Zsákovics, Ivett; Krenács, Tibor

    2011-09-01

    We tested the expression of known (p16(ink4), Ki67, p53, EGFR) and a new immunohistochemical (collagen XVII/BP180) biomarker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of diverse anatomical localization. Tissue microarrays (TMA) of 124 SCC were created, immunostained, and analyzed following whole slide digitalization using the Pannoramic Scan and the TMA Module software (3DHISTECH Kft, Budapest, Hungary). Statistical analysis of scoring results was carried out using Pearson's chi-square test. We observed the significant elevation of p16(ink4) and Ki67 expression in supraglottic, tonsillar and tonsillo-lingual SCCs compared to those affecting the oral cavity, oropharynx without tonsils, larynx without supraglottis and the hypopharynx. This differential antigen expression may reflect the diverse route of embryologic differentiation followed by the affected regions except those of the tonsils and the supraglottis which show similar antigenic pattern but diverse developmental path. All the other biomarkers tested including p53, collagen XVII and EGFR were detected in the majority of cancers including high grade cases, but did not reveal any significant regional difference. Based on our results oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas may not be regarded as one entity. Concerning the oral cavity and the oropharynx, cancers affecting the tonsils (palatine and lingual) show significantly elevated p16(ink4) and Ki67 expression; so as the cancers of the supraglottis compared to the rest of larynx. Consequently, tonsillar and supraglottic cancers show similar biomarker profiles. Correlation of differential biomarker expression with diverse biological behavior in head and neck cancers need further investigations. PMID:21487776

  4. Residential characteristics as correlates of occupants’ health in the greater Accra region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Housing has been a relatively neglected site for public health action. However, it remains a place where human beings spend the most part of their day. As a result, the quality of housing has consequences for human health. We investigate residential characteristics associated with self-rated occupant health in five neighbourhoods in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana. Methods A cross sectional study using a semi-structured questionnaire was conducted among 500 informed adults aged 18 years and above to investigate residential characteristics associated with self-rated occupant health in five neighbourhoods in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana. Correlates of occupant rated health were determined using Pearson chi-square test and binary logistic regression. Results Forty-two per cent of houses were rented, 44% required repair and 46% shared sanitation facilities. One in twenty occupants reported poor health. Gender, employment status, income, ventilation, house wall material, odours, stale air, privacy, shared facilities, hand washing facility, type of house and house repair status were associated with poor health in the bivariate analysis. Only two variables were independently associated with poor self-rated health: occupants who lacked privacy were eight times more likely to report poor self-rated health when compared to peers who did not lack privacy [OR = 8.16, 95% CI 2.86-23.26] and women were three times more likely than men to report poor health [OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.06-8.35]. Conclusion The results provide further evidence of housing as a determinant of occupants’ health, and identify housing characteristics and living conditions as issues for public health action in Ghana. PMID:24612884

  5. Expression of cancer stem cell markers and their correlation with pathogenesis in vascular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jiaojiao; Huang, Bing; Liu, Ruixue; Ju, Xinxin; Zhou, Yang; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Shen, Yaoyuan; Li, Feng; Pang, Lijuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Vascular tumor, which belongs to a kind of complicated lesion in soft tissue tumor, is derived from mesenchymal tissue. Although many studies have been focused on the pathogenesis of vascular tumors in human, the specific mechanism of the vascular tumors was currently unclear. Previous studies have reported an association of cancer stem cells with the development of tumor in many solid tumors. Thus the purpose of this study was to explore whether different expression level of cancer stem cell markers including CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1 in vascular tumor may help to elucidate the possible pathogenesis of vascular tumor. In present study, tissues of 9 cases of hemangioma, 22 cases of hemangiosarcoma, 3 cases of Kaposi’s sarcoma, and 5 cases of hemangioendothelioma were immunostained for CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1. Of the 39 vascular tumor cases included in the current study, CD29, CD133 and nestin were positive in most vascular tumor cases. Although CD44 and ALDH1 were observed in vascular tumor cases, the percentage of cells staining for the two markers was less than 2% in all cases of vascular tumor. Capillary hemangiomas exhibited significantly higher expression rate of CD29 and nestin compared with malignant vascular tumors and hemangioendotheliomas (P<0.05, Fisher’s exact test), while CD44, CD133 and ALDH1 exhibited no statistically significant difference between these two groups. Pearson correlation analysis exhibited that CD29 expression and nestin expression in vascular tumor were no statistically significant relationship (C=0.288, P=0.063>0.05). Our findings confirmed that the five cancer stem cells markers, including CD29, CD44, CD133, nestin and ALDH1, exhibited different expression levels in vascular tumors and demonstrated that immonhistochemical analysis for cancer stem cells markers may provide useful information for studying the pathogenesis of vascular tumors. PMID:26722452

  6. 2004 Photon Correlation and Scattering Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William (Editor); Smart, Anthony (Editor); Wegdam, Gerard (Editor); Dogariu, Aristide (Editor); Carpenter, Bradley (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The Photon Correlation and Scattering (PCS) meeting welcomes all who are interested in the art and science of photon correlation and its application to optical scattering. The meeting is intended to enhance interactions between theory, applications, instrument design, and participants.

  7. Percolation of secret correlations in a network

    E-print Network

    Raul, Garcia-Patron

    In this work, we explore the analogy between entanglement and secret classical correlations in the context of large networks—more precisely, the question of percolation of secret correlations in a network. It is known that ...

  8. SU-E-T-422: Correlation Between 2D Passing Rates and 3D Dose Differences for Pretreatment VMAT QA

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, X; Xie, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) is typically using QA methods and action levels taken from fixedbeam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) QA methods. However, recent studies demonstrated that there is no correlation between the percent gamma passing rate (%GP) and the magnitude of dose discrepancy between the planned dose and the actual delivered dose for IMRT. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether %GP is correlated with clinical dosimetric difference for VMAT. Methods: Twenty nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with dual-arc simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and 20 esophageal cancer patients treated with one-arc VMAT were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment VMAT QA was performed by a 3D diode array ArcCheck. Acceptance criteria of 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were applied for 2D %GP. Dose values below 10% of the per-measured normalization maximum dose were ignored.Mean DVH values obtained from 3DVH software and TPS were calculated and percentage dose differences were calculated. Statistical correlation between %GP and percent dose difference was studied by using Pearson correlation. Results: The %GP for criteria 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were 82.33±4.45, 93.47±2.31, 97.13±2.41, respectively. Dose differences calculated from 3DVH and TPS for beam isocenter, mean dose of PTV, maximum dose of PTV, D2 of PTV and D98 of PTV were -1.04±3.24, -0.74±1.71, 2.92±3.62, 0.89±3.29, -1.46±1.97, respectively. No correction were found between %GP and dose differences. Conclusion: There are weak correlations between the 2D %GP and dose differences calculated from 3DVH. The %GP acceptance criteria of 3%/3mm usually applied for pretreatment QA of IMRT and VMAT is not indicating strong clinical correlation with 3D dose difference. 3D dose reconstructions on patient anatomy may be necessary for physicist to predict the accuracy of delivered dose for VMAT QA.

  9. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in representative broiler feedlots environments: identification of indicator ARGs and correlations with environmental variables.

    PubMed

    He, Liang-Ying; Liu, You-Sheng; Su, Hao-Chang; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Jun; Liu, Wang-Rong; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2014-11-18

    Livestock operations are known to harbor elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) that may pose a threat to public health. Broiler feedlots may represent an important source of ARGs in the environment. However, the prevalence and dissemination mechanisms of various types of ARGs in the environment of broiler feedlots have not previously been identified. We examined the occurrence, abundance and variation of ARGs conferring resistance to chloramphenicols, sulfonamides and tetracyclines in the environments of two representative types of broiler feedlots (free range and indoor) by quantitative PCR, and assessed their dissemination mechanisms. The results showed the prevalence of various types of ARGs in the environmental samples of the broiler feedlots including manure/litter, soil, sediment, and water samples, with the first report of five chloramphenicol resistance genes (cmlA, floR, fexA, cfr, and fexB) in broiler feedlots. Overall, chloramphenicol resistance genes and sulfonamides sul genes were more abundant than tetracyclines tet genes. The ARG abundances in the samples from indoor boiler feedlots were generally different to the free range feedlots, suggesting the importance of feeding operations in ARG dissemination. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant correlations between ARGs and mobile genetic element genes (int1 and int2), and between the different classes of ARGs themselves, revealing the roles of horizontal gene transfer and coselection for ARG dissemination in the environment. Further regression analysis revealed that fexA, sul1 and tetW could be reliable indicator genes to surrogate anthropogenic sources of ARGs in boiler feedlots (correlations of fexA, sul1 and tetW to all ARGs: R = 0.95, 0.96 and 0.86, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, significant correlations were also identified between indicator ARGs and their corresponding antibiotics. In addition, some ARGs were significantly correlated with typical metals (e.g., Cu, Zn, and As with fexA, fexB, cfr, sul1, tetW, tetO, tetS: R = 0.52-0.71) and some environmental parameters (e.g., TOC, TN, TP, NH3-N with fexA, fexB, cfr, sul1, tetW, tetO, tetQ, tetS: R = 0.53-0.87) (p < 0.01). Further redundancy analysis demonstrated that the distribution and transportation of ARGs from the boiler feedlots to the receiving environments were correlated with environmental variables. The findings highlight the contribution of some chemicals such as antibiotics and metals to the development of ARGs in broiler feedlots environments; and the observed ARG dissemination mechanism in the broiler feedlots facilitates the development of effective mitigation measures. PMID:25338275

  10. Correlation between X-ray and UV/Optical variability in NLS1 1H0707-495

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbhari Pawar, Pramod; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Khushalrao Patil, Madhav

    2015-08-01

    We present results derived from the temporal study of 1H0707-495 using the XMM-Newton and Swift archival data. 1H0707-495 has been extensively observed using these two space missions. Multi-wavelength study can enable us to comment on the radiation mechanism and the reprocessing of the photons that happen in the surrounding or in the accretion disk itself. We aim at the inter-connection between the primary continuum emission (hard band), soft X-ray emission and the UV/optical emission. This study enabled us to derive the UV/Optical and X-ray light curves in various energy bands. The hard and soft band fluxes for XMM-Newton data were obtained by performing time resolved spectroscopy, the time information was taken from the simultaneous UVW1 data. We have used various techniques to understand the correlation among different bands like fractional variability amplitude, Pearson's 'r' correlation between two light curves. The fractional variability amplitude, as calculated from the XMM-Newton X-ray light curves, revealed that the variations in the hard band dominates in the total variability of the source where the hard band varied by ~ 65 % than the soft band which varied by only ~ 31 %. The UV/optical showed the lowest variability amplitude in both the XMM-Newton (~ 10 %) and Swift data (~ 12 %). The UVW1 analysis, after inclusion of all the observations from XMM-Newton, shows a variability amplitude change by almost 6 times whereas X-ray variability amplitude remained same, implying that the UV/optical has longer variability time scale than the X-ray. Color-color plots are also obtained to demonstrate the nature of correlation. The current study revealed a significant correlation between the primary hard component and probably the reprocessed soft component. The UVW1 seems weakly anti-correlated, however, UVW2 filter of Swift found to be un-correlated to the X-ray. These results can be interpreted under the light bending scenario.

  11. Redshift distortions of galaxy correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, J.N. Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL . Dept. of Physics); Gaztanaga, E. Oxford Univ. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-05-12

    To examine how peculiar velocities can affect the 2-, 3-, and 4-point correlation functions, we evaluate volume-average correlations for configurations that emphasize and minimize distortions for four different volume-limited samples from each of the CfA, SSRS, and IRAS redshift catalogs. We present the results as the correlation length r[sub 0] and power index [gamma] of the 2-point correlation, [anti [Xi

  12. Geometrical optics in correlated imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Dezhong; Xiong Jun; Wang Kaige

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the geometrical optics of correlated imaging for two kinds of spatial correlations corresponding, respectively, to a classical thermal light source and a quantum two-photon entangled source. Due to the different features in the second-order spatial correlation, the two sources obey different imaging equations. The quantum entangled source behaves as a mirror, whereas the classical thermal source looks like a phase-conjugate mirror in the correlated imaging.

  13. Wind-Tunnel/Flight Correlation, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinney, L. W. (editor); Baals, D. D. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    Wind-tunnel/flight correlation activities are reviewed to assure maximum effectiveness of the early experimental programs of the National Transonic Facility (NTF). Topics included a status report of the NTF, the role of tunnel-to-tunnel correlation, a review of past flight correlation research and the resulting data base, the correlation potential of future flight vehicles, and an assessment of the role of computational fluid dynamics.

  14. Prototype Optical Correlator For Robotic Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1993-01-01

    Known and unknown images fed in electronically at high speed. Optical correlator and associated electronic circuitry developed for vision system of robotic vehicle. System recognizes features of landscape by optical correlation between input image of scene viewed by video camera on robot and stored reference image. Optical configuration is Vander Lugt correlator, in which Fourier transform of scene formed in coherent light and spatially modulated by hologram of reference image to obtain correlation.

  15. Economic and Educational Correlates of TIMSS Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikk, Jaan

    2005-01-01

    The good knowledge of the correlates of educational achievement highlights the ways to the efficient use of economic and human capital in raising the efficiency of education. The present paper investigates the correlates and compares the values of the correlates for the Republic of Lithuania with the average international values. The data for the…

  16. Negative Correlations in Visual Cortical Networks.

    PubMed

    Chelaru, Mircea I; Dragoi, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    The amount of information encoded by cortical circuits depends critically on the capacity of nearby neurons to exhibit trial-to-trial (noise) correlations in their responses. Depending on their sign and relationship to signal correlations, noise correlations can either increase or decrease the population code accuracy relative to uncorrelated neuronal firing. Whereas positive noise correlations have been extensively studied using experimental and theoretical tools, the functional role of negative correlations in cortical circuits has remained elusive. We addressed this issue by performing multiple-electrode recording in the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) of alert monkey. Despite the fact that positive noise correlations decayed exponentially with the difference in the orientation preference between cells, negative correlations were uniformly distributed across the population. Using a statistical model for Fisher Information estimation, we found that a mild increase in negative correlations causes a sharp increase in network accuracy even when mean correlations were held constant. To examine the variables controlling the strength of negative correlations, we implemented a recurrent spiking network model of V1. We found that increasing local inhibition and reducing excitation causes a decrease in the firing rates of neurons while increasing the negative noise correlations, which in turn increase the population signal-to-noise ratio and network accuracy. Altogether, these results contribute to our understanding of the neuronal mechanism involved in the generation of negative correlations and their beneficial impact on cortical circuit function. PMID:25217468

  17. Functional Multiple-Set Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Jung, Kwanghee; Takane, Yoshio; Woodward, Todd S.

    2012-01-01

    We propose functional multiple-set canonical correlation analysis for exploring associations among multiple sets of functions. The proposed method includes functional canonical correlation analysis as a special case when only two sets of functions are considered. As in classical multiple-set canonical correlation analysis, computationally, the…

  18. Investigation of correlation classification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A two-step classification algorithm for processing multispectral scanner data was developed and tested. The first step is a single pass clustering algorithm that assigns each pixel, based on its spectral signature, to a particular cluster. The output of that step is a cluster tape in which a single integer is associated with each pixel. The cluster tape is used as the input to the second step, where ground truth information is used to classify each cluster using an iterative method of potentials. Once the clusters have been assigned to classes the cluster tape is read pixel-by-pixel and an output tape is produced in which each pixel is assigned to its proper class. In addition to the digital classification programs, a method of using correlation clustering to process multispectral scanner data in real time by means of an interactive color video display is also described.

  19. Correlated continuous time random walks

    E-print Network

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Xiao, Yimin

    2008-01-01

    Continuous time random walks impose a random waiting time before each particle jump. Scaling limits of heavy tailed continuous time random walks are governed by fractional evolution equations. Space-fractional derivatives describe heavy tailed jumps, and the time-fractional version codes heavy tailed waiting times. This paper develops scaling limits and governing equations in the case of correlated jumps. For long-range dependent jumps, this leads to fractional Brownian motion or linear fractional stable motion, with the time parameter replaced by an inverse stable subordinator in the case of heavy tailed waiting times. These scaling limits provide an interesting class of non-Markovian, non-Gaussian self-similar processes.

  20. Physiological correlates of mental workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to assess the basis of and techniques for physiological assessment of mental workload. The study findings reviewed had shortcomings involving one or more of the following basic problems: (1) physiologic arousal can be easily driven by nonworkload factors, confounding any proposed metric; (2) the profound absence of underlying physiologic models has promulgated a multiplicity of seemingly arbitrary signal processing techniques; (3) the unspecified multidimensional nature of physiological "state" has given rise to a broad spectrum of competing noncommensurate metrics; and (4) the lack of an adequate definition of workload compels physiologic correlations to suffer either from the vagueness of implicit workload measures or from the variance of explicit subjective assessments. Using specific studies as examples, two basic signal processing/data reduction techniques in current use, time and ensemble averaging are discussed.

  1. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  2. Quantum Correlations, Chaos and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhok, Vaibhav

    Quantum chaos is the study of quantum systems whose classical description is chaotic. How does chaos manifest itself in the quantum world? In this spirit, we study the dynamical generation of entanglement as a signature of chaos in a system of periodically kicked coupled-tops, where chaos and entanglement arise from the same physical mechanism. The long-time entanglement as a function of the position of an initially localized wave packet very closely correlates with the classical phase space surface of section - it is nearly uniform in the chaotic sea, and reproduces the detailed structure of the regular islands. The uniform value in the chaotic sea is explained by the random state conjecture. As classically chaotic dynamics take localized distributions in phase space to random distributions, quantized versions take localized coherent states to pseudo-random states in Hilbert space. Such random states are highly entangled, with an average value near that of the maximally entangled state. For a map with global chaos, we derive that value based on new analytic results for the entropy of random states. For a mixed phase space, we use the Percival conjecture to identify a "chaotic subspace" of the Hilbert space. The typical entanglement, averaged over the unitarily invariant Haar measure in this subspace, agrees with the long-time averaged entanglement for initial states in the chaotic sea. In all cases the dynamically generated entanglement is that of a random complex vector, even though the system is time-reversal invariant, and the Floquet operator is a member of the circular orthogonal ensemble. Continuing on our journey to find the footprints of chaos in the quantum world, we explore quantum signatures of classical chaos by studying the rate of information gain in quantum tomography. The measurement record is obtained as a sequence of expectation values of a Hermitian operator evolving under repeated application of the Floquet operator of the quantum kicked top on a large ensemble of identical systems. We find an increase in the rate of information gain and hence higher fidelities in the process when the Floquet maps employed increase in chaoticity. We make predictions for the information gain using random matrix theory in the fully chaotic regime and show a remarkable agreement between the two. Finally we discuss how this approach can be used in general as a benchmark for information gain in an experimental implementation based on nonlinear dynamics of atomic spins measured weakly by the Faraday rotation of a laser probe. The last part of this thesis is devoted to the study of the nature of quantum correlations themselves. Quantum correlations are at the heart of the weirdness of quantum mechanics and at the same time serve as a resource for the potential benefits quantum information processing might provide. For example, Einstein described quantum entanglement as "spooky action at a distance". However, even entanglement does not fully capture the complete quantum character of a system. Quantum discord aims to fill this gap and captures essentially all the quantum correlations in a quantum state. There is a considerable interest in the research community about quantum discord, since there is evidence showing this very quantity as responsible for the exponential speed up of a certain class of quantum algorithms over classical ones. Now, an important question arises: Is discord just a mathematical construct or does it have a definable physical role in information processing? This thesis provides a link between quantum discord and an actual physical task involving communication between two parties. We present an operational interpretation of quantum discord based on the quantum state merging protocol. Quantum discord is the markup in the cost of quantum communication in the process of quantum state merging, if one discards relevant prior information. We further derive a quantitative relation between the yield of the fully quantum Slepian-Wolf protocol in the presence of noise and the quantum discord of

  3. Correlation effects in metallic cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2014-03-01

    The electronic contribution to the cohesive energy of a correlated metal is the sum of the transition energies for adding successive electrons at successive Fermi levels until the system reaches its final electron density. This can be computed as the integral of energy over the projected density of transitions for adding single electrons to localized orbitals. In the case of independent electrons, this reduces to the usual integral over the projected density of states. As an example, cohesive energies for some simple transition metal structures are calculated using the recursion method* with a Hubbard repulsion between electrons. * Phys. Rev. B 61, 7953-64 Work supported by the Richmond F. Snyder gift to the University of Oregon.

  4. Astrochemical Correlations in Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaches, Brandt A.L.; Offner, Stella

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the spectral correlations between different chemical tracers used to observe molecular clouds. We study a 600 Solar Mass molecular cloud with Mach number 6.6 modeled using the magnetohydrodynamic code ORION. The chemical abundances are calculated by 3D-PDR, a three-dimensional astrochemical code using a full network of 3300 reactions and 215 species. We take synthetic observations of 16 different species using the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADMC-3D. The effects of different lines of sight and spatial resolution on the emission maps of the 16 different species will be discussed in this talk.We use the Spectral Correlation Function to quantify the structure of the simulated cloud in position-position-velocity space, which measures the average rms velocity between spectra separated by a given length scale. This statistic has been shown to be sensitive to global hydrodynamic parameters, such as the sonic Mach number and velocity dispersion. The SCF is analytically fit by a power law, with the slope being the one free parameter. We verify that the SCF is generally insensitive to the sightline through the cloud. We discover that the beam size has a distinct effect on different chemical tracers. However, the change is not large enough to move the SCF slopes into different parts of the parameter space. This is the first quantitative 3D study of the spectral similarity of a variety of species. We predict the observed SCF for a broad range of observational tracers, and thus, identify complementary species. In particular, we show that the pairs C and CO, C+ and CN, NH3 and H2CS have very similar SCFs. The results from this study will also give observers a guide for selecting which chemical tracers would be best for observing different length scales.

  5. Fully exponentially correlated wavefunctions for small atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    2015-01-01

    Fully exponentially correlated atomic wavefunctions are constructed from exponentials in all the interparticle coordinates, in contrast to correlated wavefunctions of the Hylleraas form, in which only the electron-nuclear distances occur exponentially, with electron-electron distances entering only as integer powers. The full exponential correlation causes many-configuration wavefunctions to converge with expansion length more rapidly than either orbital formulations or correlated wavefunctions of the Hylleraas type. The present contribution surveys the effectiveness of fully exponentially correlated functions for the three-body system (the He isoelectronic series) and reports their application to a four-body system (the Li atom).

  6. Spatial correlation coefficient images for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Cepel, Raina; Ho, K C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Lerch, Terrence P; Neal, Steven P

    2007-09-01

    In ultrasonics, image formation and detection are generally based on signal amplitude. In this paper, we introduce correlation coefficient images as a signal-amplitude independent approach for image formation. The correlation coefficients are calculated between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. In these images, defects are revealed as regions of high or low correlation relative to the background correlations associated with noise. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular ring and crack detection in an aluminum aircraft structure. PMID:17941390

  7. Energetics of correlations in interacting systems

    E-print Network

    Nicolai Friis; Marcus Huber; Martí Perarnau-Llobet

    2015-11-27

    A fundamental connection between thermodynamics and information theory arises from the fact that correlations exhibit an inherent work value. For noninteracting systems this translates to a work cost for establishing correlations. Here we investigate the relationship between work and correlations in the presence of interactions that cannot be controlled or removed. For such naturally coupled systems, which are correlated even in thermal equilibrium, we determine general strategies that can reduce the work cost of correlations, and illustrate these for a selection of exemplary physical systems.

  8. An easy measure of quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui; Wu, Zhao-Qin; Hu, Li-Yun; Xu, Xue-Xiang; Huang, Jie-Hui

    2015-11-01

    To measure the quantum correlation of a bipartite state, a test matrix is constructed through the commutations among the blocks of its density matrix, which turns out to be a zero matrix for a classical state with zero quantum correlation, and a nonzero one for a quantum state with positive quantum correlation. The Frobenius norm of the test matrix is used to measure the quantum correlation, which satisfies the basic requirements for a good measure and coincides with Wootters concurrence for two-qubit pure states. Since no optimization is involved in the definition, this measure of quantum correlation is easy to compute and even can be calculated manually.

  9. Accurate estimator of correlations between asynchronous signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Bence; Kertész, János

    2009-04-01

    The estimation of the correlation between time series is often hampered by the asynchronicity of the signals. Cumulating data within a time window suppresses this source of noise but weakens the statistics. We present a method to estimate correlations without applying long time windows. We decompose the correlations of data cumulated over a long window using decay of lagged correlations as calculated from short window data. This increases the accuracy of the estimated correlation significantly and decreases the necessary effort of calculations both in real and computer experiments.

  10. Overexpression of GPC6 and TMEM132D in Early Stage Ovarian Cancer Correlates with CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Infiltration and Increased Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Karapetsas, Athanasios; Giannakakis, Antonis; Dangaj, Denarda; Lanitis, Evripidis; Kynigopoulos, Spyridon; Lambropoulou, Maria; Tanyi, Janos L.; Galanis, Alex; Kakolyris, Stylianos; Trypsianis, Gregorios; Coukos, George; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Infiltration of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes in ovarian cancer is a favorable prognostic factor. Employing a differential expression approach, we have recently identified a number of genes associated with CD8+ T-cell infiltration in early stage ovarian tumors. In the present study, we validated by qPCR the expression of two genes encoding the transmembrane proteins GPC6 and TMEM132D in a cohort of early stage ovarian cancer patients. The expression of both genes correlated positively with the mRNA levels of CD8A, a marker of T-lymphocyte infiltration [Pearson coefficient: 0.427 (p = 0.0067) and 0.861 (p < 0.0001), resp.]. GPC6 and TMEM132D expression was also documented in a variety of ovarian cancer cell lines. Importantly, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that high mRNA levels of GPC6 and/or TMEM132D correlated significantly with increased overall survival of early stage ovarian cancer patients (p = 0.032). Thus, GPC6 and TMEM132D may serve as predictors of CD8+ T-lymphocyte infiltration and as favorable prognostic markers in early stage ovarian cancer with important consequences for diagnosis, prognosis, and tumor immunobattling. PMID:26448945

  11. Do Chondral Lesions of the Knee Correlate with Bone Tracer Uptake by Using SPECT/CT?

    PubMed

    Dordevic, Milos; Hirschmann, Michael T; Rechsteiner, Jan; Falkowski, Anna; Testa, Enrique; Hirschmann, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the correlation of bone tracer uptake as determined with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) and the size and severity of chondral lesions detected with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the knee. Materials and Methods MR imaging and SPECT/CT images of 63 knee joints in 63 patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 49.2 years ± 12.7) with chondral or osteochondral lesions were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed after approval by the ethics committee. Chondral lesions were graded on MR images by using a modified Noyes grading scale (grade 0, intact; grade 1, fibrillations; grade 2, <50% defect; grade 3, >50% defect; and grade 4, grade three plus subchondral changes) and measured in two dimensions. Technetium 99m hydroxymethane diphosphonate SPECT/CT bone tracer uptake was volumetrically quantified by using validated software. Maximum values of each subchondral area (patellofemoral or medial and lateral femorotibial) were quantified, and a ratio was calculated in relation to a reference region in the femoral shaft, which represented the bone tracer uptake background activity. Grades and sizes of chondral lesions and bone tracer uptake were correlated by using an independent t test and analysis of variance (P < .05). Results Bone tracer uptake was low (mean relative uptake, 1.64 ± 0.95) in knees without any present chondral lesion. In knees with grade 3 and 4 chondral lesions, the relative ratio was significantly higher (3.62 ± 2.18, P = .002) than in knees with grade 1 and 2 lesions (2.95 ± 2.07). The larger the diameter of the chondral lesion, the higher the bone tracer uptake. Higher grades of chondral lesions (grades 3 and 4) larger than 4 cm(2) (4.96 ± 2.43) showed a significantly higher bone tracer uptake than smaller lesions (<1 cm(2), 2.72 ± 1.43 [P = .011]; and 1-4 cm(2), 3.28 ± 2.15 [P = .004]). Conclusion SPECT/CT findings significantly correlate with the degree and size of chondral lesions on MR images. Grade 3 and 4 chondral lesions of the knee, as well as larger lesions, correlate with a high bone tracer uptake. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26162025

  12. Performance highlights of the ALMA correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudry, Alain; Lacasse, Richard; Escoffier, Ray; Webber, John; Greenberg, Joseph; Platt, Laurence; Treacy, Robert; Saez, Alejandro F.; Cais, Philippe; Comoretto, Giovanni; Quertier, Benjamin; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Kamazaki, Takeshi; Chikada, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Okuda, Takeshi; Kurono, Yasutake; Iguchi, Satoru

    2012-09-01

    Two large correlators have been constructed to combine the signals captured by the ALMA antennas deployed on the Atacama Desert in Chile at an elevation of 5050 meters. The Baseline correlator was fabricated by a NRAO/European team to process up to 64 antennas for 16 GHz bandwidth in two polarizations and another correlator, the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) correlator, was fabricated by a Japanese team to process up to 16 antennas. Both correlators meet the same specifications except for the number of processed antennas. The main architectural differences between these two large machines will be underlined. Selected features of the Baseline and ACA correlators as well as the main technical challenges met by the designers will be briefly discussed. The Baseline correlator is the largest correlator ever built for radio astronomy. Its digital hybrid architecture provides a wide variety of observing modes including the ability to divide each input baseband into 32 frequency-mobile sub-bands for high spectral resolution and to be operated as a conventional 'lag' correlator for high time resolution. The various observing modes offered by the ALMA correlators to the science community for 'Early Science' are presented, as well as future observing modes. Coherently phasing the array to provide VLBI maps of extremely compact sources is another feature of the ALMA correlators. Finally, the status and availability of these large machines will be presented.

  13. Optical correlators: systems and domains of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragulinescu, Andrei; Cojoc, Dan

    2005-08-01

    The paper presents the basic concepts of the optical correlators. In our knowledge, it is the first systematic presentation of the applications of optical correlators. The main three types of optical correlators: the optical correlator in incoherent light, the optical correlator in coherent light (VanderLugt) and the joint transform correlator are presented. The optical correlators are very powerll systems used for image recognition, that perform a correlation between a bidimensional function which represents a Scene that must be analyzed and another bidimensional function that contains information about the reference function. This correlation is optically realized by a Fourier transform between the two functions. The optical Correlators have found a lot of applications for image recognition and target detection in various fields, such as the military field, robotics, medical field, industry a.s.o. Among the various applications of the optical correlators we can mention: digital fingerprints identification, credit card security, antique scripts recognition, determination of the cosmic ships and satellites behavior, amelioration of cancer tests precision, quality control etc.

  14. Local correlation measures in atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Nicolais L.; Sagar, Robin P.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    2005-02-01

    The phenomenon of electron correlation in atomic systems is examined and compared from the statistical, information theoretic, and energetic perspectives. Local correlation measures, based on the correlation coefficient, information entropies, and idempotency measure, are compared to the correlation energy density. Analysis of these local measures reveals that the chemically significant valence region is responsible for the behavior of their respective global measures in contrast to the correlation energy density which has large contributions to the correlation energy from both the core and valence regions. These results emphasize the difference in the mechanisms inherent in the different perspectives, the similarity between the statistical, information entropic, and idempotency views, and provides further evidence for the use of information theoretic based quantities in studies of electron correlation.

  15. Sensitivity of adjustment to parameter correlations and to response-parameter correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagschal, J.J.

    2011-07-01

    The adjusted parameters and response, and their respective posterior uncertainties and correlations, are presented explicitly as functions of all relevant prior correlations for the two parameters, one response case. The dependence of these adjusted entities on the various prior correlations is analyzed and portrayed graphically for various valid correlation combinations on a simple criticality problem. (authors)

  16. Mechanical torque measurement in the proximal femur correlates to failure load and bone mineral density ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Stefan; Noeldeke, Tatjana; Blauth, Michael; Mutschler, Wolf; Bürklein, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of local bone quality is essential for surgeons to determine operation techniques. A device for intraoperative measurement of local bone quality has been developed by the AO-Research Foundation (Densi - Probe®). We used this device to experimentally measure peak breakaway torque of trabecular bone in the proximal femur and correlated this with local bone mineral density (BMD) and failure load. Bone mineral density of 160 cadaver femurs was measured by ex situ dualenergy X-ray absorptiometry. The failure load of all femurs was analyzed by side-impact analysis. Femur fractures were fixed and mechanical peak torque was measured with the DensiProbe® device. Correlation was calculated whereas correlation coefficient and significance was calculated by Fisher’s Ztransformation. Moreover, linear regression analysis was carried out. The unpaired Student’s t-test was used to assess the significance of differences. The Ward triangle region had the lowest BMD with 0.511 g/cm2 (±0.17 g/cm2), followed by the upper neck region with 0.546 g/cm2 (±0.16 g/cm2), trochanteric region with 0.685 g/cm2 (±0.19 g/cm2) and the femoral neck with 0.813 g/cm2 (±0.2 g/cm2). Peak torque of DensiProbe® in the femoral head was 3.48 Nm (±2.34 Nm). Load to failure was 4050.2 N (±1586.7 N). The highest correlation of peak torque measured by Densi Probe® and load to failure was found in the femoral neck (r=0.64, P<0.001). The overall correlation of mechanical peak torque with T-score was r=0.60 (P<0.001). A correlation was found between mechanical peak torque, load to failure of bone and BMD in vitro. Trabecular strength of bone and bone mineral density are different aspects of bone strength, but a correlation was found between them. Mechanical peak torque as measured may contribute additional information about bone strength, especially in the perioperative testing. PMID:23888206

  17. Gastroprotective effect of alpha-pinene and its correlation with antiulcerogenic activity of essential oils obtained from Hyptis species

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Marcelo de Almeida; Magalhães, Rafael Matos; Torres, Danielle Mesquita; Cavalcante, Rodrigo Cardoso; Mota, Francisca Sheila Xavier; Oliveira Coelho, Emanuela Maria Araújo; Moreira, Henrique Pires; Lima, Glauber Cruz; Araújo, Pamella Cristina da Costa; Cardoso, José Henrique Leal; de Souza, Andrelina Noronha Coelho; Diniz, Lúcio Ricardo Leite

    2015-01-01

    Background: Alpha-pinene (?-pinene) is a monoterpene commonly found in essential oils with gastroprotective activity obtained from diverse medicinal plants, including Hyptis species. The genus Hyptis (lamiaceae) consists of almost 400 species widespread in tropical and temperate regions of America. In the north and northeastern Brazil, some Hyptis species are used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal disturbances. Objective: The present study has investigated the gastoprotective effect of purified ?-pinene in experimental gastric ulcer induced by ethanol and indomethacin in mice. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcers were induced in male Swiss mice (20-30 g) by oral administration of absolute ethanol or indomethacin 45 min after oral pretreatment with vehicle, standard control drugs or ?-pinene (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg). One hour after the ulcerative challenges, the stomach were removed, and gastric lesions areas measured. The effects of ?-pinene on the gastric juice acidity were determined by pylorus ligation model. The gastrointestinal motility and mucus depletion were determined by measuring the gastric levels of phenol red and alcian blue, respectively. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of gastric mucosa of the experimental groups were used for histology analysis. Results: ?-pinene pretreatment inhibited ethanol-induced gastric lesions, reduced volume and acidity of the gastric juice and increased gastric wall mucus (P < 0.05). Furthermore, we showed an interesting correlation between concentration of ?-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species (P Pearson = 0.98). Conclusion: Our data showed that the ?-pinene exhibited significant antiulcerogenic activity and a great correlation between concentration of ?-pinene and gastroprotective effect of Hyptis species was also observed. PMID:25709221

  18. Spatial variability of maximum and minimum monthly temperature in Spain during 1981-2010 evaluated by correlation decay distance (CDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena-Angulo, D.; Cortesi, N.; Brunetti, M.; González-Hidalgo, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    The spatial variability of monthly diurnal and nocturnal mean values of temperature in Spain has been analysed to evaluate the optimal threshold distance between neighbouring stations that make a meteorological network (in terms of stations' density) well representative of the conterminous land of Spain. To this end, the correlation decay distance has been calculated using the highest quality monthly available temperature series (1981-2010) from AEMet (National Spanish Meteorological Agency). In the conterminous land of Spain, the distance at which couples of stations have a common variance above the selected threshold (50 %, r Pearson ˜0.70) for both maximum and minimum temperature on average does not exceed 400 km, with relevant spatial and temporal differences, and in extended areas of Spain, this value is lower than 200 km. The spatial variability for minimum temperature is higher than for maximum, except in cold months when the reverse is true. Spatially, highest values are located in both diurnal and nocturnal temperatures to the southeastern coastland and lower spatial variability is found to the inland areas, and thus the spatial variability shows a clear coastland-to-inland gradient at annual and monthly scale. Monthly analyses show that the highest spatial variability in maximum and minimum temperatures occur in July and August, when radiation is maximum, and in lowland areas, (<200 m o.s.l.), which coincide with the mostly transformed landscapes, particularly by irrigation and urbanization. These results highlight local factors could play a major role on spatial variability of temperature. Being maximum and minimum temperature interstation correlation values highly variable in Spanish land, an average of threshold distance of about 200 km as a limit value for a well representative network should be recommended for climate analyses,.

  19. Assessment of Communications-related Admissions Criteria in a Three-year Pharmacy Program.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jayesh R; Tejada, Frederick R; Lang, Lynn A; Purnell, Miriam; Acedera, Lisa; Ngonga, Ferdinand

    2015-08-25

    Objective. To determine if there is a correlation between TOEFL and other admissions criteria that assess communications skills (ie, PCAT variables: verbal, reading, essay, and composite), interview, and observational scores and to evaluate TOEFL and these admissions criteria as predictors of academic performance. Methods. Statistical analyses included two sample t tests, multiple regression and Pearson's correlations for parametric variables, and Mann-Whitney U for nonparametric variables, which were conducted on the retrospective data of 162 students, 57 of whom were foreign-born. Results. The multiple regression model of the other admissions criteria on TOEFL was significant. There was no significant correlation between TOEFL scores and academic performance. However, significant correlations were found between the other admissions criteria and academic performance. Conclusion. Since TOEFL is not a significant predictor of either communication skills or academic success of foreign-born PharmD students in the program, it may be eliminated as an admissions criterion. PMID:26430273

  20. Measuring and modeling correlations in multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-09-01

    The interactions among the elementary components of many complex systems can be qualitatively different. Such systems are therefore naturally described in terms of multiplex or multilayer networks, i.e., networks where each layer stands for a different type of interaction between the same set of nodes. There is today a growing interest in understanding when and why a description in terms of a multiplex network is necessary and more informative than a single-layer projection. Here we contribute to this debate by presenting a comprehensive study of correlations in multiplex networks. Correlations in node properties, especially degree-degree correlations, have been thoroughly studied in single-layer networks. Here we extend this idea to investigate and characterize correlations between the different layers of a multiplex network. Such correlations are intrinsically multiplex, and we first study them empirically by constructing and analyzing several multiplex networks from the real world. In particular, we introduce various measures to characterize correlations in the activity of the nodes and in their degree at the different layers and between activities and degrees. We show that real-world networks exhibit indeed nontrivial multiplex correlations. For instance, we find cases where two layers of the same multiplex network are positively correlated in terms of node degrees, while other two layers are negatively correlated. We then focus on constructing synthetic multiplex networks, proposing a series of models to reproduce the correlations observed empirically and/or to assess their relevance.

  1. Bayesian Analysis (2006) 1, Number 1, pp. 140 When Did Bayesian Inference Become

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    in Pearson's chi-square statistic1 , Student's t-test, Hotelling's T 2 statistic, the Box-Cox transformation take great pride in having an eponymous method in their lifetime, but this was insufficient for Karl Pearson. See Porter (129, Chapter 1). 2Named by John Tukey after the boy scout's trusty knife. 3Coined

  2. Bayesian Analysis (2007) 1, Number 1, pp. 140 When Did Bayesian Inference Become

    E-print Network

    Steorts, Rebecca C.

    2007-01-01

    in Pearson's chi-square statistic1 , Student's t-test, Hotelling's T 2 statistic, the Box-Cox transformation take great pride in having an eponymous method in their lifetime, but this was insufficient for Karl Pearson. See Porter (127, Chapter 1). 2Named by John Tukey after the boy scout's trusty knife. 3Coined

  3. Oscillatory correlates of autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2015-03-01

    Recollection of events from one's own life is referred to as autobiographical memory. Autobiographical memory is an important part of our self. Neuroimaging findings link self-referential processes with the default mode network (DMN). Much evidence coming primarily from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies shows that autobiographical memory and DMN have a common neural base. In this study, electroencephalographic data collected in 47 participants during recollection of autobiographical episodes were analyzed using temporal and spatial independent component analyses in combination with source localization. Autobiographical remembering was associated with an increase of spectral power in alpha and beta and a decrease in delta band. The increase of alpha power, as estimated by sLORETA, was most prominent in the posterior DMN, but was also observed in visual and motor cortices, prompting an assumption that it is associated with activation of DMN and inhibition of irrelevant sensory and motor areas. In line with data linking delta oscillations with aversive states, decrease of delta power was more pronounced in episodes associated with positive emotions, whereas episodes associated with negative emotions were accompanied by an increase of delta power. Vividness of recollection correlated positively with theta oscillations. These results highlight the leading role of alpha oscillations and the DMN in the processes accompanying autobiographical remembering. PMID:25523347

  4. Neural correlates of mystical experience.

    PubMed

    Cristofori, Irene; Bulbulia, Joseph; Shaver, John H; Wilson, Marc; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Mystical experiences, or subjectively believed encounters with a supernatural world, are widely reported across cultures and throughout human history. Previous theories speculate that executive brain functions underpin mystical experiences. To evaluate causal hypotheses, structural studies of brain lesion are required. Previous studies suffer from small samples or do not have valid measures of cognitive functioning prior to injury. We investigated mystical experience among participants from the Vietnam Head Injury Study and compared those who suffered penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI; n=116) with matched healthy controls (HC; n=32). Voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping analysis showed that lesions to frontal and temporal brain regions were linked with greater mystical experiences. Such regions included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and middle/superior temporal cortex (TC). In a confirmatory analysis, we grouped pTBI patients by lesion location and compared mysticism experiences with the HC group. The dlPFC group presented markedly increased mysticism. Notably, longitudinal analysis of pre-injury data (correlating with general intelligence and executive performance) excludes explanations from individual differences. Our findings support previous speculation linking executive brain functions to mystical experiences, and reveal that executive functioning (dlPFC) causally contributes to the down-regulation of mystical experiences. PMID:26631541

  5. Quantum correlations which imply causation

    PubMed Central

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.; Jones, Jonathan A.; Vedral, Vlatko

    2015-01-01

    In ordinary, non-relativistic, quantum physics, time enters only as a parameter and not as an observable: a state of a physical system is specified at a given time and then evolved according to the prescribed dynamics. While the state can, and usually does, extend across all space, it is only defined at one instant of time. Here we ask what would happen if we defined the notion of the quantum density matrix for multiple spatial and temporal measurements. We introduce the concept of a pseudo-density matrix (PDM) which treats space and time indiscriminately. This matrix in general fails to be positive for measurement events which do not occur simultaneously, motivating us to define a measure of causality that discriminates between spatial and temporal correlations. Important properties of this measure, such as monotonicity under local operations, are proved. Two qubit NMR experiments are presented that illustrate how a temporal pseudo-density matrix approaches a genuinely allowed density matrix as the amount of decoherence is increased between two consecutive measurements. PMID:26675807

  6. Primary progressive aphasia: clinicopathological correlations

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a disorder of declining language that is a frequent presentation of neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Three variants of PPA are recognized: progressive nonfluent aphasia, semantic dementia, and logopenic progressive aphasia. In an era of etiology-specific treatments for neurodegenerative conditions, determining the histopathological basis of PPA is crucial. Clinicopathological correlations in PPA emphasize the contributory role of dementia with Pick bodies and other tauopathies, TDP-43 proteinopathies, and Alzheimer disease. These data suggest an association between a specific PPA variant and an underlying pathology, although many cases of PPA are associated with an unexpected pathology. Neuroimaging and biofluid biomarkers are now emerging as important adjuncts to clinical diagnosis. There is great hope that the addition of biomarker assessments to careful clinical examination will enable accurate diagnosis of the pathology associated with PPA during a patient’s life, and that such findings will serve as the basis for clinical trials in this spectrum of disease. PMID:20139998

  7. Quantum correlations which imply causation.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Jones, Jonathan A; Vedral, Vlatko

    2015-01-01

    In ordinary, non-relativistic, quantum physics, time enters only as a parameter and not as an observable: a state of a physical system is specified at a given time and then evolved according to the prescribed dynamics. While the state can, and usually does, extend across all space, it is only defined at one instant of time. Here we ask what would happen if we defined the notion of the quantum density matrix for multiple spatial and temporal measurements. We introduce the concept of a pseudo-density matrix (PDM) which treats space and time indiscriminately. This matrix in general fails to be positive for measurement events which do not occur simultaneously, motivating us to define a measure of causality that discriminates between spatial and temporal correlations. Important properties of this measure, such as monotonicity under local operations, are proved. Two qubit NMR experiments are presented that illustrate how a temporal pseudo-density matrix approaches a genuinely allowed density matrix as the amount of decoherence is increased between two consecutive measurements. PMID:26675807

  8. Evaluation of a portable clinical analyzer in cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fasicularis).

    PubMed

    Hopper, Kelly J; Cray, Carolyn

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of a portable analyzer for use in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fasicularis). During semiannual health screening, blood samples from 23 animals were analyzed by both the portable clinical analyzer and the institutional comparative pathology laboratory. Portable clinical analyzers have been evaluated for use in other species, but the suitability for macaques has not yet been determined. Results for glucose, urea (BUN), sodium, potassium, chloride, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and total CO2 were compared by overall t test, paired t test, and Pearson correlation. Only glucose and BUN did not differ in the overall t test between methods. Only potassium values did not differ in the paired t test. Compared with those from the portable analyzer, laboratory values were lower for glucose, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and total CO2 and higher for electrolytes and BUN. All values were within normal ranges for cynomolgus macaques which, in this study, were all apparently healthy, physiologically normal animals. We attributed differences between methods to sample type and handling and the physiologic changes in blood after collection. These results indicate that direct comparison of values obtained through different methods may not be valid, and normal ranges for point-of-care devices should be developed for each species. PMID:17487954

  9. From correlation functions to event shapes

    E-print Network

    Belitsky, A V; Korchemsky, G P; Sokatchev, E; Zhiboedov, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a new approach to computing event shape distributions or, more precisely, charge flow correlations in a generic conformal field theory (CFT). These infrared finite observables are familiar from collider physics studies and describe the angular distribution of global charges in outgoing radiation created from the vacuum by some source. The charge flow correlations can be expressed in terms of Wightman correlation functions in a certain limit. We explain how to compute these quantities starting from their Euclidean analogues by means of a non-trivial analytic continuation which, in the framework of CFT, can elegantly be performed in Mellin space. The relation between the charge flow correlations and Euclidean correlation functions can be reformulated directly in configuration space, bypassing the Mellin representation, as a certain Lorentzian double discontinuity of the correlation function integrated along the cuts. We illustrate the general formalism in N=4 SYM, making use of the well-known results...

  10. Effects of HBT correlations on flow measurements

    E-print Network

    Mai Dinh; Nicolas Borghini; Jean-Yves Ollitrault

    2000-01-21

    The methods currently used to measure collective flow in nucleus--nucleus collisions assume that the only azimuthal correlations between particles are those arising from their correlation with the reaction plane. However, quantum HBT correlations also produce short range azimuthal correlations between identical particles. This creates apparent azimuthal anisotropies of a few percent when pions are used to estimate the direction of the reaction plane. These should not be misinterpreted as originating from collective flow. In particular, we show that the peculiar behaviour of the directed and elliptic flow of pions observed by NA49 at low p_T can be entirely understood in terms of HBT correlations. Such correlations also produce apparent higher Fourier harmonics (of order n larger than 3) of the azimuthal distribution, with magnitudes of the order of 1%, which should be looked for in the data.

  11. Gene-history correlation and population structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, A.; Mehlig, B.

    2004-12-01

    Correlation of gene histories in the human genome determines the patterns of genetic variation (haplotype structure) and is crucial to understanding genetic factors in common diseases. We derive closed analytical expressions for the correlation of gene histories in established demographic models for genetic evolution and show how to extend the analysis to more realistic (but more complicated) models of demographic structure. We identify two contributions to the correlation of gene histories in divergent populations: linkage disequilibrium, and differences in the demographic history of individuals in the sample. These two factors contribute to correlations at different length scales: the former at small, and the latter at large scales. We show that recent mixing events in divergent populations limit the range of correlations and compare our findings to empirical results on the correlation of gene histories in the human genome.

  12. Squeezed correlations among particle-antiparticle pairs

    E-print Network

    Sandra S. Padula; Danuce M. Dudek; Otavio Socolowski Jr

    2009-02-04

    The hadronic correlation among particle-antiparticle pairs was highlighted in the late 1990's, culminating with the demonstration that it should exist if the masses of the hadrons were modified in the hot and dense medium formed in high energy heavy ion collisions. They were called Back-to-Back Correlations (BBC) of particle-antiparticle pairs, also known as squeezed correlations. However, even though they are well-established theoretically, such hadronic correlations have not yet been experimentally discovered. Expecting to compel the experimentalists to search for this effect, we suggest here a clear way to look for the BBC signal, by constructing the squeezed correlation function of phi-phi and K+K- pairs at RHIC energies, plotted in terms of the average momentum of the pair, K12=(k1+k2)/2, inspired by procedures adopted in Hanbury-Brown & Twiss (HBT) correlations.

  13. Nuclear Matter Bulk Parameter Scales and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, B. M.; Dutra, M.; Lourenço, O.; Delfino, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the arising of correlations among some isovector bulk parameters in nonrelativistic and relativistic hadronic mean-field models. For the former, we investigate correlations in the nonrelativistic (NR) limit of relativistic point-coupling models. We provide analytical correlations, for the NR limit model, between the symmetry energy and its derivatives, namely, the symmetry energy slope, curvature, skewness and fourth order derivative, discussing the conditions in which they are linear ones. We also show that some correlations presented in the NR limit model are reproduced for relativistic models presenting cubic and quartic self-interactions in its scalar field. As a direct application of such linear correlations, we remark its association with possible crossing points in the density dependence of the linearly correlated bulk parameter.

  14. Gait speed using powered robotic exoskeletons after spinal cord injury: a systematic review and correlational study.

    PubMed

    Louie, Dennis R; Eng, Janice J; Lam, Tania

    2015-01-01

    Powered robotic exoskeletons are an emerging technology of wearable orthoses that can be used as an assistive device to enable non-ambulatory individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to walk, or as a rehabilitation tool to improve walking ability in ambulatory individuals with SCI. No studies to date have systematically reviewed the literature on the efficacy of powered exoskeletons on restoring walking function. Our objective was to systematically review the literature to determine the gait speed attained by individuals with SCI when using a powered exoskeleton to walk, factors influencing this speed, and characteristics of studies involving a powered exoskeleton (e.g. inclusion criteria, screening, and training processes). A systematic search in computerized databases was conducted to identify articles that reported on walking outcomes when using a powered exoskeleton. Individual gait speed data from each study was extracted. Pearson correlations were performed between gait speed and 1) age, 2) years post-injury, 3) injury level, and 4) number of training sessions. Fifteen articles met inclusion criteria, 14 of which investigated the powered exoskeleton as an assistive device for non-ambulatory individuals and one which used it as a training intervention for ambulatory individuals with SCI. The mean gait speed attained by non-ambulatory participants (n?=?84) while wearing a powered exoskeleton was 0.26 m/s, with the majority having a thoracic-level motor-complete injury. Twelve articles reported individual data for the non-ambulatory participants, from which a positive correlation was found between gait speed and 1) age (r?=?0.27, 95 % CI 0.02-0.48, p?=?0.03, 63 participants), 2) injury level (r?=?0.27, 95 % CI 0.02-0.48, p?=?0.03, 63 participants), and 3) training sessions (r?=?0.41, 95 % CI 0.16-0.61, p?=?0.002, 55 participants). In conclusion, powered exoskeletons can provide non-ambulatory individuals with thoracic-level motor-complete SCI the ability to walk at modest speeds. This speed is related to level of injury as well as training time. PMID:26463355

  15. Portable real-time coherent optical correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upatnieks, J.

    1983-09-01

    A real-time coherent optical correlator is mounted inside a 15- x 23- x 38-cm enclosure and features laser diode light sources and a liquid crystal incoherent-to-coherent image converter. Each of four reference filters is illuminated by a separate laser diode, real-time operation is achieved by the image converter, and a zoom lens forming the incoherent image allows a scale search. The correlator can be mounted on a tripod and performs correlations indoors or outdoors.

  16. Infinite Correlation in Measured Quantum Processes

    E-print Network

    Karoline Wiesner; James P. Crutchfield

    2006-11-14

    We show that quantum dynamical systems can exhibit infinite correlations in their behavior when repeatedly measured. We model quantum processes using quantum finite-state generators and take the stochastic language they generate as a representation of their behavior. We analyze two spin-1 quantum systems that differ only in how they are observed. The corresponding language generated has short-range correlation in one case and infinite correlation in the other.

  17. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  18. Correlation of Helium Solubility in Liquid Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    A correlation has been developed for the equilibrium mole fraction of soluble gaseous helium in liquid nitrogen as a function of temperature and pressure. Experimental solubility data was compiled and provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Data from six sources was used to develop a correlation within the range of 0.5 to 9.9 MPa and 72.0 to 119.6 K. The relative standard deviation of the correlation is 6.9 percent.

  19. Neural correlates of feeling sympathy.

    PubMed

    Decety, Jean; Chaminade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to investigate the neural correlates of feeling sympathy for someone else (i.e. the affinity, association, or relationship between persons wherein whatever affects one similarly affects the other). While undergoing PET scans, subjects were presented with a series of video-clips showing individuals (who were semi-professional stage actors) telling sad and neutral stories, as if they had personally experienced them. These stories were told with either congruent or incongruent motor expression of emotion (MEE). At the end of each movie, subjects were asked to rate the mood of the communicator and also how likable they found that person. Watching sad stories versus neutral stories was associated with increased activity in emotion processing-related structures, as well as in a set of cortical areas that belong to a "shared representation" network, including the right inferior parietal cortex. Motor expression of emotion, regardless of the narrative content of the stories, resulted in a specific regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) increase in the left inferior frontal gyrus. The condition of mismatch between the narrative content of the stories and the motor expression of emotion elicited a significant skin conductance response and strong rCBF increase in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and superior frontal gyrus which are involved in dealing with social conflict. Taken together, these results are consistent with a model of feeling sympathy that relies on both the shared representation and the affective networks. Interestingly, this network was not activated when subjects watched inappropriate social behavior. PMID:12459211

  20. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question. PMID:25431285

  1. On position, momentum and their correlation

    E-print Network

    Alberto Clemente de la Torre

    2013-08-22

    Position and momentum observables are considered and their correlation is studied for the simplest quantum system of a free particle moving in one dimension. The algebra and the eigenvalue problem for the correlation observable is presented and its possible relevance for the solution of the Pauli problem is analysed. The correlation provides a simple explanation of the shrinking and spreading of wave packets in an interpretation of quantum mechanics based in an ontology suggested by quantum field theory. Several properties and speculations concerning position-momentum correlations are mentioned.

  2. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  3. Asymmetric velocity correlations in shearing media

    E-print Network

    Peter Olsson

    2010-05-11

    A model of soft frictionless disks in two dimensions at zero temperature is simulated with a shearing dynamics to study various kinds of asymmetries in sheared systems. We examine both single particle properties, the spatial velocity correlation function, and a correlation function designed to separate clockwise and counter-clockwise rotational fields from one another. Among the rich and interesting behaviors we find that the velocity correlation along the two different diagonals corresponding to compression and dilation, respectively, are almost identical and, furthermore, that a feature in one of the correlation functions is directly related to irreversible plastic events.

  4. Correlation in states of two identical particles

    E-print Network

    D. L. Zhou

    2008-10-09

    We identify the correlation in a state of two identical particles as the residual information beyond what is already contained in the 1-particle reduced density matrix, and propose a correlation measure based on the maximum entropy principle. We obtain the analytical results of the correlation measure, which make it computable for arbitrary two-particle states. We also show that the degrees of correlation in the same two-particle states with different particle types will decrease in the following order: bosons, fermions, and distinguishable particles.

  5. Parallel auto-correlative statistics with VTK.

    SciTech Connect

    Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Bennett, Janine Camille

    2013-08-01

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK and presents both the serial and parallel auto-correlative statistics engines. It is a sequel to [PT08, BPRT09b, PT09, BPT09, PT10] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, principal component analysis, contingency, k-means, and order statistics engines. The ease of use of the new parallel auto-correlative statistics engine is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets and algorithm verification is provided. This report justifies the design of the statistics engines with parallel scalability in mind, and provides scalability and speed-up analysis results for the autocorrelative statistics engine.

  6. Pattern recognition, inner products and correlation filters

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Romero, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, we review correlation filters as an approach to pattern recognition with a special emphasis on the consequences of normalizing the correlation to achieve intensity invariance. Intensity invariance is effected using the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality to normalize the correlation integral. We discuss the implications of this criterion for the application of correlation filters to the pattern recognition problem. It is shown that normalized phase-only and synthetic discriminate functions do not provide the recognition/discrimination obtained with the classical matched filter. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  7. RECONSTRUCTING THE SHAPE OF THE CORRELATION FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Huffenberger, K. M.; Galeazzi, M.; Ursino, E.

    2013-06-01

    We develop an estimator for the correlation function which, in the ensemble average, returns the shape of the correlation function, even for signals that have significant correlations on the scale of the survey region. Our estimator is general and works in any number of dimensions. We develop versions of the estimator for both diffuse and discrete signals. As an application, we apply them to Monte Carlo simulations of X-ray background measurements. These include a realistic, spatially inhomogeneous population of spurious detector events. We discuss applying the estimator to the averaging of correlation functions evaluated on several small fields, and to other cosmological applications.

  8. Correlation between Systemic Oxidative Stress and Intraocular Pressure Level

    PubMed Central

    Tanito, Masaki; Kaidzu, Sachiko; Takai, Yasuyuki; Ohira, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Background The involvement of local and systemic oxidative stress in intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation and optic nerve damage has been hypothesized in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. We reported previously that the level of systemic antioxidative capacity is lower in patients with open-angle glaucoma than controls without glaucoma. Here, we assessed the correlation between IOP and systemic levels of prooxidants and antioxidants by analyzing the blood biochemistry in patients with glaucoma. Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from Japanese patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (n = 206), exfoliation syndrome (n = 199), and controls (n = 126). Serum levels of lipid peroxides, ferric-reducing activity, and thiol antioxidant activity were measured by diacron reactive oxygen metabolite (dROM), biological antioxidant potential (BAP), and sulfhydryl (SH) tests, respectively, using a free radical analyzer. To test the possible effect of oxidative stress on IOP levels, the patients were classified into one of four groups (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4, with Q1 having the lowest IOP) based on the quartile value of IOP. For this classification, the known highest IOP value in both the right and left eyes was regarded as each subject’s IOP. For comparisons among the IOP groups, the differences were calculated using one-way analysis of variance followed by post-hoc unpaired t-tests. To adjust for differences in demographic characteristic distributions, the dROM, BAP, and SH test values were compared among the IOP groups using multiple logistic regression analysis; the odds ratio (OR) of each variable was calculated with the Q1 group as the reference. Results The dROM and the SH levels did not differ significantly (p = 0.6704 and p = 0.6376, respectively) among the four IOP groups. The BAP levels differed significantly (p = 0.0115) among the four IOP groups; the value was significantly lower in the Q4 group (1,932 ?mol/L) compared with the Q1 (2,023 ?mol/L, p = 0.0042) and Q2 (2,003 ?mol/L, p = 0.0302) groups and significantly lower in the Q3 group (1,948 ?mol/L) than the Q1 (p = 0.0174) group. After adjustment for differences in various demographic characteristics, lower BAP values were significantly associated with the classification into higher IOP groups (Q3 group, p = 0.0261 and OR = 0.06/range; Q4 group, p = 0.0018 and OR = 0.04/range). The dROM and SH values did not reach significance in any comparisons. Conclusions Lower systemic antioxidant capacity measured by ferric-reducing activity is involved in the pathogenesis of open-angle glaucoma via its roles in IOP elevation. PMID:26186651

  9. How to assess and compare inter-rater reliability, agreement and correlation of ratings: an exemplary analysis of mother-father and parent-teacher expressive vocabulary rating pairs

    PubMed Central

    Stolarova, Margarita; Wolf, Corinna; Rinker, Tanja; Brielmann, Aenne

    2014-01-01

    This report has two main purposes. First, we combine well-known analytical approaches to conduct a comprehensive assessment of agreement and correlation of rating-pairs and to dis-entangle these often confused concepts, providing a best-practice example on concrete data and a tutorial for future reference. Second, we explore whether a screening questionnaire developed for use with parents can be reliably employed with daycare teachers when assessing early expressive vocabulary. A total of 53 vocabulary rating pairs (34 parent–teacher and 19 mother–father pairs) collected for two-year-old children (12 bilingual) are evaluated. First, inter-rater reliability both within and across subgroups is assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Next, based on this analysis of reliability and on the test-retest reliability of the employed tool, inter-rater agreement is analyzed, magnitude and direction of rating differences are considered. Finally, Pearson correlation coefficients of standardized vocabulary scores are calculated and compared across subgroups. The results underline the necessity to distinguish between reliability measures, agreement and correlation. They also demonstrate the impact of the employed reliability on agreement evaluations. This study provides evidence that parent–teacher ratings of children's early vocabulary can achieve agreement and correlation comparable to those of mother–father ratings on the assessed vocabulary scale. Bilingualism of the evaluated child decreased the likelihood of raters' agreement. We conclude that future reports of agreement, correlation and reliability of ratings will benefit from better definition of terms and stricter methodological approaches. The methodological tutorial provided here holds the potential to increase comparability across empirical reports and can help improve research practices and knowledge transfer to educational and therapeutic settings. PMID:24994985

  10. Downregulation of KIF1B mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues correlates with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Song-Zhu; Wang, Jian-Tao; Yu, Wei-Wei; Liu, Qing; Wu, Yan-Fang; Chen, Shu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare kinesin family member 1B (KIF1B) expression with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. METHODS: KIF1B protein and mRNA expression was assessed in HCC and paracarcinomatous (PC) tissues from 68 patients with HCC using Western blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR, respectively. Student’s t-tests were used to analyze relationships between clinicopathologic parameters and KIF1B expression, the Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze survival outcomes, and the log-rank test was used to compare survival differences between groups. RESULTS: Mean protein and mRNA levels of KIF1B were similar between HCC and PC tissues. However, HCC tissues with vein invasions had significantly lower KIF1B protein levels compared to those without vein invasions (2.30 ± 0.82 relative units vs 2.77 ± 0.84 relative units, P < 0.05). KIF1B protein levels in HCC tissues from patients with recurrence during the follow-up period were significantly lower than those without recurrence (2.31 ± 0.92 relative units vs 2.80 ± 0.80 relative units, P < 0.05). However, KIF1B protein and mRNA expression in HCC patients was not associated with other clinicopathologic parameters. Ratios of KIF1B mRNA expression in HCC tissues to those in PC tissues were correlated with overall survival (13.5 mo vs 20.0 mo, P < 0.05) and disease-free survival (11.5 mo vs 19.5 mo, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Downregulation of KIF1B in HCC tissues is associated with poor prognosis; additional clinical studies are needed to confirm whether KIF1B can serve as a prognostic marker. PMID:26217094

  11. Prevalence of Hand Disorders in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its Correlation with Microvascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, A; Usman, K; Reddy, H; Gutch, M; Jain, N; Qidwai, SA

    2013-01-01

    Background: Physicians have long recognized the association between diabetes mellitus and several pathologic conditions of the hand. The most commonly recognized maladies are limited joint mobility (LJM), Dupuytren's disease (DD), trigger finger (TF), and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Incidence of these hand disorders has increased in the setting of diabetes. Collectively, these are described as diabetic hand syndrome. Aim: The aims were to find out the prevalence of hand disorders in diabetic patients, and to study the relation of these hand disorders with microvascular complications. Subjects and Methods: This is an observational cross-sectional case-control study done over a period of 1 year Patients of type 2 DM, of age < 65 years, who visited Gandhi Memorial Hospital, Lucknow were enrolled and were described as cases. Age- and sex-matched nondiabetic individuals were taken in the control group. The data were analyzed using software SPSS. SPSS Inc. Released 2008. SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 17.0. Chicago: SPSS Inc. Means and standard deviations were computed; the Student t-test and Chi-square (?2) test were used as appropriate. Results: A total of 400 subjects were studied, 200 each in the case and control groups. Of total 200 diabetic patients, 30% (60/200) patients had neuropathy, 37.5% (75/200) had nephropathy, and 44.5% (89/200) patients had retinopathy. In the study population, 67% patients were having one or more hand disorders, in which LJM was found in 40.5% (81/200) patients, DD was found in 19% (38/200) patients, TF in 16.5% (33/200), and CTS in 14% (28/200) patients. Conclusions: This study shows a high prevalence of hand disorders in diabetic patients and also correlates with the duration of type 2 DM, LJM being the most common hand disorder and more common in patients who have microvascular complications. PMID:24116312

  12. Prevalence and correlates of suicide ideation in patients with COPD: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Fleehart, Sara; Fan, Vincent S; Nguyen, Huong Q; Lee, Jungeun; Kohen, Ruth; Herting, Jerald R; Matute-Bello, Gustavo; Adams, Sandra G; Pagalilauan, Genevieve; Borson, Soo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation (SI) in patients with stable moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients and methods We conducted an exploratory mixed methods analysis of data from participants in a longitudinal observational study of depression in COPD. We measured depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), which includes an item on SI. We compared participants with and without SI in relation to sociodemographics, symptoms, anxiety, and healthcare resource use with independent t-tests and chi-square tests. Content analysis was performed on qualitative data gathered during a structured SI safety assessment. Results Of 202 participants, 121 (60%) had depressive symptoms (PHQ ?6); 51 (25%) had a PHQ-9 ?10, indicating a high likelihood of current major depression; and 22 (11%) reported SI. Compared to the 99 depressed participants without SI, those with SI were more likely to be female (59% vs 27%, P=0.004); had worse dyspnea (P=0.009), depression (P<0.001), and anxiety (P=0.003); and were also more likely to have received treatment for depression and/or anxiety (82% vs 40%, P<0.001) and more hospitalizations for COPD exacerbations (P=0.03) but had similar levels of airflow obstruction and functioning than participants without SI. Themes from the qualitative analysis among those with SI included current or prior adverse life situations, untreated or partially treated complex depression, loss of a key relationship, experience of illness and disability, and poor communication with providers. Conclusion Our findings suggest that current SI is common in COPD, may occur disproportionately in women, can persist despite mental health treatment, and has complex relationships with both health and life events. Adequate management of SI in COPD may therefore require tailored, comprehensive treatment approaches that integrate medical and mental health objectives. PMID:25587219

  13. The Correlation between Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) and Thyroid Hormones in the General Population: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuemin; Wang, Hailong; Li, Jing; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Teng, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Certain epidemiological studies have suggested exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) affect the production and secretion of thyroid hormones (TH); however, conflicting results have been reported in different studies. There is not a convincing conclusion about this debate to date. Materials and Methods To perform a meta-analysis determining if there are correlations between PBDEs exposure and the serum levels of TH. Medical and scientific literature databases were searched for articles that met the eligibility criteria. The included articles were assessed for methodological quality. The correlation coefficient values or regression coefficient values between PBDEs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or total thyroxine (TT4) from each article were used for analysis. Data Synthesis Sixteen articles were included in this meta-analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were directly collected or calculated from data given in the articles. Then, Fisher’s z transformation was performed to convert each correlation coefficient to an approximately normal distribution. For z values between PBDEs exposure and TSH levels, the pooled z value for 18 studies was 0.08 (95% CI: -0.06, 0.22), and indicated significant heterogeneity (I2 values = 90.7%). Subgroup analysis was performed based on the median values of serum PBDEs in each study, there was not significant heterogeneity in each of the four subgroups (I2 values <30%). In meta-analysis of z values between PBDEs exposure and the levels of TT4, the pooled z value for 11 studies was -0.02 (95% CI: -0.11, 0.08), and also indicated significant heterogeneity (I2 values = 57.6%). Similar subgroup analysis was done for the PBDEs exposures and the levels of TT4. No significant heterogeneity was shown in either of the two subgroups (I2 values = 0). Conclusion The findings in our meta-analysis indicate the effects of PBDEs on thyroid function may mainly depend on PBDEs exposure and their levels found in serum. The relationship between PBDEs exposure and changes in thyroid function seem to fit an approximate u-shaped curve. These predictions await further verification, namely a prospective longitudinal study. PMID:25992849

  14. RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science Strong Correlation Physics Division

    E-print Network

    Fukai, Tomoki

    RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science Strong Correlation Physics Division Strong Correlation Physics Theory Research Team Emergent Matter Science Research Support Team Quantum Effect Device Research Physics Research Group Strong Correlation Theory Research Group Strong Correlation Interface Research

  15. Correlator I. Basics D. Anish Roshi

    E-print Network

    Groppi, Christopher

    function is also called Visibility. In general it is required to measure the visibility for different device used to measure the spectral visibility is called a spectral correlator. These devicesChapter 8 Correlator I. Basics D. Anish Roshi 8.1 Introduction A radio interferometer measures

  16. New physics correlations in rare decays

    E-print Network

    David M. Straub

    2011-01-18

    This talk gives an overview of correlations between new physics effects in rare B and K decays arising in concrete models or on a model-independent basis and discusses how these correlations can be utilized to distinguish between different classes of new physics scenarios.

  17. Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

    2011-08-30

    We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

  18. The Neural Correlates of Consciousness GIULIO TONONIa

    E-print Network

    Koch, Christof

    The Neural Correlates of Consciousness An Update GIULIO TONONIa AND CHRISTOF KOCHb a Department examines recent advances in the study of brain correlates of consciousness. First, we briefly discuss some useful distinctions between consciousness and other brain functions. We then examine what has been

  19. Nonparametric Regression with Correlated Errors Jean Opsomer

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuedong

    Nonparametric Regression with Correlated Errors Jean Opsomer Iowa State University Yuedong Wang Nonparametric regression techniques are often sensitive to the presence of correlation in the errors Nonparametric regression is a rapidly growing and exciting branch of statistics, both because of recent

  20. Botnet detection using correlated Naveen Davis

    E-print Network

    Botnet detection using correlated anomalies Naveen Davis Kongens Lyngby 2012 IMM-M.Sc.-2012-50 #12;Summary (English) Botnets are collections of computers which have come under the control of a malicious is to produce a simple prototype which detects botnet attacks by correlating patterns of anomalous behavior

  1. The Bonn Astro/Geo Correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhart, Simone; Alef, Walter; Bertarini, Alessandra; La Porta, Laura; Muskens, Arno; Rottmann, Helge; Roy, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The Bonn Distributed FX (DiFX) correlator is a software correlator operated jointly by the Max- Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie (MPIfR), the Institut fur Geodasie und Geoinformation der Universitat Bonn (IGG), and the Bundesamt fur Kartographie und Geodasie (BKG) in Frankfurt.

  2. Intelligence and Semen Quality Are Positively Correlated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arden, Rosalind; Gottfredson, Linda S.; Miller, Geoffrey; Pierce, Arand

    2009-01-01

    Human cognitive abilities inter-correlate to form a positive matrix, from which a large first factor, called "Spearman's g" or general intelligence, can be extracted. General intelligence itself is correlated with many important health outcomes including cardio-vascular function and longevity. However, the important evolutionary question of…

  3. Thermal correlation functions of twisted quantum fields

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Prasad; Srivastava, Rahul; Vaidya, Sachindeo

    2010-07-15

    We derive the thermal correlators for twisted quantum fields on noncommutative spacetime. We show that the thermal expectation value of the number operator is same as in commutative spacetime, but that higher correlators are sensitive to the noncommutativity parameters {theta}{sup {mu}{nu}.}

  4. Periodically correlated processes and their stationary dilations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1990-01-01

    An explicit form for a stationary dilation for periodically correlated random processes is obtained. This is then used to give spectral conditions for a periodically correlated process to be non-deterministic, purely deterministic, minimal, and to have a positive angle between its past and future.

  5. Periodically correlated processes and their stationary dilations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    An explicit form for a stationary dilation for periodically correlated random processes is obtained. This is then used to give spectral conditions for a periodically correlated process to be non-deterministic, purely deterministic, minimal, and to have a positive angle between its past and future.

  6. Kernel Regression in the Presence of Correlated Errors Kernel Regression in the Presence of Correlated Errors

    E-print Network

    in nonparametric regression is difficult in the presence of correlated errors. There exist a wide variety vector machines for regression. Keywords: nonparametric regression, correlated errors, bandwidth choice, cross-validation, short-range dependence, bimodal kernel 1. Introduction Nonparametric regression

  7. Correlated activity supports efficient cortical processing

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chou P.; Cui, Ding; Chen, Yueh-peng; Lin, Chia-pei; Levine, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual recognition is a computational challenge that is thought to occur via efficient coding. An important concept is sparseness, a measure of coding efficiency. The prevailing view is that sparseness supports efficiency by minimizing redundancy and correlations in spiking populations. Yet, we recently reported that “choristers”, neurons that behave more similarly (have correlated stimulus preferences and spontaneous coincident spiking), carry more generalizable object information than uncorrelated neurons (“soloists”) in macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex. The rarity of choristers (as low as 6% of IT neurons) indicates that they were likely missed in previous studies. Here, we report that correlation strength is distinct from sparseness (choristers are not simply broadly tuned neurons), that choristers are located in non-granular output layers, and that correlated activity predicts human visual search efficiency. These counterintuitive results suggest that a redundant correlational structure supports efficient processing and behavior. PMID:25610392

  8. Optimization of photon correlations by frequency filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tudela, Alejandro; del Valle, Elena; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2015-04-01

    Photon correlations are a cornerstone of quantum optics. Recent works [E. del Valle, New J. Phys. 15, 025019 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/2/025019; A. Gonzalez-Tudela et al., New J. Phys. 15, 033036 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/3/033036; C. Sanchez Muñoz et al., Phys. Rev. A 90, 052111 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052111] have shown that by keeping track of the frequency of the photons, rich landscapes of correlations are revealed. Stronger correlations are usually found where the system emission is weak. Here, we characterize both the strength and signal of such correlations, through the introduction of the "frequency-resolved Mandel parameter." We study a plethora of nonlinear quantum systems, showing how one can substantially optimize correlations by combining parameters such as pumping, filtering windows and time delay.

  9. Norm-based measurement of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yuchun; Guo Guangcan

    2011-06-15

    In this paper we derived a necessary and sufficient condition for classical correlated states and proposed a norm-based measurement Q of quantum correlation. Using the max norm of operators, we gave the expression of the quantum correlation measurement Q and investigated the dynamics of Q in Markovian and non-Markovian cases, respectively. Q decays exponentially and vanishes only asymptotically in the Markovian case and causes periodical death and rebirth in the non-Markovian case. In the pure state, the quantum correlation Q is always larger than the entanglement, which was different from other known measurements. In addition, we showed that locally broadcastable and broadcastable are equivalent and reproved the density of quantum correlated states.

  10. Statistical correlations in the Moshinsky atom

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, H. G.; Sagar, R. P.

    2011-07-15

    We study the influence of the interparticle and confining potentials on statistical correlation via the correlation coefficient and mutual information in ground and some excited states of the Moshinsky atom in position and momentum space. The magnitude of the correlation between positions and between momenta is equal in the ground state. In excited states, the correlation between the momenta of the particles is greater than between their positions when they interact through an attractive potential whereas for repulsive interparticle potentials the opposite is true. Shannon entropies, and their sums (entropic formulations of the uncertainty principle), are also analyzed, showing that the one-particle entropy sum is dependent on the interparticle potential and thus able to detect the correlation between particles.

  11. Correlation between apical protrusion in the Scheimflug imaging and Corneal Hysteresis and Corneal Resistance factor by Ocular Response Analyzer, among refractive non-keratoconic Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    Refai, Tamer Adel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Apical protrusion in the central 4-mm ring in the Scheimflug imaging (Pentacam), both for the anterior and posterior floats as well as Corneal Hysteresis and Corneal Resistance Factor by Ocular Response Analyzer (ORA), generally are considered important predictors for post-Lasik ectasia. The aim of this work was to find out if there is a statistically significant correlation between these different predictors and their correlation with the central corneal thickness for refractive non-keratoconic Egyptian patients trying to achieve a better decision and avoiding ectasia. Methods This case-control study involved 142 eyes (of 77 patients with various refractive errors) arriving at the refractive surgery unit in the Research Institute of Ophthalmology in Giza (Egypt) in 2014–2015 seeking excimer laser ablation. The flattest, steepest keratometry readings, central corneal thickness as well as the apical protrusion in the central 4-mm ring, both for the anterior and posterior floats, in microns were measured by Scheimflug imaging. The Corneal Hysteresis and Corneal Resistance Factor were measured by the ocular response analyzer. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS, using the Pearson correlation test. Results The spherical refractive error ranged from +7.00 to ?13.00 diopters (?3.80 ± 2.89). The central pachymetry ranged from 494 to 634 ?m (550.35 ± 32.13). For the central 4-mm ring, the apical protrusion ranged from 0 to +15 ? (6.93 ± 2.99) for the anterior float and from ?3 to +20 ? (9.33 ± 4.55) for the posterior float. The Corneal Hysterisis (CH) ranged from 7 to 14.8 mmHg (10.18±1.44), while the Corneal Resistance Factor (CRF) ranged from 7.5 to 14.9 mmHg (10.58 ± 1.67). There was a strong positive correlation between the central corneal thickness and both Corneal Hysteresis (CH: r = 0.56, P ? 0.01) and Corneal Resistance Factor (r = 0.46, P ? 0.01). A significant correlation (P < 0.05, r = 0.15) existed between apical protrusion in the posterior float and the central corneal thickness. Also, significant negative correlation (P < 0.05, r = ?0.12) existed between apical protrusion in the anterior float by pentacam and the Corneal Resistance Factor by ocular response analyzer. Conclusions Our finding of a strong positive correlation between both Corneal Hysteresis and Corneal Resistance Factor and the Central corneal thickness being important for biomechanical corneal stability. The findings of this study also support using both machines preoperatively to decrease the risk of post-Lasik ectasia. PMID:26516449

  12. The search for the neural correlate (or correlates) of consciousness1

    E-print Network

    Kreiman, Gabriel

    REVIEWS The search for the neural correlate (or correlates) of consciousness1 has resulted in two important distinc- tions being made.The first is that the neural correlates of the level of consciousness everyday experience of the phenomenal distinction between being conscious (as opposed to being unconscious

  13. Nurses' perception of ethical climate and organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Fariba; Jalali, Tayebe; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Haghdoost, Aliakbar

    2014-05-01

    The high turnover of nurses has become a universal issue. The manner in which nurses view their organization's ethical climate has direct bearing on their organizational commitment. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between nurses' perception of ethical climate and organizational commitment in teaching hospitals in the southeastern region of Iran. A descriptive analytical design was used in this study. The sample consisted of 275 nurses working in four teaching hospitals in the southeastern region of Iran. The instruments used in this study included a demographic questionnaire, Ethical Climate Questionnaire, and Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using Pearson's correlation, t-test, and descriptive statistic through Statistical Package for Social Science, version 16. The result of this research indicated a positive correlation among professionalism, caring, rules, independence climate, and organizational commitment. Therefore, findings of this study are a guideline for researchers and managers alike who endeavor to improve organizational commitment. PMID:24019306

  14. Correlation between serum bactericidal activity against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y measured using human versus rabbit serum as the complement source.

    PubMed

    Gill, C J; Ram, S; Welsch, J A; Detora, L; Anemona, A

    2011-12-01

    The surrogate of protection against invasive meningococcal disease is the presence of serum bactericidal activity (SBA) at a titer ?4 in an assay using human serum as the complement source (hSBA). However, for various practical and logistical reasons, many meningococcal vaccines in use today were licensed based on a modified SBA assay that used baby rabbit serum as the complement source (rSBA). To assess the strength of correlation between the two assay systems for serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y, we analyzed a subset of samples from adolescent subjects enrolled in a Phase II study of Novartis' MenACWY-CRM conjugate vaccine vs. an ACWY polysaccharide vaccine; samples were analyzed in parallel using hSBA and rSBA. We compared geometric mean titers (GMTs), calculated Pearson correlation coefficients between paired hSBA and rSBA results, and calculated sensitivity/specificity and likelihood ratios for an rSBA ?8 or ?128 for classifying hSBA ?4, taking hSBA as the 'gold standard'. Correlations between hSBA and rSBA ranged from 0.46 to 0.78 for serogroup C, but were weaker for serogroups A, W-135 and Y (range -0.15 to 0.57). In post vaccination samples, nearly all subjects had rSBA titers ?8, though up to 15% remained seronegative by hSBA. In post vaccination settings, rSBA titers at ?8 or ?128 was highly sensitive for an hSBA titer ?4, but non-specific. In conclusion, results generated by rSBA did not accurately classify serostatus according to hSBA for serogroups A, W-135 and Y. PMID:22075087

  15. Correlation of Global Strain Rate and Left Ventricular Filling Pressure in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A 2-D Speckle-Tracking Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Wu, Wei-Chun; Xie, Rong-Ai; Gao, Li-Jian; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of 2-D speckle-tracking imaging in the prediction of left ventricular filling pressure in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Eighty-four patients with CAD and 30 healthy controls were recruited prospectively. The longitudinal strain rate (SR) curves were determined in three apical views of the left ventricle long axis. Circumferential and radial SR curves were determined in three short-axis views. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) was invasively obtained by left heart catheterization. Compared with the 30 controls, the patients with CAD had significantly lower global SR during early diastole (SRe) and higher E/SRe in three directions of myocardial deformation. CAD patients with elevated LVEDP had significantly lower SRe and higher E/SRe of three deformations. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that LVEDP correlated positively with E/E' ratio, radial SRe and longitudinal and circumferential E/SRe. LVEDP correlated negatively with longitudinal and circumferential SRe and radial E/SRe. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that these SR indexes predicted elevated LVEDP (areas under the curve: longitudinal E/SRe = 0.74, circumferential E/SRe = 0.74, circumferential SRe = 0.70, longitudinal SRe = 0.69, radial E/SRe = 0.68, radial SRe = 0.65), but neither was superior to the tissue Doppler imaging index E/E' (area under the curve = 0.84). The present study indicates that 2-D speckle-tracking imaging is a practical method for evaluating LV filling pressure, but it might not provide additional advantages compared with E/E' in CAD patients. PMID:26585465

  16. From correlation functions to event shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitsky, A. V.; Hohenegger, S.; Korchemsky, G. P.; Sokatchev, E.; Zhiboedov, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a new approach to computing event shape distributions or, more precisely, charge flow correlations in a generic conformal field theory (CFT). These infrared finite observables are familiar from collider physics studies and describe the angular distribution of global charges in outgoing radiation created from the vacuum by some source. The charge flow correlations can be expressed in terms of Wightman correlation functions in a certain limit. We explain how to compute these quantities starting from their Euclidean analogues by means of a nontrivial analytic continuation which, in the framework of CFT, can be performed elegantly in Mellin space. The relation between the charge flow correlations and Euclidean correlation functions can be reformulated directly in configuration space, bypassing the Mellin representation, as a certain Lorentzian double discontinuity of the correlation function integrated along the cuts. We illustrate the general formalism in N=4 SYM, making use of the well-known results on the four-point correlation function of half-BPS scalar operators. We compute the double scalar flow correlation in N=4 SYM, at weak and strong coupling and show that it agrees with known results obtained by different techniques. One of the remarkable features of the N=4 theory is that the scalar and energy flow correlations are proportional to each other. Imposing natural physical conditions on the energy flow correlations (finiteness, positivity and regularity), we formulate additional constraints on the four-point correlation functions in N=4 SYM that should be valid at any coupling and away from the planar limit. presence of intrinsic infrared (IR) divergences; integration over the phase space of the final state and subsequent intricate IR cancellations; necessity for summation over all final states. Let us comment on each of these points. They are very well understood in the context of perturbation theory no IR divergences are present in the correlation functions; no summation over all final states is needed; no integration over the phase space is required. There is however a price to pay. In order to apply (1.2), we have to find an efficient way of computing the Euclidean correlation functions involving the product of source operators, O(0) and O†(x), and several charge operators O˜(xi), then analytically continue them to Minkowski signature to obtain the corresponding Wightman counterparts and, finally, integrate over the detector (or calorimeter) working time to get <0|O†(x)D[w]O(0)|0>. Conformal symmetry simplifies the form of the correlation functions enough to make this program of computing weighted cross sections from correlation functions an attractive enterprise.What is the utility of exploring charge flow correlations in CFTs? There are two immediate applications. The first one comes from the similarity of charge flow correlations in certain four-dimensional superconformal theories (e.g., N=4 SYM) at weak coupling with those in perturbative QCD. The hope is that by studying the former one can get some insight into the latter. Secondly, in the special case of energy correlations, ?w(q) is expected to be a positive definite

  17. Joint transform correlators with spatially incoherent illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovsky, Yuri A.; Karpiouk, Andrey B.; Markilov, Anatoly A.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    1997-03-01

    Two variants of joint transform correlators with monochromatic spatially incoherent illumination are considered. The Fourier-holograms of the reference and recognized images are recorded simultaneously or apart in a time on the same spatial light modulator directly by monochromatic spatially incoherent light. To create the signal of mutual correlation of the images it is necessary to execute nonlinear transformation when the hologram is illuminated by coherent light. In the first scheme of the correlator this aim was achieved by using double pas of a restoring coherent wave through the hologram. In the second variant of the correlator the non-linearity of the characteristic of the spatial light modulator for hologram recording was used. Experimental schemes and results on processing teste images by both variants of joint transform correlators with monochromatic spatially incoherent illumination. The use of spatially incoherent light on the input of joint transform correlators permits to reduce the requirements to optical quality of elements, to reduce accuracy requirements on elements positioning and to expand a number of devices suitable to input images in correlators.

  18. Coding stimulus amplitude by correlated neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzen, Michael G.; Ávila-Åkerberg, Oscar; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2015-04-01

    While correlated activity is observed ubiquitously in the brain, its role in neural coding has remained controversial. Recent experimental results have demonstrated that correlated but not single-neuron activity can encode the detailed time course of the instantaneous amplitude (i.e., envelope) of a stimulus. These have furthermore demonstrated that such coding required and was optimal for a nonzero level of neural variability. However, a theoretical understanding of these results is still lacking. Here we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework explaining these experimental findings. Specifically, we use linear response theory to derive an expression relating the correlation coefficient to the instantaneous stimulus amplitude, which takes into account key single-neuron properties such as firing rate and variability as quantified by the coefficient of variation. The theoretical prediction was in excellent agreement with numerical simulations of various integrate-and-fire type neuron models for various parameter values. Further, we demonstrate a form of stochastic resonance as optimal coding of stimulus variance by correlated activity occurs for a nonzero value of noise intensity. Thus, our results provide a theoretical explanation of the phenomenon by which correlated but not single-neuron activity can code for stimulus amplitude and how key single-neuron properties such as firing rate and variability influence such coding. Correlation coding by correlated but not single-neuron activity is thus predicted to be a ubiquitous feature of sensory processing for neurons responding to weak input.

  19. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  20. Secrecy extraction from no-signalling correlations

    E-print Network

    Valerio Scarani; Nicolas Gisin; Nicolas Brunner; Lluis Masanes; Sergi Pino; Antonio Acin

    2006-06-23

    Quantum cryptography shows that one can guarantee the secrecy of correlation on the sole basis of the laws of physics, that is without limiting the computational power of the eavesdropper. The usual security proofs suppose that the authorized partners, Alice and Bob, have a perfect knowledge and control of their quantum systems and devices; for instance, they must be sure that the logical bits have been encoded in true qubits, and not in higher-dimensional systems. In this paper, we present an approach that circumvents this strong assumption. We define protocols, both for the case of bits and for generic $d$-dimensional outcomes, in which the security is guaranteed by the very structure of the Alice-Bob correlations, under the no-signalling condition. The idea is that, if the correlations cannot be produced by shared randomness, then Eve has poor knowledge of Alice's and Bob's symbols. The present study assumes, on the one hand that the eavesdropper Eve performs only individual attacks (this is a limitation to be removed in further work), on the other hand that Eve can distribute any correlation compatible with the no-signalling condition (in this sense her power is greater than what quantum physics allows). Under these assumptions, we prove that the protocols defined here allow extracting secrecy from noisy correlations, when these correlations violate a Bell-type inequality by a sufficiently large amount. The region, in which secrecy extraction is possible, extends within the region of correlations achievable by measurements on entangled quantum states.