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Sample records for t47d human breast

  1. Human T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression reflect ERα/ERβ ratios in rat and human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Evers, N M; van de Klundert, T M C; van Aesch, Y M; Wang, S; de Roos, W K; Romano, A; de Haan, L H J; Murk, A J; Ederveen, A G H; Rietjens, I M C M; Groten, J P

    2013-09-01

    T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression and constant ERα expression can be used to investigate effects of varying ERα/ERβ ratios on estrogen-induced cellular responses. This study defines conditions at which ERα/ERβ ratios in T47D-ERβ cells best mimic ERα/ERβ ratios in breast and other estrogen-sensitive tissues in vivo in rat as well as in human. Protein and mRNA levels of ERα and ERβ were analyzed in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to a range of tetracycline concentrations and compared to ERα and ERβ levels found in breast, prostate, and uterus from rat and human origin. The ERα/ERβ ratio in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to >150ng/ml tetracycline is comparable to the ratio found in rat mammary gland and in human breast tissue. The ERα/ERβ ratio of other estrogen-sensitive rat and human tissues can also be mimicked in T47D-ERβ cells. The ERα/ERβ ratio found in MCF-7 and native T47D breast cancer cell lines did not reflect ratios in analyzed rat and human tissues, which further supports the use of T47D-ERβ cells as model for estrogen-responsive tissues. Using 17β-estradiol and the T47D-ERβ cells under the conditions defined to mimic various tissues it could be demonstrated how these different tissues vary in their proliferative response. PMID:23680332

  2. Induction of Mitochondria Mediated Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells (T-47D) by Annona reticulata L. Leaves Methanolic Extracts.

    PubMed

    Roham, Pratiksha H; Kharat, Kiran R; Mungde, Priyanka; Jadhav, Mahadev A; Makhija, Surinder J

    2016-01-01

    Annona reticulata Linn. (Common name: Bullock's-heart) (Annonaceae family) is a semi-evergreen and small deciduous tree. The extracts of various parts of Annona reticulata L. have been reported as cytotoxic to many cancer cells. Annona reticulata L. leaves' methanolic extract (ARME) was prepared and used against the breast cancer cells. The breast cancer cells (T-47D) viability and IC50 were evaluated by Vybrant® MTT Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Detection of phosphatidylserine on membranes of apoptotic cells was done by Attune flow cytometer. RNA transcripts were quantified in ARME treated and untreated cells. Finally, the Vybrant® FAM Poly Caspases assay kit was used for analysis of polycaspases activity in T-47D cells. The IC50 (5 ± 0.5 µg/mL) of the ARME was found against breast cancer cells (T-47D). The Paclitaxel was used as a control standard drug for the study. The downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax and Bak, and caspases activation suggested induction of apoptosis in T-47D cells by ARME through mitochondrial pathway. The cell cycle halted at G2/M phase in the ARME treated cells. The ARME was found to be effective against Breast cancer cells (T-47D). PMID:26908199

  3. Effect of nomegestrol acetate on human estrogen sulfotransferase activity in the hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chetrite, Gérard Samuel; Paris, Jacques; Shields-Botella, Jacqueline; Philippe, Jean-Claude; Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer cells possess all the enzymes involved in the last steps of estradiol (E2) bioformation, as well as in its transformation (e.g. sulfotransferases) for the conversion to estrogen sulfates (ES). As ES are biologically inactive, the formation of these conjugates is an important transformation pathway in the control of the hormone. In the present study, we explored the effect of nomegestrol acetate on the sulfotransferase activity in the hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T-47D human breast cancer cells. After 24-h incubation at 37 degrees C of physiological concentrations of estrone ([3H]-E1: 5 x 10(-9) mol/l), it was observed that the sulfotransferase activity was present in both cell lines, since the concentrations of estrogen sulfates found were 9.40 +/- 1.10 in MCF-7 cells and 6.65 +/- 0.72 in the T-47D cells. The presence of ES was found exclusively in the culture medium, which suggests that as soon as the sulfate is biosynthesized it is secreted into the medium. Nomegestrol acetate has a stimulatory effect on sulfotransferase activity: at low doses (5 x 10(-8) and 5 x 10(-7) mol/l) this compound strongly increases the activity of this enzyme by 60.6% and 83%, respectively, in the MCF-7 cells and by 69.2% at 5 x 10(-7) mol/l in T-47D cells. At a high concentration (5 x 10(-5) mol/l) the stimulatory effect of nomegestrol acetate on the sulfotransferase activity was only 5.4% and 6.1%, respectively, in MCF-7 and T-47D cells. In conclusion, the stimulation provoked at low doses by nomegestrol acetate on the estrogen sulfotransferase activity involved in the biosynthesis of the biologically inactive estrogen sulfates in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells is an important effect of this progestin and can open attractive clinical applications. PMID:14981909

  4. Effects of extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on morphological and biochemical properties of human breast carcinoma cells (T47D).

    PubMed

    Sadeghipour, Razmin; Ahmadian, Shahin; Bolouri, Bahram; Pazhang, Yaghub; Shafiezadeh, Mahshid

    2012-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of 100 and 217 Hz extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (ELF-PEMF) on cell proliferation, actin reorganization, and ROS generation in a human breast carcinoma cells (T47D). Cells were exposed for 24-72 h, at 100 and 217 Hz, 0.1 mT. The treatment induced a time dependent decrease in cell growth after 72 h and revealed an increase in fluorescence intensity in cytoplasm and actin aggregations around the nucleus as detected by fluorescence microscopy. The amount of actin in T47D cells increased after 48 h exposure to 100 Hz and 24 h to 217 Hz while no changes in nuclear morphology were detected. Exposing the cells to 217 Hz for 72 h caused a dramatically increase of intracellular ROS generation while with exposure to 100 Hz it remained nearly unchanged. These results suggest that exposure to ELF-PEMF (100, 217 Hz, 0.1 mT) are able inducing an increase of actin level, its migration toward nucleus but despite of these changes and dramatically increase in ROS generation the symptoms of apoptosis were not observed. Our results support the hypothesis that cell response to EMF may only be observed at certain window effects; such as frequency and intensity of EMF parameters. PMID:22676212

  5. The Comparison of The Effects of Silybin and Silybin-Phosphatidylcholine on Viability and ESR Expression in Human Breast Cancer T47D Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Narges; Motamed, Nasrin; Paylakhi, Seyed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Silybin is a polyphenol with anti-oxidant and anti-cancer properties. The poor bioavailability of some polyphenols can be improved by binding to phosphatidylcholine. In recent years, studies have been conducted to evaluate the anti-cancer effect of silybin. We studied the effect of silybin and silybin-phosphatidylcholine on ESR1 and ESR2 gene expression and viability in the T47D breast cancer cell line. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide test (MTT test) was used to determine doses for cell treatment, and the gene expression was analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT- PCR). Results Significant dose- and time-dependent cell growth inhibitory effects of silybin and silybin-phosphatidylcholine along with ESR1 down-regulation were observed in T47D cells. In contrast to ESR1, the T47D cell line showed negligible ESR2 expression. Conclusion This study suggests that silybin and silybin-phosphatidylcholine down-regulate ESR1 in ER+breast cancers. Results also show that in the T47D cell line, silybindown-regulation of ESR1 compared with silybin. PMID:24611152

  6. Perfluorinated chemicals, PFOS and PFOA, enhance the estrogenic effects of 17β-estradiol in T47D human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonthithai, Pacharapan; Suriyo, Tawit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2016-06-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are the two most popular surfactants among perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), with a wide range of uses. Growing evidence suggests that PFCs have the potential to interfere with estrogen homeostasis, posing a risk of endocrine-disrupting effects. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the estrogenic effect of these compounds on T47D hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. PFOS and PFOA (10(-12) to 10(-4)  M) were not able to induce estrogen response element (ERE) activation in the ERE luciferase reporter assay. The ERE activation was induced when the cells were co-incubated with PFOS (10(-10) to 10(-7)  M) or PFOA (10(-9) to 10(-7)  M) and 1 nM of 17β-estradiol (E2). PFOS and PFOA did not modulate the expression of estrogen-responsive genes, including progesterone (PR) and trefoil factor (pS2), but these compounds enhanced the effect of E2-induced pS2 gene expression. Neither PFOS nor PFOA affected T47D cell viability at any of the tested concentrations. In contrast, co-exposure with PFOS or PFOA and E2 resulted in an increase of E2-induced cell viability, but no effect was found with 10 ng ml(-1) EGF co-exposure. Both compounds also intensified E2-dependent growth in the proliferation assay. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased by co-exposure with PFOS or PFOA and E2, but not with EGF. Collectively, this study shows that PFOS and PFOA did not possess estrogenic activity, but they enhanced the effects of E2 on estrogen-responsive gene expression, ERK1/2 activation and the growth of the hormone-deprived T47D cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26234195

  7. Combination of imatinib and clotrimazole enhances cell growth inhibition in T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Motawi, Tarek M K; Sadik, Nermin A H; Fahim, Sally A; Shouman, Samia A

    2015-05-25

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used as targeted cancer therapy. However, mono-targeting by IM does not always achieve full tumor eradication and thus it is recommended to combine IM with other anticancer agents. Clotrimazole (CLT) is an antifungal azole derivative with promising anticancer effects due to inhibiting the activity of glycolytic enzymes. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of combining CLT with IM on breast cancer cell line in an attempt to establish effective new combination. T47D human breast cancer cell line was treated with different concentrations of IM and/or CLT for 48 h. IM-CLT interaction was determined by isobologram equation and combination index. Cell viability was confirmed by measuring LDH activity. As indicators of glycolysis inhibition, the expression of hexokinase-2 (HK-2) and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1) plus the activity of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) were determined. In addition, glucose consumption and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production were measured. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia inducible factor-α (HIF-α) were also determined as they are modulators for glycolysis. This study demonstrated that IM or CLT synergistically inhibited cell growth in T47D as shown by combination and dose reduction indices. The combination of 15 μM IM and 20 μM CLT significantly decreased glucose consumption, activity of both PK and intracellular LDH, while increased leaked LDH, VEGF and NO in the medium compared to each drug alone. Furthermore the combination decreased gene expression of HK-2, PFK-1 and ATP content compared to the control. In conclusion, the synergistic effect of CLT on IM cytotoxicity in T47D cell line maybe mediated through inhibition of glycolysis and increasing both NO and VEGF. Further studies are required to confirm the efficiency and safety of this combination. PMID:25863232

  8. Assessment of Interactions between Cisplatin and Two Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines – An Isobolographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wawruszak, Anna; Luszczki, Jarogniew J.; Grabarska, Aneta; Gumbarewicz, Ewelina; Dmoszynska-Graniczka, Magdalena; Polberg, Krzysztof; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) are promising anticancer drugs, which inhibit proliferation of a wide variety of cancer cells including breast carcinoma cells. In the present study, we investigated the influence of valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat), alone or in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) on proliferation, induction of apoptosis and cell cycle progression in MCF7, T47D and MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cell lines. The type of interaction between HDIs and CDDP was determined by an isobolographic analysis. The isobolographic analysis is a very precise and rigorous pharmacodynamic method, to determine the presence of synergism, addition or antagonism between different drugs with using variety of fixed dose ratios. Our experiments show that the combinations of CDDP with SAHA or VPA at a fixed-ratio of 1:1 exerted additive interaction in the viability of MCF7 cells, while in T47D cells there was a tendency to synergy. In contrast, sub-additive (antagonistic) interaction was observed for the combination of CDDP with VPA in MDA-MB-231 “triple-negative” (i.e. estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, and HER-2 negative) human breast cancer cells, whereas combination of CDDP with SAHA in the same MDA-MB-231 cell line yielded additive interaction. Additionally, combined HDIs/CDDP treatment resulted in increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in all tested breast cancer cell lines in comparison with a single therapy. In conclusion, the additive interaction of CDDP with SAHA or VPA suggests that HDIs could be combined with CDDP in order to optimize treatment regimen in some human breast cancers. PMID:26580554

  9. Characterization of the effects of the novel non-steroidal antiestrogen EM-800 on basal and estrogen-induced proliferation of T-47D, ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simard, J; Labrie, C; Bélanger, A; Gauthier, S; Singh, S M; Mérand, Y; Labrie, F

    1997-09-26

    Since estrogens play a predominant role in the development and growth of human breast cancer, antiestrogens represent a logical approach to the treatment of this disease. The present study compares the effects of the novel nonsteroidal anti-estrogen EM-800 and related compounds with those of a series of anti-estrogens on basal and 17 beta-estradiol (E2)-induced cell proliferation in human breast cancer cell lines. In the absence of added E2, EM-800 and related compounds failed to change basal cell proliferation, thus showing the absence of intrinsic estrogenic activity in the ER-positive T-47D, ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cell lines. The stimulation of T-47D cell proliferation induced by 0.1 nM E2 was competitively blocked by a simultaneous incubation with EM-652, EM-800, OH-tamoxifen, OH-toremifene, ICI 182780, ICI 164384, droloxifene, tamoxifen and toremifene at apparent Ki values of 0.015, 0.011-0.017, 0.040-0.054, 0.043, 0.044, 0.243 and 0.735 nM, approx. 10 nM and > 10 nM, respectively. Similar data were obtained in ZR-75-1 and/or MCF-7 cells. Moreover, EM-652 was 6-fold more potent than OH-Tamoxifen in inhibiting the proportion of cycling MCF-7 cells. Our data show that EM-800 and EM-652 are the most potent known antiestrogens in human breast cancer cells in vitro and that they are devoid of the estrogenic activity of OH-tamoxifen and droloxifene suggested by stimulation of cell growth in the absence of estrogens in ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cells. PMID:9334816

  10. Synthesis of novel 1,8-acridinediones derivatives: Investigation of MDR reversibility on breast cancer cell lines T47D and tamoxifen-resistant T47D

    PubMed Central

    Moallem, S.A.; Dehghani, N.; Mehri, S.; Shahsavand, Sh.; Alibolandi, M.; Hadizadeh, F.

    2015-01-01

    Multi drug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle in the management of breast cancer. Therefore, overcoming MDR using novel anticancer agents is a top priority for medicinal chemists. It was found that dihydropyridines lacking calcium antagonistic activity (e.g acridinediones) possess MDR modifier potency. In this study, the capability of four novel acridine-1,8-diones derivatives 3a-d were evaluated as MDR reversing agents. In addition, the relationship between structural properties and biological effects of synthesized compounds was discussed. In vitro cytotoxicity of acridine-1,8-diones 3a-d derivatives in combination with doxorubicin (DOX) on T47D and tomoxifen-resistant T47D (TAMR-6) breast cancer cell lines were investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test. Drug resistant index (DRI), which is equal to the ratio of IC50 in drug-resistant cells over IC50 in drug-sensitive cells, was calculated for each substance. Flowcytometry experiments were also implemented to distinguish cells undergoing apoptosis from those undergoing necrosis. The results from MTT and flowcytometry experiments indicated that 1 nM 3c derivative along with DOX significantly (P<0.05) increased the DOX cytotoxicity in T47D and TAMR-6 breast cancer cell lines. Synthesized compounds 3a and 3b also at concentrations of 1 nM with DOX significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DOX on T47D and TAMR-6 breast cancer cell lines. Meanwhile, 3d derivative with DOX did not exhibit good synergistic effect on cytotoxic activity of DOX, and slightly increased DOX cytotoxicity in both cell lines. Our results proposed that 3c may be an attractive lead compound for further development as a chemotherapeutic agent for MDR breast cancer therapy in combination with routine chemotherapeutic agents such as DOX. PMID:26600848

  11. Met-HGF/SF mediates growth arrest and differentiation in T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ronen, D; Altstock, R T; Firon, M; Mittelman, L; Sobe, T; Resau, J H; Vande Woude, G F; Tsarfaty, I

    1999-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is a pluripotent growth factor that exerts mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects. To elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying the pluripotent function of this growth factor, T47D human breast cancer cells were transfected with human hgf/sf. The hgf/sf-positive clones exhibited different levels of biologically functional HGF/SF expression and up-regulation of endogenous Met (HGF/SF receptor) expression. In addition, a constitutive phosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine residues was detected, establishing a Met-HGF/SF autocrine loop. The autocrine activation of Met caused marked inhibition in cell growth accompanied by cell accumulation at G0/G1. These cells underwent terminal cell differentiation as determined by morphological changes, synthesis of milk proteins such as beta-casein and alpha-lactalbumin, and production of lipid vesicles. Our results demonstrate that Met-HGF/SF, an oncogenic signal transduction pathway, is capable of inducing growth arrest and differentiation in certain breast cancer cells and, thus, may have potential as therapeutic and/or prognostic tools in breast cancer treatment. PMID:10074906

  12. Influence of mitoxantrone on nucleic acid synthesis on the T-47D breast tumor cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Safa, A.R.; Chegini, N.; Tseng, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    Mitoxantrone exerts growth inhibitory effects, suppresses (3H)-thymidine as well as (3H)-uridine incorporation, and induces ultrastructural alterations in T-47D human breast tumor cells. At low concentration (10(-9)M) the drug induced little effect on cell proliferation; cell growth kinetics were inhibited at a concentration of 10(-5)M. (3H)-thymidine and (3H)-uridine incorporation declined rapidly at the concentrations tested (10(-9), 10(-7), and 10(-5) M), revealing a potent effect on metabolic activity of the cultured cells. The sharpest decline in DNA and RNA synthesis occurred within the first 2 hr of drug treatment. Serial ultrastructural examinations indicated definitive alterations in chromatin structure, disintegration of nucleolar components as early as 2 hr after drug treatment, and complete segregation of nucleolar components following 8-hr exposure to concentrations of the drug between 10(-5) and 10(-7) M. A distinct increase in the density of mitochrondrial matrix was evident. The in vitro data presented in this report demonstrate the growth inhibitory and antimetabolic effects of mitoxantrone on human breast tumor cells and suggest that the drug may be a promising antitumor agent.

  13. Antiproliferative and apoptosis induction of α-mangostin in T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kritsanawong, Somchai; Innajak, Sukanda; Imoto, Masaya; Watanapokasin, Ramida

    2016-05-01

    α-Mangostin extracted from mangosteen, Garcinia mangostana Linn. is known as 'queen of fruits'. The anticancer activity of α-mangostin through apoptosis induction and related signaling pathways in human breast cancer T47D cells was investigated. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling have been shown to play important roles in apoptosis. The results showed that α-mangostin induced cell proliferation inhibition, DNA fragmentation, nuclear condensation, increased cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9, but decreased Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. Mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome c release were also detected. In addition, phosphorylation of ERα, HER2, PI3K, Akt and ERK1/2 were downregulated whereas p-JNK1/2 and p-p38 were upregulated. These results indicated that α-mangostin induced apoptosis associated with HER2/PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling pathways suggesting that α-mangostin may be used as food supplement or a potential therapeutic compound for breast cancer. PMID:26892433

  14. Progesterone-specific stimulation of triglyceride biosynthesis in a breast cancer cell line (T-47D)

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, S.M.; Chatterton, R.T. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the lactogenic response of human mammary cancer cell lines to hormones in vitro. Progesterone was found to stimulate the incorporation of 14C from (14C)acetate into triglycerides (TG) and to promote accumulation of TG with a fatty acid composition similar to that of human milk fat in T-47D cells. Lipid droplets were observed in larger numbers without concomitant accumulation of casein granules in cells incubated with progesterone, but secretion of lipid into the medium did not occur. An effect of progesterone on TG accumulation was detectable after 12 hr and was maximal at 72 hr. Increasing doses of progesterone (10(-9) to 10(-5) M) caused a progressive increase in TG accumulation. The presence of cortisol and/or prolactin did not alter TG formation nor the dose response of the cells to progesterone. The growth rate of T-47D cells was not altered by the presence of progesterone in the medium. Neither of the human mammary cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HBL-100, nor the human fibroblast cell lines, 28 and 857, responded to progesterone. The data indicate that, while the normally lactogenic hormones do not stimulate milk product biosynthesis in the cell lines tested, progesterone specifically stimulated synthesis and accumulation of TG in the T-47D cells.

  15. Bisphenol AF stimulates transcription and secretion of C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 to promote proliferation of cultured T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Han, Xiaoyu; Gao, Wenhui; Chen, Feng; Shao, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Bisphenol AF (4,4'-hexafluoroisopropylidene-2-diphenol, BPAF), an endocrine disruptor, has been shown to stimulate the proliferation of human breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. We found that BPAF promoted the in vitro proliferation of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cells (T47D and MCF7), but not ERα-negative cells (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435s). BPAF significantly stimulated the proliferation of cultured T47D cell in a dose-dependent manner, and the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) was approximately 123 nM. We employed lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to knockdown ERα and ER antagonist ICI 182780 to inhibit ER activation, which resulted in the repression of BPAF-induced proliferation of T47D and MCF7 cells. We observed that C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) was up-regulated in T47D cells under treatment with BPAF. Quantitative real-time PCR results showed that BPAF caused a time and dose dependent increase in mRNA level of CXCL12. Furthermore, treatment of T47D cells with BPAF increased CXCL12 secretion according to ELISA assay. BPAF-induced CXCL12 transcription and secretion was significantly attenuated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERα and ICI 182780, indicating BPAF-induced CXCL12 expression is mediated through ERα. Notably, knockdown CXCL12 in T47D cells significantly attenuated BPAF-induced cell proliferation. We also observed that inhibition of CXCL12 binding to its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 by chalcone 4 blocked BPAF-induced cell growth. Our results indicated that CXCL12 facilitated BPAF-induced proliferation of T47D cells. Taken together, our data provided support that BPAF stimulated transcription and secretion of CXCL12 depending on ERα, and ERα/CXCL12 signaling positively regulated BPAF-induced proliferation of cultured T47D breast cancer cells. PMID:26435001

  16. Opposing effects of estradiol- and testosterone-membrane binding sites on T47D breast cancer cell apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kampa, Marilena; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe; Charalampopoulos, Ioannis; Alexaki, Vassilia-Ismini; Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis A.; Stathopoulos, Efstathios N.; Gravanis, Achille; Castanas, Elias . E-mail: castanas@med.uoc.gr

    2005-07-01

    Classical steroid mode of action involves binding to intracellular receptors, the later acting as ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors. Recently, membrane sites for different steroids have been also identified, mediating rapid, non-genomic, steroid actions. Membrane sites for estrogen and androgen have been found in a number of different cell types, bearing or not classical intracellular receptors. In the present study, with the use of radioligand binding, flow cytometry and confocal laser microscopy, we report that T47D human breast cancer cells express specific and saturable membrane receptors for both estrogen (K {sub D} 4.06 {+-} 3.31 nM) and androgen (K {sub D} 7.64 {+-} 3.15 nM). Upon activation with BSA-conjugated, non-permeable ligands (E{sub 2}-BSA and testosterone-BSA), membrane estrogen receptors protect cells from serum-deprivation-induced apoptosis, while androgen receptors induce apoptosis in serum-supplemented T47D cells. In addition, co-incubation of cells with a fixed concentration of one steroid and varying concentrations of the other reversed the abovementioned effect (apoptosis for androgen, and anti-apoptosis for E{sub 2}), suggesting that the fate of the cell depends on the relative concentration of either steroid in the culture medium. We also report the identification of membrane receptors for E{sub 2} and androgen in biopsy slides from breast cancer patients. Both sites are expressed, with the staining for membrane E{sub 2} being strongly present in ER-negative, less differentiated, more aggressive tumors. These findings suggest that aromatase inhibitors may exert their beneficial effects on breast cancer by also propagating the metabolism of local steroids towards androgen, inducing thus cell apoptosis through membrane androgen receptor activation.

  17. Effect of nomegestrol acetate on estrogen biosynthesis and transformation in MCF-7 and T47-D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shields-Botella, J; Chetrite, G; Meschi, S; Pasqualini, J R

    2005-01-01

    Although ovaries serve as the primary source of estrogen for pre-menopausal women, after menopause estrogen biosynthesis from circulating precursors occurs in peripheral tissues by the action of several enzymes, 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (17beta-HSD1), aromatase and estrogen sulfatase. In the breast, both normal and tumoral tissues have been shown to be capable of synthesizing estrogens, and this local estrogen production can be implicated in the development of breast tumors. In these tissues, estradiol (E(2)) can be synthesized by three pathways: (1) estrone sulfatase transforms estrogen sulfates into bioactive estrogens, (2) 17beta-HSD1 converts estrone (E(1)) into E(2), (3) aromatase which converts androgens into estrogens is also present and contributes to the in situ synthesis of active estrogens but to a far lesser extent than estrone sulfatase. Quantitative assessment of E(2) formation in human breast tumors indicates that metabolism of estrone sulfate (E(1)S) via the sulfatase pathway produces 100-500 times more E(2) than androgen aromatization. Breast tissue also possesses the estrogen sulfotransferase involved in the conversion of estrogens into their sulfates that are biologically inactive. In the present review, we summarized the action of the 19-nor-progestin nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC) on the sulfatase, 17beta-HSD1 and sulfotransferase activities in the hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T47-D human breast cancer cell lines. Using physiological doses of substrates NOMAC blocks very significantly the conversion of E(1)S to E(2). It inhibits the transformation of E(1) to E(2). NOMAC has a stimulatory effect on sulfotransferase activity in both cell lines, with a strong stimulating effect at low doses but only a weak effect at high concentrations. The effects on the three enzymes are always stronger in the progesterone-receptor rich T47-D cell line as compared with the MCF-7 cell line. Besides, no effect is found for NOMAC on the transformation of androstenedione to E(1) in the aromatase-rich choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. In conclusion, the inhibitory effect provoked by NOMAC on the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of E(2) (sulfatase and 17HSD pathways) in estrogen-dependent breast cancer, as well as the stimulatory effect on the formation of the inactive E(1)S, can open attractive perspectives for future clinical trials. PMID:15748827

  18. Bioenergetic differences between MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells and their regulation by oestradiol and tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Ivanova, Margarita M; Mai, Huy Xuan; Salabei, Joshua K; Hill, Bradford G; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2015-01-01

    Oestrogen receptor ? (ER?+) breast tumours rely on mitochondria (mt) to generate ATP. The goal of the present study was to determine how oestradiol (E2) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) affect cellular bioenergetic function in MCF-7 and T47D ER?+ breast cancer cells in serum-replete compared with dextran-coated charcoal (DCC)-stripped foetal bovine serum (FBS)-containing medium ('serum-starved'). Serum-starvation reduced oxygen consumption rate (OCR), extracellular acidification rate (ECAR), ATP-linked OCR and maximum mt capacity, reflecting lower ATP demand and mt respiration. Cellular respiratory stateapparent was unchanged by serum deprivation. 4-OHT reduced OCR independent of serum status. Despite having a higher mt DNA/nuclear DNA ratio than MCF-7 cells, T47D cells have a lower OCR and ATP levels and higher proton leak. T47D express higher nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and NRF-1-regulated, nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor TFAM and cytochrome c, but lower levels of cytochrome c oxidase, subunit IV, isoform 1 (COX4, COX4I1). Mitochondrial reserve capacity, reflecting tolerance to cellular stress, was higher in serum-starved T47D cells and was increased by 4-OHT, but was decreased by 4-OHT in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate critical differences in cellular energetics and responses to 4-OHT in these two ER?+ cell lines, likely reflecting cancer cell avoidance of apoptosis. PMID:25279503

  19. Clofarabine Has Apoptotic Effect on T47D Breast Cancer Cell Line via P53R2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah; Ahmadi, Yasin; Baradaran, Behzad; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad; Milani, Morteza; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Shaker, Maghsud; Pourhassan-Moghaddam, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Clofarabine, a purine nucleoside analogue and inhibitor of Ribonucleotide Reductase (RR), is used for treatment of leukemia. Clofarabine-induced defect in DNA replication, induces p53 and subsequently P53R2 genes as subunit of RR. clofarabine deregulated P53R2 gene expression leading to the elevated levels of P53R2 which impose resistance to DNA damaging drugs. In this study the apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of clofarabine has been investigated on breast cancer cell line. Methods: Cofarabine cytotoxicity on T47D cells has been studied by MTT assay. T47D cells were exposed to the different concentrations of clofarabine for 24, 48 and 72 hours intervals. Relative expression of P53R2 gene has been studied using real-time PCR. Moreover, after treating with clofarabine the apoptotic and necrotic cells were detected using Annexin V and propodium iodide (PI) reagents by flowcytometry technique. Results: MTT assay results showed that the clofarabine IC50 on T47D cell line were 3 and 2.5µM after 48 and 72 h exposure, respectively. Clofarabine did not show any significant cytotoxic effect after 24 h exposure. The analysis of qRT-PCR showed a significant increase in P53R2 gene expression in treated cells with both 2.5 and 3 μM doses and also, the results of flowcytometry revealed 26.91 and 74.46 percent apoptosis induction in 48 and 72h treatments respectively in comparison to the control groups. Conclusion: Our results showed that apoptotic and cytotoxic effects of clofarabine on T47D cell line were in time and dose dependent manner; therefore it could be considered a new candidate in breast cancer therapy. PMID:26819918

  20. Combination of low-concentration of novel phytoestrogen (8,9)-furanyl-pterocarpan-3-ol from Pachyrhizus erosus attenuated tamoxifen-associated growth inhibition on breast cancer T47D cells

    PubMed Central

    Nurrochmad, Arief; Lukitaningsih, Endang; Monikawati, Ameilinda; Septhea, Dita Brenna; Meiyanto, Edy

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the estrogenic effect of (8,9)-furanyl-pterocarpan-3-ol (FPC) on growth of human breast cancer T47D cells and the interactions between the FPC and tamoxifen (TAM), on the growth of estrogen receptor-dependent breast cancer T47D cells. Methods The proliferation effect of FPC were conducted on T47D cells in vitro by MTT test. T47D cells were treated with FPC alone (0.01-200 µmol/L) or in combination with TAM 20 nmol/L. Furthermore, the expression of ERα or c-Myc were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Results The results indicated that administration of an anti-estrogen TAM showed growth inhibitory effect on T47D cells, wheraes co-administered with low concentration (less than 1 µmol/L) of FPC attenuated to promote cell proliferation. In contrast, the combination of TAM with higher doses (more than 20 µmol/L) of FPC showed growth inhibitory. This result was supported by immunocytochemistry studies that the administration of 20 nmol/L TAM down-regulated ER-α and c-Myc, but the combination of 20 nmol/L TAM and 1 µmol/L FPC robustly up-regulated expression of ER-α. Thus, the reduced growth inhibition of TAM 20 nmol/L by FPC 1 µmol/L on T47D cells may act via the modulation of ER-α. Conclusions The findings indicate and suggest that FPC had estrogenic activity at low concentrations and anti-estrogenic effect that are likely to be regulated by c-Myc and estrogen receptors. We also confirm that low concentration of FPC attenuated the growth-inhibitory effects of TAM on mammary tumor prevention. Therefore, the present study suggests that caution is warranted regarding the consumption of dietary FPC by breast cancer patients while on TMA therapy.

  1. Cytotoxic data of 14-deoxy-11, 12-didehydroandrographolide (14-DDA), double transfection and DDIT3 silencing data in T-47D breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Heng Kean; Tengku Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul; Tan, Mei Lan

    2016-06-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide induces DDIT3-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D breast carcinoma cells", which the mechanistic toxicology properties of 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (14-DDA) were investigated (Tan et al., 2016 [1]). This article describes the derivation of cytotoxic parameters of 14-DDA, cell viability data after double transfection and DDIT3 silencing in T-47D cells. PMID:27182548

  2. 14-Deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide induces DDIT3-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Heng Kean; Muhammad, Tengku Sifzizul Tengku; Tan, Mei Lan

    2016-06-01

    14-Deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (14-DDA), a major diterpenoid isolated from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees, is known to be cytotoxic and elicits a non-apoptotic cell death in T-47D breast carcinoma cells. In this study, the mechanistic toxicology properties of 14-DDA in T-47D cells were further investigated. 14-DDA is found to induce the formation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) vacuoles and autophagosomes, with concurrent upregulation of LC3-II in the breast carcinoma cells. It stimulated an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration and caused a collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential in these cells. In addition, both DDIT3 and GADD45A, molecules implicated in ER stress pathway, were significantly upregulated. DDIT3 knockdown suppressed the formation of both ER vacuoles and autophagosomes, indicating that 14-DDA-induced ER stress and autophagy is dependent on this transcription factor. Collectively, it is possible that GADD45A/p38 MAPK/DDIT3 pathway is involved in the 14-DDA-induced ER-stress-mediated autophagy in T-47D cells. PMID:27049118

  3. Cytotoxic Effect and Constituent Profile of Alkaloid Fractions from Ethanolic Extract of Ficus septica Burm. f. Leaves on T47D Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Akbar, Fiki Fatihah; Wiyani, Anggie; Sudarsono

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the profile of alkaloids in two ethyl acetate soluble fractions, namely fractions A and B from an ethanolic extract of Ficus septica leaves and cytotoxic effect on T47D breast cancer cells. Preparation of both fractions involved maceration of leaves with 70% (v/v) ethanol, filtration with Al2O3, precipitation with 0.1 N HCl, Mayer reagent, and 0.1 N NaOH, and also partition with ethyl acetate. Qualitative thin layer chromatography (TLC) was conducted to determine the profile of alkaloids in the two fractions, using alkaloid specific reagents such as Dragendorff, sodium nitrite, and Van Urk-Salkowski. Cytotoxic effects of both fractions on T47D cells were evaluated using MTT assay with a concentration series of 1.56; 3.12; 6.25; 12.5; 25 and 50 ?g/mL. The TLC test showed that fractions A and B contained alkaloids with Rx values of 0.74 and 0.80 for fraction A and 0.74, 0.84, 0.92 for fraction B with regard to yohimbine using the mobile phase of n-buthanol:glacial acetic acid:distilled water (3:1:1 v/v/v). Moreover, an indole alkaloid was detected with Rx values of 0.80 and 0.84, respectively. Fractions A and B exhibited high cytotoxic effects on T47D cells with IC50 values of 2.57 and 2.73 ?g/mL, respectively. In conclusion, overall the results of this study showed that fractions of Ficus septica contain alkaloids including indole alkaloid or its derivatives and possess a cytotoxic effect on T47D cells. This research supports the idea that alkaloids in F. septica have anticancer activity. PMID:26514534

  4. Verrucarin A, a protein synthesis inhibitor, induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and T47D.

    PubMed

    Palanivel, Kandasamy; Kanimozhi, Veerasamy; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2013-09-01

    Verrucarin A (VA), a protein synthesis inhibitor, derived from the pathogen fungus Myrothecium verrucaria, inhibits growth of leukemia cell lines and activates caspases and apoptosis and inflammatory signaling in macrophages. We have investigated VA-induced growth inhibition in breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T47D and, particularly, the mechanism of VA-induced apoptosis. VA treatment brought about apoptotic cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner which was associated with chromatin condensation, cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation and intracellular ROS production. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of caspase-3, down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and up-regulation of Bax and p53 expression were observed. VA thus affects the viability of both the breast cancer cells by triggering ROS-mediated intrinsic mechanism of apoptosis. PMID:23690045

  5. Inhibition of hTERT Gene Expression by Silibinin-Loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 in T47D Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimnezhad, Zohreh; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Keyhani, Manoutchehr; Amirsaadat, Soumaye; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Rahmati, Mohammad; Mohammad Taheri, Zohreh; Nejati-Koshki, Kazem

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, using drug delivery is an essential method to improve cancer therapy through decreasing drug toxicity and increasing efficiency of treatment. Silibinin (C25H22O10), a polyphenolic flavonoid which is isolated from the milk thistle plant, has various applications in cancer therapy but it has hydrophobic structure with low water solubility and bioavailability. To increase the effect of silibinin, silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 was prepared to determine the inhibitory effect of this nanodrug on Telomerase gene expression. Methods: The rate of silibinin loaded into PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 was measured. Then, the cytotoxic effect of silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 was determined by Methyl Thiazol Tetrazolium (MTT) assay. After that, inhibition of Telomerase gene expression was indicated through Real-time PCR. Results: Data analysis from MTT assay showed that silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 had dose dependent cytotoxic effect on T47D cell line. MTT assay showed no cytotoxic effect of free PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 on T47D breast cancer cell line. Real Time PCR analysis showed that the level of telomerase gene expression more efficiently decreased with silibinin-loaded PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 than with free silibinin alone. Conclusion: The present study indicates that this nanodrug causes down-regulation of Telomerase gene expression in cancer cells. Therefore, PLGA-PEG-Fe3O4 could be an appropriate carrier for hydrophobic agents such as silibinin to improve their action in cancer therapy. PMID:23878789

  6. Cooperation of p27Kip1 and p18INK4c in Progestin-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest in T-47D Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Swarbrick, Alexander; Lee, Christine S. L.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    The steroid hormone progesterone regulates proliferation and differentiation in the mammary gland and uterus by cell cycle phase-specific actions. The long-term effect of progestins on T-47D breast cancer cells is inhibition of cellular proliferation. This is accompanied by decreased G1 cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activities, redistribution of the CDK inhibitor p27Kip1 among these CDK complexes, and alterations in the elution profile of cyclin E-Cdk2 upon gel filtration chromatography, such that high-molecular-weight complexes predominate. This study aimed to determine the relative contribution of CDK inhibitors to these events. Following progestin treatment, the majority of cyclin E- and D-CDK complexes were bound to p27Kip1 and few were bound to p21Cip1. In vitro, recombinant His6-p27 could quantitatively reproduce the effects on cyclin E-Cdk2 kinase activity and the shift in molecular weight observed following progestin treatment. In contrast, cyclin D-Cdk4 was not inhibited by His6-p27 in vitro or p27Kip1 in vivo. However, an increase in the expression of the Cdk4/6 inhibitor p18INK4c and its extensive association with Cdk4 and Cdk6 were apparent following progestin treatment. Recombinant p18INK4c led to the reassortment of cyclin-CDK-CDK inhibitor complexes in vitro, with consequent decrease in cyclin E-Cdk2 activity. These results suggest a concerted model of progestin action whereby p27Kip1 and p18INK4c cooperate to inhibit cyclin E-Cdk2 and Cdk4. Since similar models have been developed for growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β and during adipogenesis, interaction between the Cip/Kip and INK4 families of inhibitors may be a common theme in physiological growth arrest and differentiation. PMID:10713180

  7. Constitutive overexpression of cyclin D1 but not cyclin E confers acute resistance to antiestrogens in T-47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hui, Rina; Finney, Georgina L; Carroll, Jason S; Lee, Christine S L; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Sutherland, Robert L

    2002-12-01

    Cyclin D1 and cyclin E are overexpressed in approximately 45% and 30% of breast cancers, respectively, and adverse associations with patient outcome have been reported. The potential roles of cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression as markers of therapeutic responsiveness to the pure steroidal antiestrogen ICI 182780 were investigated using T-47D breast cancer cell lines constitutively overexpressing cyclin D1 or cyclin E. Measurement of S phase fraction, phosphorylation states of the retinoblastoma protein, and cyclin E-cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 activity demonstrated that overexpression of cyclin D1 decreased sensitivity to antiestrogen inhibition at 24 and 48 h. Overexpression of cyclin E produced a less pronounced early cell cycle effect indicating only partial resistance to antiestrogen inhibition in the short-term. In ICI 182780-treated cyclin D1-overexpressing cells, sufficient Cdk activity was retained to allow retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and cell proliferation, despite an increase in the association of p21 and p27 with cyclin D1-Cdk4/6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes. After longer-term (>7 days) treatment, antiestrogens inhibited colony growth in cyclin D1- or cyclin E-overexpressing breast cancer cells, but with an approximately 2-2.5-fold decrease in dose sensitivity. This was associated with a fall in cyclin D1 levels, a reduction in the half-life of cyclin D1 protein and a decline in cyclin E-Cdk2 activity in cyclin D1-overexpressing cells, and the maintenance of cyclin E-p27 association in the cyclin E-overexpressing cells. These data confirm that cyclin D1 expression and cyclin E-p27 association play important roles in antiestrogen action, and suggest that cyclin D1 or cyclin E overexpression has subtle effects on antiestrogen sensitivity. Additional studies to elucidate the contribution of alterations in cyclin D1 stability to antiestrogen action and to assess the relationship between antiestrogen sensitivity and expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, or p27 in a clinical setting are required. PMID:12460907

  8. Deregulation of miR-21 and miR-155 and their putative targets after silibinin treatment in T47D breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Masoud Maleki; Ranji, Najmeh; Motamed, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short RNAs that control the biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and development. Aberrant expression of miRNAs was determined in the different stages of tumor development and metastasis. To study the effect of silibinin on miRNAs expression, we evaluated quantitative expression of miR-21 and miR-155 as two oncomiRs and several potential targets in silibinin-treated T47D cells. Materials and Methods: The rate of proliferation and apoptosis was measured in silibinin-treated and untreated cells. The expression levels of miR-21 and miR-155 were evaluated in T47D cells treated with silibinin (100 µg/ml). Also, their putative targets were predicted in apoptotic pathways using multiple algorithms; as a confirmation, the transcription level of APAF-1, CASP-9 and BID was evaluated. Results: In silibinin-treated cells, death was occurred in a dose and time-dependent manner. miR-21 and miR-155 was downregulated in cells treated with silibinin (100 µg/ml). It is noticeable that the expression of their potential targets including CASP-9 and APAF-1 was increased in silibinin-treated cells after 48 hr. Conclusion: Our findings showed a correlation between the expression of miR-21 and miR-155 and apoptosis in silibinin treated T47D cells. It seems that miRNAs such as miR-21 and miR-155 were regulated by silibinin. Also, increase in the transcript level of APAF-1 and CASP-9 after downregulation of miR-21 and miR-155 might indicate that these genes were targeted by aforementioned miRNAs in T47D cells. PMID:26877850

  9. Growth arrest and non-apoptotic programmed cell death associated with the up-regulation of c-myc mRNA expression in T-47D breast tumor cells following exposure to Epipremnum pinnatum (L.) Engl. hexane extract.

    PubMed

    Tan, M L; Muhammad, T S Tengku; Najimudin, N; Sulaiman, S F

    2005-01-15

    Epipremnum pinnatum (L.) Engl. hexane extract produced a significant growth inhibition against T-47D breast carcinoma cells and analysis of cell death mechanisms indicated that the extract elicited a non-apoptotic programmed cell death. T-47D cells exposed to the extract at EC(50) concentration (72 h) for 24 h failed to demonstrate typical DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis, as carried out using a modified TUNEL assay. In addition, acute exposure to the extract produced an insignificant regulation of caspase-3 and p53 mRNA expression but increased in the c-myc mRNA expression. Ultrastructural analysis using transmission electron microscope demonstrated distinct vacuolated cells, which strongly indicated a Type II non-apoptotic cell death although the changes in chromatin were also detected. The presence of non-apoptotic programmed cell death was then reconfirmed with annexin-V and propidium iodide staining. These findings suggested that up-regulation of c-myc mRNA expression may have contributed to the growth arrest and Type II non-apoptotic programmed cell death in the Epipremnum pinnatum (L.) Engl. hexane extract-treated T-47D cells. PMID:15619555

  10. Dense collagen-I matrices enhance pro-tumorigenic estrogen-prolactin crosstalk in MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Barcus, Craig E; Holt, Elizabeth C; Keely, Patricia J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Schuler, Linda A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers that express estrogen receptor alpha (ER?+) constitute the majority of breast tumors. Estrogen is a major driver of their growth, and targeting ER-mediated signals is a largely successful primary therapeutic strategy. Nonetheless, ER?+ tumors also result in the most breast cancer mortalities. Other factors, including altered characteristics of the extracellular matrix such as density and orientation and consequences for estrogen crosstalk with other hormones such as prolactin (PRL), may contribute to these poor outcomes. Here we employed defined three dimensional low density/compliant and high density/stiff collagen-I matrices to investigate the effects on 17?-estradiol (E2) activity and PRL/E2 interactions in two well-characterized ER?+/PRLR+ luminal breast cancer cell lines in vitro. We demonstrate that matrix density modulated E2-induced transcripts, but did not alter the growth response. However, matrix density was a potent determinant of the behavioral outcomes of PRL/E2 crosstalk. High density/stiff matrices enhanced PRL/E2-induced growth mediated by increased activation of Src family kinases and insensitivity to the estrogen antagonist, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. It also permitted these hormones in combination to drive invasion and modify the alignment of collagen fibers. In contrast, low density/compliant matrices allowed modest if any cooperation between E2 and PRL to growth and did not permit hormone-induced invasion or collagen reorientation. Our studies demonstrate the power of matrix density to determine the outcomes of hormone actions and suggest that stiff matrices are potent collaborators of estrogen and PRL in progression of ER?+ breast cancer. Our evidence for bidirectional interactions between these hormones and the extracellular matrix provides novel insights into the regulation of the microenvironment of ER?+ breast cancer and suggests new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25607819

  11. Intracellular reactive oxygen species as apparent modulators of heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) structural organization and phosphorylation in basal and tumour necrosis factor alpha-treated T47D human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlen, P; Kretz-Remy, C; Briolay, J; Fostan, P; Mirault, M E; Arrigo, A P

    1995-01-01

    The small stress protein heat-shock protein 27 (hsp27) is an oligomeric phosphoprotein, constitutively expressed in most human cells, which enhances cellular resistance to tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). This phenomenon correlates with dramatic changes in hsp27 cellular location, structural organization and phosphorylation. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating these properties of hsp27, we investigated whether they were a consequence of the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by TNF alpha. Here, we report that, in T47D carcinoma cell lines, the rapid burst of intracellular ROS production and changes in hsp27 locale, structural organization and phosphoisoform composition induced by TNF alpha were abolished by the overexpression of the antioxidant enzyme seleno-glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx). These effects were greatly diminished when GSHPx-expressing cells were grown in the absence of selenium, a cofactor that is essential for seleno-GSHPx activity, indicating that they are directly linked to the increased GSHPx activity. Moreover, in growing T47D cells, GSHPx expression induced intracellular redistribution of hsp27 and decreased the phosphorylation of this protein without altering its pattern of oligomerization. In contrast, the heat-mediated phosphorylation of hsp27 was not altered by decreased intracellular ROS levels. Hence, in growing and TNF-treated cells, several hsp27 properties appear to be modulated by fluctuations in intracellular ROS levels. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8526844

  12. Two types of antiprogestins identified by their differential action in transcriptionally active extracts from T47D cells.

    PubMed Central

    Klein-Hitpass, L; Cato, A C; Henderson, D; Ryffel, G U

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptionally active nuclear extracts from human breast carcinoma cells (T47D) were used to compare the action of progestins and several antiprogestins of the 11 beta-aryl substituted steroid series on the DNA-binding properties and the trans-activating potential of progesterone receptor (PR) in vitro. Using the gel-shift assay we identified a novel type of antiprogestin (ZK98299, type I), which in contrast to type II antiprogestins, including RU486, does not induce binding of PR to progesterone response elements (PREs). In competition experiments excess of type I antiprogestin inhibits induction of DNA binding of PR by progestins and type II antiprogestins suggesting that its binding to PR interferes with the formation of stable receptor dimers. Moreover, we demonstrate that the antagonistic action of ZK98299 can be fully mimicked in vitro by using cell-free nuclear extracts from T47D cells and a 'simple' test promoter. In contrast, type II antiprogestins known to induce certain promoters in vivo exert strong agonistic effects on in vitro transcription of the test template used. Images PMID:2030942

  13. METABOLITES OF BENZO[A]FLUORANTHENE ARE POTENT CYP1 INDUCERS IN T-47D HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS. (R827180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. Determining estrogenic activity in serum from ovariectomized rats treated with environmental compounds using an in vitro estrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of cell-based assays to quantify low levels of estrogen in human serum is an accepted method. These assays are more sensitive but less specific than radioimmunoassays (RIA). Thus, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive T47D-KBluc cells would detect estrogenic activity i...

  15. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  16. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Richard P.; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F.; Maki, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO’s single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO’s unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  17. Synthesis, in vitro progesterone receptors affinity of gadolinium containing mifepristone conjugates and estimation of binding sites in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Saha, Pijus; Hödl, Claudia; Strauss, Wolfgang S L; Steiner, Rudolf; Goessler, Walter; Kunert, Olaf; Leitner, Alexander; Haslinger, Ernst; Schramm, H Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Novel gadolinium-based mifepristone conjugates were synthesised using various synthetic routes. Moderate antiprogestagenic activity of the new conjugates was observed in human breast cancer cells (T47-D cells) using AP (alkaline phosphatase) assay. The amount of incorporated Gd determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICPMS) indicates the number of binding sites per cell. These conjugates might be important compounds to develop receptor-targeted MRI contrast agents as well as other anti-breast cancer therapeutics. PMID:20149664

  18. Estradiol-Induced Regression in T47D:A18/PKCα Tumors Requires the Estrogen Receptor And Interaction with the Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyun; Zhao, Huiping; Asztalos, Szilard; Chisamore, Michael; Sitabkhan, Yasmin; Tonetti, Debra A.

    2009-01-01

    Several breast cancer tumor models respond to estradiol (E2) by undergoing apoptosis, a phenomenon known to occur in clinical breast cancer. Prior to the application of tamoxifen as an endocrine therapy, high dose E2 or diethystilbesterol (DES) treatment was successfully utilized, albeit with unfavorable side effects. It is now recognized that such an approach may be a potential endocrine therapy option. We have explored the mechanism of E2-induced tumor regression in our T47D:A18/PKCα tumor model that exhibits autonomous growth, tamoxifen-resistance and E2-induced tumor regression. Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor downregulator, prevents T47D:A18/PKCα E2-induced tumor growth inhibition and regression when given prior or subsequent to tumor establishment, respectively. Interestingly, E2-induced growth inhibition is only observed in vivo or when cells are grown in Matrigel but not in two-dimensional tissue culture, suggesting the requirement of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tumor regression is accompanied by increased expression of the pro-apoptotic Fas/FasL proteins and downregulation of the pro-survival Akt pathway. Inhibition of colony formation in Matrigel by E2 is accompanied by increased expression of Fas and shRNA knockdown partially reverses colony formation inhibition. Classical ERE-regulated transcription of pS2, PR, TGFα, C3 and cathepsin D is independent of the inhibitory effects of E2. A membrane impermeable E2-BSA conjugate is capable of mediating growth inhibition, suggesting the involvement of a plasma membrane ER. We conclude that E2-induced T47D:A18/PKCα tumor regression requires participation of ERα, the ECM, Fas/FasL and Akt pathways, allowing the opportunity to explore new predictive markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:19372579

  19. Prostaglandin E2 production and metabolism in human breast cancer cells and breast fibroblasts. Regulation by inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Schrey, M. P.; Patel, K. V.

    1995-01-01

    Malignant human breast tumours contain high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, the mechanisms controlling PGE2 production in breast cancer are unknown. This in vitro study investigates the capacity for PGE2 synthesis and metabolism in several human breast cancer cell lines and early passage human breast fibroblasts and seeks to identify potential regulatory factors which may control these pathways. Basal PGE2 production rose up to 30-fold in breast fibroblast lines on addition of exogenous arachidonic acid (10 microM), whereas no such changes were observed in six out of seven cancer cell lines, with the exception of modest increases in MDA-MB-231 cells. Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) also induced PGE2 production in breast fibroblasts in the presence of excess substrate, consistent with cyclo-oxygenase induction by the cytokine. Under these conditions only Hs578T cells and MDA-MB-231 cells demonstrated large increases in PGE2 in response to IL-1 beta or phorbol ester; no such responses were seen in MCF-7, T47-D, ZR-75-1, BT-20 or CLF-90-1 cells. In the absence of added arachidonate, bradykinin (BK) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), potentiated PGE2 production in IL-1 beta-treated fibroblasts, possibly by mobilising endogenous substrate. PGE2 also stimulated ET-1 production by breast cancer cells. In co-cultures with T47-D cells both basal and stimulated PGE2 production by breast fibroblasts was greatly reduced. This appeared to be due to metabolic inactivation by the cancer cell since T47-D cells readily converted PGE2 to 15-keto-PGE2. This apparent 15-hydroxy-PG dehydrogenase activity was stimulated by TPA and inhibited by cycloheximide. In conclusion, breast fibroblasts, particularly under the influence of inflammatory mediators, provide a potentially rich source for PGE2 production in breast tumours, whereas significant contributions from the epithelial tumour component may be restricted to cancer cells exhibiting an invasive phenotype. Metabolic inactivation by the cancer cells may also play an important role in the regulation of breast tumour PGE2 levels. PMID:8519653

  20. miR-181b promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer by regulating Bim expression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yabing; Lv, Xiaoai; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Bei; Shao, Xiying; Huang, Yuan; Shi, Lei; Chen, Zhanhong; Huang, Jian; Huang, Ping

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs are emerging as critical regulators of the initiation and progression of multiple types of human cancers, including breast cancer. In the present study, the expression of miR-181b in breast cancer patient serum and breast cancer cell lines was evaluated. It was demonstrated that the miR-181b level was significantly upregulated in patient serum and breast cancer cell lines compared with that in normal controls. The results of in vitro 3H thymidine incorporation and Transwell migration assay indicated that miR-181b overexpression markedly promoted the proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer cells. These data suggest that miR-181b is a tumor promoter in breast cancer. Furthermore, miR-181b expression was found to be upregulated in doxorubicin (DOX)-resistant T-47D cells (T-47D-R) compared with that in the parental T-47D cells, and upregulation of miR-181b expression decreased the anticancer effect of DOX in the T-47D cells. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the Bim gene, an essential initiator of apoptosis, was inhibited by miR-181b overexpression. We observed that knockdown of miR-181b by its specific inhibitors significantly re-sensitized the T-47D-R cells to the cytotoxicity of DOX. Importantly, we demonstrated that miR-181b inhibitors increased the level of Bim in the T-47D-R cells, resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the activation of caspases caused by DOX. In summary, the results of the present study suggest that miR-181b functions as an oncogene during breast cancer development, and the miR-181b/Bim pathway may be a novel target used to overcome the chemoresistance in breast cancer. PMID:26572075

  1. Breast cancer cell-associated endopeptidase EC 24.11 modulates proliferative response to bombesin.

    PubMed

    Burns, D M; Walker, B; Gray, J; Nelson, J

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the production, growth and inactivation of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP)-like peptides in human breast cancer cell lines. Radioimmunoassay detected GRP-like immunoreactivity (GRP-LI) in T47D breast cancer cells but not in the conditioned medium, indicating rapid clearance. No GRP-LI was found in the ZR-75-1 or MDA-MB-436 cells or their conditioned medium. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the GRP-LI in the T47D cells revealed a major peak, which co-eluted with GRP(18-27), and a minor more hydrophilic peak. In vitro stimulation of T47D cell growth by bombesin (BN) was enhanced to 138% of control levels (bombesin alone) by the addition of the selective endopeptidase EC 3.4.24.11 inhibitor phosphoramidon (0.1 ng ml(-1)). Fluorogenic analysis using whole cells confirmed low levels of this phosphoramidon-sensitive enzyme on the T47D cells. This enzyme, previously unreported in human breast cancer cells, significantly modulates both T47D growth and its response to BN-induced growth. PMID:9888460

  2. INDUCTION OF CYP1A1 AND CYP1B1 IN T-47D HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS BY BENZO[A]PYRENE IS DIMINISHED BY ARSENITE. (R827180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. First trimester human placental factors induce breast cancer cell autophagy.

    PubMed

    Epstein Shochet, G; Drucker, L; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Pomeranz, M; Fishman, A; Tartakover Matalon, S; Lishner, M

    2015-02-01

    Placental factors, progesterone included, facilitate breast cancer cell line (BCCL) motility and thus may contribute to the advanced breast cancer found during pregnancy. Cancer and placental implantations are similar; the last is accompanied by extravillous trophoblast cell invasion and autophagy which are interlinked. We aimed to analyze the effect of first trimester human placenta on BCCL autophagy. BCCLs (MCF-7/T47D) were cultured with placental explants (60 h) or placental supernatants (24 h). Following cultures, BCCLs were sorted out for RNA/protein extraction. RNA served for microarray/qPCR (BNIP3) and protein for Western blot (HIF1α, LC3BII) analyses. Inhibitors were added to the placenta-MCF-7 coculture or placental supernatants (autophagy inhibitor-3MA, progesterone receptor (PR) inhibitor-RU486, and HIF1α inhibitor-Vitexin) in order to evaluate their effects on BCCL motility and LC3BII/HIF1α expression. LC3BII (an autophagy marker) expression was elevated in BCCLs following placental explant coculture and exposure to placental supernatants. The autophagy inhibitor (3MA) repressed the placenta-induced MCF-7/T47D migration, establishing a connection between BCCL autophagy and migration. Microarray analysis of MCF-7 following placenta-MCF-7 coculture showed that "HIF1α pathway," a known autophagy facilitator, was significantly manipulated. Indeed, placental factors elevated HIF1α and its target BNIP3 in the BCCLs, verifying array results. Lastly, PR inhibitor reduced HIF1α expression and both PR and HIF1α inhibitors reduced MCF-7 LC3BII expression and motility, suggesting involvement of the PR-HIF1α axis in the autophagy process. Placental factors induced BCCL autophagy that is interlinked to their motility. This suggests that autophagy-related molecules may serve as targets for therapy in pregnancy-associated breast cancer. PMID:25656679

  4. Molecular expression and functional activity of vitamin C specific transport system (SVCT2) in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Varun; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-10-20

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the expression of sodium dependent vitamin C transport system (SVCT2). Moreover, this investigation has been carried out to define uptake mechanism and intracellular regulation of ascorbic acid (AA) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1). Uptake of [(14)C] AA was studied in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Functional parameters of [(14)C] AA uptake were delineated in the presence of different concentrations of unlabeled AA, pH, temperature, metabolic inhibitors, substrates and structural analogs. Molecular identification of SVCT2 was carried out with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Uptake of [(14)C] AA was studied and found to be sodium, chloride, temperature, pH and energy dependent in all breast cancer cell lines. [(14)C] AA uptake was found to be saturable, with Km values of 53.85 ± 6.24, 49.69 ± 2.83 and 45.44 ± 3.16 μM and Vmax values of 18.45 ± 0.50, 32.50 ± 0.43 and 33.25 ± 0.53 pmol/min/mg protein, across MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1, respectively. The process is inhibited by structural analogs (l-AA and d-iso AA) but not by structurally unrelated substrates (glucose and PAHA). Ca(++)/calmodulin and protein kinase pathways appeared to play a crucial role in modulating AA uptake. A 626 bp band corresponding to a vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) based on the primer design was detected by RT-PCR analysis in all breast cancer cell lines. This research article describes AA uptake mechanism, kinetics, and regulation by sodium dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Also, MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cell lines can be utilized as a valuable in vitro model to investigate absorption and permeability of AA-conjugated chemotherapeutics. PMID:25102111

  5. MOLECULAR EXPRESSION AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF VITAMIN C SPECIFIC TRANSPORT SYSTEM (SVCT2) IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Varun; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the expression of sodium dependent vitamin C transport system (SVCT2). Moreover this investigation has been carried out to define uptake mechanism and intracellular regulation of ascorbic acid (AA) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1). Uptake of [14C] AA was studied in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Functional parameters of [14C] AA uptake were delineated in the presence of different concentrations of unlabeled AA, pH, temperature, metabolic inhibitors, substrates and structural analogs. Molecular identification of SVCT2 was carried out with reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Uptake of [14C] AA was studied and found to be sodium, chloride, temperature, pH and energy dependent in all breast cancer cell lines. [14C] AA uptake was found to be saturable, with Km values of 53.85±6.24, 49.69±2.83 and 45.44±3.16 μM and Vmax values of 18.45±0.50, 32.50±0.43 and 33.25±0.53 pmol/min/mg protein, across MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1, respectively. The process is inhibited by structural analogs (L-AA and D-Iso AA) but not by structurally unrelated substrates (glucose and PAHA). Ca++/calmodulin and protein kinase pathways appeared to play a crucial role in modulating AA uptake. A 626 bp band corresponding to a vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) based on the primer design was detected by RT-PCR analysis in all breast cancer cell lines. This research article describes AA uptake mechanism, kinetics, and regulation by sodium dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Also, MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cell lines can be utilized as a valuable in vitro model to investigate absorption and permeability of AA-conjugated chemotherapeutics. PMID:25102111

  6. Chemokines induce migrational responses in human breast carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Youngs, S J; Ali, S A; Taub, D D; Rees, R C

    1997-04-10

    Chemokines have been shown to chemoattract and activate different leukocyte populations. Here we report the in vitro effect of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, regulated on activation, normal T-cells, expressed and secreted (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon inducible protein-10 (IP-10), neutrophil-activating peptide-2 (NAP-2), growth-related protein (GRO)-alpha and GRO-gamma, on the migration of 3 human breast carcinoma cell lines, MCF-7, T47D and ZR-75-1, using a microchemotaxis chamber to assess migration across fibronectin-coated polycarbonate membranes. MCF-7 cells responded chemotactically to all chemokines tested in a pattern which was dose and time dependent, although responses to the different chemokines were variable. ZR-75-1 responded to MIP-1beta and GRO-alpha, giving maximum migration indices of 3.7 and 5.3, respectively, and exhibited a migratory response to MIP-1alpha, IL-8 and MCP-1 although to a lower degree. T47D was unresponsive to the chemokines tested, but both MCF-7 and T47D cells bound radiolabelled ligands with binding constants (Kd) ranging from 0.6 to 2.2 nM and 0.6 to 2.1 nM, respectively. The specificity of the chemotactic response of MCF-7 to MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta was confirmed using chemokine-specific neutralising antibodies and heat denaturation, and was demonstrated to involve G protein and cyclic AMP signalling pathways. MIP-1beta and MIP-1alpha were shown to induce changes in the organisation of the actin cytoskeleton and the level of F-actin in MCF-7 cells, as determined using flow cytometric analysis and confocal microscopy. Our results show that breast carcinoma cells can respond to chemokines, and suggests a potential role for these molecules in the process of tumour cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:9139852

  7. Src Drives Growth of Antiestrogen Resistant Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Is a Marker for Reduced Benefit of Tamoxifen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sarah L.; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Bak, Martin; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E.; Kirkegaard, Tove

    2015-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms leading to antiestrogen resistance in estrogen-receptor ? (ER)-positive breast cancer is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was therefore to identify biomarkers and novel treatments for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer. We performed a kinase inhibitor screen on antiestrogen responsive T47D breast cancer cells and T47D-derived tamoxifen and fulvestrant resistant cell lines. We found that dasatinib, a broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor, inhibited growth of the antiestrogen resistant cells compared to parental T47D cells. Furthermore western blot analysis showed increased expression and phosphorylation of Src in the resistant cells and that dasatinib inhibited phosphorylation of Src and also signaling via Akt and Erk in all cell lines. Immunoprecipitation revealed Src: ER complexes only in the parental T47D cells. In fulvestrant resistant cells, Src formed complexes with the Human Epidermal growth factor Receptor (HER)1 and HER2. Neither HER receptors nor ER were co-precipitated with Src in the tamoxifen resistant cell lines. Compared to treatment with dasatinib alone, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant had a stronger inhibitory effect on tamoxifen resistant cell growth, whereas dasatinib in combination with tamoxifen had no additive inhibitory effect on fulvestrant resistant growth. When performing immunohistochemical staining on 268 primary tumors from breast cancer patients who had received tamoxifen as first line endocrine treatment, we found that membrane expression of Src in the tumor cells was significant associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival. In conclusion, Src was identified as target for treatment of antiestrogen resistant T47D breast cancer cells. For tamoxifen resistant T47D cells, combined treatment with dasatinib and fulvestrant was superior to treatment with dasatinib alone. Src located at the membrane has potential as a new biomarker for reduced benefit of tamoxifen. PMID:25706943

  8. Cdx2 Polymorphism Affects the Activities of Vitamin D Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Human Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Di Benedetto, Anna; Korita, Etleva; Goeman, Frauke; Sacconi, Andrea; Biagioni, Francesca; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina; Muti, Paola; Mottolese, Marcella; Falvo, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D plays a role in cancer development and acts through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). It regulates the action of hormone responsive genes and is involved in cell cycle regulation, differentiation and apoptosis. VDR is a critical component of the vitamin D pathway and different common single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism can play an important role in breast cancer, modulating the activity of VDR. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between the Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and the activities of VDR in human breast cancer cell lines and carcinomas breast patients. Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and antiproliferative effects of vitamin D treatment were investigated in a panel of estrogen receptor-positive (MCF7 and T-47D) and estrogen receptor-negative (MDA-MB-231, SUM 159PT, SK-BR-3, BT549, MDA-MB-468, HCC1143, BT20 and HCC1954) human breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the potential relationship among Cdx2 VDR polymorphism and a number of biomarkers used in clinical management of breast cancer was assessed in an ad hoc set of breast cancer cases. Vitamin D treatment efficacy was found to be strongly dependent on the Cdx2 VDR status in ER-negative breast cancer cell lines tested. In our series of breast cancer cases, the results indicated that patients with variant homozygote AA were associated with bio-pathological characteristics typical of more aggressive tumours, such as ER negative, HER2 positive and G3. Our results may suggest a potential effect of Cdx2 VDR polymorphism on the efficacy of vitamin D treatment in aggressive breast cancer cells (estrogen receptor negative). These results suggest that Cdx2 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for vitamin D treatment in breast cancer, independently of the VDR receptor expression. PMID:25849303

  9. The impact of Cysteine-Rich Intestinal Protein 1 (CRIP1) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CRIP1 (cysteine-rich intestinal protein 1) has been found in several tumor types, its prognostic impact and its role in cellular processes, particularly in breast cancer, are still unclear. Methods To elucidate the prognostic impact of CRIP1, we analyzed tissues from 113 primary invasive ductal breast carcinomas using immunohistochemistry. For the functional characterization of CRIP1, its endogenous expression was transiently downregulated in T47D and BT474 breast cancer cells and the effects analyzed by immunoblotting, WST-1 proliferation assay and invasion assay. Results We found a significant correlation between CRIP1 and HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) expression levels (p?=?0.016) in tumor tissues. In Kaplan Meier analyses, CRIP1 expression was significantly associated with the distant metastases-free survival of patients, revealing a better prognosis for high CRIP1 expression (p?=?0.039). Moreover, in multivariate survival analyses, the expression of CRIP1 was an independent negative prognostic factor, along with the positive prognosticators nodal status and tumor size (p?=?0.029). CRIP1 knockdown in the T47D and BT474 breast cancer cell lines led to the increased phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt, to the reduced phosphorylation of cdc2, and to a significantly elevated cell proliferation in vitro (p?breast cancer tissue is significantly associated with a worse prognosis for patients and low endogenous CRIP1 levels in vitro increased the malignant potential of breast cancer cells, we hypothesize that CRIP1 may act as a tumor suppressor in proliferation and invasion processes. Therefore, CRIP1 may be an independent prognostic marker with significant predictive power for use in breast cancer therapy. PMID:23570421

  10. Undecylprodigiosin selectively induces apoptosis in human breast carcinoma cells independent of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.-F.; Ma, C.-J.; Lu, C.-H.; Tsai, Yo-Ting; Wei, Y.-H.; Chang, J.-S.; Lai, J.-K.; Cheuh, Pin-Ju; Yeh, C.-T.; Tang, P.-C.; Jingua, T.C.; Ko, J.-L.; Liu, F.-S.; Yen, H.E.

    2007-12-15

    Undecylprodigiosin (UP) is a bacterial bioactive metabolite produced by Streptomyces and Serratia. In this study, we explored the anticancer effect of UP. Human breast carcinoma cell lines BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and T47D and one nonmalignant human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, were tested in this study. We found that UP exerted a potent cytotoxicity against all breast carcinoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, UP showed limited toxicity to MCF-10A cells, indicating UP's cytotoxic effect is selective for malignant cells. UP's cytotoxic effect was due to apoptosis, as confirmed by positive TUNEL signals, annexin V-binding, caspase 9 activation and PARP cleavage. Notably, UP-induced apoptosis was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk, further indicating the involvement of caspase activity. Moreover, UP caused a marked decrease of the levels of antiapoptotic BCL-X{sub L}, Survivin and XIAP while enhancing the levels of proapoptotic BIK, BIM, MCL-1S and NOXA, consequently favoring induction of apoptosis. Additionally, we found that cells with functional p53 (MCF-7, T47D) or mutant p53 (BT-20, MDA-MB-231) were both susceptible to UP's cytotoxicity. Importantly, UP was able to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells with p53 knockdown by RNA interference, confirming the dispensability of p53 in UP-induced apoptosis. Overall, our results establish that UP induces p53-independent apoptosis in breast carcinoma cells with no marked toxicity to nonmalignant cells, raising the possibility of its use as a new chemotherapeutic drug for breast cancer irrespective of p53 status.

  11. Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) inhibits expression of the Spot 14 (THRSP) and fatty acid synthase genes and impairs the growth of human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Christina; Olsen, Arne M.; Lewis, Lionel D.; Eisenberg, Burton L.; Eastman, Alan; Kinlaw, William B.

    2010-01-01

    Spot 14 (THRSP, S14) is a nuclear protein involved in the regulation of genes required for fatty acid synthesis in normal and malignant mammary epithelial and adipose cells. Havartine and Bauman reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits S14 gene expression in bovine mammary and mouse adipose tissues, and reduces milk fat production in cows. We hypothesized that CLA inhibits S14 gene expression in human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells, and that this will retard their growth. Exposure of T47D breast cancer cells to a mixture of CLA isomers reduced the expression of the S14 and fatty acid synthase (FAS) genes. The mixture caused a dose-related inhibition of T47D cell growth, as did pure c9, t11- and t10, c12-CLA, but not linoleic acid. Similar effects were observed in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Provision of 8 μM palmitate fully (CLA mix, t10, c12-CLA) or partially (c9, t11-CLA) reversed the antiproliferative effect in T47D cells. CLA likewise suppressed levels of S14 and FAS mRNAs in liposarcoma cells, and caused growth inhibition that was prevented by palmitic acid. CLA did not affect the growth of nonlipogenic HeLa cells or human fibroblasts. We conclude that, as in bovine mammary and mouse adipose cells, CLA suppresses S14 and FAS gene expression in human breast cancer and liposarcoma cells. Rescue from the antiproliferative effect of CLA by palmitic acid indicates that reduced tumor lipogenesis is a major mechanism for the anticancer effects of CLA. PMID:19116881

  12. Autophagy inhibition enhances apigenin-induced apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuchen; Liu, Bowen; Cao, Wenfeng; Zhang, Weiran; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Hongmeng; Meng, Ran; Zhang, Lin; Niu, Ruifang; Hao, Xishan

    2013-01-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is a member of the flavone subclass of flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables. The involvement of autophagy in the apigenin-induced apoptotic death of human breast cancer cells was investigated. Cell proliferation and viability were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and clonogenic assays. Flow cytometry, fluorescent staining and Western blot analysis were employed to detect apoptosis and autophagy, and the role of autophagy was assessed using autophagy inhibitors. Apigenin dose- and time-dependently repressed the proliferation and clonogenic survival of the human breast cancer T47D and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. The death of T47D and MDA-MB-231 cells was due to apoptosis associated with increased levels of Caspase3, PARP cleavage and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios. The results from flow cytometry and fluorescent staining also verified the occurrence of apoptosis. In addition, the apigenin-treated cells exhibited autophagy, as characterized by the appearance of autophagosomes under fluorescence microscopy and the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the results of the Western blot analysis revealed that the level of LC3-II, the processed form of LC3-I, was increased. Treatment with the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3-MA), significantly enhanced the apoptosis induced by apigenin, which was accompanied by an increase in the level of PARP cleavage. Similar results were also confirmed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results indicate that apigenin has apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing effects in breast cancer cells. Autophagy plays a cyto-protective role in apigenin-induced apoptosis, and the combination of apigenin and an autophagy inhibitor may be a promising strategy for breast cancer control. PMID:23592903

  13. Genistein modulates proliferation and mitochondrial functionality in breast cancer cells depending on ERalpha/ERbeta ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Blanquer-Rossello, M Mar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of developed countries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, and 17?-estradiol (E2) could have effects on the cell cycle and mitochondrial function and dynamics. Three human breast cancer cell lines with different estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) and estrogen receptor beta (ER?) ratio were used: MCF-7 (high ER?/ER? ratio), T47D (low ER?/ER? ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, mitochondrial functionality, and mitochondrial dynamics parameters were analyzed. E2 and genistein treatment induced cell proliferation and apoptosis inhibition in MCF-7, but not in T47D and MDA-MB-231. Moreover, genistein treatment produced an up-regulation of ER? and a rise in cytochrome c oxidase activity in T47D cells, decreasing the ATP synthase/cytochrome c oxidase ratio. Finally, genistein treatment produced a drop in mitochondrial dynamics only in MCF-7 cells. In summary, the beneficial effects of genistein consumption depend on the ER?/ER? ratio in breast cells. Therefore, genistein treatment produces cell cycle arrest and an improvement of mitochondrial functionality in T47D cells with a low ER?/ER? ratio, but not in MCF-7 (high ER?/ER? ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) ones. PMID:24375531

  14. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies identifying breast tumor-associated antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Keydar, I; Chou, C S; Hareuveni, M; Tsarfaty, I; Sahar, E; Selzer, G; Chaitchik, S; Hizi, A

    1989-01-01

    We have generated a mouse monoclonal antibody (H23) against the retrovirus-like particles (human mammary tumor virus) released in vitro by the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line T47D. This antibody reacts specifically with a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 68 kDa (gp68) that is detected in the growth medium of T47D cells as well as in pleural effusion fluids from breast adenocarcinoma patients. No detectable levels of this antigen could be observed in pleural effusions of patients with cancers other than of breast origin. The H23-related antigen was localized in the cytoplasm of breast tumor cells as well as on the cell surface of both T47D cells and metastatic cells from breast cancer patients. A survey of tissue from 812 patients was performed by using H23 in an indirect immunoperoxidase assay. The results showed that the antigen was detectable in 91% of all breast tumors tested. No cytoplasmic staining was observed in either normal tissues or nonbreast carcinomas. Only one of the benign breast tissues tested (out of a total of 56 samples of tissue) was positive for this antigen. Given the ability of this antibody to specifically detect breast tumor cells, H23 may be of importance in diagnosis and in clinical follow-up of patients for the detection of metastatic lesions by imaging and for therapy. Images PMID:2465551

  15. Increased fucosylation has a pivotal role in multidrug resistance of breast cancer cells through miR-224-3p targeting FUT4.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobin; Zhao, Lifen; Gao, Shuhang; Song, Xiaobo; Dong, Weijie; Zhao, Yongfu; Zhou, Huimin; Cheng, Lei; Miao, Xiaolong; Jia, Li

    2016-03-10

    Fucosylation is the final step in the glycosylation machinery, which produces glycans involved in tumor multidrug resistance development. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous negative regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in most cellular processes of tumors, including drug resistance. This study was undertaken to determine the roles of fucosylation and miR-224-3p in multidrug resistance of human breast cancer cell lines. Comparative analysis revealed differential modification patterns of fucosylation of the fucosylated N-glycans in drug-resistant T47D/ADR cells and sensitive line T47D cells. The expressional profiles of fucosyltransferase genes in two pairs of parental and chemoresistant human breast cancer cell lines showed that FUT4 was up-regulated highly in MDR cell lines. Altered level of FUT4 affected the drug-resistant phenotype of T47D and T47D/ADR cells both in vitro and in vivo. By bioinformatics analysis, we identified FUT4 as one of the miR-224-3p-targeted genes. Further studies showed an inverse relationship between of FUT4 and miR-224-3p in parental and ADR-resistant breast cancer cells, wherein miR-224-3p was downregulated in resistant cells. 3'-UTR dual-luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-224-3p directly targeted 3'-untranslation region (3'-UTR) of FUT4 mRNA. In addition, miR-224-3p overexpression sensitized T47D/ADR cells to chemotherapeutics and reduced the growth rate of breast cancer xenografts in vivo. Our results indicate that FUT4 and miR-224-3p are crucial regulators of cancer response to chemotherapy, and may serve as therapeutic targets to reverse chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer. PMID:26701615

  16. Function of RasGRP3 in the formation and progression of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) mediate the activation of the Ras signaling pathway that is over activated in many human cancers. The RasGRP3, an activator of H-Ras and R-Ras protein exerts oncogenic effects and the overexpression of the protein is observed in numerous malignant cancer types. Here, we investigated the putative alteration of expression and potential function of RasGRP3 in the formation and progression of human breast cancer. Methods The RasGRP3 and phosphoRasGRP3 expressions were examined in human invasive ductal adenocarcinoma derived samples and cell lines (BT-474, JIMT-1, MCF7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-453, T-47D) both in mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (Western blot; immunohistochemistry) levels. To explore the biological function of the protein, RasGRP3 knockdown cultures were established. To assess the role of RasGRP3 in the viability of cells, annexin-V/PI staining and MitoProbe™ DilC1 (5) assay were performed. To clarify the function of the protein in cell proliferation and in the development of chemotherapeutic resistance, CyQuant assay was performed. To observe the RasGRP3 function in tumor formation, the Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model was used. To investigate the role of the protein in Ras-related signaling Q-PCR and Western blot experiments were performed. Results RasGRP3 expression was elevated in human breast tumor tissue samples as well as in multiple human breast cancer cell lines. Down-regulation of RasGRP3 expression in breast cancer cells decreased cell proliferation, induced apoptosis in MCF7 cells, and sensitized T-47D cells to the action of drugs Tamoxifen and trastuzumab (Herceptin). Gene silencing of RasGRP3 reduced tumor formation in mouse xenografts as well. Inhibition of RasGRP3 expression also reduced Akt, ERK1/2 and estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation downstream from IGF-I insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) or epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation confirming the functional role of RasGRP3 in the altered behavior of these cells. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that the Ras activator RasGRP3 may have a role in the pathological behavior of breast cancer cells and may constitute a therapeutic target for human breast cancer. PMID:24779681

  17. Activin A mediates growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest through Smads in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Joanna E; Jeruss, Jacqueline S; Kurley, Sarah J; Lee, Eun Jig; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2005-09-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of growth factors is responsible for a variety of physiologic actions, including cell cycle regulation. Activin is a member of the TGF-beta superfamily that inhibits the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Activin functions by interacting with its type I and type II receptors to induce phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules known as Smads. Smads regulate transcription of many genes in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. In this study, the role of activin A in growth regulation of breast cancer cells was investigated. Activin stimulated the Smad-responsive promoter, p3TP, 2-fold over control in T47D breast cancer cells. Activin inhibited cellular proliferation of T47D breast cancer cells after 72 hours, an effect that could be abrogated by incubation with the activin type I receptor inhibitor, SB431542. Activin arrested T47D cells in the G0-G1 cell cycle phase. Smad2 and Smad3 were phosphorylated in response to activin and accumulated in the nucleus of treated T47D cells. Infection of T47D cells with adenoviral Smad3 resulted in cell cycle arrest and activation of p3TP-luciferase, whereas a adenoviral dominant-negative Smad3 blocked activin-mediated cell cycle arrest and gene transcription. Activin maintained expression of p21 and p27 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors involved in cell cycle control, enhanced expression of p15, reduced cyclin A expression, and reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Smad3 overexpression recapitulated activin-induced p15 expression and repression of cyclin A and Rb phosphorylation. These data indicate that activin A inhibits breast cancer cellular proliferation and activates Smads responsible for initiating cell cycle arrest. PMID:16140969

  18. Screening complex effluents for estrogenic activity with the T47D-KBluc cell bioassay: assay optimization and comparison with in vivo responses in fish.

    PubMed

    Wehmas, Leah C; Cavallin, Jenna E; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Kahl, Michael D; Martinovic, Dalma; Mayasich, Joe; Tuominen, Tim; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2011-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can contain estrogenic chemicals, which potentially disrupt fish reproduction and development. The current study focused on the use of an estrogen-responsive in vitro cell bioassay (T47D-KBluc), to quantify total estrogenicity of WWTP effluents. We tested a novel sample preparation method for the T47D-KBluc assay, using powdered media prepared with direct effluent. Results of the T47D-KBluc assay were compared with the induction of estrogen receptor-regulated gene transcription in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the same effluents. Effluent samples for the paired studies were collected over the course of three months. According to the T47D-KBluc assay, the effluent estrogenicity ranged from 1.13 to 2.00 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents/L. Corresponding in vivo studies exposing male fathead minnows to 0, 10, 50, and 100% effluent dilutions demonstrated that exposure to 100% effluent significantly increased hepatic vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor α subunit transcripts relative to controls. The induction was also significant in males exposed to 250 ng E2/L or 100 ng E2/L. The in vitro and in vivo results support the conclusion that the effluent contains significant estrogenic activity, but there was a discrepancy between in vitro- and in vivo-based E2 equivalent estimates. Our results suggest that the direct effluent preparation method for the T47D-KBluc assay is a reasonable approach to estimate the estrogenicity of wastewater effluent. PMID:21038435

  19. Human breast cancer cells contain a phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1: a proposed mitogen for human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Patel, K V; Schrey, M P

    1995-03-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels are elevated in human breast tumours compared with normal and benign tissues, and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) ET-1 is a potent mitogen for human breast fibroblasts. In this study we have examined the ability of intact human breast cancer cell lines to process exogenously added big ET-1 (1-38) to the active mature ET-1 peptide by using a specific radioimmunometric assay. In both hormome-dependent (MCF-7, T47-D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines the putative endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) exhibited apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics when converting added big ET-1 to ET-1. Both basal ET-1 production and exogenously added big ET-1 to ET-1 conversion were greatly reduced in all three cell lines in response to the metalloproteinase inhibitor phosphoramidon but were insensitive to other classes of protease inhibitors. Inhibition was also observed when cells were incubated in the presence of the divalent cation chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. In MCF-7 cells the optimal pH for the ECE activity using a saponin cell permeabilisation procedure was found to residue within a narrow range of 6.2-7.26. Our results indicate that human breast cancer cells contain a neutral phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process big ET-1 to ET-1. In the breast this conversion could contribute substantially to the local extracellular levels of this proposed paracrine breast fibroblast mitogen. PMID:7880721

  20. Human breast cancer cells contain a phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process exogenous big endothelin-1 to endothelin-1: a proposed mitogen for human breast fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K. V.; Schrey, M. P.

    1995-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels are elevated in human breast tumours compared with normal and benign tissues, and in the presence of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) ET-1 is a potent mitogen for human breast fibroblasts. In this study we have examined the ability of intact human breast cancer cell lines to process exogenously added big ET-1 (1-38) to the active mature ET-1 peptide by using a specific radioimmunometric assay. In both hormome-dependent (MCF-7, T47-D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines the putative endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) exhibited apparent Michaelis-Menten kinetics when converting added big ET-1 to ET-1. Both basal ET-1 production and exogenously added big ET-1 to ET-1 conversion were greatly reduced in all three cell lines in response to the metalloproteinase inhibitor phosphoramidon but were insensitive to other classes of protease inhibitors. Inhibition was also observed when cells were incubated in the presence of the divalent cation chelators 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. In MCF-7 cells the optimal pH for the ECE activity using a saponin cell permeabilisation procedure was found to residue within a narrow range of 6.2-7.26. Our results indicate that human breast cancer cells contain a neutral phosphoramidon-sensitive metalloproteinase which can process big ET-1 to ET-1. In the breast this conversion could contribute substantially to the local extracellular levels of this proposed paracrine breast fibroblast mitogen. PMID:7880721

  1. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  2. Aluminium and the human breast.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2016-06-01

    The human population is exposed to aluminium (Al) from diet, antacids and vaccine adjuvants, but frequent application of Al-based salts to the underarm as antiperspirant adds a high additional exposure directly to the local area of the human breast. Coincidentally the upper outer quadrant of the breast is where there is also a disproportionately high incidence of breast cysts and breast cancer. Al has been measured in human breast tissues/fluids at higher levels than in blood, and experimental evidence suggests that at physiologically relevant concentrations, Al can adversely impact on human breast epithelial cell biology. Gross cystic breast disease is the most common benign disorder of the breast and evidence is presented that Al may be a causative factor in formation of breast cysts. Evidence is also reviewed that Al can enable the development of multiple hallmarks associated with cancer in breast cells, in particular that it can cause genomic instability and inappropriate proliferation in human breast epithelial cells, and can increase migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. In addition, Al is a metalloestrogen and oestrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer known to influence multiple hallmarks. The microenvironment is established as another determinant of breast cancer development and Al has been shown to cause adverse alterations to the breast microenvironment. If current usage patterns of Al-based antiperspirant salts contribute to causation of breast cysts and breast cancer, then reduction in exposure would offer a strategy for prevention, and regulatory review is now justified. PMID:26997127

  3. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue; Yang, Guifang; Cai, Xiaojun; Falck, John R.; Yang, Jing; Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP4Z1 transfection increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt, while PI3K or ERK inhibitors and siRNA silencing reversed CYP4Z1-mediated changes in VEGF-A and TIMP-2 expression. Conversely, HET0016, an inhibitor of the CYP4 family, potently inhibited the tumor-induced angiogenesis with associated changes in the intracellular levels of myristic acid, lauric acid and 20-HETE. Collectively, these data suggest that increased CYP4Z1 expression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer partly via PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 activation. -- Highlights: ► CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes human breast cancer growth and angiogenesis. ► The pro-angiogenic effects of CYP4Z1 have been studied in vitro and in vivo. ► CYP4Z1 regulates expression and production of VEGF-A and TIMP-2. ► CYP4Z1-induced angiogenesis is associated with PI3K and ERK1/2 activation. ► CYP4Z1 may be an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy.

  4. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 depends on cell-specific factors in human breast cancer cell lines: role of estrogen receptor status.

    PubMed

    Angus, W G; Larsen, M C; Jefcoate, C R

    1999-06-01

    The impact of estrogen receptor (ER) was examined for expression and activity of cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1) and cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) in two pairs of ER+/ER- human breast epithelial cell lines derived from single lineages, and representing earlier (T47D) or later (MDA-MB-231) stages of tumorigenesis. Acute loss of ER was evaluated using the anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 (ICI). In all lines, CYP1B1 was expressed constitutively and was induced by 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), whereas CYP1A1 was expressed only following induction. Expression of each CYP (with or without TCDD) was greater in T47D cells than MDA cells. The ER impacted expression of these genes in opposite directions. The ER- phenotype was associated with less TCDD-induced CYP1A1 expression, but greater basal and induced CYP1B1 expression. A 48 h treatment of ER+ cells with ICI did not revert the P450 expression pattern to that of ER- cells. Based on activities of recombinant enzyme and expression levels, differences in 7,2-dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA) metabolism between the cell lines were consistent with differences in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. In T47D lines, basal microsomal DMBA metabolism was primarily due to CYP1B1, based on regioselective metabolite distribution and inhibition by anti-CYP1B1 antibodies (>80%). Metabolism in TCDD-induced microsomes was mostly due to CYP1A1 and was inhibited by anti-CYP1A1 antibody (>50%). TCDD-induced MDA+ cells demonstrated CYP1A1 activity, whereas TCDD-induced MDA- cells displayed CYP1B1 activity. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) levels, but not AhR nuclear translocator protein (ARNT) levels were highly dependent on cell type; AhR was high and ER-independent in MDA, and low and ER-linked in T47D. AhR levels were insensitive to ICI. ER does not directly modulate the expression of CYP1A1, CYP1B1 or AhR. Indeed, factors that have replaced ER in growth regulation during clonal selection predominate in this regulation. Characteristics unique to each cell line, including ER status, determine CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. PMID:10357772

  5. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 1. Immunonaffinity purification of transformed receptors and production of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, P.A.; Suba, E.J.; Lawler-Heavner, J.; Elashry-Stowers, D.; Wei, L.L.; Toft, D.O.; Sullivan, W.P.; Horwitz, K.B.; Edwards, D.P.

    1987-09-22

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), designated PR-6, produced against chick oviduct progesterone receptors cross-reacts with the M/sub r/ 120,000 human B receptors. An immunomatrix prepared with PR-6 was used to purify progesterone receptors (PR) from T47D human breast cancer cells. Single-step immunoaffinity chromatography results in enrichment of B receptors (identified by immunoblot with PR-6 and by photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)promegestone) to a specific activity of 1915 pmol/mg of protein (or 23% purity) and with 27% yield. Purity and yields as judged by gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of the B protein were approximately 1.7-fold higher due to partial loss in hormone binding activity at the elution step. B receptors purified under these conditions are transformed and biologically active. They were maintained as undergraded 120-kDa doublets and retained both hormone and DNA binding activities. These purified B receptors were used as immunogen for production of four monoclonal antibodies against human PR. Three of the MAbs, designated as B-30 (IgG/sub 1/), B-64 (IgG/sub 1/), and B-11 (IgM), are specific for B receptors. The fourth MAb, A/B-52 (IgG/sub 1/), reacts with both A and B receptors. The IgG MAbs are monospecific for human PR since they recognize and absorb native receptor-hormone complexes, displace the sedimentation of 4S receptors on salt containing sucrose gradients, and, by immunoblot assay of crude T47D cytosol, react only with receptor polypeptides. Although mice were injected with B receptors only, production of A/B-52 which recognized both A and B receptors provides evidence that these two proteins share regions of structural homology.

  6. A peptide derived from alpha-fetoprotein prevents the growth of estrogen-dependent human breast cancers sensitive and resistant to tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James A; Mesfin, Fassil B; Andersen, Thomas T; Gierthy, John F; Jacobson, Herbert I

    2002-02-19

    An 8-mer peptide (EMTOVNOG) derived from alpha-fetoprotein was compared with tamoxifen for activity against growth of human breast cancer xenografts implanted in immune-deficient mice. Both peptide and tamoxifen prevented growth of estrogen-receptor-positive MCF-7 and T47D human breast cancer xenografts. A subline of MCF-7, made resistant to tamoxifen by a 6-month exposure to this drug in culture, was found to be resistant to tamoxifen in vivo. Peptide completely prevented the xenograft growth of this tamoxifen-resistant subline of MCF-7. Neither peptide nor tamoxifen was effective in slowing the xenograft growth of the estrogen-receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer. A worrisome side effect of tamoxifen is its hypertrophic effect on the uterus. In this study, tamoxifen was shown to stimulate the growth of the immature mouse uterus in vivo, and the peptide significantly inhibited tamoxifen's uterotrophic effect. The mechanism of action of peptide is different from that of tamoxifen in that the peptide does not interfere with the binding of [(3)H]estradiol to the estrogen receptor. In conclusion, alpha-fetoprotein-derived peptide appears to be a novel agent that interferes with the growth of tamoxifen-sensitive as well as tamoxifen-resistant estrogen-receptor-positive human breast cancers; it inhibits the uterotrophic side effect of tamoxifen and, thus, it may be useful in combination with or in place of tamoxifen for treatment of estrogen-receptor-positive human breast cancers. PMID:11830647

  7. Kinetics of hyperpolarized 13C1-pyruvate transport and metabolism in living human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Talia; Eliyahu, Galit; Frydman, Lucio; Degani, Hadassa

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic fluxes can serve as specific biomarkers for detecting malignant transformations, tumor progression, and response to microenvironmental changes and treatment procedures. We present noninvasive hyperpolarized 13C NMR investigations on the metabolic flux of pyruvate to lactate, in a well-controlled injection/perfusion system using T47D human breast cancer cells. Initial rates of pyruvate-to-lactate conversion were obtained by fitting the hyperpolarized 13C and ancillary 31P NMR data to a model, yielding both kinetic parameters and mechanistic insight into this conversion. Transport was found to be the rate-limiting process for the conversion of extracellular pyruvate to lactate with Km = 2.14 ± 0.03 mM, typical of the monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), and a Vmax = 27.6 ± 1.1 fmol·min−1·cell−1, in agreement with the high expression level of this transporter. Modulation of the environment to hypoxic conditions as well as suppression of cells' perfusion enhanced the rate of pyruvate-to-lactate conversion, presumably by up-regulation of the MCT1. Conversely, the addition of quercetin, a flavonoidal MCT1 inhibitor, markedly reduces the apparent rate of pyruvate-to-lactate conversion. These results suggest that hyperpolarized 13C1-pyruvate may be a useful magnetic resonance biomarker of MCT regulation and malignant transformations in breast cancer. PMID:19826085

  8. Benzene-Poly-Carboxylic Acid Complex, a Novel Anti-Cancer Agent Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Fuad; Azzam, Naiel; Fares, Basem; Larsen, Stig; Lindkaer-Jensen, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Some cases of breast cancer are composed of clones of hormonal-independent growing cells, which do not respond to therapy. In the present study, the effect of Benzene-Poly-Carboxylic Acid Complex (BP-C1) on growth of human breast-cancer cells was tested. BP-C1 is a novel anti-cancer complex of benzene-poly-carboxylic acids with a very low concentration of cis-diammineplatinum (II) dichloride. Human breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and T47D, were used. Cell viability was detected by XTT assay and apoptosis was detected by Flow Cytometry and by annexin V/FITC/PI assay. Caspases were detected by western blot analysis and gene expression was measured by using the Applied Biosystems® TaqMan® Array Plates. The results showed that exposure of the cells to BP-C1 for 48 h, significantly (P<0.001) reduced cell viability, induced apoptosis and activated caspase 8 and caspace 9. Moreover, gene expression experiments indicated that BP-C1 increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (CASP8AP1, TNFRSF21, NFkB2, FADD, BCL10 and CASP8) and lowered the level of mRNA transcripts of inhibitory apoptotic genes (BCL2L11, BCL2L2 and XIAP. These findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of human cancer using BP-C1 analog. PMID:24523856

  9. Alpha Cyano-4-Hydroxy-3-Methoxycinnamic Acid Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Lamia; Arrar, Zoheir; Al Muataz, Yacoub; Suleiman, Lutfi; Négrier, Claude; Mulengi, Joseph Kajima; Boukerche, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA), on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231) with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. PMID:24039831

  10. Alpha cyano-4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Lamia; Arrar, Zoheir; Al Muataz, Yacoub; Suleiman, Lutfi; Négrier, Claude; Mulengi, Joseph Kajima; Boukerche, Habib

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the underlying mechanism of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid (ACCA), on the growth of breast cancer cells and normal immortal epithelial cells, and compared their cytotoxic effects responses. Treatment of breast cancer cells (MCF-7, T47D, and MDA-231) with ACCA resulted in dose- and time-dependent decrease of cell proliferation, viability in colony formation assay, and programmed cell death (apoptosis) with minimal effects on non-tumoral cells. The ability of ACCA to suppress growth in cancer cells not expressing or containing defects in p53 gene indicates a lack of involvement of this critical tumor suppressor element in mediating ACCA-induced growth inhibition. Induction of apoptosis correlated with an increase in Bax protein, an established inducer of programmed cell death, and the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2, an established inhibitor of apoptosis. We also documented the ability of ACCA to inhibit the migration and invasion of MDA-231 cells with ACCA in vitro. Additionally, tumor growth of MDA-231 breast cancer cells in vivo was dramatically affected with ACCA. On the basis of its selective anticancer inhibitory activity on tumor cells, ACCA may represent a promising therapeutic drug that should be further evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. PMID:24039831

  11. Validation of T47D-KBluc cell assay for detection of estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists###

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to environmental estrogens and their potential impact on reproductive health. Cell-based assays are useful tools to determine the estrogenic activity of chemicals. Confidence in in vitro assay results is strengthe...

  12. Validation of T47D-KBluc cell assay for detection of estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to environmental estrogens and their potential impact on reproductive health. Cell-based assays are useful tools to determine the estrogenic activity of chemicals. Confidence in in vitro assay results is strengthe...

  13. Synthesis of new N,N'-bis[1-aryl-3-(piperidine-1-yl)propylidene]hydrazine dihydrochlorides and evaluation of their cytotoxicity against human hepatoma and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kucukoglu, Kaan; Gul, H Inci; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Baratli, Yosra; Charles, Anne-Laure; Sukuroglu, Murat; Gul, Mustafa; Geny, Bernard

    2014-06-01

    N,N'-Bis[1-aryl-3-(piperidine-1-yl)propylidene]hydrazine dihydrochlorides were synthesized by the reaction of 2 mols of 1-aryl-3-(piperidine-1-yl)-1-propanone hydrochlorides with 1 mol of hydrazine hydrate. Aryl part was C₆H₅ (P1), 4-CH₃C₆H₄ (P2), 4-CH₃OC₆H₄ (P3), 4-HOC₆H₄ (P4), 4-ClC₆H₄ (P5), 3-CH₃OC₆H₄ (P6), 4-FC₆H₄ (P7) and 4-BrC₆H₄ (P8). Except P1, all compounds were reported for the first time. The chemical structures were confirmed by UV, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and HRMS spectra. P1, P2, P7 and P8 against human hepatoma (Huh7) cells and P1, P2, P4, P5, P6, P7 and P8 against breast cancer (T47D) cells have shown cytotoxicity. P1, P2 and P7 had more potent cytotoxicity against Huh7 cells than the reference compound 5-FU, whereas only P2 was more potent than the 5-FU against T47D cells. Representative compound P7 inhibited the mitochondrial respiration at 144, 264 and 424 µM concentrations dose-dependantly in liver homogenates. The results suggest that P1, P2, P7 and P8 may serve as model compounds for further synthetic studies. PMID:23859151

  14. Human breast cancer bone metastasis in vitro and in vivo: a novel 3D model system for studies of tumour cell-bone cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Holen, I; Nutter, F; Wilkinson, J M; Evans, C A; Avgoustou, P; Ottewell, Penelope D

    2015-10-01

    Bone is established as the preferred site of breast cancer metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for this preference remain unidentified. In order to improve outcome for patients with advanced breast cancer and skeletal involvement, we need to better understand how this process is initiated and regulated. As bone metastasis cannot be easily studied in patients, researchers have to date mainly relied on in vivo xenograft models. A major limitation of these is that they do not contain a human bone microenvironment, increasingly considered to be an important component of metastases. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a novel humanised bone model, where 1 10(5) luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 or T47D human breast tumour cells are seeded on viable human subchaodral bone discs in vitro. These discs contain functional osteoclasts 2-weeks after in vitro culture and positive staining for calcine 1-week after culture demonstrating active bone resorption/formation. In vitro inoculation of MDA-MB-231 or T47D cells colonised human bone cores and remained viable for <4 weeks, however, use of matrigel to enhance adhesion or a moving platform to increase diffusion of nutrients provided no additional advantage. Following colonisation by the tumour cells, bone discs pre-seeded with MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously into NOD SCID mice, and tumour growth monitored using in vivo imaging for up to 6 weeks. Tumour growth progressed in human bone discs in 80 % of the animals mimicking the later stages of human bone metastasis. Immunohistochemical and PCR analysis revealed that growing MDA-MB-231 cells in human bone resulted in these cells acquiring a molecular phenotype previously associated with breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231 cells grown in human bone discs showed increased expression of IL-1B, HRAS and MMP9 and decreased expression of S100A4, whereas, DKK2 and FN1 were unaltered compared with the same cells grown in mammary fat pads of mice not implanted with human bone discs. PMID:26231669

  15. Transition of human breast cancer cells from an oestrogen responsive to unresponsive state.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Daly, R J

    1990-12-20

    An in vitro model system is described for studying the problem of loss of steroid sensitivity in breast cancer cells. Growth of cloned oestrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells in the long-term absence of steroid gives rise to a population of oestrogen-insensitive cells. In ZR-75-1 cells, the effect is clonal but occurs at high frequency suggesting a mechanism affecting a wide proportion of the cell population synchronously. This does not involve any reduction in oestrogen receptor number. Furthermore, there is no coordinated loss of oestrogen-sensitive molecular markers, showing that oestrogen receptors remain not only present but functional. These growth changes are not accompanied by any loss of growth inhibition by antioestrogen. Although steroid deprivation does not result in loss of oestrogen-sensitive markers, this does not hold true for other steroids. There was a reduction in progestin, androgen and glucocorticoid regulation on transfected LTRs. Loss of steroid-sensitive growth was accompanied by changes in response to exogenous growth factors and altered endogenous growth factor mRNA production. Steroid-deprived T-47-D cells acquire sensitivity to stimulation by TGF beta and have raised TGF beta 1 and TGF beta 2 mRNA levels. ZR-75-1 cells are growth inhibited by TGF beta and have reduced TGF beta 1 mRNA levels. In MCF-7 cells, increased IGFII mRNA, following transfection, can result in an increased basal cell growth rate in the absence of steroid. These findings are discussed in relation to possible autocrine mechanisms in the loss of steroid sensitivity of breast cancer cells. PMID:2285587

  16. Three-dimensional microtissues essentially contribute to preclinical validations of therapeutic targets in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Natalie; Höfig, Ines; Rosemann, Michael; Szumielewski, Justine; Richter, Sabine; Schorpp, Kenji; Hadian, Kamyar; Aubele, Michaela; Atkinson, Michael J; Anastasov, Nataša

    2016-04-01

    A 3D microtissues using T47D and JIMT-1 cells were generated to analyze tissue-like response of breast cancer cells after combined human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted treatment and radiation. Following lentiviral knockdown of HER2, we compared growth rate alterations using 2D monolayers, 3D microtissues, and mouse xenografts. Additionally, to model combined therapeutic strategies, we treated HER2-depleted T47D cells and 3D microtissues using trastuzumab (anti-HER2 antibody) in combination with irradiation. Comparison of HER2 knockdown with corresponding controls revealed growth impairment due to HER2 knockdown in T47D 2D monolayers, 3D microtissues, and xenografts (after 2, 12, and ≥40 days, respectively). In contrast, HER2 knockdown was less effective in inhibiting growth of trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells in vitro and in vivo. Combined administration of trastuzumab and radiation treatment was also analyzed using T47D 3D microtissues. Administration of both, radiation (5 Gy) and trastuzumab, significantly enhanced the growth inhibiting effect in 3D microtissues. To improve the predictive power of potential drugs-as single agents or in combination-here, we show that regarding tumor growth analyses, 3D microtissues are highly comparable to outcomes derived from xenografts. Considering increased limitations for animal experiments on the one hand and strong need of novel drugs on the other hand, it is indispensable to include highly reproducible 3D microtissue platform in preclinical analyses to validate more accurately the capacity of future drug-combined radiotherapy. PMID:26763588

  17. Effects of 60-Hz fields, estradiol and xenoestrogens on human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, C.; Travis, C.; Garrett, S.; Henley, D.

    1996-10-01

    If exposure to xenoestrogens or electromagnetic fields (EMFs) such as 60 Hz contributes to the etiology of breast cancer, it is likely that they must stimulate the growth of breast cells, damage genetic material or enhance the effects of other mitogenic or mutagenic agents (co-promotion). Therefore, the ability of xenoestrogens or exposure to 60-Hz fields to stimulate the entry of growth-arrested human breast cancer cells into the cell cycle was determined using cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, synthesis of cyclin D1 and cdc2 activity. Exposure of estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 or T-47D cells to estrogen and xenoestrogens (DDT and Red No.3) increased Cdk2 and cyclin B1-cdc2 activity and cyclin D1 synthesis. Exposure of breast cancer cells to 12 mG or 1 or 9 G electromagnetic fields at 60 Hz failed to stimulate Cdk2 or cyclin B1-cdc2 activity or cyclin D1 synthesis. Simultaneous co-exposure of cells to 60-Hz fields and chemical promoters did not enhance Cdk2 activation above the levels produced by the chemical promoter alone. Estrogen and xenoestrogens also stimulated binding of the estrogen receptor to the estrogen receptor element but the EMF did not. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of p53 and pRb105 in MCF-7 cells, but EMF exposure had no effect. DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and Red Dye No. 3 were found to increase p53 site-specific DNA binding in breast cancer cells, but EMF exposure did not. These studies suggest that estrogen and xenoestrogens stimulate growth-arrested breast cancer cells to enter the growth cycle, but EMF exposure does not. Site-specific p53-DNA binding was increased in MCF-7 cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, but not by EMF exposure. EMF exposure does not appear to act as a promoter or DNA-damaging agent for human breast cancer cells in vitro. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  18. The transcriptional responsiveness of LKB1 to STAT-mediated signaling is differentially modulated by prolactin in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver kinase 1 (LKB1) is an important multi-tasking protein linked with metabolic signaling, also controlling polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangements in diverse cell types including cancer cells. Prolactin (PRL) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins have been associated with breast cancer progression. The current investigation examines the effect of PRL and STAT-mediated signaling on the transcriptional regulation of LKB1 expression in human breast cancer cells. Methods MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T47D human breast cancer cells, and CHO-K1 cells transiently expressing the PRL receptor (long form), were treated with 100 ng/ml of PRL for 24 hours. A LKB1 promoter-luciferase construct and its truncations were used to assess transcriptional changes in response to specific siRNAs or inhibitors targeting Janus activated kinase 2 (JAK2), STAT3, and STAT5A. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were applied to quantify changes in mRNA and protein levels. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to examine STAT3 and STAT5A binding to the LKB1 promoter. Results Consistent with increases in mRNA, the LKB1 promoter was up-regulated by PRL in MDA-MB-231 cells, a response that was lost upon distal promoter truncation. A putative GAS element that could provide a STAT binding site mapped to this region, and its mutation decreased PRL-responsiveness. PRL-mediated increases in promoter activity required signaling through STAT3 and STAT5A, also involving JAK2. Both STATs imparted basally repressive effects in MDA-MB-231 cells. PRL increased in vivo binding of STAT3, and more definitively, STAT5A, to the LKB1 promoter region containing the GAS site. In T47D cells, PRL down-regulated LKB1 transcriptional activity, an effect that was reversed upon culture in phenol red-free media. Interleukin 6, a cytokine activating STAT signaling in diverse cell types, also increased LKB1 mRNA levels and promoter activity in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusions LKB1 is differentially regulated by PRL at the level of transcription in representative human breast cancer cells. Its promoter is targeted by STAT proteins, and the cellular estrogen receptor status may affect PRL-responsiveness. The hormonal and possibly cytokine-mediated control of LKB1 expression is particularly relevant in aggressive breast cancer cells, potentially promoting survival under energetically unfavorable conditions. PMID:24913037

  19. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p < 0.001) and associated with CD163+ macrophages (p < 0.0001), poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.021) and significantly increased numbers of TGF-α+ cells. While G-CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  20. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein (PTHrP) receptor expression and mitogenic responses in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, M. A.; Carron, J. A.; Scott, M.; Fraser, W. D.; Gallagher, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Previous reports have shown the production of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) by breast cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. We have investigated the expression of the PTH/PTHrP receptor by the human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, ZR-75-1, T-47-D, SK-BR-3, Hs578T and MDA-MB231. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blot analysis, we detected transcripts for the receptor in MCF-7, SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB231 cells. There was no evidence of receptor mRNA in ZR-75-1 and Hs578T cells. Furthermore, Northern blot analysis of mRNA from MCF-7 cells showed two transcripts of 1.5 and 2.4 kb which coded for the PTH/PTHrP receptor. Expression of PTH/PTHrP receptor mRNA by the breast cancer cell lines was also correlated with the detection of PTHrP transcripts. RT-PCR demonstrated PTHrP mRNA in MCF-7, ZR-75-1, T-47-D and Hs578T cells, but not in SK-BR-3 and MDA-MB231 cells. The detection of receptor transcripts was complemented by [3H]thymidine and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation studies, in which mitogenic responses to PTH and PTHrP were observed in MCF-7 cells but not in Hs578T cells. In response to both PTH(1-34) and PTHrP(1-34), quiescent MCF-7 cells proliferated in a similar dose-dependent manner (1.6-100 ng ml-1). No mitogenic effects of these peptides were observed with Hs578T cells. In addition, levels of intracellular cAMP were measured in MCF-7 and Hs578T cells in response to PTHrP(1-34). In MCF-7 cells there was a significant rise in cAMP with 100 ng ml-1 PTHrP(1-34). The expression of PTH/PTHrP receptor by breast cancer cells suggests that PTHrP may be a paracrine/autocrine regulator of breast carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7599071

  1. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 2. Structure, phosphorylation, and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.L.; Sheridan, P.L.; Krett, N.L.; Francis, M.D.; Toft, D.O.; Edwards, D.P.; Horwitz, K.B.

    1987-09-22

    The authors have used a monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against chick oviduct progesterone receptors (PR), that cross-reacts with human PR, to analyze PR structure and phosphorylation. This MAb, designated PR-6, interacts only with B receptors (M/sub r/ 120,000) of T47D human breast cancer cells; it has no affinity for A receptors (M/sub r/ 94,000) or for proteolytic fragments from either protein. The antibody immunoprecipitates native B receptors and was used to study the structure of native untransformed 8S and transformed 4S receptors, using sucrose density gradient analysis, photoaffinity labeling, and gel electrophoresis. The independence of A- and B-receptor complexes was confirmed by the fining that purified, transformed B receptors bind well to DNA-cellulose. Additional studies focused on the covalent modifications of receptors. The previously described shifts in apparent molecular weight of nuclear PR following R5020 treatment using in situ photoaffinity labeling. To show whether these shifts can be explained by receptor phosphorylation, untreated cells and hormone-treated cells were metabolically labeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, and the B receptors were isolated by immunoprecipitation with PR-6 and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. In both treatment states, B receptors were labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P, thus demonstrating directly that human PR are phosphoproteins. Since B receptors were labeled in the absence of hormone and also after their in vivo transformation by hormone, they appear to be substrates for two phosphorylation reactions, one in the untransformed state and another after they are tightly bound to chromatin. The second phosphorylation may account for the mobility shift of the receptors on SDS gels. On the basis of these data a model of human PR structure and subcellular receptor dynamics is presented.

  2. Mouse mammary tumor virus chromatin in human breast cancer cells is constitutively hypersensitive and exhibits steroid hormone-independent loading of transcription factors in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Mymryk, J S; Berard, D; Hager, G L; Archer, T K

    1995-01-01

    We have stably introduced a reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) into human T47D breast cancer cells to study the action of the progesterone receptor (PR) on transcription from a chromatin template. Unexpectedly, the chromatin organization of the MMTV LTR in these human breast cancer cells differed markedly from what we have observed previously. The region adjacent to the transcription start site (-221 to -75) was found to be constitutively hypersensitive to restriction enzyme cleavage in the absence of hormone. This region is normally encompassed within the second nucleosome of a phased array of six nucleosomes that is assembled when the MMTV LTR is stably maintained in mouse cells. Characteristically, in these rodent cells, the identical DNA sequences show increased restriction enzyme cleavage only in the presence of glucocorticoid. The increased access of restriction enzymes observed in the human PR+ cells was not observed in adjacent nucleosomes and was unaffected by treatment with the progesterone antagonist RU486. In addition, exonuclease III-dependent stops corresponding to the binding sites for nuclear factor 1 and the PR were observed before and after hormone treatment. These results indicate that MMTV chromatin replicated in these cells is organized into a constitutively open architecture and that this open chromatin state is accompanied by hormone-independent loading of a transcription factor complex that is normally excluded from uninduced chromatin. PMID:7799933

  3. Early estrogen-induced metabolic changes and their inhibition by actinomycin D and cycloheximide in human breast cancer cells: sup 31 P and sup 13 C NMR studies

    SciTech Connect

    Neeman, M.; Degani, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Metabolic changes following estrogen stimulation and the inhibition of these changes in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide were monitored continuously in perfused human breast cancer T47D clone 11 cells with {sup 31}P and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. The experiments were performed by estrogen rescue of tamoxifen-treated cells. Immediately after perfusion with estrogen-containing medium, a continuous enhancement in the rates of glucose consumption, lactate production by glycolysis, and glutamate synthesis by the Krebs cycle occurred with a persistent 2-fold increase at 4 hr. Pretreatment with either actinomycin D or cycloheximide, at concentrations known to inhibit mRNA and protein synthesis, respectively, and simultaneous treatment with estrogen and each inhibitor prevented the estrogen-induced changes in glucose metabolism. This suggested that the observed estrogen stimulation required synthesis of mRNA and protein. These inhibitors also modulated several metabolic activities that were not related to estrogen stimulation. The observed changes in the in vivo kinetics of glucose metabolism may provide a means for the early detection of the response of human breast cancer cells to estrogen versus tamoxifen treatment.

  4. Essiac? and Flor-Essence? herbal tonics stimulate the in vitro growth of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, K S; Montgomery, J L; McLimans, B; Latham, E R; Shattuck, D L; Klotz, D M; Bennett, L M

    2005-10-07

    People diagnosed with cancer often self-administer complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) to supplement their conventional treatments, improve health, or prevent recurrence. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} Herbal Tonics are commercially available complex mixtures of herbal extracts sold as dietary supplements and used by cancer patients based on anecdotal evidence that they can treat or prevent disease. In this study, we evaluated Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} for their effects on the growth of human tumor cells in culture. The effect of Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} herbal tonics on cell proliferation was tested in MCF-7, MDA-MB-436, MDA-MB-231, and T47D cancer cells isolated from human breast tumors. Estrogen receptor (ER) dependent activation of a luciferase reporter construct was tested in MCF-7 cells. Specific binding to the ER was tested using an ICI 182,780 competition assay. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} herbal tonics at 1%, 2%, 4% and 8% stimulated cell proliferation relative to untreated controls and activated ER dependent luciferase activity in MCF-7 cells. A 10{sup -7} M concentration of ICI 870,780 inhibited the induction of ER dependent luciferase activity by Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign}, but did not affect cell proliferation. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} Herbal Tonics can stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells through ER mediated as well as ER independent mechanisms of action. Cancer patients and health care providers can use this information to make informed decisions about the use of these CAMs.

  5. Human breast cancer cells and normal mammary epithelial cells: retinol metabolism and growth inhibition by the retinol metabolite 4-oxoretinol.

    PubMed

    Chen, A C; Guo, X; Derguini, F; Gudas, L J

    1997-10-15

    To understand the signaling and growth-inhibitory effects of retinoids, we have examined the metabolism of [3H]retinol in a number of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor-negative (ER-) human breast cancer cell lines. We have also assayed the metabolism of [3H]retinol in normal human mammary epithelial cells. The ER+ breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D produce [3H]4-oxoretinol from [3H]retinol; the production of [3H]4-oxoretinol is increased by initial culture in the presence of nonradiolabeled retinoic acid (RA) or N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide, indicating that these drugs enhance [3H]retinol metabolism to [3H]4-oxoretinol. No metabolism of [3H]retinol to [3H]RA in these ER+ tumor lines was detected. ER- breast cancer lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, and BT20 do not metabolize [3H]retinol to [3H]4-oxoretinol. In the ER- tumor lines, most of the [3H]retinol remains unmetabolized during the 24-h culture period; MDA-MB-468 and BT20 metabolize some [3H]retinol to [3H]RA. Unlike the majority of the tumor lines, the normal human breast epithelial cell strains AD074 and MCF10A rapidly metabolize [3H]retinol to [3H]retinyl esters. No detectable [3H]RA is produced from [3H]retinol in AD074 and MCF10A cells. Thus, the normal breast epithelial strains, the ER+ tumor lines and the ER- tumor lines differ greatly in their pathways of [3H]retinol metabolism. The levels of cellular retinol binding protein-I mRNA expression are not correlated with the levels or types of various retinol metabolites. Whereas the normal breast epithelial cells and the ER+ tumor lines are growth inhibited by RA, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide, and 4-oxoretinol, only the 4-oxoretinol is growth inhibitory in the ER- tumor lines. The cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II mRNA levels are not correlated with the growth inhibition by RA or 4-oxoretinol in the normal and tumor lines. PMID:9377581

  6. [Effect of carnosol against proliferative activity of breast cancer cells and its estrogen receptor subtype's mediation and regulation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pi-Wen; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Ma, Zhong-Ze; Sun, Yan-Ling; Tao, Shi-Ying; Zang, Jin-Feng; Niu, Jian-Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Carnosol has been proved to have anti-breast cancer effect in previous research. But its ER subtype's specific regulation and mediation mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study is to observe the effect of carnosol on cell proliferation and its estrogen receptor ? and ?'s specific regulation and mediation mechanisms with ER positive breast cancer T47D cell. With estrogen receptor ? and ? antagonists MPP and PHTPP as tools, the MTT cell proliferation assay was performed to observe the effect of carnosol on T47D cell proliferation. The changes in the T47D cell proliferation cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The effect of carnosol on ER? and ER? expressions of T47D cells was measured by Western blot. The findings showed that 1 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1) carnosol could significantly inhibit the T47D cell proliferation, which could be enhanced by MPP or weakened by PHTPP. Meanwhile, 1 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) or 1 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) carnosol could significantly increase ER? and ER? expressions of T47D cells, and remarkably increase ER?/ER? ratio. The results showed that carnosol showed the inhibitory effect on the proliferation of ER positive breast cancer cells through target cell ER, especially ER? pathway. In the meantime, carnosol could regulate expressions and proportions of target cell ER subtype ER? and ER?. PMID:25522625

  7. Real-Time Growth Kinetics Measuring Hormone Mimicry for ToxCast Chemicals in T?47D Human Ductal Carcinoma Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays capable of profiling thousands of environmentally relevant chemicals for in vitro biological activity provide useful information on the potential for disrupting endocrine pathways. Disruption of the estrogen signaling pathway has been implic...

  8. Part I. Molecular and cellular characterization of high nitric oxide-adapted human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vesper, B J; Onul, A; Haines, G K; Tarjan, G; Xue, J; Elseth, K M; Aydogan, B; Altman, M B; Roeske, J C; Paradise, W A; De Vitto, H; Radosevich, J A

    2013-02-01

    There is a lack of understanding of the casual mechanisms behind the observation that some breast adenocarcinomas have identical morphology and comparatively different cellular growth behavior. This is exemplified by a differential response to radiation, chemotherapy, and other biological intervention therapies. Elevated concentrations of the free radical nitric oxide (NO), coupled with the up-regulated enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS) which produces NO, are activities which impact tumor growth. Previously, we adapted four human breast cancer cell lines: BT-20, Hs578T, T-47D, and MCF-7 to elevated concentrations of nitric oxide (or high NO [HNO]). This was accomplished by exposing the cell lines to increasing levels of an NO donor over time. Significantly, the HNO cell lines grew faster than did each respective ("PARENT") cell line even in the absence of NO donor-supplemented media. This was evident despite each "parent" being morphologically equivalent to the HNO adapted cell line. Herein, we characterize the HNO cells and their biological attributes against those of the parent cells. Pairs of HNO/parent cell lines were then analyzed using a number of key cellular activity criteria including: cell cycle distribution, DNA ploidy, response to DNA damage, UV radiation response, X-ray radiation response, and the expression of significant cellular enzymes. Other key enzyme activities studied were NOS, p53, and glutathione S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) expression. HNO cells were typified by a far more aggressive pattern of growth and resistance to various treatments than the corresponding parent cells. This was evidenced by a higher S-phase percentage, variable radioresistance, and up-regulated GST-pi and p53. Taken collectively, this data provides evidence that cancer cells subjected to HNO concentrations become resistant to free radicals such as NO via up-regulated cellular defense mechanisms, including p53 and GST-pi. The adaptation to NO may explain how tumor cells acquire a more aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:23238815

  9. The nucleoside antagonist cordycepin causes DNA double strand breaks in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Jue; Burger, Petra; Vogel, Marianne; Friese, Klaus; Brüning, Ansgar

    2012-10-01

    The fungal drug cordycepin (3-deoxyadenosine) is known to exert anti-tumor activities, preferentially by interfering with RNA synthesis. We have investigated the effect of cordycepin on human breast epithelial cell lines, ranging from non-malignant MCF10A cells to highly de-differentiated MDA-MB-435 cancer cells. Treatment of human breast cancer cells with cordycepin caused either apoptosis or persistent cell cycle arrest that was associated with reduced clonal growth of cordycepin-treated breast cancer cells. Highly de-differentiated breast cancer cell lines, such as MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, reacted more sensitive to cordycepin than less aggressive breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D) or non-malignant breast epithelial cells (MCF10A), which poorly reacted to cordycepin. In cordycepin-sensitive breast cancer cells, a marked induction of the DNA damage response (DDR), including the phosphorylation of ATM, ATR, and histone γH2AX could be observed. These data indicate that cordycepin, which was believed to cause cancer cell death by inhibition of RNA synthesis, induces DNA double strand breaks in breast cancer cells. The genotoxic effect of cordycepin on breast cancer cells indicates a new mechanism of cordycepin-induced cancer cell death, and its activity against highly undifferentiated breast cancer cells provides a new perspective of how cordycepin may be used in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. PMID:22821173

  10. The effectiveness of nano chemotherapeutic particles combined with mifepristone depends on the PR isoform ratio in preclinical models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Paola; Lamb, Caroline; Colombo, Lucas; May, María; Molinolo, Alfredo; Lanari, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    There is clinical and experimental evidence suggesting that antiprogestins might be used for the treatment of selected breast cancer patients. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of albumin-bound paclitaxel (Nab-paclitaxel) and pegylated doxorubicin liposomes (PEG-LD) in combination with mifepristone (MFP) in experimental breast cancer models expressing different ratios of progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms A and B. We used two antiprogestin-responsive (PRA>PRB) and two resistant (PRAhuman T47D-YA and T47D-YB xenografts growing in immunocompromised NSG mice. MFP improved the therapeutic effects of suboptimal doses of Nab-paclitaxel or PEG-LD in murine and human carcinomas with higher levels of PRA than PRB. MFP induced tissue remodeling in PRA-overexpressing tumors, increasing the stromal/tumor cell ratio and the number of functional vessels. Accordingly, an increase in nanoparticles and drug accumulation was observed in stromal and tumor cells in MFP-treated tumors. We conclude that MFP induces an increase in vessels during tissue remodeling, favoring the selective accumulation of nanoparticles inside the tumors. We propose that antiprogestins have the potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy in breast tumors with a high PRA/PRB ratio. PMID:24912774

  11. MiR-221 promotes stemness of breast cancer cells by targeting DNMT3b

    PubMed Central

    Roscigno, Giuseppina; Quintavalle, Cristina; Donnarumma, Elvira; Puoti, Ilaria; Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Iaboni, Margherita; Fiore, Danilo; Russo, Valentina; Todaro, Matilde; Romano, Giulia; Thomas, Renato; Cortino, Giuseppina; Gaggianesi, Miriam; Esteller, Manel; Croce, Carlo M.; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small part of the heterogeneous tumor cell population possessing self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential as well as a great ability to sustain tumorigenesis. The molecular pathways underlying CSC phenotype are not yet well characterized. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that play a powerful role in biological processes. Early studies have linked miRs to the control of self-renewal and differentiation in normal and cancer stem cells. We aimed to study the functional role of miRs in human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), also named mammospheres. We found that miR-221 was upregulated in BCSCs compared to their differentiated counterpart. Similarly, mammospheres from T47D cells had an increased level of miR-221 compared to differentiated cells. Transfection of miR-221 in T47D cells increased the number of mammospheres and the expression of stem cell markers. Among miR-221's targets, we identified DNMT3b. Furthermore, in BCSCs we found that DNMT3b repressed the expression of various stemness genes, such as Nanog and Oct 3/4, acting on the methylation of their promoters, partially reverting the effect of miR-221 on stemness. We hypothesize that miR-221 contributes to breast cancer tumorigenicity by regulating stemness, at least in part through the control of DNMT3b expression. PMID:26556862

  12. MiR-221 promotes stemness of breast cancer cells by targeting DNMT3b.

    PubMed

    Roscigno, Giuseppina; Quintavalle, Cristina; Donnarumma, Elvira; Puoti, Ilaria; Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Iaboni, Margherita; Fiore, Danilo; Russo, Valentina; Todaro, Matilde; Romano, Giulia; Thomas, Renato; Cortino, Giuseppina; Gaggianesi, Miriam; Esteller, Manel; Croce, Carlo M; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small part of the heterogeneous tumor cell population possessing self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential as well as a great ability to sustain tumorigenesis. The molecular pathways underlying CSC phenotype are not yet well characterized. MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that play a powerful role in biological processes. Early studies have linked miRs to the control of self-renewal and differentiation in normal and cancer stem cells. We aimed to study the functional role of miRs in human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), also named mammospheres. We found that miR-221 was upregulated in BCSCs compared to their differentiated counterpart. Similarly, mammospheres from T47D cells had an increased level of miR-221 compared to differentiated cells. Transfection of miR-221 in T47D cells increased the number of mammospheres and the expression of stem cell markers. Among miR-221's targets, we identified DNMT3b. Furthermore, in BCSCs we found that DNMT3b repressed the expression of various stemness genes, such as Nanog and Oct 3/4, acting on the methylation of their promoters, partially reverting the effect of miR-221 on stemness. We hypothesize that miR-221 contributes to breast cancer tumorigenicity by regulating stemness, at least in part through the control of DNMT3b expression. PMID:26556862

  13. Modulation of the uptake of critical nutrients by breast cancer cells by lactate: Impact on cell survival, proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Marta; Arajo, Joo R; Correia-Branco, Ana; Gregrio, Ins; Martel, Ftima; Keating, Elisa

    2016-02-15

    This work aimed to characterize the uptake of folate and glucose by breast cancer cells and to study the effect of lactate upon the transport of these nutrients and upon cell viability, proliferation and migration capacity. Data obtained showed that: a) MCF7 cells uptake (3)H-folic acid ((3)H-FA) at physiological but not at acidic pH; b) T47D cells accumulate (3)H-FA and (14)C-5-methyltetrahydrofolate ((14)C-5-MTHF) more efficiently at acidic than at physiological pH; c) (3)H-deoxyglucose ((3)H-DG) uptake by T47D cells is sodium-independent, inhibited by cytochalasin B (CYT B) and stimulated by insulin. Regarding the effect of lactate, in T47D cells, acute (26min) and chronic (24h) exposure to lactic acid (LA) stimulated (3)H-FA uptake. Acute exposure to LA also stimulated (3)H-DG uptake and chronic exposure to LA significantly stimulated T47D cell migratory capacity. In conclusion, the transport of folates is strikingly different in two phenotypically similar breast cancer cell lines: MCF7 and T47D cells. Additionally, lactate seems to act as a signaling molecule which increases the uptake of nutrients and promotes the migration capacity of T47D cells. PMID:26794902

  14. Prolactin Inhibits BCL6 Expression in Breast Cancer Cells through a MicroRNA-339-5p-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Zhao, Min; Huang, Shan; Chen, Ping; Wu, Wen-yong; Huang, Jin; Wu, Zheng-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prolactin (PRL) plays a critical role in breast cancer progression by activating its cognate receptor and promotes the growth and differentiation of breast cancer cells. Studies have shown that B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) is the target gene of microRNA-339-5p (miR-339-5p) and that BCL6 expression contributes to breast cancer progression. Herein, we identified PRL as a potent suppressor of BCL6 expression in human breast cancer cells. Methods Western blotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying miR-339-5p expression and BCL6 manipulation in MCF-7, T47D, and SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Phenotypic changes in these breast cancer cell lines were assessed by performing cell viability (MTT), colony formation, migration, and invasion assays. Results PRL suppressed BCL6 protein and mRNA expression and upregulated miR-339-5p expression in MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells. Selective downregulation of miR-339-5p expression significantly reversed PRL-induced suppression of BCL6 mRNA and protein expression. Exogenous PRL stimulation significantly decreased the proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells, and suppression of miR-339-5p expression reversed these processes in vitro. Conclusion These results indicated that PRL inhibited BCL6 expression and regulated breast cancer progression through a miR-339-5p-dependent pathway. PMID:27066093

  15. The Human Cell Surfaceome of Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Júlia Pinheiro Chagas; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Pieprzyk, Martin; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Old, Lloyd J.; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; de Souza, Sandro José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cell surface proteins are ideal targets for cancer therapy and diagnosis. We have identified a set of more than 3700 genes that code for transmembrane proteins believed to be at human cell surface. Methods. We used a high-throuput qPCR system for the analysis of 573 cell surface protein-coding genes in 12 primary breast tumors, 8 breast cell lines, and 21 normal human tissues including breast. To better understand the role of these genes in breast tumors, we used a series of bioinformatics strategies to integrates different type, of the datasets, such as KEGG, protein-protein interaction databases, ONCOMINE, and data from, literature. Results. We found that at least 77 genes are overexpressed in breast primary tumors while at least 2 of them have also a restricted expression pattern in normal tissues. We found common signaling pathways that may be regulated in breast tumors through the overexpression of these cell surface protein-coding genes. Furthermore, a comparison was made between the genes found in this report and other genes associated with features clinically relevant for breast tumorigenesis. Conclusions. The expression profiling generated in this study, together with an integrative bioinformatics analysis, allowed us to identify putative targets for breast tumors. PMID:24195083

  16. Modeling mixtures of environmental estrogens found in U.S. surface waters with an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptionai activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipa...

  17. Retinoic acid reduces migration of human breast cancer cells: role of retinoic acid receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Marina Ines; Gauna, Gisel Valeria; Sottile, Mayra Lis; Nadin, Beatriz Silvina; Sanchez, Angel Matias; Vargas-Roig, Laura Maria

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and the appearance of distant metastases produces the death in 98% of cases. The retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) is not expressed in 50% of invasive breast carcinoma compared with normal tissue and it has been associated with lymph node metastasis. Our hypothesis is that RARβ protein participates in the metastatic process. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines were used to perform viability assay, immunobloting, migration assays, RNA interference and immunofluorescence. Administration of retinoic acid (RA) in breast cancer cells induced RARβ gene expression that was greatest after 72 hrs with a concentration 1 μM. High concentrations of RA increased the expression of RARβ causing an inhibition of the 60% in cell migration and significantly decreased the expression of migration-related proteins [moesin, c-Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)]. The treatment with RARα and RARγ agonists did not affect the cell migration. On the contrary, the addition of the selective retinoid RARβ-agonist (BMS453) significantly reduced cell migration comparable to RA inhibition. When RARβ gene silencing was performed, the RA failed to significantly inhibit migration and resulted ineffective to reduce moesin, c-Src and FAK expressions. RARβ is necessary to inhibit migration induced by RA in breast cancer cells modulating the expression of proteins involved in cell migration. PMID:24720764

  18. Epigenetic Effects of Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Verduci, Elvira; Banderali, Giuseppe; Barberi, Salvatore; Radaelli, Giovanni; Lops, Alessandra; Betti, Federica; Riva, Enrica; Giovannini, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    A current aim of nutrigenetics is to personalize nutritional practices according to genetic variations that influence the way of digestion and metabolism of nutrients introduced with the diet. Nutritional epigenetics concerns knowledge about the effects of nutrients on gene expression. Nutrition in early life or in critical periods of development, may have a role in modulating gene expression, and, therefore, have later effects on health. Human breast milk is well-known for its ability in preventing several acute and chronic diseases. Indeed, breastfed children may have lower risk of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, and also of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity and related-disorders. Beneficial effects of human breast milk on health may be associated in part with its peculiar components, possible also via epigenetic processes. This paper discusses about presumed epigenetic effects of human breast milk and components. While evidence suggests that a direct relationship may exist of some components of human breast milk with epigenetic changes, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. Studies have to be conducted to clarify the actual role of human breast milk on genetic expression, in particular when linked to the risk of non-communicable diseases, to potentially benefit the infant’s health and his later life. PMID:24763114

  19. Epigenetic effects of human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Verduci, Elvira; Banderali, Giuseppe; Barberi, Salvatore; Radaelli, Giovanni; Lops, Alessandra; Betti, Federica; Riva, Enrica; Giovannini, Marcello

    2014-04-01

    A current aim of nutrigenetics is to personalize nutritional practices according to genetic variations that influence the way of digestion and metabolism of nutrients introduced with the diet. Nutritional epigenetics concerns knowledge about the effects of nutrients on gene expression. Nutrition in early life or in critical periods of development, may have a role in modulating gene expression, and, therefore, have later effects on health. Human breast milk is well-known for its ability in preventing several acute and chronic diseases. Indeed, breastfed children may have lower risk of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, and also of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity and related-disorders. Beneficial effects of human breast milk on health may be associated in part with its peculiar components, possible also via epigenetic processes. This paper discusses about presumed epigenetic effects of human breast milk and components. While evidence suggests that a direct relationship may exist of some components of human breast milk with epigenetic changes, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. Studies have to be conducted to clarify the actual role of human breast milk on genetic expression, in particular when linked to the risk of non-communicable diseases, to potentially benefit the infant's health and his later life. PMID:24763114

  20. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  1. Metabolic perturbation sensitizes human breast cancer to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by increasing the expression of MHC class I chain-related A/B

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dexue; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Karthikeyan, Swathi; Miller, Eliyahu; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Wang, Zhijun; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2015-01-01

    Cleavage or shedding of the surface antigen, MHC class I chain-related (MIC) protein (A/B) has been known to be one of the mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immune surveillance. Thus, any strategy to augment the surface expression of MICA/B could facilitate anticancer immune response. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic perturbation by the glycolytic inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) augments the surface expression of MICA/B in human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and T47D. Data from in vitro studies show that a non-toxic, low-dose of 3-BrPA is sufficient to perturb energy metabolism, as evident by the activation of p-AMPK, p-AKT and p-PI3K. Further, 3-BrPA-treatment also elevated the levels of MICA/B in human breast cancer cell lines. Significantly, 3-BrPA-dependent increase in MICA/B levels also enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to natural killer (NK-92MI)-mediated cytotoxicity. In vivo, 3-BrPA-pretreated cells demonstrated greater sensitivity to NK-92MI therapy than their respective controls. The antitumor effect was confirmed by a reduction in tumor size and decreased tumor viability as observed by bioluminescence imaging. Histological examination and TUNEL staining demonstrated that NK-92MI administration promoted apoptosis in 3-BrPA-pretreated cells. Taken together, our data show that targeting energy metabolism could be a novel strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer immunotherapeutics. PMID:25949910

  2. Antimanic drug sensitizes breast cancer cell line to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Maryam; Goliaei, Bahram; Khodagholi, Fariba; Nikoofar, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer among women. Lithium chloride (LiCl) is an FDA-approved drug for bipolar disorder. Breast cancer is reported to occur with higher rate in women with bipolar disorder. The effect of LiCl on the response of breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation has not been studied. We studied the effect of LiCl on the radiosensitivity of radioresistant T47D breast cancer cell line. Treatment of T47D cells with 20 mM LiCl for 24 hours decreased the radioresistance of these cells indicated by clonogenic survival assay. Comet assay demonstrated decreased DNA repair in LiCl-treated cells. LiCl treatment also decreased the meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11) mRNA level. Mre11 is an essential protein for DNA repair whose transcription is regulated by β-catenin protein. Western blot analysis indicated that the β-catenin protein level was decreased in LiCl-treated cells. LiCl increased glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) protein that is involved in β-catenin degradation. The results demonstrated that LiCl could radiosensitize T47D cells by decreasing DNA repair, partially through Mre11 repression. GSK-3β/β-catenin/Mre11 pathway might be the connection between LiCl treatment and the decreased DNA repair in T47D cells. PMID:24448371

  3. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer. PMID:25572806

  4. N-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids shift estrogen signaling to inhibit human breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenqing; Ma, ZhiFan; Rasenick, Mark M; Yeh, ShuYan; Yu, JiangZhou

    2012-01-01

    Although evidence has shown the regulating effect of n-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) on cell signaling transduction, it remains unknown whether n-3 PUFA treatment modulates estrogen signaling. The current study showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5) shifted the pro-survival and proliferative effect of estrogen to a pro-apoptotic effect in human breast cancer (BCa) MCF-7 and T47D cells. 17 β-estradiol (E2) enhanced the inhibitory effect of n-3 PUFAs on BCa cell growth. The IC50 of DHA or EPA in MCF-7 cells decreased when combined with E2 (10 nM) treatment (from 173 µM for DHA only to 113 µM for DHA+E2, and from 187 µm for EPA only to 130 µm for EPA+E2). E2 also augmented apoptosis in n-3 PUFA-treated BCa cells. In contrast, in cells treated with stearic acid (SA, C18:0) as well as cells not treated with fatty acid, E2 promoted breast cancer cell growth. Classical (nuclear) estrogen receptors may not be involved in the pro-apoptotic effects of E2 on the n-3 PUFA-treated BCa cells because ERα agonist failed to elicit, and ERα knockdown failed to block E2 pro-apoptotic effects. Subsequent studies reveal that G protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) may mediate the pro-apoptotic effect of estrogen. N-3 PUFA treatment initiated the pro-apoptotic signaling of estrogen by increasing GPER1-cAMP-PKA signaling response, and blunting EGFR, Erk 1/2, and AKT activity. These findings may not only provide the evidence to link n-3 PUFAs biologic effects and the pro-apoptotic signaling of estrogen in breast cancer cells, but also shed new insight into the potential application of n-3 PUFAs in BCa treatment. PMID:23285198

  5. Blockade of transforming growth factor-beta signaling does not abrogate antiestrogen-induced growth inhibition of human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koli, K M; Ramsey, T T; Ko, Y; Dugger, T C; Brattain, M G; Arteaga, C L

    1997-03-28

    We have studied the role of autocrine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling on antiestrogen-mediated growth inhibition of hormone-dependent T47D and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells. Tamoxifen treatment increased the secretion of TGF-beta activity into serum-free cell medium and the cellular content of affinity cross-linked type I and III TGF-beta receptors in both cell lines. Anti-pan-TGF-beta antibodies did not block anti-estrogen-induced recruitment in G1 and inhibition of anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of both cell lines. Early passage MCF-7 cells, which exhibit detectable type II TGF-beta receptors at the cell surface and exquisite sensitivity to exogenous TGF-beta1, were transfected with a tetracycline-controllable dominant-negative TGF-betaRII (DeltaRII) construct. Although the TGF-beta1 response was blocked by removal of tetracycline in MCF-7/DeltaRII cells, tamoxifen-mediated suppression of Rb phosphorylation, recruitment in G1, and inhibition of cell proliferation were identical in the presence and absence of tetracycline. TGF-beta1 treatment up-regulated the Cdk inhibitor p21 and induced its association with Cdk2 in MCF-7 cells; these responses were blocked by the DeltaRII transgene product. In MCF-7 cells with a functional TGF-beta signaling pathway, tamoxifen did not up-regulate p21 nor did it induce association of p21 with Cdk2, suggesting alternative mechanisms for antiestrogen-mediated cytostasis. Finally, transfection of late-passage, TGF-beta1 unresponsive MCF-7 cells with high levels of TGF-betaRII restored TGF-beta1-induced growth inhibition but did not enhance tamoxifen response in culture. Taken together these data strongly argue against any role for TGF-beta signaling on tamoxifen-mediated growth inhibition of hormone-dependent breast cancer cells. PMID:9079651

  6. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on progestin stimulation of invasive properties in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael R; King, Rebecca A

    2012-12-01

    Clinical studies have shown that progestins increase breast cancer risk in hormone replacement therapy, while we and others have previously reported that progestins stimulate invasive properties in progesterone receptor (PR)-rich human breast cancer cell lines. Based on others' reports that omega-3 fatty acids inhibit metastatic properties of breast cancer, we have reviewed the literature for possible connections between omega-3 fatty-acid-driven pathways and progestin-stimulated pathways in an attempt to suggest theoretical mechanisms for possible omega-3 fatty acid inhibition of progestin stimulation of breast cancer invasion. We also present some data suggesting that fatty acids regulate progestin stimulation of invasive properties in PR-rich T47D human breast cancer cells, and that an appropriate concentration of the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits progestin stimulation of invasive properties. It is hoped that focus on the inter-relationship between pathways by which omega-3 fatty acids inhibit and progestins stimulate breast cancer invasive properties will lead to further in vitro, in vivo, and clinical studies testing the hypothesis that omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit progestin stimulation of invasive properties in breast cancer, and ameliorate harmful effects of progestins which occur in combined progestin-estrogen hormone replacement therapy. PMID:22833172

  7. The PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 triad in human breast cancer: Functional link between elevated Sac3 phosphatase and enhanced proliferation of triple negative cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ikonomov, Ognian C. Filios, Catherine Sbrissa, Diego Chen, Xuequn Shisheva, Assia

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •We assess PAS complex proteins and phosphoinositide levels in breast cancer cells. •Sac3 and ArPIKfyve are markedly elevated in triple-negative breast cancer cells. •Sac3 silencing inhibits proliferation in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. •Phosphoinositide profiles are altered in breast cancer cells. •This is the first evidence linking high Sac3 with breast cancer cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The phosphoinositide 5-kinase PIKfyve and 5-phosphatase Sac3 are scaffolded by ArPIKfyve in the PIKfyve–ArPIKfyve–Sac3 (PAS) regulatory complex to trigger a unique loop of PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} synthesis and turnover. Whereas the metabolizing enzymes of the other 3-phosphoinositides have already been implicated in breast cancer, the role of the PAS proteins and the PtdIns3P–PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} conversion is unknown. To begin elucidating their roles, in this study we monitored the endogenous levels of the PAS complex proteins in cell lines derived from hormone-receptor positive (MCF7 and T47D) or triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) (BT20, BT549 and MDA-MB-231) as well as in MCF10A cells derived from non-tumorigenic mastectomy. We report profound upregulation of Sac3 and ArPIKfyve in the triple negative vs. hormone-sensitive breast cancer or non-tumorigenic cells, with BT cell lines showing the highest levels. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Sac3, but not that of PIKfyve, significantly inhibited proliferation of BT20 and BT549 cells. In these cells, knockdown of ArPIKfyve had only a minor effect, consistent with a primary role for Sac3 in TNBC cell proliferation. Intriguingly, steady-state levels of PtdIns(3,5)P{sub 2} in BT20 and T47D cells were similar despite the 6-fold difference in Sac3 levels between these cell lines. However, steady-state levels of PtdIns3P and PtdIns5P, both regulated by the PAS complex, were significantly reduced in BT20 vs. T47D or MCF10A cell lines, consistent with elevated Sac3 affecting directly or indirectly the homeostasis of these lipids in TNBC. Together, our results uncover an unexpected role for Sac3 phosphatase in TNBC cell proliferation. Database analyses, discussed herein, reinforce the involvement of Sac3 in breast cancer pathogenesis.

  8. Excretion of drugs in human breast milk

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, R.M.; Findlay, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The present report briefly discusses some of the morphological, physiological, and compositional aspects of animal and human breast milk and how these characteristics might be important for the accumulation of drugs and foreign compounds. In addition, a study is described confirming the presence of caffeine, codeine, morphine, phenacetin, acetaminophen, and salicylic acid in the breast milk of a lactating mother following oral administration of a combination analgesic containing aspirin, phenacetin, caffeine, and codeine. Although the study is limited to one subject, it has provided critically needed data on the rates of appearance in, and elimination of these drugs from, breast milk. A similar amount of information is presented on phenacetin, also a component of the analgesic mixture, which has not been previously reported to enter human milk. The distribution of these drugs between the slightly more acidic breast milk and the relatively neutral plasma is consistent with their weakly basic, acidic, or relatively neutral properties. In general, the study shows that codeine and morphine milk concentrations are higher than, salicylic acid milk levels are much lower than, and phenacetin, caffeine, and acetaminophen milk concentrations are relatively similar to their respective plasma levels. It is projected, from estimated steady-state milk concentrations of the drugs and their metabolites studied, that very low percentages of the therapeutic dosages (less than 0.7%) would be excreted in mother's milk, too low an amount to be clinically significant to the infant.

  9. Chemical Biomarkers of Human Breast Milk Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Massart, Francesco; Gherarducci, Giulia; Marchi, Benedetta; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Human milk is, without question, the best source of nutrition for infants containing the optimal balance of fats, carbohydrates and proteins for developing babies. Breastfeeding provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity and development building a powerful bond between mother and her child. Recognition of the manifold benefits of breast milk has led to the adoption of breast-feeding policies by numerous health and professional organizations such as the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics. In industrially developed as well as in developing nations, human milk contamination by toxic chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins and organohalogen compounds, however, is widespread and is the consequence of decades of inadequately controlled pollution. Through breastfeeding, the mother may transfer to the suckling infant potentially toxic chemicals to which the mother has previously been exposed. In the present review, environmental exposure, acquisition and current levels of old and emerging classes of breast milk pollutants are systematically presented. Although scientific evidences indicated that the advantages of breast-feeding outweigh any risks from contaminants, it is important to identify contaminant trends, to locate disproportionately exposed populations, and to take public health measures to improve chemical BM pollution as possible. PMID:19578503

  10. The role of miR-100 in regulating apoptosis of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; He, Tianliang; Yang, Lu; Yang, Geng; Chen, Yulei; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious health problem worldwide. Inhibition of apoptosis plays a major role in breast cancer tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the regulation of apoptosis. However, the regulation of breast cancer apoptosis by miRNAs has not been intensively investigated. To address this issue, the effect of miR-100 on the cell proliferation of different breast cancer cells was characterized in the present study. The results showed that miR-100 was significantly upregulated in SK-BR-3 cells compared with other human breast cancer cells (MCF7, MDA-MB-453, T47D, HCC1954 and SUM149). Silencing miR-100 expression with anti-miRNA-100 oligonucleotide (AMO-miR-100) initiated apoptosis of SK-BR-3 cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the overexpression of miR-100 led to the proliferation inhibition of the miR-100-downregulated breast cancer cells. Antagonism of miR-100 in SK-BR-3 cells increased the expression of MTMR3, a target gene of miR-100, which resulted in the activation of p27 and eventually led to G2/M cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. The downregulation of miR-100 sensitized SK-BR-3 cells to chemotherapy. Therefore, our finding highlights a novel aspect of the miR-100-MTMR3-p27 pathway in the molecular etiology of breast cancer. PMID:26130569

  11. Oxidized derivative of docosahexaenoic acid preferentially inhibit cell proliferation in triple negative over luminal breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pogash, Thomas J; El-Bayoumy, Karam; Amin, Shantu; Gowda, Krishne; de Cicco, Ricardo López; Barton, Maria; Su, Yanrong; Russo, Irma H; Himmelberger, Julie A; Slifker, Michael; Manni, Andrea; Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert an anticancer effect by affecting multiple cellular mechanisms leading to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. It is well known that breast cancer comprises distinct molecular subtypes which differ in their responsiveness to therapeutic and preventive agents. We tested the hypothesis that n-3FA may preferentially affect triple-negative breast cancer cells for which no targeted intervention is presently available. The in vitro antiproliferative effects of n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its metabolite, 4-OH-DHA as well as its putative metabolite 4-OXO-DHA, were tested in five triple-negative human basal breast cell lines at different stages of transformation (MCF-10F, trMCF, bsMCF, MDA-MB-231, and BT-549) and three luminal breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, and SK-BR-3). Cell proliferation was measured with the tetrazolium MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. DHA and its oxidized derivatives significantly inhibited cell proliferation (20-90% reduction) of both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect was more pronounced on triple-negative basal breast cancer cell lines as compared to luminal breast cancer cell lines after 4-OXO-DHA treatment. Our data provide novel information regarding the preferential antitumor effect of oxidized derivatives of DHA on basal type breast cancer. PMID:25413005

  12. Defining the cellular precursors to human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Patricia J.; Arendt, Lisa M.; Skibinski, Adam; Logvinenko, Tanya; Klebba, Ina; Dong, Shumin; Smith, Avi E.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Gilmore, Hannah; Schnitt, Stuart; Naber, Stephen P.; Garlick, Jonathan A.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Human breast cancers are broadly classified based on their gene-expression profiles into luminal- and basal-type tumors. These two major tumor subtypes express markers corresponding to the major differentiation states of epithelial cells in the breast: luminal (EpCAM+) and basal/myoepithelial (CD10+). However, there are also rare types of breast cancers, such as metaplastic carcinomas, where tumor cells exhibit features of alternate cell types that no longer resemble breast epithelium. Until now, it has been difficult to identify the cell type(s) in the human breast that gives rise to these various forms of breast cancer. Here we report that transformation of EpCAM+ epithelial cells results in the formation of common forms of human breast cancer, including estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative tumors with luminal and basal-like characteristics, respectively, whereas transformation of CD10+ cells results in the development of rare metaplastic tumors reminiscent of the claudin-low subtype. We also demonstrate the existence of CD10+ breast cells with metaplastic traits that can give rise to skin and epidermal tissues. Furthermore, we show that the development of metaplastic breast cancer is attributable, in part, to the transformation of these metaplastic breast epithelial cells. These findings identify normal cellular precursors to human breast cancers and reveal the existence of a population of cells with epidermal progenitor activity within adult human breast tissues. PMID:21940501

  13. Angelica sinensis polysaccharides promotes apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via CREB-regulated caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jie; Wang, Sheng; Hu, Zhuang; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Song, Cai-Juan

    2015-11-20

    Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) is purified from the fresh roots of Angelica sinensis (AS). This traditional Chinese medicine has been used for thousands of years for treating gynecological diseases and used in functional foods for the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as inflammation and cancer. The antitumor activity of ASP is related to its biological activities, because it suppresses a variety of pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic factors that are dramatically expressed in cancer cells of given types. In this study, we show that angelica sinensis polysaccharide induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells of T47D over-expressing the Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), inducing apoptosis-related signaling pathway activity. The result also found that ASP caused cell death was linked to caspase activity, accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, and Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria. We found that ASP significantly affected the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), Bcl-2 Associated X Protein (Bax), Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and apoptotic protease activating facter-1 (Apaf1) protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of ASP in vivo. ASP has profound antitumor effect on T47D cells, probably by inducing apoptosis through CREB signaling pathway. Thus, these results suggest that ASP would be a promising therapeutic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26431878

  14. Effects of biosurfactants on the viability and proliferation of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactants are molecules with surface activity produced by microorganisms that can be used in many biomedical applications. The anti-tumour potential of these molecules is being studied, although results are still scarce and few data are available regarding the mechanisms underlying such activity. In this work, the anti-tumour activity of a surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis 573 and a glycoprotein (BioEG) produced by Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei A20 was evaluated. Both biosurfactants were tested against two breast cancer cell lines, T47D and MDA-MB-231, and a non-tumour fibroblast cell line (MC-3 T3-E1), specifically regarding cell viability and proliferation. Surfactin was found to decrease viability of both breast cancer cell lines studied. A 24 h exposure to 0.05 g l-1 surfactin led to inhibition of cell proliferation as shown by cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. Similarly, exposure of cells to 0.15 g l-1 BioEG for 48 h decreased cancer cells’ viability, without affecting normal fibroblasts. Moreover, BioEG induced the cell cycle arrest at G1 for both breast cancer cell lines. The biosurfactant BioEG was shown to be more active than surfactin against the studied breast cancer cells. The results gathered in this work are very promising regarding the biosurfactants potential for breast cancer treatment and encourage further work with the BioEG glycoprotein. PMID:24949273

  15. Placenta-breast cancer cell interactions promote cancer cell epithelial mesenchymal transition via TGF?/JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Epstein Shochet, Gali; Tartakover-Matalon, Shelly; Drucker, Liat; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Pomeranz, Meir; Fishman, Ami; Lishner, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Women diagnosed with pregnancy associated breast cancer often have advanced cancer with metastases and reduced expression of ER? compared to non-pregnant women. Nevertheless, metastases to the placenta are uncommon. Previously, we demonstrated that breast cancer cells (MCF-7/T47D) migrated from ex vivo human placental explant implantation sites. We aimed to analyze the effect of factors produced during placental implantation or as a result of the interaction between the implanted placentae to cancer cells on cancer cells migration and aggressiveness. We collected supernatants from implanted placentae and placental-breast cancer cells cocultures and analyzed their effects on cancer cells phenotype and pathways. Supernatants collected from breast cancer cells served as controls. We found that supernatants collected from implanted placentae induced modest cancer cells migration that was not accompanied by epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), supported breast cancer cells survival and elevated MCF-7 cell number. The coculture supernatant induced excessive motility and EMT of the MCF-7 cells. This EMT was mediated by Smad3 and JNK/ERK activation. Both placenta and coculture supernatants reduced ER? expression in the cancer cells. Finally, we showed that MCF-7 cocultured with the human placental explants underwent continuous activation of JNK and Smad3 pathways and the EMT process, which led to their migration away from the placental implantation sites. These findings may explain the reduced ER? and elevated metastases found in breast cancer during pregnancy and highlights pathways involved in it. PMID:25316285

  16. Control of sulfatase activity by nomegestrol acetate in normal and cancerous human breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Chetrite, Gérard Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Shields-Botella, Jaqueline; Cortes-Prieto, Joaquin; Philippe, Jean-Claude; Pasqualini, Jorge Raul

    2005-01-01

    Nomegestrol acetate (NOMAC), a 17alpha-hydroxy-nor-progesterone derivative (17alpha-acetoxy-6-methyl-19-nor-4,6-pregnadiene-3,20-dione, the active substance in Lutenyl), is a potent and useful clinical synthetic progestin for the treatment of menopausal complaints and is under current development for oral contraception. Previous studies in this laboratory demonstrated that NOMAC can block sulfatase and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis and transformation of estradiol (E2) in hormone-dependent MCF-7 and T-47D breast cancer cells. In the present study, the effect of NOMAC on sulfatase activity using total breast cancer tissue, compared to the effect in normal breast tissue, was explored. Slices of tumoral or normal breast tissues (45-65 mg) were incubated in buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.2) with physiological concentrations of [3H]-estrone sulfate (5x10(-9) M), alone or in the presence of nomegestrol acetate (5x10(-5) - 5x10(-7) - 5x10(-9) M), for 4 h at 37 degrees C. Estrone sulfate (E1S), estrone (E1) and E2 were characterized by thin layer chromatography and quantified using the corresponding standard. It was observed that [3H]- E1S was only converted to [3H]- E1 and not to [3H]- E2, in normal or cancerous breast tissues, which suggests a low or no 17beta-HSD activity under these experimental conditions. The sulfatase activity was more intense with breast cancer tissue than normal tissue, since the concentrations of E1 were 42.5 +/- 3.4 and 27.2 +/- 2.5 pg/mg tissue, respectively. NOMAC, at the concentration of 5x10(-5) M, inhibited this conversion by 49.2% and 40.8% in cancerous and normal breast tissues, respectively. The sulfatase inhibition at low concentration (5x10(-7) M) was 32.5% and 22.8%, respectively. It is concluded that sulfatase activity is almost twice as potent in cancerous breast tissues than in normal tissues. Nomegestrol acetate is a strong anti-sulfatase agent, in particular with cancerous breast tissues. The inhibition of estrone sulfatase activity by NOMAC in total normal or cancerous breast tissues can open attractive perspectives for future clinical trials. PMID:16080533

  17. p53-independent activation of the hdm2-P2 promoter through multiple transcription factor response elements results in elevated hdm2 expression in estrogen receptor alpha-positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Monika; Darley, Matthew; Primrose, John N; Blaydes, Jeremy P

    2003-05-15

    The negative-regulatory feedback loop between p53 and hdm2 forms part of a finely balanced regulatory network of proteins that controls cell cycle progression and commitment to apoptosis. Expression of hdm2, and its mouse orthologue mdm2, is known to be induced by p53, but recent evidence has demonstrated mdm2 expression can also be regulated via p53-independent pathways. However the p53 independent mechanisms that control transcription of the human hdm2 gene have not been studied. Differential levels of hdm2 mRNA and protein expression have been reported in several types of human malignancy, including breast cancers in which hdm2 expression correlates with positive estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) status. Experimental models have demonstrated that hdm2 overexpression can promote breast cancer development. Here, we show that the elevated level of hdm2 protein in ERalpha(+ve) breast cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 and T47D is because of transcription from the p53-inducible P2 promoter of hdm2. The P2 promoter is inactive in ERalpha(-ve) cell lines such as SKBr3. Hdm2-P2 promoter activity in T47D cells is independent of p53, as well as of known regulators of the mouse mdm2-P2 promoter, including ERalpha and ras-raf-mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. We show that hdm2-P2 activity in T47D cells is dependent on the integrity of both an evolutionarily conserved composite binding site for AP1 and ETS family transcription factors (AP1-ETS) and a nonconserved upstream (nnGGGGC)(5) repeat sequence. Lack of hdm2-P2 activity in ERalpha(-ve) cells is shown to be a consequence of reduced transcriptional activation through the AP1-ETS element. Overexpression of ETS2 in SKBr3 cells reconstitutes AP1-ETS element-dependent hdm2-P2 promoter activity, resulting in increased levels of hdm2 protein in the cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that the elevated levels of hdm2 expression reported in cancers such as ERalpha(+ve) breast tumors play an important role in the development of these tumors. PMID:12750288

  18. A monoclonal antibody to the human c-erbB3 protein stimulates the anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, T.; Gullick, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    The c-erbB3 protein is a member of the type I growth factor receptor family. It has a widespread pattern of expression in normal tissues and is overexpressed in about 20% of breast cancers. We have raised a specific monoclonal antibody, called SGP1, against the extracellular domain of c-erbB3 which recognises the native form of the protein. The monoclonal antibody was found to modestly but significantly stimulate the anchorage-independent cloning efficiency of the breast tumour cell lines BT483 and T47D, both of which express the c-erbB3 protein. No effect was observed on 293 cells lacking expression, nor did a control isotype-matched antibody promote the growth of any of the cells tested. These results suggest that the c-erbB3 protein may normally act as a growth factor receptor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8080731

  19. Expression of glycodelin in human breast and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, M; Halttunen, M; Koistinen, R; von Boguslawsky, K; von Smitten, K; Andersson, L C; Seppälä, M

    1999-12-10

    Glycodelin is a 28 kDa glycoprotein with structural homology to beta-lactoglobulins, particularly expressed in steroid-responsive tissues of the female reproductive tract. We previously found that transfection of glycodelin cDNA into MCF-7 breast cancer cells induces differentiation into organized acinar epithelium and up-regulation of epithelial markers. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry, Northern blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses to study glycodelin expression in normal and in malignant breast tissues. The results were compared with the expression of estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) and p53 tumor suppressor protein. Glycodelin was found in ductal and lobular epithelium of 6/6 normal breast tissues, 27/29 morphologically normal breast tissues from breast cancer patients, 6/6 benign lactating adenomas, 21/35 ductal carcinomas, 9/9 tubular carcinomas, 9/9 mucinous carcinomas, 3/3 mixed ductal/tubular carcinomas and 7/11 lobular carcinomas. In the latter, of particular interest was the presence of glycodelin in paranucleolar vacuoles of carcinoma cells. Northern blot analysis of fresh frozen tissues revealed the normal full length 0.9 kb mRNA of glycodelin in ductal breast carcinoma. Using RT-PCR analysis, glycodelin messenger ribonucleic acid was found in 13/13 ductal and in 3/3 tubular tumor tissues. We also detected a splicing variant lacking exon 4, which includes the nucleotide sequence encoding the potential N-glycosylation site at Asn-85. Our results demonstrate the synthesis of glycodelin in normal breast and breast cancer. In addition, we show that the paranuclear vacuole, characteristically present in lobular breast cancer cells, contains abundant amounts of glycodelin. PMID:10597188

  20. TNF{alpha} acting on TNFR1 promotes breast cancer growth via p42/P44 MAPK, JNK, Akt and NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, Martin A.; Carnevale, Romina P.; Proietti, Cecilia J.; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Beguelin, Wendy; Salatino, Mariana; Charreau, Eduardo H.; Frahm, Isabel; Sapia, Sandra; Brouckaert, Peter; Elizalde, Patricia V.; Schillaci, Roxana

    2008-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha}) enhances proliferation of chemically-induced mammary tumors and of T47D human cell line through not fully understood pathways. Here, we explored the intracellular signaling pathways triggered by TNF{alpha}, the participation of TNF{alpha} receptor (TNFR) 1 and TNFR2 and the molecular mechanism leading to breast cancer growth. We demonstrate that TNF{alpha} induced proliferation of C4HD murine mammary tumor cells and of T47D cells through the activation of p42/p44 MAPK, JNK, PI3-K/Akt pathways and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) transcriptional activation. A TNF{alpha}-specific mutein selectively binding to TNFR1 induced p42/p44 MAPK, JNK, Akt activation, NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activation and cell proliferation, just like wild-type TNF{alpha}, while a mutein selective for TNFR2 induced only p42/p44 MAPK activation. Interestingly, blockage of TNFR1 or TNFR2 with specific antibodies was enough to impair TNF{alpha} signaling and biological effect. Moreover, in vivo TNF{alpha} administration supported C4HD tumor growth. We also demonstrated, for the first time, that injection of a selective inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activity, Bay 11-7082, resulted in regression of TNF{alpha}-promoted tumor. Bay 11-7082 blocked TNF{alpha} capacity to induce cell proliferation and up-regulation of cyclin D1 and of Bcl-x{sub L}in vivo and in vitro. Our results reveal evidence for TNF{alpha} as a breast tumor promoter, and provide novel data for a future therapeutic approach using TNF{alpha} antagonists and NF-{kappa}B pharmacological inhibitors in established breast cancer treatment.

  1. Methyl Angolensate from Callus of Indian Redwood Induces Cytotoxicity in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Panjamurthy, Kuppusamy; Choudhary, Bibha; Joy, Omana; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Natural products discovered from medicinal plants have played an important role in the treatment of cancer. Methyl angolensate (MA), a tetranortriterpenoid obtained from the root callus of Indian Redwood tree, Soymida febrifuga Roxb. (A.Juss) was tested for its anticancer properties on breast cancer cells. METHODS: Cell viability was tested using trypan blue, MTT and LDH assays. Tritiated thymidine assay and flowcytometry were used to study effect of MA on cell proliferation. The activation of apoptosis was checked by annexin V and JC-1 staining followed by FACS analysis. Immunoblotting analysis was used for studying expression of apoptotic and DNA double strand break repair proteins. RESULTS: We find that MA inhibited the growth of breast cancer cell line, T47D in a time- and dose-dependent manner. MA treatment led to the inhibition of cell proliferation as detected by tritiated thymidine assay and flowcytometry. Further, MA treated cells exhibited typical apoptotic morphological changes and led to the accumulation of subG1 peak in cell cycle distribution. The induction of apoptosis was further confirmed both by annexin V staining and JC1 staining. We also find that MA activates MAP kinase pathway to induce apoptosis. Besides, we find a time dependent activation followed by degradation of DNA double-strand break repair proteins upon treatment with MA. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that MA induces cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Further, the altered expression of DSB repair proteins in MA treated cells may control the induction of apoptosis in these cancer cells. PMID:23675192

  2. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-02-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin v3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin v3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer.

  3. Tamoxifen induces a pluripotency signature in breast cancer cells and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Notas, George; Pelekanou, Vassiliki; Kampa, Marilena; Alexakis, Konstantinos; Sfakianakis, Stelios; Laliotis, Aggelos; Askoxilakis, John; Tsentelierou, Eleftheria; Tzardi, Maria; Tsapis, Andreas; Castanas, Elias

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen is the treatment of choice in estrogen receptor alpha breast cancer patients that are eligible for adjuvant endocrine therapy. However, ∼50% of ERα-positive tumors exhibit intrinsic or rapidly acquire resistance to endocrine treatment. Unfortunately, prediction of de novo resistance to endocrine therapy and/or assessment of relapse likelihood remain difficult. While several mechanisms regulating the acquisition and the maintenance of endocrine resistance have been reported, there are several aspects of this phenomenon that need to be further elucidated. Altered metabolic fate of tamoxifen within patients and emergence of tamoxifen-resistant clones, driven by evolution of the disease phenotype during treatment, appear as the most compelling hypotheses so far. In addition, tamoxifen was reported to induce pluripotency in breast cancer cell lines, in vitro. In this context, we have performed a whole transcriptome analysis of an ERα-positive (T47D) and a triple-negative breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231), exposed to tamoxifen for a short time frame (hours), in order to identify how early pluripotency-related effects of tamoxifen may occur. Our ultimate goal was to identify whether the transcriptional actions of tamoxifen related to induction of pluripotency are mediated through specific ER-dependent or independent mechanisms. We report that even as early as 3 hours after the exposure of breast cancer cells to tamoxifen, a subset of ERα-dependent genes associated with developmental processes and pluripotency are induced and this is accompanied by specific phenotypic changes (expression of pluripotency-related proteins). Furthermore we report an association between the increased expression of pluripotency-related genes in ERα-positive breast cancer tissues samples and disease relapse after tamoxifen therapy. Finally we describe that in a small group of ERα-positive breast cancer patients, with disease relapse after surgery and tamoxifen treatment, ALDH1A1 (a marker of pluripotency in epithelial cancers which is absent in normal breast tissue) is increased in relapsing tumors, with a concurrent modification of its intra-cellular localization. Our data could be of value in the discrimination of patients susceptible to develop tamoxifen resistance and in the selection of optimized patient-tailored therapies. PMID:26115764

  4. Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue Decoction Simultaneously Down-regulates Expressions of Aromatase and Steroid Sulfatase in Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xue-song; Li, Ping-ping

    2011-01-01

    Objective Estradiol (E2) plays an important role in the development of breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, the estrogen can be synthesized via aromatase (CYP19) pathway and steroid-sulfatase (STS) pathway in peripheral tissues, when the production in ovary has ceased. The objective of our study was to explore the effects of Shu-Gan-Liang-Xue Decoction (SGLXD) on the expressions of CYP19 and STS in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer MCF-7 and T47D cells. Methods The effects of SGLXD on the cell viability of MCF-7 and T47D were analyzed by MTT assay. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, we evaluated the mRNA and protein expressions of CYP19 and STS in MCF-7 and T47D cells after SGLXD treatment. Results By MTT assay, the cell viability rates of MCF-7 and T47D were significantly inhibited by SGLXD in a dose-dependent manner, the IC50 values were 40.07 mg/ml for MCF-7 cells and 25.62 mg/ml for T47D cells, respectively. As evidenced by real-time PCR and Western blot, the high concentrations of SGLXD significantly down-regulated the expressions of CYP19 and STS both in the transcript level and the protein level. Conclusion The results suggest that SGLXD is a potential dual aromatase-sulfatase inhibitor by simultaneously down-regulating the expressions of CYP19 and STS in MCF-7 and T47D cells. PMID:23467843

  5. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  6. Phytochemical regulation of the tumor suppressive microRNA, miR-34a, by p53-dependent and independent responses in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hargraves, Kris G; He, Lin; Firestone, Gary L

    2016-05-01

    The tumor suppressive microRNA miR-34a is transcriptionally regulated by p53 and shown to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation as well as being a marker of increased disease free survival. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) derived from cruciferous vegetables, artemisinin, extracted from the sweet wormwood plant, and artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, are phytochemicals with anti-tumorigenic properties however, little is known about the role of microRNAs in their mechanism of action. Human breast cancer cells expressing wild-type (MCF-7) or mutant p53 (T47D) were treated with a concentration range and time course of each phytochemical under conditions of cell cycle arrest as detected by flow cytometry to examine the potential connection between miR-34a expression and their anti-proliferative responses. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis of extracted RNA and total protein revealed artemsinin and artesunate increased miR-34a expression in a dose-dependent manner correlating with down-regulation of the miR-34a target gene, CDK4. I3C stimulation of miR-34a expression required functional p53, whereas, both artemisinin and artesunate up-regulated miR-34a expression regardless of p53 mutational status or in the presence of dominant negative p53. Phytochemical treatments inhibited the luciferase activity of a construct containing the wild-type 3'UTR of CDK4, but not those with a mutated miR-34a binding site, whereas, transfection of miR-34a inhibitors ablated the phytochemical mediated down-regulation of CDK4 and induction of cell cycle arrest. Our results suggest that miR-34a is an essential component of the anti-proliferative activities of I3C, artemisinin, and artesunate and demonstrate that both wild-type p53 dependent and independent pathways are responsible for miR-34a induction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25789847

  7. Food flavonoid aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated agonistic/antagonistic/synergic activities in human and rat reporter gene assays.

    PubMed

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Bechoux, Nathalie; Muller, Marc; Sergent, Thérèse; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan; Maghuin-Rogister, Guy; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2009-04-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the adverse effects of dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, we investigated the genetic-, time-, dose-, species- and tissue-dependent AhR-mediated agonistic/antagonistic activities of three food flavonoids: quercetin, chrysin and genistein. To that end, four stably transfected cell lines were used in cell-based luciferase reporter gene assays: three lines were transformed with the ptKLuc vector harbouring four dioxin-responsive elements (DREs) upstream of the thymidine kinase promoter and the luciferase gene (HepG2-Luc, T-47D-Luc and H4IIE-ULg). The fourth is a patented cell line transformed with a different construct: H4IIE DR-CALUX((R)). Both H4IIE cells were compared for their genetic construction. Human hepatoma (HepG2-Luc) and human breast tumour (T-47D-Luc) cells were compared for tissue-dependent effects. Rat hepatoma (H4IIE-ULg) and human hepatoma (HepG2-Luc) cells were compared for species-dependent activities. We concluded that quercetin, chrysin and genistein act in a time-, dose-, species- and tissue-specific way. For example, genistein displayed agonistic activities when exposed to rat hepatoma cells during 6h but not after 24h. Flavonoids displayed agonistic/antagonistic activities in human breast tumour cells, depending on the exposure time, while in human hepatoma cells, only antagonistic activities of flavonoids were measured. In addition, we report, in all the cells, a synergy between an isoflavone and two food contaminants; the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 3-methylcholanthrene, a PAH. In rat cells, this synergy occurred when cells were exposed to flavonoids and contaminant for 6h, while it was observed in human cells only after 24h. PMID:19286049

  8. Overexpression of miR-206 suppresses glycolysis, proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells via PFKFB3 targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Xin; Lyu, Pengwei; Cao, Zhang; Li, Jingruo; Guo, Guangcheng; Xia, Wanjun; Gu, Yuanting

    2015-08-07

    miRNAs, sorting as non-coding RNAs, are differentially expressed in breast tumor and act as tumor promoters or suppressors. miR-206 could suppress the progression of breast cancer, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The study here was aimed to investigate the effect of miR-206 on human breast cancers. We found that miR-206 was down-regulated while one of its predicted targets, 6-Phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFKFB3) was up-regulated in human breast carcinomas. 17β-estradiol dose-dependently decreased miR-206 expression as well as enhanced PFKFB3 mRNA and protein expression in estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we identified that miR-206 directly interacted with 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of PFKFB3 mRNA. miR-206 modulated PFKFB3 expression in MCF-7, T47D and SUM159 cells, which was influenced by 17β-estradiol depending on ERα expression. In addition, miR-206 overexpression impeded fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) production, diminished lactate generation and reduced cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that miR-206 regulated PFKFB3 expression in breast cancer cells, thereby stunting glycolysis, cell proliferation and migration. - Highlights: • miR-206 was down-regulated and PFKFB3 was up-regulated in human breast carcinomas. • 17β-estradiol regulated miR-206 and PFKFB3 expression in ERα+ cancer cells. • miR-206directly interacted with 3′-UTR of PFKFB3 mRNA. • miR-206 fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP) impeded production and lactate generation. • miR-206 reduced cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells.

  9. Nodal signaling promotes a tumorigenic phenotype in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kirsammer, Gina; Strizzi, Luigi; Margaryan, Naira V; Gilgur, Alina; Hyser, Matthew; Atkinson, Janis; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2014-12-01

    The Ras-ERK pathway is deregulated in approximately a third of human cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin. In aggressive, triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers, most tumors display increased MEK and ERK phosphorylation and exhibit a gene expression profile characteristic of Kras or EGFR mutant tumors; however, Ras family genetic mutations are uncommon in triple-negative breast cancer and EGFR mutations account for only a subset of these tumors. Therefore, the upstream events that activate MAPK signaling and promote tumor aggression in triple-negative breast cancers remain poorly defined. We have previously shown that a secreted TGF-β family signaling ligand, Nodal, is expressed in breast cancer in correlation with disease progression. Here we highlight key findings demonstrating that Nodal is required in aggressive human breast cancer cells to activate ERK signaling and downstream tumorigenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental knockdown of Nodal signaling downregulates ERK activity, resulting in loss of c-myc, upregulation of p27, G1 cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis and decreased tumorigenicity. The data suggest that ERK activation by Nodal signaling regulates c-myc and p27 proteins post-translationally and that this cascade is essential for aggressive breast tumor behavior in vivo. As the MAPK pathway is an important target for treating triple-negative breast cancers, upstream Nodal signaling may represent a promising target for breast cancer diagnosis and combined therapies aimed at blocking ERK pathway activation. PMID:25073112

  10. Nodal signaling promotes a tumorigenic phenotype in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirsammer, Gina; Strizzi, Luigi; Margaryan, Naira V.; Gilgur, Alina; Hyser, Matthew; Atkinson, Janis; Kirschmann, Dawn A.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Hendrix, Mary J.C.

    2014-01-01

    The Ras-ERK pathway is deregulated in approximately a third of human cancers, particularly those of epithelial origin. In aggressive, triple-negative, basal-like breast cancers, most tumors display increased MEK and ERK phosphorylation and exhibit a gene expression profile characteristic of Kras or EGFR mutant tumors; however, Ras family genetic mutations are uncommon in triple-negative breast cancer and EGFR mutations account for only a subset of these tumors. Therefore, the upstream events that activate MAPK signaling and promote tumor aggression in triple-negative breast cancers remain poorly defined. We have previously shown that a secreted TGF-β family signaling ligand, Nodal, is expressed in breast cancer in correlation with disease progression. Here we highlight key findings demonstrating that Nodal is required in aggressive human breast cancer cells to activate ERK signaling and downstream tumorigenic phenotypes both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental knockdown of Nodal signaling downregulates ERK activity, resulting in loss of c-myc, upregulation of p27, G1 cell cycle arrest, increased apoptosis and decreased tumorigenicity. The data suggest that ERK activation by Nodal signaling regulates c-myc and p27 proteins post-translationally and that this cascade is essential for aggressive breast tumor behavior in vivo. As the MAPK pathway is an important target for treating triple-negative breast cancers, upstream Nodal signaling may represent a promising target for breast cancer diagnosis and combined therapies aimed at blocking ERK pathway activation. PMID:25073112

  11. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  12. Clinical impact of human breast milk metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Cesare Marincola, Flaminia; Dessì, Angelica; Corbu, Sara; Reali, Alessandra; Fanos, Vassilios

    2015-12-01

    Metabolomics is a research field concerned with the analysis of metabolome, the complete set of metabolites in a given cell, tissue, or biological sample. Being able to provide a molecular snapshot of biological systems, metabolomics has emerged as a functional methodology in a wide range of research areas such as toxicology, pharmacology, food technology, nutrition, microbial biotechnology, systems biology, and plant biotechnology. In this review, we emphasize the applications of metabolomics in investigating the human breast milk (HBM) metabolome. HBM is the recommended source of nutrition for infants since it contains the optimal balance of nutrients for developing babies, and it provides a range of benefits for growth, immunity, and development. The molecular mechanisms beyond the inter- and intra-variability of HBM that make its composition unique are yet to be well-characterized. Although still in its infancy, the study of HBM metabolome has already proven itself to be of great value in providing insights into this biochemical variability in relation to mother phenotype, diet, disease, and lifestyle. The results of these investigations lay the foundation for further developments useful to identify normal and aberrant biochemical changes as well as to develop strategies to promote healthy infant feeding practices. PMID:25689794

  13. The presence of Estrogen Receptor ? modulates the response of breast cancer cells to therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women. The estrogen receptors (ERs) ratio is important in the maintenance of mitochondrial redox status, and higher levels of ER? increases mitochondrial functionality, decreasing ROS production. Our aim was to determine the interaction between the ER?/ER? ratio and the response to cytotoxic treatments such as cisplatin (CDDP), paclitaxel (PTX) and tamoxifen (TAM). Cell viability, apoptosis, autophagy, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial functionality were analyzed in MCF-7 (high ER?/ER? ratio) and T47D (low ER?/ER? ratio) breast cancer cell lines. Cell viability decreased more in MCF-7 when treated with CDDP and PTX. Apoptosis was less activated after cytotoxic treatments in T47D than in MCF-7 cells. Nevertheless, autophagy was increased more in CDDP-treated MCF-7, but less in TAM-treated cells than in T47D. CDDP treatment produced a raise in mitochondrial mass in MCF-7, as well as the citochrome c oxidase (COX) and ATP synthase protein levels, however significantly reduced COX activity. In CDDP-treated cells, the overexpression of ER? in MCF-7 caused a reduction in apoptosis, autophagy and ROS production, leading to higher cell survival; and the silencing of ER? in T47D cells promoted the opposite effects. In TAM-treated cells, ER?-overexpression led to less cell viability by an increment in autophagy; and the partial knockdown of ER? in T47D triggered an increase in ROS production and apoptosis, leading to cell death. In conclusion, ER? expression plays an important role in the response of cancer cells to cytotoxic agents, especially for cisplatin treatment. PMID:26232188

  14. Long-term adaptation of breast tumor cell lines to high concentrations of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Vesper, Benjamin J; Elseth, Kim M; Tarjan, Gabor; Haines, G Kenneth; Radosevich, James A

    2010-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a free radical, has been implicated in the biology of human cancers, including breast cancer, yet it is still unclear how NO affects tumor development and propagation. We herein gradually adapted four human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (BT-20, Hs578T, T-47D, and MCF-7) to increasing concentrations of the NO donor DETA-NONOate up to 600 muM. The resulting model system consisted of a set of fully adapted high nitric oxide ("HNO") cell lines that are biologically different from the "parent" cell lines from which they originated. Although each of the four parent and HNO cell lines had identical morphologic appearance, the HNO cells grew faster than their corresponding parent cells and were resistant to both nitrogen- and oxygen-based free radicals. These cell lines serve as a novel tool to study the role of NO in breast cancer progression and potentially can be used to predict the therapeutic response leading to more efficient therapeutic regimens. PMID:20480412

  15. Comparison of Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin Nanoparticles and Free Curcumin in Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene Expression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    kazemi-Lomedasht, Fatemeh; Rami, Abbas; Zarghami, Nosratolla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Telomerase is expressed in most cancers, including breast cancer. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound that obtained from the herb of Curcuma longa, has many anticancer effects. But, its effect is low due to poor water solubility. In order to improve its solubility and drug delivery, we have utilized a β-cyclodextrin-curcumin inclusion complex. Methods: To evaluate cytotoxic effects of cyclodextrin-curcumin and free curcumin, MTT assay was done. Cells were treated with equal concentration of cyclodextrin-curcumin and free curcumin. Telomerase gene expression level in two groups was compared by Real-time PCR. Results: MTT assay demonstrated that β-cyclodextrin-curcumin enhanced curcumin delivery in T47D breast cancer cells. The level of telomerase gene expression in cells treated with cyclodextrin-curcumin was lower than that of cells treated with free curcumin (P=0.001). Conclusion: Results are suggesting that cyclodextrin-curcumin complex can be more effective than free curcumin in inhibition of telomerase expression. PMID:24312824

  16. Expression of membrane transporters and metabolic enzymes involved in estrone-3-sulphate disposition in human breast tumour tissues.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Nilasha; Miller, Naomi; Allen, Christine; Bendayan, Reina

    2014-06-01

    Two-thirds of newly diagnosed hormone-dependent (HR?) breast cancers are detected in post-menopausal patients where estrone-3-sulphate (E3S) is the predominant source for tumour estradiol. Understanding intra-tumoral fate of E3S would facilitate in the identification of novel molecular targets for HR? post-menopausal breast cancer patients. Hence this study investigates the clinical expression of (i) organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), (ii) multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance proteins (BCRP), and (iii) sulphatase (STS), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD-1), involved in E3S uptake, efflux and metabolism, respectively. Fluorescent and brightfield images of stained tumour sections (n = 40) were acquired at 4× and 20× magnification, respectively. Marker densities were measured as the total area of positive signal divided by the surface area of the tumour section analysed and was reported as % area (ImageJ software). Tumour, stroma and non-tumour tissue areas were also quantified (Inform software), and the ratio of optical intensity per histologic area was reported as % area/tumour, % area/stroma and % area/non-tumour. Functional role of OATPs and STS was further investigated in HR? (MCF-7, T47-D, ZR-75) and HR-(MDA-MB-231) cells by transport studies conducted in the presence or absence of specific inhibitors. Amongst all the transporters and enzymes, OATPs and STS have significantly (p < 0.0001) higher expression in HR? tumour sections with highest target signals obtained from the tumour regions of the tissues. Specific OATP-mediated E3S uptake and STS-mediated metabolism were also observed in all HR? breast cancer cells. These observations suggest the potential of OATPs as novel molecular targets for HR? breast cancers. PMID:24831777

  17. Human papillomavirus and breast cancer in Iran: a meta- analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Mousavi, Tahoora; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aims to investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and breast cancer using meta- analysis. Materials and Methods: Relevant studies were identified reviewing the national and international databases. We also increased the search sensitivity by investigating the references as well as interview with research centers and experts. Finally, quality assessment and implementation of inclusion/exclusion criteria determined the eligible articles for meta-analysis. Based on the heterogeneity observed among the results of the primary studies, random effects model was used to estimate the pooled prevalence of HPV infection and also pooled odds ratio between HPV and developing breast cancer using Stata SE V. 11 software. Results: This meta- analysis included 11 primary studies investigating the HPV infection prevalence among 1539 Iranian women. Pooled prevalence (95% confidence interval) of HPV infection among Iranian women with breast cancer was estimated as of 23.6% (6.7- 40.5), while, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) between HPV infection and developing breast cancer was estimated as of 5.7% (0.7- 46.8). Conclusion: This meta- analysis showed a high prevalence of HPV infection among women with breast cancer. We also found that the odds of developing breast cancer among women with breast cancer was more than that of women without breast cancer. PMID:27114791

  18. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Increases Radiosensitivity of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Prolonging Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Khoram, Nastaran Masoudi; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Nikoofar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is an important cause of death among women. The development of radioresistance in breast cancer leads to recurrence after radiotherapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a polyphenolic compound of honeybee propolis, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether CAPE enhanced the radiation sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and T47D (estrogen receptor-positive) cell lines. Methods The cytotoxic effect of CAPE on MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells was evaluated by performing an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess clonogenic ability, MDA-MB-231 and T47D cells were treated with CAPE (1 µM) for 72 hours before irradiation, and then, a colony assay was performed. A comet assay was used to determine the number of DNA strand breaks at four different times. Results CAPE decreased the viability of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the clonogenic assay, pretreatment of cells with CAPE before irradiation significantly reduced the surviving fraction of MDA-MB-231 cells at doses of 6 and 8 Gy. A reduction in the surviving fraction of T47D cells was observed relative to MDA-MB-231 at lower doses of radiation. Additionally, CAPE maintained radiation-induced DNA damage in T47D cells for a longer period than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that CAPE impairs DNA damage repair immediately after irradiation. The induction of radiosensitivity by CAPE in radioresistant breast cancer cells may be caused by prolonged DNA damage. PMID:27066092

  19. WE-E-BRE-10: Level of Breast Cancer Stem Cell Correlated with Tumor Radioresistence: An Indication for Individualized Breast Cancer Therapy Adapted to Cancer Stem Cell Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, S; Pajonk, F; McCloskey, S; Low, D; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Sheng, K

    2014-06-15

    Purposes: The presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in a solid tumor could result in poor tumor control probability. The purposes are to study CSC radiosensitivity parameters α and β and their correlation to CSC levels to understand the underlying radioresistance mechanisms and enable individualized treatment design. Methods: Four established breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, and SUM159PT) were irradiated in vitro using single radiation doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. The fractions of CSCs in each cell lines were determined using cancer stem cell markers. Mammosphere assays were also performed to better estimate the number of CSCs and represent the CSC repopulation in a human solid tumor. The measured cell surviving fractions were fitted using the Linear-quadratic (LQ) model with independent fitting parameters: α-TC, β-TC (TCs), α-CSC, β-CSC (CSCs), and fs (the percentage of CSCs in each sample). Results: The measured fs increased following the irradiation by MCF-7 (0.1%), T47D (0.9%), MDA-MB-231 (1.18%) and SUM159T (2.46%), while decreasing surviving curve slopes were observed, indicating greater radioresistance, in the opposite order. The fitting yielded the radiosensitive parameters for the MCF-7: α-TC=0.1±0.2Gy{sup −1}, β-TC= 0.08 ±0.14Gy{sup −2}, α-CSC=0.04±0.07Gy{sup −1}, β-CSC =0.02±0.3Gy{sup −2}; for the SUM159PT, α-TC=0.08±0.25 Gy{sup −1}, β-TC=0.02±0.02Gy{sup −2}, α-CSC=0.04±0.18Gy{sup −1}, β-CSC =0.004±0.24Gy{sup −2}. In the mammosphere assay, where fs were higher than the corresponding cell line assays, there was almost no shoulder found in the surviving curves (more radioresistant in mammosphere assays) yielding β-CSC of approximately 0. Conclusion: Breast cancer stem cells were more radioresistant characterized by smaller α and β values compared to differentiated breast cancer cells. Percentage of breast cancer stem cells strongly correlated to overall tumor radioresistance. This observation suggested the feasibility of individualized radiotherapy prescription based on the fractions of cancer stem cells found in biopsy.

  20. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    SciTech Connect

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan; and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power-law descriptions of the phantom images were in general agreement with real human images. The Singlet approach offered more realistic contrast as compared to the Doublet approach, but at the expense of air bubbles and air pockets that formed during the filling process. Conclusions: The presented physical breast phantoms and their matching virtual breast phantoms offer realistic breast anatomy, patient variability, and ease of use, making them a potential candidate for performing both system quality control testing and virtual clinical trials.

  1. The lectin Helix pomatia agglutinin recognizes O-GlcNAc containing glycoproteins in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rambaruth, Neela D S; Greenwell, Pamela; Dwek, Miriam V

    2012-06-01

    There has been considerable interest in understanding the epitopes that bind the lectin Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) in breast cancer as the lectin has been shown to identify glycosylation changes associated with the development of metastatic disease. HPA has previously been shown to recognize aberrant O-linked α-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAcα)/mucin glycosylation in cancer, including exposed Tn epitopes. However, recent glycan-array analysis reported that diverse epitopes are also recognized by the lectin, e.g. consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) data: GalNAcα1,3Gal; β-GalNAc; GlcNAcβ1,4Gal. The intriguing observations from the CFG array led to this study, in which HPA-binding epitopes were localized and characterized in an in vitro model of breast cancer metastasis. HMT3522 (benign disease), BT474 (primary cancer) and T47D/MCF7 (metastatic cancer) cells were assessed in confocal microscopy-based co-localization studies and a glycoproteomic analysis based on 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), western blotting and mass spectrometry was adopted. HPA binding correlated with levels of integrin α6, transcription factors heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein (HnRNP) H1, HnRNP D-like, HnRNP A2/B1 as well as heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27), glial fibrillary acidic protein and enolase 1 (ENO1). These glycoproteins were non-detectable in the non-metastatic breast cancer cell lines. The recognition of HnRNPs, Hsp27 and ENO1 by HPA correlated with O-GlcNAcylation of these proteins. Integrin α6 was the most abundant HPA glycoprotein in the breast cancer cells with a metastatic phenotype; this concurred with previous findings in colorectal cancer. This is the first report in which HPA has been shown to bind O-GlcNAcylated transcription factors. This class of proteins represents a new means by which HPA differentiates cancer cells with an aggressive metastatic phenotype. PMID:22322011

  2. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells. PMID:22254082

  3. Antiproliferative Effects of Cucurbitacin B in Breast Cancer Cells: Down-Regulation of the c-Myc/hTERT/Telomerase Pathway and Obstruction of the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Duangmano, Suwit; Dakeng, Sumana; Jiratchariyakul, Weena; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Smith, Duncan R.; Patmasiriwat, Pimpicha

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring cucurbitacins have been shown to have anticancer, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we determined the effects of cucurbitacin B extracted from the Thai herb Trichosanthes cucumerina L. on telomerase regulation in three human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, SKBR-3, and MCF-7) and a mammary epithelium cell line (HBL-100). Cell viability after treatment with cucurbitacin B, which is an active ingredient of this herb, was assessed. Telomeric Repeat Amplification Protocol (TRAP) assays and RT-PCR (qualitative and realtime) were performed to investigate activity of telomerase as well as expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and c-Myc. The c-Myc protein level was also determined in SKBR-3 and HBL-100 cells. Our results show that the cucurbitacin B inhibits growth and telomerase activity in the three breast cancer cell lines and exerts an obvious inhibitory effect in the estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer SKBR-3 cells. The expression of hTERT and c-Myc were also inhibited by cucurbitacin B, In addition, a clear reduction of c-Myc protein was observed after treatment in SKBR-3 cells even with a concentration of cucurbitacin B that was ten-times lower compared to the concentration used for HBL-100. Our findings imply that cucurbitacin B exerts an anticancer effect by inhibiting telomerase via down regulating both the hTERT and c-Myc expression in breast cancer cells. PMID:21614210

  4. The Oncogenic Potential of Human Cytomegalovirus and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herbein, Georges; Kumar, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading causes of cancer-related death among women. The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that originate from cells lining the milk-forming ducts of the mammary gland. Numerous articles indicate that breast tumors exhibit diverse phenotypes depending on their distinct physiopathological signatures, clinical courses, and therapeutic possibilities. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a multifaceted highly host specific betaherpesvirus that is regarded as asymptomatic or mildly pathogenic virus in immunocompetent host. HCMV may cause serious in utero infections as well as acute and chronic complications in immunocompromised individual. The involvement of HCMV in late inflammatory complications underscores its possible role in inflammatory diseases and cancer. HCMV targets a variety of cell types in vivo, including macrophages, epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, stromal cells, neuronal cells, smooth muscle cells, and hepatocytes. HCMV can be detected in the milk after delivery and thereby HCMV could spread to adjacent mammary epithelial cells. HCMV also infects macrophages and induces an atypical M1/M2 phenotype, close to the tumor-associated macrophage phenotype, which is associated with the release of cytokines involved in cancer initiation or promotion and breast cancer of poor prognosis. HCMV antigens and DNA have been detected in tissue biopsies of breast cancers and elevation in serum HCMV IgG antibody levels has been reported to precede the development of breast cancer in some women. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of HCMV in the initiation and progression of breast cancer. PMID:25202681

  5. microRNA, cell cycle, and human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zuoren; Baserga, Renato; Chen, Lide; Wang, Chenguang; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G

    2010-03-01

    The discovery of microRNAs as a novel class of gene expression regulators has led to a new strategy for disease diagnostics and therapeutics. Cell cycle, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis are all regulated by microRNAs. Several general principles linking microRNAs and cancer have been recently reviewed; therefore, the current review focuses specifically on the perspective of microRNAs in control of cell cycle, stem cells, and heterotypic signaling, as well as the role of these processes in breast cancer. Altered abundance of cell cycle regulation proteins and aberrant expression of microRNAs frequently coexist in human breast cancers. Altered microRNA expression in breast cancer cell lines is associated with altered cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated a causal role for microRNA in governing breast tumor suppression or collaborative oncogenesis. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role for microRNA in regulating the cell cycle and summarizes the evidence for aberrant microRNA expression in breast cancer. The new evidence for microRNA regulation by annotated genes and the involvement of microRNA in breast cancer metastasis are discussed, as is the potential for microRNA to improve breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20075198

  6. Early Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Oncogenic Influences in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Christopher; Lawson, James S.; Clay, Rosemary; Delprado, Warick; Whitaker, Noel J.; Glenn, Wendy K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) may act early in breast oncogenesis (“hit-and-run” phenomena). METHODS The authors used immunohistochemistry for the identification of HPV E7 oncogenic protein expression in 32 sets of benign and subsequent breast cancer specimens from the same Australian patients. RESULTS HPV E7 oncoprotein was clearly expressed in the nuclei of 23 (72%) of the 32 benign specimens and 20 (62.5%) of the subsequent 32 breast cancer specimens in the same patients. There was no HPV E7 protein expression in seven (30%) of the 23 breast cancer specimens that had prior HPV E7 protein-positive benign breast biopsies in the same patients. CONCLUSIONS This observation suggests that HPV oncogenic influences occur early in some breast cancers. This finding confirms the previous observations. This early influence of HPVs may be the reason why there is no increase in the prevalence of HPV-associated breast cancer in immunocompromised patients as compared to HPV-associated cervical cancer. PMID:26691275

  7. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Yohei; Mukohyama, Junko; Nakamura, Shun-ichi; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in virtually all biological processes, including stem cell maintenance, differentiation, and development. The dysregulation of miRNAs is associated with many human diseases including cancer. We have identified a set of miRNAs differentially expressed between human breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) and non-tumorigenic cancer cells. In addition, these miRNAs are similarly upregulated or downregulated in normal mammary stem/progenitor cells. In this review, we mainly describe the miRNAs that are dysregulated in human breast CSCs directly isolated from clinical specimens. The miRNAs and their clusters, such as the miR-200 clusters, miR-183 cluster, miR-221-222 cluster, let-7, miR-142 and miR-214, target the genes and pathways important for stem cell maintenance, such as the self-renewal gene BMI1, apoptosis, Wnt signaling, Notch signaling, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, the current evidence shows that metastatic breast CSCs acquire a phenotype that is different from the CSCs in a primary site. Thus, clarifying the miRNA regulation of the metastatic breast CSCs will further advance our understanding of the roles of human breast CSCs in tumor progression. PMID:26712794

  8. Development of a new metastatic human breast carcinoma xenograft line.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, R. R.; Graves, J. M.; Shilkaitis, A.; Das Gupta, T. K.

    1998-01-01

    Xenografts originated from human tumours offer the most appropriate research material for in vivo experimental research. However, primary human breast carcinomas are difficult to grow when transplanted in athymic mice: tumour take is less than 15%. Recently, we have achieved 60% tumour take by injecting tumour cell suspensions mixed with Matrigel. Human breast xenografts originated from primary breast carcinoma also frequently show the potential to metastasize spontaneously. In the present study, we generated a human breast carcinoma xenograft line (UISO-BCA-NMT-18) that shows 100% tumorigenicity and 80-100% lung metastasis when transplanted s.c. in athymic mice. We have studied in detail the characteristics of the xenograft and the patient's tumour from which the xenograft line originated. Both the xenograft and the patient's tumour showed intense staining for mutant p53 nuclear protein, and high expression of U-PA, PAI and u-PAR. In vivo growth of the xenograft is stimulated by exogenous supplementation of oestrogen. This xenograft is continuously growing in mice and has shown 80-100% metastasis for the last three successive in vivo passages. This well-characterized, oestrogen-responsive, metastatic breast carcinoma xenograft line will provide excellent research material for metastasis-related research. Images p596-a Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 4 Figure 9 PMID:9484817

  9. PTEN and NEDD4 in Human Breast Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yilun; van de Vijver, Marc J; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon; Saal, Lao H

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is an important tumor suppressor gene that antagonizes the oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling pathway and has functions in the nucleus for maintaining genome integrity. Although PTEN inactivation by mutation is infrequent in breast cancer, transcript and protein levels are deficient in >25 % of cases. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 (also known as NEDD4-1) has been reported to negatively regulate PTEN protein levels through poly-ubiquitination and proteolysis in carcinomas of the prostate, lung, and bladder, but its effect on PTEN in the breast has not been studied extensively. To investigate whether NEDD4 contributes to low PTEN levels in human breast cancer, we analyzed the expression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry across a large Swedish cohort of breast tumor specimens, and their transcript expression levels by microarrays. For both NEDD4 and PTEN, their transcript expression was significantly correlated to their protein expression. However, comparing NEDD4 expression to PTEN expression, either no association or a positive correlation was observed at the protein and transcript levels. This unexpected observation was further corroborated in two independent breast cancer cohorts from The Netherlands Cancer Institute and The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our results suggest that NEDD4 is not responsible for the frequent down-regulation of the PTEN protein in human breast carcinoma. PMID:26276352

  10. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li-Hong; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Ma, Qin; Shi, Ye-Hui; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Breast Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Li, Shu-Fen; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin ; Tong, Zhong-Sheng; Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment of the Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  11. Analysis of human breast tissues with Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Jianhong; Yu, Fan; Sun, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to study normal, benign and malignant human breast tissues. The Raman spectrum of normal breast tissue recorded with 514.5 nm line of Ar + laser excitation contains features attributed to carotenoids and lipids. The CH II bending mode near 1447 cm -1 in normal tissue shifts up to 1454 cm -1 in diseased tissues (benign and malignant). The band near 1660 cm -1 in normal tissue is narrow and sharp; whereas the band is broaden in the diseased tissues. In the region of C-H stretching mode, the 2902-/2860-cm -1 intensity ratio shows differences among normal, benign and malignant breast tissues. The ratio is the smallest in carcinoma tissue. The observed spectra differences may be used to probe breast lesion. The results show that Raman spectroscopic technique may have clinical applications.

  12. Global profiling of prolactin-modulated transcripts in breast cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolactin (PRL) is essential for normal mammary gland development. PRL promotes mammary tumor formation in rodents and elevated serum prolactin is associated with increased risk of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer in women. On the other hand, PRL may also exert pro-differentiation effects and act to suppress invasive features of established breast cancer. Previously published limited global transcript profiling analyses of prolactin-regulated gene expression in human breast cancer cells have exclusively been performed in vitro. The present study aimed to shed new light on how PRL modulates estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer through global transcript profiling of a human breast cancer xenograft model in vivo. Methods The prolactin-responsive human T47D breast cancer cell line was xenotransplanted into nude mice and global transcript profiling was carried out following treatment with or without human PRL for 48 h. A subset of PRL-modulated transcripts was further validated using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results The in vivo analyses identified 130 PRL-modulated transcripts, 75 upregulated and 55 downregulated, based on fold change >1.6 and P-value <0.05. From this initial panel of transcripts, a subset of 18 transcripts with established breast cancer-relevance were selected and validated by qRT-PCR. Some but not all of the transcripts were also PRL-modulated in vitro. The selected PRL-modulated transcripts were tested for dependence on Stat5, Jak1 or Jak2 activation, and for co-regulation by 17β-estradiol (E2). The protein encoded by one of the PRL-regulated transcripts, PTHrP, was examined in a panel of 92 human breast cancers and found by in situ quantitative immunofluorescence analysis to be highly positively correlated with nuclear localized and tyrosine phosphorylated Stat5. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that PRL-upregulated genes were enriched in pathways involved in differentiation. Finally, a gene signature based on PRL-upregulated genes was associated with prolonged relapse-free and metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. Conclusions This global analysis identified and validated a panel of PRL-modulated transcripts in an ER-positive human breast cancer xenotransplant model, which may have value as markers of relapse-free and metastasis-free survival. Gene products identified in the present study may facilitate ongoing deciphering of the pleiotropic effects of PRL on human breast cancer. PMID:23758962

  13. Human neural stem cell tropism to metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Donghong; Najbauer, Joseph; Annala, Alexander J; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z; Gutova, Margarita; Polewski, Monika D; Gilchrist, Megan; Glackin, Carlotta A; Kim, Seung U; Aboody, Karen S

    2012-02-01

    Metastasis to multiple organs is the primary cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. The poor prognosis for patients with metastatic breast cancer and toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of effective tumor-selective therapies. Neural stem cells (NSCs) possess inherent tumor tropic properties that enable them to overcome many obstacles of drug delivery that limit effective chemotherapy strategies for breast cancer. We report that increased NSC tropism to breast tumor cell lines is strongly correlated with the invasiveness of cancer cells. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) was identified as a major cytokine mediating NSC tropism to invasive breast cancer cells. We show for the first time in a preclinical mouse model of metastatic human breast cancer that NSCs preferentially target tumor metastases in multiple organs, including liver, lung, lymph nodes, and femur, versus the primary intramammary fat pad tumor. For proof-of-concept of stem cell-mediated breast cancer therapy, NSCs were genetically modified to secrete rabbit carboxylesterase (rCE), an enzyme that activates the CPT-11 prodrug to SN-38, a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, to effect tumor-localized chemotherapy. In vitro data demonstrate that exposure of breast cancer cells to conditioned media from rCE-secreting NSCs (NSC.rCE) increased their sensitivity to CPT-11 by 200-fold. In vivo, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with NSC.rCE cells in combination with CPT-11 resulted in reduction of metastatic tumor burden in lung and lymph nodes. These data suggest that NSC-mediated enzyme/prodrug therapy may be more effective and less toxic than currently available chemotherapy strategies for breast cancer metastases. PMID:22084033

  14. T Cell Coinhibition and Immunotherapy in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janakiram, Murali; Abadi, Yael M.; Sparano, Joseph A.; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    Costimulation and coinhibition generated by the B7 family and their receptor CD28 family have key roles in regulating T lymphocyte activation and tolerance. These pathways are very attractive therapeutic targets for human cancers including breast cancer. Gene polymorphisms of B7x (B7-H4/B7S1), PD-1 (CD279), and CTLA-4 (CD152) are associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In human breast cancer microenvironment, up-regulation of coinhibitory B7/CD28 members B7x, B7-H3 (CD276), and PD-L1 (B7-H1/CD274) on tumor cells as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 on tumor-infiltrating immune cells are emerging as immune evasion pathways. Chemotherapy can affect the expression of these molecules, and therefore may dampen the immune response against breast cancer. Immunotherapy targeting T cell coinhibition as monotherapy or combined with standard therapies are in early stages of clinical development, but hold great promise for treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:23114578

  15. Human breast milk: A review on its composition and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Nicholas J; Kampmann, Beate; Mehring Le-Doare, Kirsty

    2015-11-01

    Breast milk is the perfect nutrition for infants, a result of millions of years of evolution, finely attuning it to the requirements of the infant. Breast milk contains many complex proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, the concentrations of which alter dramatically over a single feed, as well as over lactation, to reflect the infant's needs. In addition to providing a source of nutrition for infants, breast milk contains a myriad of biologically active components. These molecules possess diverse roles, both guiding the development of the infants immune system and intestinal microbiota. Orchestrating the development of the microbiota are the human milk oligosaccharides, the synthesis of which are determined by the maternal genotype. In this review, we discuss the composition of breast milk and the factors that affect it during the course of breast feeding. Understanding the components of breast milk and their functions will allow for the improvement of clinical practices, infant feeding and our understanding of immune responses to infection and vaccination in infants. PMID:26375355

  16. A tissue-engineered humanized xenograft model of human breast cancer metastasis to bone

    PubMed Central

    Thibaudeau, Laure; Taubenberger, Anna V.; Holzapfel, Boris M.; Quent, Verena M.; Fuehrmann, Tobias; Hesami, Parisa; Brown, Toby D.; Dalton, Paul D.; Power, Carl A.; Hollier, Brett G.; Hutmacher, Dietmar W.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The skeleton is a preferred homing site for breast cancer metastasis. To date, treatment options for patients with bone metastases are mostly palliative and the disease is still incurable. Indeed, key mechanisms involved in breast cancer osteotropism are still only partially understood due to the lack of suitable animal models to mimic metastasis of human tumor cells to a human bone microenvironment. In the presented study, we investigate the use of a human tissue-engineered bone construct to develop a humanized xenograft model of breast cancer-induced bone metastasis in a murine host. Primary human osteoblastic cell-seeded melt electrospun scaffolds in combination with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 were implanted subcutaneously in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The tissue-engineered constructs led to the formation of a morphologically intact ‘organ’ bone incorporating a high amount of mineralized tissue, live osteocytes and bone marrow spaces. The newly formed bone was largely humanized, as indicated by the incorporation of human bone cells and human-derived matrix proteins. After intracardiac injection, the dissemination of luciferase-expressing human breast cancer cell lines to the humanized bone ossicles was detected by bioluminescent imaging. Histological analysis revealed the presence of metastases with clear osteolysis in the newly formed bone. Thus, human tissue-engineered bone constructs can be applied efficiently as a target tissue for human breast cancer cells injected into the blood circulation and replicate the osteolytic phenotype associated with breast cancer-induced bone lesions. In conclusion, we have developed an appropriate model for investigation of species-specific mechanisms of human breast cancer-related bone metastasis in vivo. PMID:24713276

  17. Systems consequences of amplicon formation in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inaki, Koichiro; Menghi, Francesca; Woo, Xing Yi; Wagner, Joel P.; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Lee, Yi Fang; Shreckengast, Phung Trang; Soon, Wendy WeiJia; Malhotra, Ankit; Teo, Audrey S.M.; Hillmer, Axel M.; Khng, Alexis Jiaying; Ruan, Xiaoan; Ong, Swee Hoe; Bertrand, Denis; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Hidalgo Miranda, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal structural variations play an important role in determining the transcriptional landscape of human breast cancers. To assess the nature of these structural variations, we analyzed eight breast tumor samples with a focus on regions of gene amplification using mate-pair sequencing of long-insert genomic DNA with matched transcriptome profiling. We found that tandem duplications appear to be early events in tumor evolution, especially in the genesis of amplicons. In a detailed reconstruction of events on chromosome 17, we found large unpaired inversions and deletions connect a tandemly duplicated ERBB2 with neighboring 17q21.3 amplicons while simultaneously deleting the intervening BRCA1 tumor suppressor locus. This series of events appeared to be unusually common when examined in larger genomic data sets of breast cancers albeit using approaches with lesser resolution. Using siRNAs in breast cancer cell lines, we showed that the 17q21.3 amplicon harbored a significant number of weak oncogenes that appeared consistently coamplified in primary tumors. Down-regulation of BRCA1 expression augmented the cell proliferation in ERBB2-transfected human normal mammary epithelial cells. Coamplification of other functionally tested oncogenic elements in other breast tumors examined, such as RIPK2 and MYC on chromosome 8, also parallel these findings. Our analyses suggest that structural variations efficiently orchestrate the gain and loss of cancer gene cassettes that engage many oncogenic pathways simultaneously and that such oncogenic cassettes are favored during the evolution of a cancer. PMID:25186909

  18. Globular adiponectin enhances invasion in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FALK LIBBY, EMILY; LIU, JIANZHONG; LI, YI; LEWIS, MONICA J.; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, a large number of women succumb to metastatic breast cancer due to a lack of curative approaches for this disease. Adiponectin (AdipoQ) is the most abundant of the adipocyte-secreted adipokines. In recent years, there has been an interest in the use of AdipoQ and AdipoQ receptor agonists as therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. However, while multiple epidemiological studies have previously indicated that low levels of circulating plasma AdipoQ portend poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, recent studies have reported that elevated expression levels of AdipoQ in breast tissue are correlated with advanced stages of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which AdipoQ in breast tissue acts directly on tumor cells to regulate the early steps of breast cancer metastasis. In the present study, the effects of different AdipoQ isoforms on the metastatic potential of human breast cancer cells were investigated. The results revealed that globular adiponectin (gAd) promoted invasive cell morphology and significantly increased the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells, whereas full-length adiponectin (fAd) had no effect on these cells. Additionally, gAd, but not fAd, increased the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3B)-II and intracellular LC3B puncta, which are indicators of autophagosome formation, thus suggesting autophagic induction by gAd. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagic function by autophagy-related protein 7 knockdown attenuated the gAd-induced increase in invasiveness in breast cancer cells. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that a specific AdipoQ isoform may enhance breast cancer invasion, possibly via autophagic induction. Understanding the roles of the different AdipoQ isoforms as microenvironmental regulatory molecules may aid the development of effective AdipoQ-based treatments for breast cancer. PMID:26870258

  19. Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunpeng; Zhu, Changjun; Chen, Hongyan; Li, Linwei; Guo, Liping; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Shih Hsin

    2010-09-01

    Microtubule (MT) kinesin motor proteins orchestrate various cellular processes (e.g. mitosis, motility and organelle transportation) and have been implicated in human carcinogenesis. Kif18A, a plus-end directed MT depolymerase kinesin, regulates MT dynamics, chromosome congression and cell division. In this study, we report that Kif18A is overexpressed in human breast cancers and Kif18A overexpression is associated with tumor grade, metastasis and poor survival. Functional analyses reveal that ectopic overexpression of Kif18A results in cell multinucleation, whereas ablation of Kif18A expression significantly inhibits the proliferative capability of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of Kif18A not only affects the critical mitotic function of Kif18A but also decreases cancer cell migration by stabilizing MTs at leading edges and ultimately induces anoikis of cells with inactivation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway. Together, our results indicate that Kif18A is involved in human breast carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human breast cancer. PMID:20595236

  20. A Mechanistic Study of the Effect of Doxorubicin/Adriamycin on the Estrogen Response in a Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Jessica E.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Conaway, Mark R.; Silva, Corinne M.; Parsons, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Estrogen treatment limits the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cell lines, suggesting that estrogen-pathway signaling may confer chemotherapeutic resistance. This study investigates the molecular responses of ER+ breast cancer cell lines to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, in the presence or absence of estrogen. Methods ER+ MCF-7 and T47-D cells were cultured in hormone-starved or estrogen-containing media with or without doxorubicin at concentrations mimicking the low concentrations seen in plasma and tumor microenvironments in humans following typical bolus administration. Protein levels, phosphorylations, and interactions of estrogen-signaling molecules were assessed following these treatments, as well the effects of ER signaling inhibitors on cell proliferation. Results Surprisingly, estrogen and doxorubicin co-treatment markedly induced pro-growth alterations compared to doxorubicin alone and modestly enhanced estrogen alone-induced changes. Several inhibitors suppressed cell proliferation in the presence of doxorubicin and estrogen. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that molecular changes caused by doxorubicin in ER+ breast cancer cells can be reversed by estrogen, providing molecular evidence for the poorer responses of ER+ tumors to doxorubicin in the presence of physiologic estrogen levels. Our results also suggest that the addition of drugs targeting the ER, EGFR, the SFKs, MEK, PI3K, and/or the MMP proteins to a conventional chemotherapy regimen may improve chemosensitivity. PMID:22964943

  1. Modeling the interaction of binary and ternary mixtures of estradiol with bisphenol A and bisphenol A F in an in vitro estrogen mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are concurrently exposed to xenoestrogens and to physiological levels of endogenous estrogens. Endogenous estrogen levels vary from low levels in infants to high levels during pregnancy and in young women. However, few studies have addressed how xenoestrogens interact with...

  2. Modelling defined mixtures of environmental oestrogens found in domestic animal and sewage treatment effluents using an in vitro oestrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern that exposure of fish, wildlife, and humans to water sources contaminated with estrogens could potentially impact reproductive health. Environmental estrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipal...

  3. Aging of stromal-derived human breast fibroblasts might contribute to breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Martens, John W M; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Bolt-deVries, Joan; Bosma, Peter T; Swiggers, Susan J J; Klijn, Jan G M; Foekens, John A

    2003-02-01

    Age is an important factor in the development and spread of breast cancer. Stromal cells also contribute to breast cancer growth and metastasis through the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) modifiers such as urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA), its receptor (uPAR), its inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and growth factors, including the fibroblast and insulin-like growth factors (FGF's and IGF's). In the present study we have investigated whether breast fibroblasts aged in vitro through passage in culture display altered levels of the plasminogen activator system and growth factors that are known to modulate that system. With real-time RT-PCR we found that during passage human breast fibroblasts, whether derived from the tumour burden or from matched adjacent normal breast tissue, exhibited a consistent increase in PAI-1 and FGF-1 and a decrease in MMP-2 mRNA expression. In addition, in 5 out of 7 fibroblast strains we observed an induction of uPA expression in combination with a reduced IGF-1 expression. Interestingly, while during aging MMP-2 protein increased in all tumour-derived fibroblast strains, these protein levels were reduced in all normal tissue- derived fibroblasts. No other clear-cut age-dependent alterations were found in the all-together 25 factors investigated. We furthermore demonstrate in one tumour-derived fibroblast strain that the increases in uPA and PAI-1 mRNA and MMP-2 protein production are inversely related to the telomere length. Artificially increasing telomere length in this fibroblast strain by expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) prevented senescence and resulted in late passage cultures with early passage uPA, PAI-1 and MMP-2 levels. Our results show that aging accompanied by telomere loss induces PAI-1 and FGF-1 mRNA expression in all breast fibroblast strains, increases uPA and decreases IGF-1 mRNA expression in a subset, and increases MMP-2 protein expression only in tumour-derived breast fibroblasts. These age-induced levels of PAI-1, FGF-1, uPA and MMP-2 in stromal breast fibroblast could contribute to breast cancer progression. PMID:12574821

  4. Comparison of the antiproliferative activity of crude ethanol extracts of nine salvia species grown in Jordan against breast cancer cell line models

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Dahab, Rana; Afifi, Fatma; Kasabri, Violet; Majdalawi, Lara; Naffa, Randa

    2012-01-01

    Background: The antiproliferative activity of Salvia species grown in Jordan has not been fully evaluated yet. The aim of this work was to study the antiproliferative activity of crude ethanol extracts from nine Salvia species grown in Jordan against a panel of breast cancer cell lines. Material and Methods: Cytotoxic activity was evaluated in human tumor models of breast cancer; MCF-7, T47D, ZR-75-1, and BT 474 by the sulforhodamine B assay. In addition, the extracts were evaluated using a non-transformed cell line (Vero) and normal fibroblast cells in order to demonstrate their selectivity and safety. Results: From the nice ethanol extracts under investigation, those of S. dominica and S. fruticosa showed an inhibitory concentration of 50% of cells (IC50) in concentrations less than 30μg/mL against the four cell lines under investigation. S. syriaca and S. hormium showed an IC50 below 30μg/ml for two out of the four cell lines. S. fruticosa, S. hormium and S. syriaca showed selectivity in their antiproliferative activity against estrogen receptor positive cell lines with minimal toxicity against normal human periodontal fibroblasts. Phytochemical screening using thin layer chromatography indicated the presence of terpenoids, flavonoids and coumarins in all examined extracts. Conclusion: Three of the plant extracts under investigation exhibited antiproliferative activity against breast cancer cells and were shown to be safe and selective. These could be considered as a potential source for novel anticancer therapy. PMID:24082637

  5. The Gαi AND Gαq Proteins Mediate the Effects of Melatonin on Steroid/Thyroid Hormone Receptor Transcriptional Activity and Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ling; Yuan, Lin; Chen, Qi; Dong, Chunmin; Mao, Lulu; Rowan, Brian; Frasch, Tripp; Hill, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, via its MT1 receptor, but not the MT2 receptor, can modulate the transcriptional activity of various nuclear receptors (ERα and RARα, but not ERβ) in MCF-7, T47D and ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell lines. The anti-proliferative and nuclear receptor modulatory actions of melatonin are mediated via the MT1 G protein-coupled receptor expressed in human breast cancer cells. However, the specific G proteins and associated pathways involved in nuclear receptor transcriptional regulation by melatonin are not yet clear. Upon activation, the MT1 receptor specifically couples to the Gαi2, Gαi3, Gαq and Gαll proteins, and via activation of Gαi2 proteins, melatonin suppresses forskolin-induced cyclic AMP (cAMP) production, while melatonin activation of Gαq, is able to inhibit phospholipid hydrolysis and ATP’s induction of inositol triphosphate (IP3) production in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Employing dominant-negative (DN) and dominant-positive (DP) forms of these G proteins we demonstrate that Gαi2 proteins mediate the suppression of estrogen-induced ERα transcriptional activity by melatonin, while the Gq protein mediates the enhancement of retinoid-induced RARα transcriptional activity by melatonin. However, the growth-inhibitory actions of melatonin are mediated via both Gαi2 and Gαq proteins. PMID:18705646

  6. Inactivated Sendai Virus Strain Tianjin Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer MCF-7 Cells by Promoting Caspase Activation and Fas/FasL Expression

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhe; Li, Xiao-Xia; Li, Mei; Han, Han; Chen, Jun; Zang, Sitao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Virotherapy represents a promising new approach for treating cancer. Here the authors have analyzed the effect of ultraviolet-inactivated Sendai virus strain Tianjin (UV-Tianjin) on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, UV-Tianjin inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and T47D breast cancer cell lines, although MCF-7 cells were most susceptible to UV-Tianjin treatment. Hoechst staining and flow cytometric analysis of UV-Tianjin-treated MCF-7 cells revealed that UV-Tianjin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, UV-Tianjin treatment resulted in reductions in the mitochondria membrane potential of MCF-7 cells and regulated the levels and activities of Bcl-2, Bax, cyt c, caspases, Fas, and Fas ligand (FasL). In vivo, UV-Tianjin inhibited the growth of MCF-7 tumors in nude mice and increased tumor cell apoptosis compared with saline-treated controls. In addition, the percentage of tumor cells positive for cleaved versions of caspase-7, caspase-8, and caspase-9 was higher in UV-Tianjin-treated tumors than in saline-treated controls. In summary, UV-Tianjin exhibited the antitumor activity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells both in vitro and in vivo. The UV-Tianjin treatment seemed to induce apoptosis by activating both the mitochondrial and death receptor apoptotic pathways. PMID:25517620

  7. Ocular input for human melatonin regulation: relevance to breast cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Levin, Robert; Brainard, George C.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of breast cancer on women across the world has been extensive and severe. As prevalence of breast cancer is greatest in industrialized regions, exposure to light at night has been proposed as a potential risk factor. This theory is supported by the epidemiological observations of decreased breast cancer in blind women and increased breast cancer in women who do shift-work. In addition, human, animal and in vitro studies which have investigated the melatonin-cancer dynamic indicate an apparent relationship between light, melatonin and cancer, albeit complex. Recent developments in understanding melatonin regulation by light in humans are examined, with particular attention to factors that contribute to the sensitivity of the light-induced melatonin suppression response. Specifically, the role of spectral characteristics of light is addressed, and recent relevant action spectrum studies in humans and other mammalian species are discussed. Across five action spectra for circadian and other non-visual responses, a peak sensitivity between 446-484 nm was identified. Under highly controlled exposure circumstances, less than 1 lux of monochromatic light elicited a significant suppression of nocturnal melatonin. In view of the possible link between light exposure, melatonin suppression and cancer risk, it is important to continue to identify the basic related ocular physiology. Visual performance, rather than circadian function, has been the primary focus of architectural lighting systems. It is now necessary to reevaluate lighting strategies, with consideration of circadian influences, in an effort to maximize physiological homeostasis and health.

  8. [Breast is best--human milk for premature infants].

    PubMed

    Riskin, Arieh; Bader, David

    2003-03-01

    Nutrition for preterm babies is aimed at achieving expected intrauterine growth and accretion of nutrients. Early trophic feedings should be started as soon as possible for gastrointestinal priming. Mother's (breast) milk is the best food for preterm babies. Its advantages are in host defence, nutritional components and suitability for gut absorption, as well as its psychological and developmental value. The limitations of human milk for preterm babies, mainly in protein and minerals, can be compensated for by using powdered human milk fortifier. Sucking skills usually mature around 34 weeks, corrected gestational age. Thus, small preemies are initially fed by orogastric tubes, meaning that expressed breast milk is used. Support of lactation in mothers of preemies mandates protection of the mother and child bonding process and early skin to skin contact ("kangeroo care"). Methods for storage of expressed breast milk and the recommended length of storage are discussed. Milk bank mandates pasteurization and freezing of the donors' milk. Most of the nutritional and immunological advantages of human milk are preserved after such treatments. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in preterm infants, that were acquired from mother's expressed breast milk, are not uncommon, and require further attention. PMID:12696478

  9. Novel Selective Estrogen Mimics for the Treatment of Tamoxifen-Resistant Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Mary Ellen; Perez White, Bethany E.; Gherezghiher, Teshome; Michalsen, Bradley T.; Xiong, Rui; Patel, Hitisha; Zhao, Huiping; Maximov, Philipp Y.; Jordan, V. Craig; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.; Tonetti, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-resistant breast cancer is a major clinical obstacle. The use of 17β-estradiol (E2) has re-emerged as a potential treatment option following exhaustive use of tamoxifen (TAM) or aromatase inhibitors although side effects have hindered its clinical usage. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) expression was shown to be a predictor of disease outcome for patients receiving endocrine therapy and may predict a positive response to an estrogenic treatment. Here, we have investigated the use of novel benzothiophene selective estrogen mimics (SEMs) as an alternative to E2 for the treatment of TAM-resistant breast cancer. Following in vitro characterization of SEMs, a panel of clinically relevant PKCα-expressing, TAM-resistant models were used to investigate the antitumor effects of these compounds. SEM treatment resulted in growth inhibition and apoptosis of TAM-resistant cell lines in vitro. In vivo SEM treatment induced tumor regression of TAM-resistant T47D:A18/PKCα and T47D:A18-TAM1 tumor models. T47D:A18/PKCα tumor regression was accompanied by translocation of ERα to extranuclear sites, possibly defining a mechanism through which these SEMs initiate tumor regression. SEM treatment did not stimulate growth of E2-dependent T47D:A18/neo tumors. Additionally, unlike E2 or TAM, treatment with SEMs did not stimulate uterine weight gain. These findings suggest the further development of SEMs as a feasible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of endocrine-resistant breast cancer without the side effects associated with E2. PMID:25205655

  10. Excretion of mefloquine in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Edstein, M D; Veenendaal, J R; Hyslop, R

    1988-01-01

    Concentrations of mefloquine in plasma and breast milk were measured in 2 women following the administration of one Lariam tablet (250 mg mefloquine). The milk-to-plasma ratio of mefloquine based on the area under the plasma and milk concentration curves was 0.13 and 0.16. After a maternal mefloquine dose of 3.73 mg/kg and assuming a daily milk ingestion of 1 litre over a week, the maximum amount of drug ingested by an infant would be 0.14 mg/kg. During lactation the plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution of mefloquine were about 50% less than the same parameters calculated after lactation had ceased. PMID:3262044

  11. The molecular landscape of the normal human breast – defining normal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A key approach in understanding how breast cancer can occur is to determine the regulatory pathways at play in the normal breast and to identify precisely the normal developmental mechanisms subverted during early breast cancer progression. Using normal human breast tissue samples, Pardo and colleagues have identified the gene targets and pathways displaying fluctuating expression as a consequence of the menstrual cycle. Detailed characterization of how the human breast functions in its normal state, and how this may be perturbed at its earliest point, will provide a critical step toward the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:25928365

  12. The Marine-Derived Sipholenol A-4-O-3′,4′-Dichlorobenzoate Inhibits Breast Cancer Growth and Motility in Vitro and in Vivo through the Suppression of Brk and FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Mohamed R.; Foudah, Ahmed I.; Ebrahim, Hassan Y.; Meyer, Sharon A.; Sayed, Khalid A. El

    2014-01-01

    Sipholenol A is a natural sipholane triterpenoid isolated from the Red Sea sponge, Callyspongia siphonella. Previous studies showed the antimigratory and antiproliferative activities of the semisynthetic sipholenol A esters against breast cancer cell lines. This study investigated the effects of sipholenol A-4-O-3′,4′-dichlorobenzoate (SPA) on the growth, migration and invasion of diverse human breast cancer cells. Results showed that SPA inhibited the growth of the human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT-474 and T-47D, in a dose-dependent manner. Immunofluorescent analysis showed that SPA significantly reduced Ki-67-positive cells in MDA-MB-231 cells. Flow cytometry and Western blot analyses revealed that SPA treatment suppressed MDA-MB-231 cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. In addition, SPA suppressed breast cancer cell migration, invasion and decreased Brk and FAK activation in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking study suggested a perfect fitting at the FAK’s FERM domain, inhibiting the main autophosphorylation site, Y397, which was further confirmed by Western blot analysis. Most known small molecule FAK inhibitors target the kinase domain, creating several off-target side effects. The in vivo studies showed that SPA treatment suppressed breast tumor growth and Ki-67, CD31, p-Brk and p-FAK expression in orthotopic breast cancer in nude mice. In conclusion, SPA inhibited the growth, invasion and migration of breast cancer cells possibly via deactivating Brk and FAK signaling, suggesting good potential for therapeutic use to control invasive breast cancer. PMID:24736807

  13. Retinoic acid protects human breast cancer cells against etoposide-induced apoptosis by NF-kappaB-dependent but cIAP2-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Retinoids, through their cognate nuclear receptors, exert potent effects on cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis, and have significant promise for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. These ligands can determine the ultimate fate of target cells by stimulating or repressing gene expression directly, or indirectly through crosstalking with other signal transducers. Results Using different breast cancer cell models, we show here that depending on the cellular context retinoids can signal either towards cell death or cell survival. Indeed, retinoids can induce the expression of pro-apoptotic (i.e. TRAIL, TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, Apo2L/TNFSF10) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. cIAP2, inhibitor of apoptosis protein-2) genes. Promoter mapping, gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that retinoids induce the expression of this gene mainly through crosstalk with NF-kappaB. Supporting this crosstalk, the activation of NF-kappaB by retinoids in T47D cells antagonizes the apoptosis triggered by the chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide, camptothecin or doxorubicin. Notably apoptosis induced by death ligands (i.e. TRAIL or antiFAS) is not antagonized by retinoids. That knockdown of cIAP2 expression by small interfering RNA does not alter the inhibition of etoposide-induced apoptosis by retinoids in T47D cells reveals that stimulation of cIAP2 expression is not the cause of their anti-apoptotic action. However, ectopic overexpression of a NF-kappaB repressor increases apoptosis by retinoids moderately and abrogates almost completely the retinoid-dependent inhibition of etoposide-induced apoptosis. Our data exclude cIAP2 and suggest that retinoids target other regulator(s) of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway to induce resistance to etoposide on certain breast cancer cells. Conclusions This study shows an important role for the NF-kappaB pathway in retinoic acid signaling and retinoic acid-mediated resistance to cancer therapy-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells, independently of cIAP2. Our data support the use of NF-kappaB pathway activation as a marker for screening that will help to develop novel retinoids, or retinoid-based combination therapies with improved efficacy. PMID:20102612

  14. Expression of Six1 in luminal breast cancers predicts poor prognosis and promotes increases in tumor initiating cells by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mammary-specific overexpression of Six1 in mice induces tumors that resemble human breast cancer, some having undergone epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and exhibiting stem/progenitor cell features. Six1 overexpression in human breast cancer cells promotes EMT and metastatic dissemination. We hypothesized that Six1 plays a role in the tumor initiating cell (TIC) population specifically in certain subtypes of breast cancer, and that by understanding its mechanism of action, we could potentially develop new means to target TICs. Methods We examined gene expression datasets to determine the breast cancer subtypes with Six1 overexpression, and then examined its expression in the CD24low/CD44+ putative TIC population in human luminal breast cancers xenografted through mice and in luminal breast cancer cell lines. Six1 overexpression, or knockdown, was performed in different systems to examine how Six1 levels affect TIC characteristics, using gene expression and flow cytometric analysis, tumorsphere assays, and in vivo TIC assays in immunocompromised and immune-competent mice. We examined the molecular pathways by which Six1 influences TICs using genetic/inhibitor approaches in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we examined the expression of Six1 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) in human breast cancers. Results High levels of Six1 are associated with adverse outcomes in luminal breast cancers, particularly the luminal B subtype. Six1 levels are enriched in the CD24low/CD44+ TIC population in human luminal breast cancers xenografted through mice, and in tumorsphere cultures in MCF7 and T47D luminal breast cancer cells. When overexpressed in MCF7 cells, Six1expands the TIC population through activation of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MEK)/ERK signaling. Inhibition of ERK signaling in MCF7-Six1 cells with MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and AZD6244, restores the TIC population of luminal breast cancer cells back to that observed in control cells. Administration of AZD6244 dramatically inhibits tumor formation efficiency and metastasis in cells that express high levels of Six1 ectopically or endogenously. Finally, we demonstrate that Six1 significantly correlates with phosphorylated ERK in human breast cancers. Conclusions Six1 plays an important role in the TIC population in luminal breast cancers and induces a TIC phenotype by enhancing both TGF-β and ERK signaling. MEK1/2 kinase inhibitors are potential candidates for targeting TICs in breast tumors. PMID:22765220

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Farjami Shayesteh, Saber; Heidari, Zahra; Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION-BBN in human blood serum. DSPION-BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION-BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T2-weighted and T2*-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION-BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T2*-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors.

  16. Modelling defined mixtures of environmental oestrogens found in domestic animal and sewage treatment effluents using an in vitro oestrogen-mediated transcriptional activation assay (T47D-KBluc).

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Gray, L Earl; Wilson, Vickie S

    2012-06-01

    There is growing concern of exposure of fish, wildlife and humans to water sources contaminated with oestrogens and the potential impact on reproductive health. Environmental oestrogens can come from various sources including concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFO), municipal waste, agricultural and industrial effluents. US EPA's drinking water contaminant candidate list 3 (CCL3) includes several oestrogenic compounds. Although these contaminants are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, they are known or anticipated to occur in public water systems and may require future regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Using an in vitro transcriptional activation assay, this study evaluated oestrogens from CCL3 both individually and as a seven oestrogen mixture (fixed ray design) over a broad range of concentrations, including environmentally relevant concentrations. Log EC(50) and Hillslope values for individual oestrogens were as follows: estrone, -11.92, 1.283; estradiol-17α, -9.61, 1.486; estradiol-17β, 11.77, 1.494; estriol, -11.14, 1.074; ethinyl estradiol-17α, -12.63, 1.562; Mestranol, -11.08, 0.809 and Equilin, -11.48, 0.946. In addition, mixtures that mirrored the primary oestrogens found in swine, poultry and dairy CAFO effluent (fixed-ratio ray design), and a ternary mixture (4 × 4 × 4 factorial design) of oestrogens found in hormone replacement therapy and/or oral contraceptives were tested. Mixtures were evaluated for additivity using both the concentration addition (CA) model and oestrogen equivalence (EEQ) model. For each of the mixture studies, a broad range of concentrations were tested, both above and below environmentally relevant concentrations. Results show that the observed data did not vary consistently from either the CA or EEQ predictions for any mixture. Therefore, either the CA or EEQ model should be useful predictors for modelling oestrogen mixtures. PMID:22612477

  17. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  18. Analyzing the regulation of metabolic pathways in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumor therapy mainly attacks the metabolism to interfere the tumor's anabolism and signaling of proliferative second messengers. However, the metabolic demands of different cancers are very heterogeneous and depend on their origin of tissue, age, gender and other clinical parameters. We investigated tumor specific regulation in the metabolism of breast cancer. Methods For this, we mapped gene expression data from microarrays onto the corresponding enzymes and their metabolic reaction network. We used Haar Wavelet transforms on optimally arranged grid representations of metabolic pathways as a pattern recognition method to detect orchestrated regulation of neighboring enzymes in the network. Significant combined expression patterns were used to select metabolic pathways showing shifted regulation of the aggressive tumors. Results Besides up-regulation for energy production and nucleotide anabolism, we found an interesting cellular switch in the interplay of biosynthesis of steroids and bile acids. The biosynthesis of steroids was up-regulated for estrogen synthesis which is needed for proliferative signaling in breast cancer. In turn, the decomposition of steroid precursors was blocked by down-regulation of the bile acid pathway. Conclusion We applied an intelligent pattern recognition method for analyzing the regulation of metabolism and elucidated substantial regulation of human breast cancer at the interplay of cholesterol biosynthesis and bile acid metabolism pointing to specific breast cancer treatment. PMID:20831783

  19. Cytotoxicity of fucosterol containing fraction of marine algae against breast and colon carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Khanavi, Mahnaz; Gheidarloo, Razieh; Sadati, Nargess; Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Shams; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Tavajohi, Shohreh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Context: Marine algae produce different secondary metabolites with a wide range of biological activities. Many studies have been achieved on the screening of biological effects of marine organisms and a lot of active compounds were isolated and characterized. Aims: In an attempt to find cytotoxic compound of hexane fraction, isolation, identification, and cytotoxicity of active compound of this fraction were performed. Materials and Methods: In this study, total methanolic (70%) extract and partition fractions of hexane, chloroform (CHCl3), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and MeOH–H2O of Sargassum angustifolium, Chondria dasyphylla, and Ulva flexuosa, collected from coastlines of the Persian Gulf in south of Iran, were studied against colon carcinoma (HT-29), colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), breast ductal carcinoma (T47D), and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines by MTT assay. Statistical Analysis Used: IC50 (median growth inhibitory concentration) values were calculated by Sigmaplot (10) software. Results: Hexane fraction of Chondria dasyphylla (IC50 82.26 ± 4.09 μg/ml) and MeOH-H2O fraction of Ulva flexuosa (IC50 116.92 ± 8.58 μg/ml) showed cytotoxic activity against proliferation of T47D cells. Hexane fraction of Sargassum angustifolium was also observed for cytotoxicity against T47D and HT-29 cell lines (IC50 166.42 ± 26.7 and 190.24 ± 52.8 μg/ml), respectively. An investigation of a component from the hexane fraction of Sargassum angustifolium yielded a steroidal metabolite, fucosterol, with cytotoxicity in T47D and HT29 (IC50 27.94 ± 9.3 and 70.41 ± 7.5 μg/ml). Conclusions: These results indicated that fucosterol, the most abundant phytosterol in brown algae, is responsible for cytotoxic effect of this extract against breast and colon carcinoma cell lines. PMID:22438665

  20. A Hormone-responsive 3D Culture Model of the Human Mammary Gland Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Lucia; Sweeney, Michael F; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2016-01-01

    The process of mammary epithelial morphogenesis is influenced by hormones. The study of hormone action on the breast epithelium using 2D cultures is limited to cell proliferation and gene expression endpoints. However, in the organism, mammary morphogenesis occurs in a 3D environment. 3D culture systems help bridge the gap between monolayer cell culture (2D) and the complexity of the organism. Herein, we describe a 3D culture model of the human breast epithelium that is suitable to study hormone action. It uses the commercially available hormone-responsive human breast epithelial cell line, T47D, and rat tail collagen type 1 as a matrix. This 3D culture model responds to the main mammotropic hormones: estradiol, progestins and prolactin. The influence of these hormones on epithelial morphogenesis can be observed after 1- or 2-week treatment according to the endpoint. The 3D cultures can be harvested for analysis of epithelial morphogenesis, cell proliferation and gene expression. PMID:26891095

  1. Brefeldin A reduces anchorage-independent survival, cancer stem cell potential and migration of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chao-Neng; Hong, Yi-Ren; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Yu, Tsai-Jung; Hung, Ting-Wei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Cho, Chung-Lung; Liu, Chien-Tsung; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subset of cancer cells in tumors or established cancer cell lines that can initiate and sustain the growth of tumors in vivo. Cancer stem cells can be enriched in serum-free, suspended cultures that allow the formation of tumorspheres over several days to weeks. Brefeldin A (BFA) is a mycotoxin that induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in eukaryotic cells. We found that BFA, at sub-microgram per milliliter concentrations, preferentially induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 suspension cultures (EC50: 0.016 µg/mL) compared to adhesion cultures. BFA also effectively inhibited clonogenic activity and the migration and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) activity of MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting analysis indicated that the effects of BFA may be mediated by the down-regulation of breast CSC marker CD44 and anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, as well as the reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, BFA also displayed selective cytotoxicity toward suspended MDA-MB-468 cells, and suppressed tumorsphere formation in T47D and MDA-MB-453 cells, suggesting that BFA may be effective against breast cancer cells of various phenotypes. PMID:25356567

  2. BORIS (CTCFL) is not expressed in most human breast cell lines and high grade breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hines, William C; Bazarov, Alexey V; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Yaswen, Paul

    2010-01-01

    BORIS (CTCFL) is the only known paralog of the versatile regulatory protein CTCF, a multifunctional DNA binding protein that mediates distinct gene regulatory functions involved in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Unlike CTCF, the expression of BORIS is normally restricted to specific cells in testes (the only cells where CTCF is not expressed), where it may play a role in reprogramming the methylation pattern of male germ line DNA. Frequent amplification of the 20q13.2 region, which contains the BORIS gene, and expression of BORIS transcripts in diverse human tumors and cell lines have led to the hypothesis that aberrant expression of BORIS may play a role in tumorigenesis by interfering with CTCF functions. However, recent studies using more quantitative methods indicate low frequency of BORIS expression in melanoma, ovarian, prostate, and bladder carcinomas. To investigate the relationship between chromosome 20q13 amplification and BORIS mRNA levels within breast cancer cell lines and tissues, we developed a quantitative RT-PCR assay to measure the levels of BORIS mRNA. Endpoint RT-PCR assays were also used to investigate the possible expression of alternatively spliced variants. Using multiple primer sets and controls, we found that neither mature BORIS transcripts nor spliced variants are commonly expressed at detectable levels in malignant breast cells or tissues, although endogenous BORIS transcripts can be induced in MCF-7 cells following 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment. In conclusion, in most breast cancer cells, endogenous BORIS is unlikely to be expressed at sufficient levels to interfere with CTCF functions. Thus it is improbable that aberrant BORIS expression plays a role in most human breast cancers. PMID:20305816

  3. BORIS (CTCFL) Is Not Expressed in Most Human Breast Cell Lines and High Grade Breast Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William C.; Bazarov, Alexey V.; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Yaswen, Paul

    2010-01-01

    BORIS (CTCFL) is the only known paralog of the versatile regulatory protein CTCF, a multifunctional DNA binding protein that mediates distinct gene regulatory functions involved in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Unlike CTCF, the expression of BORIS is normally restricted to specific cells in testes (the only cells where CTCF is not expressed), where it may play a role in reprogramming the methylation pattern of male germ line DNA. Frequent amplification of the 20q13.2 region, which contains the BORIS gene, and expression of BORIS transcripts in diverse human tumors and cell lines have led to the hypothesis that aberrant expression of BORIS may play a role in tumorigenesis by interfering with CTCF functions. However, recent studies using more quantitative methods indicate low frequency of BORIS expression in melanoma, ovarian, prostate, and bladder carcinomas. To investigate the relationship between chromosome 20q13 amplification and BORIS mRNA levels within breast cancer cell lines and tissues, we developed a quantitative RT-PCR assay to measure the levels of BORIS mRNA. Endpoint RT-PCR assays were also used to investigate the possible expression of alternatively spliced variants. Using multiple primer sets and controls, we found that neither mature BORIS transcripts nor spliced variants are commonly expressed at detectable levels in malignant breast cells or tissues, although endogenous BORIS transcripts can be induced in MCF-7 cells following 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment. In conclusion, in most breast cancer cells, endogenous BORIS is unlikely to be expressed at sufficient levels to interfere with CTCF functions. Thus it is improbable that aberrant BORIS expression plays a role in most human breast cancers. PMID:20305816

  4. Detection of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Patients with Breast Tumor in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Ding, Jie; Zhai, Kan

    2015-01-01

    The presence of HPV in breast tissue and the potential causal association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and breast cancer (BC) remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to compare the HPV prevalence in BC tissues, adjacent normal breast tissues and breast benign disease tissues and to investigate the possible association between HPV and breast tumor development in Chinese women. Paraffin-embedded specimens from 187 pairs of BCs including tumor and normal breast tissue adjacent to tumors and 92 breast benign lesions between June 2009 and July 2014 were investigated by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and type-specific PCR, respectively. With strictly quality control, HPV positive infection was detected in three BC tissues. No HPV positive infection was detected in all normal breast tissue adjacent to tumors and benign breast tissues. Through our detailed analysis, rare HPV infection in this study suggests that HPV might not be associated with BC progression. PMID:26295705

  5. Complex CGH alterations on chromosome arm 8p at candidate tumor suppressor gene loci in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Venter, Deon J; Ramus, Susan J; Hammet, Fleur M A; de Silva, Melanie; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Petrovic, Vida; Price, Gareth; Armes, Jane E

    2005-07-15

    Loss of genetic material from chromosome arm 8p occurs frequently in human breast carcinomas, consistent with this region of the genome harboring one or more tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). We used the complementary techniques of microsatellite-based LOH, high-density FISH, and conventional CGH on 6 breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, SKBR3, T47D, MDA MB453, BT549, and BT474) to investigate the molecular cytogenetic changes occurring on chromosome 8 during tumorigenesis, with particular emphasis on 6 potential TSGs on 8p. We identified multiple alterations of chromosome 8, including partial or complete deletion of 8p or 8q, duplication of 8q, and isochromosome 8q. The detailed FISH analysis showed several complex rearrangements of 8p with differing breakpoints of varying proximity to the genes of interest. High rates of LOH were observed at markers adjacent to or within PCM1, DUSP4/MKP2, NKX3A, and DLC1, supporting their status as candidate TSGs. Due to the complex ploidy status of these cell lines, relative loss of 8p material detected by CGH did not always correlate with microsatellite-based LOH results. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms accompanying the dysregulation of candidate tumor suppressor loci on chromosome arm 8p, and identify appropriate cellular systems for further investigation of their biological properties. PMID:15993269

  6. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin fosters human breast tumor growth by promoting type 2 inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander; Xu, Kangling; Wu, Te-Chia; Aspord, Caroline; Tindle, Sasha; Marches, Florentina; Gallegos, Michael; Burton, Elizabeth C.; Savino, Daniel; Hori, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Zurawski, Sandra; Zurawski, Gerard; Bover, Laura; Liu, Yong-Jun; Banchereau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The human breast tumor microenvironment can display features of T helper type 2 (Th2) inflammation, and Th2 inflammation can promote tumor development. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms contributing to Th2 inflammation in breast tumors remain unclear. Here, we show that human breast cancer cells produce thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Breast tumor supernatants, in a TSLP-dependent manner, induce expression of OX40L on dendritic cells (DCs). OX40L+ DCs are found in primary breast tumor infiltrates. OX40L+ DCs drive development of inflammatory Th2 cells producing interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor in vitro. Antibodies neutralizing TSLP or OX40L inhibit breast tumor growth and interleukin-13 production in a xenograft model. Thus, breast cancer cell–derived TSLP contributes to the inflammatory Th2 microenvironment conducive to breast tumor development by inducing OX40L expression on DCs. PMID:21339324

  7. Biological determinants of radiation-induced human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feig, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    This is the second in a three part series on the hypothetical risk from x-ray mammography. It will review those aspects of breast anatomy, histology, physiology, and pathology which are pertinent to radiation carcinogenesis. Radiation-induced breast cancers are histologically identical to the naturally occurring type in that they arise from the ductal epithelium and consist of a similar proportion of infiltrating and intraductal lesions. Possible explanations for the increased resistance to radiation effect in women over 30 years of age at time of exposure include regression of the glandular target tissue, hormonal changes, and parity. Examples of age-related sensitivity and hormonal dependence in other radiation-induced human and animal tumors will be discussed.

  8. Expression of the fructose transporter GLUT5 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-León, S P; Golde, D W; Concha, I I; Rivas, C I; Delgado-López, F; Baselga, J; Nualart, F; Vera, J C

    1996-01-01

    The primary metabolic characteristic of malignant cells is an increased uptake of glucose and its anaerobic metabolism. We studied the expression and function of the glucose transporters in human breast cancer cell lines and analyzed their expression in normal and neoplastic primary human breast tissue. Hexose uptake assays and immunoblotting experiments revealed that the breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-468 express the glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT2, isoforms expressed in both normal and neoplastic breast tissue. We also found that the breast cancer cell lines transport fructose and express the fructose transporter GLUT5. Immunolocalization studies revealed that GLUT5 is highly expressed in vivo in human breast cancer but is absent in normal human breast tissue. These findings indicate that human breast cancer cells have a specialized capacity to transport fructose, a metabolic substrate believed to be used by few human tissues. Identification of a high-affinity fructose transporter on human breast cancer cells opens opportunities to develop novel strategies for early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8700847

  9. Characterization of a tissue-specific CDP/Cux isoform, p75, activated in breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Brigitte; Watson, Peter; Poirier, Madeleine; Leduy, Lam; Bérubé, Ginette; Meterissian, Sarkis; Jolicoeur, Paul; Nepveu, Alain

    2002-11-15

    Two isoforms of the CCAAT-displacement protein/cut homeobox (CDP/Cux) transcription factor have been characterized thus far. The full length protein, p200, which contains four DNA binding domains, transiently binds to DNA and carries the CCAAT-displacement activity. The p110 isoform is generated by proteolytic processing at the G1-S transition and is capable of stable interaction with DNA. Here we demonstrate the existence of a shorter CDP/Cux isoform, p75, which contains only two DNA binding domains, Cut repeat 3 and the Cut homeodomain, and binds more stably to DNA. CDP/Cux p75 was able to repress a reporter carrying the promoter for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 gene and to activate a DNA polymerase alpha gene reporter. Expression of CDP/Cux p75 involved a novel mechanism: transcription initiation within intron 20. The intron 20-initiated mRNA (I20-mRNA) was expressed at higher level in the thymus and in CD4+/CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. I20-mRNA was expressed only weakly or not at all in normal human mammary epithelial cells and normal breast tissues but was detected in many breast tumor cells lines and breast tumors. In invasive tumors a significant association was established between higher I20-mRNA expression and a diffuse infiltrative growth pattern (n = 41, P = 0.0137). In agreement with these findings, T47D breast cancer cells stably expressing p75 could not form tubule structures in collagen but rather developed as solid undifferentiated aggregates of cells. Taken together, these results suggest that aberrant expression of the CDP/Cux p75 isoform in mammary epithelial cells may be associated with the process of tumorigenesis in breast cancer. PMID:12438259

  10. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. )

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Expression of estrogen receptor beta increases integrin alpha1 and integrin beta1 levels and enhances adhesion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Karolina; Ström, Anders; Lock, John G; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Haldosén, Lars-Arne; Helguero, Luisa A

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen effects on mammary gland development and differentiation are mediated by two receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta). Estrogen-bound ERalpha induces proliferation of mammary epithelial and cancer cells, while ERbeta is important for maintenance of the differentiated epithelium and inhibits proliferation in different cell systems. In addition, the normal breast contains higher ERbeta levels compared to the early stage breast cancers, suggesting that loss of ERbeta could be important in cancer development. Analysis of ERbeta-/- mice has consistently revealed reduced expression of cell adhesion proteins. As such, ERbeta is a candidate modulator of epithelial homeostasis and metastasis. Consequently, the aim of this study was to analyze estrogenic effects on adhesion of breast cancer cells expressing ERalpha and ERbeta. As ERbeta is widely found in breast cancer but not in cell lines, we used ERalpha positive T47-D and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to generate cells with inducible ERbeta expression. Furthermore, the colon cancer cell lines SW480 and HT-29 were also used. Integrin alpha1 mRNA and protein levels increased following ERbeta expression. Integrin beta1-the unique partner for integrin alpha1-increased only at the protein level. ERbeta expression enhanced the formation of vinculin containing focal complexes and actin filaments, indicating a more adhesive potential. This was confirmed by adhesion assays where ERbeta increased adhesion to different extracellular matrix proteins, mostly laminin. In addition, ERbeta expression was associated to less cell migration. These results indicate that ERbeta affects integrin expression and clustering and consequently modulates adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells. PMID:19780039

  12. Predicting the Important Enzymes in Human Breast Milk Digestion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is known to contain several proteases, but little is known about whether these enzymes are active, which proteins they cleave, and their relative contribution to milk protein digestion in vivo. This study analyzed the mass spectrometry-identified protein fragments found in pooled human milk by comparing their cleavage sites with the enzyme specificity patterns of an array of enzymes. The results indicate that several enzymes are actively taking part in the digestion of human milk proteins within the mammary gland, including plasmin and/or trypsin, elastase, cathepsin D, pepsin, chymotrypsin, a glutamyl endopeptidase-like enzyme, and proline endopeptidase. Two proteins were most affected by enzyme hydrolysis: β-casein and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor. In contrast, other highly abundant milk proteins such as α-lactalbumin and lactoferrin appear to have undergone no proteolytic cleavage. A peptide sequence containing a known antimicrobial peptide is released in breast milk by elastase and cathepsin D. PMID:24620897

  13. Effects of Combination of Estradiol with Selective Progesterone Receptor Modulators (SPRMs) on Human Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Hareesh B.; Santhamma, Bindu; Krishnegowda, Naveen K.; Dileep, Kalarikkal V.; Nickisch, Klaus J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of estrogen or estrogen / progestin combination was an approved regimen for menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT). However, more recent patient-centered studies revealed an increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women receiving menopausal hormone therapy with estrogen plus progestin rather than estrogen alone. Tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC) has been proposed to eliminate the progesterone component of MHT with supporting evidences. Based on our previous studies it is evident that SPRMs have a safer profile on endometrium in preventing unopposed estrogenicity. We hypothesized that a combination of estradiol (E2) with selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) to exert a safer profile on endometrium will also reduce mammary gland proliferation and could be used to prevent breast cancer when used in MHT. In order to test our hypothesis, we compared the estradiol alone or in combination with our novel SPRMs, EC312 and EC313. The compounds were effectively controlled E2 mediated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in T47D breast cancer cells. The observed effects were found comparable that of BZD in vitro. The effects of SPRMs were confirmed by receptor binding studies as well as gene and protein expression studies. Proliferation markers were found downregulated with EC312/313 treatment in vitro and reduced E2 induced mammary gland proliferation, evidenced as reduced ductal branching and terminal end bud growth in vivo. These data supporting our hypothesis that E2+EC312/EC313 blocked the estrogen action may provide basic rationale to further test the clinical efficacy of SPRMs to prevent breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women undergoing MHT. PMID:27011208

  14. Effects of Combination of Estradiol with Selective Progesterone Receptor Modulators (SPRMs) on Human Breast Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Nair, Hareesh B; Santhamma, Bindu; Krishnegowda, Naveen K; Dileep, Kalarikkal V; Nickisch, Klaus J

    2016-01-01

    Use of estrogen or estrogen / progestin combination was an approved regimen for menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT). However, more recent patient-centered studies revealed an increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women receiving menopausal hormone therapy with estrogen plus progestin rather than estrogen alone. Tissue selective estrogen complex (TSEC) has been proposed to eliminate the progesterone component of MHT with supporting evidences. Based on our previous studies it is evident that SPRMs have a safer profile on endometrium in preventing unopposed estrogenicity. We hypothesized that a combination of estradiol (E2) with selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) to exert a safer profile on endometrium will also reduce mammary gland proliferation and could be used to prevent breast cancer when used in MHT. In order to test our hypothesis, we compared the estradiol alone or in combination with our novel SPRMs, EC312 and EC313. The compounds were effectively controlled E2 mediated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in T47D breast cancer cells. The observed effects were found comparable that of BZD in vitro. The effects of SPRMs were confirmed by receptor binding studies as well as gene and protein expression studies. Proliferation markers were found downregulated with EC312/313 treatment in vitro and reduced E2 induced mammary gland proliferation, evidenced as reduced ductal branching and terminal end bud growth in vivo. These data supporting our hypothesis that E2+EC312/EC313 blocked the estrogen action may provide basic rationale to further test the clinical efficacy of SPRMs to prevent breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women undergoing MHT. PMID:27011208

  15. Cyclin E2 overexpression is associated with endocrine resistance but not insensitivity to CDK2 inhibition in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Caldon, C Elizabeth; Sergio, C Marcelo; Kang, Jian; Muthukaruppan, Anita; Boersma, Marijke N; Stone, Andrew; Barraclough, Jane; Lee, Christine S; Black, Michael A; Miller, Lance D; Gee, Julia M; Nicholson, Rob I; Sutherland, Robert L; Print, Cristin G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A

    2012-07-01

    Cyclin E2, but not cyclin E1, is included in several gene signatures that predict disease progression in either tamoxifen-resistant or metastatic breast cancer. We therefore examined the role of cyclin E2 in antiestrogen resistance in vitro and its potential for therapeutic targeting through cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibition. High expression of CCNE2, but not CCNE1, was characteristic of the luminal B and HER2 subtypes of breast cancer and was strongly predictive of shorter distant metastasis-free survival following endocrine therapy. After antiestrogen treatment of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, cyclin E2 mRNA and protein were downregulated and cyclin E2-CDK2 activity decreased. However, this regulation was lost in tamoxifen-resistant (MCF-7 TAMR) cells, which overexpressed cyclin E2. Expression of either cyclin E1 or E2 in T-47D breast cancer cells conferred acute antiestrogen resistance, suggesting that cyclin E overexpression contributes to the antiestrogen resistance of tamoxifen-resistant cells. Ectopic expression of cyclin E1 or E2 also reduced sensitivity to CDK4, but not CDK2, inhibition. Proliferation of tamoxifen-resistant cells was inhibited by RNAi-mediated knockdown of cyclin E1, cyclin E2, or CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 inhibition of E-cyclin overexpressing cells and tamoxifen-resistant cells restored sensitivity to tamoxifen or CDK4 inhibition. Cyclin E2 overexpression is therefore a potential mechanism of resistance to both endocrine therapy and CDK4 inhibition. CDK2 inhibitors hold promise as a component of combination therapies in endocrine-resistant disease as they effectively inhibit cyclin E1 and E2 overexpressing cells and enhance the efficacy of other therapeutics. PMID:22564725

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of Lys¹(α,γ-Folate)Lys³(¹⁷⁷Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin(1-14) as a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Lara, Liliana; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Azorín-Vega, Erika; Ramírez, Flor de María; Jiménez-Mancilla, Nallely; Ocampo-García, Blanca; Santos-Cuevas, Clara; Isaac-Olivé, Keila

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to synthesize Lys(1)(α,γ-Folate)-Lys(3)((177)Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) ((177)Lu-Folate-BN), as well as to assess its potential for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of breast tumors expressing folate receptors (FR) and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR). Radiation absorbed doses of (177)Lu-Folate-BN (74 MBq, i.v.) estimated in athymic mice with T47D-induced breast tumors (positive to FR and GRPR), showed tumor doses of 23.9±2.1 Gy. T47D-tumors were clearly visible (Micro-SPECT/CT images). (177)Lu-Folate-BN demonstrated properties suitable as a theranostic radiopharmaceutical. PMID:26545016

  17. Estrogen induces Vav1 expression in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Ming-juan; Chen, Xiang-dong; Zhou, Xiao-li; Wan, Ya-juan; Lan, Bei; Zhang, Cui-zhu; Cao, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho family GTPases, is a hematopoietic protein involved in a variety of cellular events. In recent years, aberrant expression of Vav1 has been reported in non-hematopoietic cancers including human breast cancer. It remains to be answered how Vav1 is expressed and what Vav1 does in its non-resident tissues. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanism for Vav1 expression in breast cancer cells in correlation with estrogen-ER pathway. We not only verified the ectopic expression of Vav1 in human breast cancer cell lines, but also observed that Vav1 expression was induced by 17?-estradiol (E2), a typical estrogen receptor (ER) ligand, in ER-positive cell lines. On the other hand, Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suppressed the expression of Vav1. The estrogen receptor modulating Vav1 expression was identified to be ? form, not ?. Furthermore, treatment of E2 increased the transcription of vav1 gene by enhancing the promoter activity, though there was no recognizable estrogen response element (ERE). Nevertheless, two regions at the vav1 gene promoter were defined to be responsible for E2-induced activation of vav1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analyses suggested that ER? might access to the vav1 promoter via interacting with transcription factors, c-Myb and ELF-1. Consequently, the enhanced expression of Vav1 led to the elevation of Cyclin D1 and the progression of cell cycle. The present study implies that estrogen-ER modulates the transcription and expression of Vav1, which may contribute to the proliferation of cancerous cells. PMID:24905577

  18. Estrogen Induces Vav1 Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ming-juan; Chen, Xiang-dong; Zhou, Xiao-li; Wan, Ya-juan; Lan, Bei; Zhang, Cui-zhu; Cao, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    Vav1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho family GTPases, is a hematopoietic protein involved in a variety of cellular events. In recent years, aberrant expression of Vav1 has been reported in non-hematopoietic cancers including human breast cancer. It remains to be answered how Vav1 is expressed and what Vav1 does in its non-resident tissues. In this study, we aimed to explore the mechanism for Vav1 expression in breast cancer cells in correlation with estrogen-ER pathway. We not only verified the ectopic expression of Vav1 in human breast cancer cell lines, but also observed that Vav1 expression was induced by 17?-estradiol (E2), a typical estrogen receptor (ER) ligand, in ER-positive cell lines. On the other hand, Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and ICI 182,780, an ER antagonist, suppressed the expression of Vav1. The estrogen receptor modulating Vav1 expression was identified to be ? form, not ?. Furthermore, treatment of E2 increased the transcription of vav1 gene by enhancing the promoter activity, though there was no recognizable estrogen response element (ERE). Nevertheless, two regions at the vav1 gene promoter were defined to be responsible for E2-induced activation of vav1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analyses suggested that ER? might access to the vav1 promoter via interacting with transcription factors, c-Myb and ELF-1. Consequently, the enhanced expression of Vav1 led to the elevation of Cyclin D1 and the progression of cell cycle. The present study implies that estrogen-ER modulates the transcription and expression of Vav1, which may contribute to the proliferation of cancerous cells. PMID:24905577

  19. Cytotoxic Activity of the Methanolic Extract of Turnera diffusa Willd on Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Avelino-Flores, María del Carmen; Cruz-López, María del Carmen; Jiménez-Montejo, Fabiola E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Turnera diffusa Willd, commonly known as Damiana, is employed in traditional medicine as a stimulant, aphrodisiac, and diuretic. Its leaves and stems are used for flavoring and infusion. Damiana is considered to be safe for medicinal use by the FDA. Pharmacological studies have established the hypoglycemic, antiaromatase, prosexual, estrogenic, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity of T. diffusa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible cytotoxic effect of extracts and organic fractions of this plant on five tumor cell lines (SiHa, C-33, Hep G2, MDA-MB-231, and T-47D) and normal human fibroblasts. The results show that the methanolic extract (TdM) displayed greater activity on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (with an IC50 of 30.67 μg/mL) than on the other cancer cell lines. Four organic fractions of this extract exhibited activity on this cancer cell line. In the most active fraction (F4), two active compounds were isolated, arbutin (1) and apigenin (2). This is the first report of a cytotoxic effect by T. diffusa on cancer cells. The IC50 values suggest that the methanolic extract of T. diffusa has potential as an anticancer therapy. PMID:25299247

  20. Cytotoxic activity of the methanolic extract of Turnera diffusa Willd on breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Avelino-Flores, María Del Carmen; Cruz-López, María del Carmen; Jiménez-Montejo, Fabiola E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2015-03-01

    Turnera diffusa Willd, commonly known as Damiana, is employed in traditional medicine as a stimulant, aphrodisiac, and diuretic. Its leaves and stems are used for flavoring and infusion. Damiana is considered to be safe for medicinal use by the FDA. Pharmacological studies have established the hypoglycemic, antiaromatase, prosexual, estrogenic, antibacterial, and antioxidant activity of T. diffusa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible cytotoxic effect of extracts and organic fractions of this plant on five tumor cell lines (SiHa, C-33, Hep G2, MDA-MB-231, and T-47D) and normal human fibroblasts. The results show that the methanolic extract (TdM) displayed greater activity on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (with an IC50 of 30.67 μg/mL) than on the other cancer cell lines. Four organic fractions of this extract exhibited activity on this cancer cell line. In the most active fraction (F4), two active compounds were isolated, arbutin (1) and apigenin (2). This is the first report of a cytotoxic effect by T. diffusa on cancer cells. The IC50 values suggest that the methanolic extract of T. diffusa has potential as an anticancer therapy. PMID:25299247

  1. Nuclear estradiol-binding sites in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vandewalle, B; Peyrat, J P; Bonneterre, J; Hecquet, B; Dewailly, D; Lefebvre, J

    1983-09-01

    The binding of estradiol to nuclear fractions extracted from human breast carcinomatous tissue was demonstrated. The material, which was extracted with KCl, had an approximate molecular weight of 37,000 and bound estradiol with both high and low affinity (Kd congruent to 1 nM, type A receptors; Kd congruent to 30 nM, type B receptors) as calculated according to the method of Scatchard. Competition studies indicated that both components were specific for estradiol, and among the 134 tumors studied the receptors were found to be linked in almost all cases. Thirty-six % of the tumors were nuclear receptor positive. Cytoplasmic estradiol and progesterone receptors were also measured. Among the cytoplasmic tumors positive for cytoplasmic and progesterone receptors, 37% were devoid of both types of nuclear receptors; this may explain the failure of endocrine therapy in some cases. The determination of nuclear binding sites in human breast tumors appeared to be an interesting criterion for the assessment of estradiol-dependent cell growth. PMID:6683589

  2. Co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells in NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Anja K; Schmidt, Marcus; Ueberham, Elke; Ponnath, Marvin; Ortmann, Olaf; Brockhoff, Gero; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Humanized tumor mice (HTM) were generated by the co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 into neonatal NOD-scid IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. These mice are characterized by the development of a human immune system in combination with human breast cancer growth. Due to concurrent transplantation into newborn mice, transfer of MHC-mismatched tumor cells resulted in solid coexistence and immune cell activation (CD4+ T cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells), but without evidence for rejection. Histological staining of the spleen of HTM revealed co-localization of human antigen-presenting cells together with human T and B cells allowing MHC-dependent interaction, and thereby the generation of T cell-dependent antibody production. Here, we investigated the capability of these mice to generate human tumor-specific antibodies and correlated immunoglobulin titers with tumor outgrowth. We found detectable IgM and also IgG amounts in the serum of HTM, which apparently controlled tumor development when IgG serum concentrations were above 10 µg/ml. Western blot analyses revealed that the tumor-specific antibodies generated in HTM did not recognize HER2/neu antigens, but different, possibly relevant antigens for breast cancer therapy. In conclusion, HTM offer a novel approach to generate complete human monoclonal antibodies that do not require further genetic manipulation (e. g., humanization) for a potential application in humans. In addition, efficacy and safety of the generated antibodies can be tested in the same mouse model under human-like conditions. This might be of particular interest for cancer subtypes with no currently available antibody therapy. PMID:24870377

  3. Estrogen deprivation causes estradiol hypersensitivity in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Masamura, S; Santner, S J; Heitjan, D F; Santen, R J

    1995-10-01

    Genetic and environmental factors can modulate the level of sensitivity to various hormones, including estrogens. Enhanced sensitivity to estradiol (E2) has been demonstrated in several biological conditions, such as in sheep during the nonbreeding season, in untreated patients with Turner's syndrome, and in the prepubertal state in normal girls. We postulated that secondary responses to hormonal therapy in patients with breast cancer could also result from enhanced E2 sensitivity, developing as an adaptive mechanism to E2 deprivation. The present study used the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line as a model system to test the concept that enhanced sensitivity to E2 may occur as a result of adaptation to low E2 levels. After depriving MCF-7 cells of estrogens in tissue culture medium for periods of 1-6 months, we established conditions under which replication could be stimulated maximally by 10(-14)-10(-15) mol/L E2. In contrast, wild-type cells not exposed to estrogen deprivation required 10(-10) mol/L E2 to grow at the same rate. Further, the concentration of the antiestrogen, ICI 164384, needed to inhibit growth by 50% in estrogen-deprived cells was much lower than that required in wild-type cells (i.e. 10(-15) vs. 10(-9) mol/L). Nude mice implanted with these estrogen-deprived cells demonstrated an earlier appearance of palpable tumors in response to E2 than animals bearing wild-type cells. Reexposure to 10(-10)-10(-9) mol/L E2, either in vivo or in vitro, returned these cells to the level of estrogen sensitivity observed in wild-type cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that breast cancer cells can adapt to low levels of estrogens by enhancing their sensitivity to E2. PMID:7559875

  4. QSAR analysis of drug excretion into human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Meskin, M S; Lien, E J

    1985-09-01

    Breast feeding has increased by approximately 25% in the United States during the past decade and this trend appears to be continuing. The number of drugs available to lactating women is also growing at a rapid pace. The excretion of drugs into breast-milk presents a potential danger to infants. In spite of this, little is known about the excretion of drugs into breast-milk. The ability to predict which drugs are potential hazards would be very useful in the clinical setting. This study quantitatively correlates the human milk to plasma concentration ratio of various basic and acidic drugs (log M/P) with the square root of the molecular weight, the partition coefficient (log P) and the degree of dissociation (log U/D). For basic drugs there is a negative-dependence on both log P and log U/D. High lipophilicity favours protein binding and reduces the amount of drug available for diffusion into milk. Therefore, as log P increases, the log M/P decreases. The negative-dependence on log U/D indicates that the higher the degree of dissociation of the base in plasma, the greater the log M/P will be. This fits well with the concept of ion-trapping. A strong base is more likely to be transferred and then trapped in milk which has a lower pH than plasma. For acidic drugs there is a negative-dependence on both square root (MW) and log P. The negative-dependence on square root (MW) suggests that large molecules are less likely to be able to diffuse into the milk. A negative-dependence on log P appears to hold true for bases and acids. Log M/P decreases as log P increases. This is probably due to increased protein binding by lipophilic drugs through non-specific hydrophobic interaction with plasma protein. PMID:4066977

  5. Met induces diverse mammary carcinomas in mice and is associated with human basal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Graveel, Carrie R; DeGroot, Jack D; Su, Yanli; Koeman, Julie; Dykema, Karl; Leung, Samuel; Snider, Jacqueline; Davies, Sherri R; Swiatek, Pamela J; Cottingham, Sandra; Watson, Mark A; Ellis, Matthew J; Sigler, Robert E; Furge, Kyle A; Vande Woude, George F

    2009-08-01

    Understanding the signaling pathways that drive aggressive breast cancers is critical to the development of effective therapeutics. The oncogene MET is associated with decreased survival in breast cancer, yet the role that MET plays in the various breast cancer subtypes is unclear. We describe a knockin mouse with mutationally activated Met (Met(mut)) that develops a high incidence of diverse mammary tumors with basal characteristics, including metaplasia, absence of progesterone receptor and ERBB2 expression, and expression of cytokeratin 5. With gene expression and tissue microarray analysis, we show that high MET expression in human breast cancers significantly correlated with estrogen receptor negative/ERBB2 negative tumors and with basal breast cancers. Few treatment options exist for breast cancers of the basal or trastuzumab-resistant ERBB2 subtypes. We conclude from these studies that MET may play a critical role in the development of the most aggressive breast cancers and may be a rational therapeutic target. PMID:19567831

  6. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5 years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  7. A differential role for CXCR4 in the regulation of normal versus malignant breast stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ablett, Matthew P.; O'Brien, Ciara S.; Sims, Andrew H.; Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is known to regulate lung, pancreatic and prostate cancer stem cells. In breast cancer, CXCR4 signalling has been reported to be a mediator of metastasis, and is linked to poor prognosis. However its role in normal and malignant breast stem cell function has not been investigated. Anoikis resistant (AR) cells were collected from immortalised (MCF10A, 226L) and malignant (MCF7, T47D, SKBR3) breast cell lines and assessed for stem cell enrichment versus unsorted cells. AR cells had significantly higher mammosphere forming efficiency (MFE) than unsorted cells. The AR normal cells demonstrated increased formation of 3D structures in Matrigel compared to unsorted cells. In vivo, SKBR3 and T47D AR cells had 7- and 130-fold enrichments for tumour formation respectively, compared with unsorted cells. AR cells contained significantly elevated CXCR4 transcript and protein levels compared to unsorted cells. Importantly, CXCR4 mRNA was higher in stem cell-enriched CD44+ /CD24− - patient-derived breast cancer cells compared to non-enriched cells. CXCR4 stimulation by its ligand SDF-1 reduced MFE of the normal breast cells lines but increased the MFE in T47D and patient-derived breast cancer cells. CXCR4 inhibition by AMD3100 increased stem cell activity but reduced the self-renewal capacity of the malignant breast cell line T47D. CXCR4 + FACS sorted MCF7 cells demonstrated a significantly increased MFE compared with CXCR4- cells. This significant increase in MFE was further demonstrated in CXCR4 over-expressing MCF7 cells which also had an increase in self-renewal compared to parental cells. A greater reduction in self-renewal following CXCR4 inhibition in the CXCR4 over-expressing cells compared with parental cells was also observed. Our data establish for the first time that CXCR4 signalling has contrasting effects on normal and malignant breast stem cell activity. Here, we demonstrate that CXCR4 signalling specifically regulates breast cancer stem cell activities and may therefore be important in tumour formation at the sites of metastases. PMID:24583601

  8. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:27001628

  9. The role of annexin A1 in expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and invasion of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyereen; Ko, Jesang; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of ANXA1 on promoting migration and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 siRNA inhibits invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 regulates MMP-9 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANX-1 siRNA inhibits the activation of NF-{kappa}B in MDA-MB-231 cells. -- Abstract: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. However, the regulatory mechanism of MMP-9 expression and its biological effects on breast cancer development remain obscure. In the current study, we examined the potential role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in regulating migration and invasion in breast cancer cell lines. Both ANXA1 mRNA and protein are expressed in the highly invasive, hormone-insensitive human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3, but not in the hormone-responsive cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Downregulation of ANXA1 expression with specific small interfering RNAs (ANXA1 siRNA) in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in decreased cancer cell migration and invasion. Ablation of ANXA1 expression decreases the expression of MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels and also reduces the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, silencing ANXA1 also decreases the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by the suppression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-{kappa}B) activity. Collectively, these results indicate that ANXA1 functions as a positive regulator of MMP-9 expression and invasion of breast cancer cells through specific activation of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  10. Silibinin Inhibits Wnt/?-catenin Signaling by Suppressing Wnt Co-receptor LRP6 Expression in Human Prostate and Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenyan; Lin, Cuihong; King, Taj D.; Chen, Honghong; Reynolds, Robert C.; Li, Yonghe

    2012-01-01

    Silibinin is a natural compound isolated from milk thistle seed extracts, and has traditionally been used as a hepatoprotectant. A number of studies have also established the cancer therapeutic and chemopreventive role of silibinin in both in vitro and in vivo models. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) is an essential Wnt co-receptor for the Wnt/?-catenin pathway and represents a promising target for cancer prevention and therapy. In the present study, we found that silibinin was able to repress endogenous LRP6 expression and block Wnt3A-induced LRP6 phosphorylation and Wnt/?-catenin signaling activation in HEK293 cells. Importantly, silibinin was also able to suppress endogenous LRP6 expression and phosphorylation and block Wnt/?-catenin signaling in prostate cancer PC-3 and DU-145 cells and breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and T-47D cells. Mechanistically, silibinin inhibited LRP6 promoter activity and decreased LRP6 mRNA levels in prostate and breast cancer cells. Finally, we demonstrated that silibinin displayed anticancer activity with IC50 values comparable to those shown to suppress LRP6 expression and Wnt/?-catenin signaling activities in prostate and breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that silibinin is a novel small molecule Wnt/?-catenin signaling inhibitor by suppressing Wnt co-receptor LRP6 expression at the transcription level, and that the anti-cancer activity of silibinin is associated with its inhibitory effect on Wnt/LRP6 signaling. PMID:22820499

  11. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province ; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT increases breast cancer cell radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. These findings have salient implications for designing clinical trials using fulvestrant and radiation therapy.

  12. Hyaluronan synthase 2 overexpression is correlated with the tumorigenesis and metastasis of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Xiang, Tingxiu; Li, Hongzhong; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Yuan; Tan, Jinxiang; Ren, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is closely correlated with the malignant behavior of breast cancer cells. Hyaluronan (HA) is one of the main components of ECM, and actively regulates cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by interacting with specific cell surface receptors such as CD44 and RHAMM. HA synthase 2 (HAS2) catalyzes the sysnthesis of HA, but its role in breast tumorigenesis remains unclear. This study assessed the roles of HAS2 in malignant behavior of human breast cancer and sought to provide mechanistic insights into the biological and pivotal roles of HAS2. We observed HAS2 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines and invasive duct cancer tissues, compared with the nonmalignant breast cell lines and normal breast tissues. In addition, a high level of HAS2 expression was statistically correlated with lymph node metastasis. Functional assays showed that knockdown of HAS2 expression inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro, through the induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that the HA were elevated in breast cancer, and HAS2 could upregulate HA expression. In conclusion, HAS2-HA system influences the biological characteristics of human breast cancer cells, and HAS2 may be a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:26722395

  13. Hyaluronan synthase 2 overexpression is correlated with the tumorigenesis and metastasis of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Xiang, Tingxiu; Li, Hongzhong; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Bing; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Yuan; Tan, Jinxiang; Ren, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is closely correlated with the malignant behavior of breast cancer cells. Hyaluronan (HA) is one of the main components of ECM, and actively regulates cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by interacting with specific cell surface receptors such as CD44 and RHAMM. HA synthase 2 (HAS2) catalyzes the sysnthesis of HA, but its role in breast tumorigenesis remains unclear. This study assessed the roles of HAS2 in malignant behavior of human breast cancer and sought to provide mechanistic insights into the biological and pivotal roles of HAS2. We observed HAS2 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines and invasive duct cancer tissues, compared with the nonmalignant breast cell lines and normal breast tissues. In addition, a high level of HAS2 expression was statistically correlated with lymph node metastasis. Functional assays showed that knockdown of HAS2 expression inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro, through the induction of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. Further studies showed that the HA were elevated in breast cancer, and HAS2 could upregulate HA expression. In conclusion, HAS2-HA system influences the biological characteristics of human breast cancer cells, and HAS2 may be a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:26722395

  14. PAQR3 expression is downregulated in human breast cancers and correlated with HER2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenghu; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Weiwei; Lu, Xiao-Xiao; Pan, Yi; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    PAQR3 is a newly discovered tumor suppressor and its functional role in breast cancer has not been well characterized. We report here that PAQR3 is associated with the progression and survival of human patients with breast cancer, as well as cell proliferation and migration of human breast cancer cells. PAQR3 mRNA level was robustly downregulated in human breast cancer samples compared with their corresponding para-cancerous histological normal tissues (n = 82, P < 0.0001). The mRNA level of PAQR3 was negatively correlated with HER2 expression (P < 0.0001) and disease-free survival of the patients (P < 0.0001). PAQR3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and migration of breast cancer cells including MCF7, SKBR3, MDA-MD-231, MDA-MD-468 and MDA-MD-453 cells. Knockdown of PAQR3 in MDA-MD-231 cells elevated cell proliferation and migration. Inhibition of HER2 by trastuzumab increased PAQR3 expression in SKBR3 cells. In conclusion, PAQR3 expression is frequently downregulated in human breast cancers inversely correlated with HER2 expression. PAQR3 is able to modulate the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that PAQR3 functions as a tumor suppressor in the development of human breast cancers. PMID:25900239

  15. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R.; Knethen, Andreas von; Choubey, Divaker; Mehta, Rajendra G.

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding partner, RXR{alpha}.

  16. Multiplexed ion beam imaging of human breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D; Levenson, Richard M; Lowe, John B; Liu, Scot D; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P

    2014-04-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression that is employed as part of the diagnostic workup for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI can provide new insights into disease pathogenesis that will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24584119

  17. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C.; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B.; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Levenson, Richard M.; Lowe, John B.; Liu, Scot D.; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression employed as part of the diagnostic work-up for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI will provide new insights by integrating tissue microarchitecture with highly multiplexed protein expression patterns, and will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24584119

  18. Antitumor effects of crocin on human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pengwei; Lin, Huan; Gu, Yuanting; Li, Lin; Guo, Hong; Wang, Fang; Qiu, Xinguang

    2015-01-01

    Crocin is a chemical extracted from saffron and it is the most important kind of pigment of saffron. It has been proposed as a promising candidate for cancer prevention. In this study, we investigate the growth inhibition and the apoptosis of MCF-7 cells induced by Crocin, and explore the underlying molecular mechanism. We found that Crocin can significantly inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 cells, and induce their apoptosis through mitochondrial signaling pathways including the activation of Caspase-8, upregulation of Bax, the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and the release of cytochrome c. The studies showed that Crocin induced apoptosis of MCF-7 cells partially through caspase-8 mediated mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, we postulate that Crocin might have cancer-preventive and cancer-therapeutic benefit for human breast cancer. PMID:26884946

  19. The emerging importance of α-L-fucose in human breast cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Listinsky, Jay J; Siegal, Gene P; Listinsky, Catherine M

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer cells incorporate the simple sugar alpha-L-fucose (fucose) into glycoproteins and glycolipids which, in turn, are expressed as part of the malignant phenotype. We have noted that fucose is not simply a bystander molecule, but, in fact, contributes to many of the fundamental oncologic properties of breast cancer cells. Here, we summarize the evidence from us and others that fucose is necessary for key functions of neoplastic progression including hematogenous metastasis, tumor invasion through extracellular matrices including basement membranes and up-regulation of the Notch signaling system, with implications for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and activation of breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, certain breast cancer biomarkers are fucose-rich while a well-known marker of breast cancer progression, soluble E-selectin, is a known counter-receptor of fucosylated selectin ligands. We provide illustrative examples and supportive evidence drawn from work with human breast cancer cell lines in vitro as well as clinical studies with human pathologic material. And finally, we discuss evidence that fucose (or its absence) is central to the mechanisms of action of several experimental targeted therapies which may prove useful in breast cancer treatment. We propose that alpha-L-fucose is essential in order to construct first, the malignant and then the metastatic phenotype of many human breast cancers. This knowledge may inform the search for novel treatment approaches in breast cancer. PMID:21904652

  20. The Phytoestrogen Genistein Affects Breast Cancer Cells Treatment Depending on the ERα/ERβ Ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Torrens-Mas, Margalida; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soybeans. GEN exerts its functions through its interaction with the estrogen receptors (ER), ERα and ERβ, and we previously reported that the ERα/ERβ ratio is an important factor to consider in GEN-treated breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GEN in breast cancer cells with different ERα/ERβ ratio: MCF-7 (high ratio), T47D (low ratio), and MCF-7 overexpressing ERβ (MCF7 + ERβ) treated with cisplatin (CDDP), paclitaxel (PTX) or tamoxifen (TAM). Cell viability, ROS production, autophagy, apoptosis, antioxidant enzymes protein levels, and cell cycle were analyzed. GEN treatment provoked an increase in cell viability in MCF-7 cells and in the antioxidant enzymes protein levels in combination with the cytotoxic agents, decreasing ROS production (CDDP + GEN and TAM+GEN) and autophagy (TAM + GEN) or apoptosis (CDDP + GEN and TAM + GEN). Moreover GEN treatment enhanced the cell cycle S phase entry in CDDP+GEN- and TAM + GEN-treated MCF-7 cells and, in the case of CDDP + GEN, increased the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase and decreased it in the subG0 /G1 phase. Otherwise, in the T47D and MCF7 + ERβ cells the combination of GEN with cytotoxic treatments did not cause significant changes in these parameters, even TAM + GEN-treated T47D cells showed less cell viability due to an increment in the autophagy. In conclusion, GEN consumption may be counterproductive in those patients receiving anticancer treatment with a high ERα/ERβ ratio diagnosed breast cancer and it could be harmless or even beneficial in those patients with a lower ERα/ERβ ratio breast cancer cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 218-229, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26100284

  1. Gene Expression Analysis in Human Breast Cancer Associated Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dylan T.; Lechertier, Tanguy; Mitter, Richard; Herbert, John M. J.; Bicknell, Roy; Jones, J. Louise; Li, Ji-Liang; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L.; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for solid tumour growth, whilst the molecular profiles of tumour blood vessels have been reported to be different between cancer types. Although presently available anti-angiogenic strategies are providing some promise for the treatment of some cancers it is perhaps not surprisingly that, none of the anti-angiogenic agents available work on all tumours. Thus, the discovery of novel anti-angiogenic targets, relevant to individual cancer types, is required. Using Affymetrix microarray analysis of laser-captured, CD31-positive blood vessels we have identified 63 genes that are upregulated significantly (5–72 fold) in angiogenic blood vessels associated with human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast as compared with blood vessels in normal human breast. We tested the angiogenic capacity of a subset of these genes. Genes were selected based on either their known cellular functions, their enriched expression in endothelial cells and/or their sensitivity to anti-VEGF treatment; all features implicating their involvement in angiogenesis. For example, RRM2, a ribonucleotide reductase involved in DNA synthesis, was upregulated 32-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels; ATF1, a nuclear activating transcription factor involved in cellular growth and survival was upregulated 23-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels and HEX-B, a hexosaminidase involved in the breakdown of GM2 gangliosides, was upregulated 8-fold in IDC-associated blood vessels. Furthermore, in silico analysis confirmed that AFT1 and HEX-B also were enriched in endothelial cells when compared with non-endothelial cells. None of these genes have been reported previously to be involved in neovascularisation. However, our data establish that siRNA depletion of Rrm2, Atf1 or Hex-B had significant anti-angiogenic effects in VEGF-stimulated ex vivo mouse aortic ring assays. Overall, our results provide proof-of-principle that our approach can identify a cohort of potentially novel anti-angiogenic targets that are likley to be, but not exclusivley, relevant to breast cancer. PMID:23056178

  2. Development of Anatomically Realistic Numerical Breast Phantoms with Accurate Dielectric Properties for Modeling Microwave Interactions with the Human Breast

    PubMed Central

    Zastrow, Earl; Davis, Shakti K.; Lazebnik, Mariya; Kelcz, Frederick; Van Veen, Barry D.; Hagness, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Computational electromagnetics models of microwave interactions with the human breast serve as an invaluable tool for exploring the feasibility of new technologies and improving design concepts related to microwave breast cancer detection and treatment. In this paper we report the development of a collection of anatomically realistic 3D numerical breast phantoms of varying shape, size, and radiographic density which can be readily used in FDTD computational electromagnetics models. The phantoms are derived from T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of prone patients. Each MRI is transformed into a uniform grid of dielectric properties using several steps. First, the structure of each phantom is identified by applying image processing techniques to the MRI. Next, the voxel intensities of the MRI are converted to frequency-dependent and tissue-dependent dielectric properties of normal breast tissues via a piecewise-linear map. The dielectric properties of normal breast tissue are taken from the recently completed large-scale experimental study of normal breast tissue dielectric properties conducted by the Universities of Wisconsin and Calgary. The comprehensive collection of numerical phantoms is made available to the scientific community through an online repository. PMID:19126460

  3. Assessment of Cytokeratin-19 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood of Breast Cancer Patients and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Keyvani, Saeideh; Karimi, Nasrin; Orafa, Zahra; Bouzari, Saeid; Oloomi, Mana

    2016-01-01

    Detection of cytokeratin-19 (CK19) expression as an epithelial-specific marker in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) of breast cancer patients can be important for diagnostic purposes. Comparison of CK19 expression in breast cancer cell lines can indicate that expression of this marker is different in various breast cancer cell lines based on their category. Thirty-five breast cancer patients were evaluated for detection of CK19 mRNA in their peripheral blood using CK19-specific primers and a nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. CK19 expression levels were detected in MCF7, T47D, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231 cell lines by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Statistical analysis of our data indicates that there is no significant difference between CK19 expression and histopathological parameters and some molecular markers, including Ki-67, HER-2, and P53, but there are statistically significant correlations between estrogen receptor (P = 0.040) and progesterone receptor (P = 0.046) with CK19 expression. CK19 expression was detected in MCF7, T47D, and SK-BR-3 cell lines but not in MDA-MB-231 cell line. More studies are needed to determine the relationship between this marker and other markers in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. On the other hand, the study of different markers using breast cancer cell lines as experimental models of breast cancer could have an impact on improving the health outcomes of patients with breast cancer. PMID:27147896

  4. Progesterone and estrogen receptors segregate into different cell subpopulations in the normal human breast.

    PubMed

    Hilton, H N; Graham, J D; Kantimm, S; Santucci, N; Cloosterman, D; Huschtscha, L I; Mote, P A; Clarke, C L

    2012-09-25

    Progesterone is critical in normal breast development and its synthetic derivatives are emerging as major drivers of breast cancer risk. The recent demonstration that progesterone regulates the stem cell compartment in the murine mammary gland, despite the absence of progesterone receptor (PR) in mammary stem cells, highlights the fact that PR distribution in progenitor cell subsets in the human breast remains to be conclusively shown. By utilising two independent cell sorting strategies to fractionate cells into distinct subpopulations enriched for different cell lineage characteristics, we have demonstrated a consistent enrichment of PR transcripts, relative to estrogen receptor transcripts, in the bipotent progenitor subfraction in the normal human breast. We have also shown co-expression of both steroid hormone receptors with basal markers in a subset of human breast cells, and finally we have demonstrated that PR+ bipotent progenitor cells are estrogen-insensitive, and that estrogen regulates PR in mature luminal cells only. PMID:22580007

  5. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  6. WNT-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-1 enhances growth and tumorigenesis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chung, Li-Chuan; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Sun, Chi-Chin; Chen, Miin-Fu; Jan, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Shin-Cheh; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2015-01-01

    WNT1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) plays a key role in many cellular functions in a highly tissue-specific manner; however the role of WISP1 in breast cancer is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that WISP1 acts as an oncogene in human breast cancer. We demonstrated that human breast cancer tissues had higher WISP1 mRNA expression than normal breast tissues and that treatment of recombinant WISP1 enhanced breast cancer cell proliferation. Further, ectopic expression of WISP1 increased the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. WISP1 transfection also induced epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) in MCF-7 cells, leading to higher migration and invasion. During this EMT-inducing process, E-cadherin was repressed and N-cadherin, snail, and β-catenin were upregulated. Filamentous actin (F-actin) remodeling and polarization were also observed after WISP1 transfection into MCF-7 cells. Moreover, forced overexpression of WISP1 blocked the expression of NDRG1, a breast cancer tumor suppressor gene. Our study provides novel evidence that WISP1-modulated NDRG1 gene expression is dependent on a DNA fragment (−128 to +46) located within the human NDRG1 promoter. Thus, we concluded that WISP1 is a human breast cancer oncogene and is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25732125

  7. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Mortimer, J.; Deuel, T.F. . E-mail: tfdeuel@scripps.edu

    2007-06-29

    Pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) is an 18 kDa cytokine expressed in human breast cancers. Since inappropriate expression of Ptn stimulates progression of breast cancer in transgenic mice and a dominant negative PTN reverses the transformed phenotype of human breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn, it is suggested that constitutive PTN signaling in breast cancer cells that inappropriately express Ptn activates pathways that promote a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals by inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, and, recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway in PTN-stimulated cells, not through a direct interaction of PTN with ALK and thus not through the PTN-enforced dimerization of ALK. Since full-length ALK is activated in different malignant cancers and activated ALK is a potent oncogenic protein, we examined human breast cancers to test the possibility that ALK may be expressed in breast cancers and potentially activated through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; we now demonstrate that ALK is strongly expressed in different histological subtypes of human breast cancer; furthermore, ALK is expressed in both nuclei and cytoplasm and, in the 'dotted' pattern characteristic of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma. This study thus supports the possibility that activated ALK may be important in human breast cancers and potentially activated either through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway, or, alternatively, as an activated fusion protein to stimulate progression of breast cancer in humans.

  8. Detection of a 67-kD glycoprotein in human tumor cell lines by a monoclonal antibody established against a recombinant human endogenous retrovirus-K envelope-gene-encoded protein.

    PubMed

    Vogetseder, W; Feng, J; Haibach, C; Mayerl, W; Dierich, M P

    1995-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses in humans are discussed as putative etiologic agents in tumorigenesis. Molecular mimicry of cellular epitopes by retroviruses may be of importance for the genesis of autoimmune diseases. A group of human endogenous retroviruses, HERV-K, which is related to the mouse mammary tumour virus, has been characterised previously and open reading frames have been found covering their gag, pol, prt and env genes. Transcription of HERV-K genomes at the mRNA level as well as antibodies in human sera directed against HERV-K env have been detected recently. We have generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb), anti-HERV1, against a recombinant HERV-K Env protein. This mAb is capable of immunoprecipitating a 67-kD glycoprotein from the human breast carcinoma cell line T47D, the amount of which is strongly enhanced after stimulation with estradiol followed by progesterone. The same band could be precipitated from other carcinoma cell lines (Hep2, MCF7 and HeLa), but not from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line Raji and from cultured human fibroblasts. Incubation of this antigen in the presence of endoglycosidase F indicates the presence of N-linked carbohydrate moieties of at least 7-9 kD. PMID:7576722

  9. BreastDefend™ prevents breast-to-lung cancer metastases in an orthotopic animal model of triple-negative human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiahua; Thyagarajan-Sahu, Anita; Loganathan, Jagadish; Eliaz, Isaac; Terry, Colin; Sandusky, George E; Sliva, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that a natural dietary supplement BreastDefend (BD), which contains extracts from medicinal mushrooms (Coriolus versicolor, Ganoderma lucidum, Phellinus linteus), medicinal herbs (Scutellaria barbata, Astragalus membranaceus, Curcuma longa), and purified biologically active nutritional compounds (diindolylmethane and quercetin), inhibits proliferation and metastatic behavior of MDA-MB-231 invasive human breast cancer cells in vitro. In the present study, we evaluated whether BD suppresses growth and breast-to lung cancer metastasis in an orthotopic model of human breast cancer cells implanted in mice. Oral application of BD (100 mg/kg of body weight for 4 weeks) by intragastric gavage did not affect body weight or activity of liver enzymes and did not show any sign of toxicity in liver, spleen, kidney, lung and heart tissues in mice. Moreover, BD significantly decreased the change in tumor volume over time compared to the control group (p=0.002). BD treatment also markedly decreased the incidence of breast-to-lung cancer metastasis from 67% (control) to 20% (BD) (p<0.05) and the number of metastases from 2.8 (0.0, 48.0) in the control group to 0.0 (0.0, 14.2) in the BD treatment group (p<0.05). Finally, anti-metastatic activity of BD in vivo was further confirmed by the downregulation of expression of PLAU (urokinase plasminogen activator, uPA) and CXCR4 (C-X-C chemokine receptor-4) genes in breast tumors. In conclusion, BD may be considered as a biological therapeutic agent against invasive breast cancers. PMID:22842551

  10. Frondoside A inhibits human breast cancer cell survival, migration, invasion and the growth of breast tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Al Marzouqi, Nadia; Iratni, Rabah; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Arafat, Kholoud; Ahmed Al Sultan, Mahmood; Yasin, Javed; Collin, Peter; Mester, Jan; Adrian, Thomas E; Attoub, Samir

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a major challenge for pharmacologists to develop new drugs to improve the survival of cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa. It has been demonstrated that Frondoside A inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on human breast cancer cell survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth in nude mice, using the human estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The non-tumorigenic MCF10-A cell line derived from normal human mammary epithelium was used as control. Frondoside A (0.01-5 μM) decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with 50%-effective concentration (EC50) of 2.5 μM at 24h. MCF10-A cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effect of Frondoside A (EC50 superior to 5 μM at 24 h). In the MDA-MB-231 cells, Frondoside A effectively increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic) cell fraction through the activation of p53, and subsequently the caspases 9 and 3/7 cell death pathways. In addition, Frondoside A induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion. In vivo, Frondoside A (100 μg/kg/dayi.p. for 24 days) strongly decreased the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without manifest toxic side-effects. Moreover, we found that Frondoside A could enhance the killing of breast cancer cells induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for breast cancer. PMID:21741966

  11. Automated quantification of aligned collagen for human breast carcinoma prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Bredfeldt, Jeremy S.; Liu, Yuming; Conklin, Matthew W.; Keely, Patricia J.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mortality in cancer patients is directly attributable to the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to distant sites from the primary tumor. This migration of tumor cells begins with a remodeling of the local tumor microenvironment, including changes to the extracellular matrix and the recruitment of stromal cells, both of which facilitate invasion of tumor cells into the bloodstream. In breast cancer, it has been proposed that the alignment of collagen fibers surrounding tumor epithelial cells can serve as a quantitative image-based biomarker for survival of invasive ductal carcinoma patients. Specific types of collagen alignment have been identified for their prognostic value and now these tumor associated collagen signatures (TACS) are central to several clinical specimen imaging trials. Here, we implement the semi-automated acquisition and analysis of this TACS candidate biomarker and demonstrate a protocol that will allow consistent scoring to be performed throughout large patient cohorts. Methods: Using large field of view high resolution microscopy techniques, image processing and supervised learning methods, we are able to quantify and score features of collagen fiber alignment with respect to adjacent tumor-stromal boundaries. Results: Our semi-automated technique produced scores that have statistically significant correlation with scores generated by a panel of three human observers. In addition, our system generated classification scores that accurately predicted survival in a cohort of 196 breast cancer patients. Feature rank analysis reveals that TACS positive fibers are more well-aligned with each other, are of generally lower density, and terminate within or near groups of epithelial cells at larger angles of interaction. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the utility of a supervised learning protocol for streamlining the analysis of collagen alignment with respect to tumor stromal boundaries. PMID:25250186

  12. Estrogen receptor functional status in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Traish, A M; Newton, A W; Styperek, K; Beazley, R; Kavanah, M

    1995-09-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) are detected in 50-85% of all breast tumors, and are clinically important because they tend to identify patients with a higher probability of responding to hormonal or endocrine manipulations. However, approximately 30-40% of all ER+ patients do not respond to hormonal manipulations. The lack of response to hormonal manipulations in ER+ patients could be the result of nonfunctional ER, as determined by its inability to recognize and bind to specific DNA-responsive elements and/or its inability to recruit other transcriptional activation factors. The functional status of ER in 34 human breast tumors was assessed determining the structural integrity of the ER DNA-binding domain using site-directed monoclonal anti-estrogen receptor antibody and sucrose density gradient analysis. Based on the fraction of ER containing an intact DNA-binding domain, the tumors were classified into three groups: group I with > 65% of intact ER, group II with > 30% of intact ER, group III with < 30% of intact ER. Clinical and pathologic data were obtained only for patients who were treated with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen and correlated with ER functional status. In group I, 11 of 13 (84.6%) patients were responsive to hormonal therapy with favorable clinical outcome; two patients had unfavorable clinical outcome. In group II, 13 of 15 patients (86.7%) had favourable clinical outcome, and two patients 13.3% had unfavorable outcome. In group III, three of six patients appeared to be hormone responsive with favorable clinical outcome, and three of the patients in this group had unfavorable response to therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7493142

  13. Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xianqi; Qiu, Shuifeng; Yu, Daihua; Lin, Shuxin

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest of human breast cancer cells. {yields} Salidroside induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cell lines. -- Abstract: Recently, salidroside (p-hydroxyphenethyl-{beta}-D-glucoside) has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from plants of the Rhodiola genus used widely in traditional Chinese medicine, but pharmacokinetic data on the compound are unavailable. We were the first to report the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on cancer cell lines derived from different tissues, and we found that human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells (estrogen receptor negative) were sensitive to the inhibitory action of low-concentration salidroside. To further investigate the cytotoxic effects of salidroside on breast cancer cells and reveal possible ER-related differences in response to salidroside, we used MDA-MB-231 cells and MCF-7 cells (estrogen receptor-positive) as models to study possible molecular mechanisms; we evaluated the effects of salidroside on cell growth characteristics, such as proliferation, cell cycle duration, and apoptosis, and on the expression of apoptosis-related molecules. Our results demonstrated for the first time that salidroside induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and may be a promising candidate for breast cancer treatment.

  14. Acetonic Extract of Buxus sempervirens Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Autophagy in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Mohamed, Ouardia; Battisti, Valentine; Joliot, Véronique; Fritsch, Lauriane; Pontis, Julien; Medjkane, Souhila; Redeuilh, Catherine; Lamouri, Aazdine; Fahy, Christine; Rholam, Mohamed; Atmani, Djebbar; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane

    2011-01-01

    Plants are an invaluable source of potential new anti-cancer drugs. Here, we investigated the cytotoxic activity of the acetonic extract of Buxus sempervirens on five breast cancer cell lines, MCF7, MCF10CA1a and T47D, three aggressive triple positive breast cancer cell lines, and BT-20 and MDA-MB-435, which are triple negative breast cancer cell lines. As a control, MCF10A, a spontaneously immortalized but non-tumoral cell line has been used. The acetonic extract of Buxus sempervirens showed cytotoxic activity towards all the five studied breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 ranging from 7.74 µg/ml to 12.5 µg/ml. Most importantly, the plant extract was less toxic towards MCF10A with an IC50 of 19.24 µg/ml. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis showed that the plant extract induced cell death and cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase in MCF7, T47D, MCF10CA1a and BT-20 cell lines, concomitant to cyclin D1 downregulation. Application of MCF7 and MCF10CA1a respective IC50 did not show such effects on the control cell line MCF10A. Propidium iodide/Annexin V double staining revealed a pre-apoptotic cell population with extract-treated MCF10CA1a, T47D and BT-20 cells. Transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated the occurrence of autophagy in MCF7 and MCF10CA1a cell lines. Immunofluorescence and Western blot assays confirmed the processing of microtubule-associated protein LC3 in the treated cancer cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated the upregulation of Beclin-1 in these cell lines and downregulation of Survivin and p21. Also, Caspase-3 detection in treated BT-20 and T47D confirmed the occurrence of apoptosis in these cells. Our findings indicate that Buxus sempervirens extract exhibit promising anti-cancer activity by triggering both autophagic cell death and apoptosis, suggesting that this plant may contain potential anti-cancer agents for single or combinatory cancer therapy against breast cancer. PMID:21935420

  15. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  16. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  17. Human breast milk and antiretrovirals dramatically reduce oral HIV-1 transmission in BLT humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Angela; Swanson, Michael D; Nochi, Tomonori; Olesen, Rikke; Denton, Paul W; Chateau, Morgan; Garcia, J Victor

    2012-01-01

    Currently, over 15% of new HIV infections occur in children. Breastfeeding is a major contributor to HIV infections in infants. This represents a major paradox in the field because in vitro, breast milk has been shown to have a strong inhibitory effect on HIV infectivity. However, this inhibitory effect has never been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we address this important paradox using the first humanized mouse model of oral HIV transmission. We established that reconstitution of the oral cavity and upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (BLT) mice with human leukocytes, including the human cell types important for mucosal HIV transmission (i.e. dendritic cells, macrophages and CD4⁺ T cells), renders them susceptible to oral transmission of cell-free and cell-associated HIV. Oral transmission of HIV resulted in systemic infection of lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues that is characterized by the presence of HIV RNA in plasma and a gradual decline of CD4⁺ T cells in peripheral blood. Consistent with infection of the oral cavity, we observed virus shedding into saliva. We then evaluated the role of human breast milk on oral HIV transmission. Our in vivo results demonstrate that breast milk has a strong inhibitory effect on oral transmission of both cell-free and cell-associated HIV. Finally, we evaluated the effect of antiretrovirals on oral transmission of HIV. Our results show that systemic antiretrovirals administered prior to exposure can efficiently prevent oral HIV transmission in BLT mice. PMID:22737068

  18. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  19. Ultra-small volume interdigital sensors for the measurement of human breast milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, A.; Pang, W. W.; Lai, C. T.; Hartmann, P.

    2007-12-01

    A palm-size interdigital impedance sensor incorporating a 10 μL sample reservoir, temperature sensor and hybrid heater was fabricated to determine the feasibility of measuring macronutrients in ultra-small volumes of human breast milk. Comparisons with previous measurements of homogenized cows milk show excellent agreement with fat measurement. Human breast milk however shows no correlation with fat but a surprising correlation with protein. Our investigations and proposed methods to improve the correlation and measurement accuracy are discussed.

  20. Identification of novel molecular regulators of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells by RNAi screening

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) binds to its receptors, TRAIL-receptor 1 (TRAIL-R1) and TRAIL-receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), leading to apoptosis by activation of caspase-8 and the downstream executioner caspases, caspase-3 and caspase-7 (caspase-3/7). Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines with a mesenchymal phenotype are sensitive to TRAIL, whereas other breast cancer cell lines are resistant. The underlying mechanisms that control TRAIL sensitivity in breast cancer cells are not well understood. Here, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens to identify molecular regulators of the TRAIL pathway in breast cancer cells. Methods We conducted siRNA screens of the human kinome (691 genes), phosphatome (320 genes), and about 300 additional genes in the mesenchymal TNBC cell line MB231. Forty-eight hours after transfection of siRNA, parallel screens measuring caspase-8 activity, caspase-3/7 activity, or cell viability were conducted in the absence or presence of TRAIL for each siRNA, relative to a negative control siRNA (siNeg). A subset of genes was screened in cell lines representing epithelial TNBC (MB468), HER2-amplified breast cancer (SKBR3), and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (T47D). Selected putative negative regulators of the TRAIL pathway were studied by using small-molecule inhibitors. Results The primary screens in MB231 identified 150 genes, including 83 kinases, 4 phosphatases, and 63 nonkinases, as potential negative regulators of TRAIL. The identified genes are involved in many critical cell processes, including apoptosis, growth factor-receptor signaling, cell-cycle regulation, transcriptional regulation, and DNA repair. Gene-network analysis identified four genes (PDPK1, IKBKB, SRC, and BCL2L1) that formed key nodes within the interaction network of negative regulators. A secondary screen of a subset of the genes identified in additional cell lines representing different breast cancer subtypes and sensitivities to TRAIL validated and extended these findings. Further, we confirmed that small-molecule inhibition of SRC or BCL2L1, in combination with TRAIL, sensitizes breast cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, including cell lines resistant to TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity. Conclusions These data identify novel molecular regulators of TRAIL-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells and suggest strategies for the enhanced application of TRAIL as a therapy for breast cancer. PMID:24745479

  1. Vav3 oncogene activates estrogen receptor and its overexpression may be involved in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kiwon; Liu, Yin; Mo, Jun Qin; Zhang, Jinsong; Dong, Zhongyun; Lu, Shan

    2008-01-01

    Background Our previous study revealed that Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human prostate cancer, activates androgen receptor, and stimulates growth in prostate cancer cells. The current study is to determine a potential role of Vav3 oncogene in human breast cancer and impact on estrogen receptor a (ERα)-mediated signaling axis. Methods Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 43 breast cancer specimens and western blot analysis was used for human breast cancer cell lines to determine the expression level of Vav3 protein. The impact of Vav3 on breast cancer cell growth was determined by siRNA knockdown of Vav3 expression. The role of Vav3 in ERα activation was examined in luciferase reporter assays. Deletion mutation analysis of Vav3 protein was performed to localize the functional domain involved in ERα activation. Finally, the interaction of Vav3 and ERα was assessed by GST pull-down analysis. Results We found that Vav3 was overexpressed in 81% of human breast cancer specimens, particularly in poorly differentiated lesions. Vav3 activated ERα partially via PI3K-Akt signaling and stimulated growth of breast cancer cells. Vav3 also potentiated EGF activity for cell growth and ERα activation in breast cancer cells. More interestingly, we found that Vav3 complexed with ERα. Consistent with its function for AR, the DH domain of Vav3 was essential for ERα activation. Conclusion Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human breast cancer. Vav3 complexes with ERα and enhances ERα activity. These findings suggest that Vav3 overexpression may aberrantly enhance ERα-mediated signaling axis and play a role in breast cancer development and/or progression. PMID:18518979

  2. The human mammary-derived growth inhibitor (MDGI) gene: Genomic structure and mutation analysis in human breast tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, C.M.; Morgan, K.; Narod, S.A.

    1996-05-15

    The mammary-derived growth inhibitor (MDGI) gene is a candidate tumor suppressor gene for human breast cancer. It has been shown to reduce the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cell lines in nude mice, and loss of expression of this gene has been shown in primary breast tumors. Furthermore, the human MDGI gene has been mapped to human chromosome 1p32-p35, a common region of deletion in sporadic breast tumors. We have determined the genomic structure of the human MDGI gene from a cosmid clone mapping to chromosome 1p32-p35 and have more finely mapped the MDGI gene relative to chromosome 1p microsatellite markers. The gene covers approximately 8 kb of genomic DNA and is divided into four exons. In an attempt to identify possible inactivating mutations in the MDGI gene in human breast cancer, we have sequenced all four exons and their surrounding splice junctions in 30 sporadic breast tumors. Ten of these tumors showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the 1p32-p35 regions, with 5 tumors showing LOH in the subregion containing the MDGI gene. No mutations were found in this analysis. A polymorphism was identified in exon 2 in the constitutional DNA of 1/30 cases in this study, which resulted in the conversion of a lysine to an arginine residue at codon 53. This variant was present in the constitutional DNA of a further 3/26 women with sporadic breast cancer and 2/90 control individual (P=0.20). Despite experimental evidence that MDGI has tumor suppressor activity, our data suggest that mutations in the coding region are uncommon in human breast tumorigenesis. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of human breast in vivo in the mammographic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Lee, Won-Mean; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Mueller, Dean; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-03-01

    This photoacoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system is designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3D ultrasound (AUS). The good penetration of near-infrared (NIR) light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad bandwidth, 572 element, 2D PVDF array at a low center-frequency of 1MHz were utilized with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. The feasibility of this system in imaging optically absorbing objects in deep breast tissues was assessed first through experiments on ex vivo whole breasts. The blood filled pseudo lesions were imaged at depths up to 49 mm in the specimens. In vivo imaging of human breasts has been conducted. 3D PAVI image stacks of human breasts were coregistered and compared with 3D ultrasound image stacks of the same breasts. Using the designed system, PAVI shows satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides with mild compression in the mammographic geometry. With its unique soft tissue contrast and excellent sensitivity to the tissue hemodynamic properties of fractional blood volume and blood oxygenation, PAVI, as a complement to 3D ultrasound and digital tomosynthesis mammography, might well contribute to detection, diagnosis and prognosis for breast cancer.

  4. Detection of a breast tissue-associated antigen by antiserum to Raji cell-bound circulating immune complexes of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koestler, T P; Papsidero, L D; Nemoto, T; Chu, T M

    1981-07-01

    Rabbits tolerant to human immunoglobulin G were used to raise antisera against the Raji cell-bound circulating immune complexes from human breast cancer sera. After solid-phase adsorption treatment with glutaraldehyde-cross-linked normal human plasma, acetone-extracted normal liver tissue powder, and glutaraldehyde-fixed Raji cells, one antiserum reacted specifically with breast tissue extracts but not with extracts of other tissues, as examined by a counterimmunoelectrophoresis technique. Immunological reactivity of the treated antiserum was removed by incubation with normal, primary, or metastatic breast tumor tissue extracts. Incubation with normal human serum or extracts derived from tissues other than the breast showed no neutralizing effect on the antibodies. This specific antiserum reagent was used in a modification of the Raji cell radioimmunoassay. Raji cells were incubated with sera from cancer patients or normal controls and then reacted with 125I-labeled F(ab')2 fraction of the treated antiserum reagent. The amount of 125I-F(ab')2 bound was then determined. Although all sera exhibited elevated circulating immune complexes by the conventional Raji cell radioimmunoassay, 14 of 18 breast carcinoma sera demonstrated a significant uptake when compared with the normal population group as opposed to five (three lung and two colon) of 29 other cancer sera examined (p less than 0.001). An immunologically reactive breast tissue-associated antigen, purified from malignant breast tumor or normal breast tissue extracts with the use of antiserum reagent, exhibited an apparent molecular weight of 85,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate; polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a pI value of 4.9 +/- 0.2. These results demonstrated that a breast tissue-associated antigen rather than a breast tumor-associated neoantigen, was involved in circulating immune complexes of breast cancer patients as detected by Raji cell immunoassay. It also implied the occurrence of disease-related autoimmunity in human breast cancer. PMID:7018673

  5. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  6. Weightlessness acts on human breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassy, J.; Portet, S.; Beil, M.; Millot, G.; Fauvel-Lafève, F.; Gasset, G.; Schoevaert, D.

    2003-10-01

    Because cells are sensitive to mechanical forces, weightlessness might act on stress-dependent cell changes. Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space in a Photon capsule, were fixed after 1.5, 22 and 48 h in orbit. Cells subjected to weightlessness were compared to 1g in-flight and ground controls. Post-flight, fluorescent labeling was performed to visualize cell proliferation (Ki-67), three cytoskeleton components and chromatin structure. Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify cycling cells and mitosis, modifications of the cytokeratin network and chromatin structure. Several main phenomena were observed in weightlessness: The perinuclear cytokeratin network and chromatin structure were looser. More cells were cycling and mitosis was prolonged. Finally, cell proliferation was reduced as a consequence of a cell-cycle blockade. Microtubules were altered in many cells. The results reported in the first point are in agreement with basic predictions of cellular tensegrity. The prolongation of mitosis can be explained by an alteration of microtubules. We discuss here the different mechanisms involved in weightlessness alteration of microtubules: i) alteration of their self-organization by reaction-diffusion processes, and a mathematical model is proposed, ii) activation or desactivation of microtubules stabilizing proteins, acting on both microtubule and microfilament networks in cell cortex.

  7. Weightlessness acts on human breast cancer cell line MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Vassy, J; Portet, S; Beil, M; Millot, G; Fauvel-Lafève, F; Gasset, G; Schoevaert, D

    2003-01-01

    Because cells are sensitive to mechanical forces, weightlessness might act on stress-dependent cell changes. Human breast cancer cells MCF-7, flown in space in a Photon capsule, were fixed after 1.5, 22 and 48 h in orbit. Cells subjected to weightlessness were compared to 1 g in-flight and ground controls. Post-flight, fluorescent labeling was performed to visualize cell proliferation (Ki-67), three cytoskeleton components and chromatin structure. Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify cycling cells and mitosis, modifications of the cytokeratin network and chromatin structure. Several main phenomena were observed in weightlessness: The perinuclear cytokeratin network and chromatin structure were looser; More cells were cycling and mitosis was prolonged. Finally, cell proliferation was reduced as a consequence of a cell-cycle blockade; Microtubules were altered in many cells. The results reported in the first point are in agreement with basic predictions of cellular tensegrity. The prolongation of mitosis can be explained by an alteration of microtubules. We discuss here the different mechanisms involved in weightlessness alteration of microtubules: i) alteration of their self-organization by reaction-diffusion processes, and a mathematical model is proposed, ii) activation or deactivation of microtubules stabilizing proteins, acting on both microtubule and microfilament networks in cell cortex. PMID:15002416

  8. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, D. Kent

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  9. Phorbol esters induce multidrug resistance in human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, R.L.; Patel, J.; Chabner, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    Mechanisms responsible for broad-based resistance to antitumor drugs derived from natural products (multidrug resistance) are incompletely understood. Agents known to reverse the multidrug-resistant phenotype (verapamil and trifluoperazine) can also inhibit the activity of protein kinase C. When the authors assayed human breast cancer cell lines for protein kinase C activity, they found that enzyme activity was 7-fold higher in the multidrug-resistance cancer cells compared with the control, sensitive parent cells. Exposure of drug-sensitive cells to the phorbol ester phorbol 12,13-dibutyate (P(BtO)/sub 2/) led to an increase in protein kinase C activity and induced a drug-resistance phenotype, whereas exposure of drug-resistant cells to P(BtO)/sub 2/ further increased drug resistance. In sensitive cells, this increased resistance was accomplished by a 3.5-fold increased phosphorylation of a 20-kDa particulate protein and a 35-40% decreased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and vincristine. P(BtO)/sub 2/ induced resistance to agents involved in the multidrug-resistant phenotype (doxorubicin and vincristine) but did not affect sensitivity to an unrelated alkylating agent (melphalan). The increased resistance was partially or fully reversible by the calcium channel blocker verapamil and by the calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine. These data suggest that stimulation of protein kinase C playus a role in the drug-transport changes in multidrug-resistant cells. This may occur through modulation of an efflux pump by protein phosphorylation.

  10. Molecular homology and difference between spontaneous canine mammary cancer and human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Deli; Xiong, Huan; Ellis, Angela E.; Northrup, Nicole C.; Rodriguez, Carlos O.; O'Regan, Ruth M.; Dalton, Stephen; Zhao, Shaying

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring canine mammary cancer (MC) represents an excellent model of human breast cancer but is greatly understudied. To better utilize this valuable resource, we performed whole genome sequencing, whole exome sequencing, RNA-seq and/or high density arrays on 12 canine MC cases, including 7 simple carcinomas and four complex carcinomas. Canine simple carcinomas, which histologically match human breast carcinomas, harbor extensive genomic aberrations, many of which faithfully recapitulate key features of human breast cancer. Canine complex carcinomas, which are characterized by proliferation of both luminal and myoepithelial cells and are rare in human breast cancer, appear to lack genomic abnormalities. Instead, these tumors have about 35 chromatin-modification genes downregulated, and are abnormally enriched with active histone modification H4-acetylation while aberrantly depleted with repressive histone modification H3K9me3. Our findings indicate the likelihood that canine simple carcinomas arise from genomic aberrations whereas complex carcinomas originate from epigenomic alterations, reinforcing their unique value. Canine complex carcinomas offer an ideal system to study myoepithelial cells, the second major cell lineage of the mammary gland. Canine simple carcinomas, which faithfully represent human breast carcinomas at the molecular level, provide indispensable models for basic and translational breast cancer research. PMID:25082814

  11. Persistent Pesticides in Human Breast Milk and Cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Ida N.; Skakkebæk, Niels E.; Toppari, Jorma; Virtanen, Helena E.; Shen, Heqing; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Petersen, Jørgen H.; Jensen, Tina K.; Main, Katharina M.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Prenatal exposure to some pesticides can adversely affect male reproductive health in animals. We investigated a possible human association between maternal exposure to 27 organochlorine compounds used as pesticides and cryptorchidism among male children. Design Within a prospective birth cohort, we performed a case–control study; 62 milk samples from mothers of cryptorchid boys and 68 from mothers of healthy boys were selected. Milk was collected as individual pools between 1 and 3 months postpartum and analyzed for 27 organochlorine pesticides. Results Eight organochlorine pesticides were measurable in all samples (medians; nanograms per gram lipid) for cases/controls: 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p′-DDE): 97.3/83.8; β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH): 13.6/12.3; hexachlorobenzene (HCB): 10.6/8.8; α -endosulfan: 7.0/6.7; oxychlordane: 4.5/4.1; 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p′-DDT): 4.6/4.0; dieldrin: 4.1/3.1; cis-heptachloroepoxide (cis-HE): 2.5/2.2. Five compounds [octachlorostyrene (OCS); pentachlorobenzene, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p′-DDD); o,p′-DDT; mirex] were measurable in most samples (detection rates 90.8–99.2%) but in lower concentrations. For methoxychlor, cis-chlordane, pentachloroanisole (PCA), γ -HCH, 1,1-dichloro-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-2,2(4-chlorophenyl)ethane, trans-chlordane, α -HCH, and o,p′-DDE, both concentrations and detection rates were low (26.5–71.5%). Heptachlor, HCH (δ, ɛ ), aldrin, β-endosulfan and trans-heptachloroepoxide were detected at negligible concentrations and low detection rates and were not analyzed further. Seventeen of 21 organochlorine pesticides [p,p′-DDT, p,p′-DDE, p,p′-DDD, o,p′-DDT, HCH (α , β, γ ), HCB, PCA, α -endosulfan, cis-HE, chlordane (cis-, trans-) oxychlordane, methoxychlor, OCS, and dieldrin] were measured in higher median concentrations in case milk than in control milk. Apart from trans-chlordane (p = 0.012), there were no significant differences between cryptorchid and healthy boys for individual chemicals. However, combined statistical analysis of the eight most abundant persistent pesticides showed that pesticide levels in breast milk were significantly higher in boys with cryptorchidism (p = 0.032). Conclusion The association between congenital cryptorchidism and some persistent pesticides in breast milk as a proxy for maternal exposure suggests that testicular descent in the fetus may be adversely affected. PMID:16835070

  12. Aberrant Promoter Methylation of the Tumour Suppressor RASSF10 and Its Growth Inhibitory Function in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Antje M.; Walesch, Sara K.; Dammann, Reinhard H.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, with 1.7 million new cases each year. As early diagnosis and prognosis are crucial factors in cancer treatment, we investigated potential DNA methylation biomarkers of the tumour suppressor family Ras-association domain family (RASSF). Promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressors leads to their inactivation and thereby promotes cancer development and progression. In this study we analysed the tumour suppressors RASSF1A and RASSF10. Our study shows that RASSF10 is expressed in normal breast but inactivated by methylation in breast cancer. We observed a significant inactivating promoter methylation of RASSF10 in primary breast tumours. RASSF10 is inactivated in 63% of primary breast cancer samples but only 4% of normal control breast tissue is methylated (p < 0.005). RASSF1A also shows high promoter methylation levels in breast cancer of 56% vs. 8% of normal tissue (p < 0.005). Interestingly more than 80% of breast cancer samples harboured a hypermethylation of RASSF10 and/or RASSF1A promoter. Matching samples exhibited a strong tumour specific promoter methylation of RASSF10 in comparison to the normal control breast tissue. Demethylation treatment of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D reversed RASSF10 promoter hypermethylation and re-established RASSF10 expression. In addition, we could show the growth inhibitory potential of RASSF10 in breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D upon exogenous expression of RASSF10 by colony formation. We could further show, that RASSF10 induced apoptotic changes in MCF7 and T47D cells, which was verified by a significant increase in the apoptotic sub G1 fraction by 50% using flow cytometry for MCF7 cells. In summary, our study shows the breast tumour specific inactivation of RASSF10 and RASSF1A due to DNA methylation of their CpG island promoters. Furthermore RASSF10 was characterised by the ability to block growth of breast cancer cell lines by apoptosis induction. PMID:26927176

  13. Aberrant Promoter Methylation of the Tumour Suppressor RASSF10 and Its Growth Inhibitory Function in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Richter, Antje M; Walesch, Sara K; Dammann, Reinhard H

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, with 1.7 million new cases each year. As early diagnosis and prognosis are crucial factors in cancer treatment, we investigated potential DNA methylation biomarkers of the tumour suppressor family Ras-association domain family (RASSF). Promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressors leads to their inactivation and thereby promotes cancer development and progression. In this study we analysed the tumour suppressors RASSF1A and RASSF10. Our study shows that RASSF10 is expressed in normal breast but inactivated by methylation in breast cancer. We observed a significant inactivating promoter methylation of RASSF10 in primary breast tumours. RASSF10 is inactivated in 63% of primary breast cancer samples but only 4% of normal control breast tissue is methylated (p < 0.005). RASSF1A also shows high promoter methylation levels in breast cancer of 56% vs. 8% of normal tissue (p < 0.005). Interestingly more than 80% of breast cancer samples harboured a hypermethylation of RASSF10 and/or RASSF1A promoter. Matching samples exhibited a strong tumour specific promoter methylation of RASSF10 in comparison to the normal control breast tissue. Demethylation treatment of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D reversed RASSF10 promoter hypermethylation and re-established RASSF10 expression. In addition, we could show the growth inhibitory potential of RASSF10 in breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and T47D upon exogenous expression of RASSF10 by colony formation. We could further show, that RASSF10 induced apoptotic changes in MCF7 and T47D cells, which was verified by a significant increase in the apoptotic sub G1 fraction by 50% using flow cytometry for MCF7 cells. In summary, our study shows the breast tumour specific inactivation of RASSF10 and RASSF1A due to DNA methylation of their CpG island promoters. Furthermore RASSF10 was characterised by the ability to block growth of breast cancer cell lines by apoptosis induction. PMID:26927176

  14. S14 protein in breast cancer cells: Direct evidence of regulation by SREBP-1c, superinduction with progestin, and effects on cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Peter M.; Bingham, Chad M.; McGraw, Charles J.; Baker, Christina L.; Morganelli, Peter M.; Meng, Marie Louise; Armstrong, Jessica M.; Moncur, Joel T.; Kinlaw, William B. . E-mail: william.kinlaw@hitchcock.org

    2006-02-01

    Most breast cancers exhibit brisk lipogenesis, and require it for growth. S14 is a lipogenesis-related nuclear protein that is overexpressed in most breast cancers. Sterol response element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is required for induction of lipogenesis-related genes, including S14 and fatty acid synthase (FAS), in hepatocytes, and correlation of SREBP-1c and FAS expression suggested that SREBP-1c drives lipogenesis in tumors as well. We directly tested the hypothesis that SREBP-1c drives S14 expression and mediates lipogenic effects of progestin in T47D breast cancer cells. Dominant-negative SREBP-1c inhibited induction of S14 and FAS mRNAs by progestin, while active SREBP-1c induced without hormone and superinduced in its presence. Changes in S14 mRNA were reflected in protein levels. A lag time and lack of progestin response elements indicated that S14 and FAS gene activation by progestin is indirect. Knockdown of S14 reduced, whereas overexpression stimulated, T47D cell growth, while nonlipogenic MCF10a mammary epithelial cells were not growth-inhibited. These data directly demonstrate that SREBP-1c drives S14 gene expression in breast cancer cells, and progestin magnifies that effect via an indirect mechanism. This supports the prediction, based on S14 gene amplification and overexpression in breast tumors, that S14 augments breast cancer cell growth and survival.

  15. Breastfeeding: breast milk banks and human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Choto, R G

    1990-12-01

    HIV in infants and children in Zimbabwe is virtually limited to vertical transmission. Less than 5 cases of transfusion acquired HIV infections have been documented to date. Zimbabwe was the third country in the world after the United States, to screen transfusion blood and blood products. The controversy of HIV transmission through breast milk is still far from resolved. In developing countries, breast-milk substitutes for formulae are not only prohibitively expensive but dangerous because of unhygienic and economic constraints. The paper argues the case for continued breast-feeding of infants by their HIV seropositive mothers. PMID:2092885

  16. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L.

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells and that its increased expression in tumors may result in estrogen-independent ER activation, thereby reducing estrogen dependence and response to anti-estrogen therapy.

  17. Growth characteristics and metastatic properties of human breast cancer xenografts in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Visonneau, S.; Cesano, A.; Torosian, M. H.; Miller, E. J.; Santoli, D.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the growth and metastatic potential of two human breast cancer cell lines and 16 patient-derived biopsy specimens, representing the most common histological types of breast carcinomas, upon subcutaneous implantation into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. The method of engraftment we used, based on implantation of intact tissue specimens and complete immunosuppression of the host, provided an easier system to grow human breast carcinoma specimens in mouse models and resulted in a 50% success rate of tumor take. No correlation was found between growth in SCID mice and pathological diagnosis, grading, or estrogen/progesterone receptor expression by the tumor biopsy specimen. Serial passage of the tumor fragments in SCID mice resulted in increased metastasis rates and more rapid emergence of a palpable tumor mass. A tumor from a patient with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, which grew aggressively and metastasized in 100% of the female SCID mice, was also successfully engrafted in 100% of nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID female mice, but systemic spread was minimal. Fragments of the same tumor grew in only 33% of male SCID mice with very limited metastases. A strong correlation (r = 0.997) was observed between tumor burden and the presence of soluble (serum) interleukin-2 receptor, a marker associated with a subset of human breast tumors. All together, these data indicate the usefulness of SCID/human breast tumor xenografts for measuring tumor progression and evaluating novel therapeutic approaches to breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9588898

  18. Lowered circulating aspartate is a metabolic feature of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhou, Bingsen; Zhao, Aihua; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Xueqing; Garmire, Lana; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Yu, Herbert; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Distinct metabolic transformation is essential for cancer cells to sustain a high rate of proliferation and resist cell death signals. Such a metabolic transformation results in unique cellular metabolic phenotypes that are often reflected by distinct metabolite signatures in tumor tissues as well as circulating blood. Using a metabolomics platform, we find that breast cancer is associated with significantly (p = 6.27E-13) lowered plasma aspartate levels in a training group comprising 35 breast cancer patients and 35 controls. The result was validated with 103 plasma samples and 183 serum samples of two groups of primary breast cancer patients. Such a lowered aspartate level is specific to breast cancer as it has shown 0% sensitivity in serum from gastric (n = 114) and colorectal (n = 101) cancer patients. There was a significantly higher level of aspartate in breast cancer tissues (n = 20) than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line than in MCF-10A cell lines, suggesting that the depleted level of aspartate in blood of breast cancer patients is due to increased tumor aspartate utilization. Together, these findings suggest that lowed circulating aspartate is a key metabolic feature of human breast cancer. PMID:26452258

  19. DEAD-box helicase DP103 defines metastatic potential of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Myoung; Hay, Hui Sin; Lee, Moon Hee; Goh, Jen Nee; Tan, Tuan Zea; Sen, Yin Ping; Lim, See Wee; Yousef, Einas M; Ong, Hooi Tin; Thike, Aye Aye; Kong, Xiangjun; Wu, Zhengsheng; Mendoz, Earnest; Sun, Wei; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lobie, Peter E; Lim, Yoon Pin; Yap, Celestial T; Zeng, Qi; Sethi, Gautam; Lee, Martin B; Tan, Patrick; Goh, Boon Cher; Miller, Lance D; Thiery, Jean Paul; Zhu, Tao; Gaboury, Louis; Tan, Puay Hoon; Hui, Kam Man; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-09-01

    Despite advancement in breast cancer treatment, 30% of patients with early breast cancers experience relapse with distant metastasis. It is a challenge to identify patients at risk for relapse; therefore, the identification of markers and therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancers is imperative. Here, we identified DP103 as a biomarker and metastasis-driving oncogene in human breast cancers and determined that DP103 elevates matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) levels, which are associated with metastasis and invasion through activation of NF-κB. In turn, NF-κB signaling positively activated DP103 expression. Furthermore, DP103 enhanced TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) phosphorylation of NF-κB-activating IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), leading to increased NF-κB activity. Reduction of DP103 expression in invasive breast cancer cells reduced phosphorylation of IKK2, abrogated NF-κB-mediated MMP9 expression, and impeded metastasis in a murine xenograft model. In breast cancer patient tissues, elevated levels of DP103 correlated with enhanced MMP9, reduced overall survival, and reduced survival after relapse. Together, these data indicate that a positive DP103/NF-κB feedback loop promotes constitutive NF-κB activation in invasive breast cancers and activation of this pathway is linked to cancer progression and the acquisition of chemotherapy resistance. Furthermore, our results suggest that DP103 has potential as a therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. PMID:25083991

  20. DEAD-box helicase DP103 defines metastatic potential of human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Myoung; Sin Hay, Hui; Lee, Moon Hee; Goh, Jen Nee; Tan, Tuan Zea; Sen, Yin Ping; Lim, See Wee; Yousef, Einas M.; Ong, Hooi Tin; Thike, Aye Aye; Kong, Xiangjun; Wu, Zhengsheng; Mendoz, Earnest; Sun, Wei; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lobie, Peter E.; Lim, Yoon Pin; Yap, Celestial T.; Zeng, Qi; Sethi, Gautam; Lee, Martin B.; Tan, Patrick; Goh, Boon Cher; Miller, Lance D.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Zhu, Tao; Gaboury, Louis; Tan, Puay Hoon; Hui, Kam Man; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Despite advancement in breast cancer treatment, 30% of patients with early breast cancers experience relapse with distant metastasis. It is a challenge to identify patients at risk for relapse; therefore, the identification of markers and therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancers is imperative. Here, we identified DP103 as a biomarker and metastasis-driving oncogene in human breast cancers and determined that DP103 elevates matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) levels, which are associated with metastasis and invasion through activation of NF-κB. In turn, NF-κB signaling positively activated DP103 expression. Furthermore, DP103 enhanced TGF-β–activated kinase-1 (TAK1) phosphorylation of NF-κB–activating IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), leading to increased NF-κB activity. Reduction of DP103 expression in invasive breast cancer cells reduced phosphorylation of IKK2, abrogated NF-κB–mediated MMP9 expression, and impeded metastasis in a murine xenograft model. In breast cancer patient tissues, elevated levels of DP103 correlated with enhanced MMP9, reduced overall survival, and reduced survival after relapse. Together, these data indicate that a positive DP103/NF-κB feedback loop promotes constitutive NF-κB activation in invasive breast cancers and activation of this pathway is linked to cancer progression and the acquisition of chemotherapy resistance. Furthermore, our results suggest that DP103 has potential as a therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. PMID:25083991

  1. Infrequent mutation of ATBF1 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodong; Zhou, Yingfa; Otto, Kristen B; Wang, Mingrong; Chen, Ceshi; Zhou, Wei; Subramanian, Krithika; Vertino, Paula M; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2007-02-01

    Deletion at chromosome 16q is frequent in prostate and breast cancers, suggesting the existence of one or more tumor suppressor genes in 16q. Recently, the transcription factor ATBF1 at 16q22 was identified as a strong candidate tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, and loss of ATBF1 expression was associated with poorer prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, we examined mutation, expression, and promoter methylation of ATBF1 in 32 breast cancer cell lines. Only 2 of the 32 cancer cell lines had mutations, although 18 nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. In addition, 24 of 32 (75%) cancer cell lines had reduced ATBF1 mRNA levels, yet promoter methylation was not involved in gene silencing. These findings suggest that ATBF1 plays a role in breast cancer through transcriptional downregulation rather than mutations. PMID:16932943

  2. Zeranol may increase the risk of leptin-induced neoplasia in human breast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pingping; Ye, Weiping; Zhong, Saiyi; Jen, Robert; Li, Hong; Feng, Eric; Lin, Shu-Hong; Liu, Jie-Yu; Lin, Young C

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer and obesity are serious health problems and their relationship has been studied for many years. Leptin is mainly secreted by adipocytes and plays a key role in breast cancer development. Leptin expression is up-regulated in obese individuals and promotes breast cancer cell growth. On the other hand, exposure to environmental estrogens has been found to be directly related to breast cancer. Zeranol (Z) is a non-steroidal anabolic growth promoter used in the beef industry in the US. This study focused on the evaluation of Z and Z-containing sera (ZS) and its adverse health risk to human consumption of Z-containing meat produced from Z-implanted beef cattle. We hypothesized that Z increases the risk of breast neoplasia in women, particularly in obese women. A cell proliferation assay, ELISA analysis, RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted. Our study demonstrated that Z and ZS collected from Z-implanted heifers stimulated the proliferation of primary cultured human normal breast epithelial cells (HNBECs) by up-regulating cyclin D1 expression. Leptin increased the sensitivity of HNBECs to Z, and Z increased the ability of HNBECs to secrete leptin. These results suggest an interaction between leptin and Z in HNBECs. Furthermore, Z may play a role in leptin-induced breast neoplasia. PMID:22870137

  3. Three-dimensional in vivo fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlu, Alper; Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut; Rosen, Mark A.; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-05-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) in vivo images of human breast cancer based on fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT). To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported 3D fluorescence tomography of human breast cancer in vivo. In our protocol, the fluorophore Indocyanine Green (ICG) is injected intravenously. Fluorescence excitation and detection are accomplished in the soft-compression, parallel-plane, transmission geometry using laser sources at 786 nm and spectrally filtered CCD detection. Phantom and in vivo studies confirm the signals are due to ICG fluorescence, rather than tissue autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. Fluorescence images of breast tumors were in good agreement with those of MRI, and with DOT based on endogenous contrast. Tumorto- normal tissue contrast based on ICG fluorescence was two-to-four-fold higher than contrast based on hemoglobin and scattering parameters. In total the measurements demonstrate that FDOT of breast cancer is feasible and promising.

  4. Three-dimensional in vivo fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer in humans.

    PubMed

    Corlu, Alper; Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut; Rosen, Mark A; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R; Schnall, Mitchell D; Yodh, Arjun G

    2007-05-28

    We present three-dimensional (3D) in vivo images of human breast cancer based on fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT). To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported 3D fluorescence tomography of human breast cancer in vivo. In our protocol, the fluorophore Indocyanine Green (ICG) is injected intravenously. Fluorescence excitation and detection are accomplished in the soft-compression, parallel-plane, transmission geometry using laser sources at 786 nm and spectrally filtered CCD detection. Phantom and in vivo studies confirm the signals are due to ICG fluorescence, rather than tissue autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. Fluorescence images of breast tumors were in good agreement with those of MRI, and with DOT based on endogenous contrast. Tumorto- normal tissue contrast based on ICG fluorescence was two-to-four-fold higher than contrast based on hemoglobin and scattering parameters. In total the measurements demonstrate that FDOT of breast cancer is feasible and promising. PMID:19546980

  5. Characterization of human breast cancer tissues by infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Verdonck, M; Denayer, A; Delvaux, B; Garaud, S; De Wind, R; Desmedt, C; Sotiriou, C; Willard-Gallo, K; Goormaghtigh, E

    2016-01-21

    Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to microscopy (IR imaging) has shown unique advantages in detecting morphological and molecular pathologic alterations in biological tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of IR imaging as a diagnostic tool to identify characteristics of breast epithelial cells and the stroma. In this study a total of 19 breast tissue samples were obtained from 13 patients. For 6 of the patients, we also obtained Non-Adjacent Non-Tumor tissue samples. Infrared images were recorded on the main cell/tissue types identified in all breast tissue samples. Unsupervised Principal Component Analyses and supervised Partial Least Square Discriminant Analyses (PLS-DA) were used to discriminate spectra. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of PLS-DA models. Our results show that IR imaging coupled with PLS-DA can efficiently identify the main cell types present in FFPE breast tissue sections, i.e. epithelial cells, lymphocytes, connective tissue, vascular tissue and erythrocytes. A second PLS-DA model could distinguish normal and tumor breast epithelial cells in the breast tissue sections. A patient-specific model reached particularly high sensitivity, specificity and MCC rates. Finally, we showed that the stroma located close or at distance from the tumor exhibits distinct spectral characteristics. In conclusion FTIR imaging combined with computational algorithms could be an accurate, rapid and objective tool to identify/quantify breast epithelial cells and differentiate tumor from normal breast tissue as well as normal from tumor-associated stroma, paving the way to the establishment of a potential complementary tool to ensure safe tumor margins. PMID:26535413

  6. Tissue specific expression of extracellular microRNA in human breast cancers and normal human breast tissue in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Annelie; Dabrosin, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be biomarkers for disease monitoring but data are inconsistent, one reason being that blood miRNA is of heterogeneous origin. Here, we sampled extracellular microRNAs locally in situ using microdialysis. Three different cohorts of women were included; postmenopausal women with ongoing breast cancer investigated within the cancer and in normal adjacent breast tissue, postmenopausal women investigated in their normal healthy breast and subcutaneous fat before and after six weeks of tamoxifen therapy, premenopausal women during the menstrual cycle. Samples were initially screened using TaqMan array cards with subsequently absolute quantification. 124 miRNA were expressed in microdialysates. After absolute quantifications extracellular miRNA-21 was found to be significantly increased in breast cancer. In addition, the levels were significantly higher in pre-menopausal breast tissue compared with postmenopausal. In breast tissue of pre-menopausal women miRNA-21 exhibited a cyclic variation during the menstrual cycle and in postmenopausal women six weeks of tamoxifen treatment decreased miRNA-21 suggesting that this miRNA may be important for breast carcinogenesis. None of these changes were found in plasma or microdialysates from subcutaneous fat. Our data revealed tissue specific changes of extracellular circulating miRNAs that would be otherwise unraveled using blood samples. PMID:26008976

  7. Tissue specific expression of extracellular microRNA in human breast cancers and normal human breast tissue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Annelie; Dabrosin, Charlotta

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be biomarkers for disease monitoring but data are inconsistent, one reason being that blood miRNA is of heterogeneous origin. Here, we sampled extracellular microRNAs locally in situ using microdialysis. Three different cohorts of women were included; postmenopausal women with ongoing breast cancer investigated within the cancer and in normal adjacent breast tissue, postmenopausal women investigated in their normal healthy breast and subcutaneous fat before and after six weeks of tamoxifen therapy, premenopausal women during the menstrual cycle. Samples were initially screened using TaqMan array cards with subsequently absolute quantification. 124 miRNA were expressed in microdialysates. After absolute quantifications extracellular miRNA-21 was found to be significantly increased in breast cancer. In addition, the levels were significantly higher in pre-menopausal breast tissue compared with postmenopausal. In breast tissue of pre-menopausal women miRNA-21 exhibited a cyclic variation during the menstrual cycle and in postmenopausal women six weeks of tamoxifen treatment decreased miRNA-21 suggesting that this miRNA may be important for breast carcinogenesis. None of these changes were found in plasma or microdialysates from subcutaneous fat. Our data revealed tissue specific changes of extracellular circulating miRNAs that would be otherwise unraveled using blood samples. PMID:26008976

  8. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  9. Breast cancer photothermal therapy based on gold nanorods targeted by covalently-coupled bombesin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Zahra; Salouti, Mojtaba; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2015-05-01

    Photothermal therapy, a minimally invasive treatment method for killing cancers cells, has generated a great deal of interest. In an effort to improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects, better targeting of photoabsorbers to tumors has become a new concept in the battle against cancer. In this study, a bombesin (BBN) analog that can bind to all gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor subtypes was bound covalently with gold nanorods (GNRs) using Nanothinks acid as a link. The BBN analog was also coated with poly(ethylene glycol) to increase its stability and biocompatibility. The interactions were confirmed by ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A methylthiazol tetrazolium assay showed no cytotoxicity of the PEGylated GNR-BBN conjugate. The cell binding and internalization studies showed high specificity and uptake of the GNR-BBN-PEG conjugate toward breast cancer cells of the T47D cell line. The in vitro study revealed destruction of the T47D cells exposed to the new photothermal agent combined with continuous-wave near-infrared laser irradiation. The biodistribution study showed significant accumulation of the conjugate in the tumor tissue of mice with breast cancer. The in vivo photothermal therapy showed the complete disappearance of xenographted breast tumors in the mouse model.

  10. Claudin-20 promotes an aggressive phenotype in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tracey A; Lane, Jane; Ozupek, Hulya; Jiang, Wen G

    2013-01-01

    Claudin-20 is a member of the Claudin family of transmembrane proteins located in the tight junction (TJ) of cells of epithelial origin. Due to the increasing evidence supporting the role of TJ proteins in preventing tumor cell metastatic behavior, this study sought to evaluate the distribution of Claudin-20 in human breast cancer and the effect of Claudin-20 overexpression in human breast cancer cells. Q-PCR data from breast cancer primary tumors (n = 114) and matched background tissue (n = 30) showed that high claudin-20 expression was correlated with poor survival of patients with breast cancer (p = 0.022). Following transformation of the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 with a Claudin-20 expression construct functional assays were performed to ascertain changes in cell behavior. Claudin-20 transformed cells showed significantly increased invasion (p < 0.005) and were significantly less adhesive than wild type cells (p < 0.05). There was no effect on growth (either in vitro or in vivo) for either cell line. Overexpression of Claudin-20 resulted in reduced transepithelial resistance (induced by the motogen HGF at 25 ng/ml, p = 0.0007). Interestingly, this was not mirrored by paracellular permeability, as overexpression of Claudin-20 caused a decrease in permeability. The introduction of Claudin-20 into human breast cancer cells resulted in breast cancer cells with an aggressive phenotype and reduced trans-epithelial resistance. There was no corresponding decrease in paracellular permeability, indicating that this Claudin has a differential function in epithelial TJ. This provides further insight into the importance of correctly functioning TJ in preventing the progression of human breast cancer. PMID:24665404

  11. DNA barcoding reveals diverse growth kinetics of human breast tumour subclones in serially passaged xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Long V.; Cox, Claire L.; Eirew, Peter; Knapp, David J. H. F.; Pellacani, Davide; Kannan, Nagarajan; Carles, Annaick; Moksa, Michelle; Balani, Sneha; Shah, Sohrab; Hirst, Martin; Aparicio, Samuel; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic and phenotypic analyses indicate extensive intra- as well as intertumoral heterogeneity in primary human malignant cell populations despite their clonal origin. Cellular DNA barcoding offers a powerful and unbiased alternative to track the number and size of multiple subclones within a single human tumour xenograft and their response to continued in vivo passaging. Using this approach we find clone-initiating cell frequencies that vary from ~1/10 to ~1/10,000 cells transplanted for two human breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer xenografts derived from three different patients. For the cell lines, these frequencies are negatively affected in transplants of more than 20,000 cells. Serial transplants reveal five clonal growth patterns (unchanging, expanding, diminishing, fluctuating or of delayed onset), whose predominance is highly variable both between and within original samples. This study thus demonstrates the high growth potential and diverse growth properties of xenografted human breast cancer cells. PMID:25532760

  12. The Chk1 inhibitor AZD7762 sensitises p53 mutant breast cancer cells to radiation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhikun; Yao, Guoliang; Zhou, Bo; Fan, Yonggang; Gao, Shegan; Feng, Xiaoshan

    2012-10-01

    AZD7762, a novel checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk 1)inhibitor, has been proven to sensitize various tumor cells to DNA damage. However, whether or not AZD7762 sensitizes breast cancer cells to radiation has not been defined. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate for the first time, that AZD7762 not only promotes radiation-induced apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe of p53 mutant T47D breast cancer cells in vitro, but also delays their xenograft growth in response to radiation in vivo. Our mechanistic study showed that AZD7762 treatment resulted in the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and the inhibition of radiation damage repair as demonstrated by increased radiation-induced γH2AX expression and decreased RAD51 protein expression. These results suggest that AZD7762 may effectively abrogate radiation-induced G2/M arrest and inhibit radiation damage repair in conferring radiosensitivity on p53 mutant T47D breast cancer cells, by promoting radiation-induced apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. The clinical application of AZD7762, as an adjuvant in the radiotherapy of breast cancers, should be further explored. PMID:22825736

  13. 31P MRSI and 1H MRS at 7 T: initial results in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klomp, Dennis W J; van de Bank, Bart L; Raaijmakers, Alexander; Korteweg, Mies A; Possanzini, Cecilia; Boer, Vincent O; van de Berg, Cornelius A T; van de Bosch, Maurice A A J; Luijten, Peter R

    2011-12-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of the noninvasive determination of important biomarkers of human (breast) tumor metabolism using high-field (7-T) MRI and MRS. (31) P MRSI at this field strength was used to provide a direct method for the in vivo detection and quantification of endogenous biomarkers. These encompass phospholipid metabolism, phosphate energy metabolism and intracellular pH. A double-tuned, dual-element transceiver was designed with focused radiofrequency fields for unilateral breast imaging and spectroscopy tuned for optimized sensitivity at 7 T. T(1) -weighted three-dimensional MRI and (1) H MRS were applied for the localization and quantification of total choline compounds. (31) P MRSI was obtained within 20 min per subject and mapped in three dimensions over the breast with pixel volumes of 10 mL. The feasibility of monitoring in vivo metabolism was demonstrated in two patients with breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy, validated by ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR and compared with data from an age-matched healthy volunteer. Concentrations of total choline down to 0.4 mM could be detected in the human breast in vivo. Levels of adenosine and other nucleoside triphosphates, inorganic phosphate, phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine and their glycerol diesters detected in glandular tissue, as well as in tumor, were mapped over the entire breast. Altered levels of these compounds were observed in patients compared with an age-matched healthy volunteer; modulation of these levels occurred in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive MRI and MRS study in patients with breast cancer, which reveals detailed information on the morphology and phospholipid metabolism from volumes as small as 10 mL. This endogenous metabolic information may provide a new method for the noninvasive assessment of prognostic and predictive biomarkers in breast cancer treatment. PMID:21433156

  14. Recombinant GnRH-p53 protein sensitizes breast cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Zhisong; Yan, Zhenwen; Chen, Li; Deng, Weimin; Lotze, Michael; Wang, Zhou; Lin, Xinli; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    An ideal approach to treat cancers with dysfunctional p53 tumor suppressor gene is to reinstate p53 functionality by directly using p53 protein as a therapeutic agent. However, this has not been possible because the cells cannot readily internalize the protein. We constructed a fusion protein consisting of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-p53) and p53 moieties. The recombinant protein was directly used to treat human breast cancer cells and athymic nude mice bearing breast cancer xenografts, with or without DNA synthesis-arresting agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Treatments of cells from breast cancer cell-lines MDA-MB-231, T47D, or SKBR-3 with GnRH-p53 in combination with 5-FU significantly enhanced p53-activated apoptosis signals, including PUMA expression, BAX translocation to mitochondria, and activated caspase-3. Intratumoral injection of the GnRH-p53 protein inhibited MDA-MB-231 xenograft growth and induced p53-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. Systemic treatment of the tumor-bearing mice via tail vein injection of GnRH-p53 markedly augmented the anticancer efficacy of 5-FU. Substitution of GnRH-p53 with wild type p53 protein had no effect. Recombinant GnRH-p53 is able to function as a surrogate of p53 with regard to its apoptosis-inducing activity. Combination of GnRH-p53 with DNA-damaging drugs may be of important therapeutic value for cancer treatment. PMID:23801079

  15. A novel assay to assess the effectiveness of antiangiogenic drugs in human breast cancer.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cytotoxic drugs maintain antiangiogenic properties, but there are no human, tumor-based assays to evaluate their antiangiogenic potential. We used a fibrin-thrombin clot-based angiogenesis model to evaluate the angiogenic response of human breast cancer to various cytotoxic agents commonly used...

  16. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Boone, J. M.; Abbey, C. K.; Hargreaves, J.; Bateni, C.; Lindfors, K. K.; Yang, K.; Nosratieh, A.; Hernandez, A.; Gazi, P.

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33, 0.71, 1.5 and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p < 0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92% correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67% for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the average physicist observer, however trends in performance were similar. Human observers demonstrate significantly better mass-lesion detection performance on thin-section CT images of the breast, compared to thick-section simulated projection images of the breast.

  17. Cellular growth and survival are mediated by beta 1 integrins in normal human breast epithelium but not in breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Howlett, Anthony R; Bailey, Nina; Damsky, Caroline; Petersen, Ole W; Bissell, Mina J

    1994-11-28

    We previously established a rapid three-dimensional assay for discrimination of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells using a laminin-rich reconstituted basement membrane. In this assay, normal epithelial cells differentiate into well-organized acinar structures whereas tumor cells fail to recapitulate this process and produce large, disordered colonies. The data suggest that breast acinar morphogenesis and differentiation is regulated by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions and that these interactions are altered in malignancy. Here, we investigated the role of ECM receptors (integrins) in these processes and report on the expression and function of potential laminin receptors in normal and tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. Immmunocytochemical analysis showed that normal and carcinoma cells in a three-dimensional substratum express profiles of integrins similar to normal and malignant breast tissues in situ. Normal cells express {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}3, {alpha}6, {beta}1 and {beta}4 integrin subunits, whereas breast carcinoma cells show variable losses, disordered expression, or down regulation of these subunits. Function-blocking experiments using inhibitory antiintegrin subunit antibodies showed a >5-fold inhibition of the formation of acinar structures by normal cells in the presence of either anti-{beta}1 or anti-{alpha}3 antibodies, whereas anti-{alpha}2 or -{alpha}6 had little or no effect. In experiments where collagen type I gels were used instead of basement membrane, acinar morphogenesis was blocked by anti-{beta}1 and -{alpha}2 antibodies but not by anti-{alpha}3. These data suggest a specificity of integrin utilization dependent on the ECM ligands encountered by the cell. The interruption of normal acinar morphogenesis by anti-integrin antibodies was associated with an inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Function-blocking antibodies had no inhibitory effect on the rate of tumor cell growth, survival or capacity to form colonies. Thus under our culture conditions breast acinar formation is at least a two-step process involving {beta}1-integrin-dependent cellular growth followed by polarization of the cells into organized structures. The regulation of this pathway appears to be impaired or lost in the tumor cells, suggesting that tumor colony formation occurs by independent mechanisms and that loss of proper integrinmediated cell-ECM interaction may be critical to breast tumor formation.

  18. Activation of rapid oestrogen signalling in aggressive human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Poulard, Coralie; Treilleux, Isabelle; Lavergne, Emilie; Bouchekioua-Bouzaghou, Katia; Goddard-Léon, Sophie; Chabaud, Sylvie; Trédan, Olivier; Corbo, Laura; Le Romancer, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Oestrogen receptors can mediate rapid activation of cytoplasmic signalling cascades by recruiting Src and PI3K. However, the involvement of this pathway in breast cancer remains poorly defined. We have previously shown that methylation of ERα is required for the formation of the ERα/Src/PI3K complex and that ERα is hypermethylated in a subset of breast cancers. Here, we used Proximity Ligation Assay to demonstrate that this complex is present in the cytoplasm of breast cancer cell lines as well as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumours. Of particular interest, the analysis of 175 breast tumours showed that overexpression of this complex in a subset of breast tumours correlates to the activation of the downstream effector Akt. Survival analysis revealed that high expression of this complex is an independent marker of poor prognosis and associated with reduced disease-free survival. Our data introduces the new concept that the rapid oestrogen pathway is operative in vivo. It also provides a rationale for patient stratification defined by the activation of this pathway and the identification of target therapies. PMID:23065768

  19. Decreased expression of ADAMTS-1 in human breast tumors stimulates migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a member of the ADAMTS family of metalloproteases. Here, we investigated mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses, and we addressed the role of ADAMTS-1 in regulating migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast tumor cell lines. Results In a series of primary breast tumors, we observed variable levels of ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression but lower levels of ADAMTS-1 protein expression in human breast cancers as compared to normal tissue, with a striking decrease observed in high-malignancy cases (triple-negative for estrogen, progesterone and Her-2). This result prompted us to analyze the effect of ADAMTS-1 knockdown in breast cancer cells in vitro. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 expression demonstrated increased migration, invasion and invadopodia formation. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of ADAMTS-1 may be related to VEGF, a growth factor involved in migration and invasion. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 showed increased VEGF concentrations in conditioned medium capable of inducing human endothelial cells (HUVEC) tubulogenesis. Furthermore, expression of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR2) was increased in MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to MCF7 cells. To further determine the relationship between ADAMTS-1 and VEGF regulating breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced expression of ADAMTS-1 were pretreated with a function-blocking antibody against VEGF and then tested in migration and invasion assays; both were partially rescued to control levels. Conclusions ADAMTS-1 expression was decreased in human breast tumors, and ADAMTS-1 knockdown stimulated migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast cancer cells in vitro. Therefore, this series of experiments suggests that VEGF is involved in the effects mediated by ADAMTS-1 in breast cancer cells. PMID:23289900

  20. Revisiting a role for a mammary tumor retrovirus in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Brian; Gunzburg, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    There remains great controversy as to whether mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), the etiological agent of mammary cancer in mice, or a closely related human retrovirus, plays a role in the development of breast cancer in humans. On one hand, retroviruses such as human T-cell lymphotropic virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are known causative agents of cancer (in the case of HIV, albeit, indirectly), but attempts to associate other retroviruses with human cancers have been difficult. A recent, high profile, example has been the postulated involvement of another mouse virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, in human prostate cancer, which is now thought to be due to contamination. Here, we review some of the more recent evidence for and against the involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer and suggest future studies that may allow a definitive answer to this conundrum. PMID:23580334

  1. EVIDENCE FOR THE PRESENCE OF MUTAGENIC ARYL AMINES IN HUMAN BREAST MILK AND DNA ADDUCTS IN EXFOLIATED BREAST-DUCT EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatic (AA) and heterocyclic amines (HAA) are ubiquitous environmental mutagens present in combustions emissions, fried meats, tobacco smoke, etc., and are suspect human mammary carcinogens. To determine the presence of aryl amines in breast tissue and fluid, we examined exfol...

  2. Chemopreventive effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in estrogen-negative human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Joo; Kim, Mi Jie; Kim, Ha Ryong; Yi, Min Sun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Oh, Seung Min

    2013-01-01

    Excessive level of estrogen is considered as a main cause of breast cancer, therefore, many studies have focused on estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, even though ER-negative cancer has a poor prognosis than ER-positive breast cancer. We evaluated the anti-cancer effects of Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) in estrogen-independent breast cancer. GBE has been traditionally used as a platelet activating factor, a circulatory stimulant, a tonic, and anti-asthmatic drug, and anti-cancer agent. However, anti-cancer effects of GBE on ER-negative breast cancer have not been proved yet. In this study, we tested chemotherapeutic potential of GBE in the MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) human breast cancer cell line. Our results showed that cytotoxicity effects of GBE in MDA-MB-231 lead to DNA fragmentation at high concentrations (500 and 1,000 μg/ml). Caspase-3 was significantly activated and mRNA levels of apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2 and Bax) were altered. These results indicate that GBE induces apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. It is presumed that GBE has chemopreventive effects in ER-independent breast cancer through anti-proliferation and apoptosis-inducing activities. PMID:23335025

  3. Inheritance of human breast cancer: Evidence for autosomal dominant transmission in high-risk families

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, B.; Austin, M.A.; Lee, M.; King, M.C.

    1988-05-01

    Segregation analysis of breast cancer in families can provide the logical basis and the specific genetic models for mapping and identifying genes responsible for human breast cancer. Patterns of breast cancer occurrence in families were investigated by complex segregation analysis. In a sample of 1579 nuclear families ascertained through a population-based series of probands, an autosomal dominant model with a highly penetrant susceptibility allele fully explained disease clustering. From the maximum-likelihood Mendelian model, the frequency of the susceptibility allele was 0.0006 in the general population, and lifetime risk of breast cancer was 0.82 among susceptible women and 0.08 among women without the susceptibility allele. Inherited susceptibility affected only 4% of families in the sample: multiple cases of this relatively common disease occurred in other families by change. The same genetic models, with higher gene frequency, explained disease clustering in an extended kindred at high risk of breast cancer. Evidence for a highly penetrant, autosomal dominant susceptibility allele for breast cancer in a high-risk family and the general population suggests that high-risk families can serve as models for understanding breast cancer in the population as a whole.

  4. PEG10 promotes human breast cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinran; Xiao, Ruijing; Tembo, Kingsley; Hao, Ling; Xiong, Meng; Pan, Shan; Yang, Xiangyong; Yuan, Wen; Xiong, Jie; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-05-01

    Paternally expressed imprinted gene 10 (PEG10), derived from the Ty3/Gypsy family of retrotransposons, has been implicated as a genetic imprinted gene. Accumulating evidence suggests that PEG10 plays an important role in tumor growth in various cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer and prostate cancer. However, the correlation between PEG10 and breast cancer remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated and characterized the role of PEG10 in human breast cancer proliferation, cell cycle, clone formation, migration and invasion. The expression level of PEG10 was significantly elevated in breast cancer tissues and associated with distant metastasis and poor clinical outcome. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated that high expression of PEG10 could enrich cell cycle-related processes in breast cancer tissues. Ectopic overexpression of PEG10 in breast cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation, cell cycle, clone formation along with migration and invasion. Cell-to-cell junction molecule E-cadherin was downregulated and matrix degradation proteases MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-9 were up-regulated after PEG10 overexpression. Our results demonstrated that PEG10 is a crucial oncogene and has prognostic value for breast cancer, which could be applied in breast cancer diagnosis and targeting therapy in future. PMID:26934961

  5. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human breast cancer growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhi-Dong; Kong, Bin; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Dong, Qian; Niu, Hai-Tao; Wang, Yong-Hua; Li, Fu-Nian; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are now known to play an important role in cancer growth and metastasis. However, there is little information regarding chemokine expression in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate CXCL12 expression in breast cancer and to investigate the question of whether reduced expression of CXCL12 may have any pathological significance in breast cancer development or progression. In this study, we performed western blotting and immunohistochemistry to evaluate the expression of CXCL12 and relevance with clinicopathological factors in the invasive ductal carcinoma. Reduction of CXCL12 was significantly correlated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage and Her-2 expression in breast cancer. Patients with negative CXCL12 expression had significantly lower cumulative postoperative 5 year survival rate than those with positive CXCL12 expression. In addition, we demonstrated that upregulation of CXCL12 expression by infection with an adenovirus containing a CXCL12 vector significantly inhibited cell growth and reduced the migration of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, animal studies revealed that nude mice injected with the Ad-CXCL12 cell lines featured a lighter weight than the control cell lines. These data suggest that CXCL12 plays an important role in cell growth and invasion in human breast cancer and it appears to be a potential prognostic marker for patients with breast cancer. PMID:25400746

  7. Elevated insulin receptor content in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Papa, V; Pezzino, V; Costantino, A; Belfiore, A; Giuffrida, D; Frittitta, L; Vannelli, G B; Brand, R; Goldfine, I D; Vigneri, R

    1990-01-01

    The growth of breast cancer cells is under the regulation of hormones, growth factors, and their receptors. In the present study, we have employed a new, sensitive, and specific radioimmunoassay for the direct measurement of insulin receptors in surgical specimens of breast cancers. In 159 specimens the insulin receptor content was 6.15 +/- 3.69 ng/0.1 mg protein. This value was more than sixfold higher than the mean value found in both 27 normal breast tissues obtained at total mastectomy (0.95 + 0.68, P less than 0.001) and in six normal specimens obtained from reduction mammoplasty (0.84 +/- 0.78, P less than 0.001). The insulin receptor content in breast cancer tissues was also higher than in any normal tissue investigated including liver (Pezzino, V., V. Papa, V. Trischitta, A. Brunetti, P.A. Goodman, M.K. Treutelaar, J.A. Williams, B.A. Maddux, R. Vigneri, and I.D. Goldfine, 1989. Am. J. Physiol. 257:E451-457). The insulin receptor in breast cancer retained its ability to both bind insulin and undergo insulin-induced tyrosine kinase activation. Immunostaining of the specimens revealed that the insulin receptor was present in malignant epithelial cells, but was not detected in stromal and inflammatory cells. Univariant analysis revealed that the insulin receptor content of the tumors correlated positively with tumor size (P = 0.014), histological grading (P = 0.030), and the estrogen receptor content (P = 0.035). There were no significant correlations between insulin receptor content and the age, body weight, menopausal status, and nodal involvement of the patients. These studies indicate, therefore, that the insulin receptor content is increased in breast cancers and raise the possibility that the insulin receptor may have a role in the biology of these tumors. Images PMID:2243127

  8. A Novel Polyamine Analog Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Hager, Erin R.; Phillips, Dawn L.; Dunn, Valerie R.; Hacker, Amy; Frydman, Benjamin; Kink, John A.; Valasinas, Aldonia L.; Reddy, Venodhar K.; Marton, Laurence J.; Casero, Robert A.; Davidson, Nancy E.

    2013-01-01

    Polyamine analogs have demonstrated considerable activity against many important solid tumor models including breast cancer. However, the precise mechanisms of antitumor activities of polyamine analogs are not entirely understood. The cytotoxicity of a newly developed polyamine analog compound, SL11144, against human breast cancer was assessed. Treatment of human breast cancer cell lines in culture with SL11144 decreased cell proliferation and induced programmed cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. SL11144 also profoundly inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenografts in host nude mice without overt toxic effects. Treatment of MDA-MB-435 cells with SL11144 led to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol, activation of caspase-3, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. SL11144 decreased Bcl-2 and increased Bax protein levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, activator protein 1 transcriptional factor family member c-Jun was up-regulated by SL11144 in MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 cells, but not in MCF7 cells. In addition, significant inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity and a decrease in polyamine pools were demonstrated. These results demonstrate that the novel polyamine analog SL11144 has effective antineoplastic action against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and that multiple apoptotic mechanisms are associated with its cytotoxic effect in specific human breast cancer cell lines. PMID:12855657

  9. Alterations in replication timing of cancer-related genes in malignant human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Andrew; Sinha, Seema; Marella, Narasimharao; Berezney, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    The replication timing of nine genes commonly involved in cancer was investigated in the MCF10 cell lines for human breast cancer progression. Six of these nine genes are part of a constellation of tumor suppressor genes that play a major role in familial human breast cancer (TP53, ATM, PTEN, CHK2, BRCA1, and BRCA2). Three other genes are involved in a large number of human cancers including breast as either tumor suppressors (RB1 and RAD51) or as an oncogene (cMYC). Five of these nine genes (TP53, RAD51, ATM, PTEN, and cMYC) show significant differences (P < 0.05) in replication timing between MCF10A normal human breast cells and the corresponding malignant MCF10CA1a cells. These differences are specific to the malignant state of the MCF10CA1a cells since there were no significant differences in the replication timing of these genes between normal MCF10A cells and the non-malignant cancer MCF10AT1 cells. Microarray analysis further demonstrated that three of these five genes (TP53, RAD51, and cMYC) showed significant changes in gene expression (≥2-fold) between normal and malignant cells. Our findings demonstrate an alteration in the replication timing of a small subset of cancer-related genes in malignant breast cancer cells. These alterations partially correlate with the major transcriptional changes characteristic of the malignant state in these cells. PMID:23161755

  10. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of human breast cancer: a Monte Carlo simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, F.; Pagliazzi, M.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular imaging technique based on the detection of Cerenkov light produced by beta particles traveling through biological tissues. In this paper we simulated using 18F and 90Y the possibility of detecting Cerenkov luminescence in human breast tissues, in order to evaluate the potential of the CLI technique in a clinical setting. A human breast digital phantom was obtained from an 18F-FDG CT-PET scan. The spectral features of the breast surface emission were obtained as well as the simulated images obtainable by a cooled CCD detector. The simulated images revealed a signal to noise ratio equal to 6 for a 300 s of acquisition time. We concluded that a dedicated human Cerenkov imaging detector can be designed in order to offer a valid low cost alternative to diagnostic techniques in nuclear medicine, in particular allowing the detection of beta-minus emitters used in radiotherapy.

  11. Lectin of Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Monte, Leonardo G; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Reis, Larissa B; Braganhol, Elizandra; Prietsch, Rafael F; Dellagostin, Odir A; E Lacerda, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Gadelha, Carlos A A; Conceição, Fabricio R; Pinto, Luciano S

    2014-03-01

    The anti-tumor effects of a newly-discovered lectin, isolated from okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (AEL), were investigated in human breast cancer (MCF7) and skin fibroblast (CCD-1059 sk) cells. AEL induced significant cell growth inhibition (63 %) in MCF7 cells. The expression of pro-apoptotic caspase-3, caspase-9, and p21 genes was increased in MCF7 cells treated with AEL, compared to those treated with controls. In addition, AEL treatment increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio in MCF7 cells. Flow cytometry also indicated that cell death (72 %) predominantly occurred through apoptosis. Thus, AEL in its native form promotes selective antitumor effects in human breast cancer cells and may represent a potential therapeutic to combat human breast cancer. PMID:24129958

  12. Determination of optical parameters of human breast tissue from spatially resolved fluorescence: a diffusion theory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Maya S.; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Raju, Narisetti Sundar; Pradhan, Asima

    2002-07-01

    We report the measurement of optical transport parameters of pathologically characterized malignant tissues, normal tissues, and different types of benign tumors of the human breast in the visible wavelength region. A spatially resolved steady-state diffuse fluorescence reflectance technique was used to estimate the values for the reduced-scattering coefficient (mu's) and the absorption coefficient (mua) of human breast tissues at three wavelengths (530, 550, and 590 nm). Different breast tissues could be well differentiated from one another, and different benign tumors could also be distinguished by their measured transport parameters. A diffusion theory model was developed to describe fluorescence light energy distribution, especially its spatial variation in a turbid and multiply scattering medium such as human tissue. The validity of the model was checked with a Monte Carlo simulation and also with different tissue phantoms prepared with polystyrene microspheres as scatterers, riboflavin as fluorophores, and methylene blue as absorbers.

  13. Down-regulation of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 3 in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klus, G T; Rokaeus, N; Bittner, M L; Chen, Y; Korz, D M; Sukumar, S; Schick, A; Szallasi, Z

    2001-07-01

    In previous studies using cDNA microarray analysis, we have identified an expressed sequence tag which is consistently down-regulated in six human breast tumor cell lines. In the current study, we have determined this tag to be part of the mRNA sequence of human desmocollin 3, a member of the cadherin superfamily of proteins and an integral component of desmosomes. Desmosomes are sites of adhesion between adjacent cells in layers of epithelia, as well as in some non-epithelial tissues, and play an important role in the maintenance of tissue structure. Northern analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay and Western blot analysis showed that desmocollin 3 is present in normal and immortalized human mammary epithelial cells, but consistently exhibits a significant, and often complete, down-regulation in breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors, both at the mRNA and protein levels. PMID:11408939

  14. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  15. Down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by cannabidiolic acid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Eriko; Abe, Satomi; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Metastases are known to be responsible for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved not only in inflammatory processes, but also in the metastasis of cancer cells; it is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers. To comprehensively analyze the effects of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a selective COX-2 inhibitor found in the fiber-type cannabis plant (Takeda et al., 2008), on COX-2 expression and the genes involved in metastasis, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are invasive breast cancer cells that express high levels of COX-2, treated with CBDA for 48 hr at 25 µM. The results obtained revealed that COX-2 and Id-1, a positive regulator of breast cancer metastasis, were down-regulated (0.19-fold and 0.52-fold, respectively), while SHARP1 (or BHLHE41), a suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, was up-regulated (1.72-fold) and CHIP (or STUB1) was unaffected (1.03-fold). These changes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrated that i) CBDA had dual inhibitory effects on COX-2 through down-regulation and enzyme inhibition, and ii) CBDA may possess the ability to suppress genes that are positively involved in the metastasis of cancer cells in vitro. PMID:25242400

  16. Expression of Tropomyosin 1 Gene Isoforms in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Syamalima; Yalamanchili, Santhi; Lachant, Joseph; Abbott, Lynn; Benz, Patricia; Mitschow, Charles; Dube, Dipak K.; Poiesz, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    Nine malignant breast epithelial cell lines and 3 normal breast cell lines were examined for stress fiber formation and expression of TPM1 isoform-specific RNAs and proteins. Stress fiber formation was strong (++++) in the normal cell lines and varied among the malignant cell lines (negative to +++). Although TPM1γ and TPM1δ were the dominant transcripts of TPM1, there was no clear evidence for TPM1δ protein expression. Four novel human TPM1 gene RNA isoforms were discovered (λ, μ, ν, and ξ), which were not identified in adult and fetal human cardiac tissues. TPM1λ was the most frequent isoform expressed in the malignant breast cell lines, and it was absent in normal breast epithelial cell lines. By western blotting, we were unable to distinguish between TPM1γ, λ, and ν protein expression, which were the only TPM1 gene protein isoforms potentially expressed. Some malignant cell lines demonstrated increased or decreased expression of these isoforms relative to the normal breast cell lines. Stress fiber formation did not correlate with TPM1γ RNA expression but significantly and inversely correlated with TPM1δ and TPM1λ expression, respectively. The exact differences in expression of these novel isoforms and their functional properties in breast epithelial cells will require further study. PMID:26171250

  17. Infrequent CDKN2 (MTS1/p16) gene alterations in human primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Berns, E. M.; Klijn, J. G.; Smid, M.; van Staveren, I. L.; Gruis, N. A.; Foekens, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Changes which lead to excessive cyclin production or to loss of cell cycle inhibition by proteins such as p16/MTS1 may release breast tumour cells from the constraints of cell division. In order to establish the frequency of MTS1/p16 gene alteration and its relation with genetic damage to the p53 and cyclin D1 genes, we have studied these gene abnormalities in 164 human primary breast cancers and in six breast cancer cell lines. Two breast cancer cell lines and one primary tumour showed a homozygous deletion of exon 2 of the MTS1 gene. Using single-strand conformation polymorphism and subsequent sequencing analysis, one tumour showed an alteration at codon 67 (CCC-->CTC; Pro to Leu). Another tumour showed a mutation at codon 98 (without amino acid change) with an additional polymorphism at codon 140. This polymorphism was also found in 13 other tumour samples, but has no effect on (disease-free) survival. From these data we conclude that the occurrence of CDKN2 (p16/MTS1) mutation in primary breast cancer is a rare event and is not likely to be involved in human breast tumour carcinogenesis and progression. Images Figure 1 PMID:7547249

  18. COMBINED PHOTO-ACOUSTIC AND ACOUSTIC IMAGING OF HUMAN BREAST SPECIMENS IN THE MAMMOGRAPHIC GEOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhixing; Hooi, Fong Ming; Fowlkes, J Brian; Pinsky, Renee W.; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    A photo-acoustic volume imaging (PAVI) system was designed to study breast cancer detection and diagnosis in the mammographic geometry in combination with automated 3-D ultrasound (AUS). The goal of the work described here was to validate the design and evaluate its performance in human breast tissues for non-invasive imaging of deeply positioned structures covering such geometry. The good penetration of nearinfrared light and high receiving sensitivity of a broad-bandwidth, 572-element, 2-D poly(vinyl difluoride) array at a low center frequency of 1 MHz were used with 20 channel simultaneous acquisition. Pseudo-lesions filled with dilute blood were imaged in three human breast specimens at various depths up to 49 mm. With near-infrared light illumination and 256-sample averaging, the extrapolated maximum depth in imaging a 2.4-mm blood-rich lesion with a 3-dB contrast-to-noise ratio in a compressed breast was 54 mm. Three-dimensional photo-acoustic volume image stacks of the breasts were co-registered with 3-D ultrasound image stacks, suggesting for the first time that PAVI, based on the intrinsic tissue contrast, can visualize tissue interfaces other than those with blood, including the inner skin surface and connective tissue sheets. With the designed system, PAVI revealed satisfactory imaging depth and sensitivity for coverage of the entire breast when imaged from both sides in the mammographic geometry with mild compression. PMID:23972486

  19. A New Mouse Model for the Study of Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iorns, Elizabeth; Drews-Elger, Katherine; Ward, Toby M.; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Berry, Deborah; Ashry, Dorraya El; Lippman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and this prevalence has a major impact on health worldwide. Localized breast cancer has an excellent prognosis, with a 5-year relative survival rate of 85%. However, the survival rate drops to only 23% for women with distant metastases. To date, the study of breast cancer metastasis has been hampered by a lack of reliable metastatic models. Here we describe a novel in vivo model using human breast cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice; in this model human breast cancer cells reliably metastasize to distant organs from primary tumors grown within the mammary fat pad. This model enables the study of the entire metastatic process from the proper anatomical site, providing an important new approach to examine the mechanisms underlying breast cancer metastasis. We used this model to identify gene expression changes that occur at metastatic sites relative to the primary mammary fat pad tumor. By comparing multiple metastatic sites and independent cell lines, we have identified several gene expression changes that may be important for tumor growth at distant sites. PMID:23118918

  20. The protein tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1/PTPRJ promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Spring, K; Fournier, P; Lapointe, L; Chabot, C; Roussy, J; Pommey, S; Stagg, J; Royal, I

    2015-10-29

    DEP-1/PTPRJ is a receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase mainly known for its antiproliferative and tumor-suppressive functions. Many identified substrates are growth factor receptors, and DEP-1 is deleted and/or mutated in human cancers including that of the breast. However, DEP-1 was also identified as a promoter of Src activation and proinvasive functions in the endothelium, suggesting it could perhaps mediate breast cancer invasiveness that is likewise driven by Src family kinases. We show here that DEP-1 expression was greater in highly invasive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231, Hs578T, BT-549) than in the less invasive or untransformed cell lines tested (MCF-7, T47D, SK-BR3 and MCF10A). DEP-1 silencing experiments in invasive cells demonstrated that moderately expressed and catalytically active DEP-1 was required, in collaboration with basal epidermal growth factor receptor activity, for Src activation and the phosphorylation of its substrate Cortactin, and for their colocalization at the cell's leading edge. This correlated with an increased number of cell protrusions, and an enhanced capacity of the cells to migrate and invade. Similarly, moderate overexpression of DEP-1 in the low-invasive cells resulted in the promotion of their invasiveness in an Src-dependent manner. Consistent with these data, the expression of endogenous DEP-1 was elevated in a bone metastatic cell line derived from MDA-MB-231 cells, and promoted increased Src Y418 and Cortactin Y421 phosphorylation, as well as pro-MMP9 secretion and Matrigel invasion. Importantly, the silencing of DEP-1 in MDA-MB-231 cells greatly decreased their ability to metastasize, despite having no effect on tumor growth or angiogenesis. Hence, we found that moderate expression of DEP-1 was associated with the increased relapse and decreased survival of breast cancer patients. These results therefore identify a new and unsuspected role for DEP-1 as a mediator of an invasive cell program implicating Src activation and the promotion of breast cancer progression. PMID:25772245

  1. Cell turnover in the "resting" human breast: influence of parity, contraceptive pill, age and laterality.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, T. J.; Ferguson, D. J.; Raab, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Morphological identification of cell multiplication (mitosis) and cell deletion (apoptosis) within the lobules of the "resting" human breast is used to assess the response of the breast parenchyma to the menstrual cycle. The responses are shown to have a biorhythm in phase with the menstrual cycle, with a 3-day separation of the mitotic and apoptotic peaks. The study fails to demonstrate significant differences in the responses between groups defined according to parity, contraceptive-pill use or presence of fibroadenoma. However, significant differences are found in the apoptotic response according to age and laterality. The results highlight the complexity of modulating influences on breast parenchymal turnover in the "resting" state, and prompt the investigation of other factors as well as steroid hormones and prolactin in the promotion of mitosis. The factors promoting apoptosis in the breast are still not clear. PMID:7126427

  2. Paracrine Wnt signaling both promotes and inhibits human breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jennifer L.; La, Justin; Yum, Kyu W.; Desai, Payal; Rodewald, Luo-Wei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Leblanc, Mathias; Nusse, Roeland; Lewis, Michael T.; Wahl, Geoffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling in mouse mammary development and tumorigenesis has been heavily studied and characterized, but its role in human breast cancer remains elusive. Although Wnt inhibitors are in early clinical development, it is unclear whether they will be of therapeutic benefit to breast cancer patients, and subsequently, to which ones. To address this, we generated a panel of Wnt reporting human breast cancer cell lines and identified a previously unrecognized enrichment for the ability to respond to Wnt in the basal B or claudin-low subtype, which has a poor prognosis and no available targeted therapies. By co-injecting Wnt3A expressing human mammary fibroblasts with human breast cancer cell lines into mouse mammary fat pads, we showed that elevated paracrine Wnt signaling was correlated with accelerated tumor growth. Using this heterotypic system and a dual lentiviral reporter system that enables simultaneous real-time measurement of both Wnt-responsive cells and bulk tumor cells, we analyzed the outcome of elevated Wnt signaling in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. Interestingly, the PDX models exhibited responses not observed in the cell lines analyzed. Exogenous WNT3A promoted tumor growth in one human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing PDX line but inhibited growth in a second PDX line obtained from a patient with triple-negative breast cancer. Tumor suppression was associated with squamous differentiation in the latter. Thus, our work suggests that paracrine Wnt signaling can either fuel or repress the growth of human breast cancers depending on yet to be determined aspects of the molecular pathways they express. PMID:23559372

  3. Ezrin silencing by small hairpin RNA reverses metastatic behaviors of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Wu, Mingfu; Wang, Hui; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Yongtao; Liu, Ping; Song, Anping; Gang, Chen; Han, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Meng, Li; Lu, Yunpin; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding

    2008-03-01

    Ezrin primarily acts as a linker between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton and is a key component in tumor metastasis. In the present study, RNA interference (RNAi) using ezrin small hairpin RNAs (ezrin shRNAs) was used to define the roles of ezrin in the regulation of malignant behaviors of human breast cancer. The highly metastatic human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231, in which ezrin mRNA and protein levels are the highest, was selected as a cell model in vitro. In addition, we also found that ezrin expression was up-regulated and its immuno-staining trans-located from cell membrane to cytoplasm, whereas E-cadherin expression decreased and showed the same cell distribution as ezrin in lymphatic metastases of human breast carcinomas. After repression of ezrin by more than 85% of G3PDH and 75% of beta-actin in mRNA and protein levels was maintained in the stable expressing ezrin shRNAs MDA-MB-231 cell clones, the abilities of cell motility and invasiveness were obviously inhibited with a 4-fold and 2-fold, respectively, and the altered cell polarity was observed. Western blot analyses further revealed that the silencing of ezrin induced an increased E-cadherin expression and a decreased phosphorylation of beta-catenin by inhibiting phosphorylation levels of c-src. These data indicate that ezrin overexpression positively correlated with metastatic potentials of human breast cancer cells, especially lymphatic system metastasis. Decreased ezrin expression by shRNA reversed metastatic behaviors of human breast cancer cells by inducing c-src-mediated E-cadherin expression, suggesting that ezrin may have potential values in assessing lymphatic metastasis of human breast cancers. PMID:18155831

  4. Gene expression of cytokeratin 19 and its molecular detection in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Uawisetwathana, Umaporn; Rodpai, Ekkarat; Moongkarndi, Primchanien

    2016-02-20

    Cytokeratins have been identified as useful tools in oncology diagnostics. In this study, cytokeratin19 (CK19) expression was studied in three human breast cancer cell lines, SKBR3, BT549, and BT474 using RT-PCR. CK19 was expressed in tumor cell of different origin, showing higher expression in invasive breast cancer with ER(+) (BT474) than invasive breast cancer with ER(-) (BT549) and breast adenocarcinoma with ER(-) (SKBR3). Two primer sets were used to evaluate CK19 expression. Primer set I (hCK19/1) and primer set II (hCK19/2) were used to amplify the CK19 human gene at a 215bp and 384bp, respectively, whereas PBMC and RAW264.7 (mouse macrophage) no detectable PCR products were obtained. The sensitivity for detection was determined by two methods, i.e., cDNA dilution (the dilution of cDNA from RNA of breast cancer cells) and cell dilution (the dilution of breast cancer cells in PBMC). hCK19/2 was more sensitive than hCK19/1. In cDNA dilution, the lower limits of primer set II for detection were 400, 40 and 40 cells for SKBR3, BT549 and BT474 cells, respectively. While in cell dilution all of the 3 breast cancer cells could be detected at 1 cancer cell in 10(4), 10(6) and 10(5) PBMC, respectively. The data supported the possibility that CK19 could be detected and be the marker for breast cancer in patient blood. PMID:26690255

  5. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  6. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-19

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-{mu}m-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  7. Next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the premenopausal breast epithelium using specimens from a normal human breast tissue bank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our efforts to prevent and treat breast cancer are significantly impeded by a lack of knowledge of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland. In order to provide the specimens that will facilitate such an understanding, The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB) was established. The KTB is, to our knowledge, the only biorepository in the world prospectively established to collect normal, healthy breast tissue from volunteer donors. As a first initiative toward a molecular understanding of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland, the effect of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on DNA expression in the normal breast epithelium was examined. Methods Using normal breast tissue from 20 premenopausal donors to KTB, the changes in the mRNA of the normal breast epithelium as a function of phase of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraception were assayed using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Results In total, 255 genes representing 1.4% of all genes were deemed to have statistically significant differential expression between the two phases of the menstrual cycle. The overwhelming majority (221; 87%) of the genes have higher expression during the luteal phase. These data provide important insights into the processes occurring during each phase of the menstrual cycle. There was only a single gene significantly differentially expressed when comparing the epithelium of women using hormonal contraception to those in the luteal phase. Conclusions We have taken advantage of a unique research resource, the KTB, to complete the first-ever next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the epithelial compartment of 20 normal human breast specimens. This work has produced a comprehensive catalog of the differences in the expression of protein-coding genes as a function of the phase of the menstrual cycle. These data constitute the beginning of a reference data set of the normal mammary gland, which can be consulted for comparison with data developed from malignant specimens, or to mine the effects of the hormonal flux that occurs during the menstrual cycle. PMID:24636070

  8. Effects of the JWA gene in the regulation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Feng, Jiake; Ge, Zhijun; Chen, Hong; Ding, Weiliang; Zhu, Wenjiao; Tang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Yanyu; Tan, Yongfei; Ma, Tieliang

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether the JWA gene can regulate the proliferation, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells through the MAPK signaling pathway. The role of JWA in proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis was investigated in the MDA?MB?231 human breast cancer cell line. Following transfection with JWA?small interfering (si)RNA, the effect of JWA on apoptosis was assessed by Western blot analysis, proliferation was determined using Transwell chambers and cell migration and invasion were analyzed by transwell assay. The expression levels of extracellular signal?regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, CSBP/RK/Mpk2 kinase (p38) and c?Jun N?terminal kinase (JNK) were detected using Western blot analysis in the siRNA and control groups. The expression of JWA in the breast cancer cells was significantly lower compared with the normal breast cells. Downregulation of JWA protein levels reduced the apoptosis and enhanced proliferation, migration and invasion of the MDA?MB?231 cells in vitro. The results of the Western blot analysis demonstrated that, compared with the control groups, the expression levels of phosphorylated (p?)p38 decreased significantly in the JWA siRNA group. No significant changes were observed in the expression levels of p?ERK1/2 or p?JNK. Therefore, the JWA gene may regulate human breast cancer cells through the MAPK signaling pathway using different types of regulation. PMID:25586271

  9. Molecular mechanisms of oestrogen action on growth of human breast cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Darbre, Philippa D

    2012-04-01

    Growth responses to oestrogen can be reproducibly obtained using a selection of oestrogen-receptor-containing human breast cancer cell lines, and molecular mechanisms have been shown to include modulation to growth factor/receptor/signalling pathways, cell-cycle proteins, apoptosis, differentiation, adhesion, motility and migration. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of oestrogen action on gene expression through the ligand-activated transcription factors human oestrogen receptor ? (ER?) and ER? and the resulting effects on global gene expression patterns, but the full profile of coordination of the alterations, which brings about changes in cell growth through genomic and non-genomic mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Oestrogen regulation of cell growth involves a complex cross-talk between oestrogen receptor and growth factor signalling pathways such that inhibition of one pathway may lead to stimulation of another, which may explain the remarkable ability of human breast cancer cells to escape from any mode of imposed growth inhibition be it oestrogen deprivation or administration of antioestrogen. Although studies on cell growth have focused to date on the effects of physiological oestrogens, many hundreds of environmental chemicals with oestrogenic properties have now been measured in the human breast. Whether or not the weight of evidence eventually establishes any causal link of complex mixtures of environmental oestrogenic chemicals with breast cancer, the presence of so many oestrogenic chemicals in the breast must influence resulting oestrogenic responses, and the impact of this additional oestrogenic burden needs to be taken into account in future studies on growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. PMID:25961353

  10. Proteomic Identification of Mitochondrial Targets of Arginase in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajan; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K.; Braga, Melissa; Haykinson, Michael J.; Martinez, Luis; Singh, Vikash; Parveen, Meher; Chaudhuri, Gautam; Pervin, Shehla

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported arginase expression in human breast cancer cells and demonstrated that the inhibition of arginase by N? hydroxy L-arginine (NOHA) in MDA-MB-468 cells induces apoptosis. However, arginase expression and its possible molecular targets in human breast tumor samples and potential clinical implications have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate arginase expression in human breast tumor samples, and several established breast cancer cell lines, in which NOHA treatment selectively inhibits cell proliferation. The over-expression of Bcl2 in MDA-MB-468 cells abolished NOHA-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the mitochondria may be the main site of NOHAs action. We, therefore, undertook a proteomics approach to identify key mitochondrial targets of arginase in MDA-MB-468 cells. We identified 54 non-mitochondrial and 13 mitochondrial proteins that were differentially expressed in control and NOHA treated groups. Mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (mSHMT) was identified as one of the most promising targets of arginase. Both arginase II (Arg II) and mSHMT expressions were higher in human breast tumor tissues compared to the matched normal and there was a strong correlation between Arg II and mSHMT protein expression. MDA-MB-468 xenografts had significant upregulation of Arg II expression that preceded the induction of mSHMT expression. Small inhibitory RNA (siRNA)-mediated inhibition of Arg II in MDA-MB-468 and HCC-1806 cells led to significant inhibition of both the mSHMT gene and protein expression. As mSHMT is a key player in folate metabolism, our data provides a novel link between arginine and folate metabolism in human breast cancer, both of which are critical for tumor cell proliferation. PMID:24223914

  11. Chronic ethanol exposure enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer: the role of p38γ

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mei; Wang, Siying; Ren, Zhenhua; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Yang, Xiuwei H.; Zhang, Zhuo; Ke, Zun-ji; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Both epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that ethanol may enhance aggressiveness of breast cancer. We have previously demonstrated that short term exposure to ethanol (12–48 hours) increased migration/invasion in breast cancer cells overexpressing ErbB2, but not in breast cancer cells with low expression of ErbB2, such as MCF7, BT20 and T47D breast cancer cells. In this study, we showed that chronic ethanol exposure transformed breast cancer cells that were not responsive to short term ethanol treatment to a more aggressive phenotype. Chronic ethanol exposure (10 days - 2 months) at 100 (22 mM) or 200 mg/dl (44 mM) caused the scattering of MCF7, BT20 and T47D cell colonies in a 3-dimension culture system. Chronic ethanol exposure also increased colony formation in an anchorage-independent condition and stimulated cell invasion/migration. Chronic ethanol exposure increased cancer stem-like cell (CSC) population by more than 20 folds. Breast cancer cells exposed to ethanol in vitro displayed a much higher growth rate and metastasis in mice. Ethanol selectively activated p38γ MAPK and RhoC but not p38α/β in a concentration-dependent manner. SP-MCF7 cells, a derivative of MCF7 cells which compose mainly CSC expressed high levels of phosphorylated p38γ MAPK. Knocking-down p38γ MAPK blocked ethanol-induced RhoC activation, cell scattering, invasion/migration and ethanol-increased CSC population. Furthermore, knocking-down p38γ MAPK mitigated ethanol-induced tumor growth and metastasis in mice. These results suggest that chronic ethanol exposure can enhance the aggressiveness of breast cancer by activating p38γ MAPK/RhoC pathway. PMID:26655092

  12. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Yvonne S; Moresco, James J; Tu, Patricia G; Yates, John R; Nardulli, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  13. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  14. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Promotes Apoptosis in Human Breast Epithelial × Breast Cancer Hybrids, but Not in Parental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Sabrina; Tosun, Songuel; Troost, Gabriele; Keil, Silvia; Zaenker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the group of pathogen recognition receptors known to play a crucial role in the innate immune system. In cancer, TLR expression is still debated controversially due to contradictory results reporting that both induction of apoptosis as well as tumor progression could depend on TLR signaling, whereby recent data rather indicate a pro-tumorigenic effect. The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression due to findings revealing that fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit properties like an increased metastatogenic capacity and an increased drug resistance. Thus, M13MDA435 hybrid cell lines, which derived from spontaneous fusion events between human M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells and human MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, were investigated. Cultivation of cells in the presence of the TLR4 ligand LPS potently induced apoptosis in all hybrid clones, but not in parental cells, which was most likely attributed to differential kinetics of the TLR4 signal transduction cascade. Activation of this pathway concomitant with NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α expression was solely observed in hybrid cells. However, induction of LPS mediated apoptosis was not TNF-α dependent since TNF-α neutralization was not correlated to a decreased amount of dead cells. In addition to TNF-α, LPS also caused IFN-β expression in hybrid clones 1 and 3. Interestingly, hybrid clones differ in the mode of LPS induced apoptosis. While neutralization of IFN-β was sufficient to impair the LPS induced apoptosis in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrids, the amount of apoptotic M13MDA435-2 and -4 hybrid cells remained unchanged in the presence of neutralizing IFN-β antibodies. In summary, the fusion of non-LPS susceptible parental human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells gave rise to LPS susceptible hybrid cells, which is in view with the cell fusion hypothesis that hybrid cells could exhibit novel properties. PMID:26863029

  15. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Promotes Apoptosis in Human Breast Epithelial × Breast Cancer Hybrids, but Not in Parental Cells.

    PubMed

    Fried, Sabrina; Tosun, Songuel; Troost, Gabriele; Keil, Silvia; Zaenker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to the group of pathogen recognition receptors known to play a crucial role in the innate immune system. In cancer, TLR expression is still debated controversially due to contradictory results reporting that both induction of apoptosis as well as tumor progression could depend on TLR signaling, whereby recent data rather indicate a pro-tumorigenic effect. The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been associated with cancer progression due to findings revealing that fusion-derived hybrid cells could exhibit properties like an increased metastatogenic capacity and an increased drug resistance. Thus, M13MDA435 hybrid cell lines, which derived from spontaneous fusion events between human M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells and human MDA-MB-435-Hyg breast cancer cells, were investigated. Cultivation of cells in the presence of the TLR4 ligand LPS potently induced apoptosis in all hybrid clones, but not in parental cells, which was most likely attributed to differential kinetics of the TLR4 signal transduction cascade. Activation of this pathway concomitant with NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α expression was solely observed in hybrid cells. However, induction of LPS mediated apoptosis was not TNF-α dependent since TNF-α neutralization was not correlated to a decreased amount of dead cells. In addition to TNF-α, LPS also caused IFN-β expression in hybrid clones 1 and 3. Interestingly, hybrid clones differ in the mode of LPS induced apoptosis. While neutralization of IFN-β was sufficient to impair the LPS induced apoptosis in M13MDA435-1 and -3 hybrids, the amount of apoptotic M13MDA435-2 and -4 hybrid cells remained unchanged in the presence of neutralizing IFN-β antibodies. In summary, the fusion of non-LPS susceptible parental human breast epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells gave rise to LPS susceptible hybrid cells, which is in view with the cell fusion hypothesis that hybrid cells could exhibit novel properties. PMID:26863029

  16. Does Dietary Iodine Regulate Oxidative Stress and Adiponectin Levels in Human Breast Milk?

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 847–853. PMID:24001137

  17. Does dietary iodine regulate oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk?

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; García-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2014-02-10

    Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk. PMID:24001137

  18. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  19. Flow cytometric analysis of human breast tumors and assessment of in vitro chemosensitivity by clonogenic assays.

    PubMed

    Huot, J; Aubin, J; Goulet, F; Goyette, R

    1990-01-01

    We report a double-agar clonogenic system adapted to human breast cancer. We optimized the conditions for cell growth and clonogenicity with respect to hormones (insulin, estradiol, progesterone) and components of the extracellular matrix (collagen, laminin and fibronectin). Using our experimental improvements, 67% of the breast tumor samples received were grown successfully. Tests on 21 tumors with three agents: Doxorubicin, Methotrexate and 5-Fluorouracil permit objective discrimination of the in vitro pharmacosensitivity of human breast tumors. Flow cytometric analysis reveal that 64% of the tumors were diploid and 36% were aneuploid. The aneuploid tumors grew better in the double agar layer system used for the clonogenic assay. The diploid tumors were especially rich in estrogen (ER+) and progesterone (PR+) receptors whereas the aneuploid tumors were mostly estrogen and progesterone receptors negative (ER-/PR-). Finally, we noted no difference in drug responsiveness depending on the tumor ploidy and steroid receptor content. PMID:2334869

  20. Activation of antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes by fusions of human dendritic cells and breast carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jianlin; Avigan, David; Chen, Dongshu; Wu, Zekui; Koido, Shigeo; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kufe, Donald

    2000-03-01

    We have reported that fusions of murine dendritic cells (DCs) and murine carcinoma cells reverse unresponsiveness to tumor-associated antigens and induce the rejection of established metastases. In the present study, fusions were generated with primary human breast carcinoma cells and autologous DCs. Fusion cells coexpressed tumor-associated antigens and DC-derived costimulatory molecules. The fusion cells also retained the functional potency of DCs and stimulated autologous T cell proliferation. Significantly, the results show that autologous T cells are primed by the fusion cells to induce MHC class I-dependent lysis of autologous breast tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that fusions of human breast cancer cells and DCs activate T cell responses against autologous tumors.

  1. Adiponectin mediates antiproliferative and apoptotic responses in human MCF7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dieudonne, Marie-Noelle; Bussiere, Marianne; Dos Santos, Esther; Leneveu, Marie-Christine; Giudicelli, Yves . E-mail: biochip@wanadoo.fr; Pecquery, Rene

    2006-06-23

    It is well established that obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer and that blood levels of adiponectin, a hormone mainly secreted by white adipocytes, are inversely correlated with the body fat mass. As adiponectin elicits anti-proliferative effects in some cell types, we tested the hypothesis that adiponectin could influence human breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth. Here we show that MCF-7 cells express adiponectin receptors and respond to human recombinant adiponectin by reducing their growth, AMPkinase activation, and p42/p44 MAPkinase inactivation. Further, we demonstrate that the anti-proliferative effect of adiponectin involves activation of cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle. These findings suggest that adiponectin could act in vivo as a paracrine/endocrine growth inhibitor towards mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, adipose adiponectin production being strongly reduced in obesity, this study may help to explain why obesity is a risk factor of developing breast cancers.

  2. Quantitative determination of the human breast milk macronutrients by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Edlene d. C. M.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    This work proposes the evaluation of the macronutrient constitution of human breast milk based on the spectral information provided by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Human breast milk (5 mL) from a subject was collected during the first two weeks of breastfeeding and stocked in -20°C freezer. Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm excitation) coupled to a fiber based Raman probe. Spectra of human milk were dominated by bands of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in the 600-1800 cm-1 spectral region. Raman spectroscopy revealed differences in the biochemical constitution of human milk depending on the time of breastfeeding startup. This technique could be employed to develop a classification routine for the milk in Human Milk Banking (HMB) depending on the nutritional facts.

  3. Basement Membrane-Rich Organoids with Functional Human Blood Vessels Are Permissive Niches for Human Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fernndez-Periez, Rodrigo; Molina-Privado, Irene; Rojo, Federico; Guijarro-Muoz, Irene; Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Zazo, Sandra; Compte, Marta; lvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Cuesta, ngel M.; Snchez-Martn, David; lvarez-Mndez, Ana M.; Sanz, Laura; lvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Metastasic breast cancer is the leading cause of death by malignancy in women worldwide. Tumor metastasis is a multistep process encompassing local invasion of cancer cells at primary tumor site, intravasation into the blood vessel, survival in systemic circulation, and extravasation across the endothelium to metastasize at a secondary site. However, only a small percentage of circulating cancer cells initiate metastatic colonies. This fact, together with the inaccessibility and structural complexity of target tissues has hampered the study of the later steps in cancer metastasis. In addition, most data are derived from in vivo models where critical steps such as intravasation/extravasation of human cancer cells are mediated by murine endothelial cells. Here, we developed a new mouse model to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying late steps of the metastatic cascade. We have shown that a network of functional human blood vessels can be formed by co-implantation of human endothelial cells and mesenchymal cells, embedded within a reconstituted basement membrane-like matrix and inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The ability of circulating cancer cells to colonize these human vascularized organoids was next assessed in an orthotopic model of human breast cancer by bioluminescent imaging, molecular techniques and immunohistological analysis. We demonstrate that disseminated human breast cancer cells efficiently colonize organoids containing a functional microvessel network composed of human endothelial cells, connected to the mouse circulatory system. Human breast cancer cells could be clearly detected at different stages of the metastatic process: initial arrest in the human microvasculature, extravasation, and growth into avascular micrometastases. This new mouse model may help us to map the extravasation process with unprecedented detail, opening the way for the identification of relevant targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23951338

  4. Identification of p53 and its isoforms in human breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Milićević, Zorka; Bajić, Vladan; Živković, Lada; Kasapović, Jelena; Andjelković, Uroš; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    In breast carcinoma, disruption of the p53 pathway is one of the most common genetic alterations. The observation that the p53 can express multiple protein isoforms adds a novel level of complexity to the outcome of p53 mutations. p53 expression was analysed by Western immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies DO-7, Pab240, and polyclonal antiserum CM-1. The more frequently p53-positive nuclear staining has been found in the invasive breast tumors. One of the most intriguing findings is that mutant p53 appears as discrete dot-shaped regions within the nucleus of breast cancer cells. In many malignant cells, the nucleolar sequestration of p53 is evident. These observations support the view that the nucleolus is involved directly in the mediation of p53 function or indirectly by the control of the localization of p53 interplayers. p53 expressed in the nuclear fraction of breast cancer cells revealed a wide spectrum of isoforms. p53 isoforms ΔNp53 (47 kDa) and Δ133p53 β (35 kDa), known as dominant-negative repressors of p53 function, were detected as the most predominant variants in nuclei of invasive breast carcinoma cells. The isoforms expressed also varied between individual tumors, indicating potential roles of these p53 variants in human breast cancer. PMID:24511294

  5. Selective Human Estrogen Receptor Partial Agonists (ShERPAs) for Tamoxifen-Resistant Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Rui; Patel, Hitisha K; Gutgesell, Lauren M; Zhao, Jiong; Delgado-Rivera, Loruhama; Pham, Thao N D; Zhao, Huiping; Carlson, Kathryn; Martin, Teresa; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Moore, Terry W; Tonetti, Debra A; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2016-01-14

    Almost 70% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive. Tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), represents the standard of care for many patients; however, 30-50% develop resistance, underlining the need for alternative therapeutics. Paradoxically, agonists at ERα such as estradiol (E2) have demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with heavily treated breast cancer, although side effects in gynecological tissues are unacceptable. A drug that selectively mimics the actions of E2 in breast cancer therapy but minimizes estrogenic effects in other tissues is a novel, therapeutic alternative. We hypothesized that a selective human estrogen receptor partial agonist (ShERPA) at ERα would provide such an agent. Novel benzothiophene derivatives with nanomolar potency in breast cancer cell cultures were designed. Several showed partial agonist activity, with potency of 0.8-76 nM, mimicking E2 in inhibiting growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Three ShERPAs were tested and validated in xenograft models of endocrine-independent and tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer, and in contrast to E2, ShERPAs did not cause significant uterine growth. PMID:26681208

  6. Presence of human papillomavirus in breast cancer and its association with prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andreína; Bianchi, Gino; Feltri, Adriana Pesci; Pérez, Marihorgen; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer accounts for 16% of all female cancers worldwide, and in Venezuela, it is the leading cause of death among women. Recently, the presence of high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been demonstrated in breast cancer and has been associated with histopathological features of the tumours. In Venezuela, there is no study which determines the association between the presence of HPV in breast cancer and the histopathological features. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the presence of HPV in the different types of breast cancer, according to their molecular classification, based on the expression of ER, PR, HER2 and Ki67. With this purpose in mind, we assessed the presence of the HPV genome in 24 breast cancer samples diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma, by the INNO-LIPA genotyping extra kit and the evaluation of the markers ER, PR, HER2, and Ki67 by immunohistochemistry. The viral genome was found in 41.67% of the total number of samples, 51 being the most frequent genotype with 30.77%, followed by types 18 and 33, with 23.08%, respectively. Most tumours were found in the group of luminal A, with a low range of Ki67 expression. The presence of HPV in breast tumours could affect their growth pattern and metastatic power. PMID:26180547

  7. Plasma membrane calcium-ATPase 2 and 4 in human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won Jae; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R. . E-mail: G.Monteith@pharmacy.uq.edu.au

    2005-11-25

    There is evidence to suggest that plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) isoforms are important mediators sssof mammary gland physiology. PMCA2 in particular is upregulated extensively during lactation. Expression of other isoforms such as PMCA4 may influence mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation and aberrant regulation of PMCA isoform expression may lead or contribute to mammary gland pathophysiology in the form of breast cancers. To explore whether PMCA2 and PMCA4 expression may be deregulated in breast cancer, we compared mRNA expression of these PMCA isoforms in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell lines using real time RT-PCR. PMCA2 mRNA has a higher level of expression in some breast cancer cell lines and is overexpressed more than 100-fold in ZR-75-1 cells, compared to non-tumorigenic 184B5 cells. Although differences in PMCA4 mRNA levels were observed between breast cell lines, they were not of the magnitude observed for PMCA2. We conclude that PMCA2 mRNA can be highly overexpressed in some breast cancer cells. The significance of PMCA2 overexpression on tumorigenicity and its possible correlation with other properties such as invasiveness requires further study.

  8. Identification of p53 and Its Isoforms in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Milićević, Zorka; Bajić, Vladan; Živković, Lada; Kasapović, Jelena; Andjelković, Uroš; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2014-01-01

    In breast carcinoma, disruption of the p53 pathway is one of the most common genetic alterations. The observation that the p53 can express multiple protein isoforms adds a novel level of complexity to the outcome of p53 mutations. p53 expression was analysed by Western immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies DO-7, Pab240, and polyclonal antiserum CM-1. The more frequently p53-positive nuclear staining has been found in the invasive breast tumors. One of the most intriguing findings is that mutant p53 appears as discrete dot-shaped regions within the nucleus of breast cancer cells. In many malignant cells, the nucleolar sequestration of p53 is evident. These observations support the view that the nucleolus is involved directly in the mediation of p53 function or indirectly by the control of the localization of p53 interplayers. p53 expressed in the nuclear fraction of breast cancer cells revealed a wide spectrum of isoforms. p53 isoforms ΔNp53 (47 kDa) and Δ133p53β (35 kDa), known as dominant-negative repressors of p53 function, were detected as the most predominant variants in nuclei of invasive breast carcinoma cells. The isoforms expressed also varied between individual tumors, indicating potential roles of these p53 variants in human breast cancer. PMID:24511294

  9. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for X-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-01-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to 2D mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission X-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for X-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 seconds, was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent. PMID:24869902

  10. Comparison, synthesis and evaluation of anticancer drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles on breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Eatemadi, Ali; Darabi, Masoud; Afraidooni, Loghman; Zarghami, Nosratollah; Daraee, Hadis; Eskandari, Leila; Mellatyar, Hassan; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is a major form of cancer, with a high mortality rate in women. It is crucial to achieve more efficient and safe anticancer drugs. Recent developments in medical nanotechnology have resulted in novel advances in cancer drug delivery. Cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil are three important anti-cancer drugs which have poor water-solubility. In this study, we used cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil-loaded polycaprolactone-polyethylene glycol (PCL-PEG) nanoparticles to improve the stability and solubility of molecules in drug delivery systems. The nanoparticles were prepared by a double emulsion method and characterized with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)HNMR). Cells were treated with equal concentrations of cisplatin, doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil-loaded PCL-PEG nanoparticles, and free cisplatin, doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. The 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay confirmed that cisplatin, doxorubicin, and 5-fluorouracil-loaded PCL-PEG nanoparticles enhanced cytotoxicity and drug delivery in T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cells. However, the IC50 value of doxorubicin was lower than the IC50 values of both cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, where the difference was statistically considered significant (p˂0.05). However, the IC50 value of all drugs on T47D were lower than those on MCF7. PMID:25707442

  11. ERRF is essential for Estrogen-Estrogen Receptor alpha signaling pathway in ER positive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ang; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-05-27

    Estrogen-Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) belongs to one of the most important signaling pathways controlling breast tissue development and progression of breast cancer. ERRF was recently identified as a candidate breast cancer associated protein and showed positive association with ERα status in clinical samples and cell lines. To further explore the relationship between ERRF and ERα, we studied whether ERRF plays any roles in estrogen-ERα pathway. Knockdown of ERRF in ER positive breast cancer cells T-47D and BT-474 reduced the level of p-AKT, p-MAPK, and phosphorylation of ERα at Ser 118 and Ser 167, and the transcriptional activity of ERα was inhibited as well. Further mechanism study proved ERRF to be an interacting partner of ERα. In total, these data revealed that ERRF is essential for the activity of E2-ERα pathway. PMID:27125460

  12. The network of antigen-antibody reactions in adult women with breast cancer or benign breast pathology or without breast pathology.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Tania; Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Lara, Carlos; Zentella, Alejandro; León-Díaz, Rosalba; Lamoyi, Edmundo; Larralde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to different protein antigens of the mammary ductal carcinoma by adult women affected by Breast Cancer (BC) distinguishes at least 103 proteins that differ in their molecular weights (MW). The IgG producing cell clones (nodes) coexist with each other in each individual organism and share energy resources among themselves, as well as factors that control the level of expression and Specificity of their IgG antibodies. So, it can be proposed that among them there is a Network of interconnections (links) unveiled by the antigens, which specifically react with the IgG antibodies produced by the clones. This Network possibly regulates IgG antibodies' activity and effectiveness. We describe the Network of nodes and links that exists between the different antigens and their respective IgG producing cell clones against the extracted protein antigens from the cells of the T47D Cell-Line, in 50 women with BC, 50 women with Benign Breast Pathology (BBP) and 50 women without breast pathology (H). We have found that women with BBP have the highest number of Links, followed by the H group and, lastly, the women with BC, a finding which suggests that cancer interferes with the Connectivity between the IgG producing cell clones and blocks the expression of 322 links in women with BBP and 32 links in women with H. It is also plausible that the largest number of links in the women with BBP indicates the Network's state of arousal that provides protection against BC. On the other hand, there were many missing links in the BC group of women; the clone which lost more links in the BC group was the hub 24, which point to some of the antigens of T47D as potentially useful as vaccines, as the immune system of women with BBP is well aware of them. PMID:25781932

  13. The Network of Antigen-Antibody Reactions in Adult Women with Breast Cancer or Benign Breast Pathology or without Breast Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Romo-González, Tania; Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Lara, Carlos; Zentella, Alejandro; León-Díaz, Rosalba; Lamoyi, Edmundo; Larralde, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to different protein antigens of the mammary ductal carcinoma by adult women affected by Breast Cancer (BC) distinguishes at least 103 proteins that differ in their molecular weights (MW). The IgG producing cell clones (nodes) coexist with each other in each individual organism and share energy resources among themselves, as well as factors that control the level of expression and Specificity of their IgG antibodies. So, it can be proposed that among them there is a Network of interconnections (links) unveiled by the antigens, which specifically react with the IgG antibodies produced by the clones. This Network possibly regulates IgG antibodies' activity and effectiveness. We describe the Network of nodes and links that exists between the different antigens and their respective IgG producing cell clones against the extracted protein antigens from the cells of the T47D Cell-Line, in 50 women with BC, 50 women with Benign Breast Pathology (BBP) and 50 women without breast pathology (H). We have found that women with BBP have the highest number of Links, followed by the H group and, lastly, the women with BC, a finding which suggests that cancer interferes with the Connectivity between the IgG producing cell clones and blocks the expression of 322 links in women with BBP and 32 links in women with H. It is also plausible that the largest number of links in the women with BBP indicates the Network’s state of arousal that provides protection against BC. On the other hand, there were many missing links in the BC group of women; the clone which lost more links in the BC group was the hub 24, which point to some of the antigens of T47D as potentially useful as vaccines, as the immune system of women with BBP is well aware of them. PMID:25781932

  14. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  15. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini

    PubMed Central

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  16. Effects of Ambient Particulate Matter on Human Breast Cancer: Is Xenogenesis Responsible?

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qiang; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Liyu; Ma, Tingting; Yang, Qifeng

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, evidence from several studies has revealed that air pollution is associated with the increased morbidity and mortality of breast cancer patients. However, to date, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Considering the high prevalence of air pollution and breast cancer in China, it is necessary to understand how air pollution may affect breast cancer. Methods We analyzed 1,832 female patients who had resided in the same cities for at least 10 years prior to their diagnosis. Variables including demographic data as well as clinical and tumor characteristics, including the patient’s age at menarche, family history of breast cancer, tumor histopathological type, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, histological grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, progesterone receptor (PR) status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) status at the time of diagnosis were analyzed. Results Compared to patients residing in low-pollution areas, patients living in high-pollution areas demonstrated a younger age at menarche (p<0.001), a greater family history of breast cancer (p = 0.034) and more invasive cancers (p = 0.028) with higher tumor grades (p = 0.028) and estrogen receptor (ER)-positive status (p = 0.022). Differences in tumor grade were only found in ER-positive cases. Conclusions Our findings and clinical data indicate that long-term air pollution exposure may contribute to the development of breast cancer by playing the role of a xenoestrogen, and also provides new insight into the association between air pollution and the morbidity and mortality of breast cancer patients. Furthermore, it is urgently necessary to study the association between air pollution and breast cancer to improve the living quality and health of females, and applicable public health strategies may need to be established or modified as soon as possible. PMID:24146897

  17. Expression of TRPC6 channels in human epithelial breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, Arnaud; Dhennin-Duthille, Isabelle; Hiani, Yassine EL; Haren, Nathalie; Khorsi, Hafida; Sevestre, Henri; Ahidouch, Ahmed; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima

    2008-01-01

    Background TRP channels have been shown to be involved in tumour generation and malignant growth. However, the expression of these channels in breast cancer remains unclear. Here we studied the expression and function of endogenous TRPC6 channels in a breast cancer cell line (MCF-7), a human breast cancer epithelial primary culture (hBCE) and in normal and tumour breast tissues. Methods Molecular (Western blot and RT-PCR), and immunohistochemical techniques were used to investigate TRPC6 expression. To investigate the channel activity in both MCF-7 cells and hBCE we used electrophysiological technique (whole cell patch clamp configuration). Results A non selective cationic current was activated by the oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) in both hBCE and MCF-7 cells. OAG-inward current was inhibited by 2-APB, SK&F 96365 and La3+. TRPC6, but not TRPM7, was expressed both in hBCE and in MCF-7 cells. TRPC3 was only expressed in hBCE. Clinically, TRPC6 mRNA and protein were elevated in breast carcinoma specimens in comparison to normal breast tissue. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of TRPC6 protein levels were not correlated with tumour grades, estrogen receptor expression or lymph node positive tumours. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPC6 channels are strongly expressed and functional in breast cancer epithelial cells. Moreover, the overexpression of these channels appears without any correlation with tumour grade, ER expression and lymph node metastasis. Our findings support the idea that TRPC6 may have a role in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18452628

  18. PMCA2 regulates apoptosis during mammary gland involution and predicts outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    VanHouten, Joshua; Sullivan, Catherine; Bazinet, Caroline; Ryoo, Tom; Camp, Robert; Rimm, David L; Chung, Gina; Wysolmerski, John

    2010-06-22

    After lactation, weaning causes mammary epithelial cell (MEC) apoptosis. MECs express the plasma membrane calcium-ATPase 2 (PMCA2), which transports calcium across the apical surface of the cells into milk. Here we show that PMCA2 is down-regulated early in mammary involution associated with changes in MEC shape. We demonstrate that loss of PMCA2 expression raises intracellular calcium levels and sensitizes MECs to apoptosis. In contrast, overexpression of PMCA2 in T47D breast cancer cells lowers intracellular calcium and protects them from apoptosis. Finally, we show that high PMCA2 expression in breast cancers is associated with poor outcome. We conclude that loss of PMCA2 expression at weaning triggers apoptosis by causing cellular calcium crisis. PMCA2 overexpression, on the other hand, may play a role in breast cancer progression by conferring resistance to apoptosis. PMID:20534448

  19. Non-tumorigenic epithelial cells secrete MCP-1 and other cytokines that promote cell division in breast cancer cells by activating ER? via PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Riverso, Maria; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Silva, Elisabete

    2014-08-01

    Efforts in understanding the role of the microenvironment in the development of breast cancer have focused on tumor-stroma cross-talk, but the possibility that normal epithelial cells might also play a role in tumor progression has received little attention. Here, we show that non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A and HMEC) secrete factors able to enhance the proliferation of estrogen receptor ? (ER?) positive breast cancer cells (MCF7 and T47D) and suppress their ability to undergo apoptosis. Conditioned medium (CM) derived from MCF10A and HMEC cells was capable of activating ER? in a hormone-independent way, by phosphorylating ER? on Ser167. Co-exposure with PI3K and mTORC1 inhibitors significantly reduced the ER? Ser167 phosphorylation and suppressed the proliferation-enhancing effects of both 10A-CM and HMEC-CM on MCF7 cells. We show that MCF10A and HMEC secrete numerous cytokines, among them MCP-1, which was one of the most prevalent. MCP-1 was shown to have a role in the effects elicited by the 10A-CM. It activated the ER? by phosphorylating Ser167 via the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 signaling pathway, an effect which was further confirmed by silencing the MCP-1 receptors, CCR2 and CCR4. To our knowledge, this is the first time MCP-1 has been shown to contribute to ER? signaling activation. These data suggest that normal mammary cells could have the capability of supporting the proliferation of breast cancer cells via paracrine interactions. A better understanding of the role of these cells may be useful for designing strategies for the prevention of tumor progression at early stages. PMID:24878609

  20. Prolactin Receptor Expression is an Independent Favorable Prognostic Marker in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hachim, Ibrahim Y; Hachim, Mahmood Y; Lopez, Vanessa M; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Ali, Suhad

    2016-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) hormone plays an important role in the development of the mammary gland and terminal differentiation of the mammary epithelial cells. While initial studies suggested that PRL may contribute to the development of breast cancer through PRL/prolactin receptor (PRLR) autocrine function, mounting evidence indicate a different role for PRL, highlighting this hormone as a regulator of epithelial plasticity and as a potential tumor suppressor. To gain further insights into the role of PRL in human breast carcinogenesis, immunohistochemistry analyses of PRLR protein expression levels using tissue microarray of 102 cases were done in comparison with various clinical/pathologic parameters and molecular subtypes. In addition, gene expression level of PRLR was also evaluated in relation to intrinsic molecular subtypes, tumor grade, and patient outcome using GOBO database for 1881 breast cancer patients. Interestingly, PRLR expression was found to be significantly downregulated in invasive breast cancer (21.4%) in comparison with normal/benign (80%) and in situ carcinoma (60%) (P=0.003498). Moreover, PRLR expression was associated with lymph node negativity and low-grade well-differentiated tumors. PRLR expression was strongest in luminal A subtype, and was virtually undetectable in the worse prognosis triple-negative breast cancer subtype (P=0.00001). Furthermore, PRLR expression was independent of ER, PR, HER-2, and P53 status. Finally, PRLR expression was significantly (P<0.01) associated with prolonged distant metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients. In conclusion, our results highlight PRLR as an independent predictor of favorable prognosis in human breast cancer. PMID:26317306

  1. Cytometric and biochemical characterization of human breast cancer cells reveals heterogeneous myoepithelial phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Leccia, Felicia; Nardone, Agostina; Corvigno, Sara; Vecchio, Luigi Del; De Placido, Sabino; Salvatore, Francesco; Veneziani, Bianca Maria

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether cell cultures maintain the cellular heterogeneity of primary tissues and may therefore be used for in vitro modeling of breast cancer subtypes, we evaluated the expression of a cell surface marker panel in breast cancer cell cultures derived from various subtypes of human breast carcinoma. We used a four-color flow cytometry strategy to immunophenotype seven human breast cancer cell cultures and four reference breast cancer cell lines. We analyzed 28 surface markers selected based on their potential to distinguish epithelial or mesenchymal lineage, to identify stem cell populations, and to mediate cell adhesion and migration. We determined their ability to form mammospheres and analyzed luminal cytokeratins CK18, CK19, and myoepithelial/basal CK5, SMA (alpha-smooth muscle actin), and vimentin expression by western blot. All cell surface markers showed a unimodal profile. Ten/28 markers were homogenously expressed. Four (CD66b, CD66c, CD165, CD324) displayed negative/low expression. Six (CD29, CD55, CD59, CD81, CD151, CD166) displayed homogenous high expression. Eighteen (CD9, CD10, CD24, CD26, CD44, CD47, CD49b, CD49f, CD54, CD61, CD90, CD105, CD133, CD164, CD184, CD200, CD227, CD326) were heterogeneously expressed. Spearman's rank test demonstrated a significant correlation (p< 0.001) between mesenchymal phenotype and breast cancer cell cultures. Breast cancer cell cultures, all CD44+, displayed concomitant high expression of only three antigens (CD10, CD54, CD90), and low expression of CD326; cell cultures formed mammospheres and expressed CK5, SMA and vimentin, and were weakly CK19-positive. We demonstrate that breast cancer cell cultures preserve inter-tumor heterogeneity and express stem/progenitor markers that can be identified, quantified and categorized by flow cytometry. Therefore, cell cultures can be used for in vitro modeling of breast cancer subtypes; immunophenotyping may mirror breast cancer heterogeneity and reveal molecular characteristics of individual tumors useful for testing target therapy. PMID:22791584

  2. Anti-cancer effects of Kochia scoparia fruit in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Hyungwoo; Son, Yong Hae; Lee, Guemsan; Jeong, Sung-Hee; Ryu, Mi Heon

    2014-01-01

    Background: The fruit of Kochia scoparia Scharder is widely used as a medicinal ingredient for the treatment of dysuria and skin diseases in China, Japan and Korea. Especially, K. scoparia had been used for breast masses and chest and flank pain. Objective: To investigate the anti-cancer effect of K. scoparia on breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of K. scoparia, methanol extract (MEKS) in vitro. We examined the effects of MEKS on the proliferation rate, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and activation of apoptosis-associated proteins in MDA-MB-231, human breast cancer cells. Results: MTT assay results demonstrated that MEKS decreased the proliferation rates of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 36.2 ?g/ml. MEKS at 25 ?g/ml significantly increased the sub-G1 DNA contents of MDA-MB-231 cells to 44.7%, versus untreated cells. In addition, MEKS induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of apoptosis-associated proteins such as cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 8, cleaved caspase 9 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Conclusion: These results suggest that MEKS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells and that MEKS may have potential chemotherapeutic value for the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:25298688

  3. Dietary stearate reduces human breast cancer metastasis burden in athymic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Evans, Lynda M; Toline, Eric C; Desmond, Renee; Siegal, Gene P; Hashim, Arig Ibrahim; Hardy, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Stearate is an 18-carbon saturated fatty acid found in many foods in the western diet, including beef and chocolate. Stearate has been shown to have anti-cancer properties during early stages of neoplastic progression. However, previous studies have not investigated the effect of dietary stearate on breast cancer metastasis. In this study, we present evidence that exogenously supplied dietary stearate dramatically reduces the size of tumors that formed from injected human breast cancer cells within the mammary fat pads of athymic nude mice by approximately 50% and partially inhibits breast cancer cell metastasis burden in the lungs in this mouse model system. This metastatic inhibition appears to be independent of primary tumor size, as stearate fed animals that had primary tumors comparable in size to littermates fed either a safflower oil enriched diet or a low fat diet had reduced lung metastasis. Also stearate fed mice sub-groups had different primary tumor sizes but no difference in metastasis. This anti-metastasis effect may be due, at least in part, to the ability of stearate to induce apoptosis in these human breast cancer cells. Overall, this study suggests the possibility of dietary manipulation with selected long-chain saturated fatty acids such as stearate as a potential adjuvant therapeutic strategy for breast cancer patients wishing to maximize the suppression of metastatic disease. PMID:19267249

  4. Diffuse Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Human Breast for Quantitative Oximetry with Depth Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang

    Near-infrared spectral imaging for breast cancer diagnostics and monitoring has been a hot research topic for the past decade. Here we present instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging of breast tissue with tandem scan of a single source-detector pair with broadband light in transmission geometry for tissue oximetry. The efforts to develop the continuous-wave (CW) domain instrument have been described, and a frequency-domain (FD) system is also used to measure the bulk tissue optical properties and the breast thickness distribution. We also describe the efforts to improve the data processing codes in the 2D spatial domain for better noise suppression, contrast enhancement, and spectral analysis. We developed a paired-wavelength approach, which is based on finding pairs of wavelength that feature the same optical contrast, to quantify the tissue oxygenation for the absorption structures detected in the 2D structural image. A total of eighteen subjects, two of whom were bearing breast cancer on their right breasts, were measured with this hybrid CW/FD instrument and processed with the improved algorithms. We obtained an average tissue oxygenation value of 87% +/- 6% from the healthy breasts, significantly higher than that measured in the diseased breasts (69% +/- 14%) (p < 0.01). For the two diseased breasts, the tumor areas bear hypoxia signatures versus the remainder of the breast, with oxygenation values of 49 +/- 11% (diseased region) vs. 61 +/- 16% (healthy regions) for the breast with invasive ductal carcinoma, and 58 +/- 8% (diseased region) vs 77 +/- 11% (healthy regions) for ductal carcinoma in situ. Our subjects came from various ethnical/racial backgrounds, and two-thirds of our subjects were less than thirty years old, indicating a potential to apply the optical mammography to a broad population. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of depth discrimination, which is lacking with our single source-detector scan system. Based on an off-axis detection method, we incorporated an additional detector to acquire a second set of image independently. We then proposed an inner-product approach to associate absorption structures detected in the on-axis image with those detected in the off-axis image. The spatial coordinate difference for the same structure between the two images is directly related to the depth of the corresponding structure, and the monotonic dependence can be quantified by perturbation theory of the diffusion equation. A preliminary phantom study shows good agreement between the measured and the actual depth of embedded structures, and human measurements show the capability to assign a depth coordinate to the more complex absorption structures inside the breast.

  5. DNMT3b overexpression contributes to a hypermethylator phenotype in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Roll, J Devon; Rivenbark, Ashley G; Jones, Wendell D; Coleman, William B

    2008-01-01

    Background DNA hypermethylation events and other epimutations occur in many neoplasms, producing gene expression changes that contribute to neoplastic transformation, tumorigenesis, and tumor behavior. Some human cancers exhibit a hypermethylator phenotype, characterized by concurrent DNA methylation-dependent silencing of multiple genes. To determine if a hypermethylation defect occurs in breast cancer, the expression profile and promoter methylation status of methylation-sensitive genes were evaluated among breast cancer cell lines. Results The relationship between gene expression (assessed by RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR), promoter methylation (assessed by methylation-specific PCR, bisulfite sequencing, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine treatment), and the DNA methyltransferase machinery (total DNMT activity and expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b proteins) were examined in 12 breast cancer cell lines. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the expression of 64 methylation-sensitive genes revealed two groups of cell lines that possess distinct methylation signatures: (i) hypermethylator cell lines, and (ii) low-frequency methylator cell lines. The hypermethylator cell lines are characterized by high rates of concurrent methylation of six genes (CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, SCNN1A), whereas the low-frequency methylator cell lines do not methylate these genes. Hypermethylator cell lines coordinately overexpress total DNMT activity and DNMT3b protein levels compared to normal breast epithelial cells. In contrast, most low-frequency methylator cell lines possess DNMT activity and protein levels that are indistinguishable from normal. Microarray data mining identified a strong cluster of primary breast tumors that express the hypermethylation signature defined by CDH1, CEACAM6, CST6, ESR1, LCN2, and SCNN1A. This subset of breast cancers represents 18/88 (20%) tumors in the dataset analyzed, and 100% of these tumors were classified as basal-like, suggesting that the hypermethylator defect cosegregates with poor prognosis breast cancers. Conclusion These observations combine to strongly suggest that: (a) a subset of breast cancer cell lines express a hypermethylator phenotype, (b) the hypermethylation defect in these breast cancer cell lines is related to aberrant overexpression of DNMT activity, (c) overexpression of DNMT3b protein significantly contributes to the elevated DNMT activity observed in tumor cells expressing this phenotype, and (d) the six-gene hypermethylator signature characterized in breast cancer cell lines defines a distinct cluster of primary basal-like breast cancers. PMID:18221536

  6. Regulation of gene expression in human mammary epithelium: effect of breast pumping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known of the molecular regulation of human milk production because of limitations in obtaining mammary tissue from lactating women. Our objectives were to evaluate whether RNA isolated from breast milk fat globules (MFGs) could be an alternative to mammary biopsies and to determine whether...

  7. Mimicking breast cancer-induced bone metastasis in vivo: current transplantation models and advanced humanized strategies.

    PubMed

    Thibaudeau, Laure; Quent, Verena M; Holzapfel, Boris M; Taubenberger, Anna V; Straub, Melanie; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-09-01

    Bone metastasis is a complication that occurs in 80% of women with advanced breast cancer. Despite the prevalence of bone metastatic disease, the avenues for its clinical management are still restricted to palliative treatment options. In fact, the underlying mechanisms of breast cancer osteotropism have not yet been fully elucidated due to a lack of suitable in vivo models that are able to recapitulate the human disease. In this work, we review the current transplantation-based models to investigate breast cancer-induced bone metastasis and delineate the strengths and limitations of the use of different grafting techniques, tissue sources, and hosts. We further show that humanized xenograft models incorporating human cells or tissue grafts at the primary tumor site or the metastatic site mimic more closely the human disease. Tissue-engineered constructs are emerging as a reproducible alternative to recapitulate functional humanized tissues in these murine models. The development of advanced humanized animal models may provide better platforms to investigate the mutual interactions between human cancer cells and their microenvironment and ultimately improve the translation of preclinical drug trials to the clinic. PMID:24771149

  8. Susceptibility of human breast epithelial cells in vitro to hormones and drugs.

    PubMed

    Calaf, Gloria M

    2006-02-01

    Breast cancer is often hormone responsive with growth or regression of tumors modulated by endocrine manipulations. Estrogens are known to control the growth of many mammary carcinomas in experimental animals, and humans. Knowledge of tumor response to hormones will greatly improve the ability to plan therapy for breast cancer patients. Chemoprevention of breast cancer has been mostly aimed at reducing the rate of cell division through administration of anti-hormones. Tamoxifen has shown to be species, tissue, and cell-type specific. Cell proliferation in mammary gland occurs in a non-random fashion since there are specific compartments with varied rates of proliferation represented by the terminal end buds that are ready for differentiation into alveolar buds. The aim of this work was to study the effect of 17beta estradiol as well as an antiestrogen, tamoxifen in several in vitro systems to analyze the proliferative capabilities of different kind of cells under controlled experimental conditions. Normal, benign lesions, and duct carcinomas of human breast tissues were processed for organ culture. In the case of the normal breast tissue it was enzymatically digested and culture as organoid culture as well. Several immortalized normal and malignant human breast cell lines were also used in these studies to analyze the effect of 17beta estradiol, progesterone, tamoxifen and anti-progestin RU486. Both 17beta estradiol and progesterone stimulated cell proliferation whereas tamoxifen and RU486 inhibited such effect under these experimental conditions. Thus, in vitro systems allowed to analyze the proliferative capabilities of different kind of cells under controlled experimental conditions. PMID:16391781

  9. Trastuzumab plus tamoxifen: anti-proliferative and molecular interactions in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ropero, Santiago; Menéndez, Javier Abel; Vázquez-Martín, Alejandro; Montero, Sagrario; Cortés-Funes, Hernán; Colomer, Ramon

    2004-07-01

    HER2 overexpression has been associated with anti-estrogen resistance in human breast cancer, and it has been suggested that the combined treatment of an anti-HER2 antibody plus tamoxifen has enhanced anti-cancer efficacy in breast cancer. The detailed anti-proliferative interactions between trastuzumab and tamoxifen were analyzed with the isobologram and Chou and Talalay methods, which assess the presence of synergy, addition or antagonism. We used the breast cancer cell lines that are estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and HER2-positive. We also analyzed the molecular changes on the HER2 and (ER) signaling pathways that are induced by trastuzumab plus tamoxifen. In terms of cancer cell proliferation, the simultaneous combination of trastuzumab and tamoxifen on BT-474 cells was more growth inhibitory (44%) than the treatment with trastuzumab (24%) or tamoxifen (31%) alone. Isobologram analysis of simultaneous trastuzumab plus tamoxifen exposure showed, however, that there were antagonistic interactions at an effect level of 30% (IC30). Using Chou and Talalay analysis we also observed antagonistic interactions at lower levels of cell kill, although there were additive effects at highest levels of cell kill. Trastuzumab followed by tamoxifen showed antagonism at all effects levels. Tamoxifen followed by trastuzumab showed antagonism at lower levels of cell kill, and additivity at higher levels of cell kill. Similar interactions were observed using T47D cells. The molecular effects of the combined treatment with trastuzumab plus tamoxifen on the levels of HER2 and ER signaling showed that, with respect to HER2 protein levels, trastuzumab downregulated HER2 by 27%, tamoxifen upregulated HER2 by 40%, and the combination of trastuzumab plus tamoxifen did not induce changes in HER2 respect to control. With respect to HER2 mRNA, trastuzumab upregulated HER2 mRNA to 367%, tamoxifen to 166%, and the combination to 401%. With respect to HER2 phosphorylation, trastuzumab upregulated HER2 phosphorylation to 352%, tamoxifen to 202% and the combination to 633%. Epidermal growth factor receptor levels were not changed by trastuzumab or tamoxifen alone, and were upregulated to 138% by the combination. The protein levels and activity of extracellular recptor kinase were not modified by trastuzumab, tamoxifen or the combination. Finally, estrogen receptor protein and mRNA levels were downregulated to about 50% by trastuzumab, tamoxifen or the combination. Taken together, our results show that in ER-positive breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2, trastuzumab plus tamoxifen have antagonistic interactions when used in combination, and that this antagonism may be related with an increase in HER2 signaling pathways that occurs when tamoxifen is added to trastuzumab. PMID:15319565

  10. Fulvestrant-induced expression of ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors sensitizes oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells to heregulin β1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We have previously reported that induction of epidermal growth factor receptor and ErbB2 in response to antihormonal agents may provide an early mechanism to allow breast cancer cells to evade the growth-inhibitory action of such therapies and ultimately drive resistant cell growth. More recently, the other two members of the ErbB receptor family, ErbB3 and ErbB4, have been implicated in antihormone resistance in breast cancer. In the present study, we have investigated whether induction of ErbB3 and/or ErbB4 may provide an alternative resistance mechanism to antihormonal action in a panel of four oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell lines. Methods MCF-7, T47D, BT474 and MDAMB361 cell lines were exposed to fulvestrant (100 nM) for seven days, and effects on ErbB3/4 expression and signalling, as well as on cell growth, were assessed. Effects of heregulin β1 (HRGβ1) were also examined in the absence and presence of fulvestrant to determine the impact of ER blockade on the capacity of this ErbB3/4 ligand to promote signalling and cell proliferation. Results Fulvestrant potently reduced ER expression and transcriptional activity and significantly inhibited growth in MCF-7, T47D, BT474 and MDAMB361 cells. However, alongside this inhibitory activity, fulvestrant also consistently induced protein expression and activity of ErbB3 in MCF-7 and T47D cells and ErbB4 in BT474 and MDAMB361 cell lines. Consequently, fulvestrant treatment sensitised all cell lines to the actions of the ErbB3/4 ligand HRGβ1 with enhanced ErbB3/4-driven signalling activity, reexpression of cyclin D1 and significant increases in cell proliferation being observed when compared to untreated cells. Indeed, in T47D and MDAMB361 HRGβ1 was converted from a ligand having negligible or suppressive growth activity into one that potently promoted cell proliferation. Consequently, fulvestrant-mediated growth inhibition was completely overridden by HRGβ1 in all four cell lines. Conclusions These findings suggest that although antihormones such as fulvestrant may have potent acute growth-inhibitory activity in ER-positive breast cancer cells, their ability to induce and sensitise cells to growth factors may serve to reduce and ultimately limit their inhibitory activity. PMID:21396094

  11. Conjugated linoleic acid induces apoptosis through estrogen receptor alpha in human breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Shu; Huang, Yi-Wen; Liu, Suling; Yan, Pearlly; Lin, Young C

    2008-01-01

    Background Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a naturally occurring fatty acid found in ruminant products such as milk and beef, has been shown to possess anti-cancer activities in in vivo animal models and in vitro cell culture systems. In human breast cancer, the overall duration of estrogen exposure is the most important risk factor for developing estrogen-responsive breast cancer. Accordingly, it has been suggested that estrogen exposure reduces apoptosis through the up-regulation of the anti-apoptosis protein, Bcl-2. Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, regulates apoptosis and plays a crucial role in the development and growth regulation of normal and cancerous cells. Our research interest is to examine the effects of CLA on the induction of apoptosis in human breast tissues. Methods The localization of Bcl-2 in both normal and cancerous human breast tissues was determined by immunohistochemical staining and the Bcl-2 protein expression was tested by western blot analysis. Co-culture of epithelial cells and stromal cells was carried out in the presence or absence of CLA to evaluate apoptosis in the context of a cell-cell interaction. Results The results showed that both normal and cancerous breast tissues were positive for Bcl-2 staining, which was higher overall in mammary ducts but very low in the surrounding stromal compartment. Interestingly, by quantifying the western blot data, basal Bcl-2 protein levels were higher in normal breast epithelial cells than in cancerous epithelial cells. Furthermore, treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) stimulated growth and up-regulated Bcl-2 expression in estrogen responsive breast epithelial cells; however, these carcinogenic effects were diminished by either CLA or 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (Tam) and were suppressed further by the combination of CLA and Tam. In both one cell type cultured and co-culture systems, CLA induced cell apoptosis in ERα transfected MDA-MB-231 cells but not in the wild type MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion These data, therefore, demonstrate that ERα plays important roles in CLA induced apoptosis in human breast tissues. PMID:18652667

  12. Sensitivity of proliferating human breast epithelial cells to hypotonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, S E; Stanyon, R; Lan, S

    1982-12-01

    An assay for colony-forming cells of breast epithelia derived from normal and malignant surgical specimens is described using an IMR 90 fibroblast feeder layer. Their radiosensitivity (DO: 120-172) is consistent with the proliferative origin of the colonies. Distilled water inhibits proliferation of a proportion of the colony-forming cells after a 1-minute exposure. Continued detection of colonies after 10 minutes of exposure indicates that it is an inefficient way of completely eradicating proliferating epithelial cells of normal and malignant origin. PMID:6292581

  13. Sensitivity of proliferating human breast epithelial cells to hypotonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstone, S.E.; Stanyon, R.; Lan, S.

    1982-12-01

    An assay for colony-forming cells of breast epithelia derived from normal and malignant surgical specimens is described using an IMR 90 fibroblast feeder layer. Their radiosensitivity (DO: 120-172) is consistent with the proliferative origin of the colonies. Distilled water inhibits proliferation of a proportion of the colony-forming cells after a 1-minute exposure. Continued detection of colonies after 10 minutes of exposure indicates that it is an inefficient way of completely eradicating proliferating epithelial cells of normal and malignant origin.

  14. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits p53 in human breast adipose stromal cells: a novel mechanism for the regulation of aromatase in obesity and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuyi; Docanto, Maria M; Sasano, Hironobu; Lo, Camden; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and the majority of these cancers are estrogen dependent. Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its increased expression in breast adipose stromal cells (ASC) is a major driver of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. In particular, obesity-associated and tumor-derived factors, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), have been shown to drive the expression of aromatase by stimulating the activity of the proximal promoter II (PII). The tumor-suppressor p53 is a key regulator of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and is frequently mutated in breast cancer. Mutations in p53 are rare in tumor-associated ASCs. Therefore, it was hypothesized that p53 is regulated by PGE2 and involved in the PGE2-mediated regulation of aromatase. Results demonstrate that PGE2 causes a significant decrease in p53 transcript and nuclear protein expression, as well as phosphorylation at Ser15 in primary human breast ASCs. Stabilization of p53 with RITA leads to a significant decrease in the PGE2-stimulated aromatase mRNA expression and activity, and PII activity. Interaction of p53 with PII was demonstrated and this interaction is decreased in the presence of PGE2. Moreover, mutation of the identified p53 response element leads to an increase in the basal activity of the promoter. Immunofluorescence on clinical samples demonstrates that p53 is decreased in tumor-associated ASCs compared with ASCs from normal breast tissue, and that there is a positive association between perinuclear (inactive) p53 and aromatase expression in these cells. Furthermore, aromatase expression is increased in breast ASCs from Li-Fraumeni patients (germline TP53 mutations) compared with non-Li-Fraumeni breast tissue. Overall, our results demonstrate that p53 is a negative regulator of aromatase in the breast and its inhibition by PGE2 provides a novel mechanism for aromatase regulation in obesity and breast cancer. PMID:25634217

  15. Trends in the enantiomeric composition of polychlorinated biphenyl atropisomers in human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yoshimasa; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Nakano, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    For the precise estimation of the risk to human health caused by persistent organic pollutants (POPs), it is important to discuss enantiomer fraction value (EF value) because it is reported that behaviors such as stability and toxicity of enantiomers are quite different in human body. Among POPs, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) is known as one of the most persistent compounds in human breast milk samples. The main exposure source of PCB for human body is mostly from food especially in seafood. The contamination of fish and shellfish has been a serious problem for the Japanese, who consume a large amount of fish in their diet. PCBs have 19 congeners which are chlorine-substituted in 3- or 4- ortho positions are known to have enantiomers. In this study, we analyzed PCB 183 (2,2',3,4,4',5',6-hepta CB) in human breast milk and fish samples enantioselectively and revealed the time trends of the EF value. Though EF value of PCB 183 in fish samples sustained close to racemate (EF = 0.5) from 1982 to 2012, that in breast milk increased over time. This fact indicates that (+)-PCB-183 has greater bioaccumulation potential than (-)-PCB-183 in human body; therefore, the toxicity of (+)-PCB-183 should be emphasized. PMID:26081770

  16. Breast cancer and human immunodeficiency virus: a report of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J; Franco, S; Gomez-Fernandez, C; Reis, I; Velez, P; Doliny, P; Harrington, W; Wilkinson, J; Kanhoush, R; Lee, Y

    2001-10-01

    Carcinoma of the breast is the most common malignancy in women in the United States. More than 40% of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection develop cancer during their illness, but breast cancer has seldom been reported. Twenty patients with breast cancer and HIV infection seen at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital between January 1988 and August 2000 were retrospectively analyzed. Seventeen patients had a previous or concurrent diagnosis of HIV at the time of the breast cancer diagnosis. Their CD4 count ranged from 13-1126/microL (median, 309/microL). Most patients were premenopausal (16 of 20), with ages ranging from 31-61 years (median, 44 years). All stages of breast cancer were seen: ductal carcinoma in situ (2 patients), stage I (1 patient), stage II (9 patients), stage III (6 patients), and stage IV (2 patients). Ten tumors had estrogen receptors. Four of the 13 patients who underwent axillary lymph node dissection had abnormal lymph node findings, including 2 with follicular hyperplasia and 2 with caseating granulomas. Seven patients received chemotherapy with very poor tolerance. Estrogen receptor-positive patients were treated with tamoxifen. Of the 18 patients who presented with local disease, 7 have died: 2 of breast cancer, 4 of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and 1 of cardiac arrest. Nine patients remain free of disease (5 of them > 5 years) and 2 patients are alive with metastatic disease. Breast cancer in the HIV-positive population is similar to that seen in seronegative women. Most of the patients that are long-term survivors were treated with surgery and tamoxifen. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy are not clear. PMID:11899415

  17. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making. PMID:26951551

  18. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  19. Anticancer Effects of Different Seaweeds on Human Colon and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Kwak, Dong Hoon; Obiang-Obonou, Brice Wilfried; Ogandaga Maranguy, Cyr Abel; Dinzouna-Boutamba, Sylvatrie-Danne; Lee, Dae Hoon; Manvoudou Pissibanganga, Ordelia Gwenaelle; Ko, Kisung; Seo, Jae In; Choo, Young Kug

    2014-01-01

    Seafoods and seaweeds represent some of the most important reservoirs of new therapeutic compounds for humans. Seaweed has been shown to have several biological activities, including anticancer activity. This review focuses on colorectal and breast cancers, which are major causes of cancer-related mortality in men and women. It also describes various compounds extracted from a range of seaweeds that have been shown to eradicate or slow the progression of cancer. Fucoidan extracted from the brown algae Fucus spp. has shown activity against both colorectal and breast cancers. Furthermore, we review the mechanisms through which these compounds can induce apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. By considering the ability of compounds present in seaweeds to act against colorectal and breast cancers, this review highlights the potential use of seaweeds as anticancer agents. PMID:25255129

  20. The effect of reduced breast compression in breast tomosynthesis: human observer study using clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Förnvik, D; Andersson, I; Svahn, T; Timberg, P; Zackrisson, S; Tingberg, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the compression force used with conventional mammography can be reduced with breast tomosynthesis (BT), without adversely affecting the visualisation of normal and pathological structures. Forty-five women were examined with BT using full (same as for 2D mammography) and half compression force. Both examinations were performed with the same acquisition parameters. A total of 103 paired structure images were evaluated according to specified image quality criteria. Three experienced radiologists participated in the study. They had to make a forced choice, i.e. choose the image they felt best fulfilled the image quality criteria. The results showed no evident difference in the image quality, indicating that BT may be performed with substantially less compression force compared with 2D mammography. A majority of the examined women felt that half compression was more comfortable than full compression. PMID:20228049

  1. GATA3 Inhibits Lysyl Oxidase Mediated Metastases of Human Basal Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Isabel M.; Michalowski, Aleksandra M.; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Szauter, Kornelia M.; Luger, Dror; Sato, Misako; Flanders, Kathy; Oshima, Akira; Csiszar, Katalin; Green, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of mechanisms that impede the aggressive and metastatic phenotype of human basal triple-negative type breast cancers (BTNBC) could provide novel targets for therapy for this form of breast cancer that has a relatively poor prognosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of GATA3, the master transcriptional regulator of mammary luminal differentiation, can reduce the tumorigenicity and metastatic propensity of the human BTNBC MDA-MB-231 cell line (MB231), although the mechanism for reduced metastases was not elucidated. We demonstrate through gene expression profiling that GATA3 expression in 231 cells resulted in the dramatic reduction in the expression of Lysyl oxidase (LOX), a metastasis-promoting matrix remodeling protein, in part, through methylation of the LOX promoter. Suppression of LOX expression by GATA3 was further confirmed in the BTNBC Hs578T cell line. Conversely, reduction of GATA3 expression by siRNA in luminal BT474 cells increased LOX expression. Reconstitution of LOX expression in 231-GATA3 cells restored metastatic propensity. A strong inverse association between high LOX and low GATA3 expression was confirmed in a panel of 51 human breast cancer cell lines. Similarly, human breast cancer microarray data demonstrated that high LOX/low GATA3 expression is associated with the BTNBC subtype of breast cancer and poor patient prognosis. Expression of GATA3 reprograms BTNBC to a less aggressive phenotype and inhibits a major mechanism of metastasis through inhibition of LOX. Induction of GATA3 in BTNBC cells or novel approaches that inhibit LOX expression or activity could be important strategies for treating BTNBC. PMID:21892208

  2. Growth inhibitory activity of extracts and purified components of black cohosh on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Einbond, Linda Saxe; Shimizu, Masahito; Xiao, Danhua; Nuntanakorn, Paiboon; Lim, Jin T E; Suzui, Masumi; Seter, Colette; Pertel, Thomas; Kennelly, Edward J; Kronenberg, Fredi; Weinstein, I Bernard

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether black cohosh contains constituents that inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells, and therefore might eventually be useful in the prevention or treatment of breast cancer. Black cohosh rhizomes were extracted with methanol/water and fractionated by solvent-solvent partitioning to yield three fractions: hexane, ethyl acetate and water. The ethyl acetate fraction displayed the highest potency in two cell-based assays, growth inhibition and cell cycle analysis. This fraction inhibited growth of both the ER+ MCF7 and ER-MDA-MB-453 human breast cancer cell lines with IC50 values of about 20 and 10 micro g/ml, respectively. It also induced cell cycle arrest at G1 when tested at 30 micro g/ml and at G2/M at 60 micro g/ml in MCF7 cells. This suggests that the extract contains a mixture of components with the more active (or more abundant) causing G1 arrest and the less active causing G2/M arrest. We then examined specific components in this extract. The triterpene glycoside fraction obtained by polyamide column chromatography, and the specific triterpene glycosides actein, 23-epi-26-deoxyactein and cimiracemoside A, inhibited growth of the MCF7 human breast cancer cells and induced cell cycle arrest at G1. The most potent compound, actein, decreased the level of cyclin D1, cdk4 and the hyperphosphorylated form of the pRb protein and increased the level of p21cip1 in MCF7 cells, changes that may contribute to the arrest in G1. Further studies are in progress to identify the mechanisms by which actein and related compounds present in black cohosh inhibit growth of human breast cancer cells. PMID:14758092

  3. Distribution and physical properties of BCA200, a Mr 200,000 glycoprotein selectively associated with human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ring, D B; Kassel, J A; Hsieh-Ma, S T; Bjorn, M J; Tringale, F; Eaton, A M; Reid, S A; Frankel, A E; Nadji, M

    1989-06-01

    Of 122 mouse monoclonal antibodies selective for human breast cancer, 13 immunoprecipitated an acidic glycoprotein from SK-Br-3 and ZR-75-30 human breast cancer cells. The antigen (BCA200) migrates with an apparent molecular weight of 200,000 on reducing and 180,000 on nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, suggesting a single polypeptide chain with a folded domain stabilized by a disulfide bond. Cross-blocking and sandwich immunoassays detected at least three distinct antigenic determinants on BCA200. Scatchard experiments measured 1,000,000 to 5,000,000 antigen copies per SK-Br-3 cell. The tissue distribution of BCA200 was studied using two monoclonals to different epitopes. Neither antibody stained any cells in human blood. When frozen sections of 20 normal human tissues were immunoperoxidase stained, the only positive structures were mucinous glands of colon, transitional epithelium of bladder, sweat glands of skin, and acinar epithelium of breast. Antibody 454C11 stained 16 of 21 breast tumor frozen sections and 9 of 12 breast cancer cell lines, while antibody 520C9 stained 5 of 20 breast tumors and 4 of 10 breast cancer lines. Cross-reaction was observed with lung, prostatic, pancreatic, endometrial, and ovarian cancer, but not with lymphoma, melanoma, colon, stomach, bladder, or esophageal cancer. When conjugated to ricin A chain, 10 of 13 antibodies produced immunotoxins selectively cytotoxic to SK-Br-3 breast cancer cells. PMID:2470501

  4. No association between HPV positive breast cancer and expression of human papilloma viral transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Orla M.; Antonsson, Annika; Milevskiy, Michael; Brown, Melissa A.; Saunders, Nicholas A.; Bennett, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious agents are thought to be responsible for approximately 16% of cancers worldwide, however there are mixed reports in the literature as to the prevalence and potential pathogenicity of viruses in breast cancer. Furthermore, most studies to date have focused primarily on viral DNA rather than the expression of viral transcripts. We screened a large cohort of fresh frozen breast cancer and normal breast tissue specimens collected from patients in Australia for the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA, with an overall prevalence of HPV of 16% and 10% in malignant and non-malignant tissue respectively. Samples that were positive for HPV DNA by nested PCR were screened by RNA-sequencing for the presence of transcripts of viral origin, using three different bioinformatic pipelines. We did not find any evidence for HPV or other viral transcripts in HPV DNA positive samples. In addition, we also screened publicly available breast RNA-seq data sets for the presence of viral transcripts and did not find any evidence for the expression of viral transcripts (HPV or otherwise) in other data sets. This data suggests that transcription of viral genomes is unlikely to be a significant factor in breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26658849

  5. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  6. Antitumor activity of colloidal silver on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Colloidal silver has been used as an antimicrobial and disinfectant agent. However, there is scarce information on its antitumor potential. The aim of this study was to determine if colloidal silver had cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 breast cancer cells and its mechanism of cell death. Methods MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with colloidal silver (ranged from 1.75 to 17.5 ng/mL) for 5 h at 37°C and 5% CO2 atmosphere. Cell Viability was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion method and the mechanism of cell death through detection of mono-oligonucleosomes using an ELISA kit and TUNEL assay. The production of NO, LDH, and Gpx, SOD, CAT, and Total antioxidant activities were evaluated by colorimetric assays. Results Colloidal silver had dose-dependent cytotoxic effect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells through induction of apoptosis, shown an LD50 (3.5 ng/mL) and LD100 (14 ng/mL) (*P < 0.05), significantly decreased LDH (*P < 0.05) and significantly increased SOD (*P < 0.05) activities. However, the NO production, and Gpx, CAT, and Total antioxidant activities were not affected in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. PBMC were not altered by colloidal silver. Conclusions The present results showed that colloidal silver might be a potential alternative agent for human breast cancer therapy. PMID:21080962

  7. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER(+) and ER(-) breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26188095

  8. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  9. First evidence that Ecklonia cava-derived dieckol attenuates MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Tang, Yujiao; Kim, Yon-Suk; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Choi, Eun-Ju; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Lee, Seung-Hong; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effect of Ecklonia cava (E. cava)-derived dieckol on movement behavior and the expression of migration-related genes in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell. Phlorotannins (e.g., dieckol, 6,6'-biecko, and 2,7″-phloroglucinol-6,6'-bieckol) were purified from E. cava by using centrifugal partition chromatography. Among the phlorotannins, we found that dieckol inhibited breast cancer cell the most and was selected for further study. Radius™-well was used to assess cell migration, and dieckol (1-100 µM) was found to suppress breast cancer cell movement. Metastasis-related gene expressions were evaluated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, dieckol inhibited the expression of migration-related genes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). On the other hand, it stimulated the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that dieckol exerts anti-breast cancer activity via the regulation of the expressions of metastasis-related genes, and this is the first report on the anti-breast cancer effect of dieckol. PMID:25830682

  10. Estrone sulfatase versus estrone sulfotransferase in human breast cancer: potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, J R; Chetrite, G S

    1999-01-01

    Estrone sulfate (E1S) is concentrated in high levels in human breast cancer tissue. The values are particularly high in postmenopausal women and many times those circulating in the plasma. Also, the tissular concentration of this conjugate are significantly higher in tumoural tissue than in the area of the breast considered as normal. The enzyme which hydrolyzes E1S: sulfatase, as well as the enzyme which biosynthesises this conjugate: sulfotransferase, are present in significant concentrations in breast cancer tissue. Consequently, E1S is a balance between the activities of the two enzymes. As breast cancer tissue has all the enzymes necessary for the synthesis of estradiol (E2), and the formation of E2 from E1S 'via sulfatase' is the main pathway, it was very attractive to explore inhibitory agents of this enzyme. It was observed that different substances including antiestrogens (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI 164,384) and various progestins (promegestone, nomegestrol acetate, medrogestone) as well as Org OD14 (tibolone) can block the sulfatase activity. In addition, it was demonstrated that different progestins (medrogestone, nomegestrol acetate, TX-525) and org OD14 can stimulate the sulfotransferase activity for the formation of the biologically inactive E1S. It is concluded that the inhibition of sulfatase and the stimulation of sulfotransferase activity can open interesting possibilities to explore these effects in patients with breast cancer. PMID:10419004

  11. Anticancer Activity of Curcumin on Human Breast Adenocarcinoma: Role of Mcl-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei Koohpar, Zeinab; Entezari, Maliheh; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Hashemi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among females in the world. To date, chemotherapy has been the most frequently used treatment for breast cancer and other cancers. However, some natural products have been used, as alternative treatments for cancers including breast cancer, due to their wide range of biological activities and low toxicity in animal models. Objectives: The present study examined the anti-proliferative activity of curcumin and its effect(s) on the apoptosis of breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods: This study was performed by an in vitro assay and the anticancer effects of curcumin were determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide). We used quantitative real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for detection of Mcl-1 gene expression in treated groups and then compared them to control samples. Results: In the treatment group, there were higher levels of cell death changes than the control group. The results also showed that the Mcl-1 gene expression declined in the tested group as compared to the control group. Conclusions: Our present findings indicated that curcumin significantly inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cell MCF-7 by inducing apoptosis in a dose- and time- dependent manner, accompanied by a decrease in MCF-7 cell viability. Furthermore, our results showed that quantitative real-time PCR could be used as a direct method for detection Mcl-1 gene expression in tested samples and normal samples. PMID:26413251

  12. Sulforaphane Causes Epigenetic Repression of hTERT Expression in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Meeran, Syed M.; Patel, Shweta N.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is a common dietary component that has histone deacetylase inhibition activity and exciting potential in cancer prevention. The mechanisms by which SFN imparts its chemopreventive properties are of considerable interest and little is known of its preventive potential for breast cancer. Principal Findings We found that SFN significantly inhibits the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro while it has negligible effects on normal breast cells. Inhibition of telomerase has received considerable attention because of its high expression in cancer cells and extremely low level of expression in normal cells. SFN treatment dose- and time-dependently inhibited human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic regulatory subunit of telomerase, in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), especially DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were also decreased in SFN-treated breast cancer cells suggesting that SFN may repress hTERT by impacting epigenetic pathways. Down-regulation of DNMTs in response to SFN induced site-specific CpG demethylation occurring primarily in the first exon of the hTERT gene thereby facilitating CTCF binding associated with hTERT repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of the hTERT promoter revealed that SFN increased the level of active chromatin markers acetyl-H3, acetyl-H3K9 and acetyl-H4, whereas the trimethyl-H3K9 and trimethyl-H3K27 inactive chromatin markers were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. SFN-induced hyperacetylation facilitated the binding of many hTERT repressor proteins such as MAD1 and CTCF to the hTERT regulatory region. Depletion of CTCF using siRNA reduced the SFN-induced down-regulation of hTERT mRNA transcription in these breast cancer cells. In addition, down-regulation of hTERT expression facilitated the induction of cellular apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Significance Collectively, our results provide novel insights into SFN-mediated epigenetic down-regulation of telomerase in breast cancer prevention and may open new avenues for approaches to SFN-mediated cancer prevention. PMID:20625516

  13. HLA-DR antigens on differentiating human mammary gland epithelium and breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Bártek, J.; Petrek, M.; Vojtĕsek, B.; Bártková, J.; Kovarík, J.; Rejthar, A.

    1987-01-01

    The staining pattern of a monoclonal antibody directed to the monomorphic determinant of HLA-DR antigens was examined on sections of human mammary gland tissues at various stages of differentiation as well as on 50 benign and 72 malignant breast lesions. Normal resting breast epithelium lacked HLA-DR, whereas late-pregnant and lactating epithelia expressed high levels of HLA-DR antigens, followed by a decline in the post-weaning regression period. Most benign breast lesions revealed heterogeneous staining ranging from very few up to 20-25% positive epithelial Greater variability was observed among carcinomas, where a small group (approximately 7%) of cases showing 40-95% positive tumour cells was found, in addition to negative tumours and those with the minority of HLA-DR expressing carcinoma cells. The density of the leukocytic infiltrate was higher in carcinomas than in either normal breast tissue or benign lesions, the HLA-DR phenotype of the mononuclear infiltrating cells lacking any obvious correlation with the HLA-DR status of the epithelial component. Immunoblotting analyses of whole-tissue lysates separated by SDS-PAGE confirmed the immunohistochemical data and demonstrated the reactivity with only one protein band predicted for HLA-DR alpha-chain. The combination of immunohistochemistry and autoradiography on sections of human reduction mammoplasty organoids cultured in collagen gels and labelled with tritiated thymidine revealed a lack of HLA-DR expression on proliferating breast epithelial cells suggesting factors other than cell kinetics must be responsible for induction of HLA-DR antigens seen in pregnant and lactating breast epithelium and some tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3435699

  14. Epigenetic influences of low-dose bisphenol A in primary human breast epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Yu-I; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Liu, Joseph; Deatherage, Daniel E.; Huang Yiwen; Zuo Tao; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Lin, Ching-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Huang, Tim H.-M.

    2010-10-15

    Substantial evidence indicates that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) during early development may increase breast cancer risk later in life. The changes may persist into puberty and adulthood, suggesting an epigenetic process being imposed in differentiated breast epithelial cells. The molecular mechanisms by which early memory of BPA exposure is imprinted in breast progenitor cells and then passed onto their epithelial progeny are not well understood. The aim of this study was to examine epigenetic changes in breast epithelial cells treated with low-dose BPA. We also investigated the effect of BPA on the ER{alpha} signaling pathway and global gene expression profiles. Compared to control cells, nuclear internalization of ER{alpha} was observed in epithelial cells preexposed to BPA. We identified 170 genes with similar expression changes in response to BPA. Functional analysis confirms that gene suppression was mediated in part through an ER{alpha}-dependent pathway. As a result of exposure to BPA or other estrogen-like chemicals, the expression of lysosomal-associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3) became epigenetically silenced in breast epithelial cells. Furthermore, increased DNA methylation in the LAMP3 CpG island was this repressive mark preferentially occurred in ER{alpha}-positive breast tumors. These results suggest that the in vitro system developed in our laboratory is a valuable tool for exposure studies of BPA and other xenoestrogens in human cells. Individual and geographical differences may contribute to altered patterns of gene expression and DNA methylation in susceptible loci. Combination of our exposure model with epigenetic analysis and other biochemical assays can give insight into the heritable effect of low-dose BPA in human cells.

  15. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 ; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong; Department of Cancer Biology, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  16. Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family-Targeted Therapies in the Treatment of HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Zeynep; Tagawa, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer characterized by overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has been associated with more aggressive disease progression and a poorer prognosis. Although an improved understanding of breast cancer pathogenesis and the role of HER2 signaling has resulted in significant survival improvements in the past 20 years, resistance to HER2-targeted therapy remains a concern. A number of strategies to prevent or overcome resistance to HER2-targeted therapy in breast cancer are being evaluated. This article provides a comprehensive review of (a) the role of HER2 signaling in breast cancer pathogenesis, (b) potential receptor and downstream therapeutic targets in breast cancer to overcome resistance to HER2-targeted therapy, and (c) clinical trials evaluating agents targeting one or more members of the HER family and/or downstream pathways for the treatment of breast cancer, with a focus on metastatic disease. PMID:24436312

  17. Transcriptional activation of estrogen receptor alpha in human breast cancer cells by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ferguson, A T; Nass, S J; Phillips, D L; Butash, K A; Wang, S M; Herman, J G; Davidson, N E

    2000-12-15

    Recent findings have established a connection between DNA methylation and transcriptionally inactive chromatin characterized by deacetylated histones. Because the absence of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) gene expression has been associated with aberrant methylation of its CpG island in a significant fraction of breast cancers, we tested whether histone deacetylase activity contributes to the transcriptional inactivation of the methylated ER gene in a panel of ER-negative human breast cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with trichostatin A, a specific histone deacetylase inhibitor, led to dose- and time-dependent re-expression of ER mRNA as detected by reverse transcription-PCR without alteration in ERalpha CpG island methylation. Trichostatin A-induced ER re-expression was associated with increased sensitivity to DNase I at the ER locus in MDA-MB-231 cells. These data implicate inactive chromatin mediated by histone deacetylation as a critical component of ER gene silencing in human breast cancer cells. Therefore, histone deacetylation may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of a subset of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:11156387

  18. When fat becomes an ally of the enemy: adipose tissue as collaborator in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lapeire, Lore; Denys, Hannelore; Cocquyt, Vronique; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Since the discovery of leptin in 1994, our vision of adipose tissue as a static organ regulating mainly lipid storage and release has been completely overthrown, and adipose tissue is now seen as an active and integral organ in human physiology. In the past years, extensive research has tremendously given us more insights in the mechanisms and pathways involved not only in normal but also in 'sick' adipose tissue, for example, in obesity and lipodystrophy. With growing evidence of a link between obesity and several types of cancer, research focusing on the interaction between adipose tissue and cancer has begun to unravel the interesting but complex multi-lateral communication between the different players. With breast cancer as one of the first cancer types where a positive correlation between obesity and breast cancer incidence and prognosis in post-menopausal women was found, we have focused this review on the paracrine and endocrine role of adipose tissue in breast cancer initiation and progression. As important inter-species differences in adipose tissue occur, we mainly selected human adipose tissue- and breast cancer-based studies with a short reflection on therapeutic possibilities. This review is part of the special issue on "Adiposopathy in Cancer and (Cardio)Metabolic Diseases". PMID:26154196

  19. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  20. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, LIS Maternity Hospital, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv ; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris; Department of Pathology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  1. Human antimicrobial protein hCAP18/LL-37 promotes a metastatic phenotype in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Günther; Chamorro, Clara Ibel; Granath, Fredrik; Liljegren, Annelie; Zreika, Sami; Saidak, Zuzana; Sandstedt, Bengt; Rotstein, Samuel; Mentaverri, Romuald; Sánchez, Fabio; Pivarcsi, Andor; Ståhle, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Human cathelicidin antimicrobial protein, hCAP18, and its C-terminal peptide LL-37 is a multifunctional protein. In addition to being important in antimicrobial defense, it induces chemotaxis, stimulates angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair. We previously showed that human breast cancer cells express high amounts of hCAP18, and hypothesised that hCAP18/LL-37 may be involved in tumour progression. Methods hCAP18 mRNA was quantified in 109 primary breast cancers and compared with clinical findings and ERBB2 mRNA expression. Effects of exogenous LL-37 and transgenic overexpression of hCAP18 on ErbB2 signalling were investigated by immunoblotting using extracts from breast cancer cell lines ZR75-1 and derivatives of MCF7. We further analysed the impact of hCAP18/LL-37 on the morphology of breast cancer cells grown in soft agar, on cell migration and on tumour development in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Results The expression of hCAP18 correlated closely with that of ERBB2 and with the presence of lymph node metastases in oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. hCAP18/LL-37 amplified Heregulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling through ErbB2, identifying a functional association between hCAP18/LL-37 and ErbB2 in breast cancer. Treatment with LL-37 peptide significantly stimulated the migration of breast cancer cells and their colonies acquired a dispersed morphology indicative of increased metastatic potential. A truncated version of LL-37 competitively inhibited LL-37 induced MAPK phosphorylation and significantly reduced the number of altered cancer cell colonies induced by LL-37 as well as suppressed their migration. Transgenic overexpression of hCAP18 in a low malignant breast cancer cell line promoted the development of metastases in SCID mice, and analysis of hCAP18 transgenic tumours showed enhanced activation of MAPK signalling. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that hCAP18/LL-37 contributes to breast cancer metastasis. PMID:19183447

  2. Circulating Interleukin-8 levels explain breast cancer osteolysis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, Archana; Bendre, Manali S.; Washam, Charity L.; Fowler, Tristan W.; Carver, Adam; Dilley, Joshua D.; Bracey, John W.; Akel, Nisreen S.; Margulies, Aaron G.; Skinner, Robert A.; Swain, Frances L.; Hogue, William R.; Montgomery, Corey O.; Lahiji, Parshawn; Maher, Jacqueline J.; Leitzel, Kim E.; Ali, Suhail M.; Lipton, Alan; Nicholas, Richard W.; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal metastases of breast cancer and subsequent osteolysis connote a dramatic change in the prognosis for the patient and significantly increase the morbidity associated with disease. The cytokine Interleukin 8 (IL-8/CXCL8) is able to directly stimulate osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption in mouse models of breast cancer bone metastasis. In this study, we determined whether circulating levels of IL-8 were associated with increased bone resorption and breast cancer bone metastasis in patients, and investigated IL-8 action in vitro and in vivo in mice. Using breast cancer patient plasma (36 patients), we identified significantly elevated IL-8 levels in bone metastasis patients compared with patients lacking bone metastasis (p<0.05), as well as a correlation between plasma IL-8 and increased bone resorption (p<0.05), as measured by NTx levels. In a total of 22 ER+ and 15 ER− primary invasive ductal carcinomas, all cases examined stained positive for IL-8 expression. In vitro, human MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MET breast cancer cell lines secrete two distinct IL-8 isoforms, both of which were found to stimulate osteoclastogenesis. However, the more osteolytic MDA-MET–derived full length IL-8(1–77) had significantly higher potency than the non-osteolytic MDA-MB-231-derived IL-8(6–77), via the CXCR1 receptor. MDA-MET breast cancer cells were injected into the tibia of nude mice and 7 days later treated daily with a neutralizing IL-8 monoclonal antibody. All tumor-injected mice receiving no antibody developed large osteolytic bone tumors, whereas 83% of the IL-8 antibody-treated mice had no evidence of tumor at the end of 28 days and had significantly increased survival. The pro-osteoclastogenic activity of IL-8 in vivo was confirmed when transgenic mice expressing human IL-8 were examined and found to have a profound osteopenic phenotype, with elevated bone resorption and inherently low bone mass. Collectively, these data suggest that IL-8 plays an important role in breast cancer osteolysis and that anti-IL-8 therapy may be useful in the treatment of the skeletal related events associated with breast cancer. PMID:24486955

  3. Mutational analysis of multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1) gene in human primary breast tumors and established breast tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Sgroi, D.; Sterner, C.

    1994-09-01

    A putative tumor suppressor gene on the short arm of human chromosome 9 has been identified recently and named as multiple tumor suppressor 1 (MTS1). MTS1 is identical to the previously identified cyclin-dependent kinase-4 inhibitor gene p16, a cell cycle regulatory protein. Frequent homozygous deletions of MTS1 gene has been documented recently in cell lines derived from different types of tumors including breast tumors, suggesting that MTS1 is a tumor suppressor gene that is probably involved in a variety of human tumors. To determine the frequency of MTS1 mutations in primary breast tumors, we screened 39 primary breast tumors (16 lobular carcinoma and 23 ductal carcinoma) and 5 established breast tumor cell lines by utilizing single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. SSCP analysis was carried out for all 3 exons of the MTS1 gene utilizing primers in the flanking intronic sequences. Two of the five breast cancer tumor cell lines analyzed exhibited deletion of the entire MTS1 gene. However, only one of the thirty-nine primary breast tumors revealed a potential SSCP variation in exon 2 of the MTS1 gene which is currently characterized by sequencing. SSCP analysis also revealed two intragenic polymorphisms, one in exon 2 and one in the 3{prime} untranslated region, that could be used to assay allelic loss directly at the MTS1 locus. These results suggest that the mutation of the MTS1 gene may not be a critical genetic change in the formation of primary breast cancer, and the deletions observed in breast tumor cell lines may be due to product of cell growth in vitro.

  4. Expression of phenotypical changes by human breast epithelial cells treated with carcinogens in vitro.

    PubMed

    Russo, J; Reina, D; Frederick, J; Russo, I H

    1988-05-15

    In order to determine whether human breast epithelial cells undergo malignant transformation when treated with chemical carcinogens in vitro, and how host factors, such as degree of gland development, affect their response to that treatment, twenty-two reduction mammoplasty specimens from women ranging in age from 18 to 63 years and with different parity history were studied in their morphology and in their response to carcinogen treatment in vitro. Fixed tissues were processed for whole mount preparations; it was found that the lobules of the nonpregnant or resting breast tissue could be classified into three types based upon their size and number of alveolar buds composing each one of them, lobules type 1 being the least and lobules type 3 the most differentiated ones. Breast tissues were classified according to the relative proportion of lobules composing it and the reproductive and clinical history of the patient into groups A, B, or C. Fresh tissues from these three groups were digested for obtention of mammary epithelium organoids, which were plated in Dulbecco's minimal essential medium:Ham's F12 (1:1), with 5% horse serum to enhance attachment. When they reached confluence, the cells were replated in serum-free medium; 48 h postplating they were treated with 1.0 microgram/ml 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene for 24 h, or with 1.0 microgram/ml N-methyl-nitrosourea for 3 h. At every passage, the cells were monitored for colony formation efficiency, survival efficiency in agar-methocel, multinucleation assay, karyotyping, immunocytochemical detection of tumor associated antigens, lectin reactivity, and tumorigenic assay by injection into nude mice. By the fourth passage after treatment, both carcinogens induced increased survival, colony formation in agar-methocel, multinucleation, and increased reactivity with the tumor associated antigen B1:1, an epitope of carcinoembryonic antigen, and the lectins concanavalin A, Dolichos biflorus, and soybean agglutinin. This response was observed only in human breast epithelial cells obtained from less differentiated breasts (Groups A and B), whereas human breast epithelial cells from breasts exhibiting good lobular development (Group C) did not exhibit those changes. No karyotypic abnormalities were detected in treated cells, and they failed to induce tumors when injected into nude mice. It was concluded that mammary gland development is independent of age but is strongly influenced by both the reproductive and clinical history of the donor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3129189

  5. Humoral immunity to human breast cancer: antigen definition and quantitative analysis of mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, M J; Gout, I; Gordon, C M; Williamson, B; Stockert, E; Gure, A O; Jäger, D; Chen, Y T; Mackay, A; O'Hare, M J; Old, L J

    2001-03-30

    The ability of the immune system to recognize structurally altered, amplified or aberrantly expressed proteins can be used to identify molecules of etiologic relevance to cancer and to define targets for cancer immunotherapy. In the current study, ninety-four distinct antigens reactive with serum IgG from breast cancer patients were identified by immunoscreening breast cancer-derived cDNA expression libraries (SEREX). A serological profile was generated for each antigen on the basis of reactivity with allogeneic sera from normal individuals and cancer patients, and mRNA expression profiles for coding sequences were assembled based upon the tissue distribution of expressed sequence tags, Northern blots and real-time RT-PCR. Forty antigens reacted exclusively with sera from cancer patients. These included well-characterized tumor antigens, e.g. MAGE-3, MAGE-6, NY-ESO-1, Her2neu and p53, as well as newly-defined breast cancer antigens, e.g. kinesin 2, TATA element modulatory factor 1, tumor protein D52 and MAGE D, and novel gene products, e.g. NY-BR-62, NY-BR-75, NY-BR-85, and NY-BR-96. With regard to expression profiles, two of the novel gene products, NY-BR-62 and NY-BR-85, were characterized by a high level of testicular mRNA expression, and were overexpressed in 60% and 90% of breast cancers, respectively. In addition, mRNA encoding tumor protein D52 was overexpressed in 60% of breast cancer specimens, while transcripts encoding SNT-1 signal adaptor protein were downregulated in 70% of these cases. This study adds to the growing list of breast cancer antigens defined by SEREX and to the ultimate objective of identifying the complete repertoire of immunogenic gene products in human cancer (the cancer immunome). PMID:12747765

  6. Noble Hybrid Nanostructures as Efficient Anti-Proliferative Platforms for Human Breast Cancer Cell.

    PubMed

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Premnath, Priyatha; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2016-04-27

    Nanomaterials have proven to possess great potential in biomaterials research. Recently, they have suggested considerable promise in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Among others, silicon (Si) nanomaterials have been extensively employed for various biomedical applications; however, the utilization of Si for cancer therapy has been limited to nanoparticles, and its potential as anticancer substrates has not been fully explored. Noble nanoparticles have also received considerable attention owing to unique anticancer properties to improve the efficiency of biomaterials for numerous biological applications. Nevertheless, immobilization and control over delivery of the nanoparticles have been challenge. Here, we develop hybrid nanoplatforms to efficiently hamper breast cancer cell adhesion and proliferation. Platforms are synthesized by femtosecond laser processing of Si into multiphase nanostructures, followed by sputter-coating with gold (Au)/gold-palladium (Au-Pd) nanoparticles. The performance of the developed platforms was then examined by exploring the response of normal fibroblast and metastatic breast cancer cells. Our results from the quantitative and qualitative analyses show a dramatic decrease in the number of breast cancer cells on the hybrid platform compared to untreated substrates. Whereas, fibroblast cells form stable adhesion with stretched and elongated cytoskeleton and actin filaments. The hybrid platforms perform as dual-acting cytophobic/cytostatic stages where Si nanostructures depress breast cancer cell adhesion while immobilized Au/Au-Pd nanoparticles are gradually released to affect any surviving cell on the nanostructures. The nanoparticles are believed to be taken up by breast cancer cells via endocytosis, which subsequently alter the cell nucleus and may cause cell death. The findings suggest that the density of nanostructures and concentration of coated nanoparticles play critical roles on cytophobic/cytostatic properties of the platforms on human breast cancer cells while having no or even cytophilic effects on fibroblast cells. Because of the remarkable contrary responses of normal and cancer cells to the proposed platform, we envision that it will provide novel applications in cancer research. PMID:27035281

  7. Targeting ceramide metabolic pathway induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Vethakanraj, Helen Shiphrah; Babu, Thabraz Ahmed; Sudarsanan, Ganesh Babu; Duraisamy, Prabhu Kumar; Ashok Kumar, Sekar

    2015-08-28

    The sphingolipid ceramide is a pro apoptotic molecule of ceramide metabolic pathway and is hydrolyzed to proliferative metabolite, sphingosine 1 phosphate by the action of acid ceramidase. Being upregulated in the tumors of breast, acid ceramidase acts as a potential target for breast cancer therapy. We aimed at targeting this enzyme with a small molecule acid ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 in human breast cancer cell lines MCF 7 and MDA MB 231. Ceranib 2 effectively inhibited the growth of both the cell lines in dose and time dependant manner. Morphological apoptotic hallmarks such as chromatin condensation, fragmented chromatin were observed in AO/EtBr staining. Moreover, ladder pattern of fragmented DNA observed in DNA gel electrophoresis proved the apoptotic activity of Ceranib 2 in breast cancer cell lines. The apoptotic events were associated with significant increase in the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (Bad, Bax and Bid) and down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (Bcl 2). Interestingly, increase in sub G1 population of cell cycle phase analysis and elevated Annexin V positive cells after Ceranib 2 treatment substantiated its apoptotic activity in MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines. Thus, we report Ceranib 2 as a potent therapeutic agent against both ER{sup +} and ER{sup −} breast cancer cell lines. - Highlights: • Acid Ceramidase inhibitor, Ceranib 2 induced apoptosis in Breast cancer cell lines (MCF 7 and MDA MB 231 cell lines). • Apoptosis is mediated by DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest. • Ceranib 2 upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic genes and down regulated anti-apoptotic gene expression. • More potent compared to the standard drug Tamoxifen.

  8. Choline intake and genetic polymorphisms influence choline metabolite concentrations in human breast milk and plasma123

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leslie M; da Costa, Kerry Ann; Galanko, Joseph; Sha, Wei; Stephenson, Brigitte; Vick, Julie; Zeisel, Steven H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Choline is essential for infant nutrition, and breast milk is a rich source of this nutrient. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) change dietary requirements for choline intake. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether total choline intake and/or SNPs influence concentrations of choline and its metabolites in human breast milk and plasma. Design: We gave a total of 103 pregnant women supplemental choline or a placebo from 18 wk gestation to 45 d postpartum and genotyped the women for 370 common SNPs. At 45 d postpartum, we measured choline metabolite concentrations in breast milk and plasma and assessed the dietary intake of choline by using a 3-d food record. Results: On average, lactating women in our study ate two-thirds of the recommended intake for choline (Adequate Intake = 550 mg choline/d). Dietary choline intake (no supplement) correlated with breast-milk phosphatidylcholine and plasma choline concentrations. A supplement further increased breast-milk choline, betaine, and phosphocholine concentrations and increased plasma choline and betaine concentrations. We identified 5 SNPs in MTHFR that altered the slope of the intake–metabolite concentration relations, and we identified 2 SNPs in PEMT that shifted these curves upward. Individuals who shared sets of common SNPs were outliers in plots of intake–metabolite concentration curves; we suggest that these SNPs should be further investigated to determine how they alter choline metabolism. Conclusion: Total intake of choline and genotype can influence the concentrations of choline and its metabolites in the breast milk and blood of lactating women and thereby affect the amount of choline available to the developing infant. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00678925. PMID:20534746

  9. Development of Resistance towards Artesunate in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachmeier, Beatrice; Fichtner, Iduna; Killian, Peter H.; Kronski, Emanuel; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Efferth, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries. Systemic treatment of breast cancer is effective at the beginning of therapy. However, after a variable period of time, progression occurs due to therapy resistance. Artesunate, clinically used as anti-malarial agent, has recently revealed remarkable anti-tumor activity offering a role as novel candidate for cancer chemotherapy. We analyzed the anti-tumor effects of artesunate in metastasizing breast carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. Unlike as expected, artesunate induced resistance in highly metastatic human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Likewise acquired resistance led to abolishment of apoptosis and cytotoxicity in pre-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. In contrast, artesunate was more cytotoxic towards the less tumorigenic MDA-MB-468 cells without showing resistance. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms, we found that resistance was induced due to activation of the tumor progression related transcription factors NF?B and AP-1. Thereby transcription, expression and activity of the matrix-degrading enzyme MMP-1, whose function is correlated with increased invasion and metastasis, was up-regulated upon acquisition of resistance. Additionally, activation of the apoptosis-related factor NF?B lead to increased expression of ant-apoptotic bcl2 and reduced expression of pro-apoptotic bax. Application of artesunate in vivo in a model of xenografted breast cancer showed, that tumors growth was not efficiently abolished as compared to the control drug doxorubicin. Taken together our in vitro and in vivo results correlate well showing for the first time that artesunate induces resistance in highly metastatic breast tumors. PMID:21637790

  10. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive agents, such as curcumin, effective in suppressing TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy.

  11. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M.; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ERpos) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ERpos cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ERpos HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ERpos HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGFβ signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ERpos cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ERpos HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  12. Momordica cochinchinensis Aril Extract Induced Apoptosis in Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Petchsak, Phuchong; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2015-01-01

    Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng (MC) has been used in traditional medicine due to its high carotenoid content. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying apoptotic effects of MC on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A lycopene-enriched aril extract of MC (AE) showed cytotoxicity and antiestrogenicity to MCF-7 cells. On DAPI staining, AE induced cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation were evident. With flow cytometric analysis, AE increased the percentage of cells in an early apoptosis stage when compared with the control group. RT-PCR analysis showed AE to significantly increase the expression of the proapoptotic bax gene without effect on expression of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 gene. Moreover, AE enhanced caspase 6, 8 and 9 activity. Taken together, we conclude that AE of MC fruit has anticancer effects on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells by induction of cell apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of signaling. PMID:26225702

  13. Performance comparison of breast imaging modalities using a 4AFC human observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Rashidnasab, Alaleh; Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Bosmans, Hilde; Segars, William P.; Wells, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    This work compares the visibility of spheres and simulated masses in 2D-mammography and tomosynthesis systems using human observer studies. Performing comparison studies between breast imaging systems poses a number of practical challenges within a clinical environment. We therefore adopted a simulation approach which included synthetic breast blocks, a validated lesion simulation model and a set of validated image modelling tools as a viable alternative to clinical trials. A series of 4-alternative forced choice (4AFC) human observer experiments has been conducted for signal detection tasks using masses and spheres as targets. Five physicists participated in the study viewing images with a 5mm target at a range of contrast levels and 60 trials per experimental condition. The results showed that tomosynthesis has a lower threshold contrast than 2D-mammography for masses and spheres, and that detection studies using spheres may produce overly-optimistic threshold contrast values.

  14. An Improved Syngeneic Orthotopic Murine Model of Human Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Omar M.; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramachandran, Suburamaniam; Dumur, Catherine; Schaum, Julia; Yamada, Akimitsu; Terracina, Krista P.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer drug development costs nearly $610 million and 37 months in preclinical mouse model trials with minimal success rates. Despite these inefficiencies, there are still no consensus breast cancer preclinical models. Methods Murine mammary adenocarcinoma 4T1-luc2 cells were implanted subcutaneous (SQ) or orthotopically percutaneous injection in the area of the nipple (OP), or surgically into the chest 2nd mammary fat pad under direct vision (ODV) in Balb/c immunocompetent mice. Tumor progression was followed by in vivo bioluminescence and direct measurements, pathology and survival determined, and tumor gene expression analyzed by genome-wide microarrays. Results ODV produced less variable sized tumors and was a reliable method of implantation. ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad rather than into the abdominal 4th mammary pad, the most common implantation site, better mimicked human breast cancer progression pattern, which correlated with bioluminescent tumor burden and survival. Compared to SQ, ODV produced tumors that differentially expressed genes whose interaction networks are of importance in cancer research. qPCR validation of 10 specific target genes of interest in ongoing clinical trials demonstrated significant differences in expression. Conclusions ODV implantation into the chest 2nd mammary pad provides the most reliable model that mimics human breast cancer compared from subcutaneous implantation that produces tumors with different genome expression profiles of clinical significance. Increased understanding of the limitations of the different preclinical models in use will help guide new investigations and may improve the efficiency of breast cancer drug development. PMID:25200444

  15. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?/? (PPAR-?/?) inhibits human breast cancer cell line tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pei-Li; Morales, Jose L; Zhu, Bokai; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2014-04-01

    The effect of activation and overexpression of the nuclear receptor PPAR-?/? in human MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative; ER(-)) and MCF7 (estrogen-receptor-positive; ER(+)) breast cancer cell lines was examined. Target gene induction by ligand activation of PPAR-?/? was increased by overexpression of PPAR-?/? compared with controls. Overexpression of PPAR-?/? caused a decrease in cell proliferation in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells compared with controls, whereas ligand activation of PPAR-?/? further inhibited proliferation of MCF7 but not MDA-MB-231 cells. Overexpression and/or ligand activation of PPAR-?/? in MDA-MB-231 or MCF7 cells had no effect on experimental apoptosis. Decreased clonogenicity was observed in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 overexpressing PPAR-?/? in response to ligand activation of PPAR-?/? as compared with controls. Ectopic xenografts developed from MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells overexpressing PPAR-?/? were significantly smaller, and ligand activation of PPAR-?/? caused an even greater reduction in tumor volume as compared with controls. Interestingly, the decrease in MDA-MB-231 tumor size after overexpressing PPAR-?/? and ligand activation of PPAR-?/? correlated with increased necrosis. These data show that ligand activation and/or overexpression of PPAR-?/? in two human breast cancer cell lines inhibits relative breast cancer tumorigenicity and provide further support for the development of ligands for PPAR-?/? to specifically inhibit breast carcinogenesis. These new cell-based models will be invaluable tools for delineating the role of PPAR-?/? in breast cancer and evaluating the effects of PPAR-?/? agonists. PMID:24464939

  16. Dietary protein restriction inhibits tumor growth in human xenograft models of prostate and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Antonella L.; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Ciamporcero, Eric; Longo, Valter D.; Nguyen, Holly; Vessella, Robert; Pili, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data from epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that dietary protein intake may play a role in inhibiting prostate and breast cancer by modulating the IGF/AKT/mTOR pathway. In this study we investigated the effects of diets with different protein content or quality on prostate and breast cancer. Experimental Design: To test our hypothesis we assessed the inhibitory effect of protein diet restriction on prostate and breast cancer growth, serum PSA and IGF-1 concentrations, mTOR activity and epigenetic markers, by using human xenograft cancer models. Results: Our results showed a 70% inhibition of tumor growth in the castrate-resistant LuCaP23.1 prostate cancer model and a 56% inhibition in the WHIM16 breast cancer model fed with a 7% protein diet when compared to an isocaloric 21% protein diet. Inhibition of tumor growth correlated, in the LuCaP23.1 model, with decreased serum PSA and IGF-1 levels, down-regulation of mTORC1 activity, decreased cell proliferation as indicated by Ki67 staining, and reduction in epigenetic markers of prostate cancer progression, including the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and the associated histone mark H3K27me3. In addition, we observed that modifications of dietary protein quality, independently of protein quantity, decreased tumor growth. A diet containing 20% plant protein inhibited tumor weight by 37% as compared to a 20% animal dairy protein diet. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a reduction in dietary protein intake is highly effective in inhibiting tumor growth in human xenograft prostate and breast cancer models, possibly through the inhibition of the IGF/AKT/mTOR pathway and epigenetic modifications. PMID:24353195

  17. Hybrid Cells Derived from Human Breast Cancer Cells and Human Breast Epithelial Cells Exhibit Differential TLR4 and TLR9 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Songül; Fried, Sabrina; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    TLRs are important receptors of cells of the innate immune system since they recognize various structurally conserved molecular patterns of different pathogens as well as endogenous ligands. In cancer, the role of TLRs is still controversial due to findings that both regression and progression of tumors could depend on TLR signaling. In the present study, M13SV1-EGFP-Neo human breast epithelial cells, MDA-MB-435-Hyg human breast cancer cells and two hybrids M13MDA435-1 and -3 were investigated for TLR4 and TLR9 expression and signaling. RT-PCR data revealed that LPS and CpG-ODN induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in hybrid cells, but not parental cells. Interestingly, validation of RT-PCR data by Western blot showed detectable protein levels solely after LPS stimulation, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms are also controlled by TLR signaling. Analysis of pAKT and pERK1/2 levels upon LPS and CpG-ODN stimulation revealed a differential phosphorylation pattern in all cells. Finally, the migratory behavior of the cells was investigated showing that both LPS and CpG-ODN potently blocked the locomotory activity of the hybrid cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, hybrid cells exhibit differential TLR4 and TLR9 signaling. PMID:27187369

  18. Hybrid Cells Derived from Human Breast Cancer Cells and Human Breast Epithelial Cells Exhibit Differential TLR4 and TLR9 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Songül; Fried, Sabrina; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Dittmar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    TLRs are important receptors of cells of the innate immune system since they recognize various structurally conserved molecular patterns of different pathogens as well as endogenous ligands. In cancer, the role of TLRs is still controversial due to findings that both regression and progression of tumors could depend on TLR signaling. In the present study, M13SV1-EGFP-Neo human breast epithelial cells, MDA-MB-435-Hyg human breast cancer cells and two hybrids M13MDA435-1 and -3 were investigated for TLR4 and TLR9 expression and signaling. RT-PCR data revealed that LPS and CpG-ODN induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in hybrid cells, but not parental cells. Interestingly, validation of RT-PCR data by Western blot showed detectable protein levels solely after LPS stimulation, suggesting that regulatory mechanisms are also controlled by TLR signaling. Analysis of pAKT and pERK1/2 levels upon LPS and CpG-ODN stimulation revealed a differential phosphorylation pattern in all cells. Finally, the migratory behavior of the cells was investigated showing that both LPS and CpG-ODN potently blocked the locomotory activity of the hybrid cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, hybrid cells exhibit differential TLR4 and TLR9 signaling. PMID:27187369

  19. Levels and profiles of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in human breast milk from Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadou, Lida; Malarvannan, Govindan; Covaci, Adrian; Iossifidou, Eleni; Tzafettas, John; Zournatzi-Koiou, Vassiliki; Kalantzi, Olga-Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk samples (n=87) collected between July 2004 and July 2005 from primipara and multipara mothers from Thessaloniki, Greece were analysed for six groups of persistent organic pollutants (POPs): polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). DDTs [median: 410ng/g lipid weight (lw)], PCBs (median: 90ng/g lw) and HCHs (median: 40ng/g lw) were the predominantly identified compounds in all the breast milk samples. Levels of PBDEs (median: 1.5ng/g lw) in human breast milk samples from Thessaloniki, Greece were lower compared to other countries. Maternal age had a positive correlation with most compounds, but not with PBDEs. Women with a higher occupational exposure to PBDEs (i.e., working in office environments) had higher PBDE concentrations than all others and showed strong correlations, especially for BDE 47 and BDE 153. None of the analysed compounds showed any correlation with parity. Based on these levels, the daily intake of each group of POPs via human milk was calculated and compared with the tolerable daily intakes (TDI) or the reference doses (RfD). For the majority of samples (85 out of 87) a higher daily intake of PCBs than the TDI was calculated, while 11 out of 87 samples had a higher HCB intake than the TDI. The TDI and the RfD were not exceeded for DDTs and PBDEs, respectively. This is the first report of brominated flame retardants in human breast milk from Greece. PMID:26367190

  20. Experimental evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy of human breast carcinoma implanted on nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Satya Ranjan

    2000-06-01

    An in-pool small animal irradiation neutron tube (SAINT) facility was designed, constructed and installed at the University of Virginia Nuclear Research Reactor (UVAR). Thermal neutron flux profiles were measured by foil activation analysis (gold) and verified with DORT and MCNP computer code models. The gamma-ray absorbed dose in the neutron-gamma mixed field was determined from TLD measurements. The SAINT thermal neutron flux was used to investigate the well characterized human breast cancer cell line MCF-7B on both in-vitro samples and in- vivo animal subjects. Boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in 95% 10B) was used as a neutron capturing agent. The in-vitro response of MCF-7B human breast carcinoma cells to BPA in a mixed field of neutron-gamma radiation or pure 60Co gamma radiation was investigated. The best result (lowest surviving fraction) was observed in cell cultures pre-incubated with BPA and given the neutron irradiation. The least effective treatment consisted of 60Co irradiation only. Immunologically deficient nude mice were inoculated subcutaneously with human breast cancer MCF-7B cells and estradiol pellets (to support tumor growth). The tumor volume in the mouse control group increased over time, as expected. The group of mice exposed only to neutron treatment exhibited initial tumor volume reduction lasting until 35 days following the treatment, followed by renewed tumor growth. Both groups given BPA plus neutron treatment showed continuous reduction in tumor volume over the 55-day observation period. The group given the higher BPA concentration showed the best tumor reduction response. The results on both in-vitro and in-vivo studies showed increased cell killing with BPA, substantiating the incorporation of BPA into the tumor or cell line. Therefore, BNCT may be a possible choice for the treatment of human breast carcinoma. However, prior to the initiation of any clinical studies, it is necessary to determine the therapeutic efficacy in a large animal model.

  1. Methylation of PLCD1 and adenovirus-mediated PLCD1 overexpression elicits a gene therapy effect on human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Haixi; Wang, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Shuman; Li, Qianqian; Chen, Ling; Luo, Xinrong; Qiu, Zhu; Li, Lili; Ren, Guosheng; Xu, Yongzhu; Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Tingxiu

    2015-03-15

    Our previous study showed that PLCD1 significantly decreases cell proliferation and affects cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells. In the present study, we aimed to investigate its functional and molecular mechanisms, and whether or not can become a new target for gene therapies. We found reduced PLCD1 protein expression in breast tumor tissues compared with paired surgical margin tissues. PLCD1 promoter CpG methylation was detected in 55 of 96 (57%) primary breast tumors, but not in surgical-margin tissues and normal breast tissues. Ectopic expression of PLCD1 inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation in vivo by inducing apoptosis and suppressed tumor cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins including RhoA and phospho-cofilin. Furthermore, we found that PLCD1 induced p53 accumulation, increased p27 and p21 protein levels, and cleaved PARP. Finally, we constructed an adenoviral vector expressing PLCD1 (AdH5-PLCD1), which exhibited strong cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells. Our findings provide insights into the development of PLCD1 gene therapies for breast cancer and perhaps, other human cancers. - Highlights: • PLCD1 is downregulated via hypermethylation in breast cancer. • PLCD1 suppressed cell migration by regulating cytoskeletal reorganization proteins. • Adenovirus AdHu5-PLCD1 may be a novel therapeutic option for breast cancer.

  2. Expression of tropomyosin 2 gene isoforms in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    DUBE, SYAMALIMA; THOMAS, ANISH; ABBOTT, LYNN; BENZ, PATRICIA; MITSCHOW, CHARLES; DUBE, DIPAK K.; POIESZ, BERNARD J.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, four tropomyosin genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) are known to produce a multitude of isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using alternate promoters. Expression of tropomyosin has been shown to be modulated at both the transcription and the translational levels. Tropomyosins are known to make up some of the stress fibers of human epithelial cells and differences in their expression has been demonstrated in malignant breast epithelial cell lines compared to 'normal' breast cell lines. We have recently reported the expression of four novel TPM1 isoforms (TPM1λ, TPM1µ, TPM1ν, and TPM1ξ) from human malignant tumor breast cell lines that are not expressed in adult and fetal cardiac tissue. Also, we evaluated their expression in relation to the stress fiber formation. In this study, nine malignant breast epithelial cell lines and three 'normal' breast cell lines were examined for stress fiber formation and expression of tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) isoform-specific RNAs and proteins. Stress fiber formation was assessed by immunofluorescence using Leica AF6000 Deconvolution microscope. Stress fiber formation was strong (++++) in the 'normal' cell lines and varied among the malignant cell lines (negative to +++). No new TPM2 gene RNA isoforms were identified, and TPM2β was the most frequently expressed TPM2 RNA and protein isoform. Stress fiber formation positively correlated with TPM2β RNA or protein expression at high, statistically significant degrees. Previously, we had shown that TPM1δ and TPM1λ positively and inversely, respectively, correlated with stress fiber formation. The most powerful predictor of stress fiber formation was the combination of TPM2β RNA, TPM1δ RNA, and the inverse of TPM1λ RNA expression. Our results suggest that the increased expression of TPM1λ and the decreased expression of TPM1δ RNA and TPM2β may lead to decreased stress fiber formation and malignant transformation in human breast epithelial cells. PMID:27108600

  3. Expression of tropomyosin 2 gene isoforms in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dube, Syamalima; Thomas, Anish; Abbott, Lynn; Benz, Patricia; Mitschow, Charles; Dube, Dipak K; Poiesz, Bernard J

    2016-06-01

    In humans, four tropomyosin genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) are known to produce a multitude of isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using alternate promoters. Expression of tropomyosin has been shown to be modulated at both the transcription and the translational levels. Tropomyosins are known to make up some of the stress fibers of human epithelial cells and differences in their expression has been demonstrated in malignant breast epithelial cell lines compared to 'normal' breast cell lines. We have recently reported the expression of four novel TPM1 isoforms (TPM1λ, TPM1µ, TPM1ν, and TPM1ξ) from human malignant tumor breast cell lines that are not expressed in adult and fetal cardiac tissue. Also, we evaluated their expression in relation to the stress fiber formation. In this study, nine malignant breast epithelial cell lines and three 'normal' breast cell lines were examined for stress fiber formation and expression of tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) isoform-specific RNAs and proteins. Stress fiber formation was assessed by immunofluorescence using Leica AF6000 Deconvolution microscope. Stress fiber formation was strong (++++) in the 'normal' cell lines and varied among the malignant cell lines (negative to +++). No new TPM2 gene RNA isoforms were identified, and TPM2β was the most frequently expressed TPM2 RNA and protein isoform. Stress fiber formation positively correlated with TPM2β RNA or protein expression at high, statistically significant degrees. Previously, we had shown that TPM1δ and TPM1λ positively and inversely, respectively, correlated with stress fiber formation. The most powerful predictor of stress fiber formation was the combination of TPM2β RNA, TPM1δ RNA, and the inverse of TPM1λ RNA expression. Our results suggest that the increased expression of TPM1λ and the decreased expression of TPM1δ RNA and TPM2β may lead to decreased stress fiber formation and malignant transformation in human breast epithelial cells. PMID:27108600

  4. Protein kinase C is differentially regulated by thrombin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor in human mammary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.L.; Tellez-Inon, M.T. ); Medrano, E.E.; Cafferatta, E.G.A. )

    1988-03-01

    The exposure of serum-deprived mammary tumor cells MCF-7 and T-47D to insulin, thrombin, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) resulted in dramatic modifications in the activity and in the translocation capacity of protein kinase C from cytosol to membrane fractions. Insulin induces a 600% activation of the enzyme after 5 h of exposure to the hormone in MCF-7 cells; thrombin either activates (200% in MCF-7) or down-regulates (in T-47D), and EGF exerts only a moderate effect. Thus, the growth factors studied modulate differentially the protein kinase C activity in human mammary tumor cells. The physiological significance of the results obtained are discussed in terms of the growth response elicited by insulin, thrombin, and EGF.

  5. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Sett, Arghya; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod; Bora, Utpal; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4) and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg). Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20). Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancer tissues. We anticipate that the ERaptD4 aptamer targeting ERα may potentially be used for an efficient grading of ERα expression in cancer tissues. PMID:27043307

  6. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Sett, Arghya; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod; Bora, Utpal; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4) and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg). Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20). Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancer tissues. We anticipate that the ERaptD4 aptamer targeting ERα may potentially be used for an efficient grading of ERα expression in cancer tissues. PMID:27043307

  7. Expression of prolactin and prolactin receptor in human breast carcinoma. Evidence for an autocrine/paracrine loop.

    PubMed Central

    Clevenger, C. V.; Chang, W. P.; Ngo, W.; Pasha, T. L.; Montone, K. T.; Tomaszewski, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone prolactin is a growth factor required for the proliferation and terminal differentiation of the human breast. These effects are mediated by the prolactin receptor, a member of the growth factor receptor family. Three prolactin receptor isoforms (long, intermediate, and short) have been identified in the rat, which differ in the length of their intracytoplasmic domains. In humans, however, only the long prolactin receptor isoform had been identified previously. The expression of the human intermediate prolactin receptor is demonstrated and preliminary evidence for a human short isoform is presented. Heterogeneous expression of prolactin receptor, at the immunoblot and immunohistochemical levels was observed in breast carcinoma specimens. A statistically significant correlation between prolactin receptor and estrogen receptor expression was noted. An autocrine/paracrine role for prolactin within breast tissues was further examined by performing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on RNA isolated from cell lines and clinical specimens with prolactin-specific primers. A 585-bp product was observed and found to be identical to human prolactin. The synthesis of prolactin by breast epithelium was confirmed by in situ hybridization analysis of breast tissues and the detection of bio- and immunoreactive prolactin in breast cancer lines. These analyses indicate that the principal site for prolactin expression within the normal or malignant breast residues within the epithelium. These data indicate that prolactin may participate in an autocrine/paracrine stimulatory loop within breast tissues and suggest a role for this growth factor in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7534043

  8. Involvement of pp60c-src with two major signaling pathways in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Luttrell, D K; Lee, A; Lansing, T J; Crosby, R M; Jung, K D; Willard, D; Luther, M; Rodriguez, M; Berman, J; Gilmer, T M

    1994-01-01

    The phosphotyrosine residues of receptor tyrosine kinases serve as unique binding sites for proteins involved in intracellular signaling, which contain SRC homology 2 (SH2) domains. Since overexpression or activation of the pp60c-src kinase has been reported in a number of human tumors, including primary human breast carcinomas, we examined the interactions of the SH2 and SH3 domains of human SRC with target proteins in human carcinoma cell lines. Glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins containing either the SH2, SH3, or the entire SH3/SH2 region of human SRC were used to affinity purify tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins from human breast carcinoma cell lines. We show here that in human breast carcinoma cell lines, the SRC SH2 domain binds to activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and p185HER2/neu. SRC SH2 binding to EGFR was also observed in a nontumorigenic cell line after hormone stimulation. Endogenous pp60c-src was found to tightly associate with tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR. Association of the SRC SH2 with the EGFR was blocked by tyrosyl phosphopeptides containing the sequences surrounding tyrosine-530, the regulatory site in the SRC C terminus, or sequences surrounding the major sites of autophosphorylation in the EGFR. These results raise the possibility that association of pp60c-src with these receptor tyrosine kinases is an integral part of the signaling events mediated by these receptors and may contribute to malignant transformation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7506422

  9. Breastfeeding and Breast Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Breastfeeding and Breast Milk: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... nursing, is the process of feeding human breast milk to an infant, either directly from the breast ...

  10. Levels of coplanar PCBs in human breast milk at different times of lactation

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.J.; Ramos, L.; Hernandez, L.M.

    1995-03-01

    PCBs are a highly lipophilic group of global pollutants, consisting of 209 congeners which exhibit wide differences in their toxic and biological effects. The coplanar PCB (non-, mono- and di-ortho Chlorine substituted) congeners, the most toxic ones, induce similar toxic effects as 2,3,7,8 TCDD. Thus for risk assessment of exposure to PCBs, the analysis of these coplanar congeners is required. The PCB levels in human breast milk are of specific concern because of the potential health damage which may be caused to the nursing baby. The PCB levels in this sample come from previously accumulated quantities in body fat whose principal source is food, and pass directly to the nursing baby who accumulates the PCBs in adipose tissue. The amount of total PCBs and other organochlorine compounds (OCC) in human milk at different time intervals after birth was reported earlier, but data concerning individual and coplanar PCBs are sparse in the literature. The results from some studies showed a gradual decrease of residual levels in milk and milk fat. However, other research has shown differences in this respect. We present our first result concerning the concentration of 14 individual PCBs (13 coplanars) in breast milk from the same mother, during weeks 8 to 12 of lactation. We related the different concentration variations observed among the individual PCBs to their molecular structure and % fat in human breast milk. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. A convenient clinically relevant model of human breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Teresa; Jackson, Amanda; Bachelier, Richard; Clément-Lacroix, Philippe; Baron, Roland; Clézardin, Philippe; Pujuguet, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer patients with advanced disease exhibit bone metastases, leading to the formation of osteolytic lesions for which the only currently available treatments are palliative. Here, we describe how we refined a mouse model of human breast cancer metastasis into bone, characterized its transcriptome and demonstrated its clinical relevance. Cells were selected from bone metastases caused by MDA-MB-231 cells after several in vivo passages, and engineered to express luciferase. Whole body bioluminescence live imaging indicated that the selected isogenic B02 clone was unique in its ability to form rapidly growing osteolytic bone metastases. B02 cells were detected as early as 10 days after tail vein injection, as opposed to 1 month after cardiac injection in other haematogenous models. Whole transcriptomic analysis identified 114 upregulated and 247 downregulated genes in B02 cells compared to the parental cells, several of which represent novel targets. In addition, there was a 50% overlap between the B02 signature and a recently described signature obtained from human breast cancer bone metastases. Consistent with the plasticity of an aggressive metastatic variant, 10% of the regulated genes are involved in proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Strikingly, B02 cells also express osteoblast-specific genes, thus mimicking a process referred to as osteomimicry in the clinic. The B02 cells "human bone metastatic signature", the expression of bone-specific genes, as well as the live imaging of this convenient model highlight its clinical relevance and usefulness during drug development. PMID:17902030

  12. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  13. Normal breast tissue implanted into athymic nude mice identifies biomarkers of the effects of human pregnancy levels of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Blance, Rognvald N; Sims, Andrew H; Anderson, Elizabeth; Howell, Anthony; Clarke, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    We have generated a novel model system for the study of estrogen intervention in normal breast tissue. Nulliparous human breast tissue was implanted into immunocompromised nude mice and treated with high-dose estrogen to simulate the effects of pregnancy. Treatment of mice with human mid-pregnancy levels of 17beta-estradiol for a period of 4 weeks was followed by 4 weeks of withdrawal to mimic involution. Gene expression in the xenograft tissue was then analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR to identify differences between treated and control tissues. Ten genes previously identified as altered by pregnancy in rodent models were found to be differentially expressed in human breast tissue with a > or =1.8-fold up-regulation of CDC42, TGFbeta3, DCN, KRT14, LTF, and AREG and a > or =0.7-fold down-regulation of STAT1, CTGF, IGF1, and VAMP1. Immunohistochemical analysis of archival paraffin-embedded adult premenopausal human breast tissue specimens identified a significantly lower level of expression of STAT1 (P < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) in parous compared with age-matched nulliparo